Science.gov

Sample records for control software architecture

  1. A Software Architecture for Semiautonomous Robot Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortenkamp, David

    2004-01-01

    A software architecture has been developed to increase the safety and effectiveness with which tasks are performed by robots that are capable of functioning autonomously but sometimes are operated under control by humans. The control system of such a robot designed according to a prior software architecture has no way of taking account of how the environment has changed or what parts of a task were performed during an interval of control by a human, so that errors can occur (and, hence, safety and effectiveness jeopardized) when the human relinquishes control. The present architecture incorporates the control, task-planning, and sensor-based-monitoring features of typical prior autonomous-robot software architectures, plus features for updating information on the environment and planning of tasks during control by a human operator in order to enable the robot to track the actions taken by the operator and to be ready to resume autonomous operation with minimal error. The present architecture also provides a user interface that presents, to the operator, a variety of information on the internal state of the robot and the status of the task.

  2. Domain specific software architectures: Command and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Christine; Hatch, William; Ruegsegger, Theodore; Balzer, Bob; Feather, Martin; Goldman, Neil; Wile, Dave

    1992-01-01

    GTE is the Command and Control contractor for the Domain Specific Software Architectures program. The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate an architecture-driven, component-based capability for the automated generation of command and control (C2) applications. Such a capability will significantly reduce the cost of C2 applications development and will lead to improved system quality and reliability through the use of proven architectures and components. A major focus of GTE's approach is the automated generation of application components in particular subdomains. Our initial work in this area has concentrated in the message handling subdomain; we have defined and prototyped an approach that can automate one of the most software-intensive parts of C2 systems development. This paper provides an overview of the GTE team's DSSA approach and then presents our work on automated support for message processing.

  3. Software control architecture for autonomous vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; DeAnda, Juan R.; Fox, Richard K.; Meng, Xiannong

    1999-07-01

    The Strategic-Tactical-Execution Software Control Architecture (STESCA) is a tri-level approach to controlling autonomous vehicles. Using an object-oriented approach, STESCA has been developed as a generalization of the Rational Behavior Model (RBM). STESCA was initially implemented for the Phoenix Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (Naval Postgraduate School -- Monterey, CA), and is currently being implemented for the Pioneer AT land-based wheeled vehicle. The goals of STESCA are twofold. First is to create a generic framework to simplify the process of creating a software control architecture for autonomous vehicles of any type. Second is to allow for mission specification system by 'anyone' with minimal training to control the overall vehicle functionality. This paper describes the prototype implementation of STESCA for the Pioneer AT.

  4. Software architecture of INO340 telescope control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanmehr, Reza; Khosroshahi, Habib

    2016-08-01

    The software architecture plays an important role in distributed control system of astronomical projects because many subsystems and components must work together in a consistent and reliable way. We have utilized a customized architecture design approach based on "4+1 view model" in order to design INOCS software architecture. In this paper, after reviewing the top level INOCS architecture, we present the software architecture model of INOCS inspired by "4+1 model", for this purpose we provide logical, process, development, physical, and scenario views of our architecture using different UML diagrams and other illustrative visual charts. Each view presents INOCS software architecture from a different perspective. We finish the paper by science data operation of INO340 and the concluding remarks.

  5. INO340 telescope control system: software architecture and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanmehr, Reza; Jafarzadeh, Asghar

    2014-07-01

    The Iranian National Observatory telescope (INO340) is a 3.4m Alt-Az reflecting optical telescope under design and development. It is f/11 Ritchey-Chretien with a 0.3° field-of-view. INO340 telescope control system utilizes a distributed control system paradigm that includes four major systems: Telescope Control System (TCS), Observation System Supervisor (OSS), Interlock System (ILS) and Observatory Monitoring System (OMS). The control system software also employs 3-tiered hierarchical architecture. In this paper, after presenting the fundamental concepts and operations of the INO340 control system, we propose the distributed control system software architecture including technical and functional architecture, middleware and infrastructure design and finally the software development process.

  6. NASA Integrated Network Monitor and Control Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shames, Peter; Anderson, Michael; Kowal, Steve; Levesque, Michael; Sindiy, Oleg; Donahue, Kenneth; Barnes, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Communications and Navigation office (SCaN) has commissioned a series of trade studies to define a new architecture intended to integrate the three existing networks that it operates, the Deep Space Network (DSN), Space Network (SN), and Near Earth Network (NEN), into one integrated network that offers users a set of common, standardized, services and interfaces. The integrated monitor and control architecture utilizes common software and common operator interfaces that can be deployed at all three network elements. This software uses state-of-the-art concepts such as a pool of re-programmable equipment that acts like a configurable software radio, distributed hierarchical control, and centralized management of the whole SCaN integrated network. For this trade space study a model-based approach using SysML was adopted to describe and analyze several possible options for the integrated network monitor and control architecture. This model was used to refine the design and to drive the costing of the four different software options. This trade study modeled the three existing self standing network elements at point of departure, and then described how to integrate them using variations of new and existing monitor and control system components for the different proposed deployments under consideration. This paper will describe the trade space explored, the selected system architecture, the modeling and trade study methods, and some observations on useful approaches to implementing such model based trade space representation and analysis.

  7. NASA Integrated Network Monitor and Control Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shames, Peter; Anderson, Michael; Kowal, Steve; Levesque, Michael; Sindiy, Oleg; Donahue, Kenneth; Barnes, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Communications and Navigation office (SCaN) has commissioned a series of trade studies to define a new architecture intended to integrate the three existing networks that it operates, the Deep Space Network (DSN), Space Network (SN), and Near Earth Network (NEN), into one integrated network that offers users a set of common, standardized, services and interfaces. The integrated monitor and control architecture utilizes common software and common operator interfaces that can be deployed at all three network elements. This software uses state-of-the-art concepts such as a pool of re-programmable equipment that acts like a configurable software radio, distributed hierarchical control, and centralized management of the whole SCaN integrated network. For this trade space study a model-based approach using SysML was adopted to describe and analyze several possible options for the integrated network monitor and control architecture. This model was used to refine the design and to drive the costing of the four different software options. This trade study modeled the three existing self standing network elements at point of departure, and then described how to integrate them using variations of new and existing monitor and control system components for the different proposed deployments under consideration. This paper will describe the trade space explored, the selected system architecture, the modeling and trade study methods, and some observations on useful approaches to implementing such model based trade space representation and analysis.

  8. Software Architecture for Simultaneous Process Control and Software Development/Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Hileman, Michael S; McMillan, David E; Holmes Jr, William; Blankenship, Mark; Wilder, Terry

    2011-01-01

    A software architecture is described that allows modification of some application code sections while the remainder of the application continues executing. This architecture facilitates long term testing and process control because the overall process need not be stopped and restarted to allow modifications or additions to the software. A working implementation using National Instruments LabVIEW{trademark} sub-panel and shared variable features is described as an example. This architecture provides several benefits in both the program development and execution environments. The software is easier to maintain and it is not necessary to recompile the entire program after a modification.

  9. The software architecture to control the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, I.; Füßling, M.; Antonino, P. O.; Conforti, V.; Hagge, L.; Melkumyan, D.; Morgenstern, A.; Tosti, G.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarz, J.; Wegner, P.; Colomé, J.; Lyard, E.

    2016-07-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) project is an initiative to build two large arrays of Cherenkov gamma- ray telescopes. CTA will be deployed as two installations, one in the northern and the other in the southern hemisphere, containing dozens of telescopes of different sizes. CTA is a big step forward in the field of ground- based gamma-ray astronomy, not only because of the expected scientific return, but also due to the order-of- magnitude larger scale of the instrument to be controlled. The performance requirements associated with such a large and distributed astronomical installation require a thoughtful analysis to determine the best software solutions. The array control and data acquisition (ACTL) work-package within the CTA initiative will deliver the software to control and acquire the data from the CTA instrumentation. In this contribution we present the current status of the formal ACTL system decomposition into software building blocks and the relationships among them. The system is modelled via the Systems Modelling Language (SysML) formalism. To cope with the complexity of the system, this architecture model is sub-divided into different perspectives. The relationships with the stakeholders and external systems are used to create the first perspective, the context of the ACTL software system. Use cases are employed to describe the interaction of those external elements with the ACTL system and are traced to a hierarchy of functionalities (abstract system functions) describing the internal structure of the ACTL system. These functions are then traced to fully specified logical elements (software components), the deployment of which as technical elements, is also described. This modelling approach allows us to decompose the ACTL software in elements to be created and the ow of information within the system, providing us with a clear way to identify sub-system interdependencies. This architectural approach allows us to build the ACTL system model and

  10. The Diamond Beamline Controls and Data Acquisition Software Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, N.

    2010-06-01

    The software for the Diamond Light Source beamlines[1] is based on two complementary software frameworks: low level control is provided by the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) framework[2][3] and the high level user interface is provided by the Java based Generic Data Acquisition or GDA[4][5]. EPICS provides a widely used, robust, generic interface across a wide range of hardware where the user interfaces are focused on serving the needs of engineers and beamline scientists to obtain detailed low level views of all aspects of the beamline control systems. The GDA system provides a high-level system that combines an understanding of scientific concepts, such as reciprocal lattice coordinates, a flexible python syntax scripting interface for the scientific user to control their data acquisition, and graphical user interfaces where necessary. This paper describes the beamline software architecture in more detail, highlighting how these complementary frameworks provide a flexible system that can accommodate a wide range of requirements.

  11. Robust Software Architecture for Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aghazanian, Hrand; Baumgartner, Eric; Garrett, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Robust Real-Time Reconfigurable Robotics Software Architecture (R4SA) is the name of both a software architecture and software that embodies the architecture. The architecture was conceived in the spirit of current practice in designing modular, hard, realtime aerospace systems. The architecture facilitates the integration of new sensory, motor, and control software modules into the software of a given robotic system. R4SA was developed for initial application aboard exploratory mobile robots on Mars, but is adaptable to terrestrial robotic systems, real-time embedded computing systems in general, and robotic toys.

  12. Software Architecture Technology Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    2007 Carnegie Mellon University Software Architecture Technology Initiative Mark Klein Third Annual SATURN Workshop May 2007 Report Documentation...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Software Architecture Technology Initiative 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES presented at the SEI Software Architecture Technology User

  13. Software Architecture Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  14. Software Architecture Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  15. Service-oriented architecture for the ARGOS instrument control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borelli, J.; Barl, L.; Gässler, W.; Kulas, M.; Rabien, Sebastian

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Rayleigh Guided ground layer Adaptive optic System, ARGOS, equips the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) with a constellation of six rayleigh laser guide stars. By correcting atmospheric turbulence near the ground, the system is designed to increase the image quality of the multi-object spectrograph LUCIFER approximately by a factor of 3 over a field of 4 arc minute diameter. The control software has the critical task of orchestrating several devices, instruments, and high level services, including the already existing adaptive optic system and the telescope control software. All these components are widely distributed over the telescope, adding more complexity to the system design. The approach used by the ARGOS engineers is to write loosely coupled and distributed services under the control of different ownership systems, providing a uniform mechanism to offer, discover, interact and use these distributed capabilities. The control system counts with several finite state machines, vibration and flexure compensation loops, and safety mechanism, such as interlocks, aircraft, and satellite avoidance systems.

  16. Software Architecture Technology Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    2008 Carnegie Mellon University 2008 PLS March 2008 © 2008 Carnegie Mellon University Software Architecture Technology Initiative SATURN 2008...SUBTITLE Software Architecture Technology Initiative 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES presented at the SEI Software Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Workshop, 30 Apr ? 1 May 2008, Pittsburgh, PA. 14

  17. Intelligent Platform Management Controller Software Architecture in ATCA Modules for Fast Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, A. P.; Correia, M.; Batista, A.; Carvalho, P. F.; Santos, B.; Carvalho, B. B.; Sousa, J.; Gonçalves, B.; Correia, C. M. B.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2014-08-01

    The Intelligent Platform Management Controller (IPMC) is one of the main elements for hardware management in an Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) crate. Hardware failure detection, redundancy procedures, and hot insertion/removal of the boards are tasks that ensure high availability to a control and data acquisition system. Therefore, the Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear of the Instituto Superior Técnico de Lisboa (IPFN/IST) decided to develop software to an IPMC sodimm module from CoreIPM and integrate it in the ATCA boards that are being developed. The objective is to include those boards in the instrumentation catalogue of the tokamak International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This paper describes the architecture and the main tasks performed by the IPMC software module.

  18. Architecture for Verifiable Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinholtz, William; Dvorak, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Verifiable MDS Architecture (VMA) is a software architecture that facilitates the construction of highly verifiable flight software for NASA s Mission Data System (MDS), especially for smaller missions subject to cost constraints. More specifically, the purpose served by VMA is to facilitate aggressive verification and validation of flight software while imposing a minimum of constraints on overall functionality. VMA exploits the state-based architecture of the MDS and partitions verification issues into elements susceptible to independent verification and validation, in such a manner that scaling issues are minimized, so that relatively large software systems can be aggressively verified in a cost-effective manner.

  19. Software architecture design domain

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    Software architectures can provide a basis for the capture and subsequent reuse of design knowledge. The goal of software architecture is to allow the design of a system to take place at a higher level of abstraction; a level concerned with components, connections, constraints, rationale. This architectural view of software adds a new layer of abstraction to the traditional design phase of software development. It has resulted in a flurry of activity towards techniques, tools, and architectural design languages developed specifically to assist with this activity. An analysis of architectural descriptions, even though they differ in notation, shows a common set of key constructs that are present across widely varying domains. These common aspects form a core set of constructs that should belong to any ADL in order to for the language to offer the ability to specify software systems at the architectural level. This analysis also revealed a second set of constructs which served to expand the first set thereby improving the syntax and semantics. These constructs are classified according to whether they provide representation and analysis support for architectures belonging to many varying application domains (domain-independent construct class) or to a particular application domain (domain-dependent constructs). This paper presents the constructs of these two classes, their placement in the architecture design domain and shows how they may be used to classify, select, and analyze proclaimed architectural design languages (ADLs).

  20. Adoption of new software and hardware solutions at the VLT: the ESPRESSO control architecture case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirami, R.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Coretti, I.; Santin, P.; Mannetta, M.; Baldini, V.; Cristiani, S.; Abreu, M.; Cabral, A.; Monteiro, M.; Mégevand, D.; Zerbi, F.

    2012-09-01

    ESPRESSO is a fiber-fed cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph which can be operated with one or up to 4 UT (Unit Telescope) of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It will be located in the Combined-Coudé Laboratory (CCL) of the VLT and it will be the first permanent instrument using a 16-m equivalent telescope. The ESPRESSO control software and electronics are in charge of the control of all instrument subsystems: the four Coudé Trains (one for each UT), the front-end and the fiber-fed spectrograph itself contained within a vacuum vessel. The spectrograph is installed inside a series of thermal enclosures following an onion-shell principle with increasing temperature stability from outside to inside. The proposed electronics architecture will use the OPC Unified Architecture (OPC UA) as a standard layer to communicate with PLCs (Programmable Logical Controller), replacing the old Instrument Local Control Units (LCUs) for ESO instruments based on VME technology. The instrument control software will be based on the VLT Control Software package and will use the IC0 Field Bus extension for the control of the instrument hardware. In this paper we present the ESPRESSO software architectural design proposed at the Preliminary Design Review as well as the control electronics architecture.

  1. Decentralized Software Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    to describe software. Thus, the essential anthropocentrism of the term’s tradi- tional definition suggests exploring a social process that illustrates...and disagreement outside it. The anthropocentrism of the concept may seem irrelevant to the concerns of software architecture, but the missing link

  2. A software architecture for hard real-time execution of automatically synthesized plans or control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoppers, Marcel

    1994-01-01

    The design of a flexible, real-time software architecture for trajectory planning and automatic control of redundant manipulators is described. Emphasis is placed on a technique of designing control systems that are both flexible and robust yet have good real-time performance. The solution presented involves an artificial intelligence algorithm that dynamically reprograms the real-time control system while planning system behavior.

  3. Control software and electronics architecture design in the framework of the E-ELT instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marcantonio, P.; Coretti, I.; Cirami, R.; Comari, M.; Santin, P.; Pucillo, M.

    2010-07-01

    During the last years the European Southern Observatory (ESO), in collaboration with other European astronomical institutes, has started several feasibility studies for the E-ELT (European-Extremely Large Telescope) instrumentation and post-focal adaptive optics. The goal is to create a flexible suite of instruments to deal with the wide variety of scientific questions astronomers would like to see solved in the coming decades. In this framework INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Trieste (INAF-AOTs) is currently responsible of carrying out the analysis and the preliminary study of the architecture of the electronics and control software of three instruments: CODEX (control software and electronics) and OPTIMOS-EVE/OPTIMOS-DIORAMAS (control software). To cope with the increased complexity and new requirements for stability, precision, real-time latency and communications among sub-systems imposed by these instruments, new solutions have been investigated by our group. In this paper we present the proposed software and electronics architecture based on a distributed common framework centered on the Component/Container model that uses OPC Unified Architecture as a standard layer to communicate with COTS components of three different vendors. We describe three working prototypes that have been set-up in our laboratory and discuss their performances, integration complexity and ease of deployment.

  4. Software Defined Networking (SDN) controlled all optical switching networks with multi-dimensional switching architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Ji, Yuefeng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Hui; Xiong, Qianjin; Qiu, Shaofeng

    2014-08-01

    Ultrahigh throughout capacity requirement is challenging the current optical switching nodes with the fast development of data center networks. Pbit/s level all optical switching networks need to be deployed soon, which will cause the high complexity of node architecture. How to control the future network and node equipment together will become a new problem. An enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN) control architecture is proposed in the paper, which consists of Provider NOX (P-NOX) and Node NOX (N-NOX). With the cooperation of P-NOX and N-NOX, the flexible control of the entire network can be achieved. All optical switching network testbed has been experimentally demonstrated with efficient control of enhanced Software Defined Networking (eSDN). Pbit/s level all optical switching nodes in the testbed are implemented based on multi-dimensional switching architecture, i.e. multi-level and multi-planar. Due to the space and cost limitation, each optical switching node is only equipped with four input line boxes and four output line boxes respectively. Experimental results are given to verify the performance of our proposed control and switching architecture.

  5. Flexible software architecture for user-interface and machine control in laboratory automation.

    PubMed

    Arutunian, E B; Meldrum, D R; Friedman, N A; Moody, S E

    1998-10-01

    We describe a modular, layered software architecture for automated laboratory instruments. The design consists of a sophisticated user interface, a machine controller and multiple individual hardware subsystems, each interacting through a client-server architecture built entirely on top of open Internet standards. In our implementation, the user-interface components are built as Java applets that are downloaded from a server integrated into the machine controller. The user-interface client can thereby provide laboratory personnel with a familiar environment for experiment design through a standard World Wide Web browser. Data management and security are seamlessly integrated at the machine-controller layer using QNX, a real-time operating system. This layer also controls hardware subsystems through a second client-server interface. This architecture has proven flexible and relatively easy to implement and allows users to operate laboratory automation instruments remotely through an Internet connection. The software architecture was implemented and demonstrated on the Acapella, an automated fluid-sample-processing system that is under development at the University of Washington.

  6. Software architecture for a multi-purpose real-time control unit for research purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epple, S.; Jung, R.; Jalba, K.; Nasui, V.

    2017-05-01

    A new, freely programmable, scalable control system for academic research purposes was developed. The intention was, to have a control unit capable of handling multiple PT1000 temperature sensors at reasonable accuracy and temperature range, as well as digital input signals and providing powerful output signals. To take full advantage of the system, control-loops are run in real time. The whole eight bit system with very limited memory runs independently of a personal computer. The two on board RS232 connectors allow to connect further units or to connect other equipment, as required in real time. This paper describes the software architecture for the third prototype that now provides stable measurements and an improvement in accuracy compared to the previous designs. As test case a thermal solar system to produce hot tap water and assist heating in a single-family house was implemented. The solar fluid pump was power-controlled and several temperatures at different points in the hydraulic system were measured and used in the control algorithms. The software architecture proved suitable to test several different control strategies and their corresponding algorithms for the thermal solar system.

  7. The ALMA software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Joseph; Farris, Allen; Sommer, Heiko

    2004-09-01

    The software for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is being developed by many institutes on two continents. The software itself will function in a distributed environment, from the 0.5-14 kmbaselines that separate antennas to the larger distances that separate the array site at the Llano de Chajnantor in Chile from the operations and user support facilities in Chile, North America and Europe. Distributed development demands 1) interfaces that allow separated groups to work with minimal dependence on their counterparts at other locations; and 2) a common architecture to minimize duplication and ensure that developers can always perform similar tasks in a similar way. The Container/Component model provides a blueprint for the separation of functional from technical concerns: application developers concentrate on implementing functionality in Components, which depend on Containers to provide them with services such as access to remote resources, transparent serialization of entity objects to XML, logging, error handling and security. Early system integrations have verified that this architecture is sound and that developers can successfully exploit its features. The Containers and their services are provided by a system-orienteddevelopment team as part of the ALMA Common Software (ACS), middleware that is based on CORBA.

  8. Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Control Coordination Using a Tri-Level Hybrid Software Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    Tri-Level Hybrid Software Architecture A. J. Healey1, D. B. Marco, R. B. McGhee Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Laboratory Naval Postgraduate School...the software architecture to implement them is often composed of three levels for ease of segregation and development of functionality. An...the development of coastal environmental understanding, new technology is being aimed at using (semi)autonomous vehicles, requiring acoustic

  9. ALMA software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Joseph; Raffi, Gianni

    2002-12-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is a joint project involving astronomical organizations in Europe and North America. ALMA will consist of at least 64 12-meter antennas operating in the millimeter and sub-millimeter range. It will be located at an altitude of about 5000m in the Chilean Atacama desert. The primary challenge to the development of the software architecture is the fact that both its development and runtime environments will be distributed. Groups at different institutes will develop the key elements such as Proposal Preparation tools, Instrument operation, On-line calibration and reduction, and Archiving. The Proposal Preparation software will be used primarily at scientists' home institutions (or on their laptops), while Instrument Operations will execute on a set of networked computers at the ALMA Operations Support Facility. The ALMA Science Archive, itself to be replicated at several sites, will serve astronomers worldwide. Building upon the existing ALMA Common Software (ACS), the system architects will prepare a robust framework that will use XML-encoded entity objects to provide an effective solution to the persistence needs of this system, while remaining largely independent of any underlying DBMS technology. Independence of distributed subsystems will be facilitated by an XML- and CORBA-based pass-by-value mechanism for exchange of objects. Proof of concept (as well as a guide to subsystem developers) will come from a prototype whose details will be presented.

  10. Compositional Specification of Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penix, John; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes our experience using parameterized algebraic specifications to model properties of software architectures. The goal is to model the decomposition of requirements independent of the style used to implement the architecture. We begin by providing an overview of the role of architecture specification in software development. We then describe how architecture specifications are build up from component and connector specifications and give an overview of insights gained from a case study used to validate the method.

  11. Toward Measures for Software Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    application of measurement technology to software architectures. The ultimate goal of this body of work is to provide measurement guidance and quantitative...ISO/IEC FCD 9126-1.2. Information Technology – Software Product Quality, Part 1: Quality Model, 1998. [Kruchten 95] Kruchten, P. “The 4+1 View Model...research into the application of measurement technology to software architectures. The ultimate goal of this body of work is to provide

  12. Software synthesis using generic architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhansali, Sanjay

    1993-01-01

    A framework for synthesizing software systems based on abstracting software system designs and the design process is described. The result of such an abstraction process is a generic architecture and the process knowledge for customizing the architecture. The customization process knowledge is used to assist a designer in customizing the architecture as opposed to completely automating the design of systems. Our approach using an implemented example of a generic tracking architecture which was customized in two different domains is illustrated. How the designs produced using KASE compare to the original designs of the two systems, and current work and plans for extending KASE to other application areas are described.

  13. Generic Software Architecture for Launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carre, Emilien; Gast, Philippe; Hiron, Emmanuel; Leblanc, Alain; Lesens, David; Mescam, Emmanuelle; Moro, Pierre

    2015-09-01

    The definition and reuse of generic software architecture for launchers is not so usual for several reasons: the number of European launcher families is very small (Ariane 5 and Vega for these last decades); the real time constraints (reactivity and determinism needs) are very hard; low levels of versatility are required (implying often an ad hoc development of the launcher mission). In comparison, satellites are often built on a generic platform made up of reusable hardware building blocks (processors, star-trackers, gyroscopes, etc.) and reusable software building blocks (middleware, TM/TC, On Board Control Procedure, etc.). If some of these reasons are still valid (e.g. the limited number of development), the increase of the available CPU power makes today an approach based on a generic time triggered middleware (ensuring the full determinism of the system) and a centralised mission and vehicle management (offering more flexibility in the design and facilitating the long term maintenance) achievable. This paper presents an example of generic software architecture which could be envisaged for future launchers, based on the previously described principles and supported by model driven engineering and automatic code generation.

  14. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multi-core, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to .50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  15. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multicore, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to approx.50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  16. A comparison of two software architectural styles for space-based control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the hardware/software design of control systems it is almost an article of faith to decompose a system into loosely coupled subsystems, with state variables encapsulated inside device and subsystem objects.

  17. A comparison of two software architectural styles for space-based control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the hardware/software design of control systems it is almost an article of faith to decompose a system into loosely coupled subsystems, with state variables encapsulated inside device and subsystem objects.

  18. Software Architecture Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    adequately. Swanson’s taxonomy was so influential that it was incorporated, many years later, into ISO /IEC 14764 [109, § 6.2], an international standard on...borrow the software maintenance typology from ISO /IEC 14764 for their “Need for Evolution” dimension. I am aware of one empirical study that has examined...Integration. The feature prototypes were designed to allow us to develop, in iso - lation, the main features required for an evolution planning plug-in

  19. The MDS autonomous control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the autonomous control architecture for the JPL Mission Data System (MDS). MDS is a comprehensive new software infrastructure for supporting unmanned space exploration. The autonomous control architecture is one component of MDS designed to enable autonomous operations.

  20. The MDS autonomous control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gat, E.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the autonomous control architecture for the JPL Mission Data System (MDS). MDS is a comprehensive new software infrastructure for supporting unmanned space exploration. The autonomous control architecture is one component of MDS designed to enable autonomous operations.

  1. Software design by reusing architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhansali, Sanjay; Nii, H. Penny

    1992-01-01

    Abstraction fosters reuse by providing a class of artifacts that can be instantiated or customized to produce a set of artifacts meeting different specific requirements. It is proposed that significant leverage can be obtained by abstracting software system designs and the design process. The result of such an abstraction is a generic architecture and a set of knowledge-based, customization tools that can be used to instantiate the generic architecture. An approach for designing software systems based on the above idea are described. The approach is illustrated through an implemented example, and the advantages and limitations of the approach are discussed.

  2. ControlWare: A Middleware Architecture for Feedback Control of Software Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Fieldbus [9] greatly simplifying the intercon- nection of sensors, actuators, and controllers in a digital control system. Similarly, ControlWare...Measurement and Modeling of Computer Systems, pages 151–160, 1998. [9] A. Chatha. Fieldbus : the foundation for field control sys- tems. ontrol Engineering

  3. Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Real-Time Innovations, Inc. (RTI) collaborated with Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Stanford University to leverage NASA research to produce ControlShell software. RTI is the first "graduate" of Ames Research Center's Technology Commercialization Center. The ControlShell system was used extensively on a cooperative project to enhance the capabilities of a Russian-built Marsokhod rover being evaluated for eventual flight to Mars. RTI's ControlShell is complex, real-time command and control software, capable of processing information and controlling mechanical devices. One ControlShell tool is StethoScope. As a real-time data collection and display tool, StethoScope allows a user to see how a program is running without changing its execution. RTI has successfully applied its software savvy in other arenas, such as telecommunications, networking, video editing, semiconductor manufacturing, automobile systems, and medical imaging.

  4. Software Architecture for Planetary and Lunar Robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utz, Hans; Fong, Teny; Nesnas, Iasa A. D.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the role that software architecture plays in space and lunar robotics is shown. The topics include: 1) The Intelligent Robotics Group; 2) The Lunar Mission; 3) Lunar Robotics; and 4) Software Architecture for Space Robotics.

  5. SOIS and Software Reference Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torelli, Felice; Taylor, Chris; Viana Sanchez, Aitor; Mendham, Peter; Fowell, Stuart

    2011-08-01

    In the recent years ESA, in conjunction with the European space industry, has supported a number of initiatives aimed at increasing the level of standardisation in the elements composing a spacecraft avionics system. This is an ongoing process with many contributors including SAVOIR, SAVOIR-FAIRE1, CCSDS SOIS and the ECSS protocol standardisation activities. The SOIS service framework and the accompanying ECSS protocols play a key role in the evolution of flight avionics as, on the one side they standardise the external hardware interfaces required for interconnection and on the other standardise the communication services seen by applications. Much still remains to be done, in particular, the communications based services defined by SOIS must be incorporated into a standard software architecture such that real implementations can take benefit from the standards. Aspects such as the use of Electronic Data Sheets2 need to be evaluated, as does the use of plug and play concepts. This paper will present the latest evolution of the SOIS architecture and related CCSDS recommendations including the relationship and status of the software reference architecture being developed under SAVOIR-FAIRE. The potential impacts on the design of a system adopting the standardised services will also be discussed in three main areas: communication with external equipments, abstraction of sensors & actuators and software bus.

  6. Future Trends of Software Technology and Applications: Software Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Defense © 2006 by Carnegie Mellon University 1 Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890 Future Trends of Software Technology ...COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Future Trends of Software Technology and Applications: Software Architecture 5a. CONTRACT...and Applications: Software Architecture Paul Clements Software Engineering Institute Carnegie Mellon University Report Documentation Page Form

  7. The telescope control of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov telescope Array: hardware and software design architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Elisa; Cascone, Enrico; Schwarz, Joseph; Stringhetti, Luca; Tanci, Claudio; Tosti, Gino; Aisa, Damiano; Aisa, Simone; Bagaglia, Marco; Busatta, Andrea; Campeggi, Carlo; Cefala, Marco; Farnesini, Lucio; Giacomel, Stefano; Marchiori, Gianpiero; Marcuzzi, Enrico; Nucciarelli, Giuliano; Piluso, Antonfranco

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is a flagship project of the Italian Ministry of Research and led by the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics (INAF). One of its aims is to develop, within the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) framework, an end-to-end small-sized telescope prototype in a dual-mirror configuration (SST-2M) in order to investigate the energy range E ~ 1-100 TeV. A long-term goal of the ASTRI program is the production of an ASTRI/CTA mini-array composed of seven SST-2M telescopes. The prototype, named ASTRI SST-2M, is seen as a standalone system that needs only network and power connections to work. The software system that is being developed to control the prototype is the base for the Mini-Array Software System (MASS), which has the task to make possible the operation of both the ASTRI SST-2M prototype and the ASTRI/CTA mini-array. The scope of this contribution is to give an overview of the hardware and software architecture adopted for the ASTRI SST- 2M prototype, showing how to apply state of the art industrial technologies to telescope control and monitoring systems.

  8. Software architecture of biomimetic underwater vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praczyk, Tomasz; Szymak, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are vehicles that are entirely or partly independent of human decisions. In order to obtain operational independence, the vehicles have to be equipped with a specialized software. The main task of the software is to move the vehicle along a trajectory with collision avoidance. Moreover, the software has also to manage different devices installed on the vehicle board, e.g. to start and stop cameras, sonars etc. In addition to the software embedded on the vehicle board, the software responsible for managing the vehicle by the operator is also necessary. Its task is to define mission of the vehicle, to start, to stop the mission, to send emergency commands, to monitor vehicle parameters, and to control the vehicle in remotely operated mode. An important objective of the software is also to support development and tests of other software components. To this end, a simulation environment is necessary, i.e. simulation model of the vehicle and all its key devices, the model of the sea environment, and the software to visualize behavior of the vehicle. The paper presents architecture of the software designed for biomimetic autonomous underwater vehicle (BAUV) that is being constructed within the framework of the scientific project financed by Polish National Center of Research and Development.

  9. Power, Avionics and Software Communication Network Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the communication architecture for the Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 2.0 subsystem for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobile Unit (AEMU). The following systems are described in detail: Caution Warn- ing and Control System, Informatics, Storage, Video, Audio, Communication, and Monitoring Test and Validation. This document also provides some background as well as the purpose and goals of the PAS project at Glenn Research Center (GRC).

  10. Neural Architectures for Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, James K.

    1991-01-01

    The cerebellar model articulated controller (CMAC) neural architectures are shown to be viable for the purposes of real-time learning and control. Software tools for the exploration of CMAC performance are developed for three hardware platforms, the MacIntosh, the IBM PC, and the SUN workstation. All algorithm development was done using the C programming language. These software tools were then used to implement an adaptive critic neuro-control design that learns in real-time how to back up a trailer truck. The truck backer-upper experiment is a standard performance measure in the neural network literature, but previously the training of the controllers was done off-line. With the CMAC neural architectures, it was possible to train the neuro-controllers on-line in real-time on a MS-DOS PC 386. CMAC neural architectures are also used in conjunction with a hierarchical planning approach to find collision-free paths over 2-D analog valued obstacle fields. The method constructs a coarse resolution version of the original problem and then finds the corresponding coarse optimal path using multipass dynamic programming. CMAC artificial neural architectures are used to estimate the analog transition costs that dynamic programming requires. The CMAC architectures are trained in real-time for each obstacle field presented. The coarse optimal path is then used as a baseline for the construction of a fine scale optimal path through the original obstacle array. These results are a very good indication of the potential power of the neural architectures in control design. In order to reach as wide an audience as possible, we have run a seminar on neuro-control that has met once per week since 20 May 1991. This seminar has thoroughly discussed the CMAC architecture, relevant portions of classical control, back propagation through time, and adaptive critic designs.

  11. CNEOST Control Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhao, H. B.; Xia, Y.; Lu, H.; Li, B.

    2015-03-01

    In 2013, CNEOST (China Near Earth Object Survey Telescope) adapted its hardware system for the new CCD camera. Based on the new system architecture, the control software is re-designed and implemented. The software system adopts the message passing mechanism via WebSocket protocol, and improves its flexibility, expansibility, and scalability. The user interface with responsive web design realizes the remote operating under both desktop and mobile devices. The stable operating of software system has greatly enhanced the operation efficiency while reducing the complexity, and has also made a successful attempt for the future system design of telescope and telescope cloud.

  12. A Software Architecture for High Level Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen,G.

    2009-05-04

    A modular software platform for high level applications is under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source II project. This platform is based on client-server architecture, and the components of high level applications on this platform will be modular and distributed, and therefore reusable. An online model server is indispensable for model based control. Different accelerator facilities have different requirements for the online simulation. To supply various accelerator simulators, a set of narrow and general application programming interfaces is developed based on Tracy-3 and Elegant. This paper describes the system architecture for the modular high level applications, the design of narrow and general application programming interface for an online model server, and the prototype of online model server.

  13. Software Architecture for Autonomous Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Jimmy S.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis objective is to design an autonomous spacecraft architecture to perform both deliberative and reactive behaviors. The Autonomous Small Planet In-Situ Reaction to Events (ASPIRE) project uses the architecture to integrate several autonomous technologies for a comet orbiter mission.

  14. Software architecture of data acquisition control process during TJ-II operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, J.; Crémy, C.; Sánchez, E.; Portas, A.; Dormido, S.

    1997-01-01

    Data from the diagnostics on the TJ-II device will be collected by several independent systems linked to local area networks (LANs). Some of these systems will consist of digitizers based on well-known standards: CAMAC, VME, VXI, etc. Other allowable systems would be personal computers or workstations with direct control over a specific diagnostic. In principal, any equipment capable of being linked in a LAN can be used as a controller for data collection. All systems will be programmed from a central computer. In this computer, an application program will allow the set up of data acquisition in any system. This will be achieved by communicating systems through a network standard protocol: TCP/IP. The central computer will also centralize the database of discharges. For this purpose, immediately after a discharge, data will be sent from the autonomous systems to the main computer. The latter will coordinate data reception, organize discharge information, and compress data. Data will be transferred rapidly so all diagnostic signals will be available to users for immediate analysis. The computer processes outlined here will provide an application program to provide users with an interface for all operations related to data acquisition, fast signal analysis, and remote control of diagnostics. A second functionality will be the management of TJ-II discharge database.

  15. The LUCIFER control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jütte, Marcus; Knierim, Volker; Polsterer, Kai; Lehmitz, Michael; Storz, Clemens; Seifert, Walter; Ageorges, Nancy

    2010-07-01

    The successful roll-out of the control software for a complex NIR imager/spectrograph with MOS calls for flexible development strategies due to changing requirements during different phases of the project. A waterfall strategy used in the beginning has to change to a more iterative and agile process in the later stages. The choice of an appropriate program language as well as suitable software layout is crucial. For example the software has to accomplish multiple demands of different user groups, including a high level of flexibility for later changes and extensions. Different access levels to the instrument are mandatory to afford direct control mechanisms for lab operations and inspections of the instrument as well as tools to accomplish efficient science observations. Our hierarchical software structure with four layers of increasing abstract levels and the use of an object oriented language ideally supports these requirements. Here we describe our software architecture, the software development process, the different access levels and our commissioning experiences with LUCIFER 1.

  16. Development of an extendable arm and software architecture for autonomous and tele-operated control for mobile platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yung-Sen; Hunt, Shawn; Popovici, Cosmin; Walter, Steven; Witus, Gary; Ellis, R. Darin; Auner, Gregory; Cao, Alex; Pandya, Abhilash

    2008-04-01

    There is a strong demand for efficient explosive detecting devices and deployment methods in the field. In this study we present a prototype mast that uses a telescoping pulley system for optimal performance on top of an unmanned ground vehicle to be able to be controlled wirelessly. The mast and payload reaches up eight feet from the platform with a gripper that can pick up objects. The current mobile platform operators using a remote-control devices to move the arm and the robot itself from a safe distance away. It is equipped with a pulley system that can also be used to extend a camera or explosive detection sensor under a vehicle. The mast is outfitted with sensors. The simple master-slave strategy will not be sufficient as the navigation and sensory inputs will become complex. In this paper we provide a tested software/hardware framework that allows a mobile platform and the expanded arm to offload operator tasks to autonomous behaviors while maintaining tele-operations. This will implement semi-autonomous behaviors. This architecture involves a server which communicates commands and receives sensor inputs via a wireless modem to the mobile platform. This server can take requests from multiple client processes which have prioritized access to on-board sensor readings and can command the steering. The clients would include the tele-operation soldier unit, and any number of other autonomous behaviors linked to particular sensor information or triggered by the operator. For instance, the behavior of certain tasks can be controlled by low-latency clients with sensory information to prevent collisions, place sensor pods precisely, return to preplanned positions, home the units location or even perform image enhancements or object recognition on streamed video.

  17. An open architecture motion controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossol, Lothar

    1994-01-01

    Nomad, an open architecture motion controller, is described. It is formed by a combination of TMOS, C-WORKS, and other utilities. Nomad software runs in a UNIX environment and provides for sensor-controlled robotic motions, with user replaceable kinematics. It can also be tailored for highly specialized applications. Open controllers such as Nomad should have a major impact on the robotics industry.

  18. A Software Architecture for Intelligent Synthesis Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA's Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE) program is a grand attempt to develop a system to transform the way complex artifacts are engineered. This paper discusses a "middleware" architecture for enabling the development of ISE. Desirable elements of such an Intelligent Synthesis Architecture (ISA) include remote invocation; plug-and-play applications; scripting of applications; management of design artifacts, tools, and artifact and tool attributes; common system services; system management; and systematic enforcement of policies. This paper argues that the ISA extend conventional distributed object technology (DOT) such as CORBA and Product Data Managers with flexible repositories of product and tool annotations and "plug-and-play" mechanisms for inserting "ility" or orthogonal concerns into the system. I describe the Object Infrastructure Framework, an Aspect Oriented Programming (AOP) environment for developing distributed systems that provides utility insertion and enables consistent annotation maintenance. This technology can be used to enforce policies such as maintaining the annotations of artifacts, particularly the provenance and access control rules of artifacts-, performing automatic datatype transformations between representations; supplying alternative servers of the same service; reporting on the status of jobs and the system; conveying privileges throughout an application; supporting long-lived transactions; maintaining version consistency; and providing software redundancy and mobility.

  19. A Software Architecture for Intelligent Synthesis Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA's Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE) program is a grand attempt to develop a system to transform the way complex artifacts are engineered. This paper discusses a "middleware" architecture for enabling the development of ISE. Desirable elements of such an Intelligent Synthesis Architecture (ISA) include remote invocation; plug-and-play applications; scripting of applications; management of design artifacts, tools, and artifact and tool attributes; common system services; system management; and systematic enforcement of policies. This paper argues that the ISA extend conventional distributed object technology (DOT) such as CORBA and Product Data Managers with flexible repositories of product and tool annotations and "plug-and-play" mechanisms for inserting "ility" or orthogonal concerns into the system. I describe the Object Infrastructure Framework, an Aspect Oriented Programming (AOP) environment for developing distributed systems that provides utility insertion and enables consistent annotation maintenance. This technology can be used to enforce policies such as maintaining the annotations of artifacts, particularly the provenance and access control rules of artifacts-, performing automatic datatype transformations between representations; supplying alternative servers of the same service; reporting on the status of jobs and the system; conveying privileges throughout an application; supporting long-lived transactions; maintaining version consistency; and providing software redundancy and mobility.

  20. LSST active optics system software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Lotz, Paul; Xin, Bo; Claver, Charles; Angeli, George; Sebag, Jacques; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory P.

    2016-08-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an 8-meter class wide-field telescope now under construction on Cerro Pachon, near La Serena, Chile. This ground-based telescope is designed to conduct a decade-long time domain survey of the optical sky. In order to achieve the LSST scientific goals, the telescope requires delivering seeing limited image quality over the 3.5 degree field-of-view. Like many telescopes, LSST will use an Active Optics System (AOS) to correct in near real-time the system aberrations primarily introduced by gravity and temperature gradients. The LSST AOS uses a combination of 4 curvature wavefront sensors (CWS) located on the outside of the LSST field-of-view. The information coming from the 4 CWS is combined to calculate the appropriate corrections to be sent to the 3 different mirrors composing LSST. The AOS software incorporates a wavefront sensor estimation pipeline (WEP) and an active optics control system (AOCS). The WEP estimates the wavefront residual error from the CWS images. The AOCS determines the correction to be sent to the different degrees of freedom every 30 seconds. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of the AOS. More particularly, we will focus on the software architecture as well as the AOS interactions with the various subsystems within LSST.

  1. A Practical Software Architecture for Virtual Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiang, Peifeng; Shi, Yuanchun; Qin, Weijun

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces a practical software architecture called CUBES, which focuses on system integration and evolvement for online virtual universities. The key of CUBES is a supporting platform that helps to integrate and evolve heterogeneous educational applications developed by different organizations. Both standardized educational…

  2. Software system architecture for corporate user support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhopluyeva, V. S.; Kuznetsov, D. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, several existing ready-to-use solutions for the HelpDesk are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of these systems are identified. Architecture of software solution for a corporate user support system is presented in a form of the use case, state, and component diagrams described by using a unified modeling language (UML).

  3. A Practical Software Architecture for Virtual Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiang, Peifeng; Shi, Yuanchun; Qin, Weijun

    2006-01-01

    This article introduces a practical software architecture called CUBES, which focuses on system integration and evolvement for online virtual universities. The key of CUBES is a supporting platform that helps to integrate and evolve heterogeneous educational applications developed by different organizations. Both standardized educational…

  4. Selection of a Data Acquisition and Controls System Communications and Software Architecture for Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory Thermal and Vacuum Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Eric A.

    2004-01-01

    Upgrade of data acquisition and controls systems software at Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) involved the definition, evaluation and selection of a system communication architecture and software components. A brief discussion of the background of the SESL and its data acquisition and controls systems provides a context for discussion of the requirements for each selection. Further framework is provided as upgrades to these systems accomplished in the 1990s and in 2003 are compared to demonstrate the role that technological advances have had in their improvement. Both of the selections were similar in their three phases; 1) definition of requirements, 2) identification of candidate products and their evaluation and testing and 3) selection by comparison of requirement fulfillment. The candidates for the communication architecture selection embraced several different methodologies which are explained and contrasted. Requirements for this selection are presented and the selection process is described. Several candidates for the software component of the data acquisition and controls system are identified, requirements for evaluation and selection are presented, and the evaluation process is described.

  5. Selection of a Data Acquisition and Controls System Communications and Software Architecture for Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory Thermal and Vacuum Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Eric A.

    2004-01-01

    Upgrade of data acquisition and controls systems software at Johnson Space Center's Space Environment Simulation Laboratory (SESL) involved the definition, evaluation and selection of a system communication architecture and software components. A brief discussion of the background of the SESL and its data acquisition and controls systems provides a context for discussion of the requirements for each selection. Further framework is provided as upgrades to these systems accomplished in the 1990s and in 2003 are compared to demonstrate the role that technological advances have had in their improvement. Both of the selections were similar in their three phases; 1) definition of requirements, 2) identification of candidate products and their evaluation and testing and 3) selection by comparison of requirement fulfillment. The candidates for the communication architecture selection embraced several different methodologies which are explained and contrasted. Requirements for this selection are presented and the selection process is described. Several candidates for the software component of the data acquisition and controls system are identified, requirements for evaluation and selection are presented, and the evaluation process is described.

  6. Programmable bandwidth management in software-defined EPON architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengjun; Guo, Wei; Wang, Wei; Hu, Weisheng; Xia, Ming

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes a software-defined EPON architecture which replaces the hardware-implemented DBA module with reprogrammable DBA module. The DBA module allows pluggable bandwidth allocation algorithms among multiple ONUs adaptive to traffic profiles and network states. We also introduce a bandwidth management scheme executed at the controller to manage the customized DBA algorithms for all date queues of ONUs. Our performance investigation verifies the effectiveness of this new EPON architecture, and numerical results show that software-defined EPONs can achieve less traffic delay and provide better support to service differentiation in comparison with traditional EPONs.

  7. The Software Architecture of Global Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K. A.; Easterbrook, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    It has become common to compare and contrast the output of multiple global climate models (GCMs), such as in the Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). However, intercomparisons of the software architecture of GCMs are almost nonexistent. In this qualitative study of seven GCMs from Canada, the United States, and Europe, we attempt to fill this gap in research. We describe the various representations of the climate system as computer programs, and account for architectural differences between models. Most GCMs now practice component-based software engineering, where Earth system components (such as the atmosphere or land surface) are present as highly encapsulated sub-models. This architecture facilitates a mix-and-match approach to climate modelling that allows for convenient sharing of model components between institutions, but it also leads to difficulty when choosing where to draw the lines between systems that are not encapsulated in the real world, such as sea ice. We also examine different styles of couplers in GCMs, which manage interaction and data flow between components. Finally, we pay particular attention to the varying levels of complexity in GCMs, both between and within models. Many GCMs have some components that are significantly more complex than others, a phenomenon which can be explained by the respective institution's research goals as well as the origin of the model components. In conclusion, although some features of software architecture have been adopted by every GCM we examined, other features show a wide range of different design choices and strategies. These architectural differences may provide new insights into variability and spread between models.

  8. A software architecture for autonomous orbital robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henshaw, Carl G.; Akins, Keith; Creamer, N. Glenn; Faria, Matthew; Flagg, Cris; Hayden, Matthew; Healy, Liam; Hrolenok, Brian; Johnson, Jeffrey; Lyons, Kimberly; Pipitone, Frank; Tasker, Fred

    2006-05-01

    SUMO, the Spacecraft for the Universal Modification of Orbits, is a DARPA-sponsored spacecraft designed to provide orbital repositioning services to geosynchronous satellites. Such services may be needed to facilitate changing the geostationary slot of a satellite, to allow a satellite to be used until the propellant is expended instead of reserving propellant for a retirement burn, or to rescue a satellite stranded in geosynchronous transfer orbit due to a launch failure. Notably, SUMO is being designed to be compatible with the current geosynchronous satellite catalog, which implies that it does not require the customer spacecraft to have special docking fixtures, optical guides, or cooperative communications or pose sensors. In addition, the final approach and grapple will be performed autonomously. SUMO is being designed and built by the Naval Center for Space Technology, a division of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC. The nature of the SUMO concept mission leads to significant challenges in onboard spacecraft autonomy. Also, because research and development in machine vision, trajectory planning, and automation algorithms for SUMO is being pursued in parallel with flight software development, there are considerable challenges in prototyping and testing algorithms in situ and in transitioning these algorithms from laboratory form into software suitable for flight. This paper discusses these challenges, outlining the current SUMO design from the standpoint of flight algorithms and software. In particular, the design of the SUMO phase 1 laboratory demonstration software is described in detail. The proposed flight-like software architecture is also described.

  9. A Software Architecture for Network Communication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-30

    valuable critical readings of this paper. I 20] REFERENCES I 1. D. P. Anderson, D. Ferrari, P. V. Rangan and S . Tzou, "The DASH Project: Issues in...Productivity Engineering in the UNIXt Environment 1j A Software Architecture for Network Communication Qp 0Technical Report 0) S . L. Graham...N00039-84- C -0089 August 7, 1984 - August 6, 1987 D T IC EECTE Arpa Order No. 4871 JU 1988 fUNIX is a trademark of AT&T Bell Laboratories E i UTION AtT

  10. Open architecture CMM motion controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, David; Spence, Allan D.; Bigg, Steve; Heslip, Joe; Peterson, John

    2001-12-01

    Although initially the only Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) sensor available was a touch trigger probe, technological advances in sensors and computing have greatly increased the variety of available inspection sensors. Non-contact laser digitizers and analog scanning touch probes require very well tuned CMM motion control, as well as an extensible, open architecture interface. This paper describes the implementation of a retrofit CMM motion controller designed for open architecture interface to a variety of sensors. The controller is based on an Intel Pentium microcomputer and a Servo To Go motion interface electronics card. Motor amplifiers, safety, and additional interface electronics are housed in a separate enclosure. Host Signal Processing (HSP) is used for the motion control algorithm. Compared to the usual host plus DSP architecture, single CPU HSP simplifies integration with the various sensors, and implementation of software geometric error compensation. Motion control tuning is accomplished using a remote computer via 100BaseTX Ethernet. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) is used to enter geometric error compensation data, and to optimize the motion control tuning parameters. It is shown that this architecture achieves the required real time motion control response, yet is much easier to extend to additional sensors.

