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Sample records for control resources institute

  1. The Resource Development Concept: Institutional Resources. Resource Paper No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smitheran, Joyce

    Community colleges have four primary resources: income, faculty and staff, the physical plant, and students. This document recommends methods of taking a hard look at the ways in which these resources are and can be utilized. The budgeting structure must be thoroughly examined to determine the extent to which it is flexible and to which it…

  2. Archaeology: Smithsonian Institution Teacher's Resource Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC.

    This archaeology resource packet provides information on frequently asked questions of the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian Institution), including the topics of: (1) career information; (2) excavation; (3) fieldwork opportunities; (4) artifact identification; and (5) preservation. The packet is divided into six sections. Section 1…

  3. Institutional Ethics Resources: Creating Moral Spaces.

    PubMed

    Hamric, Ann B; Wocial, Lucia D

    2016-09-01

    Since 1992, institutions accredited by The Joint Commission have been required to have a process in place that allows staff members, patients, and families to address ethical issues or issues prone to conflict. While the commission's expectations clearly have made ethics committees more common, simply having a committee in no way demonstrates its effectiveness in terms of the availability of the service to key constituents, the quality of the processes used, or the outcomes achieved. Beyond meeting baseline accreditation standards, effective ethics resources are requisite for quality care for another reason. The provision of care to the sick is a practice with profound moral dimensions. Clinicians need what Margaret Urban Walker has called "moral spaces," reflective spaces within institutions in which to explore and communicate values and ethical obligations as they undergird goals of care. Walker proposed that ethicists needed to be concerned with the design and maintenance of these moral spaces. Clearly, that concern needs to extend beyond ethicists to institutional leaders. This essay uses Walker's idea of moral space to describe individuals and groups who are actual and potential ethics resources in health care institutions. We focus on four requisite characteristics of effective resources and the challenges to achieving them, and we identify strategies to build them. In our view, such moral spaces are particularly important for nurses and their colleagues on interprofessional teams and need to be expanded and strengthened in most settings.

  4. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research

    PubMed Central

    De Paoli, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology. In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization supporting clinical trial recruitment

  5. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research.

    PubMed

    De Paoli, Paolo

    2009-06-29

    The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology.In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization supporting clinical trial recruitment

  6. Budgetary Control Procedures for Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Ray M.

    Budgetary control procedures for not-for-profit institutions are presented in this compilation of budgetary materials and ideas gathered at the Program for Institutional Administrators at the University of Notre Dame. Budgetary reporting and control are suggested as the most effective tools for coordinating and controlling the acquisition and use…

  7. Overview of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute's "Guidelines For Integrated Water Resources Management" Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Sehlke

    2005-03-01

    Integrated Water Resources Management is a systematic approach to optimizing our understanding, control and management of water resources within a basin to meet multiple objectives. Recognition of the need for integrating water resources within basins is not unique to the Environmental and Water Resources Institute’s Integrated Water Resources Management Task Committee. Many individuals, governments and other organizations have attempted to develop holistic water resources management programs. In some cases, the results have been very effective and in other cases, valiant attempts have fallen far short of their initial goals. The intent of this Task Committee is to provide a set of guidelines that discusses the concepts, methods and tools necessary for integrating and optimizing the management of the physical resources and to optimize and integrate programs, organizations, infrastructure, and socioeconomic institutions into comprehensive water resources management programs.

  8. Resource Balancing Control Allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Bodson, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Next generation aircraft with a large number of actuators will require advanced control allocation methods to compute the actuator commands needed to follow desired trajectories while respecting system constraints. Previously, algorithms were proposed to minimize the l1 or l2 norms of the tracking error and of the control effort. The paper discusses the alternative choice of using the l1 norm for minimization of the tracking error and a normalized l(infinity) norm, or sup norm, for minimization of the control effort. The algorithm computes the norm of the actuator deflections scaled by the actuator limits. Minimization of the control effort then translates into the minimization of the maximum actuator deflection as a percentage of its range of motion. The paper shows how the problem can be solved effectively by converting it into a linear program and solving it using a simplex algorithm. Properties of the algorithm are investigated through examples. In particular, the min-max criterion results in a type of resource balancing, where the resources are the control surfaces and the algorithm balances these resources to achieve the desired command. A study of the sensitivity of the algorithms to the data is presented, which shows that the normalized l(infinity) algorithm has the lowest sensitivity, although high sensitivities are observed whenever the limits of performance are reached.

  9. Institutional Controls: A Guide to Planning, Implementing, Maintaining, and Enforcing Institutional Controls at Contaminated Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide provides information and recommendations that should be useful for planning, implementing, maintaining, and enforcing institutional controls (ICs) for Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, or Superfund); Brownfields; federal facility; underground storage tank (UST); and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) site cleanups.

  10. The spatial and temporal analysis of forest resources and institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweik, Charles M.

    This study addresses a central puzzle facing the Human Dimensions of Global Change research community: How can we understand the influence of environmental policies on human behavior when little or no information is available on the condition of forest resources? This dissertation capitalizes on new research tools, methods and approaches to overcome the "no information about the resource" problem. Specifically, I combine (1) forest mensuration techniques, (2) Global Positioning Systems, (3) Geographic Information Systems (GIS), (4) spatial statistics, (5) remote sensing, and (6) institutional analysis to analyze forest vegetation patterns. I provide explanation of these patterns by considering the incentive structures driving human decision-making and activity and do this through two studies in very different empirical settings. Both studies apply applicable theory related to human behavior and action. Both examine the incentive structures individuals face as they undertake daily activities related to forest resources. The first study, set in East Chitwan, Nepal, identifies spatial patterns in georeferenced forest inventory data and links these to patterns predicted by optimal foraging subject to institutional constraints. The second study compares forest management in one state and one national forest in Indiana, U.S.A. In this effort, I identify spatio-temporal patterns in the forest vegetation captured by a time series of Landsat multispectral images. The combination of natural forest regrowth and property manager actions in response to incentives and constraints explain these patterns. Substantively, both studies identify change in forest resources associated with combinations of the physical, human community and institutional "landscapes" in their regions. In both cases, geographic attributes of institutions (e.g., laws, rules) are found to influence the type and location of human actions. Methodologically, the two studies provide examples of how to control

  11. [Human resource capacity building on TB laboratory work for TB control program--through the experience of international TB laboratory training course for TB control at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis, JATA, Japan].

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Akiko; Kato, Seiya

    2008-06-01

    The international training course on TB laboratory work for national tuberculosis program (NTP) has been conducted at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis since 1975 funded by Japan International Cooperation Agency in collaboration with WHO Western Pacific Regional Office. The aim of the course is to train key personnel in TB laboratory field for NTP in resource-limited countries. The course has trained 265 national key personnel in TB laboratory service from 57 resource-limited countries in the last 33 years. The number of participants trained may sound too small in the fight against the large TB problem in resource-limited countries. However, every participant is playing an important role as a core and catalyst for the TB control program in his/her own country when they were back home. The curriculum is composed of technical aspects on TB examination, mainly sputum microscopy in addition since microscopy service is provided at many centers that are deployed in a widely spread area, the managerial aspect of maintaining quality TB laboratory work at the field laboratory is another component of the curriculum. Effective teaching methods using materials such as artificial sputum, which is useful for panel slide preparation, and technical manuals with illustrations and pictures of training procedure have been developed through the experience of the course. These manuals are highly appreciated and widely used by the front line TB workers. The course has also contributed to the expansion of EQA (External Quality Assessment) system on AFB microscopy for the improvement of the quality of TB laboratory service of NTP. The course is well-known for not only having a long history, but also for its unique learning method emphasizing "Participatory Training", particularly for practicum sessions to master the skills on AFB microscopy. The method in learning AFB microscopy, which was developed by the course, was published as a training manual by IUATLD, RIT and USAID. As it is

  12. History of the State Water Resources Research Institute Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The State Water Resources Research Institute Program, established in 1964, consists of 54 Water Resources Research Institutes located at land-grant universities in each of the 50 states and Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia, Guam, and the Virgin Islands. The program evolved from the Water Resources Research Act of 1964, as amended, the Water Research and Development Act of 1978, Public Law 94-457, and the Water Research and Development Act of 1984. These laws authorize the following components of the Institute Program: (1) the annual allotment and matching grants program for the institutes and (2) the additional and saline water research programs for organizations in addition to the State Water Resources Research Institutes. This report summarizes the legislative history, budget history, research program development, and program accomplishments. The State Water Resources Research Program has been administered to by the Office of Water Resources Research (OWRR) (1964-1974), the Office of Water Research and Technology (OWRT) (1974-1982), the Office of Water Policy (OWP) (1982-1983) , and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) (1983-present). (USGS)

  13. Legal, regulatory & institutional issues facing distributed resources development

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report describes legal, regulatory, and institutional considerations likely to shape the development and deployment of distributed resources. It is based on research co-sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and four investor-owned utilities (Central & South West Services, Cinergy Corp., Florida Power Corporation, and San Diego Gas & Electric Company). The research was performed between August 1995 and March 1996 by a team of four consulting firms experienced in energy and utility law, regulation, and economics. It is the survey phase of a project known as the Distributed Resources Institutional Analysis Project.

  14. Evaluation of the state water-resources research institutes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ertel, M.O.

    1988-01-01

    Water resources research institutes, as authorized by the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 (Public Law 98-242), are located in each state and in the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico , and the Virgin Islands. Public Law 98-242 mandated an onsite evaluation of each of these institutes to determine whether ' . . .the quality and relevance of its water resources research and its effectiveness as an institution for planning, conducting, and arranging for research warrant its continued support in the national interest. ' The results of these evaluations, which were conducted between September 1985 and June 1987, are summarized. The evaluation teams found that all 54 institutes are meeting the basic objectives of the authorizing legislation in that they: (1) use the grant funds to support research that addresses water problems of state and regional concern; (2) provide opportunities for training of water scientists through student involvement on research projects; and (3) promote the application of research results through preparation of technical reports and contributions to the technical literature. The differences among institutes relate primarily to degrees of effectiveness, and most often are determined by the financial, political, and geographical contexts in which the institutes function and by the quality of their leadership. (Lantz-PTT)

  15. North American Indians: Smithsonian Institution Teacher's Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC.

    This teacher's resource guide produced by the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian Institution) is a collection of materials about North American Indians covering 3 categories, including an introduction, selected bibliographies, and a listing photographs and portraits. Additionally, there is a collecting of answers to questions that…

  16. Assessing Faculty Perceptions of Free Educational Resources: One Institution's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Providing financial incentives to faculty who adopt free educational resources in place of traditional textbooks is becoming more common in U.S. higher education institutions. The University of Mississippi (UM) offered liberal arts instructors the opportunity to apply for internal funding to replace one traditional textbook in their classroom with…

  17. Institutional Controls: A Guide to Preparing Institutional Control Implementation and Assurance Plans at Contaminated Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to the EPA Regions for developing Institutional Control Implementation and Assurance Plans (ICIAPs) at contaminated sites where the response action includes an institutional controls (ICs) component.

  18. Project resources planning and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibbers, C. W.

    1984-01-01

    This report contains instructional guidelines for the resources planning and control of research and development (R&D) projects managed by NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC). Although written to serve primarily as a practical guide and reference for those LaRC personnel who perform resources planning, analysis, control, and reporting functions, it should also be meaningful to other NASA personnel who are directly or indirectly involved in or affected by these functions, especially project technical managers whose responsibilities include resources management. Certain sections should help Contractor personnel to better understand what resources information must usually be submitted on LaRC projects and what use is made of such information. The Project Manager of a large R&D project typicaly receives support from an Analyst in the area of resources management. The Analyst provides assistance in four functional areas: Planning, Analysis/Control, Administration, and Reporting. Each of these functions are discussed in detail. Examples of techniques used effectively on LaRC projects have been included where applicable. A considerable amount of information has been included on the use of Performance Measurement (Earned Value) Systems for contract cost control and reporting as little information is currently available on this subject in NASA publications.

  19. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan

    SciTech Connect

    W. L. Jolley

    2006-07-27

    On November 9, 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality approved the Record of Decision Experimental Breeder Reactor-I/Boiling Water Reactor Experiment Area and Miscellaneous Sites, which requires a Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan for the then Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory). This document, first issued in June 2004, fulfilled that requirement. The revision is needed to provide an update as remedial actions are completed and new areas of concern are found. This Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan is based on guidance in the May 3, 1999, EPA Region 10 Final Policy on the Use of Institutional Controls at Federal Facilities; the September 29, 2000, EPA guidance Institutional Controls: A Site Manager's Guide to Identifying, Evaluating, and Selecting Institutional Controls at Superfund and RCRA Corrective Action Cleanups; and the April 9, 2003, DOE Policy 454.1, "Use of Institutional Controls." These policies establish measures that ensure short- and long-term effectiveness of institutional controls that protect human health and the environment at federal facility sites undergoing remedial action pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and/or corrective action pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The site-specific institutional controls currently in place at the Idaho National Laboratory are documented in this Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan. This plan is being updated, along with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Comprehensive Facilities and Land Use Plan, to reflect the progress of remedial activities and changes in CERCLA sites.

  20. History of Science Web Resources at American Institute of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, G. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Center for History of Physics and the associated Niels Bohr Library & Archives at the American Institute of Physics were pioneers in web resource development for education and for research in the 1990s. While these units of AIP continue to add significantly to the traditional ways of putting content before the public, they are also experimenting with blogs and Facebook, and are looking at other forms of interactive web presence. This talk explores how an active research center is trying to do both.

  1. Comparing Public and Private Institutions That Have and Have Not Implemented Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems: A Resource Dependence Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sendhil, Geetha R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this national study was to utilize quantitative methods to examine institutional characteristics, financial resource variables, personnel variables, and customer variables of public and private institutions that have and have not implemented enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, from a resource dependence perspective.…

  2. Developing Technologies for Space Resource Utilization: Concept for a Planetary Engineering Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacic, J. D.; Dreesen, D.; Mockler, T.

    2000-01-01

    There are two principal factors that control the economics and ultimate utilization of space resources: 1) space transportation, and 2) space resource utilization technologies. Development of space transportation technology is driven by major government (military and civilian) programs and, to a lesser degree, private industry-funded research. Communication within the propulsion and spacecraft engineering community is aided by an effective independent professional organization, the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The many aerospace engineering programs in major university engineering schools sustain professional-level education in these fields. NASA does an excellent job of public education in space science and engineering at all levels. Planetary science, a precursor and supporting discipline for space resource utilization, has benefited from the establishment of the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) which has served, since the early post-Apollo days, as a focus for both professional and educational development in the geosciences of the Moon and other planets. The closest thing the nonaerospace engineering disciplines have had to this kind of professional nexus is the sponsorship by the American Society of Civil Engineers of a series of space engineering conferences that have had a predominantly space resource orientation. However, many of us with long-standing interests in space resource development have felt that an LPI-like, independent institute was needed to focus and facilitate both research and education on the specific engineering disciplines needed to develop space resource utilization technologies on an on-going basis.

  3. Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This final report describes the activities of the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) at Iowa State University for the period July 1, 1989, to June 30, 1990. Activities include research in mining- and mineral-related areas, education and training of scientists and engineers in these fields, administration of the Institute, and cooperative interactions with industry, government agencies, and other research centers. During this period, ISMMRRI has supported research efforts to: (1) Investigate methods of leaching zinc from sphalerite-containing ores. (2) Study the geochemistry and geology of an Archean gold deposit and of a gold-telluride deposit. (3) Enchance how-quality aggregates for use in construction. (4) Pre-clean coal by triboelectric charging in a fluidized-bed. (5) Characterize the crystal/grain alignment during processing of yttrium-barium-copper-perovskite (1-2-3) superconductors. (5) Study the fluid inclusion properties of a fluorite district. (6) Study the impacts of surface mining on community planning. (7) Assess the hydrophobicity of coal and pyrite for beneficiation. (8) Investigate the use of photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy for monitoring unburnt carbon in the exhaust gas from coal-fired boilers. The education and training program continued within the interdepartmental graduate minor in mineral resources includes courses in such areas as mining methods, mineral processing, industrial minerals, extractive metallurgy, coal science and technology, and reclamation of mined land. In addition, ISMMRRI hosted the 3rd International Conference on Processing and Utilization of High-Sulfur Coals in Ames, Iowa. The Institute continues to interact with industry in order to foster increased cooperation between academia and the mining and mineral community.

  4. Plant database resources at The Institute for Genomic Research.

    PubMed

    Chan, Agnes P; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Quackenbush, John; Buell, C Robin; Town, Chris D

    2007-01-01

    With the completion of the genome sequences of the model plants Arabidopsis and rice, and the continuing sequencing efforts of other economically important crop plants, an unprecedented amount of genome sequence data is now available for large-scale genomics studies and analyses, such as the identification and discovery of novel genes, comparative genomics, and functional genomics. Efficient utilization of these large data sets is critically dependent on the ease of access and organization of the data. The plant databases at The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) have been set up to maintain various data types including genomic sequence, annotation and analyses, expressed transcript assemblies and analyses, and gene expression profiles from microarray studies. We present here an overview of the TIGR database resources for plant genomics and describe methods to access the data.

  5. Fiscal Year 1990 program report: Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Barfield, B.J.; Huffsey, R.R.

    1991-08-01

    The Annual Report of the Kentucky Water Resources Research Institute for Fiscal Year 1990 describes the problems and issues facing the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A synopsis of each of the four projects are as follows: 02, Biomonitoring Study of a Constructed Wetland Site, addresses the effectiveness of a constructed wetland in improving water quality from two abandoned mine seeps. Project 03, Kinetics and Mechanisms of Atrazine Adsorption and Desorption in Soils Under No-Till and Conventional Management, studied the biochemical transformations and chemical interactions of atrazine with soil surfaces. Project 04, Use of High-Energy Radiation Sources for Degradation of Environmental Pollutants, is looking into the detoxification of pollutants using high energy radiation. Project 05, Development of a Decision Support System for Drought Characterization and Management: Application to the Kentucky River Basin, anticipates the development of an integrated software system for use in characterizing existing drought conditions.

  6. Accelerated Capacity Development in Water Resources Education: the experiences of the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamirew, T.; Mekonnen, G.; Viglione, A.

    2012-04-01

    Ethiopia recently recognises that the water resources development is the major entry point in poverty alleviation and sustainable development. Water in Ethiopia plays a key role in the Water-Energy-Food-nexus. Over 98% of the electricity in the country is generated using hydropower and yet about 2000 MW has been developed. Out of the 3.5 Mha potentially irrigable land, only 0.25 Mha has been developed to date. Access to drinking water supply coverage is among the lowest in the world. One of the limiting factors in harnessing the resource base is the absence of water professionals to face the fast growing demand in education, research, development in the water sector. Recognising this, in collaboration with University of Connecticut of the United States, Addis Ababa University launched the Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources (EIWR) by enrolling 18 PhD and 24 MSc students. The program is unique in that much of the course instructors are coming from US and European Universities, but deliver courses together with Ethiopian collaborators. This is supposed to facilitate knowledge and experience transfer from the US/EU scientist to Ethiopian counterparts. The theses/dissertations are designed to focus on Ethiopia's immediate hydrological problems on selected basins, and will be coordinated by three advisors for each PhD - one from US/EU, one from Ethiopian Universities, and one water professional from the sector. We report here the lessons learned in setting up the EIWR institute and the education program.

  7. National Institutes of Health Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases~National Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications View Publications View Publications View Publications Research Resources Clinical Trials www.clinicaltrials.gov MedlinePlus www.nlm. ... The NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center is supported by the National Institute of ...

  8. Best Practice Guide: A Resource for Receiving Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This guide has been developed primarily for institutions in the British Columbia (BC) Transfer System interested in seeking designation as receiving institutions. Institutions are encouraged to consult this guide and use those sections most relevant to their needs. Areas discussed include: (1) Policy, Procedure and Record-Keeping; (2) Transfer and…

  9. Transmission and Institutional Infection Control of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nardell, Edward A

    2015-08-20

    Tuberculosis (TB) transmission control in institutions is evolving with increased awareness of the rapid impact of treatment on transmission, the importance of the unsuspected, untreated case of transmission, and the advent of rapid molecular diagnostics. With active case finding based on cough surveillance and rapid drug susceptibility testing, in theory, it is possible to be reasonably sure that no patient enters a facility with undiagnosed TB or drug resistance. Droplet nuclei transmission of TB is reviewed with an emphasis on risk factors relevant to control. Among environmental controls, natural ventilation and upper-room ultraviolet germicidal ultraviolet air disinfection are the most cost-effective choices, although high-volume mechanical ventilation can also be used. Room air cleaners are generally not recommended. Maintenance is required for all engineering solutions. Finally, personal protection with fit-tested respirators is used in many situations where administrative and engineering methods cannot assure protection.

  10. STATE WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE PROGRAM: GROUND WATER RESEARCH.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, James S.; ,

    1985-01-01

    This paper updates a review of the accomplishments of the State Water Resources Research Program in ground water contamination research. The aim is to assess the progress made towards understanding the mechanisms of ground water contamination and based on this understanding, to suggest procedures for the prevention and control of ground water contamination. The following research areas are covered: (1) mechanisms of organic contaminant transport in the subsurface environment; (2) bacterial and viral contamination of ground water from landfills and septic tank systems; (3) fate and persistence of pesticides in the subsurface; (4) leachability and transport of ground water pollutants from coal production and utilization; and (5) pollution of ground water from mineral mining activities.

  11. 18 CFR 1317.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by... consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b) Exemption claims. An educational institution... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false...

  12. 18 CFR 1317.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by... consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b) Exemption claims. An educational institution... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false...

  13. Post-Implementation Success Factors for Enterprise Resource Planning Student Administration Systems in Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Linda; Bozeman, William

    2010-01-01

    Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems can represent one of the largest investments of human and financial resources by a higher education institution. They also bring a significant process reengineering aspect to the institution and the associated implementation project through the integration of compiled industry best practices into the…

  14. The Middle East Institute Resource Guide for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fix, Jerrold E.

    Abstracts and evaluations of over 50 instructional and resource materials related to the Middle East are presented in the resource guide. The guide is intended for use by elementary and secondary school social studies classroom teachers as they seek information about availability and potential uses of resources dealing with the Middle East. Four…

  15. 75 FR 51830 - National Cancer Institute's Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... Cancer Institute's Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources AGENCY: National Institutes of Health (NIH... commitment to maintaining current and scientifically accurate best practices, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is seeking public comment on a revised version of the NCI Best Practices for...

  16. 18 CFR 1317.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 1317.205 Section 1317.205 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN...

  17. Community orientation in hospitals: an institutional and resource dependence perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Proenca, E J; Rosko, M D; Zinn, J S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To conceptualize community orientation-defined as the generation, dissemination, and use of community health-need intelligence-as a strategic response to environmental pressures, and to test a theoretically justified model of the predictors of community orientation in hospitals. DATA SOURCES: The analysis used data for 4,578 hospitals obtained from the 1994 and 1995 American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey and the 1994 Medicare Hospital Cost Report data sets. Market-level data came from the Area Resource File. STUDY DESIGN: Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the effects of hospital size, dependence on managed care, ownership, network, system and alliance memberships, and level of diffusion of community-orientation practices in the area on the degree of community orientation in hospitals. The model, based on Oliver's (1991) framework of organizational responsiveness to environmental pressures, controlled for the effects of industry concentration and lagged profitability. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Degree of community orientation is significantly related to hospital size; ownership; dependence on managed care; and membership in a network, system, or alliance. It is also significantly related to the diffusion of community-orientation practices among other area hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Degree of community orientation is influenced by the nature of environmental pressures and by hospital interests. It is higher in hospitals that are large, nonprofit, or members of a network, system, or alliance; in hospitals that are more dependent on managed care; and in hospitals that operate in areas with higher diffusion of community-orientation activities. PMID:11130801

  18. Institutional Accountability and Competition for Resources in Undergraduate Education among U.S. Public Four-Year Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akey, Lynn D.

    2012-01-01

    With a growing concern that society's needs are not being met, there are heightened expectations for accountability for public purposes. At the same time higher education institutions are experiencing increasing competition, as well as decreasing state support for public higher education. The concern is that competition for resources is overtaking…

  19. Effective Reporting. Resources in Institutional Research, Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy H.

    This monograph is a guide to effective presentation of report data and information from institutional research. The work focuses on several types of presentation: the written report (alternative ways for presenting information, appearance, and the audience); graphic displays or charts (to present words or data in an organized or symbolic fashion;…

  20. Enrollment Management, Institutional Resources, and the Private College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Joseph A.; Coomes, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews issues involved in shaping institutional financial aid policy, including tuition discounting, student aid packaging policy, and merit scholarships. States policymakers cannot ignore the trend towards reducing public subsidies. Suggests colleges and policymakers: (1) develop new ways to make college more affordable; (2) give families…

  1. INSTITUTING A VOCATIONAL MAJOR IN NATURAL RESOURCES AT SHASTA COLLEGE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BROOKS, WALTER L.; DUBOSE, DAVID C.

    TWO FACTORS LED TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TERMINAL PROGRAM TO PREPARE STUDENTS FOR EMPLOYMENT IN OCCUPATIONS RELATED TO THE USE AND CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES--(1) THE CONSISTENTLY LARGE NUMBERS OF STUDENTS WHO ENROLLED IN TRANSFER PROGRAMS IN THESE FIELDS BUT WHO DID NOT CONTINUE BEYOND THE JUNIOR COLLEGE, AND (2) THE LOCATION OF THE COLLEGE…

  2. Community Stories and Institutional Stewardship: Digital Curation's Dual Roles of Story Creation and Resource Preservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunda, Sue; Anderson-Wilk, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Our institutions of record are facing a new digital knowledge management challenge: stakeholder communities are now expecting customized Web interfaces to institutional knowledge repositories, online environments where community members can contribute content and see themselves represented, as well as access archived resources. Digital curation…

  3. Human Resources and Staff Development as Part of an Institutional Evaluation: The Case of Oulu.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liuhanen, Anna-Maija

    1996-01-01

    At the University of Oulu (Finland), a 1992-93 institutional evaluation included both self-assessment and external evaluation. The self-evaluation paid little attention to institutional human resource management, while the external assessment gave substantial attention to personnel policy, staff development, and manpower planning. A more strategic…

  4. 40 CFR 194.41 - Active institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... controls and their effectiveness in terms of preventing or reducing radionuclide releases shall be... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Active institutional controls. 194.41... Assurance Requirements § 194.41 Active institutional controls. (a) Any compliance application shall...

  5. INL Sitewide Institutional Controls Annual Report FY2006

    SciTech Connect

    W. L. Jolley

    2006-08-01

    This document reports the results of the fiscal year 2006 institutional controls assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act sites at the Idaho National Laboratory. These activities are described in the INEEL Sitewide Institutional Control Plan. Inspections were performed by Long-term Stewardship Program personnel with representatives of the various facilities. The assessments showed that the various institutional control measures in place across the Idaho National Laboratory Site are functioning as intended. Information in the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Comprehensive Facilities and Land Use Plan was reviewed as part of the annual assessment and was revised as needed to reflect the current status of the institutional control sites.

  6. Institutional and environmental problems in geothermal resource development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslan, F.; Gordon, T. J.; Deitch, L.

    1974-01-01

    A number of regulatory and institutional impediments to the development of geothermal energy exist. None of these seem likely to prevent the development of this energy source, but in the aggregate they will pace its growth as certainly as the technological issues. The issues are associated with the encouragement of exploration and development, assuring a market for geothermal steam or hot water, and accomplishing the required research and development in a timely manner. The development of geothermal energy in the United States at a high level is apt to cause both favorable and unfavorable, though manageable, impacts in eight major areas, which are discussed.

  7. The Undergraduate Research Resources at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. Donald; Castelaz, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), a former NASA tracking station located in western North Carolina, has been offering programs, campus, and instrument use for undergraduate research and learning experiences since 2000. Over these years, PARI has collaborated with universities and colleges in the Southeastern U.S. Sharing its campus with institutions of higher learning is a priority for PARI as part of its mission to "to providing hands-on educational and research opportunities for a broad cross-section of users in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines."PARI is a 200 acre campus for environmental, earth, geological, physical, and astronomical sciences. For example, the PARI 26-m and 4.6-m radio telescopes are excellent for teaching electromagnetic theory, spectroscopy, atomic and molecular emission processes, and general physics and astronomy concepts. The PARI campus has lab and office space, data centers with high speed internet, distance learning capabilities, radio and optical telescopes, earth science sensors, housing and cafeteria.Also, the campus is in an excellent spot for environmental and biological sciences lab and classroom experiences for students. The campus has the capability to put power and Internet access almost anywhere on its 200 acre campus so experiments can be set up in a protected area of a national forest. For example, Earthscope operates a Plate Boundary Observatory sensor on campus to measure plate tectonic motion. And, Clemson University has an instrument measuring winds and temperatures in the Thermsophere. The use of thePARI campus is limited only by the creativity faculty to provide a rich educational environment for their students. An overview of PARI will be presented along with a summary of programs, and a summary of undergraduate research experiences over the past 15 years. Access to PARI and collaboration possibilities will be presented.

  8. NURSING HOME CONTROL OF PHYSICIAN RESOURCES (NHCOPR)

    PubMed Central

    Intrator, Orna; Lima, Julie; Wetle, Terrie Fox

    2014-01-01

    Objective Physician services are increasingly recognized as important contributors to quality care provision in nursing homes (NHs), but knowledge of ways in which NHs manage/ control physician resources is lacking. Data Primary data from surveys of NH Administrators and Directors of Nursing from a nationally representative sample of 1,938 freestanding U.S. NHs in 2009–2010 matched to Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR), aggregated NH Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments and Medicare claims, and data from the Area Resource File (ARF). Methods The concept of NH Control of Physician Resources (NHCOPR) was measured using NH Administrators’ reports of management implementation of rules, policies, and procedures aimed at coordinating work activities. The NHCOPR scale was based on measures of formal relationships, physician oversight and credentialing. Scale values ranged from weakest (0) to tightest (3) control. Several hypotheses of expected associations between NHCOPR and other measures of NH and market characteristics were tested. Principal Findings The full NHCOPR score averaged 1.58 (SD=0.77) on the 0–3 scale. Nearly 30% of NHs had weak control (NHCOPR <= 1), 47.5% had average control (NHCOPR between 1 and 2), and the remaining 24.8% had tight control (NHCOPR > 2). NHCOPR exhibited good face- and predictive-validity as exhibited by positive associations with more beds, more Medicare services, cross coverage and number of physicians in the market. Conclusions The NHCOPR scale capturing NH’s formal structure of control of physician resources can be useful in studying the impact of NH’s physician resources on residents’ outcomes with potential for targeted interventions by education and promotion of NH administration of physician staff. PMID:24508327

  9. 10 CFR 61.63 - Financial assurances for institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Financial assurances for institutional controls. 61.63 Section 61.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Financial Assurances § 61.63 Financial assurances for institutional controls. (a) Prior...

  10. 10 CFR 61.63 - Financial assurances for institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial assurances for institutional controls. 61.63 Section 61.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Financial Assurances § 61.63 Financial assurances for institutional controls. (a) Prior...

  11. 10 CFR 61.63 - Financial assurances for institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Financial assurances for institutional controls. 61.63 Section 61.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Financial Assurances § 61.63 Financial assurances for institutional controls. (a) Prior...

  12. 10 CFR 61.63 - Financial assurances for institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Financial assurances for institutional controls. 61.63 Section 61.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Financial Assurances § 61.63 Financial assurances for institutional controls. (a) Prior...

  13. 10 CFR 61.63 - Financial assurances for institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Financial assurances for institutional controls. 61.63 Section 61.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Financial Assurances § 61.63 Financial assurances for institutional controls. (a) Prior...

  14. Inhibition: Mental Control Process or Mental Resource?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Im-Bolter, Nancie; Johnson, Janice; Ling, Daphne; Pascual-Leone, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The current study tested 2 models of inhibition in 45 children with language impairment and 45 children with normally developing language; children were aged 7 to 12 years. Of interest was whether a model of inhibition as a mental-control process (i.e., executive function) or as a mental resource would more accurately reflect the relations among…

  15. Electronic Resources: Selection and Bibliographic Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattie, Ling-yuh W., Ed.; Cox, Bonnie Jean, Ed.

    This book is a baseline guide for professionals and library school students on issues that concern the selection and bibliographic control of electronic resources, from both conceptual and pragmatic standpoints. The book includes the following articles: (1) "Foreward" (Lois Mai Chan); (2) "Introduction" (Ling-yuh W. (Miko)…

  16. Understanding factors that influence stakeholder trust of natural resource science and institutions.

    PubMed

    Gray, Steven; Shwom, Rachael; Jordan, Rebecca

    2012-03-01

    Building trust between resource users and natural resource institutions is essential when creating conservation policies that rely on stakeholders to be effective. Trust can enable the public and agencies to engage in cooperative behaviors toward shared goals and address shared problems. Despite the increasing attention that trust has received recently in the environmental management literature, the influence that individual cognitive and behavioral factors may play in influencing levels of trust in resource management institutions, and their associated scientific assessments, remains unclear. This paper uses the case of fisheries management in the northeast to explore the relationships between an individual's knowledge of the resource, perceptions of resource health, and participatory experience on levels of trust. Using survey data collected from 244 avid recreational anglers in the Northeast U.S., we test these relationships using structural equation modeling. Results indicate that participation in fisheries management is associated with increased trust across all aspects of fisheries management. In addition, higher ratings of resource health by anglers are associated with higher levels of trust of state and regional institutions, but not federal institutions or scientific methods.

  17. Institutional Analysis, Upper Mississippi River Master Plan; Resource management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    development; * Satisfy federal flood insurance requirements; e Promote health and welfare of people; ~. . • Prevent soil erosion; e Preserve wildlife; * Make...riverfront available to general public; " Keep riverfront clean; e Control of recreational structures; l ." e Scenic preservation . Numerous water...refuge. Preservation of this area is a high priority. o ". ..... W S R .::: , . .g .- ". .’ A small craft harbor is under consideration at one of the

  18. 34 CFR 410.1 - What is the Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... institutions to ensure continued and expanded educational opportunities for Indian students, and to allow for the improvement and expansion of the physical resources of those institutions. (Authority: 20...

  19. Fiscal year 1984 program report: Connecticut Institute of Water Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, C.N.

    1985-09-01

    Alleviation and identification of threats to groundwater supplies was addressed by the following projects: a study of the mechanisms controlling gasoline partitioning and transport in groundwater; chemical and physical studies of adsorption and reactions of hazardous-waste metals and chlorinated hydrocarbons; contribution of toxic chemicals to groundwater from domestic on-site sewage disposal systems. Because of urbanization stress on lakes important to state citizens as well as to tourism, the following projects were funded: 05, Diagnosis of watershed and internal phosphorus loading in Candlewood Lake; and mirrors of the landscape: a guide to diagnosing and managing lake ecosystems.