  11. Plating Tank Control Software

    SciTech Connect

    Krafcik, John

    1998-03-01

    The Plating Tank Control Software is a graphical user interface that controls and records plating process conditions for plating in high aspect ratio channels that require use of low current and long times. The software is written for a Pentium II PC with an 8 channel data acquisition card, and the necessary shunt resistors for measuring currents in the millampere range.

  12. Playing Detective: Reconstructing Software Architecture from Available Evidence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-10-01

    1997). Kazman, Rick; Abowd , Gregory; Bass, Len; & Webb, M. "SAAM: A Method for Analyzing the Properties of Software Architectures," 81-90...1994. Kazman, Rick; Abowd , Gregory; Bass, Len; & Clements, Paul. "Scenar- io-Based Analysis of Software Architecture," IEEE Software 13, 6 (No

  13. COG Software Architecture Design Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, R M; Lent, E M

    2009-09-21

    This COG Software Architecture Design Description Document describes the organization and functionality of the COG Multiparticle Monte Carlo Transport Code for radiation shielding and criticality calculations, at a level of detail suitable for guiding a new code developer in the maintenance and enhancement of COG. The intended audience also includes managers and scientists and engineers who wish to have a general knowledge of how the code works. This Document is not intended for end-users. This document covers the software implemented in the standard COG Version 10, as released through RSICC and IAEA. Software resources provided by other institutions will not be covered. This document presents the routines grouped by modules and in the order of the three processing phases. Some routines are used in multiple phases. The routine description is presented once - the first time the routine is referenced. Since this is presented at the level of detail for guiding a new code developer, only the routines invoked by another routine that are significant for the processing phase that is being detailed are presented. An index to all routines detailed is included. Tables for the primary data structures are also presented.

  14. Formalization and visualization of domain-specific software architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailor, Paul D.; Luginbuhl, David R.; Robinson, John S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a domain-specific software design system based on the concepts of software architectures engineering and domain-specific models and languages. In this system, software architectures are used as high level abstractions to formulate a domain-specific software design. The software architecture serves as a framework for composing architectural fragments (e.g., domain objects, system components, and hardware interfaces) that make up the knowledge (or model) base for solving a problem in a particular application area. A corresponding software design is generated by analyzing and describing a system in the context of the software architecture. While the software architecture serves as the framework for the design, this concept is insufficient by itself for supplying the additional details required for a specific design. Additional domain knowledge is still needed to instantiate components of the architecture and develop optimized algorithms for the problem domain. One possible way to obtain the additional details is through the use of domain-specific languages. Thus, the general concept of a software architecture and the specific design details provided by domain-specific languages are combined to create what can be termed a domain-specific software architecture (DSSA).

  15. The Software Architecture of the Upgraded ESA DRAMA Software Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebschull, Christopher; Flegel, Sven; Gelhaus, Johannes; Mockel, Marek; Braun, Vitali; Radtke, Jonas; Wiedemann, Carsten; Vorsmann, Peter; Sanchez-Ortiz, Noelia; Krag, Holger

    2013-08-01

    In the beginnings of man's space flight activities there was the belief that space is so big that everybody could use it without any repercussions. However during the last six decades the increasing use of Earth's orbits has lead to a rapid growth in the space debris environment, which has a big influence on current and future space missions. For this reason ESA issued the "Requirements on Space Debris Mitigation for ESA Projects" [1] in 2008, which apply to all ESA missions henceforth. The DRAMA (Debris Risk Assessment and Mitigation Analysis) software suite had been developed to support the planning of space missions to comply with these requirements. During the last year the DRAMA software suite has been upgraded under ESA contract by TUBS and DEIMOS to include additional tools and increase the performance of existing ones. This paper describes the overall software architecture of the ESA DRAMA software suite. Specifically the new graphical user interface, which manages the five main tools ARES (Assessment of Risk Event Statistics), MIDAS (MASTER-based Impact Flux and Damage Assessment Software), OSCAR (Orbital Spacecraft Active Removal), CROC (Cross Section of Complex Bodies) and SARA (Re-entry Survival and Risk Analysis) is being discussed. The advancements are highlighted as well as the challenges that arise from the integration of the five tool interfaces. A framework had been developed at the ILR and was used for MASTER-2009 and PROOF-2009. The Java based GUI framework, enables the cross-platform deployment, and its underlying model-view-presenter (MVP) software pattern, meet strict design requirements necessary to ensure a robust and reliable method of operation in an environment where the GUI is separated from the processing back-end. While the GUI framework evolved with each project, allowing an increasing degree of integration of services like validators for input fields, it has also increased in complexity. The paper will conclude with an outlook on

  16. Key software architecture decisions for the automated planet finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanclos, Kyle; Deich, William T. S.; Holden, Bradford P.; Allen, S. L.

    2016-08-01

    The Automated Planet Finder (APF) at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton is a modern 2.4 meter computer controlled telescope. At one Nasmyth focus is the Levy Spectrometer, at present the sole instrument used with the APF. The primary research mission of the APF and the Levy Spectrometer is high-precision Doppler spectroscopy. Observing at the APF is unattended; custom software written by diverse authors in diverse languages manage all aspects of a night's observing. This paper will cover some of the key software architecture decisions made in the development of autonomous observing at the APF. The relevance to future projects of these decisions will be emphasized throughout.

  17. Software based controls module development

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, v.b.; kelley, g; welch, j.c.

    1999-12-10

    A project was initiated at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to implement software geometric error compensation within a PC-based machine tool controller from Manufacturing Data Systems, Inc. This project may be the first in which this type of compensation system was implemented in a commercially available machine tool controller totally in software. Previous implementations typically required using an external computer and hardware to interface through the position feedback loop of the controller because direct access to the controller software was not available. The test-bed machine for this project was a 2-axis Excello 921 T-base lathe. A mathematical error model of the lathe was created using homogeneous transformation matrices to relate the positions of the machine's slides to each other and to a world reference system. Equations describing the effects of the geometric errors were derived from the model. A software architecture was developed to support geometric error compensation for machine tools with up to 3 linear axes. Rotary axes were not supported in this implementation, but the developed architecture would not preclude their support in the future. Specific implementations will be dependent upon the configuration of the machine tool. A laser measuring system from Automated Precision, Inc. was used to characterize the lathe's geometric errors as functions of axis position and direction of motion. Multiple data files generated by the laser system were combined into a single Error File that was read at system startup and used by the compensation system to provide real-time position adjustments to the axis servos. A Renishaw Ballbar was used to evaluate the compensation system. Static positioning tests were conducted in an attempt to observe improved positioning accuracy with the compensation system enabled. These tests gave inconsistent results due to the lathe's inability to position the tool repeatably. The development of the architecture and compensation

  18. A Tool for Managing Software Architecture Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Babar, Muhammad A.; Gorton, Ian

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes a tool for managing architectural knowledge and rationale. The tool has been developed to support a framework for capturing and using architectural knowledge to improve the architecture process. This paper describes the main architectural components and features of the tool. The paper also provides examples of using the tool for supporting wellknown architecture design and analysis methods.

  19. Conceptual Architecture of Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Khamphanchai, Warodom; Saha, Avijit; Rathinavel, Kruthika; Kuzlu, Murat; Pipattanasomporn, Manisa; Rahman, Saifur; Akyol, Bora A.; Haack, Jereme N.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a conceptual architecture of a Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS) platform. The proposed BEMOSS platform is expected to improve sensing and control of equipment in small- and medium-sized buildings, reduce energy consumption and help implement demand response (DR). It aims to offer: scalability, robustness, plug and play, open protocol, interoperability, cost-effectiveness, as well as local and remote monitoring. In this paper, four essential layers of BEMOSS software architecture -- namely User Interface, Application and Data Management, Operating System and Framework, and Connectivity layers -- are presented. A laboratory test bed to demonstrate the functionality of BEMOSS located at the Advanced Research Institute of Virginia Tech is also briefly described.

  20. Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) System Architecture and Key Tradeoff Studies, Phase IIC, Congestion control Subsystem Software Algorithm; Appendix E

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Qualified Model SRAM Short-Range Attack Missile SRB Solid Rocket Booster SSBN Ballistic Missile Nuclear-Energy Submarine SSC Space Surveillance Center...ALGORITHM APPENDIX E 22 MARCH 1988 CONTRACT NO. MDA903-85-C-0065 r •J STAm#3KT"T A&.U i >>,*® $ PLEASE RETURN TO: Satellite & Space ...Subsystem Software Algorithm, Appendix E Personal Author: Niznik, C.A. Corporate Author Or Publisher: Rockwell International, Satellite & Space

  1. An enterprise software architecture for the Green Bank Telescope (GBT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziwill, Nicole M.; Mello, Melinda; Sessoms, Eric; Shelton, Amy

    2004-09-01

    The enterprise architecture presents a view of how software utilities and applications are related to one another under unifying rules and principles of development. By constructing an enterprise architecture, an organization will be able to manage the components of its systems within a solid conceptual framework. This largely prevents duplication of effort, focuses the organization on its core technical competencies, and ultimately makes software more maintainable. In the beginning of 2003, several prominent challenges faced software development at the GBT. The telescope was not easily configurable, and observing often presented a challenge, particularly to new users. High priority projects required new experimental developments on short time scales. Migration paths were required for applications which had proven difficult to maintain. In order to solve these challenges, an enterprise architecture was created, consisting of five layers: 1) the telescope control system, and the raw data produced during an observation, 2) Low-level Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) in C++, for managing interactions with the telescope control system and its data, 3) High-Level APIs in Python, which can be used by astronomers or software developers to create custom applications, 4) Application Components in Python, which can be either standalone applications or plug-in modules to applications, and 5) Application Management Systems in Python, which package application components for use by a particular user group (astronomers, engineers or operators) in terms of resource configurations. This presentation describes how these layers combine to make the GBT easier to use, while concurrently making the software easier to develop and maintain.

  2. Safety-Critical Partitioned Software Architecture: A Partitioned Software Architecture for Robotic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Greg; Chung, Seung H.; Cilloniz-Bicchi, Ferner

    2011-01-01

    The flight software on virtually every mission currently managed by JPL has several major flaws that make it vulnerable to potentially fatal software defects. Many of these problems can be addressed by recently developed partitioned operating systems (OS). JPL has avoided adopting a partitioned operating system on its flight missions, primarily because doing so would require significant changes in flight software design, and the risks associated with changes of that magnitude cannot be accepted by an active flight project. The choice of a partitioned OS can have a dramatic effect on the overall system and software architecture, allowing for realization of benefits far beyond the concerns typically associated with the choice of OS. Specifically, we believe that a partitioned operating system, when coupled with an appropriate architecture, can provide a strong infrastructure for developing systems for which reusability, modifiability, testability, and reliability are essential qualities. By adopting a partitioned OS, projects can gain benefits throughout the entire development lifecycle, from requirements and design, all the way to implementation, testing, and operations.

  3. Safety-Critical Partitioned Software Architecture: A Partitioned Software Architecture for Robotic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Greg; Chung, Seung H.; Cilloniz-Bicchi, Ferner

    2011-01-01

    The flight software on virtually every mission currently managed by JPL has several major flaws that make it vulnerable to potentially fatal software defects. Many of these problems can be addressed by recently developed partitioned operating systems (OS). JPL has avoided adopting a partitioned operating system on its flight missions, primarily because doing so would require significant changes in flight software design, and the risks associated with changes of that magnitude cannot be accepted by an active flight project. The choice of a partitioned OS can have a dramatic effect on the overall system and software architecture, allowing for realization of benefits far beyond the concerns typically associated with the choice of OS. Specifically, we believe that a partitioned operating system, when coupled with an appropriate architecture, can provide a strong infrastructure for developing systems for which reusability, modifiability, testability, and reliability are essential qualities. By adopting a partitioned OS, projects can gain benefits throughout the entire development lifecycle, from requirements and design, all the way to implementation, testing, and operations.

  4. A software architecture for automating operations processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kevin J.

    1994-01-01

    The Operations Engineering Lab (OEL) at JPL has developed a software architecture based on an integrated toolkit approach for simplifying and automating mission operations tasks. The toolkit approach is based on building adaptable, reusable graphical tools that are integrated through a combination of libraries, scripts, and system-level user interface shells. The graphical interface shells are designed to integrate and visually guide a user through the complex steps in an operations process. They provide a user with an integrated system-level picture of an overall process, defining the required inputs and possible output through interactive on-screen graphics. The OEL has developed the software for building these process-oriented graphical user interface (GUI) shells. The OEL Shell development system (OEL Shell) is an extension of JPL's Widget Creation Library (WCL). The OEL Shell system can be used to easily build user interfaces for running complex processes, applications with extensive command-line interfaces, and tool-integration tasks. The interface shells display a logical process flow using arrows and box graphics. They also allow a user to select which output products are desired and which input sources are needed, eliminating the need to know which program and its associated command-line parameters must be executed in each case. The shells have also proved valuable for use as operations training tools because of the OEL Shell hypertext help environment. The OEL toolkit approach is guided by several principles, including the use of ASCII text file interfaces with a multimission format, Perl scripts for mission-specific adaptation code, and programs that include a simple command-line interface for batch mode processing. Projects can adapt the interface shells by simple changes to the resources configuration file. This approach has allowed the development of sophisticated, automated software systems that are easy, cheap, and fast to build. This paper will

  5. Software Defined Radio Standard Architecture and its Application to NASA Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andro, Monty; Reinhart, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    A software defined radio (SDR) architecture used in space-based platforms proposes to standardize certain aspects of radio development such as interface definitions, functional control and execution, and application software and firmware development. NASA has charted a team to develop an open software defined radio hardware and software architecture to support NASA missions and determine the viability of an Agency-wide Standard. A draft concept of the proposed standard has been released and discussed among organizations in the SDR community. Appropriate leveraging of the JTRS SCA, OMG's SWRadio Architecture and other aspects are considered. A standard radio architecture offers potential value by employing common waveform software instantiation, operation, testing and software maintenance. While software defined radios offer greater flexibility, they also poses challenges to the radio development for the space environment in terms of size, mass and power consumption and available technology. An SDR architecture for space must recognize and address the constraints of space flight hardware, and systems along with flight heritage and culture. NASA is actively participating in the development of technology and standards related to software defined radios. As NASA considers a standard radio architecture for space communications, input and coordination from government agencies, the industry, academia, and standards bodies is key to a successful architecture. The unique aspects of space require thorough investigation of relevant terrestrial technologies properly adapted to space. The talk will describe NASA's current effort to investigate SDR applications to space missions and a brief overview of a candidate architecture under consideration for space based platforms.

  6. Application of parallelized software architecture to an autonomous ground vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakya, Rahul; Wright, Adam; Shin, Young Ho; Momin, Orko; Petkovsek, Steven; Wortman, Paul; Gautam, Prasanna; Norton, Adam

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents improvements made to Q, an autonomous ground vehicle designed to participate in the Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). For the 2010 IGVC, Q was upgraded with a new parallelized software architecture and a new vision processor. Improvements were made to the power system reducing the number of batteries required for operation from six to one. In previous years, a single state machine was used to execute the bulk of processing activities including sensor interfacing, data processing, path planning, navigation algorithms and motor control. This inefficient approach led to poor software performance and made it difficult to maintain or modify. For IGVC 2010, the team implemented a modular parallel architecture using the National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW programming language. The new architecture divides all the necessary tasks - motor control, navigation, sensor data collection, etc. into well-organized components that execute in parallel, providing considerable flexibility and facilitating efficient use of processing power. Computer vision is used to detect white lines on the ground and determine their location relative to the robot. With the new vision processor and some optimization of the image processing algorithm used last year, two frames can be acquired and processed in 70ms. With all these improvements, Q placed 2nd in the autonomous challenge.

  7. Achieving Product Qualities Through Software Architecture Practices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    Generate quality attribute utility tree 6. Analyze architectural approaches 7. Brainstorm and prioritize scenarios 8. Analyze architectural...approaches 9. Present results © 2004 by Carnegie Mellon University page 67 Example Utility Tree Utility Performance Modifiability Availability Security Add

  8. PLDAPS: A Hardware Architecture and Software Toolbox for Neurophysiology Requiring Complex Visual Stimuli and Online Behavioral Control.

    PubMed

    Eastman, Kyler M; Huk, Alexander C

    2012-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies in awake, behaving primates (both human and non-human) have focused with increasing scrutiny on the temporal relationship between neural signals and behaviors. Consequently, laboratories are often faced with the problem of developing experimental equipment that can support data recording with high temporal precision and also be flexible enough to accommodate a wide variety of experimental paradigms. To this end, we have developed a MATLAB toolbox that integrates several modern pieces of equipment, but still grants experimenters the flexibility of a high-level programming language. Our toolbox takes advantage of three popular and powerful technologies: the Plexon apparatus for neurophysiological recordings (Plexon, Inc., Dallas, TX, USA), a Datapixx peripheral (Vpixx Technologies, Saint-Bruno, QC, Canada) for control of analog, digital, and video input-output signals, and the Psychtoolbox MATLAB toolbox for stimulus generation (Brainard, 1997; Pelli, 1997; Kleiner et al., 2007). The PLDAPS ("Platypus") system is designed to support the study of the visual systems of awake, behaving primates during multi-electrode neurophysiological recordings, but can be easily applied to other related domains. Despite its wide range of capabilities and support for cutting-edge video displays and neural recording systems, the PLDAPS system is simple enough for someone with basic MATLAB programming skills to design their own experiments.

  9. Software Management Environment (SME) concepts and architecture, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrick, Robert; Kistler, David; Valett, Jon

    1992-01-01

    This document presents the concepts and architecture of the Software Management Environment (SME), developed for the Software Engineering Branch of the Flight Dynamic Division (FDD) of GSFC. The SME provides an integrated set of experience-based management tools that can assist software development managers in managing and planning flight dynamics software development projects. This document provides a high-level description of the types of information required to implement such an automated management tool.

  10. Verifying Architectural Design Rules of the Flight Software Product Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Lindvall, Mikael; Ackermann, Chris; McComas, David; Bartholomew, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experiences of verifying architectural design rules of the NASA Core Flight Software (CFS) product line implementation. The goal of the verification is to check whether the implementation is consistent with the CFS architectural rules derived from the developer's guide. The results indicate that consistency checking helps a) identifying architecturally significant deviations that were eluded during code reviews, b) clarifying the design rules to the team, and c) assessing the overall implementation quality. Furthermore, it helps connecting business goals to architectural principles, and to the implementation. This paper is the first step in the definition of a method for analyzing and evaluating product line implementations from an architecture-centric perspective.

  11. Hardware Architecture Study for NASA's Space Software Defined Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Mortensen, Dale J.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Andro, Monty; Smith, Carl; Liebetreu, John

    2008-01-01

    This study defines a hardware architecture approach for software defined radios to enable commonality among NASA space missions. The architecture accommodates a range of reconfigurable processing technologies including general purpose processors, digital signal processors, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), and application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) in addition to flexible and tunable radio frequency (RF) front-ends to satisfy varying mission requirements. The hardware architecture consists of modules, radio functions, and and interfaces. The modules are a logical division of common radio functions that comprise a typical communication radio. This paper describes the architecture details, module definitions, and the typical functions on each module as well as the module interfaces. Trade-offs between component-based, custom architecture and a functional-based, open architecture are described. The architecture does not specify the internal physical implementation within each module, nor does the architecture mandate the standards or ratings of the hardware used to construct the radios.

  12. Architecture independent environment for developing engineering software on MIMD computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valimohamed, Karim A.; Lopez, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    Engineers are constantly faced with solving problems of increasing complexity and detail. Multiple Instruction stream Multiple Data stream (MIMD) computers have been developed to overcome the performance limitations of serial computers. The hardware architectures of MIMD computers vary considerably and are much more sophisticated than serial computers. Developing large scale software for a variety of MIMD computers is difficult and expensive. There is a need to provide tools that facilitate programming these machines. First, the issues that must be considered to develop those tools are examined. The two main areas of concern were architecture independence and data management. Architecture independent software facilitates software portability and improves the longevity and utility of the software product. It provides some form of insurance for the investment of time and effort that goes into developing the software. The management of data is a crucial aspect of solving large engineering problems. It must be considered in light of the new hardware organizations that are available. Second, the functional design and implementation of a software environment that facilitates developing architecture independent software for large engineering applications are described. The topics of discussion include: a description of the model that supports the development of architecture independent software; identifying and exploiting concurrency within the application program; data coherence; engineering data base and memory management.

  13. Software architecture and engineering for patient records: current and future.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chunhua; Levine, Betty A; Mun, Seong K

    2009-05-01

    During the "The National Forum on the Future of the Defense Health Information System," a track focusing on "Systems Architecture and Software Engineering" included eight presenters. These presenters identified three key areas of interest in this field, which include the need for open enterprise architecture and a federated database design, net centrality based on service-oriented architecture, and the need for focus on software usability and reusability. The eight panelists provided recommendations related to the suitability of service-oriented architecture and the enabling technologies of grid computing and Web 2.0 for building health services research centers and federated data warehouses to facilitate large-scale collaborative health care and research. Finally, they discussed the need to leverage industry best practices for software engineering to facilitate rapid software development, testing, and deployment.

  14. Antenna Controller Replacement Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Roger Y.; Morgan, Scott C.; Strain, Martha M.; Rockwell, Stephen T.; Shimizu, Kenneth J.; Tehrani, Barzia J.; Kwok, Jaclyn H.; Tuazon-Wong, Michelle; Valtier, Henry; Nalbandi, Reza; Wert, Michael; Leung, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The Antenna Controller Replacement (ACR) software accurately points and monitors the Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-m and 34-m high-efficiency (HEF) ground-based antennas that are used to track primarily spacecraft and, periodically, celestial targets. To track a spacecraft, or other targets, the antenna must be accurately pointed at the spacecraft, which can be very far away with very weak signals. ACR s conical scanning capability collects the signal in a circular pattern around the target, calculates the location of the strongest signal, and adjusts the antenna pointing to point directly at the spacecraft. A real-time, closed-loop servo control algorithm performed every 0.02 second allows accurate positioning of the antenna in order to track these distant spacecraft. Additionally, this advanced servo control algorithm provides better antenna pointing performance in windy conditions. The ACR software provides high-level commands that provide a very easy user interface for the DSN operator. The operator only needs to enter two commands to start the antenna and subreflector, and Master Equatorial tracking. The most accurate antenna pointing is accomplished by aligning the antenna to the Master Equatorial, which because of its small size and sheltered location, has the most stable pointing. The antenna has hundreds of digital and analog monitor points. The ACR software provides compact displays to summarize the status of the antenna, subreflector, and the Master Equatorial. The ACR software has two major functions. First, it performs all of the steps required to accurately point the antenna (and subreflector and Master Equatorial) at the spacecraft (or celestial target). This involves controlling the antenna/ subreflector/Master-Equatorial hardware, initiating and monitoring the correct sequence of operations, calculating the position of the spacecraft relative to the antenna, executing the real-time servo control algorithm to maintain the correct position, and

  15. Controlling Material Reactivity Using Architecture

    DOE PAGES

    Sullivan, Kyle T.; Zhu, Cheng; Duoss, Eric B.; ...

    2015-12-16

    3D-printing methods are used to generate reactive material architectures. We observed several geometric parameters in order to influence the resultant flame propagation velocity, indicating that the architecture can be utilized to control reactivity. Two different architectures, channels and hurdles, are generated, and thin films of thermite are deposited onto the surface. Additionally, the architecture offers a route to control, at will, the energy release rate in reactive composite materials.

  16. Power Systems Control Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    James Davidson

    2005-01-01

    A diagram provided in the report depicts the complexity of the power systems control architecture used by the national power structure. It shows the structural hierarchy and the relationship of the each system to those other systems interconnected to it. Each of these levels provides a different focus for vulnerability testing and has its own weaknesses. In evaluating each level, of prime concern is what vulnerabilities exist that provide a path into the system, either to cause the system to malfunction or to take control of a field device. An additional vulnerability to consider is can the system be compromised in such a manner that the attacker can obtain critical information about the system and the portion of the national power structure that it controls.

  17. Telemetry Modernization with Open Architecture Software-Defined Radio Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Tech Notes January 2016www.ll.mit.edu Telemetry—the automated measurement and transmission of data from remote sources to receiving stations—plays...Marshall Islands, Lincoln Laboratory is modern- izing the test range’s telemetry systems with a software-defined, radio-based open architecture. This...As the market demand for use of the existing Telemetry Modernization with Open Architecture Software-Defined Radio Technology Lincoln Laboratory

  18. Gemini Scout Control Software

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton Hobart, Justin Garretson

    2010-11-23

    The Gemini Scout Control Software consists of two Windows applications that allow the Gemini Scout vehicle to be controlled by an operator. The Embedded application runs on the vehicle's Gemini Scout Control Software onboard computer and controls the vehicle's various motors and sensors. This application reports the vehicle's status and receives vehicle commands overthe local-area-network. The Embedded applicationalso allows the user to control the vehicle using a USB game-pad connected directly to the vehicle. The Operator Control Unit (OCU) application runs on an external PC and communicates with the vehicle via an Ethernet connection. The OCU application sends commands to and receives data from the Embedded application running on the vehicle. The OCU application also communicates directly with the digital video encoders and radios in order to display video from the vehicle's cameras and the status of the radio link. The OCU application has a graphical user interface (GUI) that displays the vehicle's status and allows the user to change various vehicle settings. Finally, the OCU application receives input from a USB game-pad connected to the PC in order to control the vehicle's functions.

  19. Evaluation of Software Dependability at the Architecture Definition Stage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    2005]. [ Babar et al. 2004] proposes a framework for their comparison and assessment. Here are some examples of architecture oriented approaches...11-33, Jan-Mar 2004 Babar , M, Zhu, L and Jeffrey, R. A Framework for Classifying and Comparing Software Architecture Evaluation Methods, Proc. Of

  20. Integrating Software Modules For Robot Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volpe, Richard A.; Khosla, Pradeep; Stewart, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Reconfigurable, sensor-based control system uses state variables in systematic integration of reusable control modules. Designed for open-architecture hardware including many general-purpose microprocessors, each having own local memory plus access to global shared memory. Implemented in software as extension of Chimera II real-time operating system. Provides transparent computing mechanism for intertask communication between control modules and generic process-module architecture for multiprocessor realtime computation. Used to control robot arm. Proves useful in variety of other control and robotic applications.

  1. Integrating Software Modules For Robot Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volpe, Richard A.; Khosla, Pradeep; Stewart, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Reconfigurable, sensor-based control system uses state variables in systematic integration of reusable control modules. Designed for open-architecture hardware including many general-purpose microprocessors, each having own local memory plus access to global shared memory. Implemented in software as extension of Chimera II real-time operating system. Provides transparent computing mechanism for intertask communication between control modules and generic process-module architecture for multiprocessor realtime computation. Used to control robot arm. Proves useful in variety of other control and robotic applications.

  2. An Architecture-Centric Approach for Acquiring Software-Reliant Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-30

    documenting and communicating the software architecture, analyzing or evaluating the software architecture, = = ==========^`nrfpfqflk=obpb^o`eW=`ob...ADD) and Architecture Expert tool (ArchE) documenting and communicating the architecture Views and Beyond Approach; Architecture and Analysis...ensuring use of effective architecture practices Architecture Competence Assessment Creating the Business Case for the System Justification for a

  3. Trends and New Directions in Software Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-10

    Detailed Design ( UML ) Code: Coding (no detailed design) Test: Testing 2014 Effort in Percent over Cycles – 2 Reqts: Requirements HLD/Arch: High...level Design / Architecture DLD: Detailed Design ( UML ) Code: Coding (no detailed design) Test: Testing 2014 Effort in Percent over Cycles – 3...Reqts: Requirements HLD/Arch: High level Design / Architecture DLD: Detailed Design ( UML ) Code: Coding (no detailed design) Test: Testing 2014

  4. Towards multi-platform software architecture for Collaborative Teleoperation

    SciTech Connect

    Domingues, Christophe; Otmane, Samir; Davesne, Frederic; Mallem, Malik

    2009-03-05

    Augmented Reality (AR) can provide to a Human Operator (HO) a real help in achieving complex tasks, such as remote control of robots and cooperative teleassistance. Using appropriate augmentations, the HO can interact faster, safer and easier with the remote real world. In this paper, we present an extension of an existing distributed software and network architecture for collaborative teleoperation based on networked human-scaled mixed reality and mobile platform. The first teleoperation system was composed by a VR application and a Web application. However the 2 systems cannot be used together and it is impossible to control a distant robot simultaneously. Our goal is to update the teleoperation system to permit a heterogeneous collaborative teleoperation between the 2 platforms. An important feature of this interface is based on the use of different Virtual Reality platforms and different Mobile platforms to control one or many robots.

  5. An intelligent CNC machine control system architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Loucks, C.S.

    1996-10-01

    Intelligent, agile manufacturing relies on automated programming of digitally controlled processes. Currently, processes such as Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machining are difficult to automate because of highly restrictive controllers and poor software environments. It is also difficult to utilize sensors and process models for adaptive control, or to integrate machining processes with other tasks within a factory floor setting. As part of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program, a CNC machine control system architecture based on object-oriented design and graphical programming has been developed to address some of these problems and to demonstrate automated agile machining applications using platform-independent software.

  6. Computational Architecture For Control Of Remote Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szakaly, Zoltan F.

    1989-01-01

    Synchronization done by hardware to reduce software overhead. Computing resources located at both master-arm node and slave-arm node. This architecture provides for effective control while reducing computational burden on host computer and reducing and balancing load on communication channel.

  7. NASA Data Acquisitions System (NDAS) Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Dawn; Duncan, Michael; Franzl, Richard; Holladay, Wendy; Marshall, Peggi; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The NDAS Software Project is for the development of common low speed data acquisition system software to support NASA's rocket propulsion testing facilities at John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC), White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), Plum Brook Station (PBS), and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  8. Architecture for interoperable software in biology.

    PubMed

    Bare, James Christopher; Baliga, Nitin S

    2014-07-01

    Understanding biological complexity demands a combination of high-throughput data and interdisciplinary skills. One way to bring to bear the necessary combination of data types and expertise is by encapsulating domain knowledge in software and composing that software to create a customized data analysis environment. To this end, simple flexible strategies are needed for interconnecting heterogeneous software tools and enabling data exchange between them. Drawing on our own work and that of others, we present several strategies for interoperability and their consequences, in particular, a set of simple data structures--list, matrix, network, table and tuple--that have proven sufficient to achieve a high degree of interoperability. We provide a few guidelines for the development of future software that will function as part of an interoperable community of software tools for biological data analysis and visualization.

  9. Architecture for interoperable software in biology

    PubMed Central

    Baliga, Nitin S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding biological complexity demands a combination of high-throughput data and interdisciplinary skills. One way to bring to bear the necessary combination of data types and expertise is by encapsulating domain knowledge in software and composing that software to create a customized data analysis environment. To this end, simple flexible strategies are needed for interconnecting heterogeneous software tools and enabling data exchange between them. Drawing on our own work and that of others, we present several strategies for interoperability and their consequences, in particular, a set of simple data structures—list, matrix, network, table and tuple—that have proven sufficient to achieve a high degree of interoperability. We provide a few guidelines for the development of future software that will function as part of an interoperable community of software tools for biological data analysis and visualization. PMID:23235920

  10. Controlling Software Piracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Albert S.

    1992-01-01

    Explains what software manufacturers are doing to combat software piracy, recommends how managers should deal with this problem, and provides a role-playing exercise to help students understand the issues in software piracy. (SR)

  11. Comprehending Software Architecture using a Single-View Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Panas, T; Epperly, T W; Quinlan, D J; Saebjoernsen, A; Vuduc, R W

    2007-01-17

    Software is among the most complex human artifacts, and visualization is widely acknowledged as important to understanding software. In this paper, we consider the problem of understanding a software system's architecture through visualization. Whereas traditional visualizations use multiple stakeholder-specific views to present different kinds of task-specific information, we propose an additional visualization technique that unifies the presentation of various kinds of architecture-level information, thereby allowing a variety of stakeholders to quickly see and communicate current development, quality, and costs of a software system. For future empirical evaluation of multi-aspect, single-view architectural visualizations, we have implemented our idea in an existing visualization tool, Vizz3D. Our implementation includes techniques, such as the use of a city metaphor, that reduce visual complexity in order to support single-view visualizations of large-scale programs.

  12. BLTC control system software

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.B., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-10

    This is a direct revision to Rev. 0 of the BLTC Control System Software. The entire document is being revised and released as HNF-SD-FF-CSWD-025, Rev 1. The changes incorporated by this revision include addition of a feature to automate the sodium drain when removing assemblies from sodium wetted facilities. Other changes eliminate locked in alarms during cold operation and improve the function of the Oxygen Analyzer. See FCN-620498 for further details regarding these changes. Note the change in the document number prefix, in accordance with HNF-MD-003.

  13. Software Reuse in the Naval Open Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    productivity, better quality, and a decrease in time to market for products. Software reuse is a quickly developing underlying pillar of the Naval Open...rapid application development, fastest time to market for updates and keeping up with the Internet technology wars. The last fifty years have seen...collaborations, working software, and responding to change. The enterprise that can get a product or service to market first wins. Organizations

  14. Designing Software Architecture to Achieve Business Goals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-19

    the requirements that drive the design of the architecture. • Quality attribute requirements • Business requirements for the developing organization...Quality attribute requirements are, typically, not well specified. • The system shall be modular • The system shall be secure Business requirements for

  15. Wendelstein Observatory control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snigula, Jan M.; Gössl, Claus; Kodric, Mihael; Riffeser, Arno; Wegner, Michael; Schlichter, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    LMU Munchen operates an astrophysical observatory on Mt. Wendelstein1. The 2m Fraunhofer telescope2, 3 is equipped with a 0.5 x 0.5 square degree field-of-view wide field camera4 and a 3 channel optical/NIR camera5, 6. Two fiber coupled spectrographs7-9 and a wavefront sensor will be added in the near future. The observatory hosts a multitude of supporting hardware, i.e. allsky cameras, webcams, meteostation, air conditioning etc. All scientific hardware can be controlled through a single, central "Master Control Program" (MCP). At the last SPIE astronomy venue we presented the overall Wendelstein Observatory software concept10. Here we explain concept and implementation of the MCP as a multi-threaded Python daemon in the area of conflict between debuggability and Don't Repeat Yourself (DRY).

  16. New architectures support for ALMA common software: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menay, Camilo E.; Zamora, Gabriel A.; Tobar, Rodrigo J.; Avarias, Jorge A.; Dahl-skog, Kevin R.; von Brand, Horst H.; Chiozzi, Gianluca

    2010-07-01

    ALMA Common Software (ACS) is a distributed control framework based on CORBA that provides communication between distributed pieces of software. Because of its size and complexity it provides its own compilation system, a mix of several technologies. The current ACS compilation process depends on specific tools, compilers, code generation, and a strict dependency model induced by the large number of software components. This document presents a summary of several porting and compatibility attempts at using ACS on platforms other than the officially supported one. A porting of ACS to the Microsoft Windows Platform and to the ARM processor architecture were attempted, with different grades of success. Also, support for LINUX-PREEMPT (a set of real-time patches for the Linux kernel) using a new design for real-time services was implemented. These efforts were integrated with the ACS building and compilation system, while others were included in its design. Lessons learned in this process are presented, and a general approach is extracted from them.

  17. Integrating MPI and deduplication engines: a software architecture roadmap.

    PubMed

    Baksi, Dibyendu

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to clarify the major concepts related to architecture and design of patient identity management software systems so that an implementor looking to solve a specific integration problem in the context of a Master Patient Index (MPI) and a deduplication engine can address the relevant issues. The ideas presented are illustrated in the context of a reference use case from Integrating the Health Enterprise Patient Identifier Cross-referencing (IHE PIX) profile. Sound software engineering principles using the latest design paradigm of model driven architecture (MDA) are applied to define different views of the architecture. The main contribution of the paper is a clear software architecture roadmap for implementors of patient identity management systems. Conceptual design in terms of static and dynamic views of the interfaces is provided as an example of platform independent model. This makes the roadmap applicable to any specific solutions of MPI, deduplication library or software platform. Stakeholders in need of integration of MPIs and deduplication engines can evaluate vendor specific solutions and software platform technologies in terms of fundamental concepts and can make informed decisions that preserve investment. This also allows freedom from vendor lock-in and the ability to kick-start integration efforts based on a solid architecture.

  18. Software Architecture for Shared Information Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    issues motivate companies to invest in systems integration ( CSTB 1992, pp. 16-21): "• For many organizations, experiences with information technology...questions. The essential enabling technologies are of several kinds ( CSTB 1992, Nilsson et al 1990): 2 CMU/SEI-93-TR-3 " Architecture: System organization...schema and import schema are distinct are suppressed at this level of abstraction; these communication questions should be addressed in an expansion

  19. Issues in Defining Software Architectures in a GIS Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Jesus; Alvorado, Lori

    1997-01-01

    The primary mission of the Pan-American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) is to advance the research areas that are relevant to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program. One of the activities at PACES is the establishment of a repository for geographical, geological and environmental information that covers various regions of Mexico and the southwest region of the U.S. and that is acquired from NASA and other sources through remote sensing, ground studies or paper-based maps. The center will be providing access of this information to other government entities in the U.S. and Mexico, and research groups from universities, national laboratories and industry. Geographical Information Systems(GIS) provide the means to manage, manipulate, analyze and display geographically referenced information that will be managed by PACES. Excellent off-the-shelf software exists for a complete GIS as well as software for storing and managing spatial databases, processing images, networking and viewing maps with layered information. This allows the user flexibility in combining systems to create a GIS or to mix these software packages with custom-built application programs. Software architectural languages provide the ability to specify the computational components and interactions among these components, an important topic in the domain of GIS because of the need to integrate numerous software packages. This paper discusses the characteristics that architectural languages address with respect to the issues relating to the data that must be communicated between software systems and components when systems interact. The paper presents a background on GIS in section 2. Section 3 gives an overview of software architecture and architectural languages. Section 4 suggests issues that may be of concern when defining the software architecture of a GIS. The last section discusses the future research effort and finishes with a summary.

  20. The Need for Software Architecture Evaluation in the Acquisition of Software-Intensive Sysetms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    scenario generation framework (Bass, Bachmann et al. 2003) Elements Brief Description Stimulus A condition that needs to be considered when it arrives...Architecture Evaluation Methods. 15th Australian Software Engineering Conference. Bass, L., F. Bachmann and M. Klein (2003). "Deriving Architectural

  1. Implications of Responsive Space on the Flight Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmot, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The Responsive Space initiative has several implications for flight software that need to be addressed not only within the run-time element, but the development infrastructure and software life-cycle process elements as well. The runtime element must at a minimum support Plug & Play, while the development and process elements need to incorporate methods to quickly generate the needed documentation, code, tests, and all of the artifacts required of flight quality software. Very rapid response times go even further, and imply little or no new software development, requiring instead, using only predeveloped and certified software modules that can be integrated and tested through automated methods. These elements have typically been addressed individually with significant benefits, but it is when they are combined that they can have the greatest impact to Responsive Space. The Flight Software Branch at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has been developing the runtime, infrastructure and process elements needed for rapid integration with the Core Flight software System (CFS) architecture. The CFS architecture consists of three main components; the core Flight Executive (cFE), the component catalog, and the Integrated Development Environment (DE). This paper will discuss the design of the components, how they facilitate rapid integration, and lessons learned as the architecture is utilized for an upcoming spacecraft.

  2. Achieving Critical System Survivability Through Software Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    survivability. Two major projects of note in the area are OASIS and MAFTIA. For detailed dis- cussions of intrusion tolerance, see the text by Lala [21] and...Software Wrappers.” in OASIS: Foundations of Intrusion Tolerant Systems (J. Lala Ed.), IEEE Computer Society Press, 2003. [16] Gartner, Felix C...2003. [21] Lala , J. “Foundations of Intrusion Tolerant Systems.” IEEE Computer Society Press, Catalog # PR02057, 2003. [22] Leveson, N., T. Shimeall, J

  3. Software Engineering in Practice: Design and Architectures of FLOSS Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capiluppi, Andrea; Knowles, Thomas

    Free/Libre/Open Source Software (FLOSS) practitioners and developers are typically also users of their own systems: as a result, traditional software engineering (SE) processes (e.g., the requirements and design phases), take less time to articulate and negotiate among FLOSS developers. Design and requirements are kept more as informal knowledge, rather than formally described and assessed. This paper attempts to recover the SE concepts of software design and architectures from three FLOSS case studies, sharing the same application domain (i.e., Instant Messaging). Its first objective is to determine whether a common architecture emerges from the three systems, which can be used as shared knowledge for future applications. The second objective is to determine whether these architectures evolve or decay during the evolution of these systems. The results of this study are encouraging: albeit no explicit effort was done by FLOSS developers to define a high-level view of the architecture, a common shared architecture could be distilled for the Instant Messaging application domain. It was also found that, for two of the three systems, the architecture becomes better organised, and the components better specified, as long as the system evolves in time.

  4. Open architecture software platform for biomedical signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Duque, Juliano J; Silva, Luiz E V; Murta, Luiz O

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical signals are very important reporters of the physiological status in human body. Therefore, great attention is devoted to the study of analysis methods that help extracting the greatest amount of relevant information from these signals. There are several free of charge softwares which can process biomedical data, but they are usually closed architecture, not allowing addition of new functionalities by users. This paper presents a proposal for free open architecture software platform for biomedical signal analysis, named JBioS. Implemented in Java, the platform offers some basic functionalities to load and display signals, and allows the integration of new software components through plugins. JBioS facilitates validation of new analysis methods and provides an environment for multi-methods analysis. Plugins can be developed for preprocessing, analyzing and simulating signals. Some applications have been done using this platform, suggesting that, with these features, JBioS presents itself as a software with potential applications in both research and clinical area.

  5. Hardware and software fault tolerance - A unified architectural approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Alger, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    The loss of hardware fault tolerance which often arises when design diversity is used to improve the fault tolerance of computer software is considered analytically, and a unified design approach is proposed to avoid the problem. The fundamental theory of fault-tolerant (FT) architectures is reviewed; the current status of design-diversity software development is surveyed; and the FT-processor/attached-processor (FTP/AP) architecture developed by Lala et al. (1986) is described in detail and illustrated with diagrams. FTP/AP is shown to permit efficient implementation of N-version FT software while still tolerating random hardware failures with very high coverage; the reliability is found to be significantly higher than that of conventional majority-vote N-version software.

  6. On-Board Software Reference Architecture for Payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Victor; Rugina, Ana; Trcka, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The goal of the On-board Software Reference Architecture for Payloads (OSRA-P) is to identify an architecture for payload software to harmonize the payload domain, to enable more reuse of common/generic payload software across different payloads and missions and to ease the integration of the payloads with the platform.To investigate the payload domain, recent and current payload instruments of European space missions have been analyzed. This led to a Payload Catalogue describing 12 payload instruments as well as a Capability Matrix listing specific characteristics of each payload. In addition, a functional decomposition of payload software was prepared which contains functionalities typically found in payload systems. The definition of OSRA-P was evaluated by case studies and a dedicated OSRA-P workshop to gather feedback from the payload community.

  7. Software Defined Radios - Architectures, Systems and Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William H.

    2017-01-01

    Software Defined Radio is an industry term describing a method of utilizing a minimum amount of Radio Frequency (RF)/analog electronics before digitization takes place. Upon digitization all other functions are performed in software/firmware. There are as many different types of SDRs as there are data systems. Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology has been proven in the commercial sector since the early 90's. Today's rapid advancement in mobile telephone reliability and power management capabilities exemplifies the effectiveness of the SDR technology for the modern communications market. In contrast the foundations of transponder technology presently qualified for satellite applications were developed during the early space program of the 1960's. SDR technology offers potential to revolutionize satellite transponder technology by increasing science data through-put capability by at least an order of magnitude. While the SDR is adaptive in nature and is "One-size-fits-all" by design, conventional transponders are built to a specific platform and must be redesigned for every new bus. The SDR uses a minimum amount of analog/Radio Frequency components to up/down-convert the RF signal to/from a digital format. Once analog data is digitized, all processing is performed using hardware logic. Typical SDR processes include; filtering, modulation, up/down converting and demodulation. This presentation will show how the emerging SDR market has leveraged the existing commercial sector to provide a path to a radiation tolerant SDR transponder. These innovations will reduce the cost of transceivers, a decrease in power requirements and a commensurate reduction in volume. A second pay-off is the increased flexibility of the SDR by allowing the same hardware to implement multiple transponder types by altering hardware logic - no change of analog hardware is required - all of which can be ultimately accomplished in orbit. This in turn would provide high capability and low cost

  8. Software Defined Radios - Architectures, Systems and Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Herb

    2017-01-01

    Software Defined Radio is an industry term describing a method of utilizing a minimum amount of Radio Frequency (RF)/analog electronics before digitization takes place. Upon digitization all other functions are performed in software/firmware. There are as many different types of SDRs as there are data systems. Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology has been proven in the commercial sector since the early 90's. Today's rapid advancement in mobile telephone reliability and power management capabilities exemplifies the effectiveness of the SDR technology for the modern communications market. In contrast the foundations of transponder technology presently qualified for satellite applications were developed during the early space program of the 1960's. SDR technology offers potential to revolutionize satellite transponder technology by increasing science data through-put capability by at least an order of magnitude. While the SDR is adaptive in nature and is "One-size-fits-all" by design, conventional transponders are built to a specific platform and must be redesigned for every new bus. The SDR uses a minimum amount of analog/Radio Frequency components to up/down-convert the RF signal to/from a digital format. Once analog data is digitized, all processing is performed using hardware logic. Typical SDR processes include; filtering, modulation, up/down converting and demodulation. This presentation will show how the emerging SDR market has leveraged the existing commercial sector to provide a path to a radiation tolerant SDR transponder. These innovations will reduce the cost of transceivers, a decrease in power requirements and a commensurate reduction in volume. A second pay-off is the increased flexibility of the SDR by allowing the same hardware to implement multiple transponder types by altering hardware logic - no change of analog hardware is required - all of which can be ultimately accomplished in orbit. This in turn would provide high capability and low cost

  9. NASA Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, J. C.; Butler, P. L.; Glassell, R. L.; Herndon, J. N.

    1992-01-01

    In support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) goals to increase the utilization of dexterous robotic systems in space, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) system. It is a dexterous, dual-arm, force reflecting teleoperator system with robotic features for NASA ground-based research. This paper describes the overall control system architecture, including both the hardware and software. The control system is a distributed, modular, and hierarchical design with flexible expansion capabilities for future enhancements of both the hardware and software.

  10. NASA Laboratory telerobotic manipulator control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, J. C.; Butler, P. L.; Glassell, R. L.; Herndon, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    In support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) goals to increase the utilization of dexterous robotic systems in space, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) system. It is a dexterous, dual-arm, force reflecting teleoperator system with robotic features for NASA ground-based research. This paper describes the overall control system architecture, including both the hardware and software. The control system is a distributed, modular, and hierarchical design with flexible expansion capabilities for future enhancements of both the hardware and software.

  11. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS). Software Architecture Seminar Report: Central Archive for Reusable Defense Software (CARDS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-29

    products and information. As noted in the DoD Software Reuse Initiative Vision and Strategy, DoD aims: [tio drive the DoD software community from its...development of systems complying with approved architectures. The creation of generic components must be independent of development of fieldable production ... products are often built to different standards. However, these issues need to be considered from an architectural standpoint so that components will

  12. Flexible Software Architecture for Visualization and Seismic Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petunin, S.; Pavlov, I.; Mogilenskikh, D.; Podzyuban, D.; Arkhipov, A.; Baturuin, N.; Lisin, A.; Smith, A.; Rivers, W.; Harben, P.

    2007-12-01

    Research in the field of seismology requires software and signal processing utilities for seismogram manipulation and analysis. Seismologists and data analysts often encounter a major problem in the use of any particular software application specific to seismic data analysis: the tuning of commands and windows to the specific waveforms and hot key combinations so as to fit their familiar informational environment. The ability to modify the user's interface independently from the developer requires an adaptive code structure. An adaptive code structure also allows for expansion of software capabilities such as new signal processing modules and implementation of more efficient algorithms. Our approach is to use a flexible "open" architecture for development of geophysical software. This report presents an integrated solution for organizing a logical software architecture based on the Unix version of the Geotool software implemented on the Microsoft NET 2.0 platform. Selection of this platform greatly expands the variety and number of computers that can implement the software, including laptops that can be utilized in field conditions. It also facilitates implementation of communication functions for seismic data requests from remote databases through the Internet. The main principle of the new architecture for Geotool is that scientists should be able to add new routines for digital waveform analysis via software plug-ins that utilize the basic Geotool display for GUI interaction. The use of plug-ins allows the efficient integration of diverse signal-processing software, including software still in preliminary development, into an organized platform without changing the fundamental structure of that platform itself. An analyst's use of Geotool is tracked via a metadata file so that future studies can reconstruct, and alter, the original signal processing operations. The work has been completed in the framework of a joint Russian- American project.