  20. [Human brain resource--experience at the Brain Research Institute,University of Niigata].

    PubMed

    Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    2010-10-01

    Through 40 years of neuropathological practice,the Brain Research Institute, University of Niigata (BRI-Niigata), Japan has accumulated extensive human brain resource,including fresh-frozen brain slices,for scientific research. Over 30,000 slices obtained from consecutive autopsies have been systematically stored in 25 deep freezers. Establishment of effective networks between brain banks and institutional collections in Japan is essential for promoting scientific activities that require human brain resource. We at the BRI-Niigata are eager to contribute to the establishment of such networks.

  1. Human resources for the control of road traffic injury.

    PubMed

    Mock, Charles; Kobusingye, Olive; Anh, Le Vu; Afukaar, Francis; Arreola-Risa, Carlos

    2005-04-01

    The definition of the ideal numbers and distribution of human resources required for control of road traffic injury (RTI) is not as advanced as for other health problems. We can nonetheless identify functions that need to be addressed across the spectrum of injury control: surveillance; road safety (including infrastructure, vehicle design, and behaviour); and trauma care. Many low-cost strategies to improve these functions in low- or middle-income countries can be identified. For all these strategies, there is need for adequate institutional capacity, including funding, legal authority, and human resources. Several categories of human resources need to be developed: epidemiologists who can handle injury data, design surveillance systems, and undertake research; engineers and planners versed in safety aspects of road design, traffic flow, urban planning, and vehicle design; police and lawyers who understand the health impact of traffic law; clinicians who can develop cost-effective improvements in the entire system of trauma treatment; media experts to undertake effective behaviour change and social marketing; and economists to assist with cost-effectiveness evaluations. RTI control can be strengthened by enhancing such training in these disciplines, as well as encouraging retention of those who have the needed skills. Mechanisms to enhance collaboration between these different fields need to be promoted. Finally, the burden of RTI is borne disproportionately by the poor; in addition to technical issues, more profound equity issues must be addressed. This mandates that people from all professional backgrounds who work for RTI control should develop skills in advocacy and politics.

  2. Strategy to Ensure Institutional Control Implementation at Superfund Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document sets forth EPA’s strategy (Strategy) for ensuring that institutional controls (ICs) are successfully implemented at Superfund sites, with an emphasis on evaluating ICs at sites where all construction of all remedies is complete (construction complete sites).

  3. World Wide Web resources on control of nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Siempos, Ilias I; Fragoulis, Konstantinos N; Falagas, Matthew E

    2007-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major worldwide cause of death and disability, infection control programs are effective in limiting these infections, especially those acquired in the intensive care unit. The development of the world wide web has provided health care professionals with immediate access to continuously updated information in the field of infection control. We sought to identify websites that contain information on nosocomial infection control by using popular internet search engines, such as Google, Yahoo and AltaVista, and by reviewing relevant publications identified in the PubMed and Current Contents databases. Only those sites that were English language, open access, and developed by a government, academic institution, or national or international scientific association were eligible for inclusion. From a vast number of internet sites initially identified, we selected 49 that provide information on infection control for inclusion in our list of practical and relevant internet resources. Several sites provide general information on infection control practices, whereas others focus on one or a few specific infection(s). We provide health care professionals with a timely and succinct list of open access internet resources that contain information regarding the prevention and control of nosocomial infections in order to help in the dissemination of relevant information and so contribute to the limitation of such hazards.

  4. Assessment of Utilization of ICT Resources in Teaching among Tertiary Institution Business Educators in South Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okolocha, Chimezie Comfort; Nwadiani, Comfort Onaigho

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the utilization of ICT resources in teaching among business educators in tertiary institutions in south Nigeria. Two research questions and two null hypotheses guided the study. Descriptive survey research design was adopted for the study. The population and sample for the study comprised all 240 business educators in colleges…

  5. Learning Activities and Resource Units: Intermediate 4-8. [Arizona] Migrant Child Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheelock, Warren H., Ed.

    A requirement of Arizona's Migrant Teacher Institutes was the preparation of instructional resource units. Development of these units was a key element in the three-stage recommendations related to individualizing instruction in both reading and oral language. The three stages were: Room Organization--Realistic Learning Centers, Unit Themes and…

  6. Directory of Academic Institutions and Organizations Offering Drug, Alcohol, and Employee Assistance Program Educational Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This directory lists academic institutions, State offices of alcohol and drug abuse, and national organizations which offer drug, alcohol, and employee assistance program (EAP) educational resources. A matrix format is used. Entries include name, address, telephone number, and contact person. A dot appears directly under column headings which are…

  7. Balancing Needs and Resources. The Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum Proceedings No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staskey, Paul J., Ed.

    The abbreviated proceedings of the 18th Annual Forum of the Association for Institutional Research on balancing needs and resources are presented. Three of the five major addresses are presented in their entirety; the other two are summarized. The invited general session addresses included: "Talent for the 1980's" (Russell Edgerton); "If You Don't…

  8. Building Futurism into the Institution's Strategic Planning and Human Resource Development Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Warren H.

    A process for building futurism into the institution's strategic planning and human resource development model is described. It is an attempt to assist faculty and staff to understand the future and the formulation and revision of professional goals in relation to an image of the future. A conceptual framework about the changing nature of human…

  9. Web Accessibility and Usability of the Homepages from Academy of Human Resource Development Members' Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Xiaoming; Sligar, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Human resource development programs in various institutions communicate with their constituencies including persons with disabilities through websites. Web sites need to be accessible for legal, economic and ethical reasons. We used an automated web usability evaluation tool, aDesigner, to evaluate 205 home pages from the organizations of AHRD…

  10. Designing Entrepreneurial Skills Development Programmes. Resource Book for Technical and Vocational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, T. V.; And Others

    This resource book offers people involved in Entrepreneurial Skills Development Programs (ESDPs) in technical and vocational education and training institutions (curriculum developers, trainers, policymakers, and managers) tools to fashion a program that suits their specific environment. The two sections of the book are "Planning an…

  11. 78 FR 23288 - Proposed Information Collection: State Water Resources Research Institute Program; Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ... application for an allotment grant and provides an annual report on its activities under the grant. The State... submit the annual application; and 80 hours (total) per grantee to complete the annual reports. Annual... Geological Survey Proposed Information Collection: State Water Resources Research Institute Program;...

  12. Successful Inter-Institutional Resource Sharing in a Niche Educational Market: Formal Collaboration without a Contract

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dow, Elizabeth H.

    2008-01-01

    Funded by an Institute for Museum and Library Services National Leadership grant, five universities developed a system to provide archives education courses--a niche curriculum--to each other. They use compressed video over Internet 2 in a resource-sharing collaboration across five states and two time zones. The original grant ran from 2002-2005,…

  13. SIDS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - SIDS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) : American SIDS Institute -- sids.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc. ...

  14. Improving the Internal Accounting Controls of Educational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apostolou, Nicholas G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Accounting controls are primarily concerned with methods and procedures that safeguard an entity's assets and ensure the reliability of its financial records. This article discusses internal control objectives as applied to educational institutions, outlines specific steps necessary to develop an effective internal control system, and mentions…

  15. Sustaining tobacco control coalitions amid declining resources.

    PubMed

    Carver, Vivien; Reinert, Bonita; Range, Lillian M

    2007-07-01

    Mississippi is unique among the 50 states in settling a lawsuit against tobacco companies earlier than the Master Settlement Agreement, devoting a relatively high amount of per capita funding on tobacco control, and avoiding tobacco-control budget cuts. Using a social-ecological approach combining insider and outsider strategies, tobacco-prevention coalitions in Mississippi succeeded in sustaining funding despite serious obstacles. Lessons learned included taking specific actions to embed themselves in the local community, wisely aligning with legislators, choosing courageous and effective champions, and ensuring that people are keenly aware of their existence and efforts. In using these strategies, tobacco-prevention coalitions in Mississippi have become an institution of the community and in so doing helped sustain their funding.

  16. The institutional role of NGOs in protecting Indonesia's treasurehouse of natural resources

    SciTech Connect

    Petrich, C.H. )

    1993-01-01

    As the world's fourth most populous nation, Indonesia faces enormous development pressures on its limited--but plentiful--resource base. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are playing an important role in protecting Indonesia's environmental bounty through a unique institutional status. Indonesia's decade-old environmental protection legislation lays out specific responsibilities for NGOs, but the government also keeps an extremely tight watch over their activities, their funding sources, and their overseas strategizing with other NGOs. They are not permitted to participate in political or commercial activities. Indonesian NGOs enjoy a unique funding relationship with the private business community wherein they may even eventually campaign against a particular donor's environmental management practices. All this occurs within the political context of highly centralized, hierarchical government control coupled with anti-North/West leanings. That NGOs have survived to the point of even having standing in court is not unique globally, but certainly noteworthy in this near-fledgling democracy. In this paper, the author recalls his experience working on environmental management issues with Indonesian government officials, power utility staff, NGOs, and private environmental practitioners, and Western environmental consultants and advocates to analyze the short history of, prospects for, and mechanisms of NGO influence over Indonesian environmental policy making and implementation.

  17. ARAC: A unique command and control resource

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.M.; Baskett, R.L.; Ellis, J.S.

    1996-04-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a centralized federal facility designed to provide real-time, world-wide support to military and civilian command and control centers by predicting the impacts of inadvertent or intentional releases of nuclear, biological, or chemical materials into the atmosphere. ARAC is a complete response system consisting of highly trained and experienced personnel, continually updated computer models, redundant data collection systems, and centralized and remote computer systems. With over 20 years of experience responding to domestic and international incidents, strong linkages with the Department of Defense, and the ability to conduct classified operations, ARAC is a unique command and control resource.

  18. Safety Control and Safety Education at Technical Institutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Hiroshi

    The importance of safety education for students at technical institutes is emphasized on three grounds including safety of all working members and students in their education, research and other activities. The Kanazawa Institute of Technology re-organized the safety organization into a line structure and improved safety minds of all their members and now has a chemical materials control system and a set of compulsory safety education programs for their students, although many problems still remain.

  19. The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics’ resources: focus on curated databases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (www.isb-sib.ch) provides world-class bioinformatics databases, software tools, services and training to the international life science community in academia and industry. These solutions allow life scientists to turn the exponentially growing amount of data into knowledge. Here, we provide an overview of SIB's resources and competence areas, with a strong focus on curated databases and SIB's most popular and widely used resources. In particular, SIB's Bioinformatics resource portal ExPASy features over 150 resources, including UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, ENZYME, PROSITE, neXtProt, STRING, UniCarbKB, SugarBindDB, SwissRegulon, EPD, arrayMap, Bgee, SWISS-MODEL Repository, OMA, OrthoDB and other databases, which are briefly described in this article. PMID:26615188

  20. The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics' resources: focus on curated databases.

    PubMed

    2016-01-04

    The SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (www.isb-sib.ch) provides world-class bioinformatics databases, software tools, services and training to the international life science community in academia and industry. These solutions allow life scientists to turn the exponentially growing amount of data into knowledge. Here, we provide an overview of SIB's resources and competence areas, with a strong focus on curated databases and SIB's most popular and widely used resources. In particular, SIB's Bioinformatics resource portal ExPASy features over 150 resources, including UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, ENZYME, PROSITE, neXtProt, STRING, UniCarbKB, SugarBindDB, SwissRegulon, EPD, arrayMap, Bgee, SWISS-MODEL Repository, OMA, OrthoDB and other databases, which are briefly described in this article.

  1. Incorporating educational institutions into a unified model of health human resources.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Masoumeh; Dauphinee, Dale; Buckeridge, David; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2009-01-01

    This commentary discusses Tzountzouris and Gilbert's article on issues related to emerging health human resources (HHR) requirements and the role of educational institutions in anticipating and meeting them. It is apparent that educational institutions are influenced by and, in turn, influence a number of elements of HHR. They therefore have a unique role in responding to emerging HHR needs, from assessing the needs to evaluating responses. While this commentary shares the general idea presented by the authors of the lead paper, it outlines some of the issues that should be taken into consideration in formulating these roles.

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NEIGHBORHOOD RACIAL CONCENTRATION AND VERBAL ABILITY: AN INVESTIGATION USING THE INSTITUTIONAL RESOURCES MODEL.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Pamela R

    2011-07-01

    Relatively few studies examine the relationship between racial residential segregation and educational or cognitive outcomes. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health and the institutional resources model of neighborhood effects, I investigate one account of how macrostructural arrangements between race, neighborhood segregation, and school quality interact to produce inequalities in test scores. Consistent with the institutional resources model, results suggest that school quality varies across neighborhoods based, in part, on their degree of racial concentration. Indeed, school quality and other school characteristics mediate the relationship between racial concentration and verbal skills, particularly among black males. These findings have implications not only for inequalities in cognitive skills among blacks across residential space, but also between blacks and whites given high levels of residential segregation in the United States. In sum, findings illustrate yet another way in which residential segregation contributes to, and not merely reflects, racial inequalities.

  3. Resources for controlling tuberculosis in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Harries, A. D.; Kwanjana, J. H.; Hargreaves, N. J.; Van Gorkom, J.; Salaniponi, F. M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To document resources for controlling tuberculosis (TB) in Malawi. METHODS: We performed a countrywide study of all 43 hospitals (3 central, 22 district and 18 mission) which register and treat patients with TB. To collect data for 1998 on the TB-related workload, diagnostic facilities, programme staff and treatment facilities, we used laboratory, radiographic and TB registers, conducted interviews and visited hospital facilities. FINDINGS: The data show that in 1998, 88,257 TB suspects/patients contributed approximately 230,000 sputum specimens for smear microscopy, 55,667 chest X-rays were performed and 23,285 patients were registered for TB treatment. There were 86 trained laboratory personnel, 44 radiographers and 83 TB programme staff. Of these, about 40% had periods of illness during 1998. Approximately 20% of the microscopes and X-ray machines were broken. Some 16% of the hospital beds were designated for TB patients in special wards, but even so, the occupancy of beds in TB wards exceeded 100%. Although stocks of anti-TB drugs were good, there was a shortage of full-time TB ward nurses and 50% of district hospitals conducted no TB ward rounds. In general, there was a shortage of facilities for managing associated HIV-related disease; central hospitals, in particular, were underresourced. CONCLUSION: Malawi needs better planning to utilize its manpower and should consider cross-training hospital personnel. The equipment needs regular maintenance, and more attention should be paid to HIV-related illness. The policies of decentralizing resources to the periphery and increasing diagnostic and case-holding resources for central hospitals should be continued. PMID:11357212

  4. Human resources for the control of road traffic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Charles; Kobusingye, Olive; Anh, Le Vu; Afukaar, Francis; Arreola-Risa, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    The definition of the ideal numbers and distribution of human resources required for control of road traffic injury (RTI) is not as advanced as for other health problems. We can nonetheless identify functions that need to be addressed across the spectrum of injury control: surveillance; road safety (including infrastructure, vehicle design, and behaviour); and trauma care. Many low-cost strategies to improve these functions in low- or middle-income countries can be identified. For all these strategies, there is need for adequate institutional capacity, including funding, legal authority, and human resources. Several categories of human resources need to be developed: epidemiologists who can handle injury data, design surveillance systems, and undertake research; engineers and planners versed in safety aspects of road design, traffic flow, urban planning, and vehicle design; police and lawyers who understand the health impact of traffic law; clinicians who can develop cost-effective improvements in the entire system of trauma treatment; media experts to undertake effective behaviour change and social marketing; and economists to assist with cost-effectiveness evaluations. RTI control can be strengthened by enhancing such training in these disciplines, as well as encouraging retention of those who have the needed skills. Mechanisms to enhance collaboration between these different fields need to be promoted. Finally, the burden of RTI is borne disproportionately by the poor; in addition to technical issues, more profound equity issues must be addressed. This mandates that people from all professional backgrounds who work for RTI control should develop skills in advocacy and politics. PMID:15868021

  5. Resilient campuses: leveraging resources among small- and moderate-sized institutions of higher education.

    PubMed

    Green, Rebekah

    2014-01-01

    Universities and colleges provide students with an opportunity to grow personally and professionally through a structured series of learning experiences. Yet disasters can interrupt traditional place-based education and prove to be intractable policy problems. The challenges of developing robust plans and drilling them extensively are most pronounced among smaller public colleges and universities. This article describes how three small- to moderate-sized higher education institutions formed a consortium to better prepare for emergencies, despite limited resources. Together the institutions built common templates, hired joint staff, and created a suit of joint exercises appropriate for their small size and campus-specific needs. In the process, they shared unique perspectives that improved resilience across the institutions.

  6. Business Planning for Cultural Heritage Institutions. A Framework and Resource Guide to Assist Cultural Heritage Institutions with Business Planning for Sustainability of Digital Asset Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishoff, Liz; Allen, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a framework and resource guide to help cultural heritage institutions plan sustainable access to their digital cultural assets and to do so by means that link their missions to planning modes and models. To aid cultural heritage organizations in the business-planning process, this resource will do the…

  7. Institutional development for sustainable rangeland resource and ecosystem management in mountainous areas of northern Nepal.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shikui; Lassoie, James; Shrestha, K K; Yan, Zhaoli; Sharma, Ekalabya; Pariya, D

    2009-02-01

    Rangelands represent one of the most important natural resources in mountainous regions of northern Nepal. However, a poor understanding of the social dimensions of rangeland use has limited their proper management and sustainable development, which represent major challenges for Nepal's resource managers. Institutional development is thought to be a viable solution to this problem and may ultimately lead to improved rangeland management in Nepal. Based on this hypothesis, a study was conduced in the Rasuwa district of northern Nepal to examine the effectiveness of institutional development at the local and national levels in mitigating the problems facing sustainable rangeland management by using an institutional analysis and development (IAD) framework. The information and data were mainly collected from different stakeholders, farmers, professionals and practitioners using a toolkit of participatory rural appraisal (PRA), workshops and literature review. It can be concluded from this case study that a number of institutional development efforts are needed to promote sustainable rangeland management in this region. First, local herders represent a repository of rich indigenous knowledge essential to sustaining sound rangeland management practices; hence, indigenous practices need to be integrated into modern technologies. Second, public services and technical support are currently unavailable or inaccessible to local herders; hence, research, development and extension interventions need to be initiated for marginalized pastoral communities. Third, rangeland institutions are incomplete and ill-organized, so institutional development of various organizations is necessary for promoting sustainable rangeland management. Fourth, the policies and governance necessary for promoting rangeland management are not well-designed; hence, governance reform and policy development need to be formulated through internal and external agencies and organizations.

  8. Shared resource control between human and computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendler, James; Wilson, Reid

    1989-01-01

    The advantages of an AI system of actively monitoring human control of a shared resource (such as a telerobotic manipulator) are presented. A system is described in which a simple AI planning program gains efficiency by monitoring human actions and recognizing when the actions cause a change in the system's assumed state of the world. This enables the planner to recognize when an interaction occurs between human actions and system goals, and allows maintenance of an up-to-date knowledge of the state of the world and thus informs the operator when human action would undo a goal achieved by the system, when an action would render a system goal unachievable, and efficiently replans the establishment of goals after human intervention.

  9. Optimal Control of Distributed Energy Resources using Model Predictive Control

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Butler-Purry, Karen

    2012-07-22

    In an isolated power system (rural microgrid), Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response can be used to complement fossil fueled generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with the goals of minimizing fuel costs and changes in power output of diesel generators, minimizing costs associated with low battery life of energy storage and maintaining system frequency at the nominal operating value. Two control modes are considered for controlling the energy storage to compensate either net load variability or wind variability. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve the aforementioned problem and the performance is compared to an open-loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies using high and low wind profiles, as well as, different MPC prediction horizons demonstrate the efficacy of the closed-loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties in wind and demand.

  10. Role of educational institutions in identifying and responding to emerging health human resources needs.

    PubMed

    Tzountzouris, John-Paul; Gilbert, John H V

    2009-01-01

    The healthcare system continues to evolve, requiring innovation to promote patient-centred, fiscally responsible healthcare delivery. This evolution includes changes to the skills and competencies required of the health human resources (HHR), both regulated and unregulated, who are central supports to healthcare delivery. This has become a priority agenda item at the international, national, provincial, regional and local levels. This paper describes the system factors that drive the emergence of HHR skill and competency needs, and explores the roles of various institutions in the identification of and response to HHR needs. Educational institutions play an important role in responding to emerging HHR needs. Their actual response to HHR skill and competency needs will ultimately depend on the risk posed to the organizations of either addressing, or not addressing, these needs. These decisions are complex and are balanced against strategic, operational and educational risks, benefits and realities within each given educational institution. Educational institutions - through their linkages with the workplace, industry, professional organizations and government - have a unique view and understanding of many facets of the complexity of HHR planning. This paper proposes that educational institutions play a pivotal role as levers in a more coordinated response to emerging HHR needs and, as such, should be intimately involved in comprehensive HHR planning.

  11. 40 CFR 194.41 - Active institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Active institutional controls. 194.41 Section 194.41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAMS CRITERIA FOR THE CERTIFICATION AND RE-CERTIFICATION OF THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT...

  12. Industrial and Institutional Pest Control. Sale Publication 4073.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    This guide gives information needed to meet Environmental Protection Agency standards on industrial and institutional pest control, and to help prepare for certification. It gives descriptions and pictures of general insect pests, parasitic pests of man, occasional invaders, wood-destroying pests, stored product pests, vertebrates, and weeds. The…

  13. Enhanced recovery protocol: implementation at a county institution with limited resources.

    PubMed

    Rona, Kais; Choi, J; Sigle, G; Kidd, S; Ault, G; Senagore, A J

    2012-10-01

    The benefits of an enhanced recovery protocol (ERP) in colorectal surgery have been well described; however, data on the implementation process is minimal, especially in a resource-limited institution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcomes during implementation of a physician-driven ERP at a public-funded institution. We retrospectively reviewed all elective colorectal surgery during a transition from standard care to an ERP (implemented via a standard order sheet). Data regarding use of care plan, length of stay (LOS), and rates of postoperative complications and readmission were recorded. One hundred eleven patients were included in the study; however, complete use of the ERP after its introduction occurred in a total of 50 patients for a compliance rate of 60 per cent (95% confidence interval [CI], 49 to 70). Late implementation of ERP diet, analgesics, and activity were the most common process errors. Full application of the ERP reduced mean LOS by 3 days (P=0.002), and there was a trend toward decreased postoperative morbidity without an increase in readmission rate (P=0.61). Full implementation of an ERP for colorectal surgery faces many challenges in a resource-limited county institution; however, when fully applied, the ERP safely reduced overall LOS, which is important in cost containment.

  14. Geothermal resource base of the world: a revision of the Electric Power Research Institute's estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, M.J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Gambill, D.T.

    1981-04-01

    Review of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) method for calculating the geothermal resource base of a country shows that modifications are needed for several of the assumptions used in the calculation. These modifications include: (1) separating geothermal belts into volcanic types with a geothermal gradient of 50{sup 0}C/km and complex types in which 80% of the area has a temperature gradient of 30{sup 0}C/km and 20% has a gradient of 45{sup 0}C/km, (2) using the actual mean annual temperature of a country rather than an assumed 15{sup 0}C average ambient temperature, and (3) making separate calculations for the resource stored in water/brine and that stored in rock. Comparison of this method (Revised EPRI) for calculating a geothermal resource base with other resource base estimates made from a heat flow map of Europe indicates that the technique yields reasonable values. The calculated geothermal resource bases, stored in water and rock to a depth of 5 km, for each country in the world are given. Approximately five times as much energy is stored in rock as is stored in water.

  15. Moving beyond obsolescence: an important role for educational institutions in health human resources needs.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Sandra G

    2009-01-01

    The plan proposed by Tzountzouris and Gilbert is a useful framework for those of us in educational settings to gather and analyze the information to assist in forming our "educational response" to issues of health human resources. But I am concerned that the proposed plan and process encourages us to continue to survey the HHR carnage from our ivory towers, waiting for someone else to pick up the pieces. Instead, academics in education institutions should use their competencies to provide external leadership, building bridges between the policy directions and the local needs.

  16. Optimal stochastic control in natural resource management: Framework and examples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1982-01-01

    A framework is presented for the application of optimal control methods to natural resource problems. An expression of the optimal control problem appropriate for renewable natural resources is given and its application to Markovian systems is presented in some detail. Three general approaches are outlined for determining optimal control of infinite time horizon systems and three examples from the natural resource literature are used for illustration.

  17. Resource Sharing Controls Gene Expression Bursting.

    PubMed

    Caveney, Patrick M; Norred, S Elizabeth; Chin, Charles W; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Razooky, Brandon S; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, C Patrick; Simpson, Michael L

    2017-02-17

    Episodic gene expression, with periods of high expression separated by periods of no expression, is a pervasive biological phenomenon. This bursty pattern of expression draws from a finite reservoir of expression machinery in a highly time variant way, i.e., requiring no resources most of the time but drawing heavily on them during short intense bursts, that intimately links expression bursting and resource sharing. Yet, most recent investigations have focused on specific molecular mechanisms intrinsic to the bursty behavior of individual genes, while little is known about the interplay between resource sharing and global expression bursting behavior. Here, we confine Escherichia coli cell extract in both cell-sized microfluidic chambers and lipid-based vesicles to explore how resource sharing influences expression bursting. Interestingly, expression burst size, but not burst frequency, is highly sensitive to the size of the shared transcription and translation resource pools. The intriguing implication of these results is that expression bursts are more readily amplified than initiated, suggesting that burst formation occurs through positive feedback or cooperativity. When extrapolated to prokaryotic cells, these results suggest that large translational bursts may be correlated with large transcriptional bursts. This correlation is supported by recently reported transcription and translation bursting studies in E. coli. The results reported here demonstrate a strong intimate link between global expression burst patterns and resource sharing, and they suggest that bursting plays an important role in optimizing the use of limited, shared expression resources.

  18. Institutional Boundaries and Common-Pool Resource Management: A Comparative Analysis of Water Management Programs in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkila, Tanya

    2004-01-01

    Policymakers and academics often identify institutional boundaries as one of the factors that shape the capacity of jurisdictions to manage natural resources such as water, forests, and scenic lands. This article examines two key bodies of literature--common-pool resource management theory and local public economy theory--to explain how the…

  19. Institutional Commitment to Sustainability: An Evaluation of Natural Resource Extension Programs in Universities in Alabama and Oregon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Shorna R.; Bliss, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to determine institutional commitment to sustainability by examining Natural Resource Extension program inputs, activities, and participation. Design/methodology/approach: A document analysis of Natural Resource Extension planning and reporting documents was conducted to provide contextual and historical…

  20. Scheduled Controller Design of Congestion Control Considering Network Resource Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Hiroyuki; Azuma, Takehito; Fujita, Masayuki

    In this paper, we consider a dynamical model of computer networks and derive a synthesis method for congestion control. First, we show a model of TCP/AQM (Transmission Control Protocol/Active Queue Management) as a dynamical model of computer networks. The dynamical model of TCP/AQM networks consists of models of TCP window size, queue length and AQM mechanisms. Second, we propose to describe the dynamical model of TCP/AQM networks as linear systems with self-scheduling parameters, which also depend on information delay. Here we focus on the constraints on the maximum queue length and TCP window-size, which are the network resources in TCP/AQM networks. We derive TCP/AQM networks as the LPV system (linear parameter varying system) with information delay and self-scheduling parameter. We design a memoryless state feedback controller of the LPV system based on a gain-scheduling method. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated by using MATLAB and the well-known ns-2 (Network Simulator Ver.2) simulator.

  1. 77 FR 9218 - Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions Program; Proposed Waivers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions Program; Proposed Waivers and Extension... the Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions Program (TCPCTIP), the..., should there be one. Eligible applicants for TCPCTIP are tribally controlled postsecondary career...

  2. Integrating Human Resources and Technology. Proceedings of the Association for Institutional Research Forum (Toronto, Canada, May 23-26, 1983). Association for Institutional Research 1983-1984 Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Daniel R., Ed.

    Abstracts and four papers from the 1983 Association for Institutional Research (AIR) Forum on integrating human resources and technology are presented. AIR membership and organizational information are also provided. Paper titles and authors are as follows: "It Ain't All Bad" (Dean F. Berkley); "Technological Innovation and…

  3. Controlling user access to electronic resources without password

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Fred Hewitt

    2015-06-16

    Described herein are devices and techniques for remotely controlling user access to a restricted computer resource. The process includes pre-determining an association of the restricted computer resource and computer-resource-proximal environmental information. Indicia of user-proximal environmental information are received from a user requesting access to the restricted computer resource. Received indicia of user-proximal environmental information are compared to associated computer-resource-proximal environmental information. User access to the restricted computer resource is selectively granted responsive to a favorable comparison in which the user-proximal environmental information is sufficiently similar to the computer-resource proximal environmental information. In at least some embodiments, the process further includes comparing user-supplied biometric measure and comparing it with a predetermined association of at least one biometric measure of an authorized user. Access to the restricted computer resource is granted in response to a favorable comparison.

  4. Advanced Resources for Catalysis Science; Recommendations for a National Catalysis Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, Charles HF.; Ray, Douglas

    2005-10-05

    Catalysis is one of the most valuable contributors to our economy and historically an area where the United States has enjoyed, but is now losing, international leadership. While other countries are stepping up their work in this area, support for advanced catalysis research and development in the U.S. has diminished. Yet, more than ever, innovative and improved catalyst technologies are imperative for new energy production processes to ease our dependence on imported resources, for new energy-efficient and environmentally benign chemical production processes, and for new emission reduction technologies to minimize the environmental impact of an active and growing economy. Addressing growing concerns about the future direction of U.S. catalysis science, experts from the catalysis community met at a workshop to determine and recommend advanced resources needed to address the grand challenges for catalysis research and development. The workshop's primary conclusion: To recapture our position as the leader in catalysis innovation and practice, and promote crucial breakthroughs, the U.S. must establish one or more well-funded and well-equipped National Catalysis Research Institutes competitively selected, centered in the national laboratories and, by charter, networked to other national laboratories, universities, and industry. The Institute(s) will be the center of a national collaboratory that gives catalysis researchers access to the most advanced techniques available in the scientific enterprise. The importance of catalysis to our energy, economic, and environmental security cannot be overemphasized. Catalysis is a vital part of our core industrial infrastructure, as it is integral to chemical processing and petroleum refining, and is critical to proposed advances needed to secure a sustainable energy future. Advances in catalysis could reduce our need for foreign oil by making better use of domestic carbon resources, for example, allowing cost-effective and zero

  5. Hemophilia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - hemophilia ... The following organizations provide further information on hemophilia : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/hemophilia/index.html National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov/ ...

  6. Patient care cancer clinical trials at the National Cancer Institute: a resource for payers and providers.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Clinical trials form the evidence base for medical decision making and may provide patients with life-threatening conditions their best chance to find an effective treatment. A growing number of states and the federal government are mandating coverage of the routine costs of cancer clinical trials, although the extent of coverage varies. Individual health plans are following suit on behalf of their beneficiaries. Trials conducted at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) are an attractive resource for payers, because NCI provides medical services at no charge, enables patient access to promising care, emphasizes continuity with patients' regular physicians, and makes the referral and enrollment process easy and efficient through its Clinical Studies Support Center's toll-free information line 1-888-NCI-1937.

  7. Navigating the Web in search of resources on antimicrobial stewardship in health care institutions.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Leonardo; Gyssens, Inge C; Huttner, Benedikt; Nathwani, Dilip; Harbarth, Stephan

    2009-03-01

    Bacterial resistance to antimicrobials has become a public health threat for which coordinated action at the international, national, and local level is needed. Current recommendations for the control of antimicrobial overuse and resistance in hospitals recommend various strategies, including antimicrobial stewardship programs. Several of these integrated and multidisciplinary antimicrobial management programs provide detailed information and recommendations on the Web. We performed a search of the most relevant and authoritative Web sites in English that were available without need for special registration or cost. The search excluded community-based programs, and we present only established programs or those providing expert information useful for building a hospital-based antimicrobial stewardship program. The overview of these Web sites may be useful either for institutions or individuals planning to implement such programs in their own health care institution or for educational purposes targeted at different professionals involved in improving antimicrobial practice.

  8. The NIH-NIAID Schistosomiasis Resource Center at the Biomedical Research Institute: Molecular Redux

    PubMed Central

    Cody, James J.; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Miller, André N.; Henein, Lucie; Mentink-Kane, Margaret M.; Hsieh, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis remains a health burden in many parts of the world. The complex life cycle of Schistosoma parasites and the economic and societal conditions present in endemic areas make the prospect of eradication unlikely in the foreseeable future. Continued and vigorous research efforts must therefore be directed at this disease, particularly since only a single World Health Organization (WHO)-approved drug is available for treatment. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)–National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Schistosomiasis Resource Center (SRC) at the Biomedical Research Institute provides investigators with the critical raw materials needed to carry out this important research. The SRC makes available, free of charge (including international shipping costs), not only infected host organisms but also a wide array of molecular reagents derived from all life stages of each of the three main human schistosome parasites. As the field of schistosomiasis research rapidly advances, it is likely to become increasingly reliant on omics, transgenics, epigenetics, and microbiome-related research approaches. The SRC has and will continue to monitor and contribute to advances in the field in order to support these research efforts with an expanding array of molecular reagents. In addition to providing investigators with source materials, the SRC has expanded its educational mission by offering a molecular techniques training course and has recently organized an international schistosomiasis-focused meeting. This review provides an overview of the materials and services that are available at the SRC for schistosomiasis researchers, with a focus on updates that have occurred since the original overview in 2008. PMID:27764112

  9. Reinforcement learning techniques for controlling resources in power networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowli, Anupama Sunil

    As power grids transition towards increased reliance on renewable generation, energy storage and demand response resources, an effective control architecture is required to harness the full functionalities of these resources. There is a critical need for control techniques that recognize the unique characteristics of the different resources and exploit the flexibility afforded by them to provide ancillary services to the grid. The work presented in this dissertation addresses these needs. Specifically, new algorithms are proposed, which allow control synthesis in settings wherein the precise distribution of the uncertainty and its temporal statistics are not known. These algorithms are based on recent developments in Markov decision theory, approximate dynamic programming and reinforcement learning. They impose minimal assumptions on the system model and allow the control to be "learned" based on the actual dynamics of the system. Furthermore, they can accommodate complex constraints such as capacity and ramping limits on generation resources, state-of-charge constraints on storage resources, comfort-related limitations on demand response resources and power flow limits on transmission lines. Numerical studies demonstrating applications of these algorithms to practical control problems in power systems are discussed. Results demonstrate how the proposed control algorithms can be used to improve the performance and reduce the computational complexity of the economic dispatch mechanism in a power network. We argue that the proposed algorithms are eminently suitable to develop operational decision-making tools for large power grids with many resources and many sources of uncertainty.