  13. Fault Management Architectures and the Challenges of Providing Software Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savarino, Shirley; Fitz, Rhonda; Fesq, Lorraine; Whitman, Gerek

    2015-01-01

    The satellite systems Fault Management (FM) is focused on safety, the preservation of assets, and maintaining the desired functionality of the system. How FM is implemented varies among missions. Common to most is system complexity due to a need to establish a multi-dimensional structure across hardware, software and operations. This structure is necessary to identify and respond to system faults, mitigate technical risks and ensure operational continuity. These architecture, implementation and software assurance efforts increase with mission complexity. Because FM is a systems engineering discipline with a distributed implementation, providing efficient and effective verification and validation (VV) is challenging. A breakout session at the 2012 NASA Independent Verification Validation (IVV) Annual Workshop titled VV of Fault Management: Challenges and Successes exposed these issues in terms of VV for a representative set of architectures. NASA's IVV is funded by NASA's Software Assurance Research Program (SARP) in partnership with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to extend the work performed at the Workshop session. NASA IVV will extract FM architectures across the IVV portfolio and evaluate the data set for robustness, assess visibility for validation and test, and define software assurance methods that could be applied to the various architectures and designs. This work focuses efforts on FM architectures from critical and complex projects within NASA. The identification of particular FM architectures, visibility, and associated VVIVV techniques provides a data set that can enable higher assurance that a satellite system will adequately detect and respond to adverse conditions. Ultimately, results from this activity will be incorporated into the NASA Fault Management Handbook providing dissemination across NASA, other agencies and the satellite community. This paper discusses the approach taken to perform the evaluations and preliminary findings from the

  14. Jitter Controller Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin; Schlensinger, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Sinusoidal jitter is produced by simply modulating a clock frequency sinusoidally with a given frequency and amplitude. But this can be expressed as phase jitter, frequency jitter, or cycle-to-cycle jitter, rms or peak, absolute units, or normalized to the base clock frequency. Jitter using other waveforms requires calculating and downloading these waveforms to an arbitrary waveform generator, and helping the user manage relationships among phase jitter crest factor, frequency jitter crest factor, and cycle-to-cycle jitter (CCJ) crest factor. Software was developed for managing these relationships, automatically configuring the generator, and saving test results documentation. Tighter management of clock jitter and jitter sensitivity is required by new codes that further extend the already high performance of space communication links, completely correcting symbol error rates higher than 10 percent, and therefore typically requiring demodulation and symbol synchronization hardware to operating at signal-to-noise ratios of less than one. To accomplish this, greater demands are also made on transmitter performance, and measurement techniques are needed to confirm performance. It was discovered early that sinusoidal jitter can be stepped on a grid such that one can connect points by constant phase jitter, constant frequency jitter, or constant cycle-cycle jitter. The tool automates adherence to a grid while also allowing adjustments off-grid. Also, the jitter can be set by the user on any dimension and the others are calculated. The calculations are all recorded, allowing the data to be rapidly plotted or re-plotted against different interpretations just by changing pointers to columns. A key advantage is taking data on a carefully controlled grid, which allowed a single data set to be post-analyzed many different ways. Another innovation was building a software tool to provide very tight coupling between the generator and the recorded data product, and the operator

  15. Software development strategies for parallel computer architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Ralf; Cooper, W. Anthony; Beniston, Martin; Gengler, Marc; Merazzi, Silvio

    1991-09-01

    As pragmatic users of high performance supercomputers, we believe that nowadays parallel computer architectures with disturbed memories are not yet mature to be used by a wide range of application engineers. A big effort should be made to bring these very promising computers closer to the users. One major flaw of massively parallel machines is that the programmer has to take care himself of the data flow which is often different on different parallel computers. To overcome this problem, we propose that data structures be standardized. The data base then can become an integrated part of the system and the data flow for a given algorithm can be easily prescribed. Fixing data structures forces the computer manufacturer to rather adapt his machine to user's demands and not, as it happens now, the user has to adapt to the innovative computer science approach of the computer manufacturer. In this paper, we present data standards chosen for our ASTRID programming platform for research scientist and engineers, as well as a plasma physics application which won the Cray Gigaflop Performance Awards 1989 and 1990 and which was succesfully ported on an INTEL iPSC/2 hypercube.

  16. Scalable software architectures for decision support.

    PubMed

    Musen, M A

    1999-12-01

    Interest in decision-support programs for clinical medicine soared in the 1970s. Since that time, workers in medical informatics have been particularly attracted to rule-based systems as a means of providing clinical decision support. Although developers have built many successful applications using production rules, they also have discovered that creation and maintenance of large rule bases is quite problematic. In the 1980s, several groups of investigators began to explore alternative programming abstractions that can be used to build decision-support systems. As a result, the notions of "generic tasks" and of reusable problem-solving methods became extremely influential. By the 1990s, academic centers were experimenting with architectures for intelligent systems based on two classes of reusable components: (1) problem-solving methods--domain-independent algorithms for automating stereotypical tasks--and (2) domain ontologies that captured the essential concepts (and relationships among those concepts) in particular application areas. This paper highlights how developers can construct large, maintainable decision-support systems using these kinds of building blocks. The creation of domain ontologies and problem-solving methods is the fundamental end product of basic research in medical informatics. Consequently, these concepts need more attention by our scientific community.

  17. Generic Software Architecture for Prognostics (GSAP) User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teubert, Christopher Allen; Daigle, Matthew John; Watkins, Jason; Sankararaman, Shankar; Goebel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The Generic Software Architecture for Prognostics (GSAP) is a framework for applying prognostics. It makes applying prognostics easier by implementing many of the common elements across prognostic applications. The standard interface enables reuse of prognostic algorithms and models across systems using the GSAP framework.

  18. Software Defined Radios - Architectures, Systems and Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Herb

    2017-01-01

    Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology has been proven in the commercial sector since the early 90's. Today's rapid advancement in mobile telephone reliability and power management capabilities exemplifies the effectiveness of the SDR technology for the modern communications market. SDR technology offers potential to revolutionize satellite transponder technology by increasing science data through-put capability by at least an order of magnitude. While the SDR is adaptive in nature and is "One-size-fits-all" by design, conventional transponders are built to a specific platform and must be redesigned for every new bus. The SDR uses a minimum amount of analog/Radio Frequency (RF) components to up/down-convert the RF signal to/from a digital format. Once analog data is digitized, all processing is performed using hardware logic. Typical SDR processes include; filtering, modulation, up/down converting and demodulation. These innovations have reduced the cost of transceivers, a decrease in power requirements and a commensurate reduction in volume. An additional pay-off is the increased flexibility of the SDR: allowing the same hardware to implement multiple transponder types by altering hardware logic -no change of analog hardware is required -all of which can be ultimately accomplished in orbit.

  19. Fault Management Architectures and the Challenges of Providing Software Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savarino, Shirley; Fitz, Rhonda; Fesq, Lorraine; Whitman, Gerek

    2015-01-01

    Fault Management (FM) is focused on safety, the preservation of assets, and maintaining the desired functionality of the system. How FM is implemented varies among missions. Common to most missions is system complexity due to a need to establish a multi-dimensional structure across hardware, software and spacecraft operations. FM is necessary to identify and respond to system faults, mitigate technical risks and ensure operational continuity. Generally, FM architecture, implementation, and software assurance efforts increase with mission complexity. Because FM is a systems engineering discipline with a distributed implementation, providing efficient and effective verification and validation (V&V) is challenging. A breakout session at the 2012 NASA Independent Verification & Validation (IV&V) Annual Workshop titled "V&V of Fault Management: Challenges and Successes" exposed this issue in terms of V&V for a representative set of architectures. NASA's Software Assurance Research Program (SARP) has provided funds to NASA IV&V to extend the work performed at the Workshop session in partnership with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). NASA IV&V will extract FM architectures across the IV&V portfolio and evaluate the data set, assess visibility for validation and test, and define software assurance methods that could be applied to the various architectures and designs. This SARP initiative focuses efforts on FM architectures from critical and complex projects within NASA. The identification of particular FM architectures and associated V&V/IV&V techniques provides a data set that can enable improved assurance that a system will adequately detect and respond to adverse conditions. Ultimately, results from this activity will be incorporated into the NASA Fault Management Handbook providing dissemination across NASA, other agencies and the space community. This paper discusses the approach taken to perform the evaluations and preliminary findings from the research.

  20. The Domain-Specific Software Architecture Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science MIT Cambridge, MA DAM @WHEATIES.AI.MIT.EDUMIT Rick Selby and Richard Taylor Department of Computer...situation assessment ([Lesser 80], [Steeb 81]). Intelligent control has been a focus of investigations in both manufacturing ([Murdock 90], [ Pardee 90...Assn. ( Pardee 90] Pardee , W.J., Shaff, M.A., and Hayes-Roth, B. "Intelligent control of complex materials processes", Artificial Intelligence in

  1. Study of a unified hardware and software fault-tolerant architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan; Alger, Linda; Friend, Steven; Greeley, Gregory; Sacco, Stephen; Adams, Stuart

    1989-01-01

    A unified architectural concept, called the Fault Tolerant Processor Attached Processor (FTP-AP), that can tolerate hardware as well as software faults is proposed for applications requiring ultrareliable computation capability. An emulation of the FTP-AP architecture, consisting of a breadboard Motorola 68010-based quadruply redundant Fault Tolerant Processor, four VAX 750s as attached processors, and four versions of a transport aircraft yaw damper control law, is used as a testbed in the AIRLAB to examine a number of critical issues. Solutions of several basic problems associated with N-Version software are proposed and implemented on the testbed. This includes a confidence voter to resolve coincident errors in N-Version software. A reliability model of N-Version software that is based upon the recent understanding of software failure mechanisms is also developed. The basic FTP-AP architectural concept appears suitable for hosting N-Version application software while at the same time tolerating hardware failures. Architectural enhancements for greater efficiency, software reliability modeling, and N-Version issues that merit further research are identified.

  2. Ensemble: an Architecture for Mission-Operations Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeffrey; Powell, Mark; Fox, Jason; Rabe, Kenneth; Shu, IHsiang; McCurdy, Michael; Vera, Alonso

    2008-01-01

    Ensemble is the name of an open architecture for, and a methodology for the development of, spacecraft mission operations software. Ensemble is also potentially applicable to the development of non-spacecraft mission-operations- type software. Ensemble capitalizes on the strengths of the open-source Eclipse software and its architecture to address several issues that have arisen repeatedly in the development of mission-operations software: Heretofore, mission-operations application programs have been developed in disparate programming environments and integrated during the final stages of development of missions. The programs have been poorly integrated, and it has been costly to develop, test, and deploy them. Users of each program have been forced to interact with several different graphical user interfaces (GUIs). Also, the strategy typically used in integrating the programs has yielded serial chains of operational software tools of such a nature that during use of a given tool, it has not been possible to gain access to the capabilities afforded by other tools. In contrast, the Ensemble approach offers a low-risk path towards tighter integration of mission-operations software tools.

  3. Architecture for a Generalized Emergency Management Software System

    SciTech Connect

    Hoza, Mark; Bower, John C.; Stoops, LaMar R.; Downing, Timothy R.; Carter, Richard J.; Millard, W. David

    2002-12-19

    The Federal Emergency Management Information System (FEMIS) was originally developed for the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP). It has evolved from a CSEPP-specific emergency management software system to a general-purpose system that supports multiple types of hazards. The latest step in the evolution is the adoption of a hazard analysis architecture that enables the incorporation of hazard models for each of the hazards such that the model is seamlessly incorporated into the FEMIS hazard analysis subsystem. This paper describes that new architecture.

  4. Measurements of the LHCb software stack on the ARM architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay Kartik, S.; Couturier, Ben; Clemencic, Marco; Neufeld, Niko

    2014-06-01

    The ARM architecture is a power-efficient design that is used in most processors in mobile devices all around the world today since they provide reasonable compute performance per watt. The current LHCb software stack is designed (and thus expected) to build and run on machines with the x86/x86_64 architecture. This paper outlines the process of measuring the performance of the LHCb software stack on the ARM architecture - specifically, the ARMv7 architecture on Cortex-A9 processors from NVIDIA and on full-fledged ARM servers with chipsets from Calxeda - and makes comparisons with the performance on x86_64 architectures on the Intel Xeon L5520/X5650 and AMD Opteron 6272. The paper emphasises the aspects of performance per core with respect to the power drawn by the compute nodes for the given performance - this ensures a fair real-world comparison with much more 'powerful' Intel/AMD processors. The comparisons of these real workloads in the context of LHCb are also complemented with the standard synthetic benchmarks HEPSPEC and Coremark. The pitfalls and solutions for the non-trivial task of porting the source code to build for the ARMv7 instruction set are presented. The specific changes in the build process needed for ARM-specific portions of the software stack are described, to serve as pointers for further attempts taken up by other groups in this direction. Cases where architecture-specific tweaks at the assembler lever (both in ROOT and the LHCb software stack) were needed for a successful compile are detailed - these cases are good indicators of where/how the software stack as well as the build system can be made more portable and multi-arch friendly. The experience gained from the tasks described in this paper are intended to i) assist in making an informed choice about ARM-based server solutions as a feasible low-power alternative to the current compute nodes, and ii) revisit the software design and build system for portability and generic improvements.

  5. Software architecture for the ORNL large-coil test facility data system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, E. T.; Baylor, L. R.

    1986-08-01

    The VAX-based data-acquisition system for the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a second-generation system that evolved from a PDP-11/60-based system used during the initial phase of facility testing. The VAX-based software represents a layered implementation that provides integrated access to all of the data sources within the system, decoupling end-user data retrieval from various front-end data sources through a combination of software architecture and instrumentation data bases. Independent VAX processes manage the various front-end data sources, each being responsible for controlling, monitoring, acquiring, and disposing data and control parameters for access from the data retrieval software. This paper describes the software architecture and the functionality incorporated into the various layers of the data system.

  6. GridOPTICS(TM): A Design for Plug-and-Play Smart Grid Software Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian

    2012-06-03

    As the smart grid becomes reality, software architectures for integrating legacy systems with new innovative approaches for grid management are needed. These architectures must exhibit flexibility, extensibility, interoperability and scalability. In this position paper, we describe our preliminary work to design such an architecture, known as GridOPTICS, that will enable the deployment and integration of new software tools in smart grid operations. Our preliminary design is based upon use cases from PNNL’s Future Power Grid Initiative, which is a developing a collection of advanced software technologies for smart grid management and control. We describe the motivations for GridOPTICS, and the preliminary design that we are currently prototyping for several distinct use cases.

  7. Guidance and Control Software,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    active in the system. COMPUTER MAIN FRAME FILE SYSTEM PROJECT DATA BASE USER--" FASP - -- FASP KRONOS S SYSTEM CDC 6600 SOFTWARE FIGURE 2 - FASP CCS...SYSTEM PRODUCTION KRONOS DIRECTORY TEST LIBRARY ~ LIBRARYPRJC DATA __ LILIBRAR FIGURE 3- Single User/Single Project FASP 3-5 FASP COMPONENTS Project...capabilities were impractical. A change in operating systems ( KRONOS 2.1) made it feasible to introduce a degree of interactive capability. From a

  8. DAQ: Software Architecture for Data Acquisition in Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Tran, Thanh; Nichols, Heidi; Bowles-Martinez, Jessica N.

    2011-01-01

    A multithreaded software application was developed by Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) to collect a set of correlated imagery, Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and GPS data for a Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) sounding rocket flight. The data set will be used to advance Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) technology algorithms being researched at JPL. This paper describes the software architecture and the tests used to meet the timing and data rate requirements for the software used to collect the dataset. Also discussed are the challenges of using commercial off the shelf (COTS) flight hardware and open source software. This includes multiple Camera Link (C-link) based cameras, a Pentium-M based computer, and Linux Fedora 11 operating system. Additionally, the paper talks about the history of the software architecture's usage in other JPL projects and its applicability for future missions, such as cubesats, UAVs, and research planes/balloons. Also talked about will be the human aspect of project especially JPL's Phaeton program and the results of the launch.

  9. Software Defined Radio Architecture Contributions to Next Generation Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.; Eddy, Wesley M.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John

    2015-01-01

    systems, as well as those communications and navigation systems operated by international space agencies and civilian and government agencies. In this paper, we review the philosophies, technologies, architectural attributes, mission services, and communications capabilities that form the structure of candidate next-generation integrated communication architectures for space communications and navigation. A key area that this paper explores is from the development and operation of the software defined radio for the NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed currently on the International Space Station (ISS). Evaluating the lessons learned from development and operation feed back into the communications architecture. Leveraging the reconfigurability provides a change in the way that operations are done and must be considered. Quantifying the impact on the NASA Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) software defined radio architecture provides feedback to keep the standard useful and up to date. NASA is not the only customer of these radios. Software defined radios are developed for other applications, and taking advantage of these developments promotes an architecture that is cost effective and sustainable. Developments in the following areas such as an updated operating environment, higher data rates, networking and security can be leveraged. The ability to sustain an architecture that uses radios for multiple markets can lower costs and keep new technology infused.

  10. Investigating the Acquisition of Software Systems that Rely on Open Architecture and Open Source Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Investigating the Acquisition of Software Systems that Rely on Open Architecture and Open Source Software March 2010 by Dr. Walt Scacchi ...including project teams operating as virtual organizations [ Scacchi 2002, 2007]. There is a basic need to understand how to identify an optimal mix of OSS...ecosystem. However, the relationship among OA, OSS, requirements, and acquisition is poorly understood [cf. Scacchi 2002, Naegle and Petross 2007

  11. Software Architecture of Sensor Data Distribution In Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Charles; Alena, Richard; Stone, Thom; Ossenfort, John; Walker, Ed; Notario, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    Data from mobile and stationary sensors will be vital in planetary surface exploration. The distribution and collection of sensor data in an ad-hoc wireless network presents a challenge. Irregular terrain, mobile nodes, new associations with access points and repeaters with stronger signals as the network reconfigures to adapt to new conditions, signal fade and hardware failures can cause: a) Data errors; b) Out of sequence packets; c) Duplicate packets; and d) Drop out periods (when node is not connected). To mitigate the effects of these impairments, a robust and reliable software architecture must be implemented. This architecture must also be tolerant of communications outages. This paper describes such a robust and reliable software infrastructure that meets the challenges of a distributed ad hoc network in a difficult environment and presents the results of actual field experiments testing the principles and actual code developed.

  12. Supporting Community Emergency Management Planning Through a Geocollaboration Software Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Wendy A.; Ganoe, Craig H.; Carroll, John M.

    Emergency management is more than just events occurring within an emergency situation. It encompasses a variety of persistent activities such as planning, training, assessment, and organizational change. We are studying emergency management planning practices in which geographic communities (towns and regions) prepare to respond efficiently to significant emergency events. Community emergency management planning is an extensive collaboration involving numerous stakeholders throughout the community and both reflecting and challenging the community’s structure and resources. Geocollaboration is one aspect of the effort. Emergency managers, public works directors, first responders, and local transportation managers need to exchange information relating to possible emergency event locations and their surrounding areas. They need to examine geospatial maps together and collaboratively develop emergency plans and procedures. Issues such as emergency vehicle traffic routes and staging areas for command posts, arriving media, and personal first responders’ vehicles must be agreed upon prior to an emergency event to ensure an efficient and effective response. This work presents a software architecture that facilitates the development of geocollaboration solutions. The architecture extends prior geocollaboration research and reuses existing geospatial information models. Emergency management planning is one application domain for the architecture. Geocollaboration tools can be developed that support community-wide emergency management planning and preparedness. This chapter describes how the software architecture can be used for the geospatial, emergency management planning activities of one community.

  13. A Multiprocessor-Based Sensor Fusion Software Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxon, Bruce C.

    1988-03-01

    The ability to reason with information from a variety of sources is critical to the development of intelligent autonomous systems. Multisensor integration, or sensor fusion, is an area of research that attempts to provide a computational framework in which such perceptual reasoning can quickly and effectively be applied, enabling autonomous systems to function in unstructured, unconstrained environments. In this paper, the fundamental characteristics of the sensor fusion problem are explored. An hierarchical sensor fusion software architecture is presented as a computational framework in which information from complementary sensors is effectively combined. The concept of a sensor fusion pyramid is introduced, along with three unique computational abstractions: virtual sensors, virtual effectors, and focus of attention processing. The computing requirements of this sensor fusion architecture are investigated, and the blackboard system model is proposed as a computational methodology on which to build a sensor fusion software architecture. Finally, the Butterfly Parallel Processor is presented as a computer architecture that provides the computational capabilities required to support these intelligent systems applications.

  14. Integrity Constraint Monitoring in Software Development: Proposed Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Francisco G.

    1997-01-01

    In the development of complex software systems, designers are required to obtain from many sources and manage vast amounts of knowledge of the system being built and communicate this information to personnel with a variety of backgrounds. Knowledge concerning the properties of the system, including the structure of, relationships between and limitations of the data objects in the system, becomes increasingly more vital as the complexity of the system and the number of knowledge sources increases. Ensuring that violations of these properties do not occur becomes steadily more challenging. One approach toward managing the enforcement or system properties, called context monitoring, uses a centralized repository of integrity constraints and a constraint satisfiability mechanism for dynamic verification of property enforcement during program execution. The focus of this paper is to describe possible software architectures that define a mechanism for dynamically checking the satisfiability of a set of constraints on a program. The next section describes the context monitoring approach in general. Section 3 gives an overview of the work currently being done toward the addition of an integrity constraint satisfiability mechanism to a high-level program language, SequenceL, and demonstrates how this model is being examined to develop a general software architecture. Section 4 describes possible architectures for a general constraint satisfiability mechanism, as well as an alternative approach that, uses embedded database queries in lieu of an external monitor. The paper concludes with a brief summary outlining the, current state of the research and future work.

  15. Extensive Evaluation of Using a Game Project in a Software Architecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Alf Inge

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an extensive evaluation of introducing a game project to a software architecture course. In this project, university students have to construct and design a type of software architecture, evaluate the architecture, implement an application based on the architecture, and test this implementation. In previous years, the domain…

  16. Extensive Evaluation of Using a Game Project in a Software Architecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Alf Inge

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an extensive evaluation of introducing a game project to a software architecture course. In this project, university students have to construct and design a type of software architecture, evaluate the architecture, implement an application based on the architecture, and test this implementation. In previous years, the domain…

  17. Educational Software Architecture and Systematic Impact: The Promise of Component Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Kaput, James

    1996-01-01

    Examines the failure of current technology to meet education's flexible needs and points to a promising solution: component software architecture. Discusses the failure of stand-alone applications in their incompatibility, waste of funding, prevention of customization, and obstruction of integration. (AEF)

  18. Educational Software Architecture and Systematic Impact: The Promise of Component Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Kaput, James

    1996-01-01

    Examines the failure of current technology to meet education's flexible needs and points to a promising solution: component software architecture. Discusses the failure of stand-alone applications in their incompatibility, waste of funding, prevention of customization, and obstruction of integration. (AEF)

  19. Distributed controller clustering in software defined networks.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Fong, Ang Tan; Gani, Abdullah; Garba, Usman; Khan, Suleman; Akhunzada, Adnan; Talebian, Hamid; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) is an emerging promising paradigm for network management because of its centralized network intelligence. However, the centralized control architecture of the software-defined networks (SDNs) brings novel challenges of reliability, scalability, fault tolerance and interoperability. In this paper, we proposed a novel clustered distributed controller architecture in the real setting of SDNs. The distributed cluster implementation comprises of multiple popular SDN controllers. The proposed mechanism is evaluated using a real world network topology running on top of an emulated SDN environment. The result shows that the proposed distributed controller clustering mechanism is able to significantly reduce the average latency from 8.1% to 1.6%, the packet loss from 5.22% to 4.15%, compared to distributed controller without clustering running on HP Virtual Application Network (VAN) SDN and Open Network Operating System (ONOS) controllers respectively. Moreover, proposed method also shows reasonable CPU utilization results. Furthermore, the proposed mechanism makes possible to handle unexpected load fluctuations while maintaining a continuous network operation, even when there is a controller failure. The paper is a potential contribution stepping towards addressing the issues of reliability, scalability, fault tolerance, and inter-operability.

  20. Distributed controller clustering in software defined networks

    PubMed Central

    Gani, Abdullah; Akhunzada, Adnan; Talebian, Hamid; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) is an emerging promising paradigm for network management because of its centralized network intelligence. However, the centralized control architecture of the software-defined networks (SDNs) brings novel challenges of reliability, scalability, fault tolerance and interoperability. In this paper, we proposed a novel clustered distributed controller architecture in the real setting of SDNs. The distributed cluster implementation comprises of multiple popular SDN controllers. The proposed mechanism is evaluated using a real world network topology running on top of an emulated SDN environment. The result shows that the proposed distributed controller clustering mechanism is able to significantly reduce the average latency from 8.1% to 1.6%, the packet loss from 5.22% to 4.15%, compared to distributed controller without clustering running on HP Virtual Application Network (VAN) SDN and Open Network Operating System (ONOS) controllers respectively. Moreover, proposed method also shows reasonable CPU utilization results. Furthermore, the proposed mechanism makes possible to handle unexpected load fluctuations while maintaining a continuous network operation, even when there is a controller failure. The paper is a potential contribution stepping towards addressing the issues of reliability, scalability, fault tolerance, and inter-operability. PMID:28384312

  1. NPOESS Interface Data Processing Segment Architecture and Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turek, S.; Souza, K. G.; Fox, C. A.; Grant, K. D.

    2004-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS is an estimated \\$6.5 billion program replacing the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS). The IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide weather, oceanographic, and environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers and field terminals operated by the United States government. This paper describes Raytheon's high performance computer and software architecture for the NPOESS IDPS. NOAA, the DoD, and NASA selected this architecture after a 2.5-year Program Definition and Risk Reduction (PDRR) competition. The PDRR phase concluded in August of 2002, and has been followed by the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) phase. The NPP satellite, scheduled to launch in late 2006, will provide risk reduction for the future NPOESS satellites, and will enable data continuity between the current EOS missions and NPOESS. Efforts within the PDRR and NPP phases consist of: requirements definition and flowdown from system to segment to subsystem, Object-Oriented (OO) software design, software code development, science to operational code conversion, integration and qualification testing. The NPOESS phase, which supports a constellation of three satellites, will also consist of this same lifecycle during the 2005 through 2009 timeframe, with operations and support

  2. The 4MOST facility control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramskiy, Alexander; Mandel, Holger; Rothmaier, Florian; Stilz, Ingo; Winkler, Roland; Hahn, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The 4-m Multi-Object Spectrographic Telescope (4MOST) is one high-resolution (R 18000) and two lowresolution (R fi 5000) spectrographs covering the wavelength range between 390 and 950 nm. The spectrographs will be installed on ESO VISTA telescope and will be fed by approximately 2400 fibres. The instrument is capable to simultaneously obtain spectra of about 2400 objects distributed over an hexagonal field-of-view of four square degrees. This paper aims at giving an overview of the control software design, which is based on the standard ESO VLT software architecture and customised to fit the needs of the 4MOST instrument. In particular, the facility control software is intended to arrange the precise positioning of the fibres, to schedule and observe many surveys in parallel, and to combine the output from the three spectrographs. Moreover, 4MOST's software will include user-friendly graphical user interfaces that enable users to interact with the facility control system and to monitor all data-taking and calibration tasks of the instrument. A secondary guiding system will be implemented to correct for any fibre exure and thus to improve 4MOST's guiding performance. The large amount of fibres requires the custom design of data exchange to avoid performance issues. The observation sequences are designed to use spectrographs in parallel with synchronous points for data exchange between subsystems. In order to control hardware devices, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) components will be used, the new standard for future instruments at ESO.

  3. New system for the real-time infrared scene simulator: system architecture and software design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haimin; Shen, Peiyi; Wu, Chengke

    1999-07-01

    This paper represents a new real-time infrared scene simulator. Hardware architecture of the simulator contains two PENTIUM 300 MHz CPUs, a hardware Z-BUFFER controller developed by EPLD, and a data transmission controller based on PCI bus, which is presented on basis of the timing analysis of scene simulator process. The software finishes the geometry transform, clipping, and infrared simulator of 3D model of a target to create data for hardware Z-BUFFER controller. The experimental results indicate that software can successfully cooperate with hardware to meet the great demand of application in practice.

  4. Space Telecommunications Radio System Software Architecture Concepts and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handler, Louis M.; Hall, Charles S.; Briones, Janette C.; Blaser, Tammy M.

    2008-01-01

    The Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) project investigated various Software Defined Radio (SDR) architectures for Space. An STRS architecture has been selected that separates the STRS operating environment from its various waveforms and also abstracts any specialized hardware to limit its effect on the operating environment. The design supports software evolution where new functionality is incorporated into the radio. Radio hardware functionality has been moving from hardware based ASICs into firmware and software based processors such as FPGAs, DSPs and General Purpose Processors (GPPs). Use cases capture the requirements of a system by describing how the system should interact with the users or other systems (the actors) to achieve a specific goal. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is used to illustrate the Use Cases in a variety of ways. The Top Level Use Case diagram shows groupings of the use cases and how the actors are involved. The state diagrams depict the various states that a system or object may be in and the transitions between those states. The sequence diagrams show the main flow of activity as described in the use cases.

  5. Experimental research control software system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, I. A.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Vystavkin, A. N.

    2014-05-01

    A software system, intended for automation of a small scale research, has been developed. The software allows one to control equipment, acquire and process data by means of simple scripts. The main purpose of that development is to increase experiment automation easiness, thus significantly reducing experimental setup automation efforts. In particular, minimal programming skills are required and supervisors have no reviewing troubles. Interactions between scripts and equipment are managed automatically, thus allowing to run multiple scripts simultaneously. Unlike well-known data acquisition commercial software systems, the control is performed by an imperative scripting language. This approach eases complex control and data acquisition algorithms implementation. A modular interface library performs interaction with external interfaces. While most widely used interfaces are already implemented, a simple framework is developed for fast implementations of new software and hardware interfaces. While the software is in continuous development with new features being implemented, it is already used in our laboratory for automation of a helium-3 cryostat control and data acquisition. The software is open source and distributed under Gnu Public License.

  6. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Levesque, Marl; Williams, Randall; Mclaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Launch vehicles within the international community vary greatly in their configuration and processing. Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific launch vehicle configuration. Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site. Each launch site has a control center for launch operations; however flight operations support varies from being co-located with the launch site to being shared with the space vehicle control center. There is also a nuance of some having an engineering support center which may be co-located with either the launch or flight control center, or in a separate geographical location altogether. A survey of control center architectures is presented for various launch vehicles including the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures shares some similarities in basic structure while differences in functional distribution also exist. The driving functions which lead to these factors are considered and a model of control center architectures is proposed which supports these commonalities and variations.

  7. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  8. Software architecture for time-constrained machine vision applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Molleda, Julio; García, Daniel F.; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2013-01-01

    Real-time image and video processing applications require skilled architects, and recent trends in the hardware platform make the design and implementation of these applications increasingly complex. Many frameworks and libraries have been proposed or commercialized to simplify the design and tuning of real-time image processing applications. However, they tend to lack flexibility, because they are normally oriented toward particular types of applications, or they impose specific data processing models such as the pipeline. Other issues include large memory footprints, difficulty for reuse, and inefficient execution on multicore processors. We present a novel software architecture for time-constrained machine vision applications that addresses these issues. The architecture is divided into three layers. The platform abstraction layer provides a high-level application programming interface for the rest of the architecture. The messaging layer provides a message-passing interface based on a dynamic publish/subscribe pattern. A topic-based filtering in which messages are published to topics is used to route the messages from the publishers to the subscribers interested in a particular type of message. The application layer provides a repository for reusable application modules designed for machine vision applications. These modules, which include acquisition, visualization, communication, user interface, and data processing, take advantage of the power of well-known libraries such as OpenCV, Intel IPP, or CUDA. Finally, the proposed architecture is applied to a real machine vision application: a jam detector for steel pickling lines.

  9. LSST control software component design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Paul J.; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory P.; Lim, Kian-Tat; Johnson, Tony; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Mills, David; Daly, Philip; Schumacher, Germán.; Delgado, Francisco; Pietrowicz, Steve; Selvy, Brian; Sebag, Jacques; Marshall, Stuart; Sundararaman, Harini; Contaxis, Christopher; Bovill, Robert; Jenness, Tim

    2016-08-01

    Construction of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope system involves several different organizations, a situation that poses many challenges at the time of the software integration of the components. To ensure commonality for the purposes of usability, maintainability, and robustness, the LSST software teams have agreed to the following for system software components: a summary state machine, a manner of managing settings, a flexible solution to specify controller/controllee relationships reliably as needed, and a paradigm for responding to and communicating alarms. This paper describes these agreed solutions and the factors that motivated these.

  10. A Software Architecture for Adaptive Modular Sensing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lyle, Andrew C.; Naish, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    By combining a number of simple transducer modules, an arbitrarily complex sensing system may be produced to accommodate a wide range of applications. This work outlines a novel software architecture and knowledge representation scheme that has been developed to support this type of flexible and reconfigurable modular sensing system. Template algorithms are used to embed intelligence within each module. As modules are added or removed, the composite sensor is able to automatically determine its overall geometry and assume an appropriate collective identity. A virtual machine-based middleware layer runs on top of a real-time operating system with a pre-emptive kernel, enabling platform-independent template algorithms to be written once and run on any module, irrespective of its underlying hardware architecture. Applications that may benefit from easily reconfigurable modular sensing systems include flexible inspection, mobile robotics, surveillance, and space exploration. PMID:22163614

  11. A software architecture for adaptive modular sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Lyle, Andrew C; Naish, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    By combining a number of simple transducer modules, an arbitrarily complex sensing system may be produced to accommodate a wide range of applications. This work outlines a novel software architecture and knowledge representation scheme that has been developed to support this type of flexible and reconfigurable modular sensing system. Template algorithms are used to embed intelligence within each module. As modules are added or removed, the composite sensor is able to automatically determine its overall geometry and assume an appropriate collective identity. A virtual machine-based middleware layer runs on top of a real-time operating system with a pre-emptive kernel, enabling platform-independent template algorithms to be written once and run on any module, irrespective of its underlying hardware architecture. Applications that may benefit from easily reconfigurable modular sensing systems include flexible inspection, mobile robotics, surveillance, and space exploration.

  12. The GIANO control software system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Emanuel; Oliva, Ernesto; Origlia, Livia

    2008-08-01

    GIANO is an ultra-stable IR echelle spectrometer, optimized for both low (R~=400) and high (R~=50,000) resolution, that will be installed at the Nasmyth-B focus of the Italian national telescope (TNG). At the beginning of this year the assembling phase of GIANO has started, at the Infrared Laboratory of INAFArcetri, and is currently in progress. We describe, here, the general control software structure of the instrument concerning both the user interface and the controls of all subsystems. We present also the software interface which provides the communication with the cryogenic system of the instrument and is handled by means of a Programmable Logic Controller.

  13. Extreme Scaling of Production Visualization Software on Diverse Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Henry; Pugmire, David; Ahern, Sean; Whitlock, Brad; Howison, Mark; Weber, Gunther; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-12-22

    We present the results of a series of experiments studying how visualization software scales to massive data sets. Although several paradigms exist for processing large data, we focus on pure parallelism, the dominant approach for production software. These experiments utilized multiple visualization algorithms and were run on multiple architectures. Two types of experiments were performed. For the first, we examined performance at massive scale: 16,000 or more cores and one trillion or more cells. For the second, we studied weak scaling performance. These experiments were performed on the largest data set sizes published to date in visualization literature, and the findings on scaling characteristics and bottlenecks contribute to understanding of how pure parallelism will perform at high levels of concurrency and with very large data sets.

  14. STOMP: A Software Architecture for the Design and Simulation UAV-Based Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E D; Roberts, R S; Hsia, T C S

    2002-10-28

    This paper presents the Simulation, Tactical Operations and Mission Planning (STOMP) software architecture and framework for simulating, controlling and communicating with unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) servicing large distributed sensor networks. STOMP provides hardware-in-the-loop capability enabling real UAVs and sensors to feedback state information, route data and receive command and control requests while interacting with other real or virtual objects thereby enhancing support for simulation of dynamic and complex events.

  15. EDS operator and control software

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.L.

    1985-04-01

    The Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to acquire, display and analyze large quantities of transient data for a real-time Advanced Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) experiment. Major topics discussed in this paper are the EDS operator interface (SHELL) program, the data acquisition and analysis scheduling software, and the graphics software. The workstation concept used in EDS, the software used to configure a user's workstation, and the ownership and management of a diagnostic are described. An EDS diagnostic is a combination of hardware and software designed to study specific aspects of the process. Overall system performance is discussed from the standpoint of scheduling techniques, evaluation tools, optimization techniques, and program-to-program communication methods. EDS is based on a data driven design which keeps the need to modify software to a minimum. This design requires a fast and reliable data base management system. A third party data base management product, Berkeley Software System Database, written explicitly for HP1000's, is used for all EDS data bases. All graphics is done with an in-house graphics product, Device Independent Graphics Library (DIGLIB). Examples of devices supported by DIGLIB are: Versatec printer/plotters, Raster Technologies Graphic Display Controllers, and HP terminals (HP264x and HP262x). The benefits derived by using HP hardware and software as well as obstacles imposed by the HP environment are presented in relation to EDS development and implementation.

  16. Enhancing User Customization through Novel Software Architecture for Utility Scale Solar Siting Software

    SciTech Connect

    Brant Peery; Sam Alessi; Randy Lee; Leng Vang; Scott Brown; David Solan; Dan Ames

    2014-06-01

    There is a need for a spatial decision support application that allows users to create customized metrics for comparing proposed locations of a new solar installation. This document discusses how PVMapper was designed to overcome the customization problem through the development of loosely coupled spatial and decision components in a JavaScript plugin architecture. This allows the user to easily add functionality and data to the system. The paper also explains how PVMapper provides the user with a dynamic and customizable decision tool that enables them to visually modify the formulas that are used in the decision algorithms that convert data to comparable metrics. The technologies that make up the presentation and calculation software stack are outlined. This document also explains the architecture that allows the tool to grow through custom plugins created by the software users. Some discussion is given on the difficulties encountered while designing the system.

  17. The Effective Use of System and Software Architecture Standards for Software Technology Readiness Assessments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    DEV V1.2” SEI Course. 2 Acknowledgements • This work would not have been possible without the help of the following people of The Aerospace...Motivation • Technology Readiness Assessments – the 64,000-foot View • Tutorial Scope • Risks of Software CTE Identification • Missing TRA...Definitions • Algorithms • Department of Defense Architecture Framework Version 2 0 . • Why the Work Breakdown Structure is Inadequate for CTE

  18. The South African Astronomical Observatory instrumentation software architecture and the SHOC instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gend, Carel; Lombaard, Briehan; Sickafoose, Amanda; Whittal, Hamish

    2016-07-01

    Until recently, software for instruments on the smaller telescopes at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) has not been designed for remote accessibility and frequently has not been developed using modern software best-practice. We describe a software architecture we have implemented for use with new and upgraded instruments at the SAAO. The architecture was designed to allow for multiple components and to be fast, reliable, remotely- operable, support different user interfaces, employ as much non-proprietary software as possible, and to take future-proofing into consideration. Individual component drivers exist as standalone processes, communicating over a network. A controller layer coordinates the various components, and allows a variety of user interfaces to be used. The Sutherland High-speed Optical Cameras (SHOC) instruments incorporate an Andor electron-multiplying CCD camera, a GPS unit for accurate timing and a pair of filter wheels. We have applied the new architecture to the SHOC instruments, with the camera driver developed using Andor's software development kit. We have used this to develop an innovative web-based user-interface to the instrument.

  19. Towards an Open, Distributed Software Architecture for UxS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Charles D.; Motter, Mark A.; Neilan, James H.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Tran, Loc; Trujillo, Anna C.; Allen, B. Danette

    2015-01-01

    To address the growing need to evaluate, test, and certify an ever expanding ecosystem of UxS platforms in preparation of cultural integration, NASA Langley Research Center's Autonomy Incubator (AI) has taken on the challenge of developing a software framework in which UxS platforms developed by third parties can be integrated into a single system which provides evaluation and testing, mission planning and operation, and out-of-the-box autonomy and data fusion capabilities. This software framework, named AEON (Autonomous Entity Operations Network), has two main goals. The first goal is the development of a cross-platform, extensible, onboard software system that provides autonomy at the mission execution and course-planning level, a highly configurable data fusion framework sensitive to the platform's available sensor hardware, and plug-and-play compatibility with a wide array of computer systems, sensors, software, and controls hardware. The second goal is the development of a ground control system that acts as a test-bed for integration of the proposed heterogeneous fleet, and allows for complex mission planning, tracking, and debugging capabilities. The ground control system should also be highly extensible and allow plug-and-play interoperability with third party software systems. In order to achieve these goals, this paper proposes an open, distributed software architecture which utilizes at its core the Data Distribution Service (DDS) standards, established by the Object Management Group (OMG), for inter-process communication and data flow. The design decisions proposed herein leverage the advantages of existing robotics software architectures and the DDS standards to develop software that is scalable, high-performance, fault tolerant, modular, and readily interoperable with external platforms and software.

  20. High Performance Orbital Propagation Using a Generic Software Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möckel, M.; Bennett, J.; Stoll, E.; Zhang, K.

    2016-09-01

    Orbital propagation is a key element in many fields of space research. Over the decades, scientists have developed numerous orbit propagation algorithms, often tailored to specific use cases that vary in available input data, desired output as well as demands of execution speed and accuracy. Conjunction assessments, for example, require highly accurate propagations of a relatively small number of objects while statistical analyses of the (untracked) space debris population need a propagator that can process large numbers of objects in a short time with only medium accuracy. Especially in the latter case, a significant increase of computation speed can be achieved by using graphics processors, devices that are designed to process hundreds or thousands of calculations in parallel. In this paper, an analytical propagator is introduced that uses graphics processing to reduce the run time for propagating a large space debris population from several hours to minutes with only a minor loss of accuracy. A second performance analysis is conducted on a parallelised version of the popular SGP4 algorithm. It is discussed how these modifications can be applied to more accurate numerical propagators. Both programs are implemented using a generic, plugin-based software architecture designed for straightforward integration of propagators into other software tools. It is shown how this architecture can be used to easily integrate, compare and combine different orbital propagators, both CPU and GPU-based.

  1. Integrating software architectures for distributed simulations and simulation analysis communities.

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsby, Michael E.; Fellig, Daniel; Linebarger, John Michael; Moore, Patrick Curtis; Sa, Timothy J.; Hawley, Marilyn F.

    2005-10-01

    The one-year Software Architecture LDRD (No.79819) was a cross-site effort between Sandia California and Sandia New Mexico. The purpose of this research was to further develop and demonstrate integrating software architecture frameworks for distributed simulation and distributed collaboration in the homeland security domain. The integrated frameworks were initially developed through the Weapons of Mass Destruction Decision Analysis Center (WMD-DAC), sited at SNL/CA, and the National Infrastructure Simulation & Analysis Center (NISAC), sited at SNL/NM. The primary deliverable was a demonstration of both a federation of distributed simulations and a federation of distributed collaborative simulation analysis communities in the context of the same integrated scenario, which was the release of smallpox in San Diego, California. To our knowledge this was the first time such a combination of federations under a single scenario has ever been demonstrated. A secondary deliverable was the creation of the standalone GroupMeld{trademark} collaboration client, which uses the GroupMeld{trademark} synchronous collaboration framework. In addition, a small pilot experiment that used both integrating frameworks allowed a greater range of crisis management options to be performed and evaluated than would have been possible without the use of the frameworks.

  2. Open Architecture Standard for NASA's Software-Defined Space Telecommunications Radio Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Hall, Charles S.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John

    2008-01-01

    NASA is developing an architecture standard for software-defined radios used in space- and ground-based platforms to enable commonality among radio developments to enhance capability and services while reducing mission and programmatic risk. Transceivers (or transponders) with functionality primarily defined in software (e.g., firmware) have the ability to change their functional behavior through software alone. This radio architecture standard offers value by employing common waveform software interfaces, method of instantiation, operation, and testing among different compliant hardware and software products. These common interfaces within the architecture abstract application software from the underlying hardware to enable technology insertion independently at either the software or hardware layer. This paper presents the initial Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture for NASA missions to provide the desired software abstraction and flexibility while minimizing the resources necessary to support the architecture.

  3. Operational facilities of remote control software of ranging measurement equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becceneri, Jose Carlos

    The basic purpose of this paper is to document, in this symposium, the work performed for the construction of Ranging Management Software (RAN), which is one of the functions of the Satellite Control System (SICS) software developed by Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) to control the Brazilian satellites of MECB (Brazilian Complete Space Mission). This paper shows the RAN basic architecture as well as a set of functions which facilitates both the operation and the ranging system test.

  4. Proceedings of the Second Software Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Workshop

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    architect for The Open Group Architecture Framework ( TOGAF ), Version 8.1, ATAM Evaluator (SEI), and Software Architecture Profes- 8 | CMU/SEI-2006-TR...quality attribute UML extensions − The DoDAF − The Object Management Group (OMG) − The Open Group Architecture Framework ( TOGAF ) • Describe tactics...Measurement and Analysis SOA service-oriented architecture SoS system of systems TIG Technical Interest Group TOGAF The Open Group Architecture

  5. Integrated Modular Avionics for Spacecraft Software Architecture and Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deredempt, Marie-Helene; Rossignol, Alain; Windsor, James; De-Ferluc, Regis; Sanmarti, Joaquim; Thorn, Jason; Parisis, Paul; Quartier, Fernand; Vatrinet, Francis; Schoofs, Tobias; Crespo, Alfons; Galizzi, Julien; Garcia, Gerald; Arberet, Paul

    2012-08-01

    Space industries designers, for scientific, observation, exploration and telecom missions are now facing requirements such as long lifetime, autonomy and safe operation guarantee in case of failure. New technical and industrial challenges will add complexity. The key point to ensure the success of future industrial projects is to answer on board processing increasing demand by designing more scalable and modular architectures in order to allow new missions whilst improving lifecycle, costs of design, qualification, and security.Focusing on data processing, new technology such as time and space partitioning as part of Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) experimented by aeronautical domain and industrialized in the new generation of aircraft, was analyzed first for security and feasibility in space domain by an ESA project on secure partitioning and working group. In order to complete these studies, Integrated Modular Avionics for Space, as current ESA project, has the objective to confirm the feasibility of Time and Space Partitioning in space domain using existing hardware and based on ARINC653.By combining the efforts of industrial partners, the IMA for Space (IMA SP) project main goals are to focus first on some major topics such as computational model, impact of caches, impact on process and tools, Failure Detection and Isolation Recovery (FDIR), maintenance and I/O management in order to consolidate requirements, then to develop software solutions that meet requirements and lastly to implement these solutions in a demonstration phase with operational software.

  6. Architecture for Payload Planning System (PPS) Software Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Eric; Hagopian, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    The complex and diverse nature of the pay load operations to be performed on the Space Station requires a robust and flexible planning approach, and the proper software tools which tools to support that approach. To date, the planning software for most manned operations in space has been utilized in a centralized planning environment. Centralized planning is characterized by the following: performed by a small team of people, performed at a single location, and performed using single-user planning systems. This approach, while valid for short duration flights, is not conducive to the long duration and highly distributed payload operations environment of the Space Station. The Payload Planning System (PPS) is being designed specifically to support the planning needs of the large number of geographically distributed users of the Space Station. This paper problem provides a general description of the distributed planning architecture that PPS must support and describes the concepts proposed for making PPS available to the Space Station payload user community.

  7. FLEX: A Modular Software Architecture for Flight License Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsan, Taner; Saka, Hamit Emre; Sahin, Ceyhun

    This paper is about the design and implementation of an examination system based on World Wide Web. It is called FLEX-Flight License Exam Software. We designed and implemented flexible and modular software architecture. The implemented system has basic specifications such as appending questions in system, building exams with these appended questions and making students to take these exams. There are three different types of users with different authorizations. These are system administrator, operators and students. System administrator operates and maintains the system, and also audits the system integrity. The system administrator can not be able to change the result of exams and can not take an exam. Operator module includes instructors. Operators have some privileges such as preparing exams, entering questions, changing the existing questions and etc. Students can log on the system and can be accessed to exams by a certain URL. The other characteristic of our system is that operators and system administrator are not able to delete questions due to the security problems. Exam questions can be inserted on their topics and lectures in the database. Thus; operators and system administrator can easily choose questions. When all these are taken into consideration, FLEX software provides opportunities to many students to take exams at the same time in safe, reliable and user friendly conditions. It is also reliable examination system for the authorized aviation administration companies. Web development platform - LAMP; Linux, Apache web server, MySQL, Object-oriented scripting Language - PHP are used for developing the system and page structures are developed by Content Management System - CMS.

  8. More About Architecture For Intelligent Robotic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Chang, Jeffrey

    1992-01-01

    Boolean neural networks proposed to implement part of intermediate level of hierarchical architecture of control system for artificially intelligent control of robot hand. Concept described in "Architecture for Intelligent Control of Robotic Tasks" (NPO-17871). Rule level of architecture implemented in two Boolean neural networks operated and updated in alternation. No explicit programming of network. Internal configuration not unique but, depends on initial state and history of previous adaptations. Accepts new rules sequentially presented by external controller.

  9. CARMENES. IV: instrument control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guàrdia, Josep; Colomé, Josep; Ribas, Ignasi; Hagen, Hans-Jürgen; Morales, Rafael; Abril, Miguel; Galadí-Enríquez, David; Seifert, Walter; Sánchez Carrasco, Miguel A.; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Amado, Pedro J.; Caballero, Jose A.; Mandel, Holger

    2012-09-01

    The overall purpose of the CARMENES instrument is to perform high-precision measurements of radial velocities of late-type stars with long-term stability. CARMENES will be installed in 2014 at the 3.5 m telescope in the German- Spanish Astronomical Center at Calar Alto observatory (CAHA, Spain) and will be equipped with two spectrographs in the near-infrared and visible windows. The technology involved in such instrument represents a challenge at all levels. The instrument coordination and management is handled by the Instrument Control System (ICS), which is responsible of carrying out the operations of the different subsystems and providing a tool to operate the instrument from low to high user interaction level. The main goal of the ICS and the CARMENES control layer architecture is to maximize the instrument efficiency by reducing time overheads and by operating it in an integrated manner. The ICS implements the CARMENES operational design. A description of the ICS architecture and the application programming interfaces for low- and high-level communication is given. Internet Communications Engine is the technology selected to implement most of the interface protocols.

  10. A Flexible and Configurable Architecture for Automatic Control Remote Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalúz, Martin; García-Zubía, Javier; Fikar, Miroslav; Cirka, Luboš

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach in hardware and software architecture design for implementation of remote laboratories for automatic control. In our contribution, we show the solution with flexible connectivity at back-end, providing features of multipurpose usage with different types of experimental devices, and fully configurable…

  11. A preliminary architecture for building communication software from traffic captures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Jaime C.; Estrada, Pedro

    2017-05-01

    Security analysts are tasked with identifying and mitigating network service vulnerabilities. A common problem associated with in-depth testing of network protocols is the availability of software that communicates across disparate protocols. Many times, the software required to communicate with these services is not publicly available. Developing this software is a time-consuming undertaking that requires expertise and understanding of the protocol specification. The work described in this paper aims at developing a software package that is capable of automatically creating communication clients by using packet capture (pcap) and TShark dissectors. Currently, our focus is on simple protocols with fixed fields. The methodologies developed as part of this work will extend to other complex protocols such as the Gateway Load Balancing Protocol (GLBP), Port Aggregation Protocol (PAgP), and Open Shortest Path First (OSPF). Thus far, we have architected a modular pipeline for an automatic traffic-based software generator. We start the transformation of captured network traffic by employing TShark to convert packets into a Packet Details Markup Language (PDML) file. The PDML file contains a parsed, textual, representation of the packet data. Then, we extract field data, types, along with inter and intra-packet dependencies. This information is then utilized to construct an XML file that encompasses the protocol state machine and field vocabulary. Finally, this XML is converted into executable code. Using our methodology, and as a starting point, we have succeeded in automatically generating software that communicates with other hosts using an automatically generated Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) client program.

  12. LOFAR Self-Calibration Using a Blackboard Software Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, G. M.

    2008-08-01

    One of the major challenges for the self-calibration of the new generation of radio telescopes is to handle the sheer amount of observational data. For LOFAR, an average observation consists of several tens of terabytes of data. Fortunately, many operations can be done in parallel on only part of the data. So, one way to take up this challenge is to employ a large cluster of computers and to distribute both data and computing power. This paper focuses on the architectural design of the LOFAR self-calibration system, which is loosely based on the Blackboard architectural pattern. Key design consideration was to provide maximum scalability by complete separation of the global controller---issuing sequences of commands---on the one side; and the local controllers---controlling the so-called `kernels' that execute the commands---on the other side. In between, resides a database system that acts as a shared memory for the global and local controllers by storing the commands and the results.

  13. A Federated Design for a Neurobiological Simulation Engine: The CBI Federated Software Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Hugo; Coop, Allan D.; Bower, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Simulator interoperability and extensibility has become a growing requirement in computational biology. To address this, we have developed a federated software architecture. It is federated by its union of independent disparate systems under a single cohesive view, provides interoperability through its capability to communicate, execute programs, or transfer data among different independent applications, and supports extensibility by enabling simulator expansion or enhancement without the need for major changes to system infrastructure. Historically, simulator interoperability has relied on development of declarative markup languages such as the neuron modeling language NeuroML, while simulator extension typically occurred through modification of existing functionality. The software architecture we describe here allows for both these approaches. However, it is designed to support alternative paradigms of interoperability and extensibility through the provision of logical relationships and defined application programming interfaces. They allow any appropriately configured component or software application to be incorporated into a simulator. The architecture defines independent functional modules that run stand-alone. They are arranged in logical layers that naturally correspond to the occurrence of high-level data (biological concepts) versus low-level data (numerical values) and distinguish data from control functions. The modular nature of the architecture and its independence from a given technology facilitates communication about similar concepts and functions for both users and developers. It provides several advantages for multiple independent contributions to software development. Importantly, these include: (1) Reduction in complexity of individual simulator components when compared to the complexity of a complete simulator, (2) Documentation of individual components in terms of their inputs and outputs, (3) Easy removal or replacement of unnecessary or

  14. A federated design for a neurobiological simulation engine: the CBI federated software architecture.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Hugo; Coop, Allan D; Bower, James M

    2012-01-01

    Simulator interoperability and extensibility has become a growing requirement in computational biology. To address this, we have developed a federated software architecture. It is federated by its union of independent disparate systems under a single cohesive view, provides interoperability through its capability to communicate, execute programs, or transfer data among different independent applications, and supports extensibility by enabling simulator expansion or enhancement without the need for major changes to system infrastructure. Historically, simulator interoperability has relied on development of declarative markup languages such as the neuron modeling language NeuroML, while simulator extension typically occurred through modification of existing functionality. The software architecture we describe here allows for both these approaches. However, it is designed to support alternative paradigms of interoperability and extensibility through the provision of logical relationships and defined application programming interfaces. They allow any appropriately configured component or software application to be incorporated into a simulator. The architecture defines independent functional modules that run stand-alone. They are arranged in logical layers that naturally correspond to the occurrence of high-level data (biological concepts) versus low-level data (numerical values) and distinguish data from control functions. The modular nature of the architecture and its independence from a given technology facilitates communication about similar concepts and functions for both users and developers. It provides several advantages for multiple independent contributions to software development. Importantly, these include: (1) Reduction in complexity of individual simulator components when compared to the complexity of a complete simulator, (2) Documentation of individual components in terms of their inputs and outputs, (3) Easy removal or replacement of unnecessary or

  15. Achieving Better Buying Power through Acquisition of Open Architecture Software Systems for Web and Mobile Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-22

    SPONSORED REPORT SERIES Achieving Better Buying Power through Acquisition of Open Architecture Software Systems for Web and Mobile Devices 22...ACQUISITION RESEARCH PROGRAM SPONSORED REPORT SERIES Achieving Better Buying Power through Acquisition of Open Architecture Software Systems for Web ...Policy Naval Postgraduate School Executive Summary Many people within large enterprises rely on up to four Web -based or mobile devices for their

  16. Software architecture standard for simulation virtual machine, version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturtevant, Robert; Wessale, William

    1994-01-01

    The Simulation Virtual Machine (SBM) is an Ada architecture which eases the effort involved in the real-time software maintenance and sustaining engineering. The Software Architecture Standard defines the infrastructure which all the simulation models are built from. SVM was developed for and used in the Space Station Verification and Training Facility.

  17. On the Role of Connectors in Modeling and Implementing Software Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-15

    On the Role of Connectors in Modeling and Implementing Software Architectures Peyman Oreizy, David S. Rosenblum, and Richard N. Taylor Department of...Std Z39-18 On the Role of Connectors in Modeling and Implementing Software Architectures Peyman Oreizy David S. Rosenblum Richard N. Taylor

  18. Software documentation for compression-machine cavity control

    SciTech Connect

    Floersch, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    A new system design using closed loop control on the hydraulic system of compression transfer presses used to make filled elastomer parts will result in improved accuracy and repeatability of speed and pressure control during critical forming stages before part cure. The new design uses a microprocessor to supply set points and timing functions to the control system. Presented are the hardware and software architecture and objectives for the microprocessor portion of the control system.

  19. An SOA developer framework for astronomical instrument control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwein, Juergen; Briegel, Florian; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Kittmann, Frank; Pavlov, Alexey

    2008-07-01

    We present a new and flexible developer framework for high performance service oriented architecture (SOA) based systems, using the middleware called ICE by ZeroC Inc. for interprocess communication. The framework was developed at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy within the scope of the LBT interferometer LINC-NIRVANA control software, but may also be used, in respect of its flexibility, for other astronomical instruments. The systems architecture was designed to decrease the development effort of large SOA (Service Oriented Architecture) based systems like astronomical instrument control software. The advantages of this new framework are a combination of the online instrument data management, the validation and the ability to integrate user defined data manipulation.

  20. Software architecture for intelligent image processing using Prolog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Andrew C.; Batchelor, Bruce G.

    1994-10-01

    We describe a prototype system for interactive image processing using Prolog, implemented by the first author on an Apple Macintosh computer. This system is inspired by Prolog+, but differs from it in two particularly important respects. The first is that whereas Prolog+ assumes the availability of dedicated image processing hardware, with which the Prolog system communicates, our present system implements image processing functions in software using the C programming language. The second difference is that although our present system supports Prolog+ commands, these are implemented in terms of lower-level Prolog predicates which provide a more flexible approach to image manipulation. We discuss the impact of the Apple Macintosh operating system upon the implementation of the image-processing functions, and the interface between these functions and the Prolog system. We also explain how the Prolog+ commands have been implemented. The system described in this paper is a fairly early prototype, and we outline how we intend to develop the system, a task which is expedited by the extensible architecture we have implemented.

  1. Upgrades to MINERVA control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Maurice; Eastman, Jason D.

    2017-01-01

    The MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) is an array of four robotic telescopes located on Mt. Hopkins in Arizona that will find and characterize rocky planets around our nearest stars. We discuss the latest upgrades to the MINERVA robotic control software. Previously, our robotic control software was only capable of taking radial velocities or photometry for the entire night, but not both. We have recently increased the speed and ease of transitioning between photometry and radial velocity (RV) observations. We can now arbitrarily assign a subset of the telescopes to either photometric or spectroscopic observations. This capability enables us to monitor stellar activity while measuring the star’s RV, gather photometry on one star while continuing our RV survey of other targets and provide education and public outreach opportunities where others can observe with one or more telescopes while we continue using the remaining telescopes for research. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. 1144152.

  2. A Proactive Means for Incorporating a Software Architecture Evaluation in a DoD System Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    A Proactive Means for Incorporating a Software Architecture Evaluation in a DoD System Acquisition John K. Bergey July 2009 TECHNICAL...www.sei.cmu.edu/publications/documents/06.reports/06tr012.html. [ Bergey 2001] Bergey , J. & Fisher, M. Use of the ATAM in the Acquisition of Software...publications/documents/01.reports/01tn009.html. [ Bergey 2005] Bergey , John K. & Clements, Paul C. Software Architecture in DoD Acquisition: An Approach and

  3. Mapping Network Centric Operational Architectures to C2 and Software Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    reached in this paper are thus those of the SMES and do not represent exhaustive experimentation of these combined architectures. Again, these are...Each worker need make only fairly simple decisions.” For example, in far northern Australia, “magnetic termites ” build large termite mounds which are...oriented north-south and contain a complex ventilation system which controls temperature, humidity, and oxygen levels. But termite brains are too

  4. Agile Development & Software Architecture - Crossing the Great Divide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-22

    University What is Architecture? Structure A Thematic Analysis System Qualities Decisions / Governance Multi-Dimensional SEI IEEE TOGAF Rozanski & Woods 12...TWITTER Hashtag #seiwebinar Crossing the Great Divide Brown , 4/22/2010 © 2010 Carnegie Mellon University Architectural Themes SEI IEEE TOGAF Rozanski...2010 © 2010 Carnegie Mellon University Structure System Qualities Decisions / Governance Multi-Dimensional Architectural Themes SEI IEEE TOGAF Rozanski

  5. The M68HC11 gripper controller software. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Jodi Wei-Duk

    1991-01-01

    This thesis discusses the development of firmware for the 68HC11 gripper controller. A general description of the software and hardware interfaces is given. The C library interface for the gripper is then described and followed by a detailed discussion of the software architecture of the firmware. A procedure to assemble and download 68HC11 programs is presented in the form of a tutorial. The tools used to implement this environment are then described. Finally, the implementation of the configuration management scheme used to manage all CIRSSE software is presented.

  6. Software Architecture of the NASA Shuttle Ground Operations Simulator - SGOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Robert P.; Lostroscio, Charles T.

    2005-01-01

    The SGOS executive and its subsystems have been an integral component of the Shuttle Launch Safety Program for almost thirty years. It is usable (via the LAN) by over 2000 NASA employees at the Kennedy Space Center and 11,000 contractors. SGOS supports over 800 models comprised of several hundred thousand lines of code and over 1,000 MCP procedures. Yet neither language has a for loop!! The simulation software described in this paper is used to train ground controllers and to certify launch countdown readiness.

  7. Software requirements: Guidance and control software development specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, B. Edward; Rich, Don C.; Lowman, Douglas S.; Buckland, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    The software requirements for an implementation of Guidance and Control Software (GCS) are specified. The purpose of the GCS is to provide guidance and engine control to a planetary landing vehicle during its terminal descent onto a planetary surface and to communicate sensory information about that vehicle and its descent to some receiving device. The specification was developed using the structured analysis for real time system specification methodology by Hatley and Pirbhai and was based on a simulation program used to study the probability of success of the 1976 Viking Lander missions to Mars. Three versions of GCS are being generated for use in software error studies.

  8. Using UML Modeling to Facilitate Three-Tier Architecture Projects in Software Engineering Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitra, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the use of a model-centric approach to facilitate software development projects conforming to the three-tier architecture in undergraduate software engineering courses. Many instructors intend that such projects create software applications for use by real-world customers. While it is important that the first version of these…

  9. Using UML Modeling to Facilitate Three-Tier Architecture Projects in Software Engineering Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitra, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the use of a model-centric approach to facilitate software development projects conforming to the three-tier architecture in undergraduate software engineering courses. Many instructors intend that such projects create software applications for use by real-world customers. While it is important that the first version of these…

  10. A resilient and secure software platform and architecture for distributed spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otte, William R.; Dubey, Abhishek; Karsai, Gabor

    2014-06-01

    A distributed spacecraft is a cluster of independent satellite modules flying in formation that communicate via ad-hoc wireless networks. This system in space is a cloud platform that facilitates sharing sensors and other computing and communication resources across multiple applications, potentially developed and maintained by different organizations. Effectively, such architecture can realize the functions of monolithic satellites at a reduced cost and with improved adaptivity and robustness. Openness of these architectures pose special challenges because the distributed software platform has to support applications from different security domains and organizations, and where information flows have to be carefully managed and compartmentalized. If the platform is used as a robust shared resource its management, configuration, and resilience becomes a challenge in itself. We have designed and prototyped a distributed software platform for such architectures. The core element of the platform is a new operating system whose services were designed to restrict access to the network and the file system, and to enforce resource management constraints for all non-privileged processes Mixed-criticality applications operating at different security labels are deployed and controlled by a privileged management process that is also pre-configuring all information flows. This paper describes the design and objective of this layer.

  11. Software architecture for a distributed real-time system in Ada, with application to telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Douglas R.; Messiora, Steve; Leake, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    The architecture structure and software design methodology presented is described in the context of telerobotic application in Ada, specifically the Engineering Test Bed (ETB), which was developed to support the Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) Program at GSFC. However, the nature of the architecture is such that it has applications to any multiprocessor distributed real-time system. The ETB architecture, which is a derivation of the NASA/NBS Standard Reference Model (NASREM), defines a hierarchy for representing a telerobot system. Within this hierarchy, a module is a logical entity consisting of the software associated with a set of related hardware components in the robot system. A module is comprised of submodules, which are cyclically executing processes that each perform a specific set of functions. The submodules in a module can run on separate processors. The submodules in the system communicate via command/status (C/S) interface channels, which are used to send commands down and relay status back up the system hierarchy. Submodules also communicate via setpoint data links, which are used to transfer control data from one submodule to another. A submodule invokes submodule algorithms (SMA's) to perform algorithmic operations. Data that describe or models a physical component of the system are stored as objects in the World Model (WM). The WM is a system-wide distributed database that is accessible to submodules in all modules of the system for creating, reading, and writing objects.

  12. New Control System Software for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafferty, T.; Cornell, M. E.; Taylor, C., III; Moreira, W.

    2011-07-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope at the McDonald Observatory is undergoing a major upgrade to support the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) and to facilitate large field systematic emission-line surveys of the universe. An integral part of this upgrade will be the development of a new software control system. Designed using modern object oriented programming techniques and tools, the new software system uses a component architecture that closely models the telescope hardware and instruments, and provides a high degree of configuration, automation and scalability. Here we cover the overall architecture of the new system, plus details some of the key design patterns and technologies used. This includes the utilization of an embedded Python scripting engine, the use of the factory method pattern and interfacing for easy run-time configuration, a flexible communication scheme, the design and use of a centralized logging system, and the distributed GUI architecture.

  13. Formal Foundations for the Specification of Software Architecture.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    Architectures For- mally: A Case-Study Using KWIC." Kestrel Institute, Palo Alto, CA 94304, April 1994. 58. Kang, Kyo C. Feature-Oriented Domain Analysis ( FODA ...6.3.5 Constraint-Based Architectures ................. 6-60 6.4 Summary ......... ............................. 6-63 VII. Analysis of Process-Based...between these architec- ture theories were investigated. A feasibility analysis on an image processing application demonstrated that architecture theories

  14. New Software Architecture Options for the TCL Data Acquisition System

    SciTech Connect

    Valenton, Emmanuel

    2014-09-01

    The Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) conducts research on combustion in turbulent flow environments. To conduct this research, the TCL utilizes several pulse lasers, a traversable wind tunnel, flow controllers, scientific grade CCD cameras, and numerous other components. Responsible for managing these different data-acquiring instruments and data processing components is the Data Acquisition (DAQ) software. However, the current system is constrained to running through VXI hardware—an instrument-computer interface—that is several years old, requiring the use of an outdated version of the visual programming language, LabVIEW. A new Acquisition System is being programmed which will borrow heavily from either a programming model known as the Current Value Table (CVT) System or another model known as the Server-Client System. The CVT System model is in essence, a giant spread sheet from which data or commands may be retrieved or written to, and the Server-Client System is based on network connections between a server and a client, very much like the Server-Client model of the Internet. Currently, the bare elements of a CVT DAQ Software have been implemented, consisting of client programs in addition to a server program that the CVT will run on. This system is being rigorously tested to evaluate the merits of pursuing the CVT System model and to uncover any potential flaws which may result in further implementation. If the CVT System is chosen, which is likely, then future work will consist of build up the system until enough client programs have been created to run the individual components of the lab. The advantages of such a System will be flexibility, portability, and polymorphism. Additionally, the new DAQ software will allow the Lab to replace the VXI with a newer instrument interface—the PXI—and take advantage of the capabilities of current and future versions of LabVIEW.

  15. Mars Science Laboratory thermal control architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Pauken, Michael; Paris, Anthony; Novak, Keith; Prina, Mauro; Ramirez, Brenda; Bame, David

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission to land a large rover on Mars is being planned for launch in 2009. This paper will describe the basic architecture of the thermal control system, the challenges and the methods used to overcome them by the use of an innovative architecture to maximize the use of heritage from past projects while meeting the requirements for the design.

  16. A synchronized computational architecture for generalized bilateral control of robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K.; Szakaly, Zoltan

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a computational architecture for an interconnected high speed distributed computing system for generalized bilateral control of robot arms. The key method of the architecture is the use of fully synchronized, interrupt driven software. Since an objective of the development is to utilize the processing resources efficiently, the synchronization is done in the hardware level to reduce system software overhead. The architecture also achieves a balaced load on the communication channel. The paper also describes some architectural relations to trading or sharing manual and automatic control.

  17. A synchronized computational architecture for generalized bilateral control of robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K.; Szakaly, Zoltan

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a computational architecture for an interconnected high speed distributed computing system for generalized bilateral control of robot arms. The key method of the architecture is the use of fully synchronized, interrupt driven software. Since an objective of the development is to utilize the processing resources efficiently, the synchronization is done in the hardware level to reduce system software overhead. The architecture also achieves a balaced load on the communication channel. The paper also describes some architectural relations to trading or sharing manual and automatic control.

  18. A Synchronized Computational Architecture For Generalized Bilateral Control Of Robot Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejczy, Antal K.; Szakaly, Zoltan

    1987-10-01

    This paper describes a computational architecture for an interconnected high speed distributed computing system for generalized bilateral control of robot arms. The key method of the architecture is the use of fully synchronized, interrupt driven software. Since an objective of the development is to utilize the processing resources efficiently, the synchronization is done in the hardware level to reduce system software overhead. The architecture also achieves a balanced load on the communication channel. The paper also describes some architectural relations to trading or sharing manual and automatic control.

  19. A control architecture for a Mars walking vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiessbach, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    A design framework for a Mars Rover, intended for missions where a high degree of autonomy is dictated, is presented. The framework provides a logical computing architecture for rover mobility and local navigation subsystem design by defining a set of functional modules and interfaces to facilitate software and hardware specification. The similarities and dissimilarities between the present approach and related architectures for autonomous navigation and robotic control are discussed. An approach is presented for specifying actions to be taken by the mobility and local navigation subsystems of the rover.

  20. Control, acquisition and quick-look software for infrared spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Emanuel; Oliva, Ernesto; Origlia, Livia

    2010-07-01

    Modern IR spectrometers must be equipped with software well suited to a wide range of purposes starting from the low level controls and going through acquisition, handling and fast quick-look of data. Such a complex software structure can be conveniently managed by means of dedicated GUIs which allow one to access the system at different levels: from the lowest (cryogenic controls) to the highest (data acquisition and quick-look). We will briefly describe the structure of this software, whose original characteristics is in the use of SQLite. We will also show a couple of results from our quick-look procedure based on customized DS9 and IRAF. The software architecture, that we present here, is general and can be adapted to any astronomical instruments. We have specifically implemented and tested it on GIANO spectrometer

  1. Intersection-Controller Software Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Aaron; Foster, Conrad

    2005-01-01

    An important part of the emergency-vehicle traffic-light-preemption system summarized in the preceding article is a software module executed by a microcontroller in each intersection controller. This module monitors the broadcasts from all nearby participating emergency vehicles and intersections. It gathers the broadcast data pertaining to the positions and velocities of the vehicles and the timing of traffic and pedestrian lights and processes the data into predictions of the future positions of the vehicles. Analyzing the predictions by a combination of proximity tests, map-matching techniques, and statistical calculations designed to minimize the adverse effects of uncertainties in vehicle positions and headings, the module decides whether to preempt and issues the appropriate commands to the traffic lights, pedestrian lights, and electronic warning signs at the intersection. The module also broadcasts its state to all nearby vehicles and intersections. The module is designed to mitigate the effects of missing data and of unpredictable delays in the system. It has been intensively tested and refined so that it fails to warn in very few cases and issues very few false warnings.

  2. The UAS control segment architecture: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Douglas A.; Batavia, Parag; Coats, Mark; Allport, Chris; Jennings, Ann; Ernst, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology and Logistics) directed the Services in 2009 to jointly develop and demonstrate a common architecture for command and control of Department of Defense (DoD) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Groups 2 through 5. The UAS Control Segment (UCS) Architecture is an architecture framework for specifying and designing the softwareintensive capabilities of current and emerging UCS systems in the DoD inventory. The UCS Architecture is based on Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) principles that will be adopted by each of the Services as a common basis for acquiring, integrating, and extending the capabilities of the UAS Control Segment. The UAS Task Force established the UCS Working Group to develop and support the UCS Architecture. The Working Group currently has over three hundred members, and is open to qualified representatives from DoD-approved defense contractors, academia, and the Government. The UCS Architecture is currently at Release 2.2, with Release 3.0 planned for July 2013. This paper discusses the current and planned elements of the UCS Architecture, and related activities of the UCS Community of Interest.

  3. Achieving Better Buying Power through Acquisition of Open Architecture Software Systems: Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-06

    SPONSORED REPORT SERIES Achieving Better Buying Power through Acquisition of Open Architecture Software Systems Volume I 6 January 2016 Dr. Walt...software component costs and cost reduction opportunities within the acquisition life cycle of open architecture (OA) systems for Web-based and mobile...he served as general co-chair of the 8th IFIP International Conference on Open Source Systems. Dr. Walt Scacchi, Senior Research Scientist

  4. A Generic Software Architecture for Deception-Based Intrusion Detection and Response Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-03-01

    known as Aikido [37]. Michael et al. [2] proposed a high-level architecture for software decoys, shown in Figure II.3. The architecture is based on...14, no.3, pp. 54-62, 1999. [37] Westbrook, A., Ratti, O., Aikido and the Dynamic Sphere, Charles E. Tuttle Co., September 1994. [38] Ellison, R.J

  5. A structured architecture for advanced plasma control experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Penaflor, B.G.; Ferron, J.R.; Walker, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    Recent new and improved plasma control regimes have evolved from enhancements to the systems responsible for managing the plasma configuration on the DIII-D tokamak. The collection of hardware and software components designed for this purpose is known at DIII-D as the Plasma Control System or PCS. Several new user requirements have contributed to the rapid growth of the PCS. Experiments involving digital control of the plasma vertical position have resulted in the addition of new high performance processors to operate in real-time. Recent studies in plasma disruptions involving the use of neural network based software have resulted in an increase in the number of input diagnostic signals sampled. Better methods for estimating the plasma shape and position have brought about numerous software changes and the addition of several new code modules. Furthermore, requests for performing multivariable control and feedback on the current profile are continuing to add to the demands being placed on the PCS. To support all of these demands has required a structured yet flexible hardware and software architecture for maintaining existing capabilities and easily adding new ones. This architecture along with a general overview of the DIII-D Plasma Control System is described. In addition, the latest improvements to the PCS are presented.

  6. Agile Development and Software Architecture: Understanding Scale and Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-26

    In a Scrum project environment, the architectural runway may be established during Sprint 0. Sprint 0 might have a longer duration than the rest of...architecture In its simplest instantiation, a Scrum development environment consists of: • a single co-located, cross-functional team • with skills...cause analysis: Typical problem 1 Symptom • Scrum teams spend almost all of their time fixing defects, and new feature development is continuously

  7. Software architecture of the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, Allen; Klinglesmith, Dan; Seamons, John; Torres, Nicolas; Buscher, David; Young, John

    2010-07-01

    Merging software from 36 independent work packages into a coherent, unified software system with a lifespan of twenty years is the challenge faced by the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer (MROI). We solve this problem by using standardized interface software automatically generated from simple highlevel descriptions of these systems, relying only on Linux, GNU, and POSIX without complex software such as CORBA. This approach, based on gigabit Ethernet with a TCP/IP protocol, provides the flexibility to integrate and manage diverse, independent systems using a centralized supervisory system that provides a database manager, data collectors, fault handling, and an operator interface.

  8. Achieving Better Buying Power through Acquisition of Open Architecture Software Systems. Volume 2 Understanding Open Architecture Software Systems: Licensing and Security Research and Recommendations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    analyzing software component costs and cost reduction opportunities within the acquisition life cycle of open architecture (OA) systems for Web -based and...development and evolution of OA systems at design-time, build-time, and release and run-time. Developing formal foundations for establishing

  9. Using an architectural approach to integrate heterogeneous, distributed software components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.; Purtilo, James M.

    1995-01-01

    Many computer programs cannot be easily integrated because their components are distributed and heterogeneous, i.e., they are implemented in diverse programming languages, use different data representation formats, or their runtime environments are incompatible. In many cases, programs are integrated by modifying their components or interposing mechanisms that handle communication and conversion tasks. For example, remote procedure call (RPC) helps integrate heterogeneous, distributed programs. When configuring such programs, however, mechanisms like RPC must be used explicitly by software developers in order to integrate collections of diverse components. Each collection may require a unique integration solution. This paper describes improvements to the concepts of software packaging and some of our experiences in constructing complex software systems from a wide variety of components in different execution environments. Software packaging is a process that automatically determines how to integrate a diverse collection of computer programs based on the types of components involved and the capabilities of available translators and adapters in an environment. Software packaging provides a context that relates such mechanisms to software integration processes and reduces the cost of configuring applications whose components are distributed or implemented in different programming languages. Our software packaging tool subsumes traditional integration tools like UNIX make by providing a rule-based approach to software integration that is independent of execution environments.

  10. Evaluation of software maintain ability with open EHR - a comparison of architectures.

    PubMed

    Atalag, Koray; Yang, Hong Yul; Tempero, Ewan; Warren, James R

    2014-11-01

    To assess whether it is easier to maintain a clinical information system developed using open EHR model driven development versus mainstream methods. A new open source application (GastrOS) has been developed following open EHR's multi-level modelling approach using .Net/C# based on the same requirements of an existing clinically used application developed using Microsoft Visual Basic and Access database. Almost all the domain knowledge was embedded into the software code and data model in the latter. The same domain knowledge has been expressed as a set of open EHR Archetypes in GastrOS. We then introduced eight real-world change requests that had accumulated during live clinical usage, and implemented these in both systems while measuring time for various development tasks and change in software size for each change request. Overall it took half the time to implement changes in GastrOS. However it was the more difficult application to modify for one change request, suggesting the nature of change is also important. It was not possible to implement changes by modelling only. Comparison of relative measures of time and software size change within each application highlights how architectural differences affected maintain ability across change requests. The use of open EHR model driven development can result in better software maintain ability. The degree to which open EHR affects software maintain ability depends on the extent and nature of domain knowledge involved in changes. Although we used relative measures for time and software size, confounding factors could not be totally excluded as a controlled study design was not feasible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Java based control software of the LUCIFER instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jütte, Marcus; Polsterer, Kai; Knierim, Volker; Luks, Thomas; Schimmelmann, Jan; Muhlack, Tobias; Mandel, Holger; Lehmitz, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The LUCIFER instrument is a near infrared spectrograph/imager with MOS for the Large Binocular Telescope. Here we present the final software design, the interrelation of the software packages and the used hardware architecture. The software package is completely running under Java using intensively its Remote Method Invocation (RMI) mechanisms in a distributed system environment. The use of Java helped us to cope with a small amount of available manpower for the SW development, providing many native built-in Java methods and classes, which speed up the development process a lot. The control software will be finally installed on a Solaris OS, hosted on a Sun Fire V880 server, which results from a specific hardware constraint. For testing purposes a standard Linux environment is used. This shows another big Java advantage, the platform independency. The "First Light" of LUCIFER 1 is estimated for summer/fall 2007, following LUCIFER 2 one year later.

  12. Open Source Software to Control Bioflo Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Burdge, David A.; Libourel, Igor G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed auxiliary hardware is often sparse or absent. This work presents flexible open source freeware for the control of bioreactors of the Bioflo product family. The functionality of the software includes setpoint control, data logging, and protocol execution. Auxiliary hardware can be easily integrated and controlled through an integrated plugin interface without altering existing software. Simple experimental protocols can be entered as a CSV scripting file, and a Python-based protocol execution model is included for more demanding conditional experimental control. The software was designed to be a more flexible and free open source alternative to the commercially available solution. The source code and various auxiliary hardware plugins are publicly available for download from https://github.com/LibourelLab/BiofloSoftware. In addition to the source code, the software was compiled and packaged as a self-installing file for 32 and 64 bit windows operating systems. The compiled software will be able to control a Bioflo system, and will not require the installation of LabVIEW. PMID:24667828

  13. Open source software to control Bioflo bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Burdge, David A; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed auxiliary hardware is often sparse or absent. This work presents flexible open source freeware for the control of bioreactors of the Bioflo product family. The functionality of the software includes setpoint control, data logging, and protocol execution. Auxiliary hardware can be easily integrated and controlled through an integrated plugin interface without altering existing software. Simple experimental protocols can be entered as a CSV scripting file, and a Python-based protocol execution model is included for more demanding conditional experimental control. The software was designed to be a more flexible and free open source alternative to the commercially available solution. The source code and various auxiliary hardware plugins are publicly available for download from https://github.com/LibourelLab/BiofloSoftware. In addition to the source code, the software was compiled and packaged as a self-installing file for 32 and 64 bit windows operating systems. The compiled software will be able to control a Bioflo system, and will not require the installation of LabVIEW.

  14. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array: camera DAQ software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, Vito; Trifoglio, Massimo; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Fioretti, Valentina; Tacchini, Alessandro; Zoli, Andrea; Malaguti, Giuseppe; Capalbi, Milvia; Catalano, Osvaldo

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) is a Flagship Project financed by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, and led by INAF, the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics. Within this framework, INAF is currently developing an end-to-end prototype of a Small Size dual-mirror Telescope. In a second phase the ASTRI project foresees the installation of the first elements of the array at CTA southern site, a mini-array of 7 telescopes. The ASTRI Camera DAQ Software is aimed at the Camera data acquisition, storage and display during Camera development as well as during commissioning and operations on the ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype that will operate at the INAF observing station located at Serra La Nave on the Mount Etna (Sicily). The Camera DAQ configuration and operations will be sequenced either through local operator commands or through remote commands received from the Instrument Controller System that commands and controls the Camera. The Camera DAQ software will acquire data packets through a direct one-way socket connection with the Camera Back End Electronics. In near real time, the data will be stored in both raw and FITS format. The DAQ Quick Look component will allow the operator to display in near real time the Camera data packets. We are developing the DAQ software adopting the iterative and incremental model in order to maximize the software reuse and to implement a system which is easily adaptable to changes. This contribution presents the Camera DAQ Software architecture with particular emphasis on its potential reuse for the ASTRI/CTA mini-array.

  15. Software Architecture to Support the Evolution of the ISRU RESOLVE Engineering Breadboard Unit 2 (EBU2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, Thomas; Nurge, Mark; Perusich, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Regolith & Environmental Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatiles Extraction (RESOLVE) software provides operation of the physical plant from a remote location with a high-level interface that can access and control the data from external software applications of other subsystems. This software allows autonomous control over the entire system with manual computer control of individual system/process components. It gives non-programmer operators the capability to easily modify the high-level autonomous sequencing while the software is in operation, as well as the ability to modify the low-level, file-based sequences prior to the system operation. Local automated control in a distributed system is also enabled where component control is maintained during the loss of network connectivity with the remote workstation. This innovation also minimizes network traffic. The software architecture commands and controls the latest generation of RESOLVE processes used to obtain, process, and quantify lunar regolith. The system is grouped into six sub-processes: Drill, Crush, Reactor, Lunar Water Resource Demonstration (LWRD), Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) (see example), and Regolith Oxygen Extraction (ROE). Some processes are independent, some are dependent on other processes, and some are independent but run concurrently with other processes. The first goal is to analyze the volatiles emanating from lunar regolith, such as water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, ammonia, hydrogen, and others. This is done by heating the soil and analyzing and capturing the volatilized product. The second goal is to produce water by reducing the soil at high temperatures with hydrogen. This is done by raising the reactor temperature in the range of 800 to 900 C, causing the reaction to progress by adding hydrogen, and then capturing the water product in a desiccant bed. The software needs to run the entire unit and all sub-processes; however

  16. Modular planning/control architecture for the semiautonomous control of telerobots in a hazardous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarn, Tzyh-Jong; Brady, Kevin; Xi, Ning; Love, Lonnie; Lloyd, Peter; Burks, Barry; Davis, Hurley

    1997-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has demonstrated, evaluated, and deployed a telerobotic approach for the remote retrieval of hazardous and radioactive wastes from underground storage tanks. The telerobotic system, built by Spar Aerospace Ltd., is capable of dislodging and removing sludge and gravel- like wastes without endangering the human operators through contact with the environment. Working in partnership with Washington University, ORNL has implemented an Event based planner/function based sharing control (FBSC) as an integral part of their overall telerobotic architecture. These aspects of the system enable the seamless union of the human operator and an autonomous controller in such a way to emphasize safety without any loss of performance. The cooperation between ORNL, Spar, and Washington University requires an open and modular control software architecture to enable the parallel development of various components of the system. ControlShell has been used as the underlying software architecture to help meet these criteria of generality and modularity.

  17. Modeling of a 3DTV service in the software-defined networking architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczewski, Grzegorz

    2014-11-01

    In this article a newly developed concept towards modeling of a multimedia service offering stereoscopic motion imagery is presented. Proposed model is based on the approach of utilization of Software-defined Networking or Software Defined Networks architecture (SDN). The definition of 3D television service spanning SDN concept is identified, exposing basic characteristic of a 3DTV service in a modern networking organization layout. Furthermore, exemplary functionalities of the proposed 3DTV model are depicted. It is indicated that modeling of a 3DTV service in the Software-defined Networking architecture leads to multiplicity of improvements, especially towards flexibility of a service supporting heterogeneity of end user devices.

  18. Flexible distributed architecture for semiconductor process control and experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, Aaron E.; Boning, Duane S.; McIlrath, Michael B.

    1997-01-01

    Semiconductor fabrication requires an increasingly expensive and integrated set of tightly controlled processes, driving the need for a fabrication facility with fully computerized, networked processing equipment. We describe an integrated, open system architecture enabling distributed experimentation and process control for plasma etching. The system was developed at MIT's Microsystems Technology Laboratories and employs in-situ CCD interferometry based analysis in the sensor-feedback control of an Applied Materials Precision 5000 Plasma Etcher (AME5000). Our system supports accelerated, advanced research involving feedback control algorithms, and includes a distributed interface that utilizes the internet to make these fabrication capabilities available to remote users. The system architecture is both distributed and modular: specific implementation of any one task does not restrict the implementation of another. The low level architectural components include a host controller that communicates with the AME5000 equipment via SECS-II, and a host controller for the acquisition and analysis of the CCD sensor images. A cell controller (CC) manages communications between these equipment and sensor controllers. The CC is also responsible for process control decisions; algorithmic controllers may be integrated locally or via remote communications. Finally, a system server images connections from internet/intranet (web) based clients and uses a direct link with the CC to access the system. Each component communicates via a predefined set of TCP/IP socket based messages. This flexible architecture makes integration easier and more robust, and enables separate software components to run on the same or different computers independent of hardware or software platform.

  19. REAGERE: a reaction-based architecture for integration and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Nina M.; Kumara, Soundar R. T.

    1997-01-01

    This research is concerned with the design, development and implementation of a unique reaction-based multi-agent architecture (REAGERE) to integrate and control a manufacturing domain, by combining concepts from distributed problem solving and multi-agent systems. This architecture represents an emerging concept of reifying the parts, equipment, and software packages of the domain as individual agent entities. This research also improves on earlier top- down automated manufacturing systems, that suffered from lack of flexibility, upgradability, overhead difficulties, and performance problems when presented with the uncertainty and dynamics of modern competitive environments. The versatility of the domain is enhanced with the independent development of the agents and the object-oriented events that permit the agents to communicate through the underlying blackboard architecture BB1. This bottom-up concept permits the architecture's integration to rely on the agents' interactions and their perceptions of the current environmental problem(s). Hence the control and coordination of the architecture are adaptable to the agents' reactions to dynamic situations. REAGERE was applied to a simulated predefined automated manufacturing domain for the purpose of controlling and coordinating the internal processes of this domain.

  20. Architecture For Intelligent Control Of Robotic Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Chang, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    Proposed architecture for control of such robotic devices as artificial hands calls for data-abstracting hierarchies of processing, controlling, and sensing equipment that plans, executes, and corrects movements of devices at acceptably high rates. Combines features developed in research on artificial intelligence and control theory. Characterized by casual connections between layers of hierarchy, approximately equal complexities of layers, and directed focus of attention.

  1. Advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Markus; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1997-06-01

    An advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles is presented. The hierarchical architecture consists of four levels: a vehicle level, a control level, a rule-based level and a knowledge-based level. A special focus is on forms of internal representation, which have to be chosen adequately for each level. The control scheme is applied to VaMP, a Mercedes passenger car which autonomously performs missions on German freeways. VaMP perceives the environment with its sense of vision and conventional sensors. It controls its actuators for locomotion and attention focusing. Modules for perception, cognition and action are discussed.

  2. On-Board Software Reference Architecture for Payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Victor; Trcka, Adam

    2015-09-01

    This abstract summarizes the On-board Reference Architecture for Payloads activity carried out by Space Systems Finland (SSF) and Evolving Systems Consulting (ESC) under ESA contract. At the time of writing, the activity is ongoing. This abstract discusses study objectives, related activities, study approach, achieved and anticipated results, and directions for future work.

  3. Supervisory Control System Architecture for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Cetiner, Sacit M; Cole, Daniel L; Fugate, David L; Kisner, Roger A; Melin, Alexander M; Muhlheim, Michael David; Rao, Nageswara S; Wood, Richard Thomas

    2013-08-01

    This technical report was generated as a product of the Supervisory Control for Multi-Modular SMR Plants project within the Instrumentation, Control and Human-Machine Interface technology area under the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report documents the definition of strategies, functional elements, and the structural architecture of a supervisory control system for multi-modular advanced SMR (AdvSMR) plants. This research activity advances the state-of-the art by incorporating decision making into the supervisory control system architectural layers through the introduction of a tiered-plant system approach. The report provides a brief history of hierarchical functional architectures and the current state-of-the-art, describes a reference AdvSMR to show the dependencies between systems, presents a hierarchical structure for supervisory control, indicates the importance of understanding trip setpoints, applies a new theoretic approach for comparing architectures, identifies cyber security controls that should be addressed early in system design, and describes ongoing work to develop system requirements and hardware/software configurations.

  4. The Orion GN and C Data-Driven Flight Software Architecture for Automated Sequencing and Fault Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ellis; Hart, Jeremy; Odegard, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CET) is being designed to include significantly more automation capability than either the Space Shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS). In particular, the vehicle flight software has requirements to accommodate increasingly automated missions throughout all phases of flight. A data-driven flight software architecture will provide an evolvable automation capability to sequence through Guidance, Navigation & Control (GN&C) flight software modes and configurations while maintaining the required flexibility and human control over the automation. This flexibility is a key aspect needed to address the maturation of operational concepts, to permit ground and crew operators to gain trust in the system and mitigate unpredictability in human spaceflight. To allow for mission flexibility and reconfrgurability, a data driven approach is being taken to load the mission event plan as well cis the flight software artifacts associated with the GN&C subsystem. A database of GN&C level sequencing data is presented which manages and tracks the mission specific and algorithm parameters to provide a capability to schedule GN&C events within mission segments. The flight software data schema for performing automated mission sequencing is presented with a concept of operations for interactions with ground and onboard crew members. A prototype architecture for fault identification, isolation and recovery interactions with the automation software is presented and discussed as a forward work item.

  5. A task control architecture for autonomous robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Reid; Mitchell, Tom

    1990-01-01

    An architecture is presented for controlling robots that have multiple tasks, operate in dynamic domains, and require a fair degree of autonomy. The architecture is built on several layers of functionality, including a distributed communication layer, a behavior layer for querying sensors, expanding goals, and executing commands, and a task level for managing the temporal aspects of planning and achieving goals, coordinating tasks, allocating resources, monitoring, and recovering from errors. Application to a legged planetary rover and an indoor mobile manipulator is described.

  6. OpenROCS: a software tool to control robotic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomé, Josep; Sanz, Josep; Vilardell, Francesc; Ribas, Ignasi; Gil, Pere

    2012-09-01

    We present the Open Robotic Observatory Control System (OpenROCS), an open source software platform developed for the robotic control of telescopes. It acts as a software infrastructure that executes all the necessary processes to implement responses to the system events that appear in the routine and non-routine operations associated to data-flow and housekeeping control. The OpenROCS software design and implementation provides a high flexibility to be adapted to different observatory configurations and event-action specifications. It is based on an abstract model that is independent of the specific hardware or software and is highly configurable. Interfaces to the system components are defined in a simple manner to achieve this goal. We give a detailed description of the version 2.0 of this software, based on a modular architecture developed in PHP and XML configuration files, and using standard communication protocols to interface with applications for hardware monitoring and control, environment monitoring, scheduling of tasks, image processing and data quality control. We provide two examples of how it is used as the core element of the control system in two robotic observatories: the Joan Oró Telescope at the Montsec Astronomical Observatory (Catalonia, Spain) and the SuperWASP Qatar Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Canary Islands, Spain).

  7. A single-board NMR spectrometer based on a software defined radio architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Weinan; Wang, Weimin

    2011-01-01

    A single-board software defined radio (SDR) spectrometer for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is presented. The SDR-based architecture, realized by combining a single field programmable gate array (FPGA) and a digital signal processor (DSP) with peripheral radio frequency (RF) front-end circuits, makes the spectrometer compact and reconfigurable. The DSP, working as a pulse programmer, communicates with a personal computer via a USB interface and controls the FPGA through a parallel port. The FPGA accomplishes digital processing tasks such as a numerically controlled oscillator (NCO), digital down converter (DDC) and gradient waveform generator. The NCO, with agile control of phase, frequency and amplitude, is part of a direct digital synthesizer that is used to generate an RF pulse. The DDC performs quadrature demodulation, multistage low-pass filtering and gain adjustment to produce a bandpass signal (receiver bandwidth from 3.9 kHz to 10 MHz). The gradient waveform generator is capable of outputting shaped gradient pulse waveforms and supports eddy-current compensation. The spectrometer directly acquires an NMR signal up to 30 MHz in the case of baseband sampling and is suitable for low-field (<0.7 T) application. Due to the featured SDR architecture, this prototype has flexible add-on ability and is expected to be suitable for portable NMR systems.

  8. Assessment of the integration capability of system architectures from a complex and distributed software systems perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuchter, S.; Reinert, F.; Müller, W.

    2014-06-01

    Procurement and design of system architectures capable of network centric operations demand for an assessment scheme in order to compare different alternative realizations. In this contribution an assessment method for system architectures targeted at the C4ISR domain is presented. The method addresses the integration capability of software systems from a complex and distributed software system perspective focusing communication, interfaces and software. The aim is to evaluate the capability to integrate a system or its functions within a system-of-systems network. This method uses approaches from software architecture quality assessment and applies them on the system architecture level. It features a specific goal tree of several dimensions that are relevant for enterprise integration. These dimensions have to be weighed against each other and totalized using methods from the normative decision theory in order to reflect the intention of the particular enterprise integration effort. The indicators and measurements for many of the considered quality features rely on a model based view on systems, networks, and the enterprise. That means it is applicable to System-of-System specifications based on enterprise architectural frameworks relying on defined meta-models or domain ontologies for defining views and viewpoints. In the defense context we use the NATO Architecture Framework (NAF) to ground respective system models. The proposed assessment method allows evaluating and comparing competing system designs regarding their future integration potential. It is a contribution to the system-of-systems engineering methodology.

  9. Partially Decentralized Control Architectures for Satellite Formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Bauer, Frank H.

    2002-01-01

    In a partially decentralized control architecture, more than one but less than all nodes have supervisory capability. This paper describes an approach to choosing the number of supervisors in such au architecture, based on a reliability vs. cost trade. It also considers the implications of these results for the design of navigation systems for satellite formations that could be controlled with a partially decentralized architecture. Using an assumed cost model, analytic and simulation-based results indicate that it may be cheaper to achieve a given overall system reliability with a partially decentralized architecture containing only a few supervisors, than with either fully decentralized or purely centralized architectures. Nominally, the subset of supervisors may act as centralized estimation and control nodes for corresponding subsets of the remaining subordinate nodes, and act as decentralized estimation and control peers with respect to each other. However, in the context of partially decentralized satellite formation control, the absolute positions and velocities of each spacecraft are unique, so that correlations which make estimates using only local information suboptimal only occur through common biases and process noise. Covariance and monte-carlo analysis of a simplified system show that this lack of correlation may allow simplification of the local estimators while preserving the global optimality of the maneuvers commanded by the supervisors.

  10. A Method for Aligning Acquisition Strategies and Software Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    vii Abstract ix 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Premise of This Work 1 1.2 Definitions 1 1.3 What Is Unique About This Approach ? 2 1.3.1 Programmatic Issue...a method that explicitly addresses key entities that are critical to alignment or misalignment, we provide a useful approach for organizations and...Architecture Framework, or DoDAF) • Acquisition Strategy: a business and technical management approach designed to achieve program objectives within the

  11. Principles for Evaluating the Quality Attributes of a Software Architecture.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    and effects analysis ( FMEA ), and failure modes effects and criticality analysis (FMECA). All of these techniques are standard practices in other...bandwidth of any secondary data channel that is identified in the system). In performance, analysis methods have grown out of two separate schools of...necessary to verify that the system can fulfill each of its obligations. Realizing that an architectural design is still a relatively high -level design

  12. RT 24 - Architecture, Modeling & Simulation, and Software Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    focus on tool extensions (UPDM, SysML, SoaML, BPMN ) Leverage “best of breed” architecture methodologies Provide tooling to support the methodology DoDAF...Capability 10 Example: BPMN 11 DoDAF 2.0 MetaModel BPMN MetaModel Mapping SysML to DoDAF 2.0 12 DoDAF V2.0 Models OV-2 SysML Diagrams Requirement

  13. Agile Development and Software Architecture: Understanding Scale and Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-24

    SEIVirtualForum Symptoms of failure  Teams (e.g., Scrum teams, product development teams, component teams, feature teams) spend almost all of...stability to support the next n iterations of development. In a Scrum project environment, the architectural runway may be established during...infrastructure Presentation Layer Common Service Common Service Common Service API APIData Access Layer Domain Layer Scrum Team A Scrum Team B Scrum Team C

  14. Mark 4A antenna control system data handling architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, H. C.; Eldred, D. B.

    1991-01-01

    A high-level review was conducted to provide an analysis of the existing architecture used to handle data and implement control algorithms for NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas and to make system-level recommendations for improving this architecture so that the DSN antennas can support the ever-tightening requirements of the next decade and beyond. It was found that the existing system is seriously overloaded, with processor utilization approaching 100 percent. A number of factors contribute to this overloading, including dated hardware, inefficient software, and a message-passing strategy that depends on serial connections between machines. At the same time, the system has shortcomings and idiosyncrasies that require extensive human intervention. A custom operating system kernel and an obscure programming language exacerbate the problems and should be modernized. A new architecture is presented that addresses these and other issues. Key features of the new architecture include a simplified message passing hierarchy that utilizes a high-speed local area network, redesign of particular processing function algorithms, consolidation of functions, and implementation of the architecture in modern hardware and software using mainstream computer languages and operating systems. The system would also allow incremental hardware improvements as better and faster hardware for such systems becomes available, and costs could potentially be low enough that redundancy would be provided economically. Such a system could support DSN requirements for the foreseeable future, though thorough consideration must be given to hard computational requirements, porting existing software functionality to the new system, and issues of fault tolerance and recovery.

  15. Designing Control System Application Software for Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The Unified Modeling Language (UML) was used to design the Environmental Systems Test Stand (ESTS) control system software. The UML was chosen for its ability to facilitate a clear dialog between software designer and customer, from which requirements are discovered and documented in a manner which transposes directly to program objects. Applying the UML to control system software design has resulted in a baseline set of documents from which change and effort of that change can be accurately measured. As the Environmental Systems Test Stand evolves, accurate estimates of the time and effort required to change the control system software will be made. Accurate quantification of the cost of software change can be before implementation, improving schedule and budget accuracy.