  10. Controlling collective dynamics in complex minority-game resource-allocation systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Qiang; Huang, Zi-Gang; Dong, Jia-Qi; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Resource allocation takes place in various kinds of real-world complex systems, such as traffic systems, social services institutions or organizations, or even ecosystems. The fundamental principle underlying complex resource-allocation dynamics is Boolean interactions associated with minority games, as resources are generally limited and agents tend to choose the least used resource based on available information. A common but harmful dynamical behavior in resource-allocation systems is herding, where there are time intervals during which a large majority of the agents compete for a few resources, leaving many other resources unused. Accompanying the herd behavior is thus strong fluctuations with time in the number of resources being used. In this paper, we articulate and establish that an intuitive control strategy, namely pinning control, is effective at harnessing the herding dynamics. In particular, by fixing the choices of resources for a few agents while leaving the majority of the agents free, herding can be eliminated completely. Our investigation is systematic in that we consider random and targeted pinning and a variety of network topologies, and we carry out a comprehensive analysis in the framework of mean-field theory to understand the working of control. The basic philosophy is then that, when a few agents waive their freedom to choose resources by receiving sufficient incentives, the majority of the agents benefit in that they will make fair, efficient, and effective use of the available resources. Our work represents a basic and general framework to address the fundamental issue of fluctuations in complex dynamical systems with significant applications to social, economical, and political systems.

  11. Preschoolers' Bistrategic Resource Control, Reconciliation, and Peer Regard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseth, Cary J.; Pellegrini, Anthony D.; Dupuis, Danielle N.; Bohn, Catherine M.; Hickey, Meghan C.; Hilk, Caroline L.; Peshkam, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Bistrategic resource control entails using both coercive and prosocial strategies in competition for resources. The present study sought to clarify whether bistrategic involves more than simply using both strategies some of the time. Examining 88 preschoolers' coercion and prosociality over an entire school year, results showed that coercive…

  12. 45 CFR 86.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... Coverage § 86.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an educational institution which is controlled by a religious organization to...

  13. 45 CFR 86.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... Coverage § 86.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an educational institution which is controlled by a religious organization to...

  14. 45 CFR 86.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... Coverage § 86.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an educational institution which is controlled by a religious organization to...

  15. 45 CFR 86.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... Coverage § 86.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an educational institution which is controlled by a religious organization to...

  16. 45 CFR 86.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... Coverage § 86.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an educational institution which is controlled by a religious organization to...

  17. Creating an institutional resource for research education and career development: a novel model from Oregon Clinical and Translational Research Institute.

    PubMed

    Morris, Cynthia D; McCracken, Karen; Samuels, Mary; Orwoll, Eric

    2014-06-01

    We have created an education and career development program within the CTSA structure at OHSU that serves the entire institution. We believe that this is unusual in scope among CTSA programs and has contributed to an increase in career development funding and research skills among fellows and faculty. While the key element is the institutional scope, important elements include: Tailoring programs of emphasis to points of inflection on the career pathway. Minimizing barriers to education by creating a flexible, tuition-free program. An integrated one-stop education and career development approach. An institutional program for career development award applicants as well as recipients. This career development program was developed within the context of a midsize health science university but the overall strategy may be applied to other CTSAs to simplify and reduce costs of education program development.

  18. Programs and resources for control of job stress in the Federal workplace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joice, Wendell

    1993-01-01

    A couple of weeks ago, the American Psychological Association and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health held a conference in Washingtion, D.C. entitled 'Stress in the 90's'. At this conference the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) conducted a session on 'Programs and Resources for the Control of Job Stress in the Federal Workplace'. I am going to present an overview of that three-hour session and some related information from the conference. My discussion covers stress terminology and models, selected programs and resources, evaluation research, some concerns about our progress, and plans to expand our efforts at OPM.

  19. “The Bush is No More”: Insights on Institutional Change and Natural Resource Availability in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kirkland, Tracy; Hunter, Lori M.; Twine, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has brought substantial transition to South Africa. The introduction of democracy in 1994 has yielded important political and socioeconomic transformations affecting millions of people. Here, we explore the impact of institutional and structural changes on the availability and management of fuelwood, a key natural resource in rural South Africa. As in other developing regions, many households depend on natural resources for both sustenance and energy needs. Drawing on qualitative data from 32 interviews, our objective is to describe, from the perspective of the respondents, (1) resource scarcity, (2) the underlying causes of resource scarcity, (3) the role of traditional authority in managing resources, and (4) strategies used by community members in the face of resource scarcity. The results have important implications for the well-being of both social and natural systems in many transitional, rural developing societies. PMID:21909188

  20. Intelligent resources for satellite ground control operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a cooperative approach to the design of intelligent automation and describes the Mission Operations Cooperative Assistant for NASA Goddard flight operations. The cooperative problem solving approach is being explored currently in the context of providing support for human operator teams and also in the definition of future advanced automation in ground control systems.

  1. Biogenic gas: Controls, habitats, and resource potential

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D. )

    1993-01-01

    As much as 20 percent of the world's natural-gas resource is estimated to have been generated by the decomposition of organic matter by anaerobic microbes at low temperatures. This gas is commonly referred to as biogenic gas. Most biogenic gas was generated early in the burial history of sediments. Some biogenic gas was also generated in relatively recent geologic time and is associated with groundwater flow. The factors that favor significant generation of biogenic gas are anoxic conditions, low sulfate content, low temperature, abundant organic matter, and sufficient pore space for the microbes to thrive. Conditions beneficial for the accumulation of biogenic gas include stratigraphic or early structural traps, adequate seals, low permeability, low pressure, early dissolution of the gas, and formation of gas hydrates. Rapid sediment deposition is critical to both the generation and the accumulation of biogenic gas generated during the early stage. Biogenic gas is distinguished by its molecular and isotopic composition. The hydrocarbon fraction is generally more than 99 percent methane, and the diagnostic isotopic composition of the methane component is as follows: [delta][sup 13]C values are generally lighter than -55 parts per thousand (permil), and [delta]D values are usually in the range of -150 to -250 permil. This isotopic composition indicates that the methane generally resulted from CO[sub 2] reduction. Significant accumulations of ancient biogenic gas have been discovered in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and South America. These accumulations occur in Mississippian and younger rocks, at burial depths as much as 4,600 m. They are associated with a variety of rock types (carbonate, clastic, and coal), and occur in a variety of marine and nonmarine depositional settings generally characterized by rapid deposition. 111 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Electric Power Research Institute: environmental Control Technology Center.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-04

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved continued investigations into the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process for the production of Anhydrous Calcium Sulfate (Anhydrite). The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. From May 3-18, the NYSEG Kintigh Station and the ECTC were off-line for a two-week scheduled Station outage. During the ECTC outage, the major systems of the Center were inspected, and several preventive maintenance activities were completed. A listing of the major O&M outage activities completed during this period is presented in the Pilot/Mini-Pilot section of this report. In May 1997, an extension to the Anhydrite Production test block was started following the NYSEG outage. The extension to the Anhydrite Production test block is being funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) after promising results from the original test program. Both EPRI and the Department of Energy (DOE) funded the original test program as part of the DOE`s Advanced Power Systems Program, whose mission is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high- efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. While the pilot portion of the Anhydrite project was conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) in Barker, New York, the extension mainly used the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot wet FGD unit to reduce operating costs. The project is designed to develop an advanced FGD process that produces a useable byproduct, anhydrite (anhydrous calcium sulfate). The original CLS/Anhydrite process included three steps: chloride removal, clear liquor scrubbing, and anhydrite production. The final step in the process involved

  3. Analysis of Perceived Stress, Coping Resources and Life Satisfaction among Students at a Newly Established Institution of Higher Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudhovozi, P.

    2011-01-01

    A survey was conducted to analyse perceived stress, coping resources and life satisfaction among university students at an institution of higher learning. Seventy-three students randomly selected from third year Social Sciences class participated in the study. A self-report questionnaire was administered to the participants. The results showed…

  4. The Road to Free and Open Educational Resources at the University of the Western Cape: A Personal and Institutional Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keats, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Free and Open Educational Resources at the University of the Western Cape (UWC) are deeply rooted in our institutional culture, stemming from the role we played in the struggle for political freedom in South Africa. The successful development of a strategy has been influenced by this history, as well as the role of a champion in the main…

  5. Impact of Performance Contracts on the Utilization of Teaching and Learning Resources in Technical Institutes in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosomi, Biutha Manwa; Kindiki, Jonah N.; Boit, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Performance contracting has been acclaimed as an effective and promising means of improving the performance of public enterprises as well as government departments. The government of Kenya introduced performance contract signing in 2004. The aim of performance contracts was to improve resource utilization in public institutions among other…

  6. Resource recovery emission control system comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The response to the necessity for control of acid gases, fine particulate, mercury vapor, and organics present in the flue gas emitted from the incineration of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste has followed the conventional steps for emerging technology. These are: adaptation of existing equipment and its failure; development of new technologies; fear of failure of new technologies; modification of technology; overcoming of concerns by extended operation. It has been established that incineration of wastes produces a flue gas containing: particulates including fine particulates in which toxic heavy metals and organics are concentrated; acid gases, primarily HCl and SO/sub 2/ with quantities produced increasing with time; mercury and organic vapor; high concentrations of incandescent particles. The initial reponse was to apply existing types of equipment to the problem.

  7. 28 CFR 54.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Educational institutions and other... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 54.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent...

  8. 41 CFR 101-4.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Educational institutions... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 101-4.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled... of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to...

  9. 41 CFR 101-4.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Educational institutions... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 101-4.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled... of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to...

  10. 10 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  11. 28 CFR 54.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Educational institutions and other... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 54.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent...

  12. 28 CFR 54.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Educational institutions and other... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 54.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent...

  13. 10 CFR 1042.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... Coverage § 1042.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or...

  14. 28 CFR 54.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Educational institutions and other... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 54.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent...

  15. 41 CFR 101-4.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Educational institutions... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 101-4.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled... of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to...

  16. 41 CFR 101-4.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Educational institutions... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 101-4.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled... of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to...

  17. 43 CFR 41.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Educational institutions and other entities... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 41.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent...

  18. 10 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  19. 10 CFR 1042.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... Coverage § 1042.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or...

  20. 10 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  1. 29 CFR 36.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... § 36.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or...

  2. 10 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  3. 10 CFR 1042.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by... Coverage § 1042.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or...

  4. Theorising culture and culture in context: institutional excellence and control.

    PubMed

    Beil-Hildebrand, Margitta B

    2002-12-01

    In this paper an attempt is made to focus on the ideological and practical implications of the new cultural forms of healthcare sector management variously described as institutional excellence, empowerment, total quality and human resource management. Thus, I look in detail at the managerial and academic claims concerning the mobilisation of corporate culture and go on to emphasise the impact which the literature of culture management has had on nursing employees and healthcare organisations. I also highlight the restrictions of the applied research approaches and argue that the managerial and poststructural literature is limited in that its conceptualisation of culture and change is incomplete. The focus switches then to a range of literature which has been used to study change with a labour process perspective and explains why an approach based upon the study of the disparity between the cultural rhetoric and the day-to-day practice, as well as how people experience and respond to that disparity, is to be preferred. Furthermore, I gain substance from a variety of viewpoints in order to discover a suitable way of putting the matter of interest into context. Drawing on the analytical framework of the sector model, which differentiates in the economy between private and state production sectors, it is possible to distinguish between the different modes of rationality governing each sector. As a basis for further contextualisation, the powerful and privileged positions of nursing as well as other healthcare professionals and the distinctive character of their employment relationships are considered. The paper concludes that an extended labour process analysis is necessary to challenge the way in which the concept of culture is applied by nursing academics and practitioners.

  5. Learning in the tutorial group: a balance between individual freedom and institutional control.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Anita; Aanstoot, Janna; Hammarström, Inger Lundeborg; Samuelsson, Christina; Johannesson, Eva; Sandström, Karin; Berglind, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates factors in problem-based learning tutorial groups which promote or inhibit learning. The informants were tutors and students from speech-language pathology and physiotherapy programmes. Semi-structured focus-group interviews and individual interviews were used. Results revealed three themes: Responsibility. Time and Support. Under responsibility, the delicate balance between individual and institutional responsibility and control was shown. Time included short and long-term perspectives on learning. Under support, supporting documents, activities and personnel resources were mentioned. In summary, an increased control by the program and tutors decreases student's motivation to assume responsibility for learning. Support in tutorial groups needs to adapt to student progression and to be well aligned to tutorial work to have the intended effect. A lifelong learning perspective may help students develop a meta-awareness regarding learning that could make tutorial work more meaningful.

  6. [The role of the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases in the control of cancer in Peru].

    PubMed

    Salazar, Miriam Rosario; Regalado-Rafael, Roxana; Navarro, Jeannie Magalli; Montanez, Dayana Melissa; Abugattas, Julio Elías; Vidaurre, Tatiana

    2013-03-01

    With a mortality rate that constitutes the second nationwide, the estimated incidence of cancer in Peru is 150 cases x 100 000 inhabitants. Around 75% of the cases are diagnosed at an advanced stage and mainly in Lima. In this context, the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases (INEN) has promoted the decentralization of oncological care creating regional institutes of neoplastic diseases, oncological units and prevention centers. In addition, INEN has designed, developed and implemented the Budgetary Program for Cancer Prevention and Control, which, since 2011, has allowed for more than 7000 centers around the country to allocate resources to the prevention, promotion and early detection of the most frequent cancers in Peru. With the financial support of the state's health insurance system, the basic strategic central points were integrated to provide low-income cancer patients with comprehensive medical care. Through this way, and within the framework of a state policy integrated to and articulated with the health sector, the National Plan for Comprehensive Medical Care for Cancer Patients and the Improvement in the Access to Oncological Services in Peru, known as "The Hope Plan", was born. This article elaborates on the role that INEN plays in the control of cancer as a public health issue, highlighting the importance of the Strategic Budgetary Program for Cancer Prevention and Control and its role in the "The Hope Plan".

  7. Managing Resources and Relations in Higher Education Institutions: A Framework for Understanding Performance Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Sophia Shi-Huei; Peng, Michael Yao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Changes in social systems demonstrate that various structural disadvantages have jointly led to increasing competition among higher education institutions (HEIs) in many countries, especially Taiwan. Institutional administrators must recognize the need to understand how to improve performance and consistently outperform other institutions.…

  8. Multidimensional optimal droop control for wind resources in DC microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Kaitlyn J.

    Two important and upcoming technologies, microgrids and electricity generation from wind resources, are increasingly being combined. Various control strategies can be implemented, and droop control provides a simple option without requiring communication between microgrid components. Eliminating the single source of potential failure around the communication system is especially important in remote, islanded microgrids, which are considered in this work. However, traditional droop control does not allow the microgrid to utilize much of the power available from the wind. This dissertation presents a novel droop control strategy, which implements a droop surface in higher dimension than the traditional strategy. The droop control relationship then depends on two variables: the dc microgrid bus voltage, and the wind speed at the current time. An approach for optimizing this droop control surface in order to meet a given objective, for example utilizing all of the power available from a wind resource, is proposed and demonstrated. Various cases are used to test the proposed optimal high dimension droop control method, and demonstrate its function. First, the use of linear multidimensional droop control without optimization is demonstrated through simulation. Next, an optimal high dimension droop control surface is implemented with a simple dc microgrid containing two sources and one load. Various cases for changing load and wind speed are investigated using simulation and hardware-in-the-loop techniques. Optimal multidimensional droop control is demonstrated with a wind resource in a full dc microgrid example, containing an energy storage device as well as multiple sources and loads. Finally, the optimal high dimension droop control method is applied with a solar resource, and using a load model developed for a military patrol base application. The operation of the proposed control is again investigated using simulation and hardware-in-the-loop techniques.

  9. Coherent control of quantum systems as a resource theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matera, J. M.; Egloff, D.; Killoran, N.; Plenio, M. B.

    2016-08-01

    Control at the interface between the classical and the quantum world is fundamental in quantum physics. In particular, how classical control is enhanced by coherence effects is an important question both from a theoretical as well as from a technological point of view. In this work, we establish a resource theory describing this setting and explore relations to the theory of coherence, entanglement and information processing. Specifically, for the coherent control of quantum systems, the relevant resources of entanglement and coherence are found to be equivalent and closely related to a measure of discord. The results are then applied to the DQC1 protocol and the precision of the final measurement is expressed in terms of the available resources.

  10. Implications of Social Support as a Self-Control Resource

    PubMed Central

    Pilcher, June J.; Bryant, Stewart A.

    2016-01-01

    Self-control is an intricate component of decision making and effectively managing day-to-day life. Failing to maintain adequate self-control can have negative effects on many desired goals and social experiences. As such, understanding how different facets of the human experience may affect self-control is an important undertaking. One area that is yet unclear is the possible relationships between social support and self-control. Research suggests that social support can be an effective resource in reducing stress and promoting health and well-being. Research has also indicated that stress can be a limiting factor on self-control. In contrast, few studies have focused on social support as a potential resource for self-control. The goal of this mini-review article is to explore the intersections between self-control and social support and encourage integration of these two relatively independent areas of research. This review will help provide a broader understanding of self-control resources and how we can better understand the relationships between social well-being and our ability to monitor and utilize our capacity to maintain self-control. PMID:27965551

  11. The Lausanne Institutional Biobank: a new resource to catalyse research in personalised medicine and pharmaceutical sciences.

    PubMed

    Mooser, Vincent; Currat, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Breakthrough technologies which now enable the sequencing of individual genomes will irreversibly modify the way diseases are diagnosed, predicted, prevented and treated. For these technologies to reach their full potential requires, upstream, access to high-quality biomedical data and samples from large number of properly informed and consenting individuals and, downstream, the possibility to transform the emerging knowledge into a clinical utility. The Lausanne Institutional Biobank was designed as an integrated, highly versatile infrastructure to harness the power of these emerging technologies and catalyse the discovery and development of innovative therapeutics and biomarkers, and advance the field of personalised medicine. Described here are its rationale, design and governance, as well as parallel initiatives which have been launched locally to address the societal, ethical and technological issues associated with this new bio-resource. Since January 2013, inpatients admitted at Lausanne CHUV University Hospital have been systematically invited to provide a general consent for the use of their biomedical data and samples for research, to complete a standardised questionnaire, to donate a 10-ml sample of blood for future DNA extraction and to be re-contacted for future clinical trials. Over the first 18 months of operation, 14,459 patients were contacted, and 11,051 accepted to participate in the study. This initial 18-month experience illustrates that a systematic hospital-based biobank is feasible; it shows a strong engagement in research from the patient population in this University Hospital setting, and the need for a broad, integrated approach for the future of medicine to reach its full potential.

  12. Design principles and common pool resource management: an institutional approach to evaluating community management in semi-arid Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Claire H; Huby, Meg; Kiwasila, Hilda; Lovett, Jon C

    2007-07-01

    This paper analyses the role of institutions in the management of common pool resources (CPRs) in semi-arid Tanzania. Common property regimes have often been considered inadequate for the management of CPRs because of the problems of excludability, but they are becoming more widely supported as the way forward to overcome the problems of resource use and degradation in developing countries. A series of design principles for long enduring common property institutions have been proposed by Ostrom, but there is concern that they are not applicable to a wide range of real life situations or that they may be specific to certain types of CPR. Here, we compare these principles to the situation prevailing in 12 villages in six districts in semi-arid Tanzania. Data on management institutions were collected through semi-structured interviews and meetings at district and village level. The combined information was used to make a qualitative assessment of the strength with which each design principle appeared to operate in the management of forest, pasture and water resources. Boundaries, conflict and negotiation in CPR management are of key importance in semi-arid regions. However, the need for flexibility in order to deal with ecological uncertainty means that many management institutions would be considered weak or absent according to the design principle approach. This supports the view that the design principles should not be used as a 'blueprint to be imposed on resource management regimes' rather that they provide a framework for investigating common property regimes with the proviso that, certainly for semi-arid regions, they may highlight where management cannot be explained by institutional theory alone.

  13. A critique of the World Resources Institute's report "Pesticides and the immune system: the public health risks".

    PubMed Central

    Acquavella, J; Burns, C; Flaherty, D; Holsapple, M; Kimber, I; Ladics, G; Loveless, S; Tobia, A

    1998-01-01

    A recent World Resources Institute (WRI) report concluded that pesticides are a likely cause of immune suppression for millions of people throughout the world. The gravity of this conclusion motivated us to review the scientific evidence cited in the report. The predominant human evidence came from cross-sectional studies conducted in the former Soviet Union.These studies were difficult to evaluate due to incomplete reporting and had obvious limitations in terms of subject selection, exposure assessment,lack of quality control, statistical analysis, adequacy of the comparison group, and confounding. The toxicologic evidence was comprised mainly of acute high-dose studies in which the exposure conditions resulted in systemic toxicity. The relevance of these studies to effects at typical human exposure levels is questionable. We did not find consistent, credible evidence to support the conclusion of widespread pesticide-related immune suppression. Nonetheless, the WRI report is an important document because it focuses attention on a potentially important issue for future research and brings a substantial literature of foreign language studies to the attention of Western scientists. PMID:9432969

  14. Megavoltage quality control, resources and demand: a pragmatic review

    PubMed Central

    Colligan, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Satisfactory radiotherapy treatment requires quality control (QC) of the equipment as well as patient-specific checks. Increased complexity and extended use of equipment plus greater demand for complex treatment has brought pressure on QC resources. The benefits of integrating patient-specific checks and QC and the efficient use of resources is examined. Methods: A non-linear model for the probability of undetected machine failure is proposed which enables the comparative efficiency of resource to be assessed. Benefits of adopting an integrated view of patient-specific and treatment machine QC is considered, considering performance tolerance levels in the context of measurement uncertainty and patient-specific tolerances. Results: Essential, machine-only QC is identified. A realistic approach to equipment-only QC is identified for 70% efficient use of resources and a relationship established to determine resource required for a QC programme. Integration of patient-specific and equipment QC is shown to half the resource required for equipment QC. Conclusion: Increasing benefit from QC requires greater resource, working at lower efficiency. A pragmatic approach is having guaranteed checks supplemented with additional, non-guaranteed checks performed within an integrated approach to machine- and patient-specific QC, bearing in mind the occasions when machine-only QC is essential. Advances in knowledge: The work reveals on a quantitative basis a rational approach to accommodating the QC requirements for safe and effective treatment. PMID:26841238

  15. State Support for Open Educational Resources: Key Findings from Achieve's OER Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieve, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    Open Educational Resources (OER) offer unique new opportunities for educators to share quality learning resources, especially in an increasingly digital world. Forty-six states and the District of Columbia have adopted the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), providing them with the unprecedented advantage of being able to share resources that are…

  16. 77 FR 30516 - Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions Program; Final Waivers and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions Program; Final Waivers and Extension of... Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions Program Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84... Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions Program (TCPCTIP), the Secretary waives 34 CFR 75.250 and...

  17. 13 CFR 113.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Educational institutions and other... Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance Coverage § 113.205 Educational institutions... not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by...

  18. 14 CFR 1253.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1253.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  19. 14 CFR § 1253.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1253.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  20. 49 CFR 25.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 25.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious...) Exemption claims. An educational institution or other entity that wishes to claim the exemption set forth...

  1. 22 CFR 229.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 229.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious...) Exemption claims. An educational institution or other entity that wishes to claim the exemption set forth...

  2. 45 CFR 2555.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  3. 22 CFR 229.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 229.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious...) Exemption claims. An educational institution or other entity that wishes to claim the exemption set forth...

  4. 6 CFR 17.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 17.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  5. 13 CFR 113.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Educational institutions and other... Programs or Activities Receiving Federal Financial Assistance Coverage § 113.205 Educational institutions... not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by...

  6. 45 CFR 618.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 618.205 Educational institutions... not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by...

  7. 36 CFR 1211.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Educational institutions and... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  8. 43 CFR 41.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Educational institutions and other... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 41.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  9. 44 CFR 19.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Educational institutions and... § 19.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or...

  10. 36 CFR 1211.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Educational institutions and... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  11. 44 CFR 19.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Educational institutions and... § 19.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or...

  12. 22 CFR 229.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 229.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious...) Exemption claims. An educational institution or other entity that wishes to claim the exemption set forth...

  13. 36 CFR 1211.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Educational institutions and... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  14. 22 CFR 146.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 146.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious...) Exemption claims. An educational institution or other entity that wishes to claim the exemption set forth...

  15. 43 CFR 41.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Educational institutions and other... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 41.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  16. 22 CFR 146.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 146.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious...) Exemption claims. An educational institution or other entity that wishes to claim the exemption set forth...

  17. 15 CFR 8a.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Educational institutions and other... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 8a.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  18. 49 CFR 25.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 25.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious...) Exemption claims. An educational institution or other entity that wishes to claim the exemption set forth...

  19. 6 CFR 17.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 17.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  20. 14 CFR 1253.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1253.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  1. 45 CFR 2555.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  2. 45 CFR 618.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 618.205 Educational institutions... not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by...

  3. 45 CFR 618.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 618.205 Educational institutions... not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by...

  4. 22 CFR 229.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 229.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious...) Exemption claims. An educational institution or other entity that wishes to claim the exemption set forth...

  5. 32 CFR 196.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  6. 15 CFR 8a.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Educational institutions and other... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 8a.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  7. 31 CFR 28.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Educational institutions and other... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 28.205 Educational institutions and other... any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a...

  8. 22 CFR 146.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 146.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious...) Exemption claims. An educational institution or other entity that wishes to claim the exemption set forth...

  9. 15 CFR 8a.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Educational institutions and other... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 8a.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  10. 6 CFR 17.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 17.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  11. 43 CFR 41.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Educational institutions and other... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 41.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  12. 14 CFR 1253.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Educational institutions and other entities... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1253.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  13. 22 CFR 146.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 146.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious...) Exemption claims. An educational institution or other entity that wishes to claim the exemption set forth...

  14. 45 CFR 2555.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  15. 44 CFR 19.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Educational institutions and... § 19.205 Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or...

  16. 43 CFR 41.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Educational institutions and other... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 41.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  17. 6 CFR 17.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 17.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  18. 14 CFR 1253.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1253.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  19. 32 CFR 196.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Educational institutions and other entities... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  20. 36 CFR 1211.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Educational institutions and... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that...

  1. 15 CFR 8a.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Educational institutions and other... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 8a.205 Educational institutions and other entities... operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization...

  2. Adaptive Insecure Attachment and Resource Control Strategies during Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Bin-Bin; Chang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    By integrating the life history theory of attachment with resource control theory, the current study examines the hypothesis that insecure attachment styles reorganized in middle childhood are alternative adaptive strategies used to prepare for upcoming competition with the peer group. A sample of 654 children in the second through seventh grades…

  3. The planning and control of NASA programs and resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The major management systems used to plan and control NASA programs and resources are described as well as their integration to form the agency's general management approach in carrying out its mission. Documents containing more detailed descriptions of the processes and techniques involved in the agency's major management systems are listed.

  4. The Consortium for Institutional Effectiveness & Student Success in the Community College: Membership Resource Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreider, Paul E.; And Others

    The Consortium for Institutional Effectiveness and Student Success in the Community College was established in 1988 to foster programs in support of the teaching and learning process, student retention and success strategies, and institutional effectiveness. Administered at Mt. Hood Community College (MHCC) in Oregon, the consortium currently has…

  5. Computer Resources: Asset or Liability for Institutional Research. SAIR Conference Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Timothy R.

    The most advantageous relationship between computer technology and institutional research is considered. Three potential problem areas are discussed: those associated with a central data processing center, those germane to minicomputers or terminals within the institutional research office, and those nondiscriminating types which cover both…

  6. The Nigerian Institute of International Affairs Library: Its Resources and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obasi, John U.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the institute library's social science collections, periodicals, user services (bibliographic, photocopy, press library, documentation, and translation) and offers recommendations for improvements in library service, collection development, and future programs. Objectives of the institute and role of foreign policy are noted. Eleven…

  7. Cooperation for Quality Services in a Period of Declining Resources. Institute Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholl, Geraldine T., Ed.

    The document contains edited versions of sessions from the 1981 Special Study Institute, the fourth in a series designed initially for state education consultants for the visually handicapped. Objectives of the 1981 Institute are listed--to establish coordination, communication, and cooperation among teacher trainers; to develop interagency…

  8. Dynamic Resource Allocation with the arcControlTower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipčič, A.; Cameron, D.; Nilsen, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Distributed computing resources available for high-energy physics research are becoming less dedicated to one type of workflow and researchers workloads are increasingly exploiting modern computing technologies such as parallelism. The current pilot job management model used by many experiments relies on static dedicated resources and cannot easily adapt to these changes. The model used for ATLAS in Nordic countries and some other places enables a flexible job management system based on dynamic resources allocation. Rather than a fixed set of resources managed centrally, the model allows resources to be requested on the fly. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) and ARC Control Tower (aCT) are the key components of the model. The aCT requests jobs from the ATLAS job management system (PanDA) and submits a fully-formed job description to ARC-CEs. ARC-CE can then dynamically request the required resources from the underlying batch system. In this paper we describe the architecture of the model and the experience of running many millions of ATLAS jobs on it.

  9. Approaches to resource recovery in controlled ecological life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, D. L.; Wydeven, T.

    1994-01-01

    Recovery of resources from waste streams in a space habitat is essential to minimize the resupply burden and achieve self sufficiency. The ultimate goal of a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) is to achieve the greatest practical level of mass recycle and provide self sufficiency and safety for humans. Several mission scenarios leading to the ultimate application could employ CELSS component technologies or subsystems with initial emphasis on recycle of the largest mass components of the waste stream. Candidate physical/chemical and biological processes for resource recovery from liquid and solid waste streams are discussed and the current fundamental recovery potentials are estimated.

  10. Space Network Control Conference on Resource Allocation Concepts and Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Karen L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the Space Network Control (SNC) Conference. In the late 1990s, when the Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System is operational, Space Network communication services will be supported and controlled by the SNC. The goals of the conference were to survey existing resource allocation concepts and approaches, to identify solutions applicable to the Space Network, and to identify avenues of study in support of the SNC development. The conference was divided into three sessions: (1) Concepts for Space Network Allocation; (2) SNC and User Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) Human-Computer Interface Concepts; and (3) Resource Allocation Tools, Technology, and Algorithms. Key recommendations addressed approaches to achieving higher levels of automation in the scheduling process.

  11. Safe, Effective Use of Pesticides, A Manual for Commercial Applicators: Home, Institutional, and Structural Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This manual is designed to assist pest control operators to prepare for certification under the Michigan Pesticide Control Act of 1976. The primary focus of this publication is on home, institutional, and structural pest control. The ten sections included describe: (1) Insect control; (2) Rodent control; (3) Special situation pest control; (4)…

  12. 78 FR 46597 - Agency Information Collection Activities: State Water Resources Research Institute Program Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... States of Micronesia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marina Islands, and American Samoa. There are... Micronesia, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Each of the 54 institutes submits an...

  13. Underutilization of Student-Centered Resources: Understanding Student Response to Supports for Improved Institutional Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Rebecca W.

    2013-01-01

    Nationwide, students enrolled in community colleges respond to national surveys indicating that academic resources are very important, while at the same time failing to utilize those same resources. This study focused on identifying the reasons for this incongruity on the Terry Campus of Delaware Technical Community College. Using a sequential…

  14. 36 CFR 1211.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  15. 32 CFR 196.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  16. 45 CFR 2555.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  17. 10 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  18. 32 CFR 196.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  19. 32 CFR 196.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  20. 45 CFR 2555.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that... Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These...

  1. 78 FR 64018 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Research Triangle Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... that on July 25, 2013, Research Triangle Institute, Hermann Building East Institute Drive, P.O. Box... controlled substance listed in schedule I. The company plans to provide small quantities to commercial...: October 10, 2013. Joseph T. Rannazzisi, Deputy Assistant Administrator, Office of Diversion Control,...

  2. 34 CFR 106.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 106.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an...

  3. 7 CFR 15a.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 15a.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an...

  4. 7 CFR 15a.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 15a.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an...

  5. 34 CFR 106.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 106.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an...

  6. 7 CFR 15a.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 15a.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an...

  7. 7 CFR 15a.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 15a.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an...

  8. 34 CFR 106.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 106.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an...

  9. 7 CFR 15a.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 15a.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an...

  10. 34 CFR 106.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 106.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an...

  11. 34 CFR 106.12 - Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Educational institutions controlled by religious... OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 106.12 Educational institutions controlled by religious organizations. (a) Application. This part does not apply to an...

  12. Male Control and Female Oppression. Fact Sheets on Institutional Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Change, Inc., New York, NY.

    Following sections that define sexism, that give examples of individual, cultural, and institutional sexism, and that provide random thoughts on sexism and racism, statistics are listed for women and their relationship to various areas such as the economy, education, sports, the government, the media, and housing. Specific topics subsumed under…

  13. Optimal reactive power control of grid connected photovoltaic resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Joshua Ryan

    As more photovoltaic distributed generation resources are installed on distribution power systems, selective control of the inverters connecting the DC power sources presents the opportunity to supply both real and reactive power at the point of common coupling. This thesis presents a simulated distribution system with individually controlled PV resources with the objective of minimizing total system losses while operating at the maximum power point and below the simulated rating of the associated inverters. The control strategy assumes the characteristics of the distribution system are known and solves for the optimal power flow operating point. The ability of each PV source to provide real and reactive power varies instantaneously as irradiance changes, so the operating point for each resource must be constantly recalculated and adjusted. The assumption of known system paramaters can be justified in a SmartGrid context, and a solution based on overall system power flow should be considered as a benchmark for any other state estimation or local control approaches.

  14. Local Government Planning Tool to Calculate Institutional and Engineering Control Costs for Brownfield Properties

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This cost calculator is designed as a guide for municipal or local governments to assist in calculating their expected costs of implementing and conducting long-term stewardship of institutional controls and engineering controls at brownfield properties.

  15. Resources

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be found on the web, through local libraries, your health care provider, and the yellow pages under "social service organizations." AIDS - resources Alcoholism - resources Allergy - resources ...