  16. Designing Control System Application Software for Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The Unified Modeling Language (UML) was used to design the Environmental Systems Test Stand (ESTS) control system software. The UML was chosen for its ability to facilitate a clear dialog between software designer and customer, from which requirements are discovered and documented in a manner which transposes directly to program objects. Applying the UML to control system software design has resulted in a baseline set of documents from which change and effort of that change can be accurately measured. As the Environmental Systems Test Stand evolves, accurate estimates of the time and effort required to change the control system software will be made. Accurate quantification of the cost of software change can be before implementation, improving schedule and budget accuracy.

  17. Continuous Software Integration and Quality Control during Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettl, M.; Neidhardt, A.; Brisken, W.; Dassing, R.

    2012-12-01

    Modern software has to be stable, portable, fast, and reliable. This requires a sophisticated infrastructure supporting and providing the developers with additional information about the state and the quality of the project. That is why we have created a centralized software repository, where the whole code-base is managed and version controlled on a centralized server. Based on this, a hierarchical build system has been developed where each project and their sub-projects can be compiled by simply calling the top level Makefile. On the top of this, a nightly build system has been created where the top level Makefiles of each project are called every night. The results of the build including the compiler warnings are reported to the developers using generated HTML pages. In addition, all the source code is automatically checked using a static code analysis tool, called "cppcheck". This tool produces warnings, similar to those of a compiler, but more pedantic. The reports of this analysis are translated to HTML and reported to the developers similar to the nightly builds. Armed with this information,the developers can discover issues in their projects at an early development stage. In combination it reduces the number of possible issues in our software to ensure quality of our projects at different development stages. These checks are also offered to the community. They are currently used within the DiFX software correlator project.

  18. System architecture for asynchronous multi-processor robotic control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Robert D.; Long, Mark; Backes, Paul

    1993-01-01

    The architecture for the Modular Telerobot Task Execution System (MOTES) as implemented in the Supervisory Telerobotics (STELER) Laboratory is described. MOTES is the software component of the remote site of a local-remote telerobotic system which is being developed for NASA for space applications, in particular Space Station Freedom applications. The system is being developed to provide control and supervised autonomous control to support both space based operation and ground-remote control with time delay. The local-remote architecture places task planning responsibilities at the local site and task execution responsibilities at the remote site. This separation allows the remote site to be designed to optimize task execution capability within a limited computational environment such as is expected in flight systems. The local site task planning system could be placed on the ground where few computational limitations are expected. MOTES is written in the Ada programming language for a multiprocessor environment.

  19. Case Studies of Software Development Tools for Parallel Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    67 PIE ...surveyed (descriptions of these, and all other tools mentioned in this report are provided in appendix B): GARDEN FIELD PIE Prometheus Faust CODE...PARALLEL SOFTWARE ENGINEERING PROBLEMS Tool Spec Design Co A1g. Par Dam Part Load Comp Cam Debug Reuse Nu Test Se Eval Dist Bal RefI /Test Procs PIE X X

  20. Peeling the Onion: Okapi System Architecture and Software Design Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, S.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Discusses software design issues for Okapi, an information retrieval system that incorporates both search engine and user interface and supports weighted searching, relevance feedback, and query expansion. The basic search system, adjacency searching, and moving toward a distributed system are discussed. (Author/LRW)

  1. Peeling the Onion: Okapi System Architecture and Software Design Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, S.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Discusses software design issues for Okapi, an information retrieval system that incorporates both search engine and user interface and supports weighted searching, relevance feedback, and query expansion. The basic search system, adjacency searching, and moving toward a distributed system are discussed. (Author/LRW)

  2. Streamlining the Process of Acquiring Secure Open Architecture Software Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-08

    Android apps and the Apple App Store also offer software (widget) components for their respective computing platforms ( Android and iPhone smartphones, or...Centralized vs . Decentralized ......................................................................... 106  Is OSSD Efficient...Enhanced (SE) Android . 2012 Android Builder’s Summit. Retrieved from https://events.linuxfoundation.org/images/stories/pdf/lf_abs12_smalley.pdf Smith

  3. Software architecture for large scale, distributed, data-intensive systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattmann, Chris A.; Medvidovic, Nenad; Ramirez, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents our experience with OODT, a novel software architectual style, and middlware-based implementation for data-intensive systems. To date, OODT has been successfully evaluated in several different science domains including Cancer Research with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and Planetary Science with NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS).

  4. Quantum-Computation for Perceptual Control Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Reid, Darryn J.

    2015-11-01

    In this Chapter, we propose a quantum-dynamical modeling approach to Perceptual Control Architecture, using large networks of Josephson Junctions and their category-theoretic generalizations with fuzzy associative functors Our approach provides the basis for composing modular multi-layered perceptual control architectures using Josephson Junction Networks, employing intuitively appealing category-theoretic abstractions to hide the algebraic details from the designer while nonetheless being able to rigorously ensure functional composition correctness. That is, our approach ensures that Josephson Junction Networks, as a modeling primitive, can be composed into formally correct multi-layered perceptual control architectures, while hiding the underlying algebraic systems of equations from the designer under a blanket of category-theoretic abstraction.

  5. Software architecture of the light weight kernel, catamount.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie

    2005-05-01

    Catamount is designed to be a low overhead operating system for a parallel computing environment. Functionality is limited to the minimum set needed to run a scientific computation. The design choices and implementations will be presented. A massively parallel processor (MPP), high performance computing (HPC) system is particularly sensitive to operating system overhead. Traditional, multi-purpose, operating systems are designed to support a wide range of usage models and requirements. To support the range of needs, a large number of system processes are provided and are often interdependent on each other. The overhead of these processes leads to an unpredictable amount of processor time available to a parallel application. Except in the case of the most embarrassingly parallel of applications, an MPP application must share interim results with its peers before it can make further progress. These synchronization events are made at specific points in the application code. If one processor takes longer to reach that point than all the other processors, everyone must wait. The overall finish time is increased. Sandia National Laboratories began addressing this problem more than a decade ago with an architecture based on node specialization. Sets of nodes in an MPP are designated to perform specific tasks, each running an operating system best suited to the specialized function. Sandia chose to not use a multi-purpose operating system for the computational nodes and instead began developing its first light weight operating system, SUNMOS, which ran on the compute nodes on the Intel Paragon system. Based on its viability, the architecture evolved into the PUMA operating system. Intel ported PUMA to the ASCI Red TFLOPS system, thus creating the Cougar operating system. Most recently, Cougar has been ported to Cray's XT3 system and renamed to Catamount. As the references indicate, there are a number of descriptions of the predecessor operating systems. While the majority

  6. A flexible architecture for advanced process control solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faron, Kamyar; Iourovitski, Ilia

    2005-05-01

    Advanced Process Control (APC) is now mainstream practice in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Over the past decade and a half APC has evolved from a "good idea", and "wouldn"t it be great" concept to mandatory manufacturing practice. APC developments have primarily dealt with two major thrusts, algorithms and infrastructure, and often the line between them has been blurred. The algorithms have evolved from very simple single variable solutions to sophisticated and cutting edge adaptive multivariable (input and output) solutions. Spending patterns in recent times have demanded that the economics of a comprehensive APC infrastructure be completely justified for any and all cost conscious manufacturers. There are studies suggesting integration costs as high as 60% of the total APC solution costs. Such cost prohibitive figures clearly diminish the return on APC investments. This has limited the acceptance and development of pure APC infrastructure solutions for many fabs. Modern APC solution architectures must satisfy the wide array of requirements from very manual R&D environments to very advanced and automated "lights out" manufacturing facilities. A majority of commercially available control solutions and most in house developed solutions lack important attributes of scalability, flexibility, and adaptability and hence require significant resources for integration, deployment, and maintenance. Many APC improvement efforts have been abandoned and delayed due to legacy systems and inadequate architectural design. Recent advancements (Service Oriented Architectures) in the software industry have delivered ideal technologies for delivering scalable, flexible, and reliable solutions that can seamlessly integrate into any fabs" existing system and business practices. In this publication we shall evaluate the various attributes of the architectures required by fabs and illustrate the benefits of a Service Oriented Architecture to satisfy these requirements. Blue

  7. Developing an Evaluation Method for Middleware-Based Software Architectures of Airborne Mission Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    documented using an architecture knowledge management tool also developed at NICTA. 31 DSTO-TR-2204 9. References [Ali- Babar & Gorton 2004] [Ali... Babar et al. 2005] [Allen et al. 2002] [Bachmann et al. 2003] [Barbacci et al. 1995] [Bass et al. 2003] [Basse/al. 2001] [Bengstsson et al. 2004...Boehm&In 1996] [CORBA 2006] [Clements et al. 2001] Ali- Babar , M. & Gorton, I. (2004) Comparison of Scenario-Based Software Architecture

  8. A Quantitative Model for Assessing Visual Simulation Software Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    complexity measure. The Computer Journal, 27, 340–347. Qingqing, Z., & Xinke, L. (2009). Complexity metrics for service-oriented systems. In 2009...Rudy Darken Professor of Computer Science Dissertation Supervisor Ted Lewis Professor of Computer Science Richard Riehle Professor of Practice...Software Engineering Arnold Buss Research Associate Professor of MOVES LtCol Jeff Boleng, PhD Associate Professor of Computer Science U.S. Air Force Academy

  9. Combining Architecture-Centric Engineering with the Team Software Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Bursatec, the IT arm of La Bolsa Mexicana de Valores (the Mexican Stock Exchange), to replace its main online stock trading engine with one that...a project at Bursatec. 4.1 Project Summary (to Date) In early 2009 Bursatec, the IT development organization of the Bolsa Mexicana de Valores (BMV...Scale: An Experience Report from Pilot Projects in Mexico (CMU/SEI-2009-TR-011). Pittsburgh, PA: Software Engineering Institute, Carnegie Mellon

  10. Relating Business Goals to Architecturally Significant Requirements for Software Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Partington 2000] 21 Figure 7: Fifteen Important Business Goals [ Hofstede 2002] 30 Figure 8: List of Business Goals Discriminated by Self-Interest...of the business goals behind the system being developed. Business goals drive the conception , creation, and evolution of software-reliant systems...business literature and uses that survey to produce a classification of business goals. It introduces the concept of goal-subject (the person or

  11. Streamlining the Process of Acquiring Secure Open Architecture Software Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    streamline the acquisition process for secure OA software systems through a focus on doing more with limited resources. Along the way, we pay particular...SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 22 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...be missing this year is the active participation and networking that has been the hallmark of previous symposia. By purposely limiting attendance to

  12. NASA's Advanced Multimission Operations System: A Case Study in Formalizing Software Architecture Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    All software systems of significant size and longevity eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by evolving requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the cause, software architecture evolution is commonplace in real world software projects. Recently, software architecture researchers have begun to study this phenomenon in depth. However, this work has suffered from problems of validation; research in this area has tended to make heavy use of toy examples and hypothetical scenarios and has not been well supported by real world examples. To help address this problem, I describe an ongoing effort at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to re-architect the Advanced Multimission Operations System (AMMOS), which is used to operate NASA's deep-space and astrophysics missions. Based on examination of project documents and interviews with project personnel, I describe the goals and approach of this evolution effort and then present models that capture some of the key architectural changes. Finally, I demonstrate how approaches and formal methods from my previous research in architecture evolution may be applied to this evolution, while using languages and tools already in place at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  13. NASA's Advanced Multimission Operations System: A Case Study in Formalizing Software Architecture Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    All software systems of significant size and longevity eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by evolving requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the cause, software architecture evolution is commonplace in real world software projects. Recently, software architecture researchers have begun to study this phenomenon in depth. However, this work has suffered from problems of validation; research in this area has tended to make heavy use of toy examples and hypothetical scenarios and has not been well supported by real world examples. To help address this problem, I describe an ongoing effort at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory to re-architect the Advanced Multimission Operations System (AMMOS), which is used to operate NASA's deep-space and astrophysics missions. Based on examination of project documents and interviews with project personnel, I describe the goals and approach of this evolution effort and then present models that capture some of the key architectural changes. Finally, I demonstrate how approaches and formal methods from my previous research in architecture evolution may be applied to this evolution, while using languages and tools already in place at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  14. Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britchcliffe, Michael J.; Conroy, Bruce L.; Anderson, Paul E.; Wilson, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    This software is used in an automated cryogenic control system developed to monitor and control the operation of small-scale cryocoolers. The system was designed to automate the cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier system described in "Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System" (NPO-47246), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 5 (May 2011), page 7a. The software contains algorithms necessary to convert non-linear output voltages from the cryogenic diode-type thermometers and vacuum pressure and helium pressure sensors, to temperature and pressure units. The control function algorithms use the monitor data to control the cooler power, vacuum solenoid, vacuum pump, and electrical warm-up heaters. The control algorithms are based on a rule-based system that activates the required device based on the operating mode. The external interface is Web-based. It acts as a Web server, providing pages for monitor, control, and configuration. No client software from the external user is required.

  15. Beyond the Renderer: Software Architecture for Parallel Graphics and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1996-01-01

    As numerous implementations have demonstrated, software-based parallel rendering is an effective way to obtain the needed computational power for a variety of challenging applications in computer graphics and scientific visualization. To fully realize their potential, however, parallel renderers need to be integrated into a complete environment for generating, manipulating, and delivering visual data. We examine the structure and components of such an environment, including the programming and user interfaces, rendering engines, and image delivery systems. We consider some of the constraints imposed by real-world applications and discuss the problems and issues involved in bringing parallel rendering out of the lab and into production.

  16. Software Productivity of Field Experiments Using the Mobile Agents Open Architecture with Workflow Interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Lowry, Michael R.; Nado, Robert Allen; Sierhuis, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed a series of ten systematically developed surface exploration systems that integrated a variety of hardware and software components. Design, development, and testing data suggest that incremental buildup of an exploration system for long-duration capabilities is facilitated by an open architecture with appropriate-level APIs, specifically designed to facilitate integration of new components. This improves software productivity by reducing changes required for reconfiguring an existing system.

  17. Software architecture for improving accessibility to medical text-based information.

    PubMed

    Topac, Vasile; Stoicu-Tivadar, Vasile

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a software architecture aiming to improve accessibility to information in specialized texts, with focus on medical texts. This software also addresses other problems related to text accessibility such as vision problems and language problems. It allows text input in any media format (text, image, sound) and outputs the text as digital text or sound, permitting the user to scan the medical papers and listen to the translated and adapted text.

  18. Fall 2014 SEI Research Review: Aligining Acquisition Strategy and Software Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    CMU /SEI-2010-TN-018: “Relating Business Goals to Architecturally Significant Requirements for Software Systems“ 8 Fall 2014 SEI Research Review...occur for a given AQA  Created acquisition strategy tactics associated with AQAs *Results published in SEI TN CMU /SEI-2013-TN-026: “Results in...published in SEI TN CMU /SEI-2014-TN-019: “A Method for Aligning Acquisition Strategies and Software Architectures“ 12 Fall 2014 SEI Research Review

  19. Understanding the Role of Licenses and Evolution in Open Architecture Software Ecosystems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-29

    Understanding the Role of Licenses and Evolution in Open Architecture Software Ecosystems Walt Scacchi Institute for Software Research. University of... Scacchi ), alspaugh@cs. georgetown.edu (Thomas A. Alspaugh) Preprint submitted to Elsevier November 29, 2010 Manuscript Click here to view linked References...2001-2002. 14. The Mono C# Compiler and Tools, Copyright 2005-2008 Novell, Inc. 15. libcurl. Copyright (c) 1996-2008, Daniel Stenberg < daniel @haxx.se

  20. Reconfigurable Software for Controlling Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Joseph B.

    2006-01-01

    Software for a system to control the trajectories of multiple spacecraft flying in formation is being developed to reflect underlying concepts of (1) a decentralized approach to guidance and control and (2) reconfigurability of the control system, including reconfigurability of the software and of control laws. The software is organized as a modular network of software tasks. The computational load for both determining relative trajectories and planning maneuvers is shared equally among all spacecraft in a cluster. The flexibility and robustness of the software are apparent in the fact that tasks can be added, removed, or replaced during flight. In a computational simulation of a representative formation-flying scenario, it was demonstrated that the following are among the services performed by the software: Uploading of commands from a ground station and distribution of the commands among the spacecraft, Autonomous initiation and reconfiguration of formations, Autonomous formation of teams through negotiations among the spacecraft, Working out details of high-level commands (e.g., shapes and sizes of geometrically complex formations), Implementation of a distributed guidance law providing autonomous optimization and assignment of target states, and Implementation of a decentralized, fuel-optimal, impulsive control law for planning maneuvers.

  1. Klystron control software in the SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, R.K.; Thompson, K.; Phinney, N.

    1985-05-01

    Triggering, control, and monitoring of 240 high-power klystrons will be supported by the SLC control system this summer. The control software is distributed among a VAX host computer, a local microprocessor cluster, and a dedicated intelligent CAMAC module. The functions performed by these three components and the algorithms used are discussed.

  2. Controlling Functional Group Architecture in Artificial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-02

    accomplished. We also developed a new methodology for synthesizing and controlling membrane architecture using light based approaches. 15. SUBJECT...TERMS phospholipid, membranes, redox, cycloaddition, light 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a. REPORT u b. ABSTRACT u c. THIS PAGE u 17...location and yield of the resulting product. The initial exploration of both these goals were performed and accomplished. We developed a light based

  3. Integrated computer control system architectural overview

    SciTech Connect

    Van Arsdall, P.

    1997-06-18

    This overview introduces the NIF Integrated Control System (ICCS) architecture. The design is abstract to allow the construction of many similar applications from a common framework. This summary lays the essential foundation for understanding the model-based engineering approach used to execute the design.

  4. What is an open architecture robot controller?

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.E.

    1994-02-14

    This paper addresses the issue of what is an open architecture robot controllers. Three different classifications are defined along with the various advantages and shortcomings of each approach. Knowledge from past research and new technology has been included in this analysis. The conclusions recommend a communication-based hybrid approach with well defined interfaces between modules.

  5. Optimizing Flight Control Software With an Application Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Irene Skupniewicz; Shi, Nija; Webster, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Flight controllers in NASA s mission control centers work day and night to ensure that missions succeed and crews are safe. The IT goals of NASA mission control centers are similar to those of most businesses: to evolve IT infrastructure from basic to dynamic. This paper describes Mission Control Technologies (MCT), an application platform that is powering mission control today and is designed to meet the needs of future NASA control centers. MCT is an extensible platform that provides GUI components and a runtime environment. The platform enables NASA s IT goals through its use of lightweight interfaces and configurable components, which promote standardization and incorporate useful solution patterns. The MCT architecture positions mission control centers to reach the goal of dynamic IT, leading to lower cost of ownership, and treating software as a strategic investment.

  6. Model based design introduction: modeling game controllers to microprocessor architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungwirth, Patrick; Badawy, Abdel-Hameed

    2017-04-01

    We present an introduction to model based design. Model based design is a visual representation, generally a block diagram, to model and incrementally develop a complex system. Model based design is a commonly used design methodology for digital signal processing, control systems, and embedded systems. Model based design's philosophy is: to solve a problem - a step at a time. The approach can be compared to a series of steps to converge to a solution. A block diagram simulation tool allows a design to be simulated with real world measurement data. For example, if an analog control system is being upgraded to a digital control system, the analog sensor input signals can be recorded. The digital control algorithm can be simulated with the real world sensor data. The output from the simulated digital control system can then be compared to the old analog based control system. Model based design can compared to Agile software develop. The Agile software development goal is to develop working software in incremental steps. Progress is measured in completed and tested code units. Progress is measured in model based design by completed and tested blocks. We present a concept for a video game controller and then use model based design to iterate the design towards a working system. We will also describe a model based design effort to develop an OS Friendly Microprocessor Architecture based on the RISC-V.

  7. A Scalable Software Architecture Booting and Configuring Nodes in the Whitney Commodity Computing Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineberg, Samuel A.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Whitney project is integrating commodity off-the-shelf PC hardware and software technology to build a parallel supercomputer with hundreds to thousands of nodes. To build such a system, one must have a scalable software model, and the installation and maintenance of the system software must be completely automated. We describe the design of an architecture for booting, installing, and configuring nodes in such a system with particular consideration given to scalability and ease of maintenance. This system has been implemented on a 40-node prototype of Whitney and is to be used on the 500 processor Whitney system to be built in 1998.

  8. Clementine auto exposure control software

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E.

    1994-11-15

    The primary mission of the Clementine program was to test technology developed under the auspices of BMDO (the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization). A secondary goal of the program was to provide astronomical data to the scientific and educational community. The mission plan developed to accomplish these goals included complete mapping of the lunar surface and a close fly-by of a near-Earth asteroid, 1620 Geographos. Exposure control for the Clementine mission was driven by mission phase requirements and sensor characteristics. Thus, there were a total of twelve algorithms developed for three primary mission phases and the four imaging sensors (two additional sensors operated as star trackers). The three mission phases in question were lunar mapping, distant observation of the asteroid for the purpose of tracking, and close-up viewing (as close as 100 Km) of Geographos. The four non-star tracker sensors consisted of an Ultra Violet/Visible (UV/Vis) camera, a High Resolution (HiRes) camera with a built-in LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) unit, a Near Infrared (NIR) camera, and a Long Wave InfraRed (LWIR) camera. Due to lack of test time and uncertainties about the imaging environment, numerous input parameters were provided in the algorithms to allow extensive tuning of the exposure control during the mission.

  9. An Architecture to Enable Autonomous Control of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Dever, Timothy P.; Soeder, James F.; George, Patrick J.; Morris, Paul H.; Colombano, Silvano P.; Frank, Jeremy D.; Schwabacher, Mark A.; Wang, Liu; LawLer, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Autonomy is required for manned spacecraft missions distant enough that light-time communication delays make ground-based mission control infeasible. Presently, ground controllers develop a complete schedule of power modes for all spacecraft components based on a large number of factors. The proposed architecture is an early attempt to formalize and automate this process using on-vehicle computation resources. In order to demonstrate this architecture, an autonomous electrical power system controller and vehicle Mission Manager are constructed. These two components are designed to work together in order to plan upcoming load use as well as respond to unanticipated deviations from the plan. The communication protocol was developed using "paper" simulations prior to formally encoding the messages and developing software to implement the required functionality. These software routines exchange data via TCP/IP sockets with the Mission Manager operating at NASA Ames Research Center and the autonomous power controller running at NASA Glenn Research Center. The interconnected systems are tested and shown to be effective at planning the operation of a simulated quasi-steady state spacecraft power system and responding to unexpected disturbances.

  10. A near-miss management system architecture for the forensic investigation of software failures.

    PubMed

    Bella, M A Bihina; Eloff, J H P

    2016-02-01

    Digital forensics has been proposed as a methodology for doing root-cause analysis of major software failures for quite a while. Despite this, similar software failures still occur repeatedly. A reason for this is the difficulty of obtaining detailed evidence of software failures. Acquiring such evidence can be challenging, as the relevant data may be lost or corrupt following a software system's crash. This paper proposes the use of near-miss analysis to improve on the collection of evidence for software failures. Near-miss analysis is an incident investigation technique that detects and subsequently analyses indicators of failures. The results of a near-miss analysis investigation are then used to detect an upcoming failure before the failure unfolds. The detection of these indicators - known as near misses - therefore provides an opportunity to proactively collect relevant data that can be used as digital evidence, pertaining to software failures. A Near Miss Management System (NMS) architecture for the forensic investigation of software failures is proposed. The viability of the proposed architecture is demonstrated through a prototype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Impact of Autonomy Technology on Spacecraft Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, E. B., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Autonomy technology for high-level, closed-loop control of spacecraft offers considerable benefits to space-flight projects. Those benefits can enable whole new classes of missions; however, they are not without cost.

  12. The Impact of Autonomy Technology on Spacecraft Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, E. B., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Autonomy technology for high-level, closed-loop control of spacecraft offers considerable benefits to space-flight projects. Those benefits can enable whole new classes of missions; however, they are not without cost.

  13. Human-Centered Software Engineering: Software Engineering Architectures, Patterns, and Sodels for Human Computer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffah, Ahmed; Vanderdonckt, Jean; Desmarais, Michel C.

    The Computer-Human Interaction and Software Engineering (CHISE) series of edited volumes originated from a number of workshops and discussions over the latest research and developments in the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Software Engineering (SE) integration, convergence and cross-pollination. A first volume in this series (CHISE Volume I - Human-Centered Software Engineering: Integrating Usability in the Development Lifecycle) aims at bridging the gap between the field of SE and HCI, and addresses specifically the concerns of integrating usability and user-centered systems design methods and tools into the software development lifecycle and practices. This has been done by defining techniques, tools and practices that can fit into the entire software engineering lifecycle as well as by defining ways of addressing the knowledge and skills needed, and the attitudes and basic values that a user-centered development methodology requires. The first volume has been edited as Vol. 8 in the Springer HCI Series (Seffah, Gulliksen and Desmarais, 2005).

  14. Software Architecture for a Virtual Environment for Nano Scale Assembly (VENSA).

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Gu; Lyons, Kevin W; Feng, Shaw C

    2004-01-01

    A Virtual Environment (VE) uses multiple computer-generated media to let a user experience situations that are temporally and spatially prohibiting. The information flow between the user and the VE is bidirectional and the user can influence the environment. The software development of a VE requires orchestrating multiple peripherals and computers in a synchronized way in real time. Although a multitude of useful software components for VEs exists, many of these are packaged within a complex framework and can not be used separately. In this paper, an architecture is presented which is designed to let multiple frameworks work together while being shielded from the application program. This architecture, which is called the Virtual Environment for Nano Scale Assembly (VENSA), has been constructed for interfacing with an optical tweezers instrument for nanotechnology development. However, this approach can be generalized for most virtual environments. Through the use of VENSA, the programmer can rely on existing solutions and concentrate more on the application software design.

  15. Spaceport Command and Control System - Support Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremblay, Shayne

    2016-01-01

    The Information Architecture Support (IAS) Team, the component of the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) that is in charge of all the pre-runtime data, was in need of some report features to be added to their internal web application, Information Architecture (IA). Development of these reports is crucial for the speed and productivity of the development team, as they are needed to quickly and efficiently make specific and complicated data requests against the massive IA database. These reports were being put on the back burner, as other development of IA was prioritized over them, but the need for them resulted in internships being created to fill this need. The creation of these reports required learning Ruby on Rails development, along with related web technologies, and they will continue to serve IAS and other support software teams and their IA data needs.

  16. New GPIB Control Software at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Bickley; Pavel Chevtsov

    2005-09-21

    The control of GPIB devices at Jefferson Lab is based on the GPIB device/driver library. The library is a part of the device/driver development framework. It is activated with the use of the device configuration files that define all hardware components used in the control system to communicate with GPIB devices. As soon as the software is activated, it is ready to handle any device connected to these components and only needs to know the set of commands that the device can understand. The old GPIB control software at Jefferson Lab requires the definition of these commands in the form of a device control software module written in C for each device. Though such modules are relatively simple, they have to be created, successfully compiled, and supported for all control computer platforms. In the new version of GPIB control software all device communication commands are defined in device protocol (ASCII text) files. This makes the support of GPIB devices in the control system much easier.

  17. Open architecture control for laser materials processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortmann, Juergen; Kahmen, A.; Kaierle, Stefan; Kreutz, Ernst-Wolfgang; Poprawe, Reinhart

    2001-12-01

    In laser materials processing, usually CNC controls come into operation that are fitted to conventional applications of machining, like milling. Because of the flexibility required and the large variety of applications in laser technology the use of an open architecture control is necessary. Open controls based on the OSACA (Open System Architecture for Controls within Automation systems) specification gain an increasing importance when innovative technology is integrated into controls. OSACA defines a uniform system platform that provides services for communication and configuration. The OSACA platform has been developed as a modular system for different operating systems with or without real-time capability and different hardware platforms. The functionality of the control is subdivided into single functional units, which communicate provided by the OSACA platform. Every unit can access the internal control data in a standardized way. The contribution reports about the implementation of an OSACA based control into a laser manufacturing plant. The problems and components concerning a linkage to the laser control and the implementation of some laser specific control units are discussed.

  18. AdOpt@TNG control system software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruffolo, Andrea; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo

    1998-09-01

    AdOptTNG is the Adaptive Optics Module for the Galileo National telescope (TNG). At first light this module will feature tip-tilt correction capabilities and a speckle interferometry facility. In this paper we describe the main characteristics of the AdOptTNG Control System Software. The system is composed by a real-time part and a graphical user interface. The real-time software computes the required corrections, drives the tip-tilt mirror and function. The user interface has been written in IDL, using the IDL Widget set, taking advantage of its powerful data manipulation and analysis capabilities for data presentation and diagnostics. The integration of all these components into the TNG Control System Software, in order to allow for remote control and data archiving, is also briefly described.

  19. Software to Control and Monitor Gas Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C.; Curley, Charles; Gore, Eric; Floyd, David; Lucas, Damion

    2012-01-01

    This software package interfaces with various gas stream devices such as pressure transducers, flow meters, flow controllers, valves, and analyzers such as a mass spectrometer. The software provides excellent user interfacing with various windows that provide time-domain graphs, valve state buttons, priority- colored messages, and warning icons. The user can configure the software to save as much or as little data as needed to a comma-delimited file. The software also includes an intuitive scripting language for automated processing. The configuration allows for the assignment of measured values or calibration so that raw signals can be viewed as usable pressures, flows, or concentrations in real time. The software is based on those used in two safety systems for shuttle processing and one volcanic gas analysis system. Mass analyzers typically have very unique applications and vary from job to job. As such, software available on the market is usually inadequate or targeted on a specific application (such as EPA methods). The goal was to develop powerful software that could be used with prototype systems. The key problem was to generalize the software to be easily and quickly reconfigurable. At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), the prior art consists of two primary methods. The first method was to utilize Lab- VIEW and a commercial data acquisition system. This method required rewriting code for each different application and only provided raw data. To obtain data in engineering units, manual calculations were required. The second method was to utilize one of the embedded computer systems developed for another system. This second method had the benefit of providing data in engineering units, but was limited in the number of control parameters.

  20. Architecture for Control of the K9 Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bresina, John L.; Bualat, maria; Fair, Michael; Wright, Anne; Washington, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Software featuring a multilevel architecture is used to control the hardware on the K9 Rover, which is a mobile robot used in research on robots for scientific exploration and autonomous operation in general. The software consists of five types of modules: Device Drivers - These modules, at the lowest level of the architecture, directly control motors, cameras, data buses, and other hardware devices. Resource Managers - Each of these modules controls several device drivers. Resource managers can be commanded by either a remote operator or the pilot or conditional-executive modules described below. Behaviors and Data Processors - These modules perform computations for such functions as planning paths, avoiding obstacles, visual tracking, and stereoscopy. These modules can be commanded only by the pilot. Pilot - The pilot receives a possibly complex command from the remote operator or the conditional executive, then decomposes the command into (1) more-specific commands to the resource managers and (2) requests for information from the behaviors and data processors. Conditional Executive - This highest-level module interprets a command plan sent by the remote operator, determines whether resources required for execution of the plan are available, monitors execution, and, if necessary, selects an alternate branch of the plan.

  1. Reconfigurable Transceiver and Software-Defined Radio Architecture and Technology Evaluated for NASA Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating the development and suitability of a software-based open-architecture for space-based reconfigurable transceivers (RTs) and software-defined radios (SDRs). The main objectives of this project are to enable advanced operations and reduce mission costs. SDRs are becoming more common because of the capabilities of reconfigurable digital signal processing technologies such as field programmable gate arrays and digital signal processors, which place radio functions in firmware and software that were traditionally performed with analog hardware components. Features of interest of this communications architecture include nonproprietary open standards and application programming interfaces to enable software reuse and portability, independent hardware and software development, and hardware and software functional separation. The goals for RT and SDR technologies for NASA space missions include prelaunch and on-orbit frequency and waveform reconfigurability and programmability, high data rate capability, and overall communications and processing flexibility. These operational advances over current state-of-art transceivers will be provided to reduce the power, mass, and cost of RTs and SDRs for space communications. The open architecture for NASA communications will support existing (legacy) communications needs and capabilities while providing a path to more capable, advanced waveform development and mission concepts (e.g., ad hoc constellations with self-healing networks and high-rate science data return). A study was completed to assess the state of the art in RT architectures, implementations, and technologies. In-house researchers conducted literature searches and analysis, interviewed Government and industry contacts, and solicited information and white papers from industry on space-qualifiable RTs and SDRs and their associated technologies for space-based NASA applications. The white papers were evaluated, compiled, and

  2. Autonomous control systems - Architecture and fundamental issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antsaklis, P. J.; Passino, K. M.; Wang, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchical functional autonomous controller architecture is introduced. In particular, the architecture for the control of future space vehicles is described in detail; it is designed to ensure the autonomous operation of the control system and it allows interaction with the pilot and crew/ground station, and the systems on board the autonomous vehicle. The fundamental issues in autonomous control system modeling and analysis are discussed. It is proposed to utilize a hybrid approach to modeling and analysis of autonomous systems. This will incorporate conventional control methods based on differential equations and techniques for the analysis of systems described with a symbolic formalism. In this way, the theory of conventional control can be fully utilized. It is stressed that autonomy is the design requirement and intelligent control methods appear at present, to offer some of the necessary tools to achieve autonomy. A conventional approach may evolve and replace some or all of the `intelligent' functions. It is shown that in addition to conventional controllers, the autonomous control system incorporates planning, learning, and FDI (fault detection and identification).

  3. Autonomous control systems - Architecture and fundamental issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antsaklis, P. J.; Passino, K. M.; Wang, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    A hierarchical functional autonomous controller architecture is introduced. In particular, the architecture for the control of future space vehicles is described in detail; it is designed to ensure the autonomous operation of the control system and it allows interaction with the pilot and crew/ground station, and the systems on board the autonomous vehicle. The fundamental issues in autonomous control system modeling and analysis are discussed. It is proposed to utilize a hybrid approach to modeling and analysis of autonomous systems. This will incorporate conventional control methods based on differential equations and techniques for the analysis of systems described with a symbolic formalism. In this way, the theory of conventional control can be fully utilized. It is stressed that autonomy is the design requirement and intelligent control methods appear at present, to offer some of the necessary tools to achieve autonomy. A conventional approach may evolve and replace some or all of the `intelligent' functions. It is shown that in addition to conventional controllers, the autonomous control system incorporates planning, learning, and FDI (fault detection and identification).

  4. The future of open architecture process control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, R.A.

    1994-02-01

    The author relates some of his experience in the acquisition and use of flexible controllers, and summarizes what he has learned and what a few other people are doing. What the author calls a ``flexible`` system could also be called open architecture system. Where one defines OA ``as the use of well defined and documented software and hardware with interfaces that will permit the system to be modified by the user``. Such systems could be based on either accepted or defacto standards for hardware and software. In addition to just sharing the author`s experiences, this presentation is appropriate because of the relatively new encouragement that the Laboratory is receiving to work with American industry in the manufacturing area.

  5. ControlShell: A real-time software framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stanley A.; Chen, Vincent W.; Pardo-Castellote, Gerardo

    1994-01-01

    The ControlShell system is a programming environment that enables the development and implementation of complex real-time software. It includes many building tools for complex systems, such as a graphical finite state machine (FSM) tool to provide strategic control. ControlShell has a component-based design, providing interface definitions and mechanisms for building real-time code modules along with providing basic data management. Some of the system-building tools incorporated in ControlShell are a graphical data flow editor, a component data requirement editor, and a state-machine editor. It also includes a distributed data flow package, an execution configuration manager, a matrix package, and an object database and dynamic binding facility. This paper presents an overview of ControlShell's architecture and examines the functions of several of its tools.

  6. Software Framework for Controlling Unsupervised Scientific Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Benjamin; Jahr, Wiebke; Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Science outreach and communication are gaining more and more importance for conveying the meaning of today’s research to the general public. Public exhibitions of scientific instruments can provide hands-on experience with technical advances and their applications in the life sciences. The software of such devices, however, is oftentimes not appropriate for this purpose. In this study, we describe a software framework and the necessary computer configuration that is well suited for exposing a complex self-built and software-controlled instrument such as a microscope to laymen under limited supervision, e.g. in museums or schools. We identify several aspects that must be met by such software, and we describe a design that can simultaneously be used to control either (i) a fully functional instrument in a robust and fail-safe manner, (ii) an instrument that has low-cost or only partially working hardware attached for illustration purposes or (iii) a completely virtual instrument without hardware attached. We describe how to assess the educational success of such a device, how to monitor its operation and how to facilitate its maintenance. The introduced concepts are illustrated using our software to control eduSPIM, a fluorescent light sheet microscope that we are currently exhibiting in a technical museum. PMID:27570966

  7. Software Framework for Controlling Unsupervised Scientific Instruments.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Benjamin; Jahr, Wiebke; Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Science outreach and communication are gaining more and more importance for conveying the meaning of today's research to the general public. Public exhibitions of scientific instruments can provide hands-on experience with technical advances and their applications in the life sciences. The software of such devices, however, is oftentimes not appropriate for this purpose. In this study, we describe a software framework and the necessary computer configuration that is well suited for exposing a complex self-built and software-controlled instrument such as a microscope to laymen under limited supervision, e.g. in museums or schools. We identify several aspects that must be met by such software, and we describe a design that can simultaneously be used to control either (i) a fully functional instrument in a robust and fail-safe manner, (ii) an instrument that has low-cost or only partially working hardware attached for illustration purposes or (iii) a completely virtual instrument without hardware attached. We describe how to assess the educational success of such a device, how to monitor its operation and how to facilitate its maintenance. The introduced concepts are illustrated using our software to control eduSPIM, a fluorescent light sheet microscope that we are currently exhibiting in a technical museum.

  8. Neural network architecture for crossbar switch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry P.; Walters, Stephen M.

    1991-01-01

    A Hopfield neural network architecture for the real-time control of a crossbar switch for switching packets at maximum throughput is proposed. The network performance and processing time are derived from a numerical simulation of the transitions of the neural network. A method is proposed to optimize electronic component parameters and synaptic connections, and it is fully illustrated by the computer simulation of a VLSI implementation of 4 x 4 neural net controller. The extension to larger size crossbars is demonstrated through the simulation of an 8 x 8 crossbar switch controller, where the performance of the neural computation is discussed in relation to electronic noise and inhomogeneities of network components.

  9. Neural network architecture for crossbar switch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troudet, Terry P.; Walters, Stephen M.

    1991-01-01

    A Hopfield neural network architecture for the real-time control of a crossbar switch for switching packets at maximum throughput is proposed. The network performance and processing time are derived from a numerical simulation of the transitions of the neural network. A method is proposed to optimize electronic component parameters and synaptic connections, and it is fully illustrated by the computer simulation of a VLSI implementation of 4 x 4 neural net controller. The extension to larger size crossbars is demonstrated through the simulation of an 8 x 8 crossbar switch controller, where the performance of the neural computation is discussed in relation to electronic noise and inhomogeneities of network components.

  10. Genetic control of inflorescence architecture in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Benlloch, Reyes; Berbel, Ana; Ali, Latifeh; Gohari, Gholamreza; Millán, Teresa; Madueño, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The architecture of the inflorescence, the shoot system that bears the flowers, is a main component of the huge diversity of forms found in flowering plants. Inflorescence architecture has also a strong impact on the production of fruits and seeds, and on crop management, two highly relevant agronomical traits. Elucidating the genetic networks that control inflorescence development, and how they vary between different species, is essential to understanding the evolution of plant form and to being able to breed key architectural traits in crop species. Inflorescence architecture depends on the identity and activity of the meristems in the inflorescence apex, which determines when flowers are formed, how many are produced and their relative position in the inflorescence axis. Arabidopsis thaliana, where the genetic control of inflorescence development is best known, has a simple inflorescence, where the primary inflorescence meristem directly produces the flowers, which are thus borne in the main inflorescence axis. In contrast, legumes represent a more complex inflorescence type, the compound inflorescence, where flowers are not directly borne in the main inflorescence axis but, instead, they are formed by secondary or higher order inflorescence meristems. Studies in model legumes such as pea (Pisum sativum) or Medicago truncatula have led to a rather good knowledge of the genetic control of the development of the legume compound inflorescence. In addition, the increasing availability of genetic and genomic tools for legumes is allowing to rapidly extending this knowledge to other grain legume crops. This review aims to describe the current knowledge of the genetic network controlling inflorescence development in legumes. It also discusses how the combination of this knowledge with the use of emerging genomic tools and resources may allow rapid advances in the breeding of grain legume crops. PMID:26257753

  11. Software System Architecture Modeling Methodology for Naval Gun Weapon Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Indiana University Southeast New Albany, IN 7. Peter Musial Department of Computer Science University of Puerto Rico at San Piedras San Juan ...GCS, which takes information from the GCC and provides services to the gun mount  Gun Console Computer [GCC]-Sub-element of the GCS. It interfaces...Display Console MK 132 Mod 0 [CDC]-The operator console used to control the MK46 Optical Sight  Optical Sight System MK 46 Mod 1-Electro-Optic

  12. ANTP Protocol Suite Software Implementation Architecture in Python

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-03

    selecting a node, more information such as routing table entries will be displayed. State Mgmt Header Process Segmentation ARQ MACK FEC CRC Send...receive all data packets Error-control modules ARQ , FEC, and CRC provide different types of reliability to the service classes. ARQ (automatic repeat...effective data delivery. For the AeroTP protocol, the selective repeat ARQ algorithm is used to provide reliable edge-to-edge connection between nodes. In

  13. The NASA Mission Operations and Control Architecture Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondrus, Paul J.; Carper, Richard D.; Jeffries, Alan J.

    1994-01-01

    The conflict between increases in space mission complexity and rapidly declining space mission budgets has created strong pressures to radically reduce the costs of designing and operating spacecraft. A key approach to achieving such reductions is through reducing the development and operations costs of the supporting mission operations systems. One of the efforts which the Communications and Data Systems Division at NASA Headquarters is using to meet this challenge is the Mission Operations Control Architecture (MOCA) project. Technical direction of this effort has been delegated to the Mission Operations Division (MOD) of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). MOCA is to develop a mission control and data acquisition architecture, and supporting standards, to guide the development of future spacecraft and mission control facilities at GSFC. The architecture will reduce the need for around-the-clock operations staffing, obtain a high level of reuse of flight and ground software elements from mission to mission, and increase overall system flexibility by enabling the migration of appropriate functions from the ground to the spacecraft. The end results are to be an established way of designing the spacecraft-ground system interface for GSFC's in-house developed spacecraft, and a specification of the end to end spacecraft control process, including data structures, interfaces, and protocols, suitable for inclusion in solicitation documents for future flight spacecraft. A flight software kernel may be developed and maintained in a condition that it can be offered as Government Furnished Equipment in solicitations. This paper describes the MOCA project, its current status, and the results to date.

  14. Verification and validation of control system software

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, J.K. Jr.; Kisner, R.A. ); Bhadtt, S.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The following guidelines are proposed for verification and validation (V V) of nuclear power plant control system software: (a) use risk management to decide what and how much V V is needed; (b) classify each software application using a scheme that reflects what type and how much V V is needed; (c) maintain a set of reference documents with current information about each application; (d) use Program Inspection as the initial basic verification method; and (e) establish a deficiencies log for each software application. The following additional practices are strongly recommended: (a) use a computer-based configuration management system to track all aspects of development and maintenance; (b) establish reference baselines of the software, associated reference documents, and development tools at regular intervals during development; (c) use object-oriented design and programming to promote greater software reliability and reuse; (d) provide a copy of the software development environment as part of the package of deliverables; and (e) initiate an effort to use formal methods for preparation of Technical Specifications. The paper provides background information and reasons for the guidelines and recommendations. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Control system devices : architectures and supply channels overview.

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, Jason; Atkins, William Dee; Schwartz, Moses Daniel; Mulder, John C.

    2010-08-01

    This report describes a research project to examine the hardware used in automated control systems like those that control the electric grid. This report provides an overview of the vendors, architectures, and supply channels for a number of control system devices. The research itself represents an attempt to probe more deeply into the area of programmable logic controllers (PLCs) - the specialized digital computers that control individual processes within supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. The report (1) provides an overview of control system networks and PLC architecture, (2) furnishes profiles for the top eight vendors in the PLC industry, (3) discusses the communications protocols used in different industries, and (4) analyzes the hardware used in several PLC devices. As part of the project, several PLCs were disassembled to identify constituent components. That information will direct the next step of the research, which will greatly increase our understanding of PLC security in both the hardware and software areas. Such an understanding is vital for discerning the potential national security impact of security flaws in these devices, as well as for developing proactive countermeasures.

  16. Control Software for Advanced Video Guidance Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Book, Michael L.; Bryan, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    Embedded software has been developed specifically for controlling an Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS). A Video Guidance Sensor is an optoelectronic system that provides guidance for automated docking of two vehicles. Such a system includes pulsed laser diodes and a video camera, the output of which is digitized. From the positions of digitized target images and known geometric relationships, the relative position and orientation of the vehicles are computed. The present software consists of two subprograms running in two processors that are parts of the AVGS. The subprogram in the first processor receives commands from an external source, checks the commands for correctness, performs commanded non-image-data-processing control functions, and sends image data processing parts of commands to the second processor. The subprogram in the second processor processes image data as commanded. Upon power-up, the software performs basic tests of functionality, then effects a transition to a standby mode. When a command is received, the software goes into one of several operational modes (e.g. acquisition or tracking). The software then returns, to the external source, the data appropriate to the command.

  17. Open core control software for surgical robots.

    PubMed

    Arata, Jumpei; Kozuka, Hiroaki; Kim, Hyung Wook; Takesue, Naoyuki; Vladimirov, B; Sakaguchi, Masamichi; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Chinzei, Kiyoyuki; Fujimoto, Hideo

    2010-05-01

    In these days, patients and doctors in operation room are surrounded by many medical devices as resulting from recent advancement of medical technology. However, these cutting-edge medical devices are working independently and not collaborating with each other, even though the collaborations between these devices such as navigation systems and medical imaging devices are becoming very important for accomplishing complex surgical tasks (such as a tumor removal procedure while checking the tumor location in neurosurgery). On the other hand, several surgical robots have been commercialized, and are becoming common. However, these surgical robots are not open for collaborations with external medical devices in these days. A cutting-edge "intelligent surgical robot" will be possible in collaborating with surgical robots, various kinds of sensors, navigation system and so on. On the other hand, most of the academic software developments for surgical robots are "home-made" in their research institutions and not open to the public. Therefore, open source control software for surgical robots can be beneficial in this field. From these perspectives, we developed Open Core Control software for surgical robots to overcome these challenges. In general, control softwares have hardware dependencies based on actuators, sensors and various kinds of internal devices. Therefore, these control softwares cannot be used on different types of robots without modifications. However, the structure of the Open Core Control software can be reused for various types of robots by abstracting hardware dependent parts. In addition, network connectivity is crucial for collaboration between advanced medical devices. The OpenIGTLink is adopted in Interface class which plays a role to communicate with external medical devices. At the same time, it is essential to maintain the stable operation within the asynchronous data transactions through network. In the Open Core Control software, several

  18. Open core control software for surgical robots

    PubMed Central

    Kozuka, Hiroaki; Kim, Hyung Wook; Takesue, Naoyuki; Vladimirov, B.; Sakaguchi, Masamichi; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Chinzei, Kiyoyuki; Fujimoto, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    Object In these days, patients and doctors in operation room are surrounded by many medical devices as resulting from recent advancement of medical technology. However, these cutting-edge medical devices are working independently and not collaborating with each other, even though the collaborations between these devices such as navigation systems and medical imaging devices are becoming very important for accomplishing complex surgical tasks (such as a tumor removal procedure while checking the tumor location in neurosurgery). On the other hand, several surgical robots have been commercialized, and are becoming common. However, these surgical robots are not open for collaborations with external medical devices in these days. A cutting-edge “intelligent surgical robot” will be possible in collaborating with surgical robots, various kinds of sensors, navigation system and so on. On the other hand, most of the academic software developments for surgical robots are “home-made” in their research institutions and not open to the public. Therefore, open source control software for surgical robots can be beneficial in this field. From these perspectives, we developed Open Core Control software for surgical robots to overcome these challenges. Materials and methods In general, control softwares have hardware dependencies based on actuators, sensors and various kinds of internal devices. Therefore, these control softwares cannot be used on different types of robots without modifications. However, the structure of the Open Core Control software can be reused for various types of robots by abstracting hardware dependent parts. In addition, network connectivity is crucial for collaboration between advanced medical devices. The OpenIGTLink is adopted in Interface class which plays a role to communicate with external medical devices. At the same time, it is essential to maintain the stable operation within the asynchronous data transactions through network. In the Open

  19. Environmental Control System Software & Hardware Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Daniel Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    ECS hardware: (1) Provides controlled purge to SLS Rocket and Orion spacecraft. (2) Provide mission-focused engineering products and services. ECS software: (1) NASA requires Compact Unique Identifiers (CUIs); fixed-length identifier used to identify information items. (2) CUI structure; composed of nine semantic fields that aid the user in recognizing its purpose.

  20. Software Technology Transfer and Export Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    capabilities based on research primarily conducted by U.S. laboratories , even before U.S. companies have been willing to make the investment. c) Several...configuration control tools. The tools oermit ex-ression, proof, and enforcement of correctness of software to its specifications at several levels of detail

  1. Designing the Undesignable: Social Software and Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dron, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Social software, such as blogs, wikis, tagging systems and collaborative filters, treats the group as a first-class object within the system. Drawing from theories of transactional distance and control, this paper proposes a model of e-learning that extends traditional concepts of learner-teacher-content interactions to include these emergent…

  2. CARMENES: The CARMENES instrument control software suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomé, J.; Guàrdia, J.; Hagen, H.-J.; Morales Muñoz, R.; Abril, M.; Benítez, D.; Caballero, J. A.; Fresno, M. L.; García-Piquer, A.; Gesa, Ll.; de Guindos, E.; de Juan, E.; Schiller, J.; Vico, I.; Vilardell, F.; Zechmeister, M.; Reiners, A.; Ribas, I.; Seifert, W.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P. J.

    2016-08-01

    The main goal of the CARMENES instrument is to perform high-accuracy measurements of stellar radial velocities (1 m/s) with long-term stability. CARMENES is installed at the 3.5 m telescope in the Calar Alto Observatory (Spain) and it is equipped with two spectrographs covering from the visible to the near-infrared. We present the software packages that are included in the instrument control layer. The coordination and management of CARMENES is handled by the Instrument Control System (ICS), which is responsible for carrying out the operations of the different subsystems providing a tool to operate the instrument in an integrated manner from low to high user interaction level. The ICS interacts with the following subsystems: the near-infrared (NIR) and visible channels, composed by the detectors and exposure meters; the calibration units; the environment sensors; the front-end electronics; the acquisition and guiding module; the interfaces with telescope and dome; and, finally, the software subsystems for operational scheduling of tasks, data processing, and data archiving. The software control framework and all the software modules and layers for the different subsystems contribute to maximize the scientific return of the instrument. The CARMENES workflow covers from the translation of the survey strategy into a detailed schedule to the data processing routines that extract radial velocity data from the observed targets. The control suite is integrated in the instrument since the end of 2015.

  3. AERCam Autonomy: Intelligent Software Architecture for Robotic Free Flying Nanosatellite Inspection Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven E.; Duran, Steve G.; Braun, Angela N.; Straube, Timothy M.; Mitchell, Jennifer D.

    2006-01-01

    with minimal impact on IVA operators and ground controllers, the Mini AERCam system architecture incorporates intelligent systems attributes that support various autonomous capabilities. 1) A robust command sequencer enables task-level command scripting. Command scripting is employed for operations such as automatic inspection scans over a region of interest, and operator-hands-off automated docking. 2) A system manager built on the same expert-system software as the command sequencer provides detection and smart-response capability for potential system-level anomalies, like loss of communications between the Free Flyer and control station. 3) An AERCam dynamics manager provides nominal and off-nominal management of guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) functions. It is employed for safe trajectory monitoring, contingency maneuvering, and related roles. This paper will describe these architectural components of Mini AERCam autonomy, as well as the interaction of these elements with a human operator during supervised autonomous control.

  4. CICADA, CCD and Instrument Control Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Peter J.; Brooks, Mick; Meatheringham, Stephen J.; Roberts, William H.

    Computerised Instrument Control and Data Acquisition (CICADA) is a software system for control of telescope instruments in a distributed computing environment. It is designed using object-oriented techniques and built with standard computing tools such as RPC, SysV IPC, Posix threads, Tcl, and GUI builders. The system is readily extensible to new instruments and currently supports the Astromed 3200 CCD controller and MSSSO's new tip-tilt system. Work is currently underway to provide support for the SDSU CCD controller and MSSSO's Double Beam Spectrograph. A core set of processes handle common communication and control tasks, while specific instruments are ``bolted'' on using C++ inheritance techniques.

  5. Minimizing communication cost among distributed controllers in software defined networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arlimatti, Shivaleela; Elbreiki, Walid; Hassan, Suhaidi; Habbal, Adib; Elshaikh, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Software Defined Networking (SDN) is a new paradigm to increase the flexibility of today's network by promising for a programmable network. The fundamental idea behind this new architecture is to simplify network complexity by decoupling control plane and data plane of the network devices, and by making the control plane centralized. Recently controllers have distributed to solve the problem of single point of failure, and to increase scalability and flexibility during workload distribution. Even though, controllers are flexible and scalable to accommodate more number of network switches, yet the problem of intercommunication cost between distributed controllers is still challenging issue in the Software Defined Network environment. This paper, aims to fill the gap by proposing a new mechanism, which minimizes intercommunication cost with graph partitioning algorithm, an NP hard problem. The methodology proposed in this paper is, swapping of network elements between controller domains to minimize communication cost by calculating communication gain. The swapping of elements minimizes inter and intra communication cost among network domains. We validate our work with the OMNeT++ simulation environment tool. Simulation results show that the proposed mechanism minimizes the inter domain communication cost among controllers compared to traditional distributed controllers.

  6. MACOP modular architecture with control primitives

    PubMed Central

    Waegeman, Tim; Hermans, Michiel; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Walking, catching a ball and reaching are all tasks in which humans and animals exhibit advanced motor skills. Findings in biological research concerning motor control suggest a modular control hierarchy which combines movement/motor primitives into complex and natural movements. Engineers inspire their research on these findings in the quest for adaptive and skillful control for robots. In this work we propose a modular architecture with control primitives (MACOP) which uses a set of controllers, where each controller becomes specialized in a subregion of its joint and task-space. Instead of having a single controller being used in this subregion [such as MOSAIC (modular selection and identification for control) on which MACOP is inspired], MACOP relates more to the idea of continuously mixing a limited set of primitive controllers. By enforcing a set of desired properties on the mixing mechanism, a mixture of primitives emerges unsupervised which successfully solves the control task. We evaluate MACOP on a numerical model of a robot arm by training it to generate desired trajectories. We investigate how the tracking performance is affected by the number of controllers in MACOP and examine how the individual controllers and their generated control primitives contribute to solving the task. Furthermore, we show how MACOP compensates for the dynamic effects caused by a fixed control rate and the inertia of the robot. PMID:23888140

  7. Flight Controller Software Protects Lightweight Flexible Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight flexible aircraft may be the future of aviation, but a major problem is their susceptibility to flutter-uncontrollable vibrations that can destroy wings. Armstrong Flight Research Center awarded SBIR funding to Minneapolis, Minnesota-based MUSYN Inc. to develop software that helps program flight controllers to suppress flutter. The technology is now available for aircraft manufacturers and other industries that use equipment with automated controls.

  8. AAO Starbugs: software control and associated algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, Nuria P. F.; Vuong, Minh V.; Shortridge, Keith; Farrell, Tony J.; Smedley, Scott; Hong, Sungwook E.; Bacigalupo, Carlos; Goodwin, Michael; Kuehn, Kyler; Satorre, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    The Australian Astronomical Observatory's TAIPAN instrument deploys 150 Starbug robots to position optical fibres to accuracies of 0.3 arcsec, on a 32 cm glass field plate on the focal plane of the 1.2 m UK-Schmidt telescope. This paper describes the software system developed to control and monitor the Starbugs, with particular emphasis on the automated path-finding algorithms, and the metrology software which keeps track of the position and motion of individual Starbugs as they independently move in a crowded field. The software employs a tiered approach to find a collision-free path for every Starbug, from its current position to its target location. This consists of three path-finding stages of increasing complexity and computational cost. For each Starbug a path is attempted using a simple method. If unsuccessful, subsequently more complex (and expensive) methods are tried until a valid path is found or the target is flagged as unreachable.

  9. Software verification plan for GCS. [guidance and control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dent, Leslie A.; Shagnea, Anita M.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1990-01-01

    This verification plan is written as part of an experiment designed to study the fundamental characteristics of the software failure process. The experiment will be conducted using several implementations of software that were produced according to industry-standard guidelines, namely the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics RTCA/DO-178A guidelines, Software Consideration in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification, for the development of flight software. This plan fulfills the DO-178A requirements for providing instructions on the testing of each implementation of software. The plan details the verification activities to be performed at each phase in the development process, contains a step by step description of the testing procedures, and discusses all of the tools used throughout the verification process.

  10. Design and reliability analysis of DP-3 dynamic positioning control architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Wan, Lei; Jiang, Da-Peng; Xu, Yu-Ru

    2011-12-01

    As the exploration and exploitation of oil and gas proliferate throughout deepwater area, the requirements on the reliability of dynamic positioning system become increasingly stringent. The control objective ensuring safety operation at deep water will not be met by a single controller for dynamic positioning. In order to increase the availability and reliability of dynamic positioning control system, the triple redundancy hardware and software control architectures were designed and developed according to the safe specifications of DP-3 classification notation for dynamically positioned ships and rigs. The hardware redundant configuration takes the form of triple-redundant hot standby configuration including three identical operator stations and three real-time control computers which connect each other through dual networks. The function of motion control and redundancy management of control computers were implemented by software on the real-time operating system VxWorks. The software realization of task loose synchronization, majority voting and fault detection were presented in details. A hierarchical software architecture was planed during the development of software, consisting of application layer, real-time layer and physical layer. The behavior of the DP-3 dynamic positioning control system was modeled by a Markov model to analyze its reliability. The effects of variation in parameters on the reliability measures were investigated. The time domain dynamic simulation was carried out on a deepwater drilling rig to prove the feasibility of the proposed control architecture.

  11. Microgrid and Inverter Control and Simulator Software

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-13

    A collection of software that can simulate the operation of an inverter on a microgrid or control a real inverter. In addition, it can simulate the control of multiple nodes on a microgrid." Application: Simulation of inverters and microgrids; control of inverters on microgrids." The MMI submodule is designed to control custom inverter hardware, and to simulate that hardware. The INVERTER submodule is only the simulator code, and is of an earlier generation than the simulator in MMI. The MICROGRID submodule is an agent-based simulator of multiple nodes on a microgrid which presents a web interface. The WIND submodule produces movies of wind data with a web interface.

  12. Overview and Software Architecture of the Copernicus Trajectory Design and Optimization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jacob; Senent, Juan S.; Ocampo, Cesar; Mathur, Ravi; Davis, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    The Copernicus Trajectory Design and Optimization System represents an innovative and comprehensive approach to on-orbit mission design, trajectory analysis and optimization. Copernicus integrates state of the art algorithms in optimization, interactive visualization, spacecraft state propagation, and data input-output interfaces, allowing the analyst to design spacecraft missions to all possible Solar System destinations. All of these features are incorporated within a single architecture that can be used interactively via a comprehensive GUI interface, or passively via external interfaces that execute batch processes. This paper describes the Copernicus software architecture together with the challenges associated with its implementation. Additionally, future development and planned new capabilities are discussed. Key words: Copernicus, Spacecraft Trajectory Optimization Software.

  13. On the design of a generic and scalable multilayer software architecture for data flow management in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Decruyenaere, J; De Turck, F; Vanhastel, S; Vandermeulen, F; Demeester, P; de Moor, G

    2003-01-01

    The current Intensive Care Information Systems (IC-ISs) collect and store monitoring data in on automated way and can replace all paper forms by an electronic equivalent, resulting in a paperless ICU. Future development of IC-ISs will now have to focus on bedside clinical decision support. The current IC-ISs are data-driven systems, with a two-layer software architecture. This software architecture is hardly maintainable and probably not the most optimal architecture to make the transition towards future systems with-decision support. The aim of this research was to address the design of an alternative software architecture based on new paradigms. State-of-the art component, middleware and agent technology were deployed to design and implement a software architecture for ICU data flow management. An advanced multi-layer architecture for efficient data flow management in the ICU has been designed. The architecture is both generic and scalable, which means that it neither depends on a particular ICU nor on the deployed monitoring devices. Automatic device detection and Graphical User Interface generation are taken into account. Furthermore, a demonstrator has been developed as a proof that the proposed conceptual software architecture is feasible in practice. The core of the new architecture consists of Bed Decision Agents (BDAs). The introduction of BDAs, who perform specific dedicated tasks, improves the adaptability and maintainability of the future very complex IC-ISs. A software architecture, based on component, middleware and agent technology, is feasible and offers important advantages over the currently used two-layer software architecture.

  14. Algorithms and software for solving finite element equations on serial and parallel architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Over the past 15 years numerous new techniques have been developed for solving systems of equations and eigenvalue problems arising in finite element computations. A package called SPARSPAK has been developed by the author and his co-workers which exploits these new methods. The broad objective of this research project is to incorporate some of this software in the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) testbed, and to extend the techniques for use on multiprocessor architectures.

  15. A Software Defined Radio Based Architecture for the Reagan Test Site Telemetry Modernization (RTM) Program-

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-26

    spectrum reallocation. A system design that is frequency agile and agnostic could adapt to these changes while being minimally impacted by a future...detectors, etc.) are instead implemented by means of software on a personal computer or embedded system [2]. The SDR architecture of the Modernized...and allowing a flexible design that can easily change as the needs of customers may change. [1] To maximize flexibility of the RTM system and to

  16. Software Architecture Design of GIS Web Service Aggregation Based on Service Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.-C.; Yang, J.; Tan, M.-J.; Gan, Q.

    2011-08-01

    Based on the analysis of research status of domestic and international GIS web service aggregation and development tendency of public platform of GIS web service, the paper designed software architecture of GIS web service aggregation based on GIS web service group. Firstly, using heterogeneous GIS services model, the software architecture converted a variety of heterogeneous services to a unified interface of GIS services, and divided different types of GIS services into different service groups referring to description of GIS services. Secondly, a service aggregation process model was designed. This model completed the task of specific service aggregation instance, by automatically selecting member GIS Web services in the same service group. Dynamic capabilities and automatic adaptation of GIS Web services aggregation process were achieved. Thirdly, this paper designed a service evaluation model of GIS web service aggregation based on service group from three aspects, i.e. GIS Web Service itself, networking conditions and service consumer. This model implemented effective quality evaluation and performance monitoring of GIS web service aggregation. It could be used to guide the execution, monitor and service selection of aggregation process. Therefore, robustness of aggregated GIS web service was improved. Finally, the software architecture has been widely used in public platform of GIS web service and a number of geo-spatial framework constructions for digital city in Sichuan Province, and aggregated various GIS web services such as World Map(National Public Platform of Geo-spatial Service), ArcGIS, SuperMap, MapGIS, NewMap etc. Applications of items showed that this software architecture was practicability.

  17. An Open Source Software Platform for Visualizing and Teaching Conservation Tasks in Architectural Heritage Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Jose, I. Ignacio; Martinez, J.; Alvarez, N.; Fernandez, J. J.; Delgado, F.; Martinez, R.; Puche, J. C.; Finat, J.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we present a new software platform for interactive volumetric visualization of complex architectural objects and their applications to teaching and training conservation interventions in Architectural Cultural Heritage. Photogrammetric surveying is performed by processing the information arising from image- and range-based devices. Our visualization application is based on an adaptation of WebGL open standard; the performed adaptation allows to import open standards and an interactive navigation of 3D models in ordinary web navigators with a good performance. The Visualization platform is scalable and can be applied to urban environments, provided open source files be used; CityGML is an open standard based on a geometry -driven Ontology which is compatible with this approach. We illustrate our results with examples concerning to very damaged churches and a urban district of Segovia (World Cultural Heritage). Their connection with appropriate database eases the building evolution and interventions tracking. We have incorporated some preliminary examples to illustrate Advanced Visualization Tools and architectural e-Learning software platform which have been created for assessing conservation and restoration tasks in very damaged buildings. First version of the Advanced Visualization application has been developed in the framework of ADISPA Spanish Project Results. Our results are illustrated with the application of these software applications to several very damaged cultural heritage buildings in rural zones of Castilla y Leon (Spain).

  18. Thirty Meter Telescope: observatory software requirements, architecture, and preliminary implementation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, David R.; Angeli, George; Boyer, Corinne; Sirota, Mark; Trinh, Thang

    2008-07-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be a ground-based, 30-m optical-IR alt-az telescope with a highly segmented primary mirror located in a remote location. Efficient science operations require the asynchronous coordination of many different sub-systems including telescope mount, three independent active optics sub-systems, adaptive optics, laser guide stars, and user-configured science instrument. An important high-level requirement is target acquisition and observatory system configuration must be completed in less than 5 minutes (or 10 minutes if moving to a new instrument). To meet this coordination challenge and target acquisition time requirement, a distributed software architecture is envisioned consisting of software components linked by a service-based software communications backbone. A master sequencer coordinates the activities of mid-layer sequencers for the telescope, adaptive optics, and selected instrument. In turn, these mid-layer sequencers coordinate the activities of groups of sub-systems. In this paper, TMT observatory requirements are presented in more detail, followed by a description of the design reference software architecture and a discussion of preliminary implementation strategies.

  19. A software architecture for multi-cellular system simulations on graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Jeannin-Girardon, Anne; Ballet, Pascal; Rodin, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    The first aim of simulation in virtual environment is to help biologists to have a better understanding of the simulated system. The cost of such simulation is significantly reduced compared to that of in vivo simulation. However, the inherent complexity of biological system makes it hard to simulate these systems on non-parallel architectures: models might be made of sub-models and take several scales into account; the number of simulated entities may be quite large. Today, graphics cards are used for general purpose computing which has been made easier thanks to frameworks like CUDA or OpenCL. Parallelization of models may however not be easy: parallel computer programing skills are often required; several hardware architectures may be used to execute models. In this paper, we present the software architecture we built in order to implement various models able to simulate multi-cellular system. This architecture is modular and it implements data structures adapted for graphics processing units architectures. It allows efficient simulation of biological mechanisms.

  20. Adaptive software architecture based on confident HCI for the deployment of sensitive services in Smart Homes.

    PubMed

    Vega-Barbas, Mario; Pau, Iván; Martín-Ruiz, María Luisa; Seoane, Fernando

    2015-03-25

    Smart spaces foster the development of natural and appropriate forms of human-computer interaction by taking advantage of home customization. The interaction potential of the Smart Home, which is a special type of smart space, is of particular interest in fields in which the acceptance of new technologies is limited and restrictive. The integration of smart home design patterns with sensitive solutions can increase user acceptance. In this paper, we present the main challenges that have been identified in the literature for the successful deployment of sensitive services (e.g., telemedicine and assistive services) in smart spaces and a software architecture that models the functionalities of a Smart Home platform that are required to maintain and support such sensitive services. This architecture emphasizes user interaction as a key concept to facilitate the acceptance of sensitive services by end-users and utilizes activity theory to support its innovative design. The application of activity theory to the architecture eases the handling of novel concepts, such as understanding of the system by patients at home or the affordability of assistive services. Finally, we provide a proof-of-concept implementation of the architecture and compare the results with other architectures from the literature.

  1. Adaptive Software Architecture Based on Confident HCI for the Deployment of Sensitive Services in Smart Homes

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Barbas, Mario; Pau, Iván; Martín-Ruiz, María Luisa; Seoane, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Smart spaces foster the development of natural and appropriate forms of human-computer interaction by taking advantage of home customization. The interaction potential of the Smart Home, which is a special type of smart space, is of particular interest in fields in which the acceptance of new technologies is limited and restrictive. The integration of smart home design patterns with sensitive solutions can increase user acceptance. In this paper, we present the main challenges that have been identified in the literature for the successful deployment of sensitive services (e.g., telemedicine and assistive services) in smart spaces and a software architecture that models the functionalities of a Smart Home platform that are required to maintain and support such sensitive services. This architecture emphasizes user interaction as a key concept to facilitate the acceptance of sensitive services by end-users and utilizes activity theory to support its innovative design. The application of activity theory to the architecture eases the handling of novel concepts, such as understanding of the system by patients at home or the affordability of assistive services. Finally, we provide a proof-of-concept implementation of the architecture and compare the results with other architectures from the literature. PMID:25815449

  2. SEPAC software configuration control plan and procedures, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    SEPAC Software Configuration Control Plan and Procedures are presented. The objective of the software configuration control is to establish the process for maintaining configuration control of the SEPAC software beginning with the baselining of SEPAC Flight Software Version 1 and encompass the integration and verification tests through Spacelab Level IV Integration. They are designed to provide a simplified but complete configuration control process. The intent is to require a minimum amount of paperwork but provide total traceability of SEPAC software.

  3. Achieving Better Buying Power for Mobile Open Architecture Software Systems Through Diverse Acquisition Scenarios

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    qÜáêíÉÉåíÜ=^ååì~ä= ^Åèìáëáíáçå=oÉëÉ~êÅÜ= póãéçëáìã= tÉÇåÉëÇ~ó=pÉëëáçåë= sçäìãÉ=f= = Achieving Better Buying Power for Mobile Open Architecture Software ...Systems Through Diverse Acquisition Scenarios Walt Scacchi, Senior Research Scientist, Institute for Software Research, UC Irvine Thomas Alspaugh...Project Scientist, Institute for Software Research, UC Irvine Published April 30, 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  4. Software architecture of the III/FBI segment of the FBI's integrated automated identification system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booker, Brian T.

    1997-02-01

    This paper will describe the software architecture of the Interstate Identification Index (III/FBI) Segment of the FBI's Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS). IAFIS is currently under development, with deployment to begin in 1998. III/FBI will provide the repository of criminal history and photographs for criminal subjects, as well as identification data for military and civilian federal employees. Services provided by III/FBI include maintenance of the criminal and civil data, subject search of the criminal and civil data, and response generation services for IAFIS. III/FBI software will be comprised of both COTS and an estimated 250,000 lines of developed C code. This paper will describe the following: (1) the high-level requirements of the III/FBI software; (2) the decomposition of the III/FBI software into Computer Software Configuration Items (CSCIs); (3) the top-level design of the III/FBI CSCIs; and (4) the relationships among the developed CSCIs and the COTS products that will comprise the III/FBI software.

  5. Towards a State Based Control Architecture for Large Telescopes: Laying a Foundation at the VLT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karban, R.; Kornweibel, N.; Dvorak, D.; Ingham, M.; Wagner, D.

    2011-01-01

    Large telescopes are characterized by a high level of distribution of control-related tasks and will feature diverse data flow patterns and large ranges of sampling frequencies; there will often be no single, fixed server-client relationship between the control tasks. the architecture is also challenged by the task of integrating heterogeneous subsystems which will be delivered by multiple different contractors. Due to the high number of distributed components, the control system needs to effectively detect errors and faults, impede their propagation, and accurately mitigate them in the shortest time possible, enabling the service to be restored. The presented Data-Driven Architecture is based on a decentralized approach with an end-to-end integration of disparate, independently developed software components. These components employ a high-performance standards-based communication middle-ware infrastructure, based on the Data Distribution Service. A set of rules and principles, based on JPL's State Analysis method and architecture, are use to constrain component-to component interactions, where the Control System and System Under Control are clearly separated. State Analysis provide a model-based process for capturing system and software requirements and design, greatly reducing the gap between the requirements on software specified by systems engineers and the implementation by software engineers. The method and architecture has been field tested at the Very Large Telescope, where it has been integrated into an operational system.

  6. Towards a State Based Control Architecture for Large Telescopes: Laying a Foundation at the VLT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karban, R.; Kornweibel, N.; Dvorak, D.; Ingham, M.; Wagner, D.

    2011-01-01

    Large telescopes are characterized by a high level of distribution of control-related tasks and will feature diverse data flow patterns and large ranges of sampling frequencies; there will often be no single, fixed server-client relationship between the control tasks. the architecture is also challenged by the task of integrating heterogeneous subsystems which will be delivered by multiple different contractors. Due to the high number of distributed components, the control system needs to effectively detect errors and faults, impede their propagation, and accurately mitigate them in the shortest time possible, enabling the service to be restored. The presented Data-Driven Architecture is based on a decentralized approach with an end-to-end integration of disparate, independently developed software components. These components employ a high-performance standards-based communication middle-ware infrastructure, based on the Data Distribution Service. A set of rules and principles, based on JPL's State Analysis method and architecture, are use to constrain component-to component interactions, where the Control System and System Under Control are clearly separated. State Analysis provide a model-based process for capturing system and software requirements and design, greatly reducing the gap between the requirements on software specified by systems engineers and the implementation by software engineers. The method and architecture has been field tested at the Very Large Telescope, where it has been integrated into an operational system.

  7. Open architecture controller solution for custom machine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ronald L.; Reagin, J. M.; Garner, T. D.; Sweeny, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    In today's marketplace, product quality and price have become requirements for entry and are no longer sufficient to differentiate one's product and gain a competitive advantage. A key to competition in the future will be a company's ability to respond quickly to a rapidly-changing global marketplace. Developers of manufacturing equipment must play a role in the reduction of the product development cycle time by increasing the flexibility of their equipment and decreasing its cost and time to market. This paper will discuss the implementation of an open-architecture machine controller on a flip-chip placement machine and how this implementation supports the goals of reduced development time and increased equipment flexibility. The following subjects are discussed: 1) Issues related to the selection of a standard operating system, including real-time performance, preemptive multi-tasking, multi-threaded applications, and development tools. 2) The use of a common API for motion, and I/O. 3) Use of a rapid application development and object-oriented programming techniques on the machine controller to shorten development time and support code reuse. 4) Specific hardware and software issues related to the implementation of the flip chip controller. This includes hardware and software implementation details, controller performance, and human interface issues.

  8. Regulatory modules controlling maize inflorescence architecture.

    PubMed

    Eveland, Andrea L; Goldshmidt, Alexander; Pautler, Michael; Morohashi, Kengo; Liseron-Monfils, Christophe; Lewis, Michael W; Kumari, Sunita; Hiraga, Susumu; Yang, Fang; Unger-Wallace, Erica; Olson, Andrew; Hake, Sarah; Vollbrecht, Erik; Grotewold, Erich; Ware, Doreen; Jackson, David

    2014-03-01

    Genetic control of branching is a primary determinant of yield, regulating seed number and harvesting ability, yet little is known about the molecular networks that shape grain-bearing inflorescences of cereal crops. Here, we used the maize (Zea mays) inflorescence to investigate gene networks that modulate determinacy, specifically the decision to allow branch growth. We characterized developmental transitions by associating spatiotemporal expression profiles with morphological changes resulting from genetic perturbations that disrupt steps in a pathway controlling branching. Developmental dynamics of genes targeted in vivo by the transcription factor RAMOSA1, a key regulator of determinacy, revealed potential mechanisms for repressing branches in distinct stem cell populations, including interactions with KNOTTED1, a master regulator of stem cell maintenance. Our results uncover discrete developmental modules that function in determining grass-specific morphology and provide a basis for targeted crop improvement and translation to other cereal crops with comparable inflorescence architectures.

  9. The LBT double prime focus camera control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Paola, Andrea; Baruffolo, Andrea; Gallozzi, Stefano; Pedichini, Fernando; Speziali, Roberto

    2004-09-01

    The LBT double prime focus camera (LBC) is composed of twin CCD mosaic imagers. The instrument is designed to match the double channel structure of the LBT telescope and to exploit parallel observing mode by optimizing one camera at blue and the other at red side of the visible spectrum. Because of these facts, the LBC activity will likely consist of simultaneous multi-wavelength observation of specific targets, with both channels working at the same time to acquire and download images at different rates. The LBC Control Software is responsible for coordinating these activities by managing scientific sensors and all the ancillary devices such as rotators, filter wheels, optical correctors focusing, house-keeping information, tracking and Active Optics wavefront sensors. The result is obtained using four dedicated PCs to control the four CCD controllers and one dual processor PC to manage all the other aspects including instrument operator interface. The general architecture of the LBC Control Software is described as well as solutions and details about its implementation.

  10. Remote Control Software: Online from Micro to Micro.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittle, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Provides an introduction to the use of communications software for remote access between microcomputers. Areas discussed include hardware requirements for these applications, software features that should be considered, security issues, and some disadvantages of remote control software. A directory of remote control software packages is provided.…

  11. Design of an integrated airframe/propulsion control system architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Gerald C.; Lee, C. William; Strickland, Michael J.; Torkelson, Thomas C.

    1990-01-01

    The design of an integrated airframe/propulsion control system architecture is described. The design is based on a prevalidation methodology that uses both reliability and performance. A detailed account is given for the testing associated with a subset of the architecture and concludes with general observations of applying the methodology to the architecture.

  12. Software Defined GPS API: Development and Implementation of GPS Correlator Architectures Using MATLAB with Focus on SDR Implementations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-18

    and Implementation of GPS Correlator Architectures Using MATLAB with Focus on SDR Implementations The Software Defined GPS API was created with the...documentation. 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 SDR ...Implementation of GPS Correlator Architectures Using MATLAB with Focus on SDR Implementations Report Title The Software Defined GPS API was created

  13. A Distributed, Cross-Agency Software Architecture for Sharing Climate Models and Observational Data Sets (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichton, D. J.; Mattmann, C. A.; Braverman, A. J.; Cinquini, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been developing a distributed infrastructure to supporting access and sharing of Earth Science observational data sets with climate models to support model-to-data intercomparison for climate research. The Climate Data Exchange (CDX), a framework for linking distributed repositories coupled with tailored distributed services to support the intercomparison, provides mechanisms to discover, access, transform and share observational and model output data [2]. These services are critical to allowing data to remain distributed, but be pulled together to support analysis. The architecture itself provides a services-based approach allowing for integrating and working with other computing infrastructures through well-defined software interfaces. Specifically, JPL has worked very closely with the Earth System Grid (ESG) and the Program for Climate Model Diagnostics and Intercomparisons (PCMDI) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to integrate NASA science data systems with the Earth System Grid to support federation across organizational and agency boundaries [1]. Of particular interest near-term is enabling access to NASA observational data along-side climate models for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project known as CMIP5. CMIP5 is the protocol that will be used for the next International Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report (AR5) on climate change. JPL and NASA are currently engaged in a project to ensure that observational data are available to the climate research community through the Earth System Grid. By both developing a software architecture and working with the key architects for the ESG, JPL has been successful at building a prototype for AR5. This presentation will review the software architecture including core principles, models and interfaces, the Climate Data Exchange project and specific goals to support access to both observational data and models for AR5. It will highlight the progress

  14. Architecture of the Effelsberg control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessner, Axel

    1995-06-01

    The 100 m radiotelescope in Effelsberg (Germany) has been in continuous operation for over 24 years. Consequently, its control system has evolved from a centralized Ferranti Argus 500 based architecture via one using Modcomp Classics coupled with `dumb' CAMAC crates to our current multi-level system, where two clustered VAX 3000 (VMS) machines coordinate several `intelligent' CAMAC crates. Receiver timing, ULO control, and also the control of the backends happens on the CAMAC level using dedicated crates equipped with DC-J11 (PDP11) auxiliary crate controllers. A similar approach is used for the positioning of the telescope, where the astronomical calculations are made by the VAX but the PID control loops for the telescope axes are calculated by the auxiliary crate controllers. A specialized 16-bit parallel interface developed by the MPIfR's digital group enables the observational data from the continuum, spectroscopic, and pulsar backends to flow directly to the VAXes, where it is buffered and then transferred to DATapes and via network connections to UNIX workstations for further processing.

  15. Advanced Active Thermal Control Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Anthony J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) initiated a dynamic study to determine possible improvements available through advanced technologies (not used on previous or current human vehicles), identify promising development initiatives for advanced active thermal control systems (ATCS's), and help prioritize funding and personnel distribution among many research projects by providing a common basis to compare several diverse technologies. Some technologies included were two-phase thermal control systems, light-weight radiators, phase-change thermal storage, rotary fluid coupler, and heat pumps. JSC designed the study to estimate potential benefits from these various proposed and under-development thermal control technologies for five possible human missions early in the next century. The study compared all the technologies to a baseline mission using mass as a basis. Each baseline mission assumed an internal thermal control system; an external thermal control system; and aluminum, flow-through radiators. Solar vapor compression heat pumps and light-weight radiators showed the greatest promise as general advanced thermal technologies which can be applied across a range of missions. This initial study identified several other promising ATCS technologies which offer mass savings and other savings compared to traditional thermal control systems. Because the study format compares various architectures with a commonly defined baseline, it is versatile and expandable, and is expected to be updated as needed.

  16. Software architecture for multi-bed FDK-based reconstruction in X-ray CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Abella, M; Vaquero, J J; Sisniega, A; Pascau, J; Udías, A; García, V; Vidal, I; Desco, M

    2012-08-01

    Most small-animal X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners are based on cone-beam geometry with a flat-panel detector orbiting in a circular trajectory. Image reconstruction in these systems is usually performed by approximate methods based on the algorithm proposed by Feldkamp et al. (FDK). Besides the implementation of the reconstruction algorithm itself, in order to design a real system it is necessary to take into account numerous issues so as to obtain the best quality images from the acquired data. This work presents a comprehensive, novel software architecture for small-animal CT scanners based on cone-beam geometry with circular scanning trajectory. The proposed architecture covers all the steps from the system calibration to the volume reconstruction and conversion into Hounsfield units. It includes an efficient implementation of an FDK-based reconstruction algorithm that takes advantage of system symmetries and allows for parallel reconstruction using a multiprocessor computer. Strategies for calibration and artifact correction are discussed to justify the strategies adopted. New procedures for multi-bed misalignment, beam-hardening, and Housfield units calibration are proposed. Experiments with phantoms and real data showed the suitability of the proposed software architecture for an X-ray small animal CT based on cone-beam geometry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Control System Architectures, Technologies and Concepts for Near Term and Future Human Exploration of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard; Overland, David

    2004-01-01

    Technologies that facilitate the design and control of complex, hybrid, and resource-constrained systems are examined. This paper focuses on design methodologies, and system architectures, not on specific control methods that may be applied to life support subsystems. Honeywell and Boeing have estimated that 60-80Y0 of the effort in developing complex control systems is software development, and only 20-40% is control system development. It has also been shown that large software projects have failure rates of as high as 50-65%. Concepts discussed include the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and design patterns with the goal of creating a self-improving, self-documenting system design process. Successful architectures for control must not only facilitate hardware to software integration, but must also reconcile continuously changing software with much less frequently changing hardware. These architectures rely on software modules or components to facilitate change. Architecting such systems for change leverages the interfaces between these modules or components.

  18. Architectures & requirements for advanced weapon controllers.

    SciTech Connect

    McMurtrey, Brian J.; Klarer, Paul Richard; Bryan, Jon R.

    2004-02-01

    This report describes work done in FY2003 under Advanced and Exploratory Studies funding for Advanced Weapons Controllers. The contemporary requirements and envisioned missions for nuclear weapons are changing from the class of missions originally envisioned during development of the current stockpile. Technology available today in electronics, computing, and software provides capabilities not practical or even possible 20 years ago. This exploratory work looks at how Weapon Electrical Systems can be improved to accommodate new missions and new technologies while maintaining or improving existing standards in nuclear safety and reliability.

  19. The Use of Software Agents for Autonomous Control of a DC Space Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Ryan D.; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to enable manned deep-space missions, the spacecraft must be controlled autonomously using on-board algorithms. A control architecture is proposed to enable this autonomous operation for an spacecraft electric power system and then implemented using a highly distributed network of software agents. These agents collaborate and compete with each other in order to implement each of the control functions. A subset of this control architecture is tested against a steadystate power system simulation and found to be able to solve a constrained optimization problem with competing objectives using only local information.

  20. The control architecture of the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    J. Fredrick Bartlett et al.

    2002-11-21

    From a controls viewpoint, contemporary high energy physics collider detectors are comparable in complexity to small to medium size accelerators: however, their controls requirements often differ significantly. D0, one of two collider experiments at Fermilab, has recently started a second, extended running period that will continue for the next five years. EPICS [1], an integrated set of software building blocks for implementing a distributed control system, has been adapted to satisfy the slow controls needs of the D0 detector by (1) extending the support for new device types and an additional field bus, (2) by the addition of a global event reporting system that augments the existing EPICS alarm support, and (3) by the addition of a centralized database with supporting tools for defining the configuration of the control system. This paper discusses the control architecture of the current D0 experiment, how the EPICS system was extended to meet the control requirements of a large, high-energy physics detector, and how a formal control system contributes to the management of detector operations.

  1. Intelligent control of a cryogenic cooling plant based on blackboard system architecture.

    PubMed

    Linkens, D A; Abbod, M F; Browne, A; Cade, N

    2000-01-01

    Intelligent system techniques have been rapidly assimilating into process control engineering, with many applications reported in the last decade. Intelligent control is bringing a new perspective as well as new challenges to process control. In this paper, a software architecture for a Blackboard for Integrated Intelligent Control Systems (BIICS) is described. The system is designed to simultaneously support multiple heterogeneous intelligent methodologies, such as neural networks. expert systems, fuzzy logic, neural networks and genetic algorithms. It will be shown how such methodologies can be readily assimilated into the software architecture. The BIICS system represents a multi-purpose platform for design and simulation of intelligent control paradigms for different kinds of processes. Currently the system utilizes intelligent control techniques (neuro-fuzzy and genetic optimization) for controlling a cryogenic plant used for superconductor testing at temperatures below 100 K.

  2. Sequence System Building Blocks: Using a Component Architecture for Sequencing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun

    2005-01-01

    Over the last few years software engineering has made significant strides in making more flexible architectures and designs possible. However, at the same time, spacecraft have become more complex and flight software has become more sophisticated. Typically spacecraft are often one-of-a-kind entities that have different hardware designs, different capabilities, different instruments, etc. Ground software has become more complex and operations teams have had to learn a myriad of tools that all have different user interfaces and represent data in different ways. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) these themes have collided to require an new approach to producing ground system software. Two different groups have been looking at tackling this particular problem. One group is working for the JPL Mars Technology Program in the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Focused Technology area. The other group is the JPL Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing Group . The major concept driving these two approaches on a similar path is to provide software that can be a more cohesive flexible system that provides a act of planning and sequencing system of services. This paper describes the efforts that have been made to date to create a unified approach from these disparate groups.

  3. Sequencing System Building Blocks: Using a Component Architecture for Sequencing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun

    2006-01-01

    Over the last few years software engineering has made significant strides in making more flexible architectures and designs possible. However, at the same time, spacecraft have become more complex and flight software has become more sophisticated. Typically spacecraft are often one-of-a-kind entities that have different hardware designs, different capabilities, different instruments, etc. Ground software has become more complex and operations teams have had to learn a myriad of tools that all have different user interfaces and represent data in different ways. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) these themes have collided to require a new approach to producing ground system software. Two different groups have been looking at tackling this particular problem. One group is working for the JPL Mars Technology Program in the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Focused Technology area. The other group is the JPL Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing Group. The major concept driving these two approaches on a similar path is to provide software that can be a more cohesive flexible system that provides a set of planning and sequencing system of services. This paper describes the efforts that have been made to date to create a unified approach from these disparate groups.

  4. Sequencing System Building Blocks: Using a Component Architecture for Sequencing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun

    2006-01-01

    Over the last few years software engineering has made significant strides in making more flexible architectures and designs possible. However, at the same time, spacecraft have become more complex and flight software has become more sophisticated. Typically spacecraft are often one-of-a-kind entities that have different hardware designs, different capabilities, different instruments, etc. Ground software has become more complex and operations teams have had to learn a myriad of tools that all have different user interfaces and represent data in different ways. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) these themes have collided to require a new approach to producing ground system software. Two different groups have been looking at tackling this particular problem. One group is working for the JPL Mars Technology Program in the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Focused Technology area. The other group is the JPL Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing Group. The major concept driving these two approaches on a similar path is to provide software that can be a more cohesive flexible system that provides a set of planning and sequencing system of services. This paper describes the efforts that have been made to date to create a unified approach from these disparate groups.

  5. Sequence System Building Blocks: Using a Component Architecture for Sequencing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; O'Reilly, Taifun

    2005-01-01

    Over the last few years software engineering has made significant strides in making more flexible architectures and designs possible. However, at the same time, spacecraft have become more complex and flight software has become more sophisticated. Typically spacecraft are often one-of-a-kind entities that have different hardware designs, different capabilities, different instruments, etc. Ground software has become more complex and operations teams have had to learn a myriad of tools that all have different user interfaces and represent data in different ways. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) these themes have collided to require an new approach to producing ground system software. Two different groups have been looking at tackling this particular problem. One group is working for the JPL Mars Technology Program in the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Focused Technology area. The other group is the JPL Multi-Mission Planning and Sequencing Group . The major concept driving these two approaches on a similar path is to provide software that can be a more cohesive flexible system that provides a act of planning and sequencing system of services. This paper describes the efforts that have been made to date to create a unified approach from these disparate groups.

  6. Software Architecture for a Virtual Environment for Nano Scale Assembly (VENSA)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Gu; Lyons, Kevin W.; Feng, Shaw C.

    2004-01-01

    A Virtual Environment (VE) uses multiple computer-generated media to let a user experience situations that are temporally and spatially prohibiting. The information flow between the user and the VE is bidirectional and the user can influence the environment. The software development of a VE requires orchestrating multiple peripherals and computers in a synchronized way in real time. Although a multitude of useful software components for VEs exists, many of these are packaged within a complex framework and can not be used separately. In this paper, an architecture is presented which is designed to let multiple frameworks work together while being shielded from the application program. This architecture, which is called the Virtual Environment for Nano Scale Assembly (VENSA), has been constructed for interfacing with an optical tweezers instrument for nanotechnology development. However, this approach can be generalized for most virtual environments. Through the use of VENSA, the programmer can rely on existing solutions and concentrate more on the application software design. PMID:27366610

  7. Experimenting with an Evolving Ground/Space-based Software Architecture to Enable Sensor Webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    mandl, Daniel; Frye, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    A series of ongoing experiments are being conducted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to explore integrated ground and space-based software architectures enabling sensor webs. A sensor web, as defined by Steve Talabac at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center(GSFC), is a coherent set of distributed nodes interconnected by a communications fabric, that collectively behave as a single, dynamically adaptive, observing system. The nodes can be comprised of satellites, ground instruments, computing nodes etc. Sensor web capability requires autonomous management of constellation resources. This becomes progressively more important as more and more satellites share resource, such as communication channels and ground station,s while automatically coordinating their activities. There have been five ongoing activities which include an effort to standardize a set of middleware. This paper will describe one set of activities using the Earth Observing 1 satellite, which used a variety of ground and flight software along with other satellites and ground sensors to prototype a sensor web. This activity allowed us to explore where the difficulties that occur in the assembly of sensor webs given today s technology. We will present an overview of the software system architecture, some key experiments and lessons learned to facilitate better sensor webs in the future.

  8. A Novel Software Architecture for the Provision of Context-Aware Semantic Transport Information

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Asier; Perallos, Asier; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Onieva, Enrique; Salaberria, Itziar; Masegosa, Antonio D.

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of Intelligent Transportation Systems depends largely on the ability to integrate information from diverse sources and the suitability of this information for the specific user. This paper describes a new approach for the management and exchange of this information, related to multimodal transportation. A novel software architecture is presented, with particular emphasis on the design of the data model and the enablement of services for information retrieval, thereby obtaining a semantic model for the representation of transport information. The publication of transport data as semantic information is established through the development of a Multimodal Transport Ontology (MTO) and the design of a distributed architecture allowing dynamic integration of transport data. The advantages afforded by the proposed system due to the use of Linked Open Data and a distributed architecture are stated, comparing it with other existing solutions. The adequacy of the information generated in regard to the specific user’s context is also addressed. Finally, a working solution of a semantic trip planner using actual transport data and running on the proposed architecture is presented, as a demonstration and validation of the system. PMID:26016915

  9. A novel software architecture for the provision of context-aware semantic transport information.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Asier; Perallos, Asier; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Onieva, Enrique; Salaberria, Itziar; Masegosa, Antonio D

    2015-05-26

    The effectiveness of Intelligent Transportation Systems depends largely on the ability to integrate information from diverse sources and the suitability of this information for the specific user. This paper describes a new approach for the management and exchange of this information, related to multimodal transportation. A novel software architecture is presented, with particular emphasis on the design of the data model and the enablement of services for information retrieval, thereby obtaining a semantic model for the representation of transport information. The publication of transport data as semantic information is established through the development of a Multimodal Transport Ontology (MTO) and the design of a distributed architecture allowing dynamic integration of transport data. The advantages afforded by the proposed system due to the use of Linked Open Data and a distributed architecture are stated, comparing it with other existing solutions. The adequacy of the information generated in regard to the specific user's context is also addressed. Finally, a working solution of a semantic trip planner using actual transport data and running on the proposed architecture is presented, as a demonstration and validation of the system.

  10. Sequence and Architectural Control in Glycopolymer Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Abdouni, Yamin; Yilmaz, Gokhan; Becer, C Remzi

    2017-07-10

    Glycopolymers are synthetic-carbohydrate-containing materials capable of interacting and binding to specific targeting lectins, which are crucially important in many biologically active processes. Over the last decade, advances in synthetic chemistry and polymerization techniques have enabled the development of sequence and architecturally controlled glycopolymers for different types of bioapplications, such as drug delivery and release purposes, gene therapy, lectin-based biosensors, and much more in the future. These precision glycopolymers are able to mimic structural and functional features of the naturally existing glycocalyx. Furthermore, self-assembled glycopolymers could enhance specific and selective recognition properties on multivalent scaffolds in glycoscience. This mini-review will focus on production methods and recent advances in precision synthesis and self-assembly of glycopolymers. Additionally, possible contributions of single-chain folding in glycopolymers will be discussed as a future prospect. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Architecture-Based Unit Testing of the Flight Software Product Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Lindvall, Mikael; McComas, David; Bartholomew, Maureen; Slegel, Steve; Medina, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the unit testing approach developed and used by the Core Flight Software (CFS) product line team at the NASA GSFC. The goal of the analysis is to understand, review, and reconunend strategies for improving the existing unit testing infrastructure as well as to capture lessons learned and best practices that can be used by other product line teams for their unit testing. The CFS unit testing framework is designed and implemented as a set of variation points, and thus testing support is built into the product line architecture. The analysis found that the CFS unit testing approach has many practical and good solutions that are worth considering when deciding how to design the testing architecture for a product line, which are documented in this paper along with some suggested innprovennents.

  12. Exploiting new CPU architectures in the SuperB software framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvo, M.; Bianchi, F.; Ciaschini, V.; Delprete, D.; Di Simone, A.; Donvito, G.; Fella, A.; Giacomini, F.; Gianoli, A.; Longo, S.; Luitz, S.; Luppi, E.; Manzali, M.; Pardi, S.; Perez, A.; Rama, M.; Russo, G.; Santeramo, B.; Stroili, R.; Tomassetti, L.

    2012-12-01

    The SuperB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider and detector to be built at the newly founded Nicola Cabibbo Lab will provide a uniquely sensitive probe of New Physics in the flavour sector of the Standard Model. Studying minute effects in the heavy quark and heavy lepton sectors requires a data sample of 75ab-1 and a luminosity target of 1036cm-2s-1. These parameters require a substantial growth in computing requirements and performances. The SuperB collaboration is thus investigating the advantages of new CPU architectures (multi and many cores) and how to exploit their capability of task parallelization in the framework for simulation and analysis software. In this work we present the underlying architecture which we intend to use and some preliminary performance results of the first framework prototype.

  13. Laboratory cost control and financial management software.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M

    1998-02-09

    Economical constraints within the health care system advocate the introduction of tighter control of costs in clinical laboratories. Detailed cost information forms the basis for cost control and financial management. Based on the cost information, proper decisions regarding priorities, procedure choices, personnel policies and investments can be made. This presentation outlines some principles of cost analysis, describes common limitations of cost analysis, and exemplifies use of software to achieve optimized cost control. One commercially available cost analysis software, LabCost, is described in some detail. In addition to provision of cost information, LabCost also serves as a general management tool for resource handling, accounting, inventory management and billing. The application of LabCost in the selection process of a new high throughput analyzer for a large clinical chemistry service is taken as an example for decisions that can be assisted by cost evaluation. It is concluded that laboratory management that wisely utilizes cost analysis to support the decision-making process will undoubtedly have a clear advantage over those laboratories that fail to employ cost considerations to guide their actions.

  14. User interaction with the LUCIFER control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knierim, Volker; Jütte, Marcus; Polsterer, Kai; Schimmelmann, Jan

    2006-06-01

    We present the concept and design of the interaction between users and the LUCIFER Control Software Package. The necessary functionality that must be provided to a user depends on and differs greatly for the different user types (i.e., engineers and observers). While engineers want total control over every service provided by the software system, observers are typically only interested in a fault tolerant and efficient user interface that helps them to carry out their observations in the best possible way during the night. To provide the functionality engineers need, direct access to a service is necessary. This may harbor a possible threat to the instrument in the case of a faulty operation by the engineer, but is the only way to test every unit during integration and commissioning of the instrument, and for service time later on. The observer on the other hand should only have indirect access to the instrument, controlled by an instrument manager service that ensures the necessary safety checks so that no harm can be done to the instrument. Our design of the user interaction provides such an approach on a level that is transparent to any interaction component regardless of interface type (i.e., textual or graphical). Using the interface and inheritance concepts of the Java Programming Language and its tools to create graphical user interfaces, it is possible to provide the necessary level of flexibility for the different user types on one side, while ensuring maximum reusability of code on the other side.

  15. Novel architecture for data management and control for small satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, G.; Fossati, D.; Turri, M.

    1995-12-01

    The paper introduces an innovative architecture for the on-board units that are responsible to provide the data interface, control and processing capability normally allocated in separated electronics boxes in the data handling subsystem of the space system. A new solution for the attitude control of the space vehicle has been studied and developed and the utilization of this technological growth, in particular that concerns the GPS receiver, is matter for novel architecture. This new approach also involves in general the small satellite ground segment product as matter of a dedicated development approach. Small and medium satellites are considered an attractive solution for the low cost scientific experimentation, communication or remote sensing satellites. The functional and performance capability of the studied on-board units and ground segment are assessed in tight conjunction with the evolution of the European and the USA market. The design of these units has to be based on few and simple driving requirements, directly derived from the new modified scenario: (1) The limited budgets available for space system. (2) The quick mission data return, i.e., low development time by specific and tailored system development tools. The quick availability of data to scientists/user is requested without jeopardizing the maximum and guaranteed scientific or commercial return. The proposed system is then given thinking to an architecture based on a high degree of modularity (and reuse of existing library of modules) thus allowing to keep down costs and to speed up the time to market. The design ground rules are so established in order to cope with the following performance: (1) capability to adapt with few impacts the system interfaces, in particular for attitude sensors and actuators that are tightly mission dependent; (2) easy adaptation of on board computational performances and memory capacity (including mass memory storage capability); (3) definition of a hierarchical

  16. PLC & DTAM Software Programs for Pumping Instrumentation & Control Skid P

    SciTech Connect

    HORNER, T.M.

    2001-07-19

    This document describes the software programs for the programmable logic controller and the datable access module for pumping instrumentation and control skid P. The appendices contains copies of the printouts of these software programs.