  16. Virtual Control Policy for Binary Ordered Resources Petri Net Class

    PubMed Central

    Rovetto, Carlos A.; Concepción, Tomás J.; Cano, Elia Esther

    2016-01-01

    Prevention and avoidance of deadlocks in sensor networks that use the wormhole routing algorithm is an active research domain. There are diverse control policies that will address this problem being our approach a new method. In this paper we present a virtual control policy for the new specialized Petri net subclass called Binary Ordered Resources Petri Net (BORPN). Essentially, it is an ordinary class constructed from various state machines that share unitary resources in a complex form, which allows branching and joining of processes. The reduced structure of this new class gives advantages that allow analysis of the entire system’s behavior, which is a prohibitive task for large systems because of the complexity and routing algorithms. PMID:27548170

  17. Virtual Control Policy for Binary Ordered Resources Petri Net Class.

    PubMed

    Rovetto, Carlos A; Concepción, Tomás J; Cano, Elia Esther

    2016-08-18

    Prevention and avoidance of deadlocks in sensor networks that use the wormhole routing algorithm is an active research domain. There are diverse control policies that will address this problem being our approach a new method. In this paper we present a virtual control policy for the new specialized Petri net subclass called Binary Ordered Resources Petri Net (BORPN). Essentially, it is an ordinary class constructed from various state machines that share unitary resources in a complex form, which allows branching and joining of processes. The reduced structure of this new class gives advantages that allow analysis of the entire system's behavior, which is a prohibitive task for large systems because of the complexity and routing algorithms.

  18. Automating PACS quality control with the Vanderbilt image processing enterprise resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esparza, Michael L.; Welch, E. Brian; Landman, Bennett A.

    2012-02-01

    Precise image acquisition is an integral part of modern patient care and medical imaging research. Periodic quality control using standardized protocols and phantoms ensures that scanners are operating according to specifications, yet such procedures do not ensure that individual datasets are free from corruption; for example due to patient motion, transient interference, or physiological variability. If unacceptable artifacts are noticed during scanning, a technologist can repeat a procedure. Yet, substantial delays may be incurred if a problematic scan is not noticed until a radiologist reads the scans or an automated algorithm fails. Given scores of slices in typical three-dimensional scans and widevariety of potential use cases, a technologist cannot practically be expected inspect all images. In large-scale research, automated pipeline systems have had great success in achieving high throughput. However, clinical and institutional workflows are largely based on DICOM and PACS technologies; these systems are not readily compatible with research systems due to security and privacy restrictions. Hence, quantitative quality control has been relegated to individual investigators and too often neglected. Herein, we propose a scalable system, the Vanderbilt Image Processing Enterprise Resource (VIPER) to integrate modular quality control and image analysis routines with a standard PACS configuration. This server unifies image processing routines across an institutional level and provides a simple interface so that investigators can collaborate to deploy new analysis technologies. VIPER integrates with high performance computing environments has successfully analyzed all standard scans from our institutional research center over the course of the last 18 months.

  19. Social institutions and psychological explanations: Druze reincarnation as a therapeutic resource.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, R

    2001-06-01

    For Emile Durkheim, to explain our social institutions through individual psychology was generally regarded as illegitimate. It has, however, often been assumed by psychologists and psychiatrists, particularly in the case of religious doctrine and institutions. However, the people actually concerned, our religious informants, might sometimes themselves volunteer interpretations which are psychologically functional for the origin and maintenance of certain cultural facts. This is particularly so when they are faced with a 'modern' worldview. The instance of the Druze belief in bodily reincarnation after death is considered in the context of the recent civil war in the Lebanon.

  20. Human Capital Planning in Higher Education Institutions: A Strategic Human Resource Development Initiative in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khasawneh, Samer

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study is to determine the status of human capital planning in higher education institutions in Jordan. Design/methodology/approach: A random sample of 120 faculty members (in administrative positions) responded to a human capital planning (HCP) survey. The survey consisted of a pool of 38 items distributed over…

  1. Integrated Water Resource Management: A Platform for Higher Education Institutions to Meet Complex Sustainability Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Neil; Larsen, Rasmus Kløcker

    2013-01-01

    Higher education institutions in Sweden are increasingly exposed to international market conditions and rising competition from a more mobile student body. This increases the need for universities to adapt to their social and economic environment and to their clients, including the political trends and financial opportunities in Sweden and EU, if…

  2. To Improve the Academy: Resources for Student, Faculty, and Institutional Development, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Julie Roy, Ed.; Erickson, Glenn R., Ed.

    This collection of papers, the fourth in an annual series, presents views of members of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education on faculty, instructional, and institutional development. Papers and authors are as follows: "The Kahuna as Professional and Organizational Development Specialists" (Susanne Whitcomb…

  3. Financial Aid in Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Aligning Resources with HSI Commitments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venegas, Kristan M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to review the literature related to Hispanic-serving institutions and financial aid. Based on this review, a framework for guiding HSIs that considers the role of financial aid in meeting the needs of Latino/a students is suggested.

  4. [Strategic decisions in public psychiatric institutions: a proposed method for resource analysis and allocation].

    PubMed

    Micheletti, Pierre; Chierici, Piero; Durang, Xavier; Salvador, Nathalie; Lopez, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Because of its sector-based organization and extra-hospital care, public psychiatry has a unique position in healthcare. This paper describes the tools and procedures used to analyze and allocate the resources of the "Centre Hospitalier Alpes-Isère", a hospital serving a catchment population of 530,000 adults. A consensus-based approach was used to validate the selected indicators and included the participation of a geographer. Five levels of resource allocation were identified and classified using a decision tree. At each level, the relevant authorities and criteria were identified as key components of the decision-making process. This paper describes the first three levels of care provision. Focusing on adult care, a comparative assessment of the resources allocated to general psychiatric care and specialist care was conducted, in addition to a comparative assessment of the resources allocated to each of the hospital's four local centers. Geographical accessibility to extramural facilities was also assessed. A study of the characteristics of each general psychiatry clinic revealed significant disparities. The paper highlights several issues: the poor knowledge of psychiatric epidemiological data relating to the population within the catchment area, the difficulty of assessing non-consolidated data or indicators from multiple sources, and the limited and partial nature of geographical data for characterizing and evaluating health care in the hospital's peripheral clinics. Several studies are currently underway to assess the operational effectiveness of the tools and procedures used to analyze and allocate resources.

  5. White Control and Minority Oppression. Fact Sheets on Institutional Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Change, Inc., New York, NY.

    Salient facts about white control and minority oppression are provided for major areas such as the economy, health, housing, education, the media, government, and the census. Economic data on white control cover topics such as wealth, the stock exchange, businesses, banks, union control and membership, and others. Data per training to minority…

  6. Offshore sand resources for coastal erosion control in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.E.; Penland, S.; McBride, R.A. ); Suter, J.R. ); Williams, J. )

    1990-09-01

    An inventory of existing geophysical data supplemented by more than 15,000 km of high-resolution seismic profiles and 400 vibracores collected cooperatively by the Louisiana Geological Survey and US Geological Survey since 1981 indicates that a wide range of aggregate minerals occurs on the continental shelf in a variety of depositional settings. The distribution of these deposits is controlled by the geometry of the preexisting fluvial and deltaic channel systems and the stratigraphic signature of the Holocene Transgression across these features. The geology of coastal and offshore Louisiana is tied to the depositional history of the Mississippi River. Offshore of the delta plain, five types of aggregate sources can be identified: inner shelf shoals, submerged barrier islands, tidal inlets, distributary channels, and barrier platforms. This paper describes the geology of offshore Louisiana, the available geophysical data sets, and the distribution of aggregate mineral resources. On the continental shelf of the Mississippi River delta plain, two extensive seismic survey grids have been developed by the Louisiana Geological Survey and US Geological Survey. The most prospective resources found are the huge sand bodies of Ship Shoal and associated distributaries, Cat Island Pass tidal channels and associated tidal deltas, and Barataria Pass/Grand Terre tidal channels and associated tidal deltas. East of the mouth of the Mississippi River are the Chandeleur Islands, where LGS identified seven major sand resource targets, truncated barrier-spit and tidal inlet deposits, submerged beach ridges, and distributaries associated with abandoned St. Bernard delta complexes. Abundant sand resources can be found in offshore Louisiana. Many of the sand bodies contain heavy minerals, but their concentration and distribution is unknown. Other potential sand resources not yet adequately explored include Sabine Bank, the Outer Shoal, and the St. Bernard shoal.

  7. Distributed autonomous systems: resource management, planning, and control algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James F., III; Nguyen, ThanhVu H.

    2005-05-01

    Distributed autonomous systems, i.e., systems that have separated distributed components, each of which, exhibit some degree of autonomy are increasingly providing solutions to naval and other DoD problems. Recently developed control, planning and resource allocation algorithms for two types of distributed autonomous systems will be discussed. The first distributed autonomous system (DAS) to be discussed consists of a collection of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) that are under fuzzy logic control. The UAVs fly and conduct meteorological sampling in a coordinated fashion determined by their fuzzy logic controllers to determine the atmospheric index of refraction. Once in flight no human intervention is required. A fuzzy planning algorithm determines the optimal trajectory, sampling rate and pattern for the UAVs and an interferometer platform while taking into account risk, reliability, priority for sampling in certain regions, fuel limitations, mission cost, and related uncertainties. The real-time fuzzy control algorithm running on each UAV will give the UAV limited autonomy allowing it to change course immediately without consulting with any commander, request other UAVs to help it, alter its sampling pattern and rate when observing interesting phenomena, or to terminate the mission and return to base. The algorithms developed will be compared to a resource manager (RM) developed for another DAS problem related to electronic attack (EA). This RM is based on fuzzy logic and optimized by evolutionary algorithms. It allows a group of dissimilar platforms to use EA resources distributed throughout the group. For both DAS types significant theoretical and simulation results will be presented.

  8. Formalization, implementation, and modeling of institutional controllers for distributed robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José N; Silva, Porfírio; Lima, Pedro U; Martinoli, Alcherio

    2014-01-01

    The work described is part of a long term program of introducing institutional robotics, a novel framework for the coordination of robot teams that stems from institutional economics concepts. Under the framework, institutions are cumulative sets of persistent artificial modifications made to the environment or to the internal mechanisms of a subset of agents, thought to be functional for the collective order. In this article we introduce a formal model of institutional controllers based on Petri nets. We define executable Petri nets-an extension of Petri nets that takes into account robot actions and sensing-to design, program, and execute institutional controllers. We use a generalized stochastic Petri net view of the robot team controlled by the institutional controllers to model and analyze the stochastic performance of the resulting distributed robotic system. The ability of our formalism to replicate results obtained using other approaches is assessed through realistic simulations of up to 40 e-puck robots. In particular, we model a robot swarm and its institutional controller with the goal of maintaining wireless connectivity, and successfully compare our model predictions and simulation results with previously reported results, obtained by using finite state automaton models and controllers.

  9. Multi-Programmatic and Institutional Computing Capacity Resource Attachment 2 Statement of Work

    SciTech Connect

    Seager, M

    2002-04-15

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has identified high-performance computing as a critical competency necessary to meet the goals of LLNL's scientific and engineering programs. Leadership in scientific computing demands the availability of a stable, powerful, well-balanced computational infrastructure, and it requires research directed at advanced architectures, enabling numerical methods and computer science. To encourage all programs to benefit from the huge investment being made by the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASCI) at LLNL, and to provide a mechanism to facilitate multi-programmatic leveraging of resources and access to high-performance equipment by researchers, M&IC was created. The Livermore Computing (LC) Center, a part of the Computations Directorate Integrated Computing and Communications (ICC) Department can be viewed as composed of two facilities, one open and one secure. This acquisition is focused on the M&IC resources in the Open Computing Facility (OCF). For the M&IC program, recent efforts and expenditures have focused on enhancing capacity and stabilizing the TeraCluster 2000 (TC2K) resource. Capacity is a measure of the ability to process a varied workload from many scientists simultaneously. Capability represents the ability to deliver a very large system to run scientific calculations at large scale. In this procurement action, we intend to significantly increase the capability of the M&IC resource to address multiple teraFLOP/s problems, and well as increasing the capacity to do many 100 gigaFLOP/s calculations.

  10. Trust for Cultural Resources Legislation: A New Funding Source for Cultural Institutions in New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolow, David S.

    1978-01-01

    Examined is the legal validity of recent New York legislation--the Trust for Cultural Resources legislation--that will aid the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York City without depleting the public treasury. Focus is on its tax exemption features, condemnation provision, and constitutional questions raised by its connections with MOMA. (JMD)

  11. National Institutes of Health Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases~National Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language Publications (en español) | Asian-Language Publications NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ NIH National Resource Center ... Font Size | S S M M L L Bone Basics Osteoporosis Osteogenesis Imperfecta Paget’s Disease of Bone Related Topics ...

  12. 29 CFR 36.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  13. 38 CFR 23.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX... a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  14. 44 CFR 19.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  15. 44 CFR 19.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  16. 29 CFR 36.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  17. 10 CFR 1042.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  18. 10 CFR 1042.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  19. 29 CFR 36.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  20. 29 CFR 36.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by a religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX...-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations...

  1. 24 CFR 3.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Educational institutions and other... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by... consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b) Exemption claims. An educational...

  2. 24 CFR 3.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Educational institutions and other... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by... consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b) Exemption claims. An educational...

  3. 24 CFR 3.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Educational institutions and other... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by... consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b) Exemption claims. An educational...

  4. 38 CFR 23.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Educational institutions... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by... consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b) Exemption claims. An educational...

  5. 24 CFR 3.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Educational institutions and other... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by... consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b) Exemption claims. An educational...

  6. 38 CFR 23.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Educational institutions... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by... consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b) Exemption claims. An educational...

  7. 38 CFR 23.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Educational institutions... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by... consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b) Exemption claims. An educational...

  8. 38 CFR 23.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Educational institutions... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by... consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b) Exemption claims. An educational...

  9. 24 CFR 3.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Educational institutions and other... regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational institution or other entity that is controlled by... consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b) Exemption claims. An educational...

  10. Understanding the Effects of Users' Behaviors on Effectiveness of Different Exogenous Regulatory Common Pool Resource Management Institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, K.; Dinar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Tragedy of the commons is generally recognized as one of the possible destinies for common pool resources (CPRs). To avoid the tragedy of the commons and prolonging the life of CPRs, users may show different behavioral characteristics and use different rationales for CPR planning and management. Furthermore, regulators may adopt different strategies for sustainable management of CPRs. The effectiveness of different regulatory exogenous management institutions cannot be evaluated through conventional CPR models since they assume that either users base their behavior on individual rationality and adopt a selfish behavior (Nash behavior), or that the users seek the system's optimal solution without giving priority to their own interests. Therefore, conventional models fail to reliably predict the outcome of CPR problems in which parties may have a range of behavioral characteristics, putting them somewhere in between the two types of behaviors traditionally considered. This work examines the effectiveness of different regulatory exogenous CPR management institutions through a user-based model (as opposed to a system-based model). The new modeling framework allows for consideration of sensitivity of the results to different behavioral characteristics of interacting CPR users. The suggested modeling approach is applied to a benchmark groundwater management problem. Results indicate that some well-known exogenous management institutions (e.g. taxing) are ineffective in sustainable management of CPRs in most cases. Bankruptcy-based management can be helpful, but determination of the fair level of cutbacks remains challenging under this type of institution. Furthermore, some bankruptcy rules such as the Constrained Equal Award (CEA) method are more beneficial to wealthier users, failing to establish social justice. Quota-based and CPR status-based management perform as the most promising and robust regulatory exogenous institutions in prolonging the CPR's life and

  11. Administrative Strategies of Departmental Heads as Determinants for the Effective Management of Human Resources in Tertiary Institutions in Delta State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osakwe, Regina N.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated administrative strategies of departmental heads as determinants of effective management of human resources in tertiary institutions. Four research questions were asked and four hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. As a descriptive survey, the population comprised all the eight tertiary institutions in the state…

  12. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Central Repositories: A Valuable Resource for Nephrology Research

    PubMed Central

    Akolkar, Beena; Spain, Lisa M.; Guill, Michael H.; Del Vecchio, Corey T.; Carroll, Leslie E.

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Central Repositories, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), are an important resource available to researchers and the general public. The Central Repositories house samples, genetic data, phenotypic data, and study documentation from >100 NIDDK-funded clinical studies, in areas such as diabetes, digestive disease, and liver disease research. The Central Repositories also have an exceptionally rich collection of studies related to kidney disease, including the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease landmark study and recent data from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort and CKD in Children Cohort studies. The data are carefully curated and linked to the samples from the study. The NIDDK is working to make the materials and data accessible to researchers. The Data Repositories continue to improve flexible online searching tools that help researchers identify the samples or data of interest, and NIDDK has created several different paths to access the data and samples, including some funding initiatives. Over the past several years, the Central Repositories have seen steadily increasing interest and use of the stored materials. NIDDK plans to make more collections available and do more outreach and education about use of the datasets to the nephrology research community in the future to enhance the value of this resource. PMID:25376765

  13. Incorporating Physical, Social, and Institutional Changes in Water Resources Planning and Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    creation of water quality wetlands and swales. • Areas that support major populations of sensitive plant or animal spe- cies will be avoided, and...species (fish, mussels, mam- mals, birds, and plants ) 5. Aesthetic resources 6. Human health and safety 7. Land use 8. Transportation and traffic...included: (a) Biodiversity - index of native fish integrity; (b) Landscape Integrity - percent of basin defined as “hu- man-disturbed,” road density, and

  14. Cancer in Angola, resources and strategy for its control

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lygia Vieira; Conceição, Ana Vaz; Oliveira, João Blasques; Tavares, António; Domingos, Clarinha; Santos, Lucio Lara

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is an increasingly important health problem in Africa. The number of cancer cases in this region could double, ranging between 700 000 and 1 600 000 new cases in 2030. The mortality rate is higher than 80% and is explained, mainly, by a lack of early detection, diagnostics and treatment resources. In Angola, about 7,000 patients die of cancer every year. Methods Data were derived from open-ended interviews conducted in 2010-11 with health authorities, clinicians, nurses and Administration of Hospitals. According Angola epidemiological data, results of interviews and international published advocacy for cancer control we develop a potential strategy for its control. The objectives are to identify existing resources for cancer control and describe the needs thereto, in order to establish an oncological program to guide the development of Angola cancer control strategies. Results Malaria remains the leading cause of illness and death in Angola, and other communicable diseases remain a public health problem. However, 9 000 new cases of cancer are diagnosed each year.The most common types of cancer are: cancer of the cervix, breast, prostate, esophagus, stomach and head and neck, as well as cancers with infectious origin, such as Kaposi‘s sarcoma and liver and bladder cancer. The foundation for developing national cancer control strategies includes: oncological data; investment and training; identifying and removing barriers; guidance and protection of the patient. Angolan National Cancer Centre, Sagrada Esperança Clinic and Girassol Clinic are now developing a cancer program. Conclusion Improving the economic situation of Angola creates conditions for an increase in life expectancy which in itself is associated with an increased risk of oncological diseases. On the other hand, infectious diseases, associated with the risk of malignant tumors, are endemic. Thus, an increase in patients with malignant disease is expected. A plan is therefore

  15. An Introduction to the Cost of Engineering and Institutional Controls at Brownfield Properties

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This fact sheet introduces and explores the costs of site cleanup and, where cleanup leaves site contamination that restricts reuse, outlines the engineering and institutional controls and their monitoring and maintenance costs over a longer time frame.

  16. 78 FR 23958 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Research Triangle Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Cocaine (9041) II The Institute will manufacture marihuana, and cocaine derivatives for use by their customers in analytical...

  17. 78 FR 46372 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Research Triangle Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Cocaine (9041) II The Institute will manufacture marihuana, and cocaine derivatives for use by their customers in analytical kits, reagents,...

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Defense & Arms Control Studies Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    arms control policy. In I990 Dr. Postol was awarded the Leo Szilard Prize from the American Physical Society. In 1995, he received the Hilliard Roderick...our Army Fellow; Lt. Col. Leo Florick, a missile and arms control specialist, was our Air Force Fellow, and Lt. Comdr. David Radi, an intelligence spe...Brigade after which he assumed command of 1-67 Armor. LIEUTENANT COLONEL LEO FLORICK, USAF Air Force Fellow Lt. Col. Florick entered the Air Force in

  19. The Media-Curriculum Specialist in Special Education: Resource Notebook. Report of the Media-Curriculum Institute (East Lansing, Michigan, June 16-20, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Donald A.

    Designed as a resource notebook for persons interested in the Media Curriculum Resource Specialist concept, the manual presents a summary of the activities of the Media Curriculum Institute held at Michigan State University (June 16-20, 1969). The section on administrative considerations provides a script for a slide presentation on an…

  20. Conceptual and Adoption of Technology Acceptance Model in Digital Information Resources Usage by Undergraduates: Implication to Higher Institutions Education in Delta and Edo of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urhiewhu, Lucky Oghenetega; Emojorho, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The article paper was on conceptual and theoretical framework of digital information resources usage by undergraduates: Implication to higher institutions education in Delta and Edo of Nigeria. It revealed the concept of digital information resources [DIRs] and model theory that related to the study. Finding shows that DIRs are use to low extent…

  1. Tribal Resource Institute in Business, Engineering, and Science (T.R.I.B.E.S.). Part I, TRIBES Energy and Resource Management Simulation. Part II, Creative Writing--Essays submitted by the T.R.I.B.E.S. Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veirs, Val; And Others

    The expository and creaive writing of Native American high school students enrolled in a summer program at Colorado College sponsored by TRIBES (Tribal Resource Institute in Business, Engineering, and Science) is featured in this document. Part 1 presents a simulation problem in energy and resource management followed by reports submitted by 28…

  2. Conservatism, institutionalism, and the social control of intergroup conflict.

    PubMed

    King, Ryan D

    2008-03-01

    This research investigates the state social control of intergroup conflict by assessing the sociopolitical determinants of hate crime prosecutions. Consistent with insights from the political sociology of punishment, group-threat accounts of intergroup relations and the state, and neoinstitutional theory, the findings suggest that hate crime prosecutions are fewer where political conservatism, Christian fundamentalism, and black population size are higher, although this last effect is nonlinear. Linkages between district attorneys' offices and communities, on the other hand, increase hate crime prosecutions and the likelihood of offices' creating hate crime policies. Yet these policies are sometimes decoupled from actual enforcement, and such decoupling is more likely in politically conservative districts. The results indicate that common correlates of criminal punishment have very different effects on types of state social control that are protective of minority groups, and also suggest conditions under which policy and practice become decoupled in organizational settings.

  3. Rural providers' access to online resources: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Laura J.; McElfresh, Karen R.; Warner, Teddy D.; Stromberg, Tiffany L.; Trost, Jaren; Jelinek, Devin A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research determined the usage and satisfaction levels with one of two point-of-care (PoC) resources among health care providers in a rural state. Methods In this randomized controlled trial, twenty-eight health care providers in rural areas were stratified by occupation and region, then randomized into either the DynaMed or the AccessMedicine study arm. Study participants were physicians, physician assistants, and nurses. A pre- and post-study survey measured participants' attitudes toward different information resources and their information-seeking activities. Medical student investigators provided training and technical support for participants. Data analyses consisted of analysis of variance (ANOVA), paired t tests, and Cohen's d statistic to compare pre- and post-study effects sizes. Results Participants in both the DynaMed and the AccessMedicine arms of the study reported increased satisfaction with their respective PoC resource, as expected. Participants in both arms also reported that they saved time in finding needed information. At baseline, both arms reported too little information available, which increased to “about right amounts of information” at the completion of the study. DynaMed users reported a Cohen's d increase of +1.50 compared to AccessMedicine users' reported use of 0.82. DynaMed users reported d2 satisfaction increases of 9.48 versus AccessMedicine satisfaction increases of 0.59 using a Cohen's d. Conclusion Participants in the DynaMed arm of the study used this clinically oriented PoC more heavily than the users of the textbook-based AccessMedicine. In terms of user satisfaction, DynaMed users reported higher levels of satisfaction than the users of AccessMedicine. PMID:26807050

  4. Environmental Controls of Microbial Resource Partitioning in Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandeler, Ellen; Poll, Christian; Kramer, Susanne; Mueller, Karolin; Marhan, Sven

    2015-04-01

    The mineralization and flow of plant-derived carbon in soils is relevant to global carbon cycling. Current models of organismic carbon fluxes in soil assume that separate bacterial and fungal energy channels exist in soil. Recent studies disentangle the herbivore and detritivore pathways of microbial resource use, identify the key players contributing to these two different pathways, and determine to what extent microbial substrate use is affected by environmental controls. To follow the kinetics of litter and root decomposition and to quantify the contribution of key players, it is necessary to use isotopic approaches like PLFA-SIP and ergosterol-SIP. It was shown that bacteria and sugar consuming fungi initiated litter decomposition in an incubation experiment during the first two weeks, whereas higher fungi started to grow after the depletion of low molecular weight substrates. Analyses of PLFA-SIP revealed, for example, that fungi assimilated C directly from the litter, whereas bacteria took up substrates in the soil and therefore depended more on external transport processes than fungi. In addition, we will present data from a field experiment showing the incorporation of root and shoot litter C into organic and microbial C pools under field conditions over a period of two years. Similar amounts of C derived from the two resources differing in substrate quality and amount were incorporated into microbial C and ergosterol pools over time, indicating the importance of root-derived C for the soil food web. High incorporation of maize C (up to 76%) into ergosterol suggests fast and high assimilation of maize C into fungal biomass. Nevertheless, there is still a debate whether bacteria, archaea and fungi start feeding on new substrates at the same time or if their activity occurs at different successional stages. This presentation gives a summery of current knowledge on microbial resource partitioning under lab and field conditions.

  5. International Council for Laboratory Animal Science: International activities. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources annual report, 1993--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    In late 1987, the Interagency Research Animal Committee (IRAC) requested that the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR), National Research Council (NRC), National Academy of Sciences, reestablish US national membership in the International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS). The ICLAS is the only worldwide organization whose goal is to foster the humane use of animals in medical research and testing. ILAR`s Mission Statement reflects its commitment to producing highly respected documents covering a wide range of scientific issues, including databases in genetic stocks, species specific management guides, guidelines for humane care of animals, and position papers on issues affecting the future of the biological sciences. As such, ILAR is recognized nationally and internationally as an independent, scientific authority in the development of animal sciences in biomedical research.

  6. Nature Bank and the Queensland Compound Library: unique international resources at the Eskitis Institute for Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Camp, David; Newman, Stuart; Pham, Ngoc B; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-03-01

    The Eskitis Institute for Drug Discovery is home to two unique resources, Nature Bank and the Queensland Compound Library (QCL), that differentiate it from many other academic institutes pursuing chemical biology or early phase drug discovery. Nature Bank is a comprehensive collection of plants and marine invertebrates that have been subjected to a process which aligns downstream extracts and fractions with lead- and drug-like physicochemical properties. Considerable expertise in screening natural product extracts/fractions was developed at Eskitis over the last two decades. Importantly, biodiscovery activities have been conducted from the beginning in accordance with the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) to ensure compliance with all international and national legislative requirements. The QCL is a compound management and logistics facility that was established from public funds to augment previous investments in high throughput and phenotypic screening in the region. A unique intellectual property (IP) model has been developed in the case of the QCL to stimulate applied, basic and translational research in the chemical and life sciences by industry, non-profit, and academic organizations.

  7. Automated Serials Control at the Indian Institutes of Technology: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Tapas Kumar; Panda, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the functional attributes of the automated serials control systems of the libraries in seven Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) and provide a comparative analysis. Design/methodology/approach: Features of the serials control modules of the library management systems (LMSs) in use in the…

  8. Popularity and Resource Control Goals as Predictors of Adolescent Indirect Aggression.

    PubMed

    Dyches, Karmon D; Mayeux, Lara

    2015-01-01

    Resource Control Theory conceptualizes aggression as a behavior that allows access to, and control of, limited resources (P. H. Hawley, 1999 ). This study investigated the associations of adolescents' indirect aggression with their resource control goals, or goals related to controlling social resources such as dating opportunities and peer status, and with their levels of popularity and social intelligence. Participants were 109 seventh-graders (52% girls) who completed a resource control goals measure, the Tromsø Social Intelligence Scale, and peer nominations of popularity and indirect aggression. Results indicated positive associations between resource control goals and peer-nominated indirect aggression, with popularity further moderating these associations. These findings suggest that the resource control goals of adolescents can be a motivating force to engage in hurtful behaviors. They provide a context from which peer relations researchers can improve their understanding and prevention of adolescents' indirect aggression.

  9. Local knowledge, science, and institutional change: the case of desertification control in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua

    2015-03-01

    This article studies the influence of local knowledge on the impact of science on institutional change in ecological and environmental management. Based on an empirical study on desertification control in 12 counties in north China, the study found the following major results: (1) although there was a cubic relationship between the extent and effect of local knowledge, local knowledge significantly influenced the impact of science on institutional change; (2) local knowledge took effect mainly through affecting formal laws and regulations, major actors, and methods of desertification control in institutional change but had no significant impact on the types of property rights; and (3) local knowledge enhanced the impact of science on the results of desertification control through affecting the impact of science on institutional change. These findings provide a reference for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners, both in China and in other regions of the world, to further explore the influence of local knowledge on the impact of science on institutional change and the roles of local knowledge or knowledge in institutional change and governance.

  10. Local Knowledge, Science, and Institutional Change: The Case of Desertification Control in Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lihua

    2015-03-01

    This article studies the influence of local knowledge on the impact of science on institutional change in ecological and environmental management. Based on an empirical study on desertification control in 12 counties in north China, the study found the following major results: (1) although there was a cubic relationship between the extent and effect of local knowledge, local knowledge significantly influenced the impact of science on institutional change; (2) local knowledge took effect mainly through affecting formal laws and regulations, major actors, and methods of desertification control in institutional change but had no significant impact on the types of property rights; and (3) local knowledge enhanced the impact of science on the results of desertification control through affecting the impact of science on institutional change. These findings provide a reference for researchers, policy makers, and practitioners, both in China and in other regions of the world, to further explore the influence of local knowledge on the impact of science on institutional change and the roles of local knowledge or knowledge in institutional change and governance.

  11. Review of USACE Institutional Information Related to Evaluation of Incremental Changes in Water Resources Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Proctor Lake , TX, constructed by the Corps of Engineers to provide flood control, drinking water, and recreation Approved for public release...such changes into planning, as well as National Research Council studies directed to USACE planning, and a chronology report on the Lake ...of how both types of incremental changes accumulate and interact was well docu- mented in the Decision-making Chronology for the Lake Pontchartrain

  12. National AIDS Control Organisation's human resource capacity building initiatives for better response to HIV/AIDS in India.

    PubMed

    Kavya, Sharma; Sanjay, Zodpey; Syed Zahiruddin, Quazi; Abhay, Gaidhane; Shailendra, Sawleshwarkar; Sunil, Khaparde

    2011-01-01

    Human resource capacity building is a key strategy in the design, delivery, sustainability and scale up HIV treatment and prevention programmes. The review aims to present human resource capacity building initiatives undertaken by the National AIDS Control Organisation (NACO) and to discuss the available opportunities in India.There was minimal emphasis on human resource capacity building in National AIDS control programme (NACP)-I. The focus of capacity building in NACP-II was on strengthening the capacity of partners implementing various HIV/AIDS interventions. NACP-III (2007-2012) focussed on capacity building as a priority agenda. Other than short-term training programmes, NACP-III is strengthening the capacity of partners through the State Training and Resource Centre, Technical Support Unit, District AIDS Prevention Control Unit, Fellowship Programme and Network of Indian Institutions for HIV/AIDS Research.Various opportunities to enhance and consolidate capacity building responses in HIV/AIDS in India may include mainstreaming of capacity building, appropriate management of knowledge and resources, effective delivery of training, measuring and documenting impact,accreditation of programmes and institutes,use of information technology, identifying and implementing innovations and working for sustainability.Growing demand for capacity-building in HIV/AIDS needs substantial efforts to ensure that these are implemented effectively and efficiently. NACO had made significant strides in these regards, but at the same time there are arduous challenges like measuring impact, quality, documentation, operational research, and sustainability. NACO is formulating Phase-IV of NACP. This review will provide feedback to the NACO for strengthening its strategic document for human resource capacity building.

  13. Emotor control: computations underlying bodily resource allocation, emotions, and confidence.

    PubMed

    Kepecs, Adam; Mensh, Brett D

    2015-12-01

    Emotional processes are central to behavior, yet their deeply subjective nature has been a challenge for neuroscientific study as well as for psychiatric diagnosis. Here we explore the relationships between subjective feelings and their underlying brain circuits from a computational perspective. We apply recent insights from systems neuroscience-approaching subjective behavior as the result of mental computations instantiated in the brain-to the study of emotions. We develop the hypothesis that emotions are the product of neural computations whose motor role is to reallocate bodily resources mostly gated by smooth muscles. This "emotor" control system is analagous to the more familiar motor control computations that coordinate skeletal muscle movements. To illustrate this framework, we review recent research on "confidence." Although familiar as a feeling, confidence is also an objective statistical quantity: an estimate of the probability that a hypothesis is correct. This model-based approach helped reveal the neural basis of decision confidence in mammals and provides a bridge to the subjective feeling of confidence in humans. These results have important implications for psychiatry, since disorders of confidence computations appear to contribute to a number of psychopathologies. More broadly, this computational approach to emotions resonates with the emerging view that psychiatric nosology may be best parameterized in terms of disorders of the cognitive computations underlying complex behavior.

  14. Emotor control: computations underlying bodily resource allocation, emotions, and confidence

    PubMed Central

    Kepecs, Adam; Mensh, Brett D.

    2015-01-01

    Emotional processes are central to behavior, yet their deeply subjective nature has been a challenge for neuroscientific study as well as for psychiatric diagnosis. Here we explore the relationships between subjective feelings and their underlying brain circuits from a computational perspective. We apply recent insights from systems neuroscience—approaching subjective behavior as the result of mental computations instantiated in the brain—to the study of emotions. We develop the hypothesis that emotions are the product of neural computations whose motor role is to reallocate bodily resources mostly gated by smooth muscles. This “emotor” control system is analagous to the more familiar motor control computations that coordinate skeletal muscle movements. To illustrate this framework, we review recent research on “confidence.” Although familiar as a feeling, confidence is also an objective statistical quantity: an estimate of the probability that a hypothesis is correct. This model-based approach helped reveal the neural basis of decision confidence in mammals and provides a bridge to the subjective feeling of confidence in humans. These results have important implications for psychiatry, since disorders of confidence computations appear to contribute to a number of psychopathologies. More broadly, this computational approach to emotions resonates with the emerging view that psychiatric nosology may be best parameterized in terms of disorders of the cognitive computations underlying complex behavior. PMID:26869840

  15. INL SITEWIDE INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS, AND OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE PLAN FOR CERCLA RESPONSE ACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    JOLLEY, WENDELL L

    2008-02-05

    On November 9, 2002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality approved the 'Record of Decision Experimental Breeder Reactor-I/Boiling Water Reactor Experiment Area and Miscellaneous Sites', which required a Site-wide institutional controls plan for the then Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory). This document, first issued in June 2004, fulfilled that requirement. This revision identifies and consolidates the institutional controls and operations and maintenance requirements into a single document.