  17. Baobab: a software architecture and methodology for distributed simulation and interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosoff, Jared

    2000-06-01

    We present Baobab, a software architecture and methodology for distributed simulation and interaction. Using pervasive componentization throughout the system, Baobab provides a stable but extensible platform for the development of content-rich interactive simulation. Entities in the environment are simulated using dynamically loadable simulation modules (shared libraries, java byte codes, scripts, etc...). We provide an elegant API to the simulation module developer, allowing modules to interact with entities which they have never encountered before. This approach allows domain experts to develop simulation modules based on their expertise with limited knowledge of the inner-workings of a VE system.

  18. BH-ShaDe: A Software Tool That Assists Architecture Students in the III-Structured Task of Housing Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millan, Eva; Belmonte, Maria-Victoria; Ruiz-Montiel, Manuela; Gavilanes, Juan; Perez-de-la-Cruz, Jose-Luis

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present BH-ShaDe, a new software tool to assist architecture students learning the ill-structured domain/task of housing design. The software tool provides students with automatic or interactively generated floor plan schemas for basic houses. The students can then use the generated schemas as initial seeds to develop complete…

  19. An Open Specification for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooke, A.; Heuser, W. R.

    1995-01-01

    An 'open specification' for Space Project Mission Operations Control Architectures is under development in the Spacecraft Control Working Group of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astro- nautics. This architecture identifies 5 basic elements incorporated in the design of similar operations systems: Data, System Management, Control Interface, Decision Support Engine, & Space Messaging Service.

  20. Control system architecture of QUIJOTE multi-frequency instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Reñasco, María. F.; Aguiar, Marta; Herreros, José Miguel; Hoyland, Roger J.; Sánchez de la Rosa, Vicente; Vega-Moreno, Afrodisio; Viera-Curbelo, Teodora; Génova-Santos, Ricardo; López-Caraballo, Carlos; Rebolo, Rafael; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto

    2012-09-01

    The QUIJOTE-CMB experiment has been described in previous publications. Here we describe the architecture of the control system, hardware and software, of the QUIJOTE I instrument (MFI). It is a multi-channel instrument with five separate polarimeters: two of which operate at 10-14 GHz, two of which operate at 16-20 GHz, and a central polarimeter at 26-36 GHz. Each polarimeter can rotate at a speed of up to 1 Hz and also can move to discrete angular positions which allow the linear polar parameters Q, U and I to be derived. The instrument is installed in an alt-azimuth telescope which implements several operational modes: movement around the azimuth axis at a constant velocity while the elevation axis is held at a fixed elevation; tracking of a sky object; and raster of a rectangular area both in horizontal and sky coordinates. The control system of both, telescope and instrument, is based in the following technologies: an LXI-VXI bus is used for the signal acquisition system; an EtherCAT bus implements software PLCs developed in TwinCAT to perform the movement of the 5 polarimeters and the 2 axes of the telescope. Science signal, angular positions of the 5 polarimeters and telescope coordinates are sampled at up to 4000 Hz. All these data are correlated by a time stamp obtained from an external GPS clock implementing the Precise Time Protocol-1588 which provides synchronization to less than 1 microsecond. The control software also acquires housekeeping (HK) from the different subsystems. LabVIEW implements the instrument user interface.

  1. PDEMOD: Software for control/structures optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Zimmerman, David

    1991-01-01

    Because of the possibility of adverse interaction between the control system and the structural dynamics of large, flexible spacecraft, great care must be taken to ensure stability and system performance. Because of the high cost of insertion of mass into low earth orbit, it is prudent to optimize the roles of structure and control systems simultaneously. Because of the difficulty and the computational burden in modeling and analyzing the control structure system dynamics, the total problem is often split and treated iteratively. It would aid design if the control structure system dynamics could be represented in a single system of equations. With the use of the software PDEMOD (Partial Differential Equation Model), it is now possible to optimize structure and control systems simultaneously. The distributed parameter modeling approach enables embedding the control system dynamics into the same equations for the structural dynamics model. By doing this, the current difficulties involved in model order reduction are avoided. The NASA Mini-MAST truss is used an an example for studying integrated control structure design.

  2. An Analysis of Security and Privacy Issues in Smart Grid Software Architectures on Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Simmhan, Yogesh; Kumbhare, Alok; Cao, Baohua; Prasanna, Viktor K.

    2011-07-09

    Power utilities globally are increasingly upgrading to Smart Grids that use bi-directional communication with the consumer to enable an information-driven approach to distributed energy management. Clouds offer features well suited for Smart Grid software platforms and applications, such as elastic resources and shared services. However, the security and privacy concerns inherent in an information rich Smart Grid environment are further exacerbated by their deployment on Clouds. Here, we present an analysis of security and privacy issues in a Smart Grids software architecture operating on different Cloud environments, in the form of a taxonomy. We use the Los Angeles Smart Grid Project that is underway in the largest U.S. municipal utility to drive this analysis that will benefit both Cloud practitioners targeting Smart Grid applications, and Cloud researchers investigating security and privacy.

  3. 49 CFR 236.18 - Software management control plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Software management control plan. 236.18 Section... Instructions: All Systems General § 236.18 Software management control plan. (a) Within 6 months of June 6, 2005, each railroad shall develop and adopt a software management control plan for its signal and...

  4. 49 CFR 236.18 - Software management control plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Software management control plan. 236.18 Section... Instructions: All Systems General § 236.18 Software management control plan. (a) Within 6 months of June 6, 2005, each railroad shall develop and adopt a software management control plan for its signal and...

  5. 49 CFR 236.18 - Software management control plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Software management control plan. 236.18 Section... Instructions: All Systems General § 236.18 Software management control plan. (a) Within 6 months of June 6, 2005, each railroad shall develop and adopt a software management control plan for its signal and...

  6. 49 CFR 236.18 - Software management control plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Software management control plan. 236.18 Section... Instructions: All Systems General § 236.18 Software management control plan. (a) Within 6 months of June 6, 2005, each railroad shall develop and adopt a software management control plan for its signal and...

  7. 49 CFR 236.18 - Software management control plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Software management control plan. 236.18 Section... Instructions: All Systems General § 236.18 Software management control plan. (a) Within 6 months of June 6, 2005, each railroad shall develop and adopt a software management control plan for its signal and...

  8. An architecture for rapid prototyping of control schemes for artificial ventricles.

    PubMed

    Ficola, Antonio; Pagnottelli, Stefano; Valigi, Paolo; Zoppitelli, Maurizio

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental system aimed at rapid prototyping of feedback control schemes for ventricular assist devices, and artificial ventricles in general. The system comprises a classical mock circulatory system, an actuated bellow-based ventricle chamber, and a software architecture for control schemes implementation and experimental data acquisition, visualization and storing. Several experiments have been carried out, showing good performance of ventricular pressure tracking control schemes.

  9. Reference Architecture Test-Bed for Avionics (RASTA): A Software Building Blocks Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana Sanchez, Aitor; Taylor, Chris

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Reference Architecture System Test-bed for Avionics (RASTA) being developed within the ESA Estec Data Systems Division. This activity aims to benefit from interface standardization to provide a hardware/software reference infrastructure into which incoming R&D activities can be integrated, thus providing a generic but standardized test and development environment rather than dedicated facilities for each activity. Rasta is composed of by both HW and SW building blocks constituting the main elements of a typical Data Handling System. This includes a core processor (LEON2), Telemetry and Telecommand links, digital interfaces, and mass memory. The range of digital serial interfaces includes CAN bus, MIL-STD-1553 and SpaceWire. The paper will focus on the Software aspects of RASTA and in particular the software building blocks provided to ease development activities and allow hardware independency. To support the take-up of RASTA by European Industry, all RASTA software developed internally by ESA is provided free under license. Significant outputs are already available and include: Basic SW and SW drivers (CAN/1553/SpW, TT&C), OS abstraction layer, CFDP flight implementation, highly portable and independent file system for space, ground segment telecommand/telemetry router. In the future, additional SW building blocks are planned (e.g. ECSS CAN library). The present focus of RASTA is related to a prototype implementation of the SOIS services and protocols under development by the CCSDS (Consultative committee for Space Data Standards)

  10. Control of research oriented software development

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L.C.; Dronkers, J.J.; Pitsker, B.

    1985-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to dispose permanently high level radioactive waste and civilian spent nuclear fuel by January 31, 1998. DOE has responded by creating an organizational structure that directs all the activities necessary to carry out the legislative demands. LLNL is conducting research in the earth sciences and is developing some unique computer codes to help establish the feasibility of geologic repositories for nuclear waste. LLNL has several codes under development. This paper examines the administrative and organizational measures that were and still are being undertaken in order to control the development of the two major codes. In the case of one code, the software quality assurance requirements were imposed five years after the code began its development. This required a retroactive application of requirements. The other code is still in the conceptual stages of development and here requirements can be applied as soon as the initial code design begins. Both codes are being developed by scientists, not computer programmers, and both are modeling codes, not data acquisition and reduction codes. Also the projects for which these codes are being developed have slightly different software quality assurance requirements. All these factors contribute unique difficulties in attempts to assure that the development not only results in a reliable prediction, but that whatever the reliability, it can be objectively shown to exist. The paper will examine a software management model. It will also discuss the reasons why it is felt that this particular model would stand a reasonable chance for success. The paper will then describe the way in which the model should be integrated into the existing management configuration and tradition.

  11. Architecture and Implementation of OpenPET Firmware and Embedded Software.

    PubMed

    Abu-Nimeh, Faisal T; Ito, Jennifer; Moses, William W; Peng, Qiyu; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2016-04-01

    OpenPET is an open source, modular, extendible, and high-performance platform suitable for multi-channel data acquisition and analysis. Due to the flexibility of the hardware, firmware, and software architectures, the platform is capable of interfacing with a wide variety of detector modules not only in medical imaging but also in homeland security applications. Analog signals from radiation detectors share similar characteristics - a pulse whose area is proportional to the deposited energy and whose leading edge is used to extract a timing signal. As a result, a generic design method of the platform is adopted for the hardware, firmware, and software architectures and implementations. The analog front-end is hosted on a module called a Detector Board, where each board can filter, combine, timestamp, and process multiple channels independently. The processed data is formatted and sent through a backplane bus to a module called Support Board, where 1 Support Board can host up to eight Detector Board modules. The data in the Support Board, coming from 8 Detector Board modules, can be aggregated or correlated (if needed) depending on the algorithm implemented or runtime mode selected. It is then sent out to a computer workstation for further processing. The number of channels (detector modules), to be processed, mandates the overall OpenPET System Configuration, which is designed to handle up to 1,024 channels using 16-channel Detector Boards in the Standard System Configuration and 16,384 channels using 32-channel Detector Boards in the Large System Configuration.

  12. Control Software for Piezo Stepping Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel F.

    2013-01-01

    A control system has been developed for the Space Interferometer Mission (SIM) piezo stepping actuator. Piezo stepping actuators are novel because they offer extreme dynamic range (centimeter stroke with nanometer resolution) with power, thermal, mass, and volume advantages over existing motorized actuation technology. These advantages come with the added benefit of greatly reduced complexity in the support electronics. The piezo stepping actuator consists of three fully redundant sets of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs), two sets of brake PZTs, and one set of extension PZTs. These PZTs are used to grasp and move a runner attached to the optic to be moved. By proper cycling of the two brake and extension PZTs, both forward and backward moves of the runner can be achieved. Each brake can be configured for either a power-on or power-off state. For SIM, the brakes and gate of the mechanism are configured in such a manner that, at the end of the step, the actuator is in a parked or power-off state. The control software uses asynchronous sampling of an optical encoder to monitor the position of the runner. These samples are timed to coincide with the end of the previous move, which may consist of a variable number of steps. This sampling technique linearizes the device by avoiding input saturation of the actuator and makes latencies of the plant vanish. The software also estimates, in real time, the scale factor of the device and a disturbance caused by cycling of the brakes. These estimates are used to actively cancel the brake disturbance. The control system also includes feedback and feedforward elements that regulate the position of the runner to a given reference position. Convergence time for smalland medium-sized reference positions (less than 200 microns) to within 10 nanometers can be achieved in under 10 seconds. Convergence times for large moves (greater than 1 millimeter) are limited by the step rate.

  13. Architectures for mission control at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Reger A.; Murphy, Susan C.

    1992-01-01

    JPL is currently converting to an innovative control center data system which is a distributed, open architecture for telemetry delivery and which is enabling advancement towards improved automation and operability, as well as new technology, in mission operations at JPL. The scope of mission control within mission operations is examined. The concepts of a mission control center and how operability can affect the design of a control center data system are discussed. Examples of JPL's mission control architecture, data system development, and prototype efforts at the JPL Operations Engineering Laboratory are provided. Strategies for the future of mission control architectures are outlined.

  14. Software quality assurance and software safety in the Biomed Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.P.; Chu, W.T.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Marks, K.M.; Nyman, M.A.; Renner, T.R.; Stradtner, R.

    1989-10-31

    The Biomed Control System is a hardware/software system used for the delivery, measurement and monitoring of heavy-ion beams in the patient treatment and biology experiment rooms in the Bevalac at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This paper describes some aspects of this system including historical background philosophy, configuration management, hardware features that facilitate software testing, software testing procedures, the release of new software quality assurance, safety and operator monitoring. 3 refs.

  15. SPCC- Software Elements for Security Partition Communication Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpel, H. J.; Willig, G.; Montano, G.; Tverdyshev, S.; Eckstein, K.; Schoen, M.

    2016-08-01

    Future satellite missions like Earth Observation, Telecommunication or any other kind are likely to be exposed to various threats aiming at exploiting vulnerabilities of the involved systems and communications. Moreover, the growing complexity of systems coupled with more ambitious types of operational scenarios imply increased security vulnerabilities in the future. In the paper we will describe an architecture and software elements to ensure high level of security on-board a spacecraft. First the threats to the Security Partition Communication Controller (SPCC) will be addressed including the identification of specific vulnerabilities to the SPCC. Furthermore, appropriate security objectives and security requirements are identified to be counter the identified threats. The security evaluation of the SPCC will be done in accordance to the Common Criteria (CC). The Software Elements for SPCC has been implemented on flight representative hardware which consists of two major elements: the I/O board and the SPCC board. The SPCC board provides the interfaces with ground while the I/O board interfaces with typical spacecraft equipment busses. Both boards are physically interconnected by a high speed spacewire (SpW) link.

  16. A flexible software architecture for scalable real-time image and video processing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Molleda, Julio; García, Daniel F.; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2012-06-01

    Real-time image and video processing applications require skilled architects, and recent trends in the hardware platform make the design and implementation of these applications increasingly complex. Many frameworks and libraries have been proposed or commercialized to simplify the design and tuning of real-time image processing applications. However, they tend to lack flexibility because they are normally oriented towards particular types of applications, or they impose specific data processing models such as the pipeline. Other issues include large memory footprints, difficulty for reuse and inefficient execution on multicore processors. This paper presents a novel software architecture for real-time image and video processing applications which addresses these issues. The architecture is divided into three layers: the platform abstraction layer, the messaging layer, and the application layer. The platform abstraction layer provides a high level application programming interface for the rest of the architecture. The messaging layer provides a message passing interface based on a dynamic publish/subscribe pattern. A topic-based filtering in which messages are published to topics is used to route the messages from the publishers to the subscribers interested in a particular type of messages. The application layer provides a repository for reusable application modules designed for real-time image and video processing applications. These modules, which include acquisition, visualization, communication, user interface and data processing modules, take advantage of the power of other well-known libraries such as OpenCV, Intel IPP, or CUDA. Finally, we present different prototypes and applications to show the possibilities of the proposed architecture.

  17. Trends in software reliability for digital flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.

    1983-01-01

    Software error data of major recent Digital Flight Control Systems Development Programs. The report summarizes the data, compare these data with similar data from previous surveys and identifies trends and disciplines to improve software reliability.

  18. Increasing software testability with standard access and control interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, Allen P; Some, Raphael R.; Tamir, Yuval

    2003-01-01

    We describe an approach to improving the testability of complex software systems with software constructs modeled after the hardware JTAG bus, used to provide visibility and controlability in testing digital circuits.

  19. The development process of the LUCIFER control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juette, Marcus; Polsterer, Kai L.; Lehmitz, Michael; Knierim, Volker

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we present the software development process and history of the LUCIFER (LBT NIR spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral- Field Unit for Extragalactic Research) multi-mode near-infrared instrument, which is one of the first light instruments of the LBT on Mt. Graham, Arizona. The software is realised as a distributed system in Java using its remote method invocation service (RMI). We describe the current status of the software and give an overview of the planned computer hardware architecture.

  20. The architecture of the CMS Level-1 Trigger Control and Monitoring System using UML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrans de Abril, Marc; Da Rocha Melo, Jose L.; Ghabrous Larrea, Carlos; Hammer, Josef; Hartl, Christian; Lazaridis, Christos

    2011-12-01

    The architecture of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Level-1 Trigger Control and Monitoring software system is presented. This system has been installed and commissioned on the trigger online computers and is currently used for data taking. It has been designed to handle the trigger configuration and monitoring during data taking as well as all communications with the main run control of CMS. Furthermore its design has foreseen the provision of the software infrastructure for detailed testing of the trigger system during beam down time. This is a medium-size distributed system that runs over 40 PCs and 200 processes that control about 4000 electronic boards. The architecture of this system is described using the industry-standard Universal Modeling Language (UML). This way the relationships between the different subcomponents of the system become clear and all software upgrades and modifications are simplified. The described architecture has allowed for frequent upgrades that were necessary during the commissioning phase of CMS when the trigger system evolved constantly. As a secondary objective, the paper provides a UML usage example and tries to encourage the standardization of the software documentation of large projects across the LHC and High Energy Physics community.

  1. Different micromanipulation applications based on common modular control architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipola, Risto; Vallius, Tero; Pudas, Marko; Röning, Juha

    2010-01-01

    This paper validates a previously introduced scalable modular control architecture and shows how it can be used to implement research equipment. The validation is conducted by presenting different kinds of micromanipulation applications that use the architecture. Conditions of the micro-world are very different from those of the macro-world. Adhesive forces are significant compared to gravitational forces when micro-scale objects are manipulated. Manipulation is mainly conducted by automatic control relying on haptic feedback provided by force sensors. The validated architecture is a hierarchical layered hybrid architecture, including a reactive layer and a planner layer. The implementation of the architecture is modular, and the architecture has a lot in common with open architectures. Further, the architecture is extensible, scalable, portable and it enables reuse of modules. These are the qualities that we validate in this paper. To demonstrate the claimed features, we present different applications that require special control in micrometer, millimeter and centimeter scales. These applications include a device that measures cell adhesion, a device that examines properties of thin films, a device that measures adhesion of micro fibers and a device that examines properties of submerged gel produced by bacteria. Finally, we analyze how the architecture is used in these applications.

  2. Designing a meta-level architecture in Java for adaptive parallelism by mobile software agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominic, Stephen Victor

    Adaptive parallelism refers to a parallel computation that runs on a pool of processors that may join or withdraw from a running computation. In this dissertation, a functional system of agents and agent behaviors for adaptive parallelism is developed. Software agents have the properties of robustness and have capacity for fault-tolerance. Adaptation and fault-tolerance emerge from the interaction of self-directed autonomous software agents for a parallel computation application. The multi-agent system can be considered an object-oriented system with a higher-level architectural component, i.e., a meta level for agent behavior. The meta-level object architecture is based on patterns of behavior and communication for mobile agents, which are developed to support cooperative problem solving in a distributed-heterogeneous computing environment. Although parallel processing is a suggested application domain for mobile agents implemented in the Java language, the development of robust agent behaviors implemented in an efficient manner is an active research area. Performance characteristics for three versions of a pattern recognition problem are used to demonstrate a linear speed-up with efficiency that is compared to research using a traditional client-server protocol in the C language. The best ideas from existing approaches to adaptive parallelism are used to create a single general-purpose paradigm that overcomes problems associated with nodefailure, the use of a single-centralized or shared resource, requirements for clients to actively join a computation, and a variety of other limitations that are associated with existing systems. The multi-agent system, and experiments, show how adaptation and parallelism can be exploited by a meta-architecture for a distributed-scientific application that is of particular interest to design of signal-processing ground stations. To a large extent the framework separates concern for algorithmic design from concern for where and

  3. The NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator control system architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, J.C.; Butler, P.L.; Glassell, R.L.; Herndon, J.N.

    1991-01-01

    In support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) goals to increase the utilization of dexterous robotic systems in space, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the Laboratory Telerobotic Manipulator (LTM) system. It is a dexterous, dual-arm, force reflecting teleoperator system with robotic features for NASA ground-based research. This paper describes the overall control system architecture, including both the hardware and software. The control system is a distributed, modular, and hierarchical design with flexible expansion capabilities for future enhancements of both the hardware and software. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  4. RBAC Driven Least Privilege Architecture For Control Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, Julie; Markham, Mark

    2014-01-25

    The concept of role based access control (RBAC) within the IT environment has been studied by researchers and was supported by NIST (circa 1992). This earlier work highlighted the benefits of RBAC which include reduced administrative workload and policies which are easier to analyze and apply. The goals of this research were to expand the application of RBAC in the following ways. • Apply RBAC to the control systems environment: The typical RBAC model within the IT environment is used to control a user’s access to files. Within the control system environment files are replaced with measurement (e.g., temperature) and control (e.g. valve) points organized as a hierarchy of control assets (e.g. a boiler, compressor, refinery unit). Control points have parameters (e.g., high alarm limit, set point, etc.) associated with them. The RBAC model is extended to support access to points and their parameters based upon roles while at the same time allowing permissions for the points to be defined at the asset level or point level directly. In addition, centralized policy administration with distributed access enforcement mechanisms was developed to support the distributed architecture of distributed control systems and SCADA. • Extend the RBAC model to include access control for software and devices: The established RBAC approach is to assign users to roles. This work extends that notion by first breaking the control system down into three layers 1) users, 2) software and 3) devices. An RBAC model is then created for each of these three layers. The result is that RBAC can be used to define machine-to-machine policy enforced via the IP security (IPsec) protocol. This highlights the potential to use RBAC for machine-to-machine connectivity within the internet of things. • Enable dynamic policy based upon the operating mode of the system: The IT environment is generally static with respect to policy. However, large cyber physical systems such as industrial controls have

  5. GiA Roots: software for the high throughput analysis of plant root system architecture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Characterizing root system architecture (RSA) is essential to understanding the development and function of vascular plants. Identifying RSA-associated genes also represents an underexplored opportunity for crop improvement. Software tools are needed to accelerate the pace at which quantitative traits of RSA are estimated from images of root networks. Results We have developed GiA Roots (General Image Analysis of Roots), a semi-automated software tool designed specifically for the high-throughput analysis of root system images. GiA Roots includes user-assisted algorithms to distinguish root from background and a fully automated pipeline that extracts dozens of root system phenotypes. Quantitative information on each phenotype, along with intermediate steps for full reproducibility, is returned to the end-user for downstream analysis. GiA Roots has a GUI front end and a command-line interface for interweaving the software into large-scale workflows. GiA Roots can also be extended to estimate novel phenotypes specified by the end-user. Conclusions We demonstrate the use of GiA Roots on a set of 2393 images of rice roots representing 12 genotypes from the species Oryza sativa. We validate trait measurements against prior analyses of this image set that demonstrated that RSA traits are likely heritable and associated with genotypic differences. Moreover, we demonstrate that GiA Roots is extensible and an end-user can add functionality so that GiA Roots can estimate novel RSA traits. In summary, we show that the software can function as an efficient tool as part of a workflow to move from large numbers of root images to downstream analysis. PMID:22834569

  6. GiA Roots: software for the high throughput analysis of plant root system architecture.

    PubMed

    Galkovskyi, Taras; Mileyko, Yuriy; Bucksch, Alexander; Moore, Brad; Symonova, Olga; Price, Charles A; Topp, Christopher N; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S; Zurek, Paul R; Fang, Suqin; Harer, John; Benfey, Philip N; Weitz, Joshua S

    2012-07-26

    Characterizing root system architecture (RSA) is essential to understanding the development and function of vascular plants. Identifying RSA-associated genes also represents an underexplored opportunity for crop improvement. Software tools are needed to accelerate the pace at which quantitative traits of RSA are estimated from images of root networks. We have developed GiA Roots (General Image Analysis of Roots), a semi-automated software tool designed specifically for the high-throughput analysis of root system images. GiA Roots includes user-assisted algorithms to distinguish root from background and a fully automated pipeline that extracts dozens of root system phenotypes. Quantitative information on each phenotype, along with intermediate steps for full reproducibility, is returned to the end-user for downstream analysis. GiA Roots has a GUI front end and a command-line interface for interweaving the software into large-scale workflows. GiA Roots can also be extended to estimate novel phenotypes specified by the end-user. We demonstrate the use of GiA Roots on a set of 2393 images of rice roots representing 12 genotypes from the species Oryza sativa. We validate trait measurements against prior analyses of this image set that demonstrated that RSA traits are likely heritable and associated with genotypic differences. Moreover, we demonstrate that GiA Roots is extensible and an end-user can add functionality so that GiA Roots can estimate novel RSA traits. In summary, we show that the software can function as an efficient tool as part of a workflow to move from large numbers of root images to downstream analysis.

  7. Guidance and Control Software Project Data - Volume 1: Planning Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project was the last in a series of software reliability studies conducted at Langley Research Center between 1977 and 1994. The technical results of the GCS project were recorded after the experiment was completed. Some of the support documentation produced as part of the experiment, however, is serving an unexpected role far beyond its original project context. Some of the software used as part of the GCS project was developed to conform to the RTCA/DO-178B software standard, "Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification," used in the civil aviation industry. That standard requires extensive documentation throughout the software development life cycle, including plans, software requirements, design and source code, verification cases and results, and configuration management and quality control data. The project documentation that includes this information is open for public scrutiny without the legal or safety implications associated with comparable data from an avionics manufacturer. This public availability has afforded an opportunity to use the GCS project documents for DO-178B training. This report provides a brief overview of the GCS project, describes the 4-volume set of documents and the role they are playing in training, and includes the planning documents from the GCS project. Volume 1 contains five appendices: A. Plan for Software Aspects of Certification for the Guidance and Control Software Project; B. Software Development Standards for the Guidance and Control Software Project; C. Software Verification Plan for the Guidance and Control Software Project; D. Software Configuration Management Plan for the Guidance and Control Software Project; and E. Software Quality Assurance Activities.

  8. Planning assistance for the NASA 30/20 GHz program. Network control architecture study.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inukai, T.; Bonnelycke, B.; Strickland, S.

    1982-01-01

    Network Control Architecture for a 30/20 GHz flight experiment system operating in the Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) was studied. Architecture development, identification of processing functions, and performance requirements for the Master Control Station (MCS), diversity trunking stations, and Customer Premises Service (CPS) stations are covered. Preliminary hardware and software processing requirements as well as budgetary cost estimates for the network control system are given. For the trunking system control, areas covered include on board SS-TDMA switch organization, frame structure, acquisition and synchronization, channel assignment, fade detection and adaptive power control, on board oscillator control, and terrestrial network timing. For the CPS control, they include on board processing and adaptive forward error correction control.

  9. The software architecture of climate models: a graphical comparison of CMIP5 and EMICAR5 configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Easterbrook, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the source code of eight coupled climate models, selected from those that participated in the CMIP5 (Taylor et al., 2012) or EMICAR5 (Eby et al., 2013; Zickfeld et al., 2013) intercomparison projects. For each model, we sort the preprocessed code into components and subcomponents based on dependency structure. We then create software architecture diagrams which show the relative sizes of these components/subcomponents and the flow of data between them. The diagrams also illustrate several major classes of climate model design; the distribution of complexity between components, which depends on historical development paths as well as the conscious goals of each institution; and the sharing of components between different modelling groups. These diagrams offer insights into the similarities and differences between models, and have the potential to be useful tools for communication between scientists, scientific institutions, and the public.

  10. The software architecture of climate models: a graphical comparison of CMIP5 and EMICAR5 configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Easterbrook, S. M.

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the source code of eight coupled climate models, selected from those that participated in the CMIP5 (Taylor et al., 2012) or EMICAR5 (Eby et al., 2013; Zickfeld et al., 2013) intercomparison projects. For each model, we sort the preprocessed code into components and subcomponents based on dependency structure. We then create software architecture diagrams that show the relative sizes of these components/subcomponents and the flow of data between them. The diagrams also illustrate several major classes of climate model design; the distribution of complexity between components, which depends on historical development paths as well as the conscious goals of each institution; and the sharing of components between different modeling groups. These diagrams offer insights into the similarities and differences in structure between climate models, and have the potential to be useful tools for communication between scientists, scientific institutions, and the public.

  11. Bringing electronic patient records into health professional education: software architecture and implementation.

    PubMed

    Joe, Ronald S; Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Otto, Tony; Ho, Kendall

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) which has been redesigned specifically for the purposes of teaching medical and other health professional students. Currently available EMR software is designed specifically for use in actual practice settings and not for the needs of students and educators. The authors identified many unique requirements of an EMR in order to satisfy the educational goals unique to the electronic medium. This paper describes the specific architecture and many of the unique features of the EMR implemented for the University of British Columbia (UBC) Medical School program for teaching medical students. This implementation describes 200 participating students participating in a hands-on use of an EMR with a single standardized patient case. The participating students were distributed across three physical sites in the Province of British Columbia UBC curricula in December, 2007.

  12. Architecture and Implementation of OpenPET Firmware and Embedded Software

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Nimeh, Faisal T.; Ito, Jennifer; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2016-01-11

    OpenPET is an open source, modular, extendible, and high-performance platform suitable for multi-channel data acquisition and analysis. Due to the versatility of the hardware, firmware, and software architectures, the platform is capable of interfacing with a wide variety of detector modules not only in medical imaging but also in homeland security applications. Analog signals from radiation detectors share similar characteristics-a pulse whose area is proportional to the deposited energy and whose leading edge is used to extract a timing signal. As a result, a generic design method of the platform is adopted for the hardware, firmware, and software architectures and implementations. The analog front-end is hosted on a module called a Detector Board, where each board can filter, combine, timestamp, and process multiple channels independently. The processed data is formatted and sent through a backplane bus to a module called Support Board, where 1 Support Board can host up to eight Detector Board modules. The data in the Support Board, coming from 8 Detector Board modules, can be aggregated or correlated (if needed) depending on the algorithm implemented or runtime mode selected. It is then sent out to a computer workstation for further processing. The number of channels (detector modules), to be processed, mandates the overall OpenPET System Configuration, which is designed to handle up to 1,024 channels using 16-channel Detector Boards in the Standard System Configuration and 16,384 channels using 32-channel Detector Boards in the Large System Configuration.

  13. Architecture and Implementation of OpenPET Firmware and Embedded Software

    DOE PAGES

    Abu-Nimeh, Faisal T.; Ito, Jennifer; Moses, William W.; ...

    2016-01-11

    OpenPET is an open source, modular, extendible, and high-performance platform suitable for multi-channel data acquisition and analysis. Due to the versatility of the hardware, firmware, and software architectures, the platform is capable of interfacing with a wide variety of detector modules not only in medical imaging but also in homeland security applications. Analog signals from radiation detectors share similar characteristics-a pulse whose area is proportional to the deposited energy and whose leading edge is used to extract a timing signal. As a result, a generic design method of the platform is adopted for the hardware, firmware, and software architectures andmore » implementations. The analog front-end is hosted on a module called a Detector Board, where each board can filter, combine, timestamp, and process multiple channels independently. The processed data is formatted and sent through a backplane bus to a module called Support Board, where 1 Support Board can host up to eight Detector Board modules. The data in the Support Board, coming from 8 Detector Board modules, can be aggregated or correlated (if needed) depending on the algorithm implemented or runtime mode selected. It is then sent out to a computer workstation for further processing. The number of channels (detector modules), to be processed, mandates the overall OpenPET System Configuration, which is designed to handle up to 1,024 channels using 16-channel Detector Boards in the Standard System Configuration and 16,384 channels using 32-channel Detector Boards in the Large System Configuration.« less

  14. Architecture and Implementation of OpenPET Firmware and Embedded Software

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Nimeh, Faisal T.; Ito, Jennifer; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2016-01-01

    OpenPET is an open source, modular, extendible, and high-performance platform suitable for multi-channel data acquisition and analysis. Due to the flexibility of the hardware, firmware, and software architectures, the platform is capable of interfacing with a wide variety of detector modules not only in medical imaging but also in homeland security applications. Analog signals from radiation detectors share similar characteristics – a pulse whose area is proportional to the deposited energy and whose leading edge is used to extract a timing signal. As a result, a generic design method of the platform is adopted for the hardware, firmware, and software architectures and implementations. The analog front-end is hosted on a module called a Detector Board, where each board can filter, combine, timestamp, and process multiple channels independently. The processed data is formatted and sent through a backplane bus to a module called Support Board, where 1 Support Board can host up to eight Detector Board modules. The data in the Support Board, coming from 8 Detector Board modules, can be aggregated or correlated (if needed) depending on the algorithm implemented or runtime mode selected. It is then sent out to a computer workstation for further processing. The number of channels (detector modules), to be processed, mandates the overall OpenPET System Configuration, which is designed to handle up to 1,024 channels using 16-channel Detector Boards in the Standard System Configuration and 16,384 channels using 32-channel Detector Boards in the Large System Configuration. PMID:27110034

  15. Total Quality development of Material Control Accountability software: LANMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Woychick, M.R.; Yearsley, D.; McRae, L.P.

    1993-07-01

    Changing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines require Material Control & Accountability (MC&A) software to meet Total Quality certification requirements. Some MC&A software has met site quality standards, but only after extensive documentation rework. Mandating Total Quality methods during development virtually guarantees MC&A software certification.

  16. EZ-Rhizo: integrated software for the fast and accurate measurement of root system architecture.

    PubMed

    Armengaud, Patrick; Zambaux, Kevin; Hills, Adrian; Sulpice, Ronan; Pattison, Richard J; Blatt, Michael R; Amtmann, Anna

    2009-03-01

    The root system is essential for the growth and development of plants. In addition to anchoring the plant in the ground, it is the site of uptake of water and minerals from the soil. Plant root systems show an astonishing plasticity in their architecture, which allows for optimal exploitation of diverse soil structures and conditions. The signalling pathways that enable plants to sense and respond to changes in soil conditions, in particular nutrient supply, are a topic of intensive research, and root system architecture (RSA) is an important and obvious phenotypic output. At present, the quantitative description of RSA is labour intensive and time consuming, even using the currently available software, and the lack of a fast RSA measuring tool hampers forward and quantitative genetics studies. Here, we describe EZ-Rhizo: a Windows-integrated and semi-automated computer program designed to detect and quantify multiple RSA parameters from plants growing on a solid support medium. The method is non-invasive, enabling the user to follow RSA development over time. We have successfully applied EZ-Rhizo to evaluate natural variation in RSA across 23 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, and have identified new RSA determinants as a basis for future quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis.

  17. Operation and control software for APNEA

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.H.; Storm, B.H. Jr.; Ahearn, J.

    1997-11-01

    The human interface software for the Lockheed Martin Specialty Components (LMSC) Active/Passive Neutron Examination & Analysis System (APENA) provides a user friendly operating environment for the movement and analysis of waste drums. It is written in Microsoft Visual C++ on a Windows NT platform. Object oriented and multitasking techniques are used extensively to maximize the capability of the system. A waste drum is placed on a loading platform with a fork lift and then automatically moved into the APNEA chamber in preparation for analysis. A series of measurements is performed, controlled by menu commands to hardware components attached as peripheral devices, in order to create data files for analysis. The analysis routines use the files to identify the pertinent radioactive characteristics of the drum, including the type, location, and quantity of fissionable material. At the completion of the measurement process, the drum is automatically unloaded and the data are archived in preparation for storage as part of the drum`s data signature. 3 figs.

  18. SpaceWire- Based Control System Architecture for the Lightweight Advanced Robotic Arm Demonstrator [LARAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucinski, Marek; Coates, Adam; Montano, Giuseppe; Allouis, Elie; Jameux, David

    2015-09-01

    The Lightweight Advanced Robotic Arm Demonstrator (LARAD) is a state-of-the-art, two-meter long robotic arm for planetary surface exploration currently being developed by a UK consortium led by Airbus Defence and Space Ltd under contract to the UK Space Agency (CREST-2 programme). LARAD has a modular design, which allows for experimentation with different electronics and control software. The control system architecture includes the on-board computer, control software and firmware, and the communication infrastructure (e.g. data links, switches) connecting on-board computer(s), sensors, actuators and the end-effector. The purpose of the control system is to operate the arm according to pre-defined performance requirements, monitoring its behaviour in real-time and performing safing/recovery actions in case of faults. This paper reports on the results of a recent study about the feasibility of the development and integration of a novel control system architecture for LARAD fully based on the SpaceWire protocol. The current control system architecture is based on the combination of two communication protocols, Ethernet and CAN. The new SpaceWire-based control system will allow for improved monitoring and telecommanding performance thanks to higher communication data rate, allowing for the adoption of advanced control schemes, potentially based on multiple vision sensors, and for the handling of sophisticated end-effectors that require fine control, such as science payloads or robotic hands.

  19. Total quality development of material control and accountability software -- LANMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Yearsley, D.; McRae, L.P.

    1993-12-31

    Changing US Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines require Material Control and Accountability (MC and A) software to meet Total Quality certification requirements. Some MC and A software has met site quality standards, but only after extensive documentation rework. Mandating Total Quality methods during development virtually guarantees MC and A software certification. Throughout this discussion, the development of LANMAS will be used to illustrate the Total Quality software development process.

  20. Advanced transport operating system software upgrade: Flight management/flight controls software description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinedinst, Winston C.; Debure, Kelly R.; Dickson, Richard W.; Heaphy, William J.; Parks, Mark A.; Slominski, Christopher J.; Wolverton, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software for the Norden 2 (PDP-11/70M) computer installed on the NASA 737 aircraft is described. The software computes the navigation position estimates, guidance commands, those commands to be issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight based on the modes selected on the Advanced Guidance Control System (AGSC) mode panel, and the flight path selected via the Navigation Control/Display Unit (NCDU).

  1. Control vocabulary software designed for CMIP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, D.; Taylor, K. E.; Williams, D. N.; Ames, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) coordinates a number of intercomparison activities and includes many more experiments than its predecessor, CMIP5. In order to organize and facilitate use of the complex collection of expected CMIP6 model output, a standard set of descriptive information has been defined, which must be stored along with the data. This standard information enables automated machine interpretation of the contents of all model output files. The standard metadata is stored in compliance with the Climate and Forecast (CF) standard, which ensures that it can be interpreted and visualized by many standard software packages. Additional attributes (not standardized by CF) are required by CMIP6 to enhance identification of models and experiments, and to provide additional information critical for interpreting the model results. To ensure that CMIP6 data complies with the standards, a python program called "PrePARE" (Pre-Publication Attribute Reviewer for the ESGF) has been developed to check the model output prior to its publication and release for analysis. If, for example, a required attribute is missing or incorrect (e.g., not included in the reference CMIP6 controlled vocabularies), then PrePare will prevent publication. In some circumstances, missing attributes can be created or incorrect attributes can be replaced automatically by PrePARE, and the program will warn users about the changes that have been made. PrePARE provides a final check on model output assuring adherence to a baseline conformity across the output from all CMIP6 models which will facilitate analysis by climate scientists. PrePARE is flexible and can be easily modified for use by similar projects that have a well-defined set of metadata and controlled vocabularies.

  2. Architectures and Evaluation for Adjustable Control Autonomy for Space-Based Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schreckenghost, Debra K.

    2001-01-01

    In the past five years, a number of automation applications for control of crew life support systems have been developed and evaluated in the Adjustable Autonomy Testbed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. This paper surveys progress on an adjustable autonomous control architecture for situations where software and human operators work together to manage anomalies and other system problems. When problems occur, the level of control autonomy can be adjusted, so that operators and software agents can work together on diagnosis and recovery. In 1997 adjustable autonomy software was developed to manage gas transfer and storage in a closed life support test. Four crewmembers lived and worked in a chamber for 91 days, with both air and water recycling. CO2 was converted to O2 by gas processing systems and wheat crops. With the automation software, significantly fewer hours were spent monitoring operations. System-level validation testing of the software by interactive hybrid simulation revealed problems both in software requirements and implementation. Since that time, we have been developing multi-agent approaches for automation software and human operators, to cooperatively control systems and manage problems. Each new capability has been tested and demonstrated in realistic dynamic anomaly scenarios, using the hybrid simulation tool.

  3. A Hybrid Multi-Robot Control Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Applications of Artificial Intelligence , 19:179–188, 2006. 14. Cao, Y. Uny, Alex S. Fukunaga, and Andrew B. Kahng. “Cooperative Mobile Robotics...13. Camacho, David, Fernando Fernández, and Miguel A. Rodelgo. “Roboskeleton: An architecture for coordinating robot soccer agents”. Engineering

  4. System design document U-AVLIS control system architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Viebeck, P.G.

    1994-02-16

    This document describes the architecture of the integrated control system for the U-AVLIS process. It includes an overview of the major control system components and their interfaces to one another. Separate documents are utilized to fully describe each component mentioned herein. The purpose of this document is to introduce the reader to the integrated U-AVLIS control system. It describes the philosophy of the control system architecture and how all of the control system components are integrated. While the other System Design Documents describe in detail the design of individual control system components, this document puts those components into their correct context within the entire integrated control system.

  5. TANGO standard software to control the Nuclotron beam slow extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. A.; Volkov, V. I.; Gorbachev, E. V.; Isadov, V. A.; Kirichenko, A. E.; Romanov, S. V.; Sedykh, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    TANGO Controls is a basis of the NICA control system. The report describes the software which integrates the Nuclotron beam slow extraction subsystem into the TANGO system of NICA. Objects of control are power supplies for resonance lenses. The software consists of the subsystem device server, remote client and web-module for viewing the subsystem data.

  6. Framework for Small-Scale Experiments in Software Engineering: Guidance and Control Software Project: Software Engineering Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1998-01-01

    Software is becoming increasingly significant in today's critical avionics systems. To achieve safe, reliable software, government regulatory agencies such as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Department of Defense mandate the use of certain software development methods. However, little scientific evidence exists to show a correlation between software development methods and product quality. Given this lack of evidence, a series of experiments has been conducted to understand why and how software fails. The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project is the latest in this series. The GCS project is a case study of the Requirements and Technical Concepts for Aviation RTCA/DO-178B guidelines, Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification. All civil transport airframe and equipment vendors are expected to comply with these guidelines in building systems to be certified by the FAA for use in commercial aircraft. For the case study, two implementations of a guidance and control application were developed to comply with the DO-178B guidelines for Level A (critical) software. The development included the requirements, design, coding, verification, configuration management, and quality assurance processes. This paper discusses the details of the GCS project and presents the results of the case study.

  7. Large-Scale CORBA-Distributed Software Framework for NIF Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, R W; Fong, K W; Sanchez, R J; Tappero, J D; Woodruff, J P

    2001-10-16

    The Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) is based on a scalable software framework that is distributed over some 325 computers throughout the NIF facility. The framework provides templates and services at multiple levels of abstraction for the construction of software applications that communicate via CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture). Various forms of object-oriented software design patterns are implemented as templates to be extended by application software. Developers extend the framework base classes to model the numerous physical control points, thereby sharing the functionality defined by the base classes. About 56,000 software objects each individually addressed through CORBA are to be created in the complete ICCS. Most objects have a persistent state that is initialized at system start-up and stored in a database. Additional framework services are provided by centralized server programs that implement events, alerts, reservations, message logging, database/file persistence, name services, and process management. The ICCS software framework approach allows for efficient construction of a software system that supports a large number of distributed control points representing a complex control application.

  8. Instrument control software development process for the multi-star AO system ARGOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulas, M.; Barl, L.; Borelli, J. L.; Gässler, W.; Rabien, S.

    2012-09-01

    The ARGOS project (Advanced Rayleigh guided Ground layer adaptive Optics System) will upgrade the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) with an AO System consisting of six Rayleigh laser guide stars. This adaptive optics system integrates several control loops and many different components like lasers, calibration swing arms and slope computers that are dispersed throughout the telescope. The purpose of the instrument control software (ICS) is running this AO system and providing convenient client interfaces to the instruments and the control loops. The challenges for the ARGOS ICS are the development of a distributed and safety-critical software system with no defects in a short time, the creation of huge and complex software programs with a maintainable code base, the delivery of software components with the desired functionality and the support of geographically distributed project partners. To tackle these difficult tasks, the ARGOS software engineers reuse existing software like the novel middleware from LINC-NIRVANA, an instrument for the LBT, provide many tests at different functional levels like unit tests and regression tests, agree about code and architecture style and deliver software incrementally while closely collaborating with the project partners. Many ARGOS ICS components are already successfully in use in the laboratories for testing ARGOS control loops.

  9. An open-architecture approach to defect analysis software for mask inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Mark; Pai, Ravi R.; Reddy, Murali Mohan; Krishna, Ravi M.

    2009-04-01

    Industry data suggests that Mask Inspection represents the second biggest component of Mask Cost and Mask Turn Around Time (TAT). Ever decreasing defect size targets lead to more sensitive mask inspection across the chip, thus generating too many defects. Hence, more operator time is being spent in analyzing and disposition of defects. Also, the fact that multiple Mask Inspection Systems and Defect Analysis strategies would typically be in use in a Mask Shop or a Wafer Foundry further complicates the situation. In this scenario, there is a need for a versatile, user friendly and extensible Defect Analysis software that reduces operator analysis time and enables correct classification and disposition of mask defects by providing intuitive visual and analysis aids. We propose a new vendor-neutral defect analysis software, NxDAT, based on an open architecture. The open architecture of NxDAT makes it easily extensible to support defect analysis for mask inspection systems from different vendors. The capability to load results from mask inspection systems from different vendors either directly or through a common interface enables the functionality of establishing correlation between inspections carried out by mask inspection systems from different vendors. This capability of NxDAT enhances the effectiveness of defect analysis as it directly addresses the real-life scenario where multiple types of mask inspection systems from different vendors co-exist in mask shops or wafer foundries. The open architecture also potentially enables loading wafer inspection results as well as loading data from other related tools such as Review Tools, Repair Tools, CD-SEM tools etc, and correlating them with the corresponding mask inspection results. A unique concept of Plug-In interface to NxDAT further enhances the openness of the architecture of NxDAT by enabling end-users to add their own proprietary defect analysis and image processing algorithms. The plug-in interface makes it

  10. From data to the decision: A software architecture to integrate predictive modelling in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Millana, A; Fernandez-Llatas, C; Sacchi, L; Segagni, D; Guillen, S; Bellazzi, R; Traver, V

    2015-08-01

    The application of statistics and mathematics over large amounts of data is providing healthcare systems with new tools for screening and managing multiple diseases. Nonetheless, these tools have many technical and clinical limitations as they are based on datasets with concrete characteristics. This proposition paper describes a novel architecture focused on providing a validation framework for discrimination and prediction models in the screening of Type 2 diabetes. For that, the architecture has been designed to gather different data sources under a common data structure and, furthermore, to be controlled by a centralized component (Orchestrator) in charge of directing the interaction flows among data sources, models and graphical user interfaces. This innovative approach aims to overcome the data-dependency of the models by providing a validation framework for the models as they are used within clinical settings.

  11. A new flight control and management system architecture and configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fan-e.; Chen, Zongji

    2006-11-01

    The advanced fighter should possess the performance such as super-sound cruising, stealth, agility, STOVL(Short Take-Off Vertical Landing),powerful communication and information processing. For this purpose, it is not enough only to improve the aerodynamic and propulsion system. More importantly, it is necessary to enhance the control system. A complete flight control system provides not only autopilot, auto-throttle and control augmentation, but also the given mission management. F-22 and JSF possess considerably outstanding flight control system on the basis of pave pillar and pave pace avionics architecture. But their control architecture is not enough integrated. The main purpose of this paper is to build a novel fighter control system architecture. The control system constructed on this architecture should be enough integrated, inexpensive, fault-tolerant, high safe, reliable and effective. And it will take charge of both the flight control and mission management. Starting from this purpose, this paper finishes the work as follows: First, based on the human nervous control, a three-leveled hierarchical control architecture is proposed. At the top of the architecture, decision level is in charge of decision-making works. In the middle, organization & coordination level will schedule resources, monitor the states of the fighter and switch the control modes etc. And the bottom is execution level which holds the concrete drive and measurement; then, according to their function and resources all the tasks involving flight control and mission management are sorted to individual level; at last, in order to validate the three-leveled architecture, a physical configuration is also showed. The configuration is distributed and applies some new advancement in information technology industry such line replaced module and cluster technology.

  12. Evaluating the Multicast Control Protocol on a Multicasting Network Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergiou, E.; Meletiou, G.; Vasiliadis, D. C.; Rizos, G. E.; Margariti, S. V.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper a reliable multicasting architecture presented. This architecture operates using a Multicasting Firewall over the Multicast Control Protocol (MCP). Our aim was to evaluate the transition times of specific packets such as the IGMPv2 reports in the proposed multicasting network. In our study, multicasting experiments presented and analyzed. The obtained results of our experiments clearly show that the average validation times of IGMP reports on the Multicast Control Server smoothly increase versus the number of clients.