  16. Space station freedom resource nodes internal thermal control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merhoff, Paul; Dellinger, Brent; Taggert, Shawn; Cornwell, John

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the design and operation of the internal thermal control system (ITCS) developed for Space Station Freedom by the NASA-Johnson Space Center and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace to provide cooling for the resource nodes, airlock, and pressurized logistics modules. The ITCS collects, transports and rejects waste heat from these modules by a dual-loop, single-phase water cooling system. ITCS performance, cooling, and flow rate requirements are presented. An ITCS fluid schematic is shown and an overview of the current baseline system design and its operation is presented. Assembly sequence of the ITCS is explained as its configuration develops from Man Tended Capability (MTC), for which node 2 alone is cooled, to Permanently Manned Capability (PMC) where the airlock, a pressurized logistics module, and node 1 are cooled, in addition to node 2. A SINDA/FLUINT math model of the ITCS is described, and results of analyses for an MTC and a PMC case are shown and discussed.

  17. Institutional and technological barriers to the use of open educational resources (OERs) in physiology and medical education.

    PubMed

    Hassall, Christopher; Lewis, David I

    2017-03-01

    Open educational resources (OERs) are becoming increasingly common as a tool in education, particularly in medical and biomedical education. However, three key barriers have been identified to their use: 1) lack of awareness of OERs, 2) lack of motivation to use OERs, and 3) lack of training in the use of OERs. Here, we explore these three barriers with teachers of medical and biomedical science to establish how best to enhance the use of OERs to improve pedagogical outcomes. An online survey was completed by 209 educators, many of whom (68.4%) reported using OERs in their teaching and almost all (99.5%) showing awareness of at least one OER. The results suggest that key problems that prevent educators from adopting OERs in their teaching include suitability for particular classes, time, and copyright. Most (81.8%) educators were somewhat, very, or extremely comfortable with OERs so there is no innate motivational barrier to adoption. A lack of training was reported by 13.9% of respondents, and 40% of respondents stated that there was little or no support from their institutions. OER users were no more comfortable with technology or better supported by departments but tended to be aware of a greater number of sources of OERs. Our study illustrates key opportunities for the expansion of OER use in physiology and medical teaching: increased breadth of awareness, increased institutional support (including time, training, and copyright support), and greater sharing of diverse OERs to suit the range of teaching challenges faced by staff in different subdisciplines.

  18. Geologic controls on supercritical geothermal resources above magmatic intrusions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas; Weis, Philipp

    2015-07-27

    A new and economically attractive type of geothermal resource was recently discovered in the Krafla volcanic system, Iceland, consisting of supercritical water at 450 °C immediately above a 2-km deep magma body. Although utilizing such supercritical resources could multiply power production from geothermal wells, the abundance, location and size of similar resources are undefined. Here we present the first numerical simulations of supercritical geothermal resource formation, showing that they are an integral part of magma-driven geothermal systems. Potentially exploitable resources form in rocks with a brittle-ductile transition temperature higher than 450 °C, such as basalt. Water temperatures and enthalpies can exceed 400 °C and 3 MJ kg(-1), depending on host rock permeability. Conventional high-enthalpy resources result from mixing of ascending supercritical and cooler surrounding water. Our models reproduce the measured thermal conditions of the resource discovered at Krafla. Similar resources may be widespread below conventional high-enthalpy geothermal systems.

  19. Geologic controls on supercritical geothermal resources above magmatic intrusions

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas; Weis, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    A new and economically attractive type of geothermal resource was recently discovered in the Krafla volcanic system, Iceland, consisting of supercritical water at 450 °C immediately above a 2-km deep magma body. Although utilizing such supercritical resources could multiply power production from geothermal wells, the abundance, location and size of similar resources are undefined. Here we present the first numerical simulations of supercritical geothermal resource formation, showing that they are an integral part of magma-driven geothermal systems. Potentially exploitable resources form in rocks with a brittle–ductile transition temperature higher than 450 °C, such as basalt. Water temperatures and enthalpies can exceed 400 °C and 3 MJ kg−1, depending on host rock permeability. Conventional high-enthalpy resources result from mixing of ascending supercritical and cooler surrounding water. Our models reproduce the measured thermal conditions of the resource discovered at Krafla. Similar resources may be widespread below conventional high-enthalpy geothermal systems. PMID:26211617

  20. Advanced Communication and Control Solutions of Distributed Energy Resources (DER)

    SciTech Connect

    Asgeirsson, Haukur; Seguin, Richard; Sherding, Cameron; de Bruet, Andre, G.; Broadwater, Robert; Dilek, Murat

    2007-01-10

    This report covers work performed in Phase II of a two phase project whose objective was to demonstrate the aggregation of multiple Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and to offer them into the energy market. The Phase I work (DE-FC36-03CH11161) created an integrated, but distributed, system and procedures to monitor and control multiple DERs from numerous manufacturers connected to the electric distribution system. Procedures were created which protect the distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. Using the web as the communication medium for control and monitoring of the DERs, the integration of information and security was accomplished through the use of industry standard protocols such as secure SSL,VPN and ICCP. The primary objective of Phase II was to develop the procedures for marketing the power of the Phase I aggregated DERs in the energy market, increase the number of DER units, and implement the marketing procedures (interface with ISOs) for the DER generated power. The team partnered with the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), the local ISO, to address the energy market and demonstrate the economic dispatch of DERs in response to market signals. The selection of standards-based communication technologies offers the ability of the system to be deployed and integrated with other utilities’ resources. With the use of a data historian technology to facilitate the aggregation, the developed algorithms and procedures can be verified, audited, and modified. The team has demonstrated monitoring and control of multiple DERs as outlined in phase I report including procedures to perform these operations in a secure and safe manner. In Phase II, additional DER units were added. We also expanded on our phase I work to enhance communication security and to develop the market model of having DERs, both customer and utility owned, participate in the energy market. We are proposing a two-part DER energy market model--a utility

  1. 13 CFR 113.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do... religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  2. 13 CFR 113.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do... religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  3. 45 CFR 618.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do... religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  4. 13 CFR 113.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and other entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do... religious organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent... official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with...

  5. Institutional Level Identity Control Strategies in the Distance Education Environment: A Survey of Administrative Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amigud, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Physical separation of students and instructors creates the gap of anonymity and limited control over the remote learning environment. The ability of academic institutions to authenticate students and validate authorship of academic work at various points during a course is necessary for preserving not only perceived credibility but also public…

  6. 31 CFR 28.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 28.205 Section 28.205 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of... writing to the designated agency official a statement by the highest-ranking official of the...

  7. 12 CFR 303.245 - Waiver of liability for commonly controlled depository institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... controlled depository institutions. (a) Scope. Section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) creates...)(6), (7) and (8), the FDI Act also permits the FDIC, in its discretion, to exempt any insured... liability pursuant to section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)(5)(A)). (b) Definition. Conditional...

  8. 12 CFR 303.245 - Waiver of liability for commonly controlled depository institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... controlled depository institutions. (a) Scope. Section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) creates...)(6), (7) and (8), the FDI Act also permits the FDIC, in its discretion, to exempt any insured... liability pursuant to section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)(5)(A)). (b) Definition. Conditional...

  9. 12 CFR 303.245 - Waiver of liability for commonly controlled depository institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... controlled depository institutions. (a) Scope. Section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) creates...)(6), (7) and (8), the FDI Act also permits the FDIC, in its discretion, to exempt any insured... liability pursuant to section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)(5)(A)). (b) Definition. Conditional...

  10. 12 CFR 303.245 - Waiver of liability for commonly controlled depository institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... controlled depository institutions. (a) Scope. Section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) creates...)(6), (7) and (8), the FDI Act also permits the FDIC, in its discretion, to exempt any insured... liability pursuant to section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)(5)(A)). (b) Definition. Conditional...

  11. 34 CFR 410.1 - What is the Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions Program? 410.1 Section 410.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  12. New Cancer Prevention and Control Central Institutional Review Board Established | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Central Institutional Review Board (CIRB) Initiative announced the establishment of the Cancer Prevention and Control (CPC) CIRB January 14, extending the benefits of centralized review to investigators participating in clinical trials sponsored by the Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP). |

  13. 45 CFR 618.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 618.205 Section 618.205 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN...

  14. 40 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 5.205 Section 5.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES...

  15. 40 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 5.205 Section 5.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES...

  16. 40 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 5.205 Section 5.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES...

  17. 40 CFR 5.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations. 5.205 Section 5.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES...

  18. 12 CFR 303.245 - Waiver of liability for commonly controlled depository institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... controlled depository institutions. (a) Scope. Section 5(e) of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)) creates...)(6), (7) and (8), the FDI Act also permits the FDIC, in its discretion, to exempt any insured... liability pursuant to section 5 of the FDI Act (12 U.S.C. 1815(e)(5)(A)). (b) Definition. Conditional...

  19. 42 CFR 84.43 - Quality control records; review by the Institute; revocation of approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quality control records; review by the Institute; revocation of approval. 84.43 Section 84.43 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF...

  20. 42 CFR 84.43 - Quality control records; review by the Institute; revocation of approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Quality control records; review by the Institute; revocation of approval. 84.43 Section 84.43 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF...

  1. 42 CFR 84.43 - Quality control records; review by the Institute; revocation of approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quality control records; review by the Institute; revocation of approval. 84.43 Section 84.43 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF...

  2. 42 CFR 84.43 - Quality control records; review by the Institute; revocation of approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quality control records; review by the Institute; revocation of approval. 84.43 Section 84.43 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF...

  3. The Model and Control Methods of Access to Information and Technology Resources of Automated Control Systems in Water Supply Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rytov, M. Yu; Spichyack, S. A.; Fedorov, V. P.; Petreshin, D. I.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes a formalized control model of access to information and technological resources of automated control systems at water supply enterprises. The given model considers the availability of various communication links with information systems and technological equipment. There are also studied control methods of access to information and technological resources of automated control systems at water supply enterprises. On the basis of the formalized control model and appropriate methods there was developed a software-hardware complex for rapid access to information and technological resources of automated control systems, which contains an administrator’s automated workplace and ultimate users.

  4. Optimization-based Approach to Cross-layer Resource Management in Wireless Networked Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    distribution is unlimited. Optimization-based approach to cross-layer resource management in Wireless networked control systems The views, opinions...Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 cross-layer resource management , sampling rate adaptation, networked control system REPORT...7749 2 ABSTRACT Optimization-based approach to cross-layer resource management in Wireless networked control systems Report Title Wireless Networked

  5. Wellness: A Bargain for Life, A Resource for Higher Education. The Complete Guide to Creating an Effective Wellness Program in Higher Educational Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Vickie L., Ed.

    This book provides college and university personnel administrators with information and resources for the development and expansion of wellness programs at institutions of higher education. The five contributed chapters address some of the issues involved in the development of wellness programs. In Chapter 1, "Wellness in Higher…

  6. Human resources, patient load, and infrastructure at institutions providing diabetic care in India: The India 11-city 9-state study

    PubMed Central

    Anchala, Raghupathy; Gudlavalleti, Aashrai Sai Venkat; Gudlavalleti, Murthy V. S.; Singh, Vivek; Shukla, Rajan; Jotheeswaran, A. T.; Babu, R. Giridhara; Ramachandra, Srikrishna S.; Sagar, Jayanti; Bandyopadhyay, Souvik; Ballabh, Hira Pant; Gilbert, Clare E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a lack of information on the practice patterns and available human resources and services for screening for eye complications among persons with diabetes in India. Objectives: The study was undertaken to document existing health care infrastructure and practice patterns for managing diabetes and screening for eye complications. Methods: This cross-sectional, hospital-based survey was conducted in 11 cities where public and private diabetic care providers were identified. Both multispecialty and standalone diabetic care facilities were included. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered to senior representative(s) of each institution to evaluate parameters using the World Health Organization health systems framework. Results: We interviewed physicians in 73 hospitals (61.6% multispecialty hospitals; 38.4% standalone clinics). Less than a third reported having skilled personnel for direct ophthalmoscopy. About 74% had provision for glycated hemoglobin testing. Only a third had adequate vision charts. Printed protocols on management of diabetes were available only in 31.5% of the facilities. Only one in four facilities had a system for tracking diabetics. Half the facilities reported having access to records from the treating ophthalmologists. Direct observation of the services provided showed that reported figures in relation to availability of patient support services were overestimated by around 10%. Three fourths of the information sheets and half the glycemia monitoring cards contained information on the eye complications and the need for a regular eye examination. Conclusions: The study highlighted existing gaps in service provision at diabetic care centers in India. PMID:27144131

  7. Addressing institutional amplifiers in the dynamics and control of tuberculosis epidemics.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis outbreaks originating in prisons, mines, or hospital wards can spread to the larger community. Recent proposals have targeted these high-transmission institutional amplifiers by improving case detection, treatment, or reducing the size of the exposed population. However, what effects these alternative proposals may have is unclear. We mathematically modeled these control strategies and found case detection and treatment methods insufficient in addressing epidemics involving common types of institutional amplifiers. Movement of persons in and out of amplifiers fundamentally altered the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis in a manner not effectively mitigated by detection or treatment alone. Policies increasing the population size exposed to amplifiers or the per-person duration of exposure within amplifiers potentially worsened incidence, even in settings with high rates of detection and treatment success. However, reducing the total population size entering institutional amplifiers significantly lowered tuberculosis incidence and the risk of propagating new drug-resistant tuberculosis strains.

  8. Institutional capacity for health systems research in East and Central African Schools of Public Health: strengthening human and financial resources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite its importance in providing evidence for health-related policy and decision-making, an insufficient amount of health systems research (HSR) is conducted in low-income countries (LICs). Schools of public health (SPHs) are key stakeholders in HSR. This paper, one in a series of four, examines human and financial resources capacities, policies and organizational support for HSR in seven Africa Hub SPHs in East and Central Africa. Methods Capacity assessment done included document analysis to establish staff numbers, qualifications and publications; self-assessment using a tool developed to capture individual perceptions on the capacity for HSR and institutional dialogues. Key informant interviews (KIIs) were held with Deans from each SPH and Ministry of Health and non-governmental officials, focusing on perceptions on capacity of SPHs to engage in HSR, access to funding, and organizational support for HSR. Results A total of 123 people participated in the self-assessment and 73 KIIs were conducted. Except for the National University of Rwanda and the University of Nairobi SPH, most respondents expressed confidence in the adequacy of staffing levels and HSR-related skills at their SPH. However, most of the researchers operate at individual level with low outputs. The average number of HSR-related publications was only <1 to 3 per staff member over a 6-year period with most of the publications in international journals. There is dependency on external funding for HSR, except for Rwanda, where there was little government funding. We also found that officials from the Ministries of Health often formulate policy based on data generated through ad hoc technical reviews and consultancies, despite their questionable quality. Conclusions There exists adequate skilled staff for HSR in the SPHs. However, HSR conducted by individuals, fuelled by Ministries’ of Health tendency to engage individual researchers, undermines institutional capacity. This study

  9. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-05-01

    variability in response. We find that, in general, baseline model error is large. Though some facilities exhibit real DR variability, most observed variability results from baseline model error. In some cases, however, aggregations of C&I facilities exhibit real DR variability, which could create challenges for power system operation. These results have implications for DR program design and deployment. Emerging DR paradigms focus on faster timescale DR. Here, we investigate methods to coordinate aggregations of residential thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs), including air conditioners and refrigerators, to manage frequency and energy imbalances in power systems. We focus on opportunities to centrally control loads with high accuracy but low requirements for sensing and communications infrastructure. Specifically, we compare cases when measured load state information (e.g., power consumption and temperature) is 1) available in real time; 2) available, but not in real time; and 3) not available. We develop Markov Chain models to describe the temperature state evolution of heterogeneous populations of TCLs, and use Kalman filtering for both state and joint parameter/state estimation. We present a look-ahead proportional controller to broadcast control signals to all TCLs, which always remain in their temperature dead-band. Simulations indicate that it is possible to achieve power tracking RMS errors in the range of 0.26–9.3% of steady state aggregated power consumption. Results depend upon the information available for system identification, state estimation, and control. We find that, depending upon the performance required, TCLs may not need to provide state information to the central controller in real time or at all. We also estimate the size of the TCL potential resource; potential revenue from participation in markets; and break-even costs associated with deploying DR-enabling technologies. We find that current TCL energy storage capacity in California is 8–11

  10. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The resources listed different types of materials related to the aerospace science under specified categories: free materials and inexpensive, selected government publication, audiovisual (government, nongovernment), aviation books, and space books. The list includes the publisher's name and the price for each publication. (SK)

  11. Effect of locus of resource control on operational efficiency in distributed operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geoffroy, A. L.

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in view graph form: space network control (SNC) usage in the Advanced Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (ATDRSS) era; an acronym and icon list; demands of the SNC; tightness of resources coupling; sharing information and sharing control; potential ways of distributing control; efficiency problems unrelated to distribution of control; efficiency problems related to distribution of control; and recommendations.

  12. Resource availability controls fungal diversity across a plant diversity gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.; Blackwood, C.B.; Curtis, C.D.; Tilman, D.

    2006-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the ecological determinants of microbial diversity remain poorly understood. Here, we test two alternative hypotheses concerning the factors regulating fungal diversity in soil. The first states that higher levels of plant detritus production increase the supply of limiting resources (i.e. organic substrates) thereby increasing fungal diversity. Alternatively, greater plant diversity increases the range of organic substrates entering soil, thereby increasing the number of niches to be filled by a greater array of heterotrophic fungi. These two hypotheses were simultaneously examined in experimental plant communities consisting of one to 16 species that have been maintained for a decade. We used ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA), in combination with cloning and sequencing, to quantify fungal community composition and diversity within the experimental plant communities. We used soil microbial biomass as a temporally integrated measure of resource supply. Plant diversity was unrelated to fungal diversity, but fungal diversity was a unimodal function of resource supply. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that plant diversity showed a relationship to fungal community composition, although the occurrence of RISA bands and operational taxonomic units (OTUs) did not differ among the treatments. The relationship between fungal diversity and resource availability parallels similar relationships reported for grasslands, tropical forests, coral reefs, and other biotic communities, strongly suggesting that the same underlying mechanisms determine the diversity of organisms at multiple scales. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  13. Collaborative Corrections with Spelling Control: Digital Resources and Peer Assistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cekaite, Asta

    2009-01-01

    The present study has explored how pairs of students deployed digital tools (spelling software) as resources in spontaneously occurring corrections of spelling errors. Drawing on the sociocultural theory of learning and ethnomethodological (Conversation Analytic) insights into social interaction, it has identified a range of consistent practices…

  14. National Cancer Institute's leadership role in promoting State and Community Tobacco Control research

    PubMed Central

    Ginexi, Elizabeth M; Vollinger, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has been at the vanguard of funding tobacco control research for decades with major efforts such as the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT) in 1988 and the American Stop Smoking Intervention Study (ASSIST) in 1991, followed by the Tobacco Research Initiative for State and Community Interventions in 1999. Most recently, in 2011, the NCI launched the State and Community Tobacco Control (SCTC) Research Initiative to address gaps in secondhand smoke policies, tax and pricing policies, mass media countermeasures, community and social norms and tobacco marketing. The initiative supported large scale research projects and time-sensitive ancillary pilot studies in response to expressed needs of state and community partners. This special issue of Tobacco Control showcases exciting findings from the SCTC. In this introductory article, we provide a brief account of NCI's historical commitment to promoting research to inform tobacco control policy. PMID:27697941

  15. Whittier Narrows Flood Control Basin Historic Resources Survey,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-15

    Adobe 5.23 Workman Mill Site 6. Tabular Inventory of Historic Resources 35 7. Number of Man Hours Spent 36 8. Footnotes 37 9. Bibliography 42 10...34 Some buildings "are of adobe ; but most are of palisades and tules .... One very large building of palisades, all under one roof...serves as a...pipes brought water from the San Gabriel River through the present Whittier Narrows down to Pico 2ivera and Whittier ( sol only in 1955 to the City of

  16. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center monthly report to the Steering Committee, June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-02

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot FGD unit continued this month with High Velocity Scrubbing and the Tampa Electric Company (TECO) Tailored Collaboration test block. Additionally, Phase III of the Toxics Removal/Carbon Injection test block was conducted concurrently with FGD testing. At the beginning of the month, a second phase of third-party testing began for Suncor, Inc. The Suncor Gypsum Sample Collection test block (MSUN) began on June 5 on the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet FGD unit. Testing was completed on June 13. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, testing continued this month as ammonia slip measurements were conducted under low catalyst inlet temperatures and at baseline conditions.

  17. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental control technology. Final technical monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block. A second phase of the lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG) was also conducted simultaneously on the Pilot System this month. This month the ECTC was off-line from 6/9 through 6/19 to complete a Facility retrofit project. During this brief outage, modifications were made to the ECTC Flue Gas Handling System to enhance the facility capabilities, and to prepare for future High Velocity Wet FGD Testing. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the low temperature performance testing resumed this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the new SCR catalysts.

  18. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and a simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). At the end of the month, a series of Duct Injection tests began in a study to determine the efficiencies of alkaline injection for removing trace elements (mercury). On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, low temperature performance testing continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and SO{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the SCR reactor. This report describes the status of the facilities and test activities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  19. Translating Infection Control Guidelines Into Practice: Implementation Process Within a Health Care Institution

    PubMed Central

    Raveis, Victoria H.; Conway, Laurie J.; Uchida, Mayuko; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Larson, Elaine L.; Stone, Patricia W.

    2014-01-01

    Health-care-associated infections (HAIs) remain a major patient safety problem even as policy and programmatic efforts designed to reduce HAIs have increased. Although information on implementing effective infection control (IC) efforts has steadily grown, knowledge gaps remain regarding the organizational elements that improve bedside practice and accommodate variations in clinical care settings. We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews in 11 hospitals across the United States with a range of hospital personnel involved in IC (n = 116). We examined the collective nature of IC and the organizational elements that can enable disparate groups to work together to prevent HAIs. Our content analysis of participants’ narratives yielded a rich description of the organizational process of implementing adherence to IC. Findings document the dynamic, fluid, interactional, and reactive nature of this process. Three themes emerged: implementing adherence efforts institution-wide, promoting an institutional culture to sustain adherence, and contending with opposition to the IC mandate. PMID:24598775

  20. High-autonomy control of space resource processing plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schooley, Larry C.; Zeigler, Bernard P.; Cellier, Francois E.; Wang, Fei-Yue

    1993-01-01

    A highly autonomous intelligent command/control architecture has been developed for planetary surface base industrial process plants and Space Station Freedom experimental facilities. The architecture makes use of a high-level task-oriented mode with supervisory control from one or several remote sites, and integrates advanced network communications concepts and state-of-the-art man/machine interfaces with the most advanced autonomous intelligent control. Attention is given to the full-dynamics model of a Martian oxygen-production plant, event-based/fuzzy-logic process control, and fault management practices.

  1. Radar coordination and resource management in a distributed sensor network using emergent control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, B. S.; Sokol, T. M.

    2009-05-01

    As the list of anti-air warfare and ballistic missile defense missions grows, there is an increasing need to coordinate and optimize usage of radar resources across the netted force. Early attempts at this optimization involved top-down control mechanisms whereby sensors accept resource tasking orders from networked tracking elements. These approaches rely heavily on uncertain knowledge of sensor constraints and capabilities. Furthermore, advanced sensor systems may support self-defense missions of the host platform and are therefore unable to relinquish control to an external function. To surmount these issues, the use of bottom-up emergent control techniques is proposed. The information necessary to make quality, network-wide resource allocations is readily available to sensor nodes with access to a netted track picture. By assessing resource priorities relative to the network (versus local) track picture, sensors can understand the contribution of their resources to the netted force. This allows the sensors to apply resources where most needed and remove waste. Furthermore, simple local rules for resource usage, when properly constructed, allow sensors to obtain a globally optimal resource allocation without direct coordination (emergence). These results are robust to partial implementation (i.e., not all nodes upgraded at once) and failures on individual nodes (whether from casualty or reallocation to other sensor missions), and they leave resource control decisions in the hands of the sensor systems instead of an external function. This paper presents independent research and development work on emergent control of sensor resources and the impact to resource allocation and tracking performance.

  2. Application of dynamic programming to control khuzestan water resources system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jamshidi, M.; Heidari, M.

    1977-01-01

    An approximate optimization technique based on discrete dynamic programming called discrete differential dynamic programming (DDDP), is employed to obtain the near optimal operation policies of a water resources system in the Khuzestan Province of Iran. The technique makes use of an initial nominal state trajectory for each state variable, and forms corridors around the trajectories. These corridors represent a set of subdomains of the entire feasible domain. Starting with such a set of nominal state trajectories, improvements in objective function are sought within the corridors formed around them. This leads to a set of new nominal trajectories upon which more improvements may be sought. Since optimization is confined to a set of subdomains, considerable savings in memory and computer time are achieved over that of conventional dynamic programming. The Kuzestan water resources system considered in this study is located in southwest Iran, and consists of two rivers, three reservoirs, three hydropower plants, and three irrigable areas. Data and cost benefit functions for the analysis were obtained either from the historical records or from similar studies. ?? 1977.

  3. Human resources for control of tuberculosis and HIV-associated tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Harries, A D; Zachariah, R; Bergström, K; Blanc, L; Salaniponi, F M; Elzinga, G

    2005-02-01

    The global targets for tuberculosis (TB) control were postponed from 2000 to 2005, but on current evidence a further postponement may be necessary. Of the constraints preventing these targets being met, the primary one appears to be the lack of adequately trained and qualified staff. This paper outlines: 1) the human resources and skills for global TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) TB control, including the human resources for implementing the DOTS strategy, the additional human resources for implementing joint HIV-TB control strategies and what is known about human resource gaps at global level; 2) the attempts to quantify human resource gaps by focusing on a small country in sub-Saharan Africa, Malawi; and 3) the main constraints to human resources and their possible solutions, under six main headings: human resource planning; production of human resources; distribution of the work-force; motivation and staff retention; quality of existing staff; and the effect of HIV/AIDS. We recommend an urgent shift in thinking about the human resource paradigm, and exhort international policy makers and the donor community to make a concerted effort to bridge the current gaps by investing for real change.

  4. Institutional Control Policies and Implementation for the Area 5 and Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Vefa Yucel, Greg Shott, Denise Wieland, et al.

    2007-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) has implemented varying institutional control policies in performance assessment/composite analysis (PA/CA) calculations for the Area 5 and Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) (Shott et al., 1998; 2000; Bechtel Nevada [BN] and Neptune and Company Inc. [Neptune], 2006). The facilities are within the actively maintained boundaries of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that are enforced by NNSA/NSO. Under current policies, access required for exposure of the member of public (MOP) or the inadvertent human intruder (IHI) is prohibited. Uncertainties affecting institutional control policies are the duration and effectiveness of the controls during the post-closure period. Implementing a uniform set of institutional control policies for the RWMSs that encompasses waste management and environmental restoration programs and is consistent with the end-state vision for the environmental management programs for the NTS (DOE, 2006) is a primary goal of the maintenance program. The NNSA/NSO Performance Management Plan (DOE, 2002) complies with DOE Policy P455.1, 'Use of Risk-Based End States' (DOE, 2003a). Expected future land uses are a driver in selecting acceptable end state conditions and clean-up goals for the NTS. NNSA/NSO Environmental Management's (EM's) land management assumptions and framework for Environmental Management activities are as follows: The NTS will remain under federal control in perpetuity as an NNSA test site, and the large buffer zone surrounding the NTS (the Nevada Test and Training Range) is assumed to remain under the control of the U.S. Air Force. There are no plans for transfer of any NTS lands to other agencies or public entities. Access will continue to be restricted to the NTS and the surrounding areas. For management purposes, NNSA/NV EM activities have been established based on the source of contamination and type of waste

  5. Geological controls on supercritical fluid resources in volcanic geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, S. W.; Driesner, T.; Weis, P.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale fluid convection in conventional volcanic geothermal systems is driven by the hydrothermal cooling of shallow intrusions. Recently, there has been increased interest in tapping supercritical fluid resources in volcanic geothermal systems, since such fluid reservoirs could provide a roughly order-of-magnitude greater potential for electricity production than conventional geothermal wells drilled to temperatures of 250-300 °C. The potential of supercritical geothermal reservoirs was demonstrated in 2010, when the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) drilled into liquid magma at 2 km depth and encountered an overlying permeable, high-temperature (~450 °C) fluid reservoir capable of more than ~30 MWe of electricity production. However, a conceptual model describing the main factors governing the extent and structure of target reservoirs has remained elusive. Here, we present the first systematic investigation of the role of rock permeability, the brittle-ductile transition temperature, and the depth of magma chamber emplacement on the development of supercritical fluid reservoirs. We use the numerical modeling code CSMP++ to model two-phase flow of compressible water around an initially elliptical, 900 °C intrusion. Our models indicate that potentially exploitable supercritical fluid resources are an integral part of many magma-driven geothermal systems. Hotter and more extensive reservoirs are promoted by a brittle-ductile transition temperature higher than ~400 °C, an intrusion depth less than 3 km, and a host rock permeability of 10-14 to 10-15 m2. The systematic dependence of the size, location and hydrologic behavior of supercritical reservoirs on these factors aids the development of exploration models for different volcanic settings. In addition, by serving as the main agents of heat transfer at the interface of an intrusion and the overlying hydrothermal system, supercritical fluid reservoirs play a decisive role in determining the overall

  6. Challenges and Opportunities for the implementation of interventions to prevent and control CVD in low resource settings in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Adolfo; Irazola, Vilma E.; Poggio, Rosana; Gulayin, Pablo; Nejamis, Analía; Beratarrechea, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In Argentina, Cardiovascular diseases are estimated to cause about 100,000 deaths and more than 250,000 coronary heart disease and stroke events annually, at a cost of more than one billion international dollars. Despite progress in the implementation of several programs to combat non-communicable diseases in Argentina over the last years, most health resources are still dedicated to infectious disease and maternal and child health. The Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy, an independent academic institution affiliated to the University of Buenos Aires medical school, runs CESCAS (South American Centre of Excellence in Cardiovascular Health), a center devoted to epidemiological, implementation and policy research. At CESCAS there are three ongoing randomized clinical trials focused on implementation science: 1) A Mobile health intervention to prevent progression of pre-hypertension in poor urban settings in Argentina, Guatemala and Peru; 2) A Comprehensive Approach for Hypertension Prevention and Control in low-resource settings in Argentina; and 3) An Educational Approach to Improve Physician Effectiveness in the Detection, Treatment and Control for patients with Hypercholesterolemia and high Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) risk in low-resource settings in Argentina. All these studies involve the design and implementation of complex interventions to change behaviors of providers and patients. The rationale of each of the three studies, the design of the interventions and the evaluation of processes and outcomes are described in this article together with the barriers and enabling factors associated with implementation research studies. There is a strong need in Argentina and the region at large to build the health research capacity and infrastructure necessary to undertake implementation studies to translate evidence from research findings into improvements in health policy and practice to address CVD and their risk factors. PMID:25754563

  7. The effects of control of resources on magnitudes of sex differences in human mate preferences.

    PubMed

    Moore, Fhionna; Cassidy, Clare; Perrett, David I

    2010-12-03

    We tested the hypothesis that magnitudes of sex differences in human mate preferences would be inversely related to control of resources. Specifically, we predicted that the ideal partner age, maximum and minimum partner ages tolerated and preferences for "physical attractiveness" over "good financial prospects" of female participants would approach parity with that of men with increasing control of resources. In a sample of 3770 participants recruited via an online survey, the magnitudes of sex differences in age preferences increased with resource control whereas the sex difference in preferences for "physical attractiveness" over "good financial prospects" disappeared when resource control was high. Results are inconsistent, and are discussed in the context of adaptive tradeoff and biosocial models of sex differences in human mate preferences.

  8. 2003 Sitewide Institutional Controls Annual Assessment Report for Hanford CERCLA Response Action

    SciTech Connect

    TEIMOURI, A.E.

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this assessment as specified in the Institutional Controls (IC) Plan was two-fold: (1) to evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of ICs associated with ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980'' (CERCLA) Records of Decision (RODs); and (2) to identify corrective actions as necessary. Additionally, this assessment covered an assessment of sitewide ICs at the Hanford Site. The IC Plan was approved by the Tri-Party agencies July 2002, ''Sitewide Institutional Controls Plan for Hanford CERCLA Response Actions,'' DOE/RL-2001-41, Revision 0. The goal of the Plan was to identify ICs for current CERCLA response actions, describe how they are implemented and maintained, and serve as a reference for the selection of ICs in the future. Section 4.2 of the IC Plan summarizes the objectives for the assessment as follows: ''A focused and periodic self-assessment and reporting of ICs provides for an evaluation of the effectiveness of the controls and the opportunity for cost-effective improvements.

  9. Research resource: dkCOIN, the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) consortium interconnectivity network: a pilot program to aggregate research resources generated by multiple research consortia.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Neil J; Howard, Christopher L; Aufiero, Michael; Easton-Marks, Jeremy; Steffen, David L; Becnel, Lauren B; Magnuson, Mark A; McIndoe, Richard A; Cartailler, Jean-Philippe

    2012-10-01

    The National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) supports multiple basic science consortia that generate high-content datasets, reagent resources, and methodologies, in the fields of kidney, urology, hematology, digestive, and endocrine diseases, as well as metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. These currently include the Beta Cell Biology Consortium, the Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas, the Diabetic Complications Consortium, and the Mouse Metabolic Phenotyping Centers. Recognizing the synergy that would accrue from aggregating information generated and curated by these initiatives in a contiguous informatics network, we created the NIDDK Consortium Interconnectivity Network (dkCOIN; www.dkcoin.org). The goal of this pilot project, organized by the NIDDK, was to establish a single point of access to a toolkit of interconnected resources (datasets, reagents, and protocols) generated from individual consortia that could be readily accessed by biologists of diverse backgrounds and research interests. During the pilot phase of this activity dkCOIN collected nearly 2000 consortium-curated resources, including datasets (functional genomics) and reagents (mouse strains, antibodies, and adenoviral constructs) and built nearly 3000 resource-to-resource connections, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of further extending this database in the future. Thus, dkCOIN promises to be a useful informatics solution for rapidly identifying useful resources generated by participating research consortia.

  10. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee, July 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-15

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the Carbon Injection System (the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System and the Pulse Jet Fabric Filter). Testing also continued across the B and W/CHX Heat Exchanger project. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Inspections of these idled systems were conducted this month.

  11. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-01-12

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified.

  12. Alcoholism - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - alcoholism ... The following organizations are good resources for information on alcoholism : Alcoholics Anonymous -- www.aa.org Al-Anon Family Groups www.al-anon.org National Institute on Alcohol ...

  13. Scoliosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - scoliosis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on scoliosis : American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00626 National Institute of Arthritis and ...

  14. Migraine - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - migraine ... The following organizations are good resources for information on migraines : American Migraine Foundation -- www.americanmigrainefoundation.org National Headache Foundation -- www.headaches.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  15. Blindness - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - blindness ... The following organizations are good resources for information on blindness : American Foundation for the Blind -- www.afb.org Foundation Fighting Blindness -- www.blindness.org National Eye Institute -- ...

  16. Epilepsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - epilepsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on epilepsy : Epilepsy Foundation -- www.epilepsy.com National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/ ...

  17. Psoriasis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - psoriasis ... The following organizations are good resources for information about psoriasis : American Academy of Dermatology -- www.aad.org/skin-conditions/dermatology-a-to-z/psoriasis National Institute of ...

  18. Lupus - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - lupus ... The following organizations are good resources for information on systemic lupus erythematosus : The Lupus Foundation of America -- www.lupus.org The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal ...

  19. Scleroderma - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - scleroderma ... The following organizations are good resources for information on scleroderma : American College of Rheumatology -- www.rheumatology.org/practice/clinical/patients/diseases_and_conditions/scleroderma.asp National Institute ...

  20. Commercial Motor Vehicle Driving Performance: An Examination of Attentional Resources and Control Using a Driving Simulator.

    PubMed

    McManus, Benjamin; Heaton, Karen; Stavrinos, Despina

    2017-04-03

    Commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers often multitask when driving to increase travel efficiency and to increase alertness. Secondary tasks have been shown to impact CMV driving differentially, and attentional resources have been posited as a key factor. However, underlying mechanisms of secondary task engagement on attention and task performance have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is unknown if attentional control moderates these differential effects of secondary tasks and task performance. The current study aimed to examine decrements in driving performance from a resource-control theory by determining the specific relation between attentional resources and attentional control. To achieve this goal, 2 objectives were determined. Objective 1 considered the differential impact of secondary tasks on attentional resources in CMV driving performance. Objective 2 investigated individual differences in attentional control in the sample of CMV drivers. Fifty CMV drivers (Mage = 39.8 years, SD = 8.36) completed the 10-min psychomotor vigilance task providing measures of attentional control and also drove in a CMV driving simulator 4 times while presented with 1 of 4 secondary tasks. Findings linked secondary tasks to attentional resources, which, consequently affected CMV driving performance. The mediating effect of attentional resources significantly differed among varying levels of attentional control. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Resource Form Factor and Installation of GFA Controllers

    SciTech Connect

    DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2009-11-15

    The focus of this task is to optimize the form and placement of a controller comprising the Grid Friendly™ appliance (GFA) controller, power supply and power relay (and/or a solid-state power electronic switch) that would command a domestic water heater to shed its load in response to stress on the electric power grid. The GFA controller would disconnect the water heater from its supply circuit whenever it senses a low voltage signal or other indicators of system stress communicated via the electric power distribution system. Power would be reconnected to the appliance when the GFA controller senses the absence of these signals. This project has also considered more frequent cycling of this controller’s relay switch to perform demand-side frequency regulation. The principal criteria considered in this optimization are reliability, cost and life expectancy of the GFA components. The alternative embodiments of the GFA equipment under consideration are: Option 1- installation inside the insulation space of the water heater between the tank and jacket Option 2 containment in a separate nearby electrical enclosure Option 3 - as a modification or adjunct to the distribution panel housing and/or the breaker that protects the water heater supply circuit.

  2. Institutional Controls and Transfer of Real Property under CERCLA Section 120(h)(3)(A), (B) or (C)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides guidance to the EPA on the exercise of EPA's discretion under CERCLA section 120(h)(3)(A),(B), or (C) when EPA is called upon to evaluate institutional controls as part of a remedial action.

  3. Impact of Water Control Projects on Fisheries Resources in Bangladesh

    PubMed

    Mirza; Ericksen

    1996-07-01

    Bangladesh is a very flat delta built up by the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna/Barak river systems. Because of its geographical location, floods cause huge destruction of lives and properties almost every year. Water control programs have been undertaken to enhance development through mitigating the threat of disasters. This structural approach to flood hazard has severely affected floodplain fisheries that supply the major share of protein to rural Bangladesh, as exemplified by the Chandpur Irrigation Project. Although the regulated environment of the Chandpur project has become favorable for closed-water cultured fish farming, the natural open-water fishery loss has been substantial. Results from research show that fish yields were better under preproject conditions. Under project conditions per capita fish consumption has dropped significantly, and the price of fish has risen beyond the means of the poor people, so that fish protein in the diet of poor people is gradually declining. Bangladesh is planning to expand water control facilities to the remaining flood-prone areas in the next 15-20 years. This will cause further loss of floodplain fisheries. If prices for closed-water fish remain beyond the buying power of the poor, alternative sources of cheap protein will be required.

  4. Accessibility and Use of Web-Based Electronic Resources by Physicians in a Psychiatric Institution in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oduwole, Adebambo Adewale; Oyewumi, Olatundun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine the accessibility and use of web-based electronic databases on the Health InterNetwork Access to Research Initiative (HINARI) portal by physicians in the Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Aro--a psychiatry health institution in Nigeria. Design/methodology/approach: Collection of data was through the use of a three-part…

  5. A Resource-Constrained Approach to Implementing Analytics in an Institution of Higher Education: An Experience Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buerck, John P.; Mudigonda, Srikanth P.

    2014-01-01

    Academic analytics and learning analytics have been increasingly adopted by academic institutions of higher learning for improving student performance and retention. While several studies have reported the implementation details and the successes of specific analytics initiatives, relatively fewer studies exist in literature that describe the…

  6. Future Space Requirements for Indiana's Institutions of Higher Education. Higher Education in Indiana. Long Range Needs and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayless, Paul C.; And Others

    Based on data obtained in earlier phases of a comprehensive planning study, this report presents--(1) the development of a space projection model responsive to unique institutional requirements, and (2) a forecast of the aggregate academic space needs of higher education in Indiana for a given future enrollment level. The scope of the study and a…

  7. Saltstone Disposal Facility Closure Cap Configuration and Degradation Base Case: Institutional Control to Pine Forest Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.A.

    2004-03-19

    The Performance Assessment (PA) for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) is currently under revision. As part of the PA revision and as documented herein, the closure cap configuration has been reevaluated and closure cap degradation mechanisms and their impact upon infiltration through the closure cap have been evaluated for the institutional control to pine forest, land use scenario. This land use scenario is considered the base case land use scenario. This scenario assumes a 100-year institutional control period following final SDF closure during which the closure cap is maintained. At the end of institutional control, it is assumed that a pine forest succeeds the cap's original bamboo cover. Infiltration through the upper hydraulic barrier layer of the closure cap as determined by this evaluation will be utilized as the infiltration input to subsequent PORFLOW vadose zone contaminant transport modeling, which will also be performed as part of the PA revision. The impacts of pine forest succession, erosion, and colloidal clay migration as degradation mechanisms on the hydraulic properties of the closure cap layers over time have been estimated and the resulting infiltration through the closure cap has been evaluated. The primary changes caused by the degradation mechanisms that result in increased infiltration are the formation of holes in the upper GCL by pine forest succession and the reduction in the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the drainage layers due to colloidal clay migration into the layers. Erosion can also result in significant increases in infiltration if it causes the removal of soil layers, which provide water storage for the promotion of evapotranspiration. For this scenario, infiltration through the upper GCL was estimated at approximately 0.29 inches/year under initial intact conditions, it increased to approximately 11.6 inches/year at year 1000 in nearly a linear fashion, and it approached an asymptote of around 14.1 inches/year at year

  8. The earth resources technology satellite - Photographic facility quality control program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    A detailed description is given of the quality control program used in the photographic laboratory of the NASA-ERTS Ground Data Handling System. The product response variables measured include tone reproduction, resolution, and low spatial frequency noise. In addition to product response variables, certain performance parameters of the laboratory printers and processors are frequently measured in order to produce consistent duplications of archival photography. A description is given of the operation and use of a densitometer/computer interface which is used to calculate three tone reproduction response variables - film speed, average gradient, and base plus fog density. This procedure eliminates the need for any hand plotting of D log E curves to manually determine response variables.

  9. Potential International Approaches to Ownership/Control of Human Genetic Resources.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    In its governance activities for genetic resources, the international community has adopted various approaches to their ownership, including: free access; common heritage of mankind; intellectual property rights; and state sovereign rights. They have also created systems which combine elements of these approaches. While governance of plant and animal genetic resources is well-established internationally, there has not yet been a clear approach selected for human genetic resources. Based on assessment of the goals which international governance of human genetic resources ought to serve, and the implications for how they will be accessed and utilised, it is argued that common heritage of mankind will be the most appropriate approach to adopt to their ownership/control. It does this with the aim of stimulating discussion in this area and providing a starting point for deeper consideration of how a common heritage of mankind, or similar, regime for human genetic resources would function and be implemented.

  10. Adolescent Resource Control: Associations with Physical and Relational Aggression, Prosocial and Withdrawn Behaviors, and Peer Regard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findley, Danielle; Ojanen, Tiina

    2013-01-01

    This study examined adolescent coercive and prosocial resource control strategies in relation to various indices of peer-reported behaviors and peer regard ("N" = 384; 12-14 years). Coercive control was uniquely positively related to physical and relational aggression and peer disliking, and negatively to prosocial behaviors when…

  11. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center final monthly technical report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit this month involved the Trace Element Removal (TER) test block, and the simultaneous testing of the Lime Forced Oxidation process with DBA addition (LDG). Additionally, the second phase of the 1995 Carbon Injection test block began this month with the SDA/PJFF test configuration. At the end of the LDG testing this month, a one-week baseline test was conducted to generate approximately 200 lbs. of magnesium-lime FGD solids for analysis. On the 1.0 MW Post-FGD Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, performance testing was continued this month as measurements were taken for NO{sub x} removal efficiency, residual ammonia slip, and S0{sub 3} generation across the catalysts installed in the reactor. As a result of new directions received from EPRI, this will be the last scheduled month of testing for the SCR unit in 1995. At the completion of this month, the unit will be isolated from the flue gas path and placed in a cold-standby mode for future test activities. This report describes the status of facilities and test facilities at the pilot and mini-pilot plants.

  12. The Local Beneath the National and Global - Institutional Education, Credentialed Natural Resource Management (NRM) and Rural Community (Un) Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Janice

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of strategies for national and global outcomes has in some instances left rural community resources and practices devalued and disturbed and rural people demoralised with the result that local community sustainability has been compromised. Formal education in Australia is about many things, but is rarely sympathetic towards…

  13. Institutional and Technological Barriers to the Use of Open Educational Resources (OERs) in Physiology and Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassall, Christopher; Lewis, David I.

    2017-01-01

    Open educational resources (OERs) are becoming increasingly common as a tool in education, particularly in medical and biomedical education. However, three key barriers have been identified to their use: 1) lack of awareness of OERs, 2) lack of motivation to use OERs, and 3) lack of training in the use of OERs. Here, we explore these three…

  14. Let Us Take a Yale Open Course: A Chinese View of Open Educational Resources Provided by Institutions in the West

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, J.

    2013-01-01

    This research examines selected online comments from open courses available on Chinese websites. These courses were created by universities in the West as an effort to build open educational resources (OER) and were recently translated into Chinese and were relocated to some popular Chinese websites. This research aimed to understand why the…

  15. The Need to Improve Population and Resource Control in Thailand’s Counterinsurgency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    factors that gave advantage to the government:134 first, long experience of the British in Malaya – knowledge of the country, control of influence over...modifications. By improving population and resource control measures, the military will be able to reduce the insurgents’ influence , establish civil... influence , establish civil security, and finally control areas. vi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK vii TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION

  16. Summary of Resources for the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2003-01-01

    The assembly complete Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) s ystem for the International Space Station (ISS) will consist of compo nents and subsystems in both the U.S. and International partner eleme nts which together will perform the functions of Temperature and Hum idity Control (THC), Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Water Recovery and Management (WRM), Fire Detect ion and Suppression (FDS), and Vacuum System (VS) for the station. D ue to limited resources available on ISS, detailed attention is given to minimizing and tracking all resources associated with all systems , beginning with estimates during the hardware development phase thr ough measured actuals when flight hardware is built and delivered. A summary of resources consumed by the current on-orbit U.S. ECLS syste m hardware is presented, including launch weight, average continuous and peak power loads, on-orbit volume and resupply logistics. ..

  17. Demand management in healthcare IT. Controlling IT demand to meet constrained IT resource supply.

    PubMed

    Mohrmann, Gregg; Schlusberg, Craig; Kropf, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare is behind other industries in the ability to manage and control increasing demand for IT services, and to ensure that IT staff are available when and where needed. From everyday support requests to large capital projects, the IT department's ability to meet demand is limited. Organizational and IT leaders need to proactively address this issue and do a better job of predicting when services will be needed and whether appropriate resources will be available. This article describes the common issues that healthcare IT departments face in the efficient delivery of services as a result of factors such as budget constraints, skill sets and project dependencies. Best practices for controlling demand are discussed, including resource allocation, governance processes and a graphical analysis of forecasted vs. actual thresholds. Using specific healthcare provider examples, the article intends to provide IT management with an approach to predicting and controlling resource demand.

  18. EAWAG: An Environmental Science and Engineering Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Stanton

    1980-01-01

    Interviewed is the director of a Swiss research and teaching institute in the field of water resources, water pollution control, and waste management. Topics include lake studies, research programs and priorities, advisory services, and the organizational structure of EAWAG. (BT)

  19. Institutional and legal arrangements in the Nile river basin: suggestions to improve the current situation toward adaptive integrated water resources management.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Khalid Mohamed El Hassan

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted in this work in order to investigate the current situation in the Nile river basin (NRB) regarding the institutional and legal arrangements needed to support the adaptive integrated water resources management (AIWRM) strategy. Two similar river basins were selected to achieve this comparison and to introduce suggestions to reform the current situation in the basin. Before that, the ideal situation is investigated to be as a yardstick for the desired situation. The study indicated that the necessary AIWRM criteria may include regulatory as well as implementation organizations that support shared-vision reaching with its all necessary features (cooperation, stakeholders' participation, subsidiarity, and information and knowledge exchange). Thus the main features of the desired situations regarding AIWRM in river basins are stakeholders' participation, learning-driven ability, quick response to risks and uncertainties, and finally a legal framework that could support these criteria. Although the AIWRM criteria seem to be satisfied in NRB, the basin lacks the necessary regulatory institutions as well as the legal framework. According to this, this study recommends to reform the current situation in NRB by creating regulator institutions (policy and decision making level) as well a legal framework to legitimate them.

  20. Modeling the spread and control of dengue with limited public health resources.

    PubMed

    Abdelrazec, Ahmed; Bélair, Jacques; Shan, Chunhua; Zhu, Huaiping

    2016-01-01

    A deterministic model for the transmission dynamics of dengue fever is formulated to study, with a nonlinear recovery rate, the impact of available resources of the health system on the spread and control of the disease. Model results indicate the existence of multiple endemic equilibria, as well as coexistence of an endemic equilibrium with a periodic solution. Additionally, our model exhibits the phenomenon of backward bifurcation. The results of this study could be helpful for public health authorities in their planning of a proper resource allocation for the control of dengue transmission.

  1. Online fault adaptive control for efficient resource management in Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelwahed, Sherif; Wu, Jian; Biswas, Gautam; Ramirez, John; Manders, Eric-J

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the design and implementation of a controller scheme for efficient resource management in Advanced Life Support Systems. In the proposed approach, a switching hybrid system model is used to represent the dynamics of the system components and their interactions. The operational specifications for the controller are represented by utility functions, and the corresponding resource management problem is formulated as a safety control problem. The controller is designed as a limited-horizon online supervisory controller that performs a limited forward search on the state-space of the system at each time step, and uses the utility functions to decide on the best action. The feasibility and accuracy of the online algorithm can be assessed at design time. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the scheme by running a set of experiments on the Reverse Osmosis (RO) subsystem of the Water Recovery System (WRS).

  2. Controlling scabies in institutional settings: a review of medications, treatment models, and implementation.

    PubMed

    Scheinfeld, Noah

    2004-01-01

    , education, treatment, and disinfection leads to failure to control scabies epidemics. Control of epidemics of institutional scabies requires attention to treatment effects and logistics. Treatment is low risk, but cumbersome because many individuals need be treated. It is advisable to restrict, where possible, the number of staff members that deal with scabies patients to limit the spread of the scabies. Prolonged surveillance is required for the eradication of institutional scabies. While the foregoing plans require coordination of all involved personnel and sustained efforts, they are necessary to halt the spread of scabies to patients and staff, to enhance their morale, and to prevent deterioration of labor and public relations.

  3. Becoming farmers: opening spaces for women's resource control in Calakmul, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Radel, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Despite empirical findings on women's varied and often extensive participation in smallholder agriculture in Latin America, their participation continues to be largely invisible. In this article, I argue that the intransigency of farming women's invisibility reflects, in part, a discursive construction of farmers as men. Through a mixture of quantitative and qualitative methods, including interviews with one hundred women in Calakmul, Mexico, I demonstrate the material implications of gendered farmer identities for women's control of resources, including land and conservation and development project resources. In particular, I relate the activities of one women's agricultural community-based organization and the members' collective adoption of transgressive identities as farmers. For these women, the process of becoming farmers resulted in increased access to and control over resources. This empirical case study illustrates the possibility of women's collective action to challenge and transform women's continued local invisibility as agricultural actors in rural Latin American spaces.

  4. Measuring Learned Resourcefulness in College Students: Factor Structure of the Self-Control Schedule (SCS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWhirter, Benedict T.; Burrow-Sanchez, Jason J.; Townsend, Katesy C.

    2008-01-01

    Rosenbaum's Self-Control Schedule (SCS) has been used as a unidimensional measure of Learned Resourcefulness (LR) in previous research. In this study we clarified the factor structure of the SCS among college students (N = 583) by conducting a principal axis factor analysis with oblique (Oblimin) rotation on the SCS. Results revealed a…

  5. The Use of Passwords for Controlled Access to Computer Resources. Computer Science & Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Helen M.

    This paper considers the generation of passwords and their effective application to the problem of controlling access to computer resources. After describing the need for and uses of passwords, password schemes are categorized according to selection technique, lifetime, physical characteristics, and information content. Password protection, both…

  6. Analyzing Crime and Crime Control: A Resource Guide. Economics-Political Science Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Ruth I.; And Others

    This document, the fourth in a series of resource guides emphasizing economic-political analysis of contemporary public policies and issues, focuses on crime control. Designed as a three-week unit for secondary school students, the guide is presented in three sections. The introduction presents an economic and a political science framework for…

  7. Quantum resource control for noisy Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering with qubit measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiukas, Jukka; Burgarth, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate how quantum optimal control can be used to enhance quantum resources for bipartite one-way protocols, specifically Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering with qubit measurements. Steering is relevant for one-sided device-independent key distribution, the realistic implementations of which necessitate the study of noisy scenarios. So far, mainly the case of imperfect detection efficiency has been considered; here we look at the effect of dynamical noise responsible for decoherence and dissipation. In order to set up the optimization, we map the steering problem into the equivalent joint measurability problem and employ quantum resource-theoretic robustness monotones from that context. The advantage is that incompatibility (hence steerability) with arbitrary pairs of noisy qubit measurements has been completely characterized through an analytical expression, which can be turned into a computable cost function with exact gradient. Furthermore, dynamical loss of incompatibility has recently been illustrated by using these monotones. We demonstrate resource control numerically by using a special gradient-based software showing, in particular, the advantage over naive control with cost function chosen as a fidelity in relation to a specific target. We subsequently illustrate the complexity of the control landscapes with a simplified two-variable scheme. The results contribute to the theoretical understanding of the limitations in realistic implementations of quantum information protocols, also paving the way to practical use of the rather abstract quantum resource theories.

  8. 21 CFR 1311.130 - Requirements for establishing logical access control-Institutional practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... applicable, individual practitioner's DEA registration expires, unless the registration has been renewed. (3) The institutional practitioner's or, where applicable, individual practitioner's DEA registration...

  9. 21 CFR 1311.130 - Requirements for establishing logical access control-Institutional practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... applicable, individual practitioner's DEA registration expires, unless the registration has been renewed. (3) The institutional practitioner's or, where applicable, individual practitioner's DEA registration...

  10. 21 CFR 1311.130 - Requirements for establishing logical access control-Institutional practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... applicable, individual practitioner's DEA registration expires, unless the registration has been renewed. (3) The institutional practitioner's or, where applicable, individual practitioner's DEA registration...

  11. 21 CFR 1311.130 - Requirements for establishing logical access control-Institutional practitioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... applicable, individual practitioner's DEA registration expires, unless the registration has been renewed. (3) The institutional practitioner's or, where applicable, individual practitioner's DEA registration...

  12. The Revised WIPP Passive Institutional Controls Program - A Conceptual Plan - 13145

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Russ; Klein, Thomas; Van Luik, Abraham

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy/Carlsbad Field Office (DOE/CBFO) is responsible for managing all activities related to the disposal of TRU and TRU-mixed waste in the geologic repository, 650 m below the land surface, at WIPP, near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The main function of the Passive Institutional Controls (PIC's) program is to inform future generations of the long-lived radioactive wastes buried beneath their feet in the desert. For the first 100 years after cessation of disposal operations, the rooms are closed and the shafts leading underground sealed, WIPP is mandated by law to institute Active Institutional Controls (AIC's) with fences, gates, and armed guards on patrol. At this same time a plan must be in place of how to warn/inform the future, after the AIC's are gone, of the consequences of intrusion into the geologic repository disposal area. A plan was put into place during the 1990's with records management and storage, awareness triggers, permanent marker design concepts and testing schedules. This work included the thoughts of expert panels and individuals. The plan held up under peer review and met the requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Today the NEA is coordinating a study called the 'Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) Across Generations' to provide the international nuclear waste repository community with a guide on how a nuclear record archive programs should be approached and developed. CBFO is cooperating and participating in this project and will take what knowledge is gained and apply that to the WIPP program. At the same time CBFO is well aware that the EPA and others are expecting DOE to move forward with planning for the future WIPP PIC's program; so a plan will be in place in time for WIPP's closure slated for the early 2030's. The DOE/CBFO WIPP PIC's program in place today meets the regulatory criteria, but complete feasibility of implementation is questionable, and may not be in conformance

  13. THE INTEGRATION OF ENGINEERED AND INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS: A CASE STUDY APPROACH WITH LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUSLY CLOSED SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

    2005-02-01

    Environmental remediation efforts that are underway at hundreds of contaminated sites in the United States will not be able to remediate large portions of those sites to conditions that would permit unrestricted access. Rather, large volumes of waste materials, contaminated soils and cleanup residuals will have to be isolated either in place or in new, often on-site, disposal cells with long term monitoring, maintenance and institutional control needs. The challenge continues to be to provide engineering systems and controls that can ensure the protection of public health and the environment over very long time horizons (hundreds to perhaps thousands of years) with minimal intervention. Effective long term management of legacy hazardous and nuclear waste requires an integrated approach that addresses both the engineered containment and control system itself and the institutional controls and other responsibilities that are needed. Decisions concerning system design, monitoring and maintenance, and the institutional controls that will be employed are best done through a "risk-nformed, performance-based" approach. Such an approach should incorporate an analysis of potential "failure" modes and consequences for all important system features, together with lessons learned from experience with systems already in place. The authors will present the preliminary results of a case study approach that included several sites where contamination isolation systems including institutional controls have been implemented. The results are being used together with failure trees and logic diagrams that have been developed for both the engineered barriers and the institutional controls. The use of these analytical tools to evaluate the potential for different levels of failure and associated consequences will be discussed. Of special interest is the robustness of different approaches to providing long-term protection through redundancy and defense in depth.

  14. Proceedings of the Summer Institute on Biological Control of Plant Insects and Diseases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Fowden G., Ed.; Harris, F. A., Ed.

    This institute, conducted at Mississippi State University, was an outgrowth of the Council of Higher Education in the Agricultural Science's efforts to study the needs and opportunities for the advancement of scientific knowledge in land grant institutions and recommend programs for implementation. The proceedings serve as an information source to…

  15. Advances in water resources technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The presentation of technological advances in the field of water resources will be the focus of Advances in Water Resources Technology, a conference to be held in Athens, Greece, March 20-23, 1991. Organized by the European Committee for Water Resources Management, in cooperation with the National Technical University of Athens, the conference will feature state-of-the art papers, contributed original research papers, and poster papers. Session subjects will include surface water, groundwater, water resources conservation, water quality and reuse, computer modeling and simulation, real-time control of water resources systems, and institutions and methods for technology.The official language of the conference will be English. Special meetings and discussions will be held for investigating methods of effective technology transfer among European countries. For this purpose, a wide representation of research institutions, universities and companies involved in water resources technology will be attempted.

  16. Resources for infection prevention and control on the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura E; Reyes, Katherine; Zervos, Marcus J

    2009-06-01

    This review summarizes infection prevention resources on the Internet. Web sites are presented in 8 categories: guidelines, policies, and regulatory bodies; health care-associated infection and multidrug-resistant organisms; surveillance, reporting, and initiatives; antibiotic use; employee health; long-term care facilities; facility and environmental infection control; and professional societies, educational opportunities, and listserves. For example, links to the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program and National Healthcare Safety Network reports are provided among resources for infection surveillance, reporting, and initiatives. A link to guidelines for infection prevention in health care workers is listed with other information regarding employee health. The Web address for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America guidelines for infection control in long-term care facilities is listed with resources for long-term care facilities. Guidelines for construction and environmental services are summarized with other information regarding facility and environmental infection control. This review summarizes the most useful and up-to-date infection prevention resources on the Internet and will simplify the search for pertinent information.

  17. Climate studies: can students' perceptions of the ideal educational environment be of use for institutional planning and resource utilization?

    PubMed

    Till, Hettie

    2005-06-01

    As educational climate strongly affects student achievement, satisfaction and success, it is important to get regular feedback from students on how they experience the educational environment. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) Inventory was administered on the same day to all first-, second- and third-year students at the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC) and the students were requested to complete the questionnaire as they were actually experiencing the educational environment at CMCC, and then to say what they would have wanted, or preferred it to be like. Valid returns were received from 146 (95%) first-, 123 (82%) second- and 73 (48%) third-year students (n = 342). The results indicated that the DREEM Inventory used in the Ideal mode, together with the responses in the Actual mode, could be used effectively to determine the dissonance between what they had and what they would have liked to have. It was found that there was a strong similarity in the areas of the educational environment that the different groups of students indicated as falling short of their ideal. The results of this study provided a useful basis for strategic planning and resource utilization.

  18. Model Predictive Control-based Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Lian, Jianming; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-01-07

    Distributed energy resources, such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response, can be used to complement conventional generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging, especially in isolated systems. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation performance. The goals of the optimization problem are to minimize fuel costs and maximize the utilization of wind while considering equipment life of generators and energy storage. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve a look-ahead dispatch optimization problem and the performance is compared to an open loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the closed loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties and variability caused in the system.

  19. Model Predictive Control-based Optimal Coordination of Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Kalsi, Karanjit; Lian, Jianming; Elizondo, Marcelo A.

    2013-04-03

    Distributed energy resources, such as renewable energy resources (wind, solar), energy storage and demand response, can be used to complement conventional generators. The uncertainty and variability due to high penetration of wind makes reliable system operations and controls challenging, especially in isolated systems. In this paper, an optimal control strategy is proposed to coordinate energy storage and diesel generators to maximize wind penetration while maintaining system economics and normal operation performance. The goals of the optimization problem are to minimize fuel costs and maximize the utilization of wind while considering equipment life of generators and energy storage. Model predictive control (MPC) is used to solve a look-ahead dispatch optimization problem and the performance is compared to an open loop look-ahead dispatch problem. Simulation studies are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the closed loop MPC in compensating for uncertainties and variability caused in the system.

  20. Human genetics and politics as mutually beneficial resources: The case of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics during the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Sheila Faith

    2006-01-01

    This essay analyzes one of Germany's former premier research institutions for biomedical research, the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics (KWIA) as a test case for the way in which politics and human heredity served as resources for each other during the Third Reich. Examining the KWIA from this perspective brings us a step closer to answering the questions at the heart of most recent scholarship concerning the biomedical community under the swastika: (1) How do we explain why the vast majority of German human geneticists and eugenicists were willing to work for the National Socialist state and, at the very least, legitimized its exterminationist racial policy; and (2) what accounts for at least some of Germany's most renowned medically trained professionals' involvement in forms of morally compromised science that wholly transcend the bounds of normal scientific practice? Although a complete answer to this question must await an examination of other German biological research centers, the present study suggests that during the Nazi period the symbiotic relationship between human genetics and politics served to radicalize both. The dynamic between the science of human heredity and Nazi politics changed the research practice of some of the biomedical sciences housed at the KWIA. It also simultaneously made it easier for the Nazi state to carry out its barbaric racial program leading, finally, to the extermination of millions of so-called racial undesirables.

  1. From Management to Negotiation: Technical and Institutional Innovations for Integrated Water Resource Management in the Upper Comoé River Basin, Burkina Faso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncoli, Carla; Kirshen, Paul; Etkin, Derek; Sanon, Moussa; Somé, Léopold; Dembélé, Youssouf; Sanfo, Bienvenue J.; Zoungrana, Jacqueline; Hoogenboom, Gerrit

    2009-10-01

    This study focuses on the potential role of technical and institutional innovations for improving water management in a multi-user context in Burkina Faso. We focus on a system centered on three reservoirs that capture the waters of the Upper Comoé River Basin and servicing a diversity of users, including a sugar manufacturing company, a urban water supply utility, a farmer cooperative, and other downstream users. Due to variable and declining rainfall and expanding users’ needs, drastic fluctuations in water supply and demand occur during each dry season. A decision support tool was developed through participatory research to enable users to assess the impact of alternative release and diversion schedules on deficits faced by each user. The tool is meant to be applied in the context of consultative planning by a local user committee that has been created by a new national integrated water management policy. We contend that both solid science and good governance are instrumental in realizing efficient and equitable water management and adaptation to climate variability and change. But, while modeling tools and negotiation platforms may assist users in managing climate risk, they also introduce additional uncertainties into the deliberative process. It is therefore imperative to understand how these technological and institutional innovations frame water use issues and decisions to ensure that such framing is consistent with the goals of integrated water resource management.

  2. Use of Evidence-Based Practices and Resources Among Comprehensive Cancer Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Steele, C. Brooke; Rose, John M.; Chovnick, Gary; Townsend, Julie S.; Stockmyer, Chrisandra K.; Fonseka, Jamila; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Context While efforts to promote use of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for cancer control have increased, questions remain whether this will result in widespread adoption of EBPs (eg, Guide to Community Preventive Services interventions) by comprehensive cancer control (CCC) programs. Objective To examine use of EBPs among CCC programs to develop cancer control plans and select interventions. Design Conducted Web-based surveys of and telephone interviews with CCC program staff between March and July 2012. Setting CCC programs funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP). Participants Sixty-one CCC program directors. Main Outcome Measures 1) Use of and knowledge/attitudes about EBPs and related resources and 2) EBP-related technical assistance needs. Results Seventy-five percent of eligible program directors reported use of EBPs to a moderate or great extent to address program objectives. Benefits of using EBPS included their effectiveness has been proven, they are an efficient use of resources, and they lend credibility to an intervention. Challenges to using EBPs included resource limitations, lack of culturally appropriate interventions, and limited skills adapting EBPs for local use. Most respondents had heard of and used Web sites for The Guide to Community Preventive Services (95% and 91%, respectively) and Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T. (98% and 75%, respectively). Training needs included how to adapt an EBP and its materials for cultural appropriateness (state 78%, tribe 86%, territory 80%) and how to maintain the fidelity of an EBP (state 75%, tribe 86%, territory 60%). Conclusions While awareness, knowledge, and use of EBPs and related resources are high, respondents identified numerous challenges and training needs. The findings from this study may be used to enhance technical assistance provided to NCCCP grantees related to selecting and implementing EBPs. PMID:24402431

  3. 76 FR 55109 - In the Matter of Certain DC-DC Controllers and Products Containing Same; Notice of Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain DC-DC Controllers and Products Containing Same; Notice of Institution of... Trade Commission, 500 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20436, telephone (202) 205-3061. Copies of all.... International Trade Commission, 500 E Street, SW., Washington, DC 20436, telephone 202-205-2000....

  4. Gap Analysis for Chinese Drug Control Institutes to Achieve the Standards of World Health Organization Medicine Prequalification.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xin; Yang, Yue

    2017-02-01

    The study aims to explore the challenges and the gaps faced by Chinese Drug Control Institutes in achieving the standards of World Health Organization (WHO) Medicine Prequalification. The study was undertaken with 6 Provincial Drug Control Institutes in China from November 2012 to November 2013. The study assessed key elements required to comply with WHO Good Practices for Pharmaceutical Quality Control Laboratories (GPPQCL). For GPPQCL, the study found gaps in quality management system, control of documentation, data-processing equipment, premises and equipment, contracts, reagents (water), reference substances and reference materials, calibration, verification of performance and qualification of equipment, instruments and other devices, analytical worksheet, evaluation of test results, personnel, and validation of analytical procedures. The study indicates that gaps are attributed to differences between the standards of Chinese Accreditation Standards and WHO-GPPQCL.

  5. The restorative effects of smoking upon self-control resources: a negative reinforcement pathway.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Bryan W; Ditre, Joseph W; Brandon, Thomas H

    2012-02-01

    Based on a model in which self-control (SC) is considered to be a limited resource, research suggests that diminished SC resources may increase the likelihood of tobacco smoking. Yet, the inverse--how smoking may influence SC resources--has not been tested. The authors of this study utilized a randomized, 2 × 2 crossed-factorial (SC Depletion Manipulation × Smoking Manipulation), between-subjects design to test the hypothesis that smoking restores depleted SC resources. To manipulate SC depletion, experimenters instructed half of 132 nicotine dependent smokers to suppress their emotional reaction to a brief video depicting environmental damage (i.e., depletion), whereas the other half were instructed to "act natural" (i.e., no depletion) during viewing. Half of the participants in each condition then smoked a cigarette, whereas the other half sat patiently without smoking (i.e., smoke vs. no smoke). All participants then completed behavioral measures of SC. As hypothesized, an interaction occurred between the depletion and smoking manipulations for duration of time spent on a frustrating mirror-tracing task. That is, depletion reduced persistence on the task, unless depletion was followed by smoking. This effect was mediated by positive affect (PA). Thus, smoking appeared to restore depleted SC resources via modulation of PA, but independent of negative affect or smoking urges. These findings suggest that restoration of SC resources may represent another means by which smoking is negatively reinforced. The application of the self-control strength model to the study of nicotine dependence may inform the development of novel treatment modalities.