  13. Guidance and Control Software Project Data - Volume 2: Development Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project was the last in a series of software reliability studies conducted at Langley Research Center between 1977 and 1994. The technical results of the GCS project were recorded after the experiment was completed. Some of the support documentation produced as part of the experiment, however, is serving an unexpected role far beyond its original project context. Some of the software used as part of the GCS project was developed to conform to the RTCA/DO-178B software standard, "Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification," used in the civil aviation industry. That standard requires extensive documentation throughout the software development life cycle, including plans, software requirements, design and source code, verification cases and results, and configuration management and quality control data. The project documentation that includes this information is open for public scrutiny without the legal or safety implications associated with comparable data from an avionics manufacturer. This public availability has afforded an opportunity to use the GCS project documents for DO-178B training. This report provides a brief overview of the GCS project, describes the 4-volume set of documents and the role they are playing in training, and includes the development documents from the GCS project. Volume 2 contains three appendices: A. Guidance and Control Software Development Specification; B. Design Description for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software; and C. Source Code for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software

  14. Scalable Adaptive Architectures for Maritime Operations Center Command and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-06

    SYSTEM ARCHITECTURES LABORATORY DEPT. OF ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY Fairfax, VA22030 SCALABLE ADAPTIVE...the project to investigate the possibility of using earlier work on the validation and verification of rule bases in addressing the dynamically...consideration of the cases identified by it. The approach, implemented as a software suite of tools, provides a repository of OPLAW/ROH sets of rules

  15. Guidance and Control Software Project Data - Volume 3: Verification Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project was the last in a series of software reliability studies conducted at Langley Research Center between 1977 and 1994. The technical results of the GCS project were recorded after the experiment was completed. Some of the support documentation produced as part of the experiment, however, is serving an unexpected role far beyond its original project context. Some of the software used as part of the GCS project was developed to conform to the RTCA/DO-178B software standard, "Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification," used in the civil aviation industry. That standard requires extensive documentation throughout the software development life cycle, including plans, software requirements, design and source code, verification cases and results, and configuration management and quality control data. The project documentation that includes this information is open for public scrutiny without the legal or safety implications associated with comparable data from an avionics manufacturer. This public availability has afforded an opportunity to use the GCS project documents for DO-178B training. This report provides a brief overview of the GCS project, describes the 4-volume set of documents and the role they are playing in training, and includes the verification documents from the GCS project. Volume 3 contains four appendices: A. Software Verification Cases and Procedures for the Guidance and Control Software Project; B. Software Verification Results for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software; C. Review Records for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software; and D. Test Results Logs for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software.

  16. Ultra-Stable Segmented Telescope Sensing and Control Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee; Bolcar, Matthew; Knight, Scott; Redding, David

    2017-01-01

    The LUVOIR team is conducting two full architecture studies Architecture A 15 meter telescope that folds up in an 8.4m SLS Block 2 shroud is nearly complete. Architecture B 9.2 meter that uses an existing fairing size will begin study this Fall. This talk will summarize the ultra-stable architecture of the 15m segmented telescope including the basic requirements, the basic rationale for the architecture, the technologies employed, and the expected performance. This work builds on several dynamics and thermal studies performed for ATLAST segmented telescope configurations. The most important new element was an approach to actively control segments for segment to segment motions which will be discussed later.

  17. The Implementation of Satellite Attitude Control System Software Using Object Oriented Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, W. Mark; Hansell, William; Phillips, Tom; Anderson, Mark O.; Drury, Derek

    1998-01-01

    NASA established the Small Explorer (SNMX) program in 1988 to provide frequent opportunities for highly focused and relatively inexpensive space science missions. The SMEX program has produced five satellites, three of which have been successfully launched. The remaining two spacecraft are scheduled for launch within the coming year. NASA has recently developed a prototype for the next generation Small Explorer spacecraft (SMEX-Lite). This paper describes the object-oriented design (OOD) of the SMEX-Lite Attitude Control System (ACS) software. The SMEX-Lite ACS is three-axis controlled and is capable of performing sub-arc-minute pointing. This paper first describes high level requirements governing the SMEX-Lite ACS software architecture. Next, the context in which the software resides is explained. The paper describes the principles of encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism with respect to the implementation of an ACS software system. This paper will also discuss the design of several ACS software components. Specifically, object-oriented designs are presented for sensor data processing, attitude determination, attitude control, and failure detection. Finally, this paper will address the establishment of the ACS Foundation Class (AFC) Library. The AFC is a large software repository, requiring a minimal amount of code modifications to produce ACS software for future projects.

  18. DKIST visible tunable filter control software: connecting the DKIST framework to OPC UA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Alexander; Halbgewachs, Clemens; Kentischer, Thomas J.; Schmidt, Wolfgang; von der Lühe, Oskar; Sigwarth, Michael; Fischer, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The Visible Tunable Filter (VTF) is a narrowband tunable filter system for imaging spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry based on large-format Fabry Perot interferometers that is currently built by the Kiepenheuer Institut fuer Sonnenphysik for the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST). The control software must handle around 30 motorised drives, 3 etalons, a polarizing modulator, a helium neon laser for system calibration, temperature controllers and a multitude of sensors. The VTF is foreseen as one of the DKISTs first-light instruments and should become operational in 2019. In the design of the control software we strongly separate between the high-level part interfacing to the DKIST common services framework (CSF) and the low-level control system software which guarantees real-time performance and synchronization to precision time protocol (PTP) based observatory time. For the latter we chose a programmable logic controller (PLC) from Beckhoff Automation GmbH which supports a wide set of input and output devices as well as distributed clocks for synchronizing signals down to the sub-microsecond level. In this paper we present the design of the required control system software as well as our work on extending the DKIST CSF to use the OPC Unified Architecture (OPC UA) standard which provides a cross-platform communication standard for process control and automation as an interface between the high-level software and the real-time control system.

  19. Safety. [requirements for software to monitor and control critical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy G.

    1991-01-01

    Software requirements, design, implementation, verification and validation, and especially management are affected by the need to produce safe software. This paper discusses the changes in the software life cycle that are necessary to ensure that software will execute without resulting in unacceptable risk. Software is being used increasingly to monitor and control safety-critical processes in which a run-time failure or error could result in unacceptable losses such as death, injury, loss of property, or environmental harm. Examples of such processes maybe found in transportation, energy, aerospace, basic industry, medicine, and defense systems.

  20. Bayesian Software Health Management for Aircraft Guidance, Navigation, and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Mbaya, Timmy; Menghoel, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Modern aircraft, both piloted fly-by-wire commercial aircraft as well as UAVs, more and more depend on highly complex safety critical software systems with many sensors and computer-controlled actuators. Despite careful design and V&V of the software, severe incidents have happened due to malfunctioning software. In this paper, we discuss the use of Bayesian networks (BNs) to monitor the health of the on-board software and sensor system, and to perform advanced on-board diagnostic reasoning. We will focus on the approach to develop reliable and robust health models for the combined software and sensor systems.

  1. Control software and user interface for the Canarias Infrared Camera Experiment (CIRCE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín-Franch, Antonio; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Charcos-Llorens, Miguel V.; Edwards, Michelle L.; Varosi, Frank; Hon, David B.; Raines, Steven N.; Warner, Craig D.; Rashkin, David

    2006-06-01

    The Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment (CIRCE) is a near-infrared visitor instrument for the 10.4-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). This document shows CIRCE software. It will have two major functions: instrument control and observatory interface. The instrument control software is based on the UFLIB library, currently used to operate FLAMINGOS-1 and T-ReCS (as well as the CanariCam and FLAMINGOS-2 instruments under development in the University of Florida). The software interface with the telescope will be based on a CORBA server-client architecture. Finally, the user interface will consist of two java-based interfaces for the mechanism/detector control, and for quick look and analysis of data.

  2. Experimental control in software reliability certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trammell, Carmen J.; Poore, Jesse H.

    1994-01-01

    There is growing interest in software 'certification', i.e., confirmation that software has performed satisfactorily under a defined certification protocol. Regulatory agencies, customers, and prospective reusers all want assurance that a defined product standard has been met. In other industries, products are typically certified under protocols in which random samples of the product are drawn, tests characteristic of operational use are applied, analytical or statistical inferences are made, and products meeting a standard are 'certified' as fit for use. A warranty statement is often issued upon satisfactory completion of a certification protocol. This paper outlines specific engineering practices that must be used to preserve the validity of the statistical certification testing protocol. The assumptions associated with a statistical experiment are given, and their implications for statistical testing of software are described.

  3. Computational architecture for integrated controls and structures design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1989-01-01

    To facilitate the development of control structure interaction (CSI) design methodology, a computational architecture for interdisciplinary design of active structures is presented. The emphasis of the computational procedure is to exploit existing sparse matrix structural analysis techniques, in-core data transfer with control synthesis programs, and versatility in the optimization methodology to avoid unnecessary structural or control calculations. The architecture is designed such that all required structure, control and optimization analyses are performed within one program. Hence, the optimization strategy is not unduly constrained by cold starts of existing structural analysis and control synthesis packages.

  4. Fault-tolerant software for aircraft control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Concepts for software to implement real time aircraft control systems on a centralized digital computer were discussed. A fault tolerant software structure employing functionally redundant routines with concurrent error detection was proposed for critical control functions involving safety of flight and landing. A degraded recovery block concept was devised to allow collocation of critical and noncritical software modules within the same control structure. The additional computer resources required to implement the proposed software structure for a representative set of aircraft control functions were discussed. It was estimated that approximately 30 percent more memory space is required to implement the total set of control functions. A reliability model for the fault tolerant software was described and parametric estimates of failure rate were made.

  5. Software Architecture for a Highly Autonomous Spacecraft Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kia, T.; Aljabri, A.

    1994-01-01

    Future space missions will continue to be scientifically and technically more ambitious, and will demand more autonomy to accomplish complex tasks in uncertain environments and in close proximity to extraterrestrial bodies.

  6. Software Architecture for a Highly Autonomous Spacecraft Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kia, T.; Aljabri, A.

    1994-01-01

    Future space missions will continue to be scientifically and technically more ambitious, and will demand more autonomy to accomplish complex tasks in uncertain environments and in close proximity to extraterrestrial bodies.

  7. Critical Branches and Lucky Loads in Control-Independence Architectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, Kshitiz

    2009-01-01

    Branch mispredicts have a first-order impact on the performance of integer applications. Control Independence (CI) architectures aim to overlap the penalties of mispredicted branches with useful execution by spawning control-independent work as separate threads. Although control independent, such threads may consume register and memory values…

  8. Critical Branches and Lucky Loads in Control-Independence Architectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, Kshitiz

    2009-01-01

    Branch mispredicts have a first-order impact on the performance of integer applications. Control Independence (CI) architectures aim to overlap the penalties of mispredicted branches with useful execution by spawning control-independent work as separate threads. Although control independent, such threads may consume register and memory values…

  9. JPL control/structure interaction test bed real-time control computer architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1989-01-01

    The Control/Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts - such as active structure - and new tools - such as combined structure and control optimization algorithm - and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. A focus mission spacecraft was designed based upon a space interferometer and is the basis for design of the ground test article. The ground test bed objectives include verification of the spacecraft design concepts, the active structure elements and certain design tools such as the new combined structures and controls optimization tool. In anticipation of CSI technology flight experiments, the test bed control electronics must emulate the computation capacity and control architectures of space qualifiable systems as well as the command and control networks that will be used to connect investigators with the flight experiment hardware. The Test Bed facility electronics were functionally partitioned into three units: a laboratory data acquisition system for structural parameter identification and performance verification; an experiment supervisory computer to oversee the experiment, monitor the environmental parameters and perform data logging; and a multilevel real-time control computing system. The design of the Test Bed electronics is presented along with hardware and software component descriptions. The system should break new ground in experimental control electronics and is of interest to anyone working in the verification of control concepts for large structures.

  10. Porting and refurbishment of the WSS TNG control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caproni, Alessandro; Zacchei, Andrea; Vuerli, Claudio; Pucillo, Mauro

    2004-09-01

    The Workstation Software Sytem (WSS) is the high level control software of the Italian Galileo Galilei Telescope settled in La Palma Canary Island developed at the beginning of '90 for HP-UX workstations. WSS may be seen as a middle layer software system that manages the communications between the real time systems (VME), different workstations and high level applications providing a uniform distributed environment. The project to port the control software from the HP workstation to Linux environment started at the end of 2001. It is aimed to refurbish the control software introducing some of the new software technologies and languages, available for free in the Linux operating system. The project was realized by gradually substituting each HP workstation with a Linux PC with the goal to avoid main changes in the original software running under HP-UX. Three main phases characterized the project: creation of a simulated control room with several Linux PCs running WSS (to check all the functionality); insertion in the simulated control room of some HPs (to check the mixed environment); substitution of HP workstation in the real control room. From a software point of view, the project introduces some new technologies, like multi-threading, and the possibility to develop high level WSS applications with almost every programming language that implements the Berkley sockets. A library to develop java applications has also been created and tested.

  11. Self-control, deviant peers, and software piracy.

    PubMed

    Higgins, George E; Makin, David A

    2004-12-01

    Tests of self-control theory have examined a substantial number of criminal behaviors, but no study has examined the correlation of low self-control with software piracy. Using data collected from 302 students in this university, this study examined the correlation of low self-control with software piracy and the moderating role of associating with deviant peers in this correlation. Low self-control correlated with software piracy more strongly for those who had high associations with deviant peers than for students with low associations with deviant peers. Analysis indicated differential links for lack of moral attitude in relation to software piracy and favorable attitudes for software piracy for varying association with deviant peers.

  12. Dynamic assertion testing of flight control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. M.; Mahmood, A.; Mccluskey, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment in using assertions to dynamically test fault tolerant flight software is described. The experiment showed that 87% of typical errors introduced into the program would be detected by assertions. Detailed analysis of the test data showed that the number of assertions needed to detect those errors could be reduced to a minimal set. The analysis also revealed that the most effective assertions tested program parameters that provided greater indirect (collateral) testing of other parameters.

  13. Dynamic assertion testing of flight control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. M.; Mahmood, A.; Mccluskey, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Assertions are used to dynamically test fault tolerant flight software. The experiment showed that 87% of typical errors introduced into the program would be detected by assertions. Detailed analysis of the test data showed that the number of assertions needed to detect those errors could be reduced to a minimal set. The analysis also revealed that the most effective assertions tested program parameters that provided greater indirect (collateral) testing of other parameters.

  14. Designing and Implementing a Distributed System Architecture for the Mars Rover Mission Planning Software (Maestro)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldgof, Gregory M.

    2005-01-01

    Distributed systems allow scientists from around the world to plan missions concurrently, while being updated on the revisions of their colleagues in real time. However, permitting multiple clients to simultaneously modify a single data repository can quickly lead to data corruption or inconsistent states between users. Since our message broker, the Java Message Service, does not ensure that messages will be received in the order they were published, we must implement our own numbering scheme to guarantee that changes to mission plans are performed in the correct sequence. Furthermore, distributed architectures must ensure that as new users connect to the system, they synchronize with the database without missing any messages or falling into an inconsistent state. Robust systems must also guarantee that all clients will remain synchronized with the database even in the case of multiple client failure, which can occur at any time due to lost network connections or a user's own system instability. The final design for the distributed system behind the Mars rover mission planning software fulfills all of these requirements and upon completion will be deployed to MER at the end of 2005 as well as Phoenix (2007) and MSL (2009).

  15. Effective software design and development for the new graph architecture HPC machines.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechev, Damian

    2012-03-01

    Software applications need to change and adapt as modern architectures evolve. Nowadays advancement in chip design translates to increased parallelism. Exploiting such parallelism is a major challenge in modern software engineering. Multicore processors are about to introduce a significant change in the way we design and use fundamental data structures. In this work we describe the design and programming principles of a software library of highly concurrent scalable and nonblocking data containers. In this project we have created algorithms and data structures for handling fundamental computations in massively multithreaded contexts, and we have incorporated these into a usable library with familiar look and feel. In this work we demonstrate the first design and implementation of a wait-free hash table. Our multiprocessor data structure design allows a large number of threads to concurrently insert, remove, and retrieve information. Non-blocking designs alleviate the problems traditionally associated with the use of mutual exclusion, such as bottlenecks and thread-safety. Lock-freedom provides the ability to share data without some of the drawbacks associated with locks, however, these designs remain susceptible to starvation. Furthermore, wait-freedom provides all of the benefits of lock-free synchronization with the added assurance that every thread makes progress in a finite number of steps. This implies deadlock-freedom, livelock-freedom, starvation-freedom, freedom from priority inversion, and thread-safety. The challenges of providing the desirable progress and correctness guarantees of wait-free objects makes their design and implementation difficult. There are few wait-free data structures described in the literature. Using only standard atomic operations provided by the hardware, our design is portable; therefore, it is applicable to a variety of data-intensive applications including the domains of embedded systems and supercomputers.Our experimental

  16. Software control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope enclosure PLC hardware using COTS software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrowman, Alastair J.; de Bilbao, Lander; Ariño, Javier; Murga, Gaizka; Goodrich, Bret; Hubbard, John R.; Greer, Alan; Mayer, Chris; Taylor, Philip

    2012-09-01

    As PLCs evolve from simple logic controllers into more capable Programmable Automation Controllers (PACs), observatories are increasingly using such devices to control complex mechanisms1, 2. This paper describes use of COTS software to control such hardware using the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) Common Services Framework (CSF). We present the Enclosure Control System (ECS) under development in Spain and the UK. The paper details selection of the commercial PLC communication library PLCIO. Implemented in C and delivered with source code, the library separates the programmer from communication details through a simple API. Capable of communicating with many types of PLCs (including Allen-Bradley and Siemens) the API remains the same irrespective of PLC in use. The ECS is implemented in Java using the observatory's framework that provides common services for software components. We present a design following a connection-based approach where all components access the PLC through a single connection class. The link between Java and PLCIO C library is provided by a thin Java Native Interface (JNI) layer. Also presented is a software simulator of the PLC based upon the PLCIO Virtual PLC. This creates a simulator operating below the library's API and thus requires no change to ECS software. It also provides enhanced software testing capabilities prior to hardware becoming available. Results are presented in the form of communication timing test data, showing that the use of CSF, JNI and PLCIO provide a control system capable of controlling enclosure tracking mechanisms, that would be equally valid for telescope mount control.

  17. The software architecture of the camera for the ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiorgi, Pierluca; Capalbi, Milvia; Gimenes, Renato; La Rosa, Giovanni; Russo, Francesco; Segreto, Alberto; Sottile, Giuseppe; Catalano, Osvaldo

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to present the current status of the software architecture of the ASTRI SST-2M Cherenkov Camera. The ASTRI SST-2M telescope is an end-to-end prototype for the Small Size Telescope of the Cherenkov Telescope Array. The ASTRI camera is an innovative instrument based on SiPM detectors and has several internal hardware components. In this contribution we will give a brief description of the hardware components of the camera of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype and of their interconnections. Then we will present the outcome of the software architectural design process that we carried out in order to identify the main structural components of the camera software system and the relationships among them. We will analyze the architectural model that describes how the camera software is organized as a set of communicating blocks. Finally, we will show where these blocks are deployed in the hardware components and how they interact. We will describe in some detail, the physical communication ports and external ancillary devices management, the high precision time-tag management, the fast data collection and the fast data exchange between different camera subsystems, and the interfacing with the external systems.

  18. U.S. Army Workshop on Exploring Enterprise, System of Systems, System, and Software Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Clements, SEI 0900-0945 Overview of Enterprise Architecture: definition, IT alignment, governance, notations and languages, Zachman, TOGAF , Carol Wortman...descriptions. An architecture framework (as defined by TOGAF8) is a tool which can be used for developing a broad range of 8 TOGAF is The Open...on a formal metamodel to promote architectural framework (e.g., DoDAF, MODAF, TOGAF , and NATO Architecture Framework [NAF]) and MAFP tool

  19. Automatic software for controlling cryogenic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A technical discussion of the lessons learned during the seven years of software development/testing which occurred on the Liquid Oxygen System for the Space Shuttle at the Kennedy Space Center is given. Problems which were solved during these years came into four distinct phases: design/debug before simulation runs, verification using simulation with models up through Space Transportation System-1 launch, hardware usage from first launch to Space Transportation System-5 launch, and future use. Each problem/solution describes the apparent problem requirements/constraints, usable alternatives, selected action, and results.

  20. The JPL telerobot operator control station. Part 2: Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, Edwin P.; Landell, B. Patrick; Oxenberg, Sheldon; Morimoto, Carl

    1989-01-01

    The Operator Control Station of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)/NASA Telerobot Demonstrator System provides the man-machine interface between the operator and the system. It provides all the hardware and software for accepting human input for the direct and indirect (supervised) manipulation of the robot arms and tools for task execution. Hardware and software are also provided for the display and feedback of information and control data for the operator's consumption and interaction with the task being executed. The software design of the operator control system is discussed.

  1. Wireless Content Repurposing Architecture for DC Command and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    COMMAND AND CONTROL by Robert J. Suh September 2003 Thesis Advisor: Gurminder Singh Second Reader: Perry McDowell...data sources , gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Wireless Content Repurposing Architecture for DC Command and Control

  2. Spaceport Command and Control System Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessluk, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    During the course of this internship, software was developed to ensure the efficient management and allocation of an employee to an area of their expertise or experience that may otherwise have gone unnoticed. This directly affects any future missions prescribed to the SLS by allowing management to easily see where employees can be re-allocated to different mission specific projects or assist a project that may be lacking in a specific field. This software is intended to provide proof of NASA's diligence and deliberation in hiring new employees and in providing training and guidance to employees who may have fallen short of expectations. Allowing management to more easily statistically track and monitor the supply and demand of employees with specific experience will help introduce a beneficial culture where employees are given the ability to grow and hone skills which might otherwise atrophy over time. With this new system in place, NASA can prove the employees they hire and already have are exemplary and will remain exemplary to serve the nation as a whole.

  3. Spaceport Command and Control System Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahlin, Jonathan Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    There is an immense challenge in organizing personnel across a large agency such as NASA, or even over a subset of that, like a center's Engineering directorate. Workforce inefficiencies and challenges are bound to grow over time without oversight and management. It is also not always possible to hire new employees to fill workforce gaps, therefore available resources must be utilized more efficiently. The goal of this internship was to develop software that improves organizational efficiency by aiding managers, making employee information viewable and editable in an intuitive manner. This semester I created an application for managers that aids in optimizing allocation of employee resources for a single division with the possibility of scaling upwards. My duties this semester consisted of developing frontend and backend software to complete this task. The application provides user-friendly information displays and documentation of the workforce to allow NASA to track diligently track the status and skills of its workforce. This tool should be able to prove that current employees are being effectively utilized and if new hires are necessary to fulfill skill gaps.

  4. On requirements for software fault tolerance for flight controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migneault, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    The need for the application of software fault tolerance techniques in digital flight control systems is argued to follow from the requirements derivable from the safety constraints of such systems, requirements which can be stated in terms of minimum acceptable system reliability levels and, moreover, stated quantitatively. It is argued further that, while fault tolerance appears to be a viable mechanism in general, individual fault tolerance schemes need to be analyzed to ensure that they are adequate to the task and being properly utilized, that such analysis is essentially an exercise in software 'reliability' estimation involving software characteristics not currently included in software 'reliability' modeling (most especially, the degree of correlation of malfunctions among redundant, dissimilar software modules), and that, consequently, further research and studies in the characterization of software behavior and malfunctions is required.

  5. Software Architecture of the NASA Shuttle Ground Operations Simulator--SGOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook Robert P.; Lostroscio, Charles T.

    2005-01-01

    The SGOS executive and its subsystems have been an integral component of the Shuttle Launch Safety Program for almost thirty years. it is usable (via the LAN) by over 2000 NASA employees at the Kennedy Space Center and 11,000 contractors. SGOS supports over 800 models comprised of several hundred thousand lines of code and over 1,00 MCP procedures. Yet neither language has a for loop!! The simulation software described in this paper is used to train ground controllers and to certify launch countdown readiness.

  6. The Integrated Airframe/Propulsion Control System Architecture program (IAPSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Cohen, Gerald C.; Meissner, Charles W.

    1990-01-01

    The Integrated Airframe/Propulsion Control System Architecture program (IAPSA) is a two-phase program which was initiated by NASA in the early 80s. The first phase, IAPSA 1, studied different architectural approaches to the problem of integrating engine control systems with airframe control systems in an advanced tactical fighter. One of the conclusions of IAPSA 1 was that the technology to construct a suitable system was available, yet the ability to create these complex computer architectures has outpaced the ability to analyze the resulting system's performance. With this in mind, the second phase of IAPSA approached the same problem with the added constraint that the system be designed for validation. The intent of the design for validation requirement is that validation requirements should be shown to be achievable early in the design process. IAPSA 2 has demonstrated that despite diligent efforts, integrated systems can retain characteristics which are difficult to model and, therefore, difficult to validate.

  7. The Integrated Airframe/Propulsion Control System Architecture program (IAPSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Cohen, Gerald C.; Meissner, Charles W.

    1990-01-01

    The Integrated Airframe/Propulsion Control System Architecture program (IAPSA) is a two-phase program which was initiated by NASA in the early 80s. The first phase, IAPSA 1, studied different architectural approaches to the problem of integrating engine control systems with airframe control systems in an advanced tactical fighter. One of the conclusions of IAPSA 1 was that the technology to construct a suitable system was available, yet the ability to create these complex computer architectures has outpaced the ability to analyze the resulting system's performance. With this in mind, the second phase of IAPSA approached the same problem with the added constraint that the system be designed for validation. The intent of the design for validation requirement is that validation requirements should be shown to be achievable early in the design process. IAPSA 2 has demonstrated that despite diligent efforts, integrated systems can retain characteristics which are difficult to model and, therefore, difficult to validate.

  8. The Application of New Software Technology to the Architecture of the National Cycle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, James D.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) effort of NASA Lewis in conjunction with the United States aeropropulsion industry, a new system simulation framework, the National Cycle Program (NCP), capable of combining existing empirical engine models with new detailed component-based computational models is being developed. The software architecture of the NCP program involves a generalized object- oriented framework and a base-set of engine component models along with supporting tool kits which will support engine simulation in a distributed environment. As the models are extended to contain two and three dimensions the computing load increases rapidly and it is intended that this load be distributed across multiple work stations executing concurrently in order to get acceptably fast results. The research carried out was directed toward performance analysis of the distributed object system. More specifically, the performance of the actor-based distributed object design I created earlier was desired. To this end, the research was directed toward the design and implementation of suitable performance-analysis techniques and software to demonstrate those techniques. There were three specific results which are reported in two separate reports submitted separately as NASA Technical Memoranda. The results are: (1) Design, implementation, and testing of a performance analysis program for a set of active objects (actor based objects) which allowed the individual actors to be assigned to arbitrary processes on an arbitrary set of machines. (2) The global-balance-equation approach has the fundamental limitation that the number of equations increases exponentially with the number of actors. Hence, unlike many approximate approaches to this problem, the nearest-neighbor approach allows checking of the solution and an estimate of the error. The technique was demonstrated in a prototype analysis program as part of this research. The results of the program were

  9. Control system software, simulation, and robotic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, Harold P.

    1991-01-01

    All essential existing capabilities needed to create a man-machine interaction dynamics and performance (MMIDAP) capability are reviewed. The multibody system dynamics software program Order N DISCOS will be used for machine and musculo-skeletal dynamics modeling. The program JACK will be used for estimating and animating whole body human response to given loading situations and motion constraints. The basic elements of performance (BEP) task decomposition methodologies associated with the Human Performance Institute database will be used for performance assessment. Techniques for resolving the statically indeterminant muscular load sharing problem will be used for a detailed understanding of potential musculotendon or ligamentous fatigue, pain, discomfort, and trauma. The envisioned capacity is to be used for mechanical system design, human performance assessment, extrapolation of man/machine interaction test data, biomedical engineering, and soft prototyping within a concurrent engineering (CE) system.

  10. Software Controls For Automated Feedback Tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarski, K.; Alkire, R. W.; Duke, N. E. C.; Rotella, F. J.

    2004-05-01

    The Structural Biology Center (SBC) beamlines have been designed to take full advantage of the highly intense radiation available at Argonne's Advance Photon Source for crystallography experiments. In order to facilitate the delivery of an intense, stable x-ray beam to crystallographic samples, new beam position stabilization software has been developed. Using the beam-position monitor developed by Alkire, Rosenbaum and Evans, the position of the beam is corrected in real time by applying changes to the monochromator tune using DC servomotors. Real-time monitoring tools were developed, in addition to the technique of selecting the reference trigger points. A user interface for feedback tuning has been developed in conjunction with real-time monitoring and interacting with data acquisition at the bending-magnet beamline (19BM) of the SBC. Preliminary results showed positional stability of the beam to better than 1 μrad in tune.

  11. Control system architecture for robotic welding of tubular joints

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, O.; Holm, H.; Lauridsen, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the architecture of a geometry model and sensor based control system for robotic welding of tubular joints. The functional architecture of the system is described with the main emphasis on the overall mode of operation of the system. Furthermore, it is described how measurements of the physical seam profile are used to update a reference geometry model, and how welding control variables are generated based on the updated reference geometry. Finally, it is illustrated how the use of a reference geometry can improve the flexibility and robustness of the system.

  12. A Biologically Inspired Cooperative Multi-Robot Control Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howsman, Tom; Craft, Mike; ONeil, Daniel; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A prototype cooperative multi-robot control architecture suitable for the eventual construction of large space structures has been developed. In nature, there are numerous examples of complex architectures constructed by relatively simple insects, such as termites and wasps, which cooperatively assemble their nests. The prototype control architecture emulates this biological model. Actions of each of the autonomous robotic construction agents are only indirectly coordinated, thus mimicking the distributed construction processes of various social insects. The robotic construction agents perform their primary duties stigmergically i.e., without direct inter-agent communication and without a preprogrammed global blueprint of the final design. Communication and coordination between individual agents occurs indirectly through the sensed modifications that each agent makes to the structure. The global stigmergic building algorithm prototyped during the initial research assumes that the robotic builders only perceive the current state of the structure under construction. Simulation studies have established that an idealized form of the proposed architecture was indeed capable of producing representative large space structures with autonomous robots. This paper will explore the construction simulations in order to illustrate the multi-robot control architecture.

  13. Computer hardware and software for robotic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Virgil Leon

    1987-01-01

    The KSC has implemented an integrated system that coordinates state-of-the-art robotic subsystems. It is a sensor based real-time robotic control system performing operations beyond the capability of an off-the-shelf robot. The integrated system provides real-time closed loop adaptive path control of position and orientation of all six axes of a large robot; enables the implementation of a highly configurable, expandable testbed for sensor system development; and makes several smart distributed control subsystems (robot arm controller, process controller, graphics display, and vision tracking) appear as intelligent peripherals to a supervisory computer coordinating the overall systems.

  14. Separating essentials from incidentals: an execution architecture for real-time control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, Daniel; Reinholtz, Kirk

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an execution architecture that makes such systems far more analyzable and verifiable by aggressive separation of concerns. The architecture separates two key software concerns: transformations of global state, as defined in pure functions; and sequencing/timing of transformations, as performed by an engine that enforces four prime invariants. The important advantage of this architecture, besides facilitating verification, is that it encourages formal specification of systems in a vocabulary that brings systems engineering closer to software engineering.

  15. Separating essentials from incidentals: an execution architecture for real-time control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, Daniel; Reinholtz, Kirk

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an execution architecture that makes such systems far more analyzable and verifiable by aggressive separation of concerns. The architecture separates two key software concerns: transformations of global state, as defined in pure functions; and sequencing/timing of transformations, as performed by an engine that enforces four prime invariants. The important advantage of this architecture, besides facilitating verification, is that it encourages formal specification of systems in a vocabulary that brings systems engineering closer to software engineering.

  16. Configuring the Orion Guidance, Navigation, and Control Flight Software for Automated Sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Ryan G.; Siliwinski, Tomasz K.; King, Ellis T.; Hart, Jeremy J.

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle is being designed with greater automation capabilities than any other crewed spacecraft in NASA s history. The Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) flight software architecture is designed to provide a flexible and evolvable framework that accommodates increasing levels of automation over time. Within the GN&C flight software, a data-driven approach is used to configure software. This approach allows data reconfiguration and updates to automated sequences without requiring recompilation of the software. Because of the great dependency of the automation and the flight software on the configuration data, the data management is a vital component of the processes for software certification, mission design, and flight operations. To enable the automated sequencing and data configuration of the GN&C subsystem on Orion, a desktop database configuration tool has been developed. The database tool allows the specification of the GN&C activity sequences, the automated transitions in the software, and the corresponding parameter reconfigurations. These aspects of the GN&C automation on Orion are all coordinated via data management, and the database tool provides the ability to test the automation capabilities during the development of the GN&C software. In addition to providing the infrastructure to manage the GN&C automation, the database tool has been designed with capabilities to import and export artifacts for simulation analysis and documentation purposes. Furthermore, the database configuration tool, currently used to manage simulation data, is envisioned to evolve into a mission planning tool for generating and testing GN&C software sequences and configurations. A key enabler of the GN&C automation design, the database tool allows both the creation and maintenance of the data artifacts, as well as serving the critical role of helping to manage, visualize, and understand the data-driven parameters both during software development

  17. Configuring the Orion Guidance, Navigation, and Control Flight Software for Automated Sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Ryan G.; Siliwinski, Tomasz K.; King, Ellis T.; Hart, Jeremy J.

    2010-01-01

    The Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle is being designed with greater automation capabilities than any other crewed spacecraft in NASA s history. The Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) flight software architecture is designed to provide a flexible and evolvable framework that accommodates increasing levels of automation over time. Within the GN&C flight software, a data-driven approach is used to configure software. This approach allows data reconfiguration and updates to automated sequences without requiring recompilation of the software. Because of the great dependency of the automation and the flight software on the configuration data, the data management is a vital component of the processes for software certification, mission design, and flight operations. To enable the automated sequencing and data configuration of the GN&C subsystem on Orion, a desktop database configuration tool has been developed. The database tool allows the specification of the GN&C activity sequences, the automated transitions in the software, and the corresponding parameter reconfigurations. These aspects of the GN&C automation on Orion are all coordinated via data management, and the database tool provides the ability to test the automation capabilities during the development of the GN&C software. In addition to providing the infrastructure to manage the GN&C automation, the database tool has been designed with capabilities to import and export artifacts for simulation analysis and documentation purposes. Furthermore, the database configuration tool, currently used to manage simulation data, is envisioned to evolve into a mission planning tool for generating and testing GN&C software sequences and configurations. A key enabler of the GN&C automation design, the database tool allows both the creation and maintenance of the data artifacts, as well as serving the critical role of helping to manage, visualize, and understand the data-driven parameters both during software development

  18. Software architecture and design of the web services facilitating climate model diagnostic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L.; Lee, S.; Zhang, J.; Tang, B.; Zhai, C.; Jiang, J. H.; Wang, W.; Bao, Q.; Qi, M.; Kubar, T. L.; Teixeira, J.

    2015-12-01

    Climate model diagnostic analysis is a computationally- and data-intensive task because it involves multiple numerical model outputs and satellite observation data that can both be high resolution. We have built an online tool that facilitates this process. The tool is called Climate Model Diagnostic Analyzer (CMDA). It employs the web service technology and provides a web-based user interface. The benefits of these choices include: (1) No installation of any software other than a browser, hence it is platform compatable; (2) Co-location of computation and big data on the server side, and small results and plots to be downloaded on the client side, hence high data efficiency; (3) multi-threaded implementation to achieve parallel performance on multi-core servers; and (4) cloud deployment so each user has a dedicated virtual machine. In this presentation, we will focus on the computer science aspects of this tool, namely the architectural design, the infrastructure of the web services, the implementation of the web-based user interface, the mechanism of provenance collection, the approach to virtualization, and the Amazon Cloud deployment. As an example, We will describe our methodology to transform an existing science application code into a web service using a Python wrapper interface and Python web service frameworks (i.e., Flask, Gunicorn, and Tornado). Another example is the use of Docker, a light-weight virtualization container, to distribute and deploy CMDA onto an Amazon EC2 instance. Our tool of CMDA has been successfully used in the 2014 Summer School hosted by the JPL Center for Climate Science. Students had positive feedbacks in general and we will report their comments. An enhanced version of CMDA with several new features, some requested by the 2014 students, will be used in the 2015 Summer School soon.

  19. An empirical study of flight control software reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, J. R.; Pierce, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a laboratory experiment in flight control software reliability are reported. The experiment tests a small sample of implementations of a pitch axis control law for a PA28 aircraft with over 14 million pitch commands with varying levels of additive input and feedback noise. The testing which uses the method of n-version programming for error detection surfaced four software faults in one implementation of the control law. The small number of detected faults precluded the conduct of the error burst analyses. The pitch axis problem provides data for use in constructing a model in the prediction of the reliability of software in systems with feedback. The study is undertaken to find means to perform reliability evaluations of flight control software.

  20. Atmosphere Explorer control system software (version 1.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villasenor, A.

    1972-01-01

    The basic design is described of the Atmosphere Explorer Control System (AECS) software used in the testing, integration, and flight contol of the AE spacecraft and experiments. The software performs several vital functions, such as issuing commands to the spacecraft and experiments, receiving and processing telemetry data, and allowing for extensive data processing by experiment analysis programs. The major processing sections are: executive control section, telemetry decommutation section, command generation section, and utility section.

  1. ControlShell - A real-time software framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stanley A.; Ullman, Marc A.; Chen, Vincent W.

    1991-01-01

    ControlShell is designed to enable modular design and impplementation of real-time software. It is an object-oriented tool-set for real-time software system programming. It provides a series of execution and data interchange mechansims that form a framework for building real-time applications. These mechanisms allow a component-based approach to real-time software generation and mangement. By defining a set of interface specifications for intermodule interaction, ControlShell provides a common platform that is the basis for real-time code development and exchange.

  2. Stress testing of digital flight-control system software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, N.; Defeo, P. V.; Saito, J.

    1983-01-01

    A technique for dynamically testing digital flight-control system software on a module-by-module basis is described. Each test module is repetitively executed faster than real-time with an exhaustive input sequence. Outputs of the test module are compared with outputs generated by an alternate, simpler implementation for the same input data. Discrepancies between the two sets of output indicate the possible presence of a software error. The results of an implementation of this technique in the Digital Flight-Control System Software Verification Laboratory are discussed.

  3. Telerobot local-remote control architecture for space flight program applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Backes, Paul; Steele, Robert; Long, Mark; Bon, Bruce; Beahan, John

    1993-01-01

    The JPL Supervisory Telerobotics (STELER) Laboratory has developed and demonstrated a unique local-remote robot control architecture which enables management of intermittent communication bus latencies and delays such as those expected for ground-remote operation of Space Station robotic systems via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) communication platform. The current work at JPL in this area has focused on enhancing the technologies and transferring the control architecture to hardware and software environments which are more compatible with projected ground and space operational environments. At the local site, the operator updates the remote worksite model using stereo video and a model overlay/fitting algorithm which outputs the location and orientation of the object in free space. That information is relayed to the robot User Macro Interface (UMI) to enable programming of the robot control macros. This capability runs on a single Silicon Graphics Inc. machine. The operator can employ either manual teleoperation, shared control, or supervised autonomous control to manipulate the intended object. The remote site controller, called the Modular Telerobot Task Execution System (MOTES), runs in a multi-processor VME environment and performs the task sequencing, task execution, trajectory generation, closed loop force/torque control, task parameter monitoring, and reflex action. This paper describes the new STELER architecture implementation, and also documents the results of the recent autonomous docking task execution using the local site and MOTES.

  4. Telerobot local-remote control architecture for space flight program applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Backes, Paul; Steele, Robert; Long, Mark; Bon, Bruce; Beahan, John

    1993-01-01

    The JPL Supervisory Telerobotics (STELER) Laboratory has developed and demonstrated a unique local-remote robot control architecture which enables management of intermittent communication bus latencies and delays such as those expected for ground-remote operation of Space Station robotic systems via the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) communication platform. The current work at JPL in this area has focused on enhancing the technologies and transferring the control architecture to hardware and software environments which are more compatible with projected ground and space operational environments. At the local site, the operator updates the remote worksite model using stereo video and a model overlay/fitting algorithm which outputs the location and orientation of the object in free space. That information is relayed to the robot User Macro Interface (UMI) to enable programming of the robot control macros. This capability runs on a single Silicon Graphics Inc. machine. The operator can employ either manual teleoperation, shared control, or supervised autonomous control to manipulate the intended object. The remote site controller, called the Modular Telerobot Task Execution System (MOTES), runs in a multi-processor VME environment and performs the task sequencing, task execution, trajectory generation, closed loop force/torque control, task parameter monitoring, and reflex action. This paper describes the new STELER architecture implementation, and also documents the results of the recent autonomous docking task execution using the local site and MOTES.

  5. Resilient Organizational Architectures for Command and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-03

    34 Operations Department, Naval War College, Newport, RI, 2009. [38] C. D. Dalton, "Systemic Operational Design: Epistemological Bumpf or the Way Ahead for...Semantic Web, Social Networks and Multiagent Systems, pp. 528-539, 2009. [49] J. Hanna, "Course of Action Simulation Analysis," Science ...2012. [59] A. H. Levis, "A Colored Petri Net Model of Command and Control Nodes," in Toward a Science of Command Control and Communications, Carl R

  6. Centralized and distributed control architectures under Foundation Fieldbus network.

    PubMed

    Persechini, Maria Auxiliadora Muanis; Jota, Fábio Gonçalves

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at discussing possible automation and control system architectures based on fieldbus networks in which the controllers can be implemented either in a centralized or in a distributed form. An experimental setup is used to demonstrate some of the addressed issues. The control and automation architecture is composed of a supervisory system, a programmable logic controller and various other devices connected to a Foundation Fieldbus H1 network. The procedures used in the network configuration, in the process modelling and in the design and implementation of controllers are described. The specificities of each one of the considered logical organizations are also discussed. Finally, experimental results are analysed using an algorithm for the assessment of control loops to compare the performances between the centralized and the distributed implementations. Copyright © 2012 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A portable modular architecture for robotic manipulator control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. L.

    1993-04-01

    A control architecture has been developed to provide a framework for robotic manipulator control. This architecture, called the Modular Integrated Control Architecture (MICA), has been successfully applied to two different manipulator systems. MICA is a portable system in two respects. First, it can be used for the control of different types of manipulator systems. Second, the MICA code is portable across several operating environments. This portability allows the sharing of common control code among various systems. A major portion of MICA is the precise control of multiple processors that have to be coordinated to control a manipulator system. By having MICA control the processor synchronization, the system developer can concentrate on the specific aspects of a new manipulator system. MICA also provides standard functions for trajectory generation that can be used for most manipulators. Custom trajectory generators can be easily added to suit the needs of a particular robotic control system. Another facility that MICA provides is a simulation of the manipulator, allowing the control code to be simulated before trying it on a manipulator system. Using this technique, one can develop code for a manipulator system without risking damage to the arm during development.

  8. A Reusable and Adaptable Software Architecture for Embedded Space Flight System: The Core Flight Software System (CFS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmot, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    The contents include the following: High availability. Hardware is in harsh environment. Flight processor (constraints) very widely due to power and weight constraints. Software must be remotely modifiable and still operate while changes are being made. Many custom one of kind interfaces for one of a kind missions. Sustaining engineering. Price of failure is high, tens to hundreds of millions of dollars.

  9. Model-Driven Development of Control System Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chaudhuri, S.; Ahuja, A. L.; Natarajan, S.; Vin, H.

    2009-09-01

    The control software for large real-time systems such as radio-telescopes is generally developed from scratch on a customized basis. The cost and effort involved may be reduced by the use of existing frameworks, components and tools, however the conceptualization, design synthesis and realization of the system still requires a massive and complex engineering process. In this paper, we discuss the design of a model-driven framework that generates much of the control and monitoring software automatically based on higher-level specifications. The design of our framework is guided by the observation that for any system, independent of its specific purpose and elements, the control software performs the same set of functions: communicate, verify, coordinate and issue commands to various sub-systems (actuators); and collect, process, transmit, visualize and archive data produced by sub-systems (sensors). The machine control problem is formulated as a recursive hierarchical composition of control nodes, each of which achieves its function by coordinating its subsystems. Control software for each node is generated from specifications of its control logic, data acquisition and processing, and events detection and handling. We developed a prototype implementation of the concept for fusion reactor control, and validated its generality by reconfiguring the prototype to control the antennas of a radio-telescope. This data-driven approach to machine control software development has the promise to not only simplify initial system software development, but greatly reduce the time and effort for maintenance and evolution of the software over the system lifetime.

  10. Development of the control system for the 40m OAN radiotelescope with the Alma Common Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vicente, P.; Bolaño, R.; Barbas, L.

    2006-07-01

    The Observatorio Astronómico Nacional (OAN) is building a 40m radiotelescope in its facilities in Yebes (Spain) which will be delivered in summer 2006. The radiotelescope is an instrument composed of antenna, receivers, backends, and auxiliary equipment connected through a Local Area Network (LAN). The control system has to deal with a distributed environment which needs to be remotely controlled and monitored from external heterogeneous users (astronomers and engineers) and requires multiple processes simultaneously working and being synchronized. We have chosen the Alma Common Software (ACS) framework for the development of the control system. ACS provides an implementation of the component/container paradigm via Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) and also provides general purpose utility libraries, hiding the complexity of CORBA to the developer. ACS is supported by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the National Radioastronomy Observatory (NRAO) for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) with a lifetime similar to our radiotelescope. This is an important guarantee for the OAN with a very reduced software team. We present an overview of the planned software architecture of the radiotelescope and the current status of the development of the components.

  11. The software system for the Control and Data Acquisition for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, P.; FüBling, M.; Oya, I.; Hagge, L.; Schwanke, U.; Schwarz, J.; Tosti, G.; Conforti, V.; Lyard, E.; Walter, R.; Oliveira Antonino, P.; Morgenstern, A.

    2016-10-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), as the next generation ground-based very high-energy gamma-ray observatory, is defining new areas beyond those related to physics. It is also creating new demands on the control and data acquisition system. CTA will consist of two installations, one in each hemisphere, containing tens of telescopes of different sizes. The ACTL (array control and data acquisition) system will consist of the hardware and software that is necessary to control and monitor the CTA array, as well as to time-stamp, read-out, filter and store the scientific data at aggregated rates of a few GB/s. The ACTL system must implement a flexible software architecture to permit the simultaneous automatic operation of multiple sub-arrays of telescopes with a minimum personnel effort on site. In addition ACTL must be able to modify the observation schedule on timescales of a few tens of seconds, to account for changing environmental conditions or to prioritize incoming scientific alerts from time-critical transient phenomena such as gamma-ray bursts. This contribution summarizes the status of the development of the software architecture and the main design choices and plans.

  12. Executable Behavioral Modeling of System and Software Architecture Specifications to Inform Resourcing Decisions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    model that all users can interpret, used to communicate with a spectrum of stakeholders. The development of a precise architecture and commonly...A system’s required behaviors can be modeled in MP to confirm that the requirements communicated by the stakeholders have been satisfied...require a different view of the architecture or architecture model to communicate relevant information to different stakeholders with different

  13. On-board processing satellite network architecture and control study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campanella, S. Joseph; Pontano, Benjamin A.; Chalmers, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The market for telecommunications services needs to be segmented into user classes having similar transmission requirements and hence similar network architectures. Use of the following transmission architecture was considered: satellite switched TDMA; TDMA up, TDM down; scanning (hopping) beam TDMA; FDMA up, TDM down; satellite switched MF/TDMA; and switching Hub earth stations with double hop transmission. A candidate network architecture will be selected that: comprises multiple access subnetworks optimized for each user; interconnects the subnetworks by means of a baseband processor; and optimizes the marriage of interconnection and access techniques. An overall network control architecture will be provided that will serve the needs of the baseband and satellite switched RF interconnected subnetworks. The results of the studies shall be used to identify elements of network architecture and control that require the greatest degree of technology development to realize an operational system. This will be specified in terms of: requirements of the enabling technology; difference from the current available technology; and estimate of the development requirements needed to achieve an operational system. The results obtained for each of these tasks are presented.

  14. Background and architecture for an autonomous ground station controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paal, L.; Golshan, N.; Fisher, F.; James, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Deep Space Station Controller (DSSC) is state of the art ground station control architecture being developed at JPL. During the past few years the technology development program at JPL demonstrated a series of increasingly competent automated ground station prototypes of which the DSSC is the latest. It has been designed for robust closed loop control of ground stations utilized for forward and return link communications with NASA's deep space exploration missions.

  15. Background and architecture for an autonomous ground station controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paal, L.; Golshan, N.; Fisher, F.; James, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Deep Space Station Controller (DSSC) is state of the art ground station control architecture being developed at JPL. During the past few years the technology development program at JPL demonstrated a series of increasingly competent automated ground station prototypes of which the DSSC is the latest. It has been designed for robust closed loop control of ground stations utilized for forward and return link communications with NASA's deep space exploration missions.

  16. Control system architecture for a minimally invasive surgical robot.

    PubMed

    Fodero, Kenneth; King, H Hawkeye; Lum, Mitchell J H; Bland, Clint; Rosen, Jacob; Sinanan, Mika; Hannaford, Blake

    2006-01-01

    As the field of surgical robotics continues to evolve, it is important to keep patient safety in mind. This paper describes a safety control architecture aimed at moving an experimental system in the direction of intrinsically safe operation. The system includes safety features such as: a small number of states, Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) state transition control, active enable, brakes, E-STOP, and a surgeon foot pedal.

  17. Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software Package Gxsm

    SciTech Connect

    Zahl P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

    2009-08-10

    Gxsm is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected toan instrument, it is operating many different avors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy(STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) or in general two-dimensional multi channel data acquisition instruments. The Gxsm core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and oating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor (DSP) subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable Gxsm vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) or tip formation. The Gxsm software is released under the GNU general public license (GPL) and can be obtained via the Internet.

  18. Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software package GXSM

    SciTech Connect

    Zahl, P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

    2010-05-01

    GXSM is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected to an instrument, it is operating many different flavors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy or, in general, two-dimensional multichannel data acquisition instruments. The GXSM core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and floating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals, and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable GXSM vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy or tip formation. The GXSM software is released under the GNU general public license and can be obtained via the internet.

  19. Regulatory modules controlling maize inflorescence architecture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic control of branching is a primary determinant of yield, regulating seed number and harvesting ability, yet little is known about the molecular networks that shape grain-bearing inflorescences of cereal crops. Here, we used the maize (Zea mays) inflorescence to investigate gene networks that...

  20. Precision segmented reflector figure control system architecture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettler, E.; Eldred, D.; Briggs, C.; Kiceniuk, T.; Agronin, M.

    1989-09-01

    This paper describes an advanced technology figure control system for a generic class of large space based segmented reflector telescopes. Major technology and design motivations for selection of sensing, actuation, and mechanism approaches result from the high precision and very low mass and power goals for the reflector system.