  6. Integration of domain and resource-based reasoning for real-time control in dynamic environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Keith; Whitebread, Kenneth R.; Kendus, Michael; Cromarty, Andrew S.

    1993-01-01

    A real-time software controller that successfully integrates domain-based and resource-based control reasoning to perform task execution in a dynamically changing environment is described. The design of the controller is based on the concept of partitioning the process to be controlled into a set of tasks, each of which achieves some process goal. It is assumed that, in general, there are multiple ways (tasks) to achieve a goal. The controller dynamically determines current goals and their current criticality, choosing and scheduling tasks to achieve those goals in the time available. It incorporates rule-based goal reasoning, a TMS-based criticality propagation mechanism, and a real-time scheduler. The controller has been used to build a knowledge-based situation assessment system that formed a major component of a real-time, distributed, cooperative problem solving system built under DARPA contract. It is also being employed in other applications now in progress.

  7. Rationalizing historical successes of malaria control in Africa in terms of mosquito resource availability management.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Gerry F; Seyoum, Aklilu; Knols, Bart G J

    2004-08-01

    Environmental management of mosquito resources is a promising approach with which to control malaria, but it has seen little application in Africa for more than half a century. Here we present a kinetic model of mosquito foraging for aquatic habitats and vertebrate hosts that allows estimation of malaria transmission intensity by defining the availability of these resources as the rate at which individual mosquitoes encounter and use them. The model captures historically observed responses of malaria transmission to environmental change, highlights important gaps in current understanding of vector ecology, and suggests convenient solutions. Resource availability is an intuitive concept that provides an adaptable framework for models of mosquito population dynamics, gene flow, and pathogen transmission that can be conveniently parameterized with direct field measurements. Furthermore, the model presented predicts that drastic reductions of malaria transmission are possible with environmental management and elucidates an ecologic basis for previous successes of integrated malaria control in Africa before the advent of DDT or chloroquine. Environmental management for malaria control requires specialist skills that are currently lacking in sub-Saharan Africa where they are needed most. Infrastructure and human capacity building in clinical, public health, and environmental disciplines should therefore be prioritized so that growing financial support for tackling malaria can be translated into truly integrated control programs.

  8. 77 FR 30327 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice Of Application; Research Triangle Institute

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... substances: Drug Schedule Marihuana (7360) I Cocaine (9041) II The Institute will manufacture marihuana, and cocaine derivatives for use by their customers in analytical kits, reagents, and reference standards...

  9. Lessons From Love Canal: Considerations for the Effective Use of Institutional Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Fil, Richard M.

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of this paper is to provide background on a well-known failure of an institutional control (IC), an overview of the types and potential shortcomings of individual ICs, provide some considerations for more effectively selecting and maintaining appropriate ICs in the context of a decommissioning project (including those that may be subject to various federal and state requirements). In light of these considerations, it should be clear that the potential liabilities arising from the failure to comply with ICs may be very significant, even if such failure is not directly caused by the party responsible for the pre-existing conditions. A number of options exist to help manage risk at sites where impacts will remain in place following the completion of active decommissioning efforts. It is important to involve all appropriate professionals early on and throughout the process and to consult with other relevant parties (e.g., regulatory agencies, the community, and potential site owners and occupants) to evaluate the most appropriate ICs available. This is particularly critical in the context of a long-term decommissioning project involving a large number of contractors, personnel turnover or departure, potential isolation of individuals with focused technical or regulatory expertise, or other factors that may affect more ideal communication. Mechanisms for ensuring long-term compliance with ICs, as well as reliable approaches for enforcing their terms, also warrant early and on-going attention. However, even with a detailed and thoughtful approach, it must be recognized under certain circumstances that a more realistic goal may be to continue to reasonably minimize potential risks rather than absolutely avoid all risks for all time.

  10. 18 CFR 1317.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Educational... of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1317.205...

  11. 18 CFR 1317.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Educational... of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 1317.205...

  12. Biotic control of an abiotic resource: Palmyra Atoll, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, M.; Heinse, R.

    2013-12-01

    The availability of abiotic resources as a control on the spatial distribution of plants in an ecosystem is well studied. Less well known is the impact of plants on the availability of abiotic resources and how this biotic control of the environment influences vegetative distribution over time. In order to investigate this question, we examined the influence of vegetation on the water balance of a tropical atoll. Palmyra is a small (2.5 km2) wet atoll in the northern Line Islands that hosts five species of native and introduced trees/shrubs, Cocos nucifera, Pisonia grandis, Tournefortia argentia, Terminalia catappa, and Scaevola sericea, accounting for ~85% percent of the vegetative coverage on the island. Using historical aerial photographs, climate data, published estimates of vegetative cover, and published estimates of transpiration rates we present estimates of the range of vegetative water demand and the change in water demand as influenced by changes in vegetation distribution through time.

  13. Use of Martian resources in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smernoff, David T.; Macelroy, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Possibile crew life support systems for Mars are reviewed, focusing on ways to use Martian resources as life support materials. A system for bioregenerative life support using photosynthetic organisms, known as the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS), is examined. The possible use of higher plants or algae to produce oxygen on Mars is investigated. The specific requirements for a CELSS on Mars are considered. The exploitation of water, respiratory gases, and mineral nutrients on Mars is discussed.

  14. Bilharziasis control in relation to water resources development in Africa and the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Donald B.; Buzo, Z. J.; Rainey, Marshall B.; Francotte, Jean

    1962-01-01

    As part of its world-wide programme for the control of bilharziasis, the World Health Organization has set up a Bilharziasis Advisory Team, composed of an epidemiologist and an engineer, to investigate in different countries the prevalence of the disease and its relationship to irrigation, agriculture and a variety of factors associated with the development of water resources. This paper is an appraisal of the situation in 15 countries in Africa and the Middle East, based largely on surveys conducted by the Bilharziasis Advisory Team in the period 1958-60. Analyses of data from these 15 countries indicate that about 26 million people, out of a total population of 107 million, have bilharziasis. In spite of considerable expenditure on control measures, the prevalence of the disease is increasing. This trend is closely related to water resources development. On the basis of observations in the field, it is believed that improved water management and agricultural methods, stream and water impoundment control, the proper use of molluscicides and mechanical barriers, and certain aspects of environmental sanitation offer practical solutions to this problem. The complexity of these measures requires the closest co-operation between the various agencies, national and international, concerned with agriculture, water resources and public health. PMID:20604119

  15. Tracking food intake as bites: Effects on cognitive resources, eating enjoyment, and self-control.

    PubMed

    Weathers, Danny; Siemens, Jennifer Christie; Kopp, Steven W

    2017-04-01

    While monitoring food intake is critical for controlling eating, traditional tools designed for this purpose can be impractical when one desires real-time feedback. Further, the act of monitoring can deplete valuable cognitive resources. In response to these concerns, technologies have been developed to aid those wanting to control their food intake. Of note, devices can now track eating in number of bites taken as opposed to more traditional units such as pieces or volume. Through two studies, the current research investigates the effects of tracking food portions at the bite level on cognitive resources, enjoyment of the eating experience, and objective and subjective self-control. Results indicate that using wearable technology to track bite portions, as compared to doing so mentally, (1) reduces cognitive resource depletion, (2) is equally as effective for allowing users to successfully achieve eating goals, and (3) does not reduce enjoyment of the eating experience. These results support the viability of tracking food intake at the bite level, which holds a number of potential implications for eating and weight management.

  16. Fast packet switching algorithms for dynamic resource control over ATM networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, R.P.; Keattihananant, P.; Chang, T.; Heieh, J.; Du, D.

    1996-12-01

    Real-time continuous media traffic, such as digital video and audio, is expected to comprise a large percentage of the network load on future high speed packet switch networks such as ATM. A major feature which distinguishes high speed networks from traditional slower speed networks is the large amount of data the network must process very quickly. For efficient network usage, traffic control mechanisms are essential. Currently, most mechanisms for traffic control (such as flow control) have centered on the support of Available Bit Rate (ABR), i.e., non real-time, traffic. With regard to ATM, for ABR traffic, two major types of schemes which have been proposed are rate- control and credit-control schemes. Neither of these schemes are directly applicable to Real-time Variable Bit Rate (VBR) traffic such as continuous media traffic. Traffic control for continuous media traffic is an inherently difficult problem due to the time- sensitive nature of the traffic and its unpredictable burstiness. In this study, we present a scheme which controls traffic by dynamically allocating/de- allocating resources among competing VCs based upon their real-time requirements. This scheme incorporates a form of rate- control, real-time burst-level scheduling and link-link flow control. We show analytically potential performance improvements of our rate- control scheme and present a scheme for buffer dimensioning. We also present simulation results of our schemes and discuss the tradeoffs inherent in maintaining high network utilization and statistically guaranteeing many users` Quality of Service.

  17. Chemical dependence - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Substance use - resources, Drug abuse - resources; Resources - chemical dependence ... National Institute on Drug Abuse -- www.drugabuse.gov Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration -- www.samhsa.gov

  18. Resource supply overrides temperature as a controlling factor of marine phytoplankton growth.

    PubMed

    Marañón, Emilio; Cermeño, Pedro; Huete-Ortega, María; López-Sandoval, Daffne C; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Ramos, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The universal temperature dependence of metabolic rates has been used to predict how ocean biology will respond to ocean warming. Determining the temperature sensitivity of phytoplankton metabolism and growth is of special importance because this group of organisms is responsible for nearly half of global primary production, sustains most marine food webs, and contributes to regulate the exchange of CO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. Phytoplankton growth rates increase with temperature under optimal growth conditions in the laboratory, but it is unclear whether the same degree of temperature dependence exists in nature, where resources are often limiting. Here we use concurrent measurements of phytoplankton biomass and carbon fixation rates in polar, temperate and tropical regions to determine the role of temperature and resource supply in controlling the large-scale variability of in situ metabolic rates. We identify a biogeographic pattern in phytoplankton metabolic rates, which increase from the oligotrophic subtropical gyres to temperate regions and then coastal waters. Variability in phytoplankton growth is driven by changes in resource supply and appears to be independent of seawater temperature. The lack of temperature sensitivity of realized phytoplankton growth is consistent with the limited applicability of Arrhenius enzymatic kinetics when substrate concentrations are low. Our results suggest that, due to widespread resource limitation in the ocean, the direct effect of sea surface warming upon phytoplankton growth and productivity may be smaller than anticipated.

  19. Resource Supply Overrides Temperature as a Controlling Factor of Marine Phytoplankton Growth

    PubMed Central

    Marañón, Emilio; Cermeño, Pedro; Huete-Ortega, María; López-Sandoval, Daffne C.; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Ramos, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The universal temperature dependence of metabolic rates has been used to predict how ocean biology will respond to ocean warming. Determining the temperature sensitivity of phytoplankton metabolism and growth is of special importance because this group of organisms is responsible for nearly half of global primary production, sustains most marine food webs, and contributes to regulate the exchange of CO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. Phytoplankton growth rates increase with temperature under optimal growth conditions in the laboratory, but it is unclear whether the same degree of temperature dependence exists in nature, where resources are often limiting. Here we use concurrent measurements of phytoplankton biomass and carbon fixation rates in polar, temperate and tropical regions to determine the role of temperature and resource supply in controlling the large-scale variability of in situ metabolic rates. We identify a biogeographic pattern in phytoplankton metabolic rates, which increase from the oligotrophic subtropical gyres to temperate regions and then coastal waters. Variability in phytoplankton growth is driven by changes in resource supply and appears to be independent of seawater temperature. The lack of temperature sensitivity of realized phytoplankton growth is consistent with the limited applicability of Arrhenius enzymatic kinetics when substrate concentrations are low. Our results suggest that, due to widespread resource limitation in the ocean, the direct effect of sea surface warming upon phytoplankton growth and productivity may be smaller than anticipated. PMID:24921945

  20. Growth rate and resource imbalance interactively control biomass stoichiometry and elemental quotas of aquatic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Casey M; Whitaker, Emily A; Cotner, James B

    2017-03-01

    The effects of resource stoichiometry and growth rate on the elemental composition of biomass have been examined in a wide variety of organisms, but the interaction among these effects is often overlooked. To determine how growth rate and resource imbalance affect bacterial carbon (C): nitrogen (N): phosphorus (P) stoichiometry and elemental content, we cultured two strains of aquatic heterotrophic bacteria in chemostats at a range of dilution rates and P supply levels (C:P of 100:1 to 10,000:1). When growing below 50% of their maximum growth rate, P availability and dilution rate had strong interactive effects on biomass C:N:P, elemental quotas, cell size, respiration rate, and growth efficiency. In contrast, at faster growth rates, biomass stoichiometry was strongly homeostatic in both strains (C:N:P of 70:13:1 and 73:14:1) and elemental quotas of C, N, and P were tightly coupled (but not constant). Respiration and cell size increased with both growth rate and P limitation, and P limitation induced C accumulation and excess respiration. These results show that bacterial biomass stoichiometry is relatively constrained when all resources are abundant and growth rates are high, but at low growth rates resource imbalance is relatively more important than growth rate in controlling bacterial biomass composition.

  1. Automating PACS Quality Control with the Vanderbilt Image Processing Enterprise Resource

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, Michael L.; Welch, E. Brian; Landman, Bennett A.

    2011-01-01

    Precise image acquisition is an integral part of modern patient care and medical imaging research. Periodic quality control using standardized protocols and phantoms ensures that scanners are operating according to specifications, yet such procedures do not ensure that individual datasets are free from corruption–for example due to patient motion, transient interference, or physiological variability. If unacceptable artifacts are noticed during scanning, a technologist can repeat a procedure. Yet, substantial delays may be incurred if a problematic scan is not noticed until a radiologist reads the scans or an automated algorithm fails. Given scores of slices in typical three-dimensional scans and wide-variety of potential use cases, a technologist cannot practically be expected inspect all images. In large-scale research, automated pipeline systems have had great success in achieving high throughput. However, clinical and institutional workflows are largely based on DICOM and PACS technologies; these systems are not readily compatible with research systems due to security and privacy restrictions. Hence, quantitative quality control has been relegated to individual investigators and too often neglected. Herein, we propose a scalable system, the Vanderbilt Image Processing Enterprise Resource–VIPER, to integrate modular quality control and image analysis routines with a standard PACS configuration. This server unifies image processing routines across an institutional level and provides a simple interface so that investigators can collaborate to deploy new analysis technologies. VIPER integrates with high performance computing environments has successfully analyzed all standard scans from our institutional research center over the course of the last 18 months. PMID:24357910

  2. Integrating Space Flight Resource Management Skills into Technical Lessons for International Space Station Flight Controller Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Evelyn

    2008-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center s (JSC) International Space Station (ISS) Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM) training program is designed to teach the team skills required to be an effective flight controller. It was adapted from the SFRM training given to Shuttle flight controllers to fit the needs of a "24 hours a day/365 days a year" flight controller. More recently, the length reduction of technical training flows for ISS flight controllers impacted the number of opportunities for fully integrated team scenario based training, where most SFRM training occurred. Thus, the ISS SFRM training program is evolving yet again, using a new approach of teaching and evaluating SFRM alongside of technical materials. Because there are very few models in other industries that have successfully tied team and technical skills together, challenges are arising. Despite this, the Mission Operations Directorate of NASA s JSC is committed to implementing this integrated training approach because of the anticipated benefits.

  3. Control of turbulent boundary layer through air blowing due to external-flow resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V. I.; Boiko, A. V.; Kavun, I. N.

    2015-07-01

    The possibility to control turbulent incompressible boundary layer using air blowing through a finely perforated wall presenting part of the streamlined flat-plate surface was examined. The control was exercised via an action on the state and characteristics of the near-wall flow exerted by controlled (through variation of external-pressure-flow velocity) blowing of air through an air intake installed on the idle side of the plate. A stable reduction of the local values of skin friction coefficient along the model, reaching 50 % at the end of the perforated area, has been demonstrated. The obtained experimental and calculated data are indicative of a possibility to model the process of turbulentboundary-layer control by air blowing due to external-flow resources.

  4. 49 CFR 25.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational... these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b... statement by the highest-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title...

  5. 49 CFR 25.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational... these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b... statement by the highest-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title...

  6. 22 CFR 229.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational... these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b... statement by the highest-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title...

  7. 22 CFR 146.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational... these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b... statement by the highest-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title...

  8. 49 CFR 25.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any operation of an educational... these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious tenets of such organization. (b... statement by the highest-ranking official of the institution, identifying the provisions of these Title...

  9. Shifting Governance and Control in Church-Related Institutions of Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fioke, Clarence J.; King, Richard A.

    Factors related to shifts in governance patterns of church-related private colleges were investigated through historical document analysis, interviews with 34 presidents and board members, and 59 questionnaires returned by current and past board members of 2 New Mexico institutions. Document analysis focused upon mission statements, annual…

  10. Do resisted temptations during smoking cessation deplete or augment self-control resources?

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Kathleen A; Schwartz, Joseph E; Shiffman, Saul

    2008-12-01

    A resource depletion model of self-control posits that for some period following performance of a task requiring self-control, self-control will be reduced and thus less available for use in a subsequent task. Using 2 substantial data sets collected in real time from individuals who were trying to quit smoking (1,660 and 9,516 temptation episodes collected from 61 and 248 individuals, respectively), we evaluated this model by testing the hypotheses that the number and length of resisted temptations and the intensity of the most recently reported urge during the prior 4 hr predict decreased self-control and increased likelihood of lapsing. Survival and multilevel regression modeling showed that contrary to the hypothesis, the number of recently resisted temptations predicted a lower risk of lapsing in both samples. Duration of resisted temptations had no significant effect in either sample. Intensity of most recently reported urge predicted lapsing in 1 data set but not in the other. Overall, there was little support for the resource depletion model. The protective effect of successfully resisting temptations was an unexpected but provocative finding.

  11. Adaptive call admission control and resource allocation in multi server wireless/cellular network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Madhu; Mittal, Ragini

    2016-11-01

    The ever increasing demand of the subscribers has put pressure on the capacity of wireless networks around the world. To utilize the scare resources, in the present paper we propose an optimal allocation scheme for an integrated wireless/cellular model with handoff priority and handoff guarantee services. The suggested algorithm optimally allocates the resources in each cell and dynamically adjust threshold to control the admission. To give the priority to handoff calls over the new calls, the provision of guard channels and subrating scheme is taken into consideration. The handoff voice call may balk and renege from the system while waiting in the buffer. An iterative algorithm is implemented to generate the arrival rate of the handoff calls in each cell. Various performance indices are established in term of steady state probabilities. The sensitivity analysis has also been carried out to examine the tractability of algorithms and to explore the effects of system descriptors on the performance indices.

  12. Joint Access Control Based on Access Ratio and Resource Utilization for High-Speed Railway Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuzhe; Ai, Bo

    2015-05-01

    The fast development of high-speed rails makes people's life more and more convenient. However, provisioning of quality of service of multimedia applications for users on the high-speed train is a critical task for wireless communications. Therefore, new solutions are desirable to be found to address this kind of problem. Current researches mainly focus on providing seamless broadband wireless access for high-speed mobile terminals. In this paper, an algorithm to calculate the optimal resource reservation fraction of handovers is proposed. A joint access control scheme for high-speed railway communication handover scenario is proposed. Metrics of access ratio and resource utilization ratio are considered jointly in the analysis and the performance evaluation. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm and the scheme improve quality of service compared with other conventional schemes.

  13. Improving Maryland's Offshore Wind Energy Resource Estimate Using Doppler Wind Lidar Technology to Assess Microtmeteorology Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Pé, Alexandra; Wesloh, Daniel; Antoszewski, Graham; Daham, Farrah; Goudarzi, Navid; Rabenhorst, Scott; Delgado, Ruben

    2016-06-01

    There is enormous potential to harness the kinetic energy of offshore wind and produce power. However significant uncertainties are introduced in the offshore wind resource assessment process, due in part to limited observational networks and a poor understanding of the marine atmosphere's complexity. Given the cubic relationship between a turbine's power output and wind speed, a relatively small error in the wind speed estimate translates to a significant error in expected power production. The University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) collected in-situ measurements offshore, within Maryland's Wind Energy Area (WEA) from July-August 2013. This research demonstrates the ability of Doppler wind lidar technology to reduce uncertainty in estimating an offshore wind resource, compared to traditional resource assessment techniques, by providing a more accurate representation of the wind profile and associated hub-height wind speed variability. The second objective of this research is to elucidate the impact of offshore micrometeorology controls (stability, wind shear, turbulence) on a turbine's ability to produce power. Compared to lidar measurements, power law extrapolation estimates and operational National Weather Service models underestimated hub-height wind speeds in the WEA. In addition, lidar observations suggest the frequent development of a low-level wind maximum (LLWM), with high turbinelayer wind shear and low turbulence intensity within a turbine's rotor layer (40m-160m). Results elucidate the advantages of using Doppler wind lidar technology to improve offshore wind resource estimates and its ability to monitor under-sampled offshore meteorological controls impact on a potential turbine's ability to produce power.

  14. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    country of Central and South America, as well as to the Caribbean, and Mexico and published notices in newsletters. Young scientists from Mexico , Peru, and...Transgenic Animals. J. Gordon. 30 4 F 88 The Spontaneously Hypercholesterolemic Pig as an Animal Model for Human Atherosclerosis . A. Attie & M...and Potential Approaches. An NIH Conference. The Contributions of Nonhuman Primates to Understanding Coronary Artery Atherosclerosis in Humans. T

  15. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    NOTES It. KEY WORDS (Conlinuo on reverse side If noceery id identify by block number) laboratory animal science laboratory animal medicine animal models ...diseminate Information on genetically defined strains and stocks of laboratory animls that are useful for studies of human physiology and disease. Through...Council met twice to provide program guidance to ILAR. The Com’Tittee on Animal Models and Genetic Stocks (AMGS) advised the staff on conduct of the

  16. Communication, Control, and Computer Access for Disabled and Elderly Individuals. ResourceBook 1: Communication Aids. Rehab/Education Technology ResourceBook Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandenburg, Sara A., Ed.; Vanderheiden, Gregg C., Ed.

    One of a series of three resource guides concerned with communication, control, and computer access for disabled and elderly individuals, the directory focuses on communication aids. The book's six chapters each cover products with the same primary function. Cross reference indexes allow access to listings of products by function, input/output…

  17. Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources at Detroit Edison

    SciTech Connect

    Haukur Asgeirsson; Richard Seguin

    2004-01-31

    The project objective was to create the communication and control system, the process and the economic procedures that will allow owners (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) connected in parallel to the electric distribution to have their resources operated in a manner that protects the electric utility distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. The Distribution Engineering Workstation (DEW) (a power flow and short circuit modeling tool) was modified to calculate the real-time characteristics of the distribution network based on the real-time electric distribution network information and provide DER operating suggestions to the Detroit Edison system operators so that regional electric stability is maintained. Part of the suggestion algorithm takes into account the operational availability of DER’s, which is known by the Energy Aggregator, DTE Energy Technologies. The availability information will be exchanged from DTE Energy Technologies to Detroit Edison. For the calculated suggestions to be used by the Detroit Edison operators, procedures were developed to allow an operator to operate a DER by requesting operation of the DER through DTE Energy Technologies. Prior to issuing control of a DER, the safety of the distribution network and personnel needs to be taken into account. This information will be exchanged from Detroit Edison to DTE Energy Technologies. Once it is safe to control the DER, DTE Energy Technologies will issue the control signal. The real-time monitoring of the DECo system will reflect the DER control. Multi-vendor DER technologies’ representing approximately 4 MW of capacity was monitored and controlled using a web-based communication path. The DER technologies included are a photovoltaic system, energy storage, fuel cells and natural gas/diesel internal combustion engine generators. This report documents Phase I result for the Detroit Edison

  18. Trade-Offs in Resource Allocation Among Moss Species Control Decomposition in Boreal Peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Turetsky, M. R.; Crow, S. E.; Evans, R. J.; Vitt, D. H.; Wieder, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    We separated the effects of plant species controls on decomposition rates from environmental controls in northern peatlands using a full factorial, reciprocal transplant experiment of eight dominant bryophytes in four distinct peatland types in boreal Alberta, Canada. Standard fractionation techniques as well as compound-specific pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry were used to identify a biochemical mechanism underlying any interspecific differences in decomposition rates. We found that over a 3-year field incubation, individual moss species and not micro-environmental conditions controlled early stages of decomposition. Across species, Sphagnum mosses exhibited a trade-off in resource partitioning into metabolic and structural carbohydrates, a pattern that served as a strong predictor of litter decomposition. Decomposition rates showed a negative co-variation between species and their microtopographic position, as species that live in hummocks decomposed slowly but hummock microhabitats themselves corresponded to rapid decomposition rates. By forming litter that degrades slowly, hummock mosses appear to promote the maintenance of macropore structure in surface peat hummocks that aid in water retention. Many northern regions are experiencing rapid climate warming that is expected to accelerate the decomposition of large soil carbon pools stored within peatlands. However, our results suggest that some common peatland moss species form tissue that resists decomposition across a range of peatland environments, suggesting that moss resource allocation could stabilize peatland carbon losses under a changing climate.

  19. Controls on sediment production from an unpaved resource road in a Pacific maritime watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meerveld, H. J.; Baird, E. J.; Floyd, W. C.

    2014-06-01

    Unpaved resource roads have the potential to produce large amounts of sediment and can negatively impact water quality and aquatic ecology. In order to better understand the dominant controls on sediment generation from unpaved resource roads, we did 23 large-scale rainfall simulation experiments on a road section in the Honna Watershed, Haida Gwaii, British Columbia, Canada. The experiments were performed with different rainfall intensities (4-52 mm/h), with and without traffic. Precipitation intensity was the dominant control on the amount of sediment generated from the road surface; the total mass of sediment increased linearly with precipitation intensity. The number of passages of loaded logging trucks during an experiment was the second most dominant control on the total amount of sediment generated from the road surface. Elevated sediment concentrations in road surface runoff persisted for 30 min following the passage of loaded logging trucks during low intensity (<8 mm/h) rainfall events and for much shorter periods at higher rainfall intensities. The mass of sediment generated by the passage of a loaded truck increased with precipitation intensity. Passages of empty logging truck did not result in sediment pulses, except during very high rainfall intensities. Seven small-scale rainfall simulation experiments on other parts of the road, however, highlight the large spatial variability in sediment production from the road surface, suggesting additional experiments are required to better describe and predict sediment production from different road sections.

  20. Controlling Nonpoint Pollution in Virginia’s Urbanizing Areas: An Institutional Perspective.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-20

    and 205 ( j ) of the Clean Water Act. *’ Such funds are in- tended to be primarily used by state and local planning agencies for Water Quality Management...Richmond, Virginia (August 30, 1985). 43 Id. " Management Handbook, p. iii. CHAPTER ONE: THE INSTITUTIONAL ENVIRONMENT 23 ~ . j .**.*** .*-% for those...landowner may find himself liable for creating a nuisance because his grassed swale has malfunctioned and become an eyesore by developing into a muddy pool

  1. Impact of the underground injection control program on energy resource development

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, E.P.

    1983-10-01

    Part C of the Safe Drinking Water Act requires that underground sources of drinking water be protected from endangerment by well injection. The Act, as amended through 1980, and the resultant Underground Injection Control (UIC) program regulations and guidance describe minimum requirements for achieving this protection. Injection wells used in the development of energy resources, for example, those related to oil and natural gas production, and the solution mining of uranium, are regulated under the UIC program. The major features of the program requirements that affect such energy related wells are considered here from the Federal-Regional perspective.

  2. A randomised controlled trial of benefit finding in caregivers: The Building Resources in Caregivers Study Protocol.

    PubMed

    Brand, Charles; O'Connell, Brenda H; Gallagher, Stephen

    2015-07-01

    Caregivers may engage in benefit finding, that is, an increase in perceived positive growth, as a cognitive strategy for coping with stress. The Building Resources in Caregivers study will compare effects of a brief benefit finding writing intervention with a control intervention. Caregivers of people with mental and physical disabilities will be randomised into either a benefit-writing group or a neutral writing group. Caregivers will complete measures relating to themselves and care-recipients (e.g. sociodemographics and illness type) and psychometric measures of benefit finding, distress and quality of life at three time points. Additionally, qualitative commentary on participation experiences will be gathered.

  3. Challenges and opportunities for implementation of interventions to prevent and control CVD in low-resource settings: a report from CESCAS in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Adolfo L; Irazola, Vilma E; Poggio, Rosana; Gulayin, Pablo; Nejamis, Analía; Beratarrechea, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    In Argentina, cardiovascular diseases cause an estimated 100,000 deaths and more than 250,000 coronary heart disease and stroke events annually, at a cost of more than $1 billion international dollars. Despite progress in the implementation of several programs to combat noncommunicable diseases in Argentina over the past few years, most health resources are still dedicated to infectious diseases and maternal and child health. The Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy, an independent academic institution affiliated with the University of Buenos Aires medical school, runs the South American Centre of Excellence in Cardiovascular Health (CESCAS), a center devoted to epidemiology, implementation, and policy research. At the CESCAS, there are 3 ongoing randomized clinical trials focused on implementation science: 1) a mobile health intervention, for preventing the progression of prehypertension in low-income, urban settings in Argentina, Guatemala, and Peru; 2) a comprehensive approach to preventing and controlling hypertension in low-resource settings in Argentina; and 3) an educational approach to improving physicians' effectiveness in the detection, treatment, and control of hypercholesterolemia and high cardiovascular disease risk in low-resource settings in Argentina. All of these trials involve the design and implementation of complex interventions for changing the behaviors of providers and patients. The rationale of each of the 3 studies, the design of the interventions, and the evaluation of processes and outcomes are described in this article, together with the barriers and enabling factors associated with implementation-research studies. There is a strong need in Argentina and all of Latin America for building the health-research capacity and infrastructure necessary for undertaking implementation studies that will translate evidence from research findings into improvements in health policy and practice with regard to cardiovascular diseases

  4. Conservation biological control of spirea aphid, Aphis spiraecolia (Hemiptera: Aphididae), on apple by providing natural altervative food resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancing biological control in orchards is an efficient way to control insect pests when effective. This study investigates the possibility of increasing biological control of spirea aphid by providing alternate food resources, in the form of peach extrafloral nectar, to adult Harmonia axyridis, t...

  5. Infertility - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - infertility ... The following organizations are good resources for information on infertility : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc/gov/reproductivehealth/infertility March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/ ...

  6. [Alprostadil Reference Standard (Control 001) of National Institute of Health Sciences].

    PubMed

    Maekawa, K; Iwata, M; Koide, T; Saito, H; Tanimoto, T; Okada, S

    2001-01-01

    The raw material of Alprostadil was examined for the preparation of "Alprostadil Reference Standard (Control 001)". Analytical data obtained were: IR spectrum, same as that of the Alprostadil Reference Standard (Control 923); thin-layer chromatography, no impurities were detected until 20 micrograms; high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), total amount of impurities estimated to be less than 0.2%. Based on the above results, the raw material was authorized as the Japanese Pharmacopoeia Alprostadil Reference Standard (Control 001).

  7. Dynamical Allocation of Cellular Resources as an Optimal Control Problem: Novel Insights into Microbial Growth Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Nils; Mairet, Francis; Gouzé, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Microbial physiology exhibits growth laws that relate the macromolecular composition of the cell to the growth rate. Recent work has shown that these empirical regularities can be derived from coarse-grained models of resource allocation. While these studies focus on steady-state growth, such conditions are rarely found in natural habitats, where microorganisms are continually challenged by environmental fluctuations. The aim of this paper is to extend the study of microbial growth strategies to dynamical environments, using a self-replicator model. We formulate dynamical growth maximization as an optimal control problem that can be solved using Pontryagin’s Maximum Principle. We compare this theoretical gold standard with different possible implementations of growth control in bacterial cells. We find that simple control strategies enabling growth-rate maximization at steady state are suboptimal for transitions from one growth regime to another, for example when shifting bacterial cells to a medium supporting a higher growth rate. A near-optimal control strategy in dynamical conditions is shown to require information on several, rather than a single physiological variable. Interestingly, this strategy has structural analogies with the regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis by ppGpp in the enterobacterium Escherichia coli. It involves sensing a mismatch between precursor and ribosome concentrations, as well as the adjustment of ribosome synthesis in a switch-like manner. Our results show how the capability of regulatory systems to integrate information about several physiological variables is critical for optimizing growth in a changing environment. PMID:26958858

  8. [Assessment of malaria screening management in blood donation control in the French Military Blood Institute].

    PubMed

    Pouget, T; Garcia-Hejl, C; Bouzard, S; Roche, C; Sailliol, A; Martinaud, C

    2014-06-01

    The French Military Blood Institute is responsible for the entire blood supply chain in the French Armed Forces. Considering, the high exposition rate of military to malaria risk, blood donation screening of plasmodium infection must be as efficient as possible. The main aim of our study was to assess our malaria testing strategy based on a single Elisa test compared with a two-step strategy implying immunofluorescence testing as confirmation test. The second goal was to describe characteristic of malaria Elisa positive donors. We conducted a prospective study: every malaria Elisa positive test was implemented by immunofluorescence testing and demographical data were recorded as usual by our medical software. We showed a significant risk of malaria ELISA positive tests among donor born in endemic area and we estimate the number of abusively 3-year rejected donors. However, based on our estimations, the two-step strategy is not relevant since the number of additionally collected blood products will be low.

  9. Business Planning as Pedagogy: Language and Control in a Changing Institutional Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakes, Leslie S.; Townley, Barbara; Cooper, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Based on Pierre Bourdieu's work on power as symbolic violence, examines business planning's pedagogical function in Alberta, Canada's museum and cultural heritage sites. Control involves redirecting work and changing producers' identity and work understandings via construction of markets, consumers, and products. Control was achieved by pedagogic…

  10. Social Involvement in Religious Institutions and God-Mediated Control Beliefs: A Longitudinal Investigation.

    PubMed

    Krause, Neal M

    2007-12-07

    This study examines the relationships among race, education, formal as well as informal involvement in the church, and God-mediated control. Formal involvement in the church was assessed by the frequency of attendance at worship services, Bible study groups, and prayer groups. Informal involvement was measured with an index of spiritual support provided by fellow church members. Data from a nationwide longitudinal survey of older people suggest that both formal and informal church involvement tend to sustain feelings of God-mediated control over time. The findings further reveal that compared to older whites, older African Americans are more likely to have stronger feelings of God-mediated control at the baseline survey and older blacks are more likely to sustain their sense of God-mediated control over time. In contrast, the data suggest that education is not significantly related to feelings of God-mediated control.

  11. Social Involvement in Religious Institutions and God-Mediated Control Beliefs: A Longitudinal Investigation

    PubMed Central

    KRAUSE, NEAL M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the relationships among race, education, formal as well as informal involvement in the church, and God-mediated control. Formal involvement in the church was assessed by the frequency of attendance at worship services, Bible study groups, and prayer groups. Informal involvement was measured with an index of spiritual support provided by fellow church members. Data from a nationwide longitudinal survey of older people suggest that both formal and informal church involvement tend to sustain feelings of God-mediated control over time. The findings further reveal that compared to older whites, older African Americans are more likely to have stronger feelings of God-mediated control at the baseline survey and older blacks are more likely to sustain their sense of God-mediated control over time. In contrast, the data suggest that education is not significantly related to feelings of God-mediated control. PMID:21359114

  12. Sustainable Development of Natural Resources in the Third World: Technological and Institutional Challenges. An International Symposium (Columbus, OH, September 3-6, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. School of Natural Resources.

    This booket contains abstracts of papers presented at a symposium which focused on sustainable development of natural resources in third world countries. The abstracts are organized under these headings: (1) factors affecting individual's resource use decisions; (2) resource conservation and economic development; (3) research on alternative…

  13. Creating a culture of wellness: conversations, curriculum, concrete resources, and control.

    PubMed

    Place, Stephanie; Talen, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Burnout and depression across the career life cycle of healthcare providers are increasing at alarming rates. We need to devote our resources and efforts to bolster the next generation of healthcare providers who have the capacity for resiliency and well-being--the antidote to burnout and depression. A handful of organizations have implemented general wellness programs to combat burnout but there are surprisingly few documented, well-researched interventions to build resiliency. Wellness provides an alternative framework to approach the epidemic rates of burnout and depersonalization within the healthcare profession. In this article we describe our rationale for developing a culture of wellness among primary care physicians along with the specific activities and initiatives for creating a culture of wellness throughout medical educational training. Examples of the four core components of a residency wellness program-concrete resources, positive conversations, curriculum, and control-are described with regard to our Family Medicine Residency. A brief description of early efforts to empirically examine the impact of the wellness initiative across systemwide residency programs (Family Medicine and other programs) is described.

  14. Response to catastrophic marine pollution incidents: an analytic method for resource planning and control

    SciTech Connect

    Harrald, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The consequences of an oil spill in an environmentally sensitive area can be serious; the result of a chemical release in a densely populated port area could be catastrophic. Response forces in either case will have a limited period of time to initiate action if their amelioration efforts are to be successful. The need for improved response planning and control is established by reviewing the historical development of maritime response forces, and by showing why rescue and salvage organizations are poorly equipped to deal with the problem of large-scale cargo releases. A multi-objective resource allocation model based on the time constained nature of this response problem is developed. A three-step process is used to adapt the covering model formulation to the maritime problem and to demonstrate its applicability. Models applied to other similar problems are reviewed and extended. The extended model is tested by applying it to the time constrained problem of response to a major oil spill in Long Island Sound. The results of this application show the utility of the algorithm both as a tactical decision support tool and as a planning model. An analysis of the risks of chemical spills in the New York Harbor based on the best available data is used to provide the basis for a broader application of the model. Results show the inadequacy of existing resources and demonstrate that significant improvements in response capability could be attained.

  15. Crossing institutional boundaries: mapping the policy process for improved control of endemic and neglected zoonoses in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Okello, Anna; Welburn, Susan; Smith, James

    2015-07-01

    The recent adoption of the World Health Assembly Resolution 66.12 for neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in May 2013 is an important turning point for advocacy regarding a number of endemic zoonotic infections, defined by the World Health Organization as the neglected zoonotic diseases (NZDs). In addition to NTD-listed zoonoses such as rabies, echinococcosis (hydatid disease), leishmaniasis, Human African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) and Taenia solium cysticercosis, the NZDs also include important bacterial zoonoses such as anthrax, bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis. To date, analysis of the processes that prioritize, develop and deliver zoonoses control programmes in many low- and middle-income countries is lacking, despite its potential to highlight significant evidence gaps and institutional constraints to the intersectoral approach required for their control. Policy process analysis was conducted via a series of semi-structured interviews with key policy actors within various ministries and institutes in Uganda and Nigeria. The study concluded that despite the rhetoric around 'linear' models of health policy development promoting consultation with a wide range of national stakeholders, the decision-making process for zoonotic disease control appears instead overtly influenced by the external political economy of trending pandemic threats, often overlooking national and regional zoonoses priorities. The inclusion of political systems remains a key factor in the zoonoses analysis matrix, enhancing our understanding of the intersectoral and transdisciplinary approaches required for their control. The authors consider policy process analysis to be a fundamental first step of any attempt to holistically strengthen human and animal health systems in a development context, particularly regarding the promotion of integrated control policies for regionally important zoonoses under the growing One Health movement.

  16. Control and Size Energy Storage for Managing Energy balance of Variable Generation Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Xinda; Lu, Ning; Jin, Chunlian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents control algorithms and sizing strategies for using energy storage to manage energy balance for variable generation resources. The control objective is to minimize the hourly generation imbalance between the actual and the scheduled generation of the wind farm. Three control algorithms are compared: tracking power imbalance, post-compensation, and pre-compensation. Measurement data from a wind farm located in South-central Washington State are used in the study. The results show that tracking power imbalance yields the best performance by keeping the hourly energy imbalances zero. However, the energy storage system (ESS) will be significantly oversized. Post-compensation reduces power rating of the ESS but the hourly imbalance may not be kept as zero when large and long-lasting energy imbalances occur. A linear regression forecasting algorithm is developed for the pre-compensation algorithm to pre-charge or pre-discharge the ESS based on predicted energy imbalances. The performance comparison shows that the pre-compensation method significantly reduces the size of the ESS while maintaining satisfactory performance.

  17. Influencing Graduation Rates through Resource Allocation: A Correlation Analysis of Institutional Expenditures and Six-Year Graduation Rates at Private Colleges and Universities in New England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Promades, Frederick C.

    2012-01-01

    The challenges facing higher education are great given the current economic environment, the shift of enrollment from private to public institutions, changing student demographics, globalization of institutions, and technology (Goldstein, 2006; Jansen & Bielak, 2008; Newman, Couturier, & Scurry, 2004a). Society's expectations that…

  18. ["Podmoskovie"--health resort institution of the Federal Drug Control Service of the Russian Federation celebrates the 20th anniversary].

    PubMed

    Bondar', I V; Minaev, D Iu; Nasretdinov, I N; Petukhov, A E

    2014-12-01

    The article is dedicated to the 20th anniversary of the Federal government health resort institution of the Federal Drug Control Service of the Russian Federation (FGI "Health resort "Podmoskovie" of the Federal Drug Control Service of the Russian Federation). In this health resort were developed treatment programs for patients with abnormalities of the cardiovascular, respiratory and digestive systems; methods of ultrasonic, laser and magnetic therapy, atmospheric hypoxic, herbal medicine, speleotherapy are employed. Widely used natural healing factors of Ruza district of the Moscow region such as climate therapy, treatment with mineral water group of X type of Smolensk from own wells and balneo-mudtherapy. Over the past 20 years 70 000 patients received an appropriate treatment in this health resort.

  19. Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    BPL Global

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at

  20. Scalable multi-objective control for large scale water resources systems under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Matteo; Quinn, Julianne; Herman, Jonathan; Castelletti, Andrea; Reed, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The use of mathematical models to support the optimal management of environmental systems is rapidly expanding over the last years due to advances in scientific knowledge of the natural processes, efficiency of the optimization techniques, and availability of computational resources. However, undergoing changes in climate and society introduce additional challenges for controlling these systems, ultimately motivating the emergence of complex models to explore key causal relationships and dependencies on uncontrolled sources of variability. In this work, we contribute a novel implementation of the evolutionary multi-objective direct policy search (EMODPS) method for controlling environmental systems under uncertainty. The proposed approach combines direct policy search (DPS) with hierarchical parallelization of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) and offers a threefold advantage: the DPS simulation-based optimization can be combined with any simulation model and does not add any constraint on modeled information, allowing the use of exogenous information in conditioning the decisions. Moreover, the combination of DPS and MOEAs prompts the generation or Pareto approximate set of solutions for up to 10 objectives, thus overcoming the decision biases produced by cognitive myopia, where narrow or restrictive definitions of optimality strongly limit the discovery of decision relevant alternatives. Finally, the use of large-scale MOEAs parallelization improves the ability of the designed solutions in handling the uncertainty due to severe natural variability. The proposed approach is demonstrated on a challenging water resources management problem represented by the optimal control of a network of four multipurpose water reservoirs in the Red River basin (Vietnam). As part of the medium-long term energy and food security national strategy, four large reservoirs have been constructed on the Red River tributaries, which are mainly operated for hydropower

  1. Forging a poison prevention and control system: report of an Institute of Medicine committee.

    PubMed

    Guyer, Bernard; Mavor, Anne

    2005-01-01

    The Committee forged a vision for a national poison prevention and control system that broadly integrates the current network of poison control centers with state and local public health departments responsible for monitoring populations. Implementing the Committee's recommendations, however, will require leadership from the Congress and the federal agencies to whom the report is addressed: HRSA and CDC. The next steps include amendments to existing legislation to establish the national system and to secure federal funding to assure stability of the system and systematic oversight by the federal agencies to hold all parties accountable for the performance of the system.

  2. [The Ascorbic Acid Reference Standard (Control 931) of the National Institute of Health Sciences].

    PubMed

    Kitajima, A; Yoshii, K; Komatsu, H; Ishimitsu, S; Okada, S

    1994-01-01

    Raw ascorbic acid material was tested for preparation of the "Ascorbic Acid Reference Standard (Control 931)". Analytical data obtained were as follows: infrared spectrum, the same as that of the JP Ascorbic Acid Reference Standard; optical rotation -alpha-20D, + 21.4 degrees; melting point, 190.3 degrees C (decomposition); loss on drying, 0.02%; assay result, 100.1% by iodometry. Based on the above findings, the raw material was authorized as the JP Ascorbic Acid Reference Standard (Control 931).

  3. Apply Pesticides Correctly, A Guide for Commercial Applicators: Industrial, Institutional, Structural and Health Related Pest Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    This guide contains basic information to meet the specific standards for pesticide applicators. The thrust of this document is the recognition and control of common pests. Included are those which directly affect man such as bees, roaches, mites, and mosquitoes; and those which destroy food products and wooden structures. Both mechanical and…

  4. 6 CFR 17.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any... the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious..., identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with a specific tenet of the...

  5. 31 CFR 28.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to... organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the..., identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with a specific tenet of the...

  6. 31 CFR 28.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to... organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the..., identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with a specific tenet of the...

  7. 15 CFR 8a.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to any... the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the religious..., identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with a specific tenet of the...

  8. 31 CFR 28.205 - Educational institutions and other entities controlled by religious organizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... entities controlled by religious organizations. (a) Exemption. These Title IX regulations do not apply to... organization to the extent that application of these Title IX regulations would not be consistent with the..., identifying the provisions of these Title IX regulations that conflict with a specific tenet of the...

  9. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Defense and Arms Control Studies Program, Abbual Report, 1989-1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    range of weapons-related technolo- gies. I am happy to report also that Professor Postol received the prestigious Leo Szilard Award this year from the...studydevelopmns in weapons technology of relevance to defense and arms control policy. In 1990 Dr. Postol received the Leo Szilard Award from the

  10. Cerebral palsy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - cerebral palsy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on cerebral palsy : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/cerebral_palsy/cerebral_palsy. ...

  11. Lung disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - lung disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on lung disease : American Lung Association -- www.lung.org National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute -- www.nhlbi.nih.gov ...

  12. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  13. Parkinson disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Parkinson disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Parkinson disease : The Michael J. Fox Foundation -- www.michaeljfox.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  14. Spinal injury - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spinal injury ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spinal injury : National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders/Spinal-Cord- ...

  15. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  16. Elder care - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - elder care ... The following organizations are good resources for information on aging and elder care: Administration on Aging -- www.aoa.gov Eldercare Locator -- www.eldercare.gov National Institute on ...

  17. Muscular dystrophy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - muscular dystrophy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on muscular dystrophy : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mdausa.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih. ...

  18. Spina bifida - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - spina bifida ... The following organizations are good resources for information on spina bifida : March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.org/baby/spina-bifida.aspx National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and ...

  19. Reye syndrome - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Reye syndrome ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Reye Syndrome : National Reye's Syndrome Foundation, Inc. -- www.reyessyndrome.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  20. Evaluation model coupling exploitable groundwater resources and land subsidence control in regional loose sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Z. J.; Zhao, S. J.; Jin, WZ; Ma, Q. S.; Wu, X. H.

    2016-08-01

    The loose sediments in the Yangtze River Delta, the North China Plain, the plain of Northern Jiangsu and other districts in China are of great thickness, complex in structure and abundant in groundwater. Groundwater overexploitation easily results in geological disasters of land subsidence. Aiming at the issues, assessment models coupling exploitable groundwater resources and land subsidence control in regional loose sediments were brought up in this paper. The two models were: (1) a three dimensional groundwater seepage model with land subsidence based on the one dimensional Terzaghi consolidation theory; (2) a three dimensional full coupling model on groundwater seepage and land subsidence based on the Biot consolidation theory to simulate and calculate. It can be used to simulate and calculate the problems in real situations. Thus, the groundwater seepage and land subsidence were coupled together in the model to evaluate the amount of exploitable groundwater under the specific requirements of land subsidence control. The full coupling model, which considers the non-linear characteristics of soil mass and the dynamic changes of soil permeability with stress state based on the Biot consolidation theory, is more coincident with the variation characteristics of the hydraulic and mechanical properties of soil mass during the pumping process, making the evaluation results more scientific and reasonable.

  1. An examination of network position and childhood relational aggression: integrating resource control and social exchange theories.

    PubMed

    Neal, Jennifer Watling; Cappella, Elise

    2012-01-01

    Applying resource control theory and social exchange theory, we examined the social network conditions under which elementary age children were likely to engage in relational aggression. Data on classroom peer networks and peer-nominated behaviors were collected on 671 second- through fourth-grade children in 34 urban, low-income classrooms. Nested regression models with robust cluster standard errors demonstrated that the association between children's number of relationships and their levels of relational aggression was moderated by the number of relationships that their affiliates had. Children with more peer relationships (i.e., higher network centrality) exhibited higher levels of relational aggression, but only when these relationships were with peers who had fewer connections themselves (i.e., poorly connected peers). This finding remained significant even when controlling for common predictors of relational aggression including gender, overt aggression, prosocial behavior, victimization, social preference, and perceived popularity. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for advancing the literature on childhood relational aggression and their practical applications for identifying children at risk for these behaviors.

  2. Summer Youth Forestry Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roesch, Gabrielle E.; Neuffer, Tamara; Zobrist, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The Summer Youth Forestry Institute (SYFI) was developed to inspire youth through experiential learning opportunities and early work experience in the field of natural resources. Declining enrollments in forestry and other natural resource careers has made it necessary to actively engage youth and provide them with exposure to careers in these…

  3. [Allocating resources for cancer control--resolving multicriteria decision-making using the analytic hierarchy process].

    PubMed

    Gróf, Agnes

    2007-01-01

    When competing programs ought to be financed simultaneously for the same purpose, an allocation problem occurs due to scarce resources, and different perspectives and preferences. Facing the problem needs determining criteria which the decision might be based on. Those criteria form the objectives (the scope) of the different participants, and are relevant for the achievement of the goal, providing a comprehensive resource allocation that bridges and integrates the different perspectives. In case of cancer control primary prevention, secondary prevention, therapy and tertiary prevention, education, basic sciences, and clinical trials form the alternatives. An analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is used for supporting decision-making in the resource allocation problem. AHP is a method for setting priorities, but can only work out the implications of what was declared through the pairwise-ranking process, namely the relative preferences, weighing the criteria and rating the alternatives two by two. In the first analysis the relative weights to criteria were 0.099 for 'distributive justice'; 0.120 for constitutional and human rights; 0.251 for lay opinion; 0.393 for EBM; 0.137 for cost-effectiveness. Ranking the alternatives using 'judgements' resulted in relative preference of 0.238 for therapy, 0.204 for primary prevention, 0.201 for secondary prevention, 0.135 for clinical trials, 0.111 for tertiary prevention, 0.066 for basic sciences and 0.045 for education. In the second analysis the relative importance of "cost-effectiveness" was doubled, thus resulting in 0.234 for therapy, 0.216 for secondary prevention, 0.183 for primary prevention, 0.145 for clinical trials, 0.113 for tertiary prevention, 0.063 for basic sciences and 0.046 for education. Sensitivity analysis has shown that increasing the relative weight of cost-effectiveness up to approximately 0.4 changes the rank of alternatives, and above 0.4 this criterion gives secondary prevention preferences. According

  4. Summary of Resources for the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System For Core Complete Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2004-01-01

    The Core Complete Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System for the International Space Station (ISS) will consist of components and subsystems in both the United States (U.S.) and International Partner elements which together will perform the functions of Temperature and Humidity Control (THC), Atmosphere Control and Supply (ACS), Atmosphere Revitalization (AR), Water Recovery and Management (WRM), Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS), and Vacuum System (VS) for the station. Due to limited resources available on ISS, detailed attention is given to minimizing and tracking all resources associated with all systems, beginning with estimates during the hardware development phase through measured actuals when flight hardware is built and delivered. A summary of resources consumed by the addition of future U.S. ECLS system hardware to get to Core Complete is presented, including launch weight, average continuous and peak power loads, on-orbit volume and resupply logistics.

  5. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, November 1995. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Pilot High Velocity (PHV) and the Trace Element Removal (TER) test blocks. In the High Velocity test block, SO{sub 2} removal and mist eliminator carryover rates were investigated while operating the absorber unit with various spray nozzle types and vertical mist eliminator sections. During the Trace Element Removal test block, the mercury measurement studies involving the EPA Draft Method 29 continued with testing of several impinger solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber system was utilized in the TER test configuration this month while the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Absorber unit remained in a state of cold-standby. A monthly inspection was conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems in the SCR building. These inspections will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff each month.

  6. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal test block (TER) as the Pilot was operated under forced oxidation conditions. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued as investigations into various activated carbons, metal amalgams, and impinger capture solutions were conducted. Following these studies, a brief test of the Pilot High Velocity FGD configuration (PHV) was conducted. This test block will be continued at the end of the month after the Fall outage is completed. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. During this month`s outage, the inlet and outlet damper plates were sealed to isolate the SCR system from flue gas. Also, the internals of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE) and catalyst reactor tower were inspected and cleaned so that the system could be available for future test activities. Monthly inspections of all SCR system equipment placed in this cold-standby mode, as well as the fire safety systems in the SCR building, will continue to be conducted by the ECTC maintenance department and will include manual rotation of the booster fan.

  7. [Impact of an educational institutional program in the control of the diabetic patient].

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Romo, Miguel Angel; Velasco-Chávez, José Fernando; Nieva de Jesús, Rafael Natividad; Andrade-Rodríguez, Héctor de Jesús; Rodríguez-Pérez, Carlos Vicente; Palou-Fraga, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: evaluar el impacto de un programa institucional educativo en el control del paciente diabético tipo 2. Métodos: estudio de intervención educativa cuasi experimental y sujetos como su propio control. Muestreo no probabilístico por conveniencia. Se incluyeron 151 pacientes del programa para la atención integral del paciente diabético. Variables demográficas: Género, edad, tipo de aseguramiento, somatometría y perfil metabólico. Se aplicó un programa educativo de un año de duración. Se utilizó estadística descriptiva e inferencial paramétrica. Resultados: se estudiaron 106 mujeres y 45 hombres cuyo rango de edad iba de 15 a 87 años, con una media de 57.22 ± 11.47. Se observó una disminución significativa en su índice de masa corporal, perímetro de cintura, glucosa venosa en ayuno, glucosa posprandial, colesterol, tensión arterial sistólica, triglicéridos y hemoglobina glucosilada (t de Student pareada, p < 0.05). No hubo cambios en la tensión arterial diastólica (p = 0.334). Conclusiones: la estrategia educativa para el control del paciente diabético presentó un comportamiento favorable en la mayoría de los parámetros somatométricos y metabólicos a un año de seguimiento. Se sugiere que se extienda el estudio a un periodo mayor para determinar si los efectos perduran con el tiempo.

  8. The Ways and Means: A Study of the Needs and Resources of Students Enrolled in United Negro College Fund Member Institutions. Research Report Vol. 2, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jerry S.; Kirschner, Alan H.

    A study funded by the Southern Education Foundation had as its purpose to identify, describe, and assess: (1) the costs of education to United Negro College Fund (UNCF) students in 1975-76; (2) the resources available to meet those costs; (3) the need for additional aid resources; and (4) some major relationships among college costs, financial aid…

  9. Impact of an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum on Resident Use of Electronic Resources: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Laura R.; Murphy, David J.; O’Rourke, Kerry; Sharma, Ranita; Shea, Judy A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is widely taught in residency, but evidence for effectiveness of EBM teaching on changing residents’ behavior is limited. Objective To investigate the impact of an EBM curriculum on residents’ use of evidence-based resources in a simulated clinical experience. Design/Participants Fifty medicine residents randomized to an EBM teaching or control group. Measurements A validated test of EBM knowledge (Fresno test) was administered before and after intervention. Post intervention, residents twice completed a Web-based, multiple-choice instrument (15 items) comprised of clinical vignettes, first without then with access to electronic resources. Use of electronic resources was tracked using ProxyPlus software. Within group pre–post differences and between group post-test differences were examined. Results There was more improvement in EBM knowledge (100-point scale) for the intervention group compared to the control group (mean score increase 22 vs. 12,  = 0.012). In the simulated clinical experience, the most commonly accessed resources were Ovid (71% of residents accessed) and InfoPOEMs (62%) for the EBM group and UptoDate (67%) and MDConsult (58%) for the control group. Residents in the EBM group were more likely to use evidence-based resources than the control group. Performance on clinical vignettes was similar between the groups both at baseline ( = 0.19) and with access to information resources ( = 0.89). Conclusions EBM teaching improved EBM knowledge and increased use of evidence-based resources by residents, but did not improve performance on Web-based clinical vignettes. Future studies will need to examine impact of EBM teaching on clinical outcomes. PMID:18769979

  10. Forest feeder root dynamics are controlled by spatiotemporal position, inherent characteristics and resource availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, M.

    2012-12-01

    Fine roots are the conduit for carbon allocation from forest trees to soil. Information on species-specific allocation patterns is crucial for predicting responses to changing environmental conditions. Yet models for belowground allocation are based on generalizations with few supporting observations. It is rare to have long-term observations of fine root dynamics compared among species and levels of resource availability. Here I present the results for fine root dynamics monitored over six years following establishment of a replicated trial comparing cottonwood (CW) and loblobloly pine (LP) grown without amendment (C), with fertilization (F), irrigation (I) or their combination (IF). The trial is located at the Savannah River Site near New Ellenton, SC, USA. Species and time since establishment had larger effects on feeder root production and mortality with relatively minor effects from irrigation and fertilization treatments. Both cumulative production and mortality followed sigmoid growth curves during six years of establishment. Cumulative production for LP was consistently 30% lower than CW throughout observations, while species differences in cumulative mortality reached the same magnitude and direction, but only after four growing seasons. Fertilization, but not irrigation, had a significant positive effect on cottonwood feeder root production. Fertilized cottonwood cumulative feeder root production was 57% greater than non-fertilizer, while fertilized pine cumulative production was 16% lower than non-fertilizer. There were no irrigation and fertilizer treatment differences in cumulative feeder root mortality identified with the repeated measures analysis approach. Survival analysis was used to evaluate factors controlling the risk of root mortality, account for covariates and to achieve greater sensitivity. Predominate factors affecting the risk of root mortality were in order: depth in soil, year of observation, root diameter at appearance, and season of

  11. Multi-agent coordination algorithms for control of distributed energy resources in smart grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, Andres

    Sustainable energy is a top-priority for researchers these days, since electricity and transportation are pillars of modern society. Integration of clean energy technologies such as wind, solar, and plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), is a major engineering challenge in operation and management of power systems. This is due to the uncertain nature of renewable energy technologies and the large amount of extra load that PEVs would add to the power grid. Given the networked structure of a power system, multi-agent control and optimization strategies are natural approaches to address the various problems of interest for the safe and reliable operation of the power grid. The distributed computation in multi-agent algorithms addresses three problems at the same time: i) it allows for the handling of problems with millions of variables that a single processor cannot compute, ii) it allows certain independence and privacy to electricity customers by not requiring any usage information, and iii) it is robust to localized failures in the communication network, being able to solve problems by simply neglecting the failing section of the system. We propose various algorithms to coordinate storage, generation, and demand resources in a power grid using multi-agent computation and decentralized decision making. First, we introduce a hierarchical vehicle-one-grid (V1G) algorithm for coordination of PEVs under usage constraints, where energy only flows from the grid in to the batteries of PEVs. We then present a hierarchical vehicle-to-grid (V2G) algorithm for PEV coordination that takes into consideration line capacity constraints in the distribution grid, and where energy flows both ways, from the grid in to the batteries, and from the batteries to the grid. Next, we develop a greedy-like hierarchical algorithm for management of demand response events with on/off loads. Finally, we introduce distributed algorithms for the optimal control of distributed energy resources, i

  12. Saltstone Disposal Facility Mechanically Stabilized Earth Vault Closure Cap Degradation Base Case: Institutional Control To Pine Forest Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, MA

    2004-03-19

    As part of the current Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) Performance Assessment (PA) revision, the closure cap configuration was reevaluated and closure cap degradation mechanisms and their impact upon infiltration through the closure cap was evaluated for the existing SDF concrete vaults (i.e. vaults 1 and 4) for the base case land use scenario (i.e. institutional control to pine forest scenario) and documented in Phifer and Nelson (2003). The closure cap configuration was modified from a compacted kaolin barrier layer concept to a geosynthetic clay layer (GCL) barrier layer concept. The degradation mechanisms developed included pine forest succession, erosion, and colloidal clay migration. These degradation mechanisms resulted in changes in the hydraulic properties of the closure cap layers and resulting increases in infiltration through the closure cap over time.

  13. William W. Lang's contributions to the development of the International Institute of Noise Control Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihlman, Tor

    2005-09-01

    Bill Lang has been a member of the Board of I-INCE since its first meeting in 1975 in Sendai, Japan. From 1988 to 1999 he served as the President, and to this day remains a very active member of the Board. The INTER-NOISE congress series has been the core activity of I-INCE, and in every case Bill has contributed very actively to secure an excellent congress. He has also taken a number of initiatives both to improve the organization itself and to develop new activities, especially the Technical Study Groups that have prepared consensus reports on important issues such as noise barrier effectiveness and industrial noise hearing conservation policy. At present, he is very active in attempting to develop a global noise control policy.

  14. Tracking the relevance of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in legislation and litigation through the online resource, Tobacco Control Laws.

    PubMed

    Muggli, Monique E; Zheng, Annie; Liberman, Jonathan; Coxon, Nicholas; Candler, Liz; Donley, Kaitlin; Lambert, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control is increasingly referenced and incorporated into the objectives, definitions and provisions of domestic legislation worldwide. It is also relied upon by courts in interpreting and upholding strong tobacco control measures challenged by the tobacco industry. In this special communication, we describe these trends and explore the important new online resource-Tobacco Control Laws (http://www.tobaccocontrollaws.org)--that has been used to track them.

  15. The use of biospecimens in population-based research: a review of the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences grant portfolio.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Danielle M; Mette, Eliza; Hoyle, Brittany; Rogers, Scott D; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Schully, Sheri D; Mechanic, Leah E

    2014-08-01

    Over the past two decades, researchers have increasingly used human biospecimens to evaluate hypotheses related to disease risk, outcomes and treatment. We conducted an analysis of population-science cancer research grants funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to gain a more comprehensive understanding of biospecimens and common derivatives involved in those studies and identify opportunities for advancing the field. Data available for 1,018 extramural, peer-reviewed grants (active as of July 2012) supported by the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences (DCCPS), the NCI Division that supports cancer control and population-science extramural research grants, were analyzed. 455 of the grants were determined to involve biospecimens or derivatives. The most common specimen types included were whole blood (51% of grants), serum or plasma (40%), tissue (39%), and the biospecimen derivative, DNA (66%). While use of biospecimens in molecular epidemiology has become common, biospecimens for behavioral and social research is emerging, as observed in our analysis. Additionally, we found the majority of grants were using already existing biospecimens (63%). Grants that involved use of existing biospecimens resulted in lower costs (studies that used existing serum/plasma biospecimens were 4.2 times less expensive) and more publications per year (1.4 times) than grants collecting new biospecimens. This analysis serves as a first step at understanding the types of biospecimen collections supported by NCI DCCPS. There is room to encourage increased use of archived biospecimens and new collections of rarer specimen and cancer types, as well as for behavioral and social research. To facilitate these efforts, we are working to better catalogue our funded resources and make that data available to the extramural community.

  16. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Technology Control Center, report to the Steering committee. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report describes test for air pollution control of flue gas and mercury as a result of coal combustion. The NYSEG Kintigh Station provided flue gas to the Center 100% of the time during this performance period. As the Kintigh Station operated with a variety of coals, fluctuations in the Center`s inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations were experienced. Safety training for the month was conducted by the O&M Superintendent, Maintenance Supervisor and Shift Supervisors. {open_quotes}Personal Protective Equipment{close_quotes} was the topic of the month. Inspections of the ECTC Facility and safety equipment (SCR air-packs, fire extinguishers, etc.) were completed and recorded this month. All systems were found to be in good condition. By continuing to emphasize safe work habits at the Center, we have raised the total number of days without a lost time injury to 1426 as of 4/30/96. The monthly safety meeting with the NYSEG Kintigh Station was held on April 30, 1996 with both NYSEG and ECTC representatives. The topics of discussion included an overview of NYSEG`s upcoming alternate fuel burn, an update on plant staffing changes, and a discussion of future safety training activities.

  17. Electrophysiological evidence for greater attention to threat when cognitive control resources are depleted.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Amanda; Mogg, Karin; de Fockert, Jan; Nielsen, Maria Kragh; Bradley, Brendan P

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the time course of attentional bias for threat-related (angry) facial expressions under conditions of high versus low cognitive (working memory) load. Event-related potential (ERP) and reaction time (RT) data were recorded while participants viewed pairs of faces (angry paired with neutral face) displayed for 500 ms and followed by a probe. Participants were required to respond to the probe while performing a concurrent task of holding in working memory a sequence of digits that were either in the same order (low memory load) or in a random mixed order (high memory load). The ERP results revealed that higher working memory load resulted in enhanced lateralized neural responses to threatening relative to neutral faces, consistent with greater initial orienting of attention to threatening faces (early N2pc: 180-252 ms) and enhanced maintenance of processing representations of threat (late N2pc, 252-320 ms; SPCN, 320-500 ms). The ERP indices showed significant positive relationships with each other, and also with the behavioral index of attentional bias to threat (reflected by faster RTs to probes replacing angry than neutral faces at 500 ms), although the latter index was not significantly influenced by memory load. Overall, the findings indicate that depletion of cognitive control resources, using a working memory manipulation, increases the capacity of task-irrelevant threat cues to capture and hold attention.

  18. Self-organizing feature maps for dynamic control of radio resources in CDMA microcellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    1998-03-01

    The application of artificial neural networks to the channel assignment problem for cellular code-division multiple access (CDMA) cellular networks has previously been investigated. CDMA takes advantage of voice activity and spatial isolation because its capacity is only interference limited, unlike time-division multiple access (TDMA) and frequency-division multiple access (FDMA) where capacities are bandwidth-limited. Any reduction in interference in CDMA translates linearly into increased capacity. To satisfy the high demands for new services and improved connectivity for mobile communications, microcellular and picocellular systems are being introduced. For these systems, there is a need to develop robust and efficient management procedures for the allocation of power and spectrum to maximize radio capacity. Topology-conserving mappings play an important role in the biological processing of sensory inputs. The same principles underlying Kohonen's self-organizing feature maps (SOFMs) are applied to the adaptive control of radio resources to minimize interference, hence, maximize capacity in direct-sequence (DS) CDMA networks. The approach based on SOFMs is applied to some published examples of both theoretical and empirical models of DS/CDMA microcellular networks in metropolitan areas. The results of the approach for these examples are informally compared to the performance of algorithms, based on Hopfield- Tank neural networks and on genetic algorithms, for the channel assignment problem.

  19. Home-based rehabilitation for COPD using minimal resources: a randomised, controlled equivalence trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahal, Ajay; Hill, Catherine J; Lee, Annemarie L; Burge, Angela T; Cox, Narelle S; Moore, Rosemary; Nicolson, Caroline; O'Halloran, Paul; Lahham, Aroub; Gillies, Rebecca; McDonald, Christine F

    2017-01-01

    Background Pulmonary rehabilitation is a cornerstone of care for COPD but uptake of traditional centre-based programmes is poor. We assessed whether home-based pulmonary rehabilitation, delivered using minimal resources, had equivalent outcomes to centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation. Methods A randomised controlled equivalence trial with 12 months follow-up. Participants with stable COPD were randomly assigned to receive 8 weeks of pulmonary rehabilitation by either the standard outpatient centre-based model, or a new home-based model including one home visit and seven once-weekly telephone calls from a physiotherapist. The primary outcome was change in 6 min walk distance (6MWD). Results We enrolled 166 participants to receive centre-based rehabilitation (n=86) or home-based rehabilitation (n=80). Intention-to-treat analysis confirmed non-inferiority of home-based rehabilitation for 6MWD at end-rehabilitation and the confidence interval (CI) did not rule out superiority (mean difference favouring home group 18.6 m, 95% CI −3.3 to 40.7). At 12 months the CI did not exclude inferiority (−5.1 m, −29.2 to 18.9). Between-group differences for dyspnoea-related quality of life did not rule out superiority of home-based rehabilitation at programme completion (1.6 points, −0.3 to 3.5) and groups were equivalent at 12 months (0.05 points, −2.0 to 2.1). The per-protocol analysis showed the same pattern of findings. Neither group maintained postrehabilitation gains at 12 months. Conclusions This home-based pulmonary rehabilitation model, delivered with minimal resources, produced short-term clinical outcomes that were equivalent to centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation. Neither model was effective in maintaining gains at 12 months. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation could be considered for people with COPD who cannot access centre-based pulmonary rehabilitation. Trial registration number NCT01423227, clinicaltrials.gov. PMID:27672116

  20. Indian Tribes as Developing Nations; A Question of Power: Indian Control of Indian Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Americans for Indian Opportunity, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    The report discusses how Indian tribes can conserve and develop their own resources at their own pace and explores the options available to them as owners of valuable natural resources. Discussed are problems encountered by tribal leaders with various government agencies; the basic precepts of the Bureau of Indian Affairs; how the problems of…