Science.gov

Sample records for control systems lessons

  1. Health System Innovation: Lessons from Tobacco Control.

    PubMed

    Garcia, John

    2017-01-01

    Comprehensive tobacco control is considered by many to be a model for effective population health promotion and chronic disease prevention. Its history holds lessons for the "scalable, actionable, innovation agenda" called for by Anne Snowdon (2017). This commentary discusses lessons from tobacco control related to: changing practices in response to evolving paradigms and scientific evidence; international best practices; the importance of a broadly-accepted, shared vision about elements of an effective strategy; scientific and public service leadership; social actors leading change through advocacy, policy and the media; organizational learning mechanisms and capacity building systems; and, the importance of a continuously renewing, forward-looking agenda. The end-game for tobacco forms part of Canada's health innovation agenda and lessons from tobacco control may inform this important forward-looking strategy.

  2. National food control systems: lessons from Mauritius.

    PubMed

    Neeliah, S A; Goburdhun, D; Neeliah, H

    2009-01-01

    Food control systems are being established or revamped in many countries because of problems occurring along the food chain and the obligations of governments towards the World Trade Organization. The main components of an ideal food control system are food legislation, administration, enforcement and supporting bodies like analytical services and consumer organizations. Mauritius introduced modern legal instruments in 1998 in an attempt to reinvigorate food control. This article describes the components of the Mauritian Food Control System (MFCS). An appraisal of these components is then made. The methodology comprised a literature review and in-depth interviews with key informants and stakeholders of the local food control system. Although much progress was made with the introduction of new food legislation in 1998, other components of the local system like enforcement and various supporting bodies did not receive appropriate support. Other countries could use the lessons drawn from the Mauritian experience while setting up or upgrading their food control systems.

  3. X-29 flight control system: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Robert; Burken, John J.; Bosworth, John T.; Bauer, Jeffery E.

    1994-01-01

    Two X-29A aircraft were flown at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center over a period of eight years. The airplanes' unique features are the forward-swept wing, variable incidence close-coupled canard and highly relaxed longitudinal static stability (up to 35-percent negative static margin at subsonic conditions). This paper describes the primary flight control system and significant modifications made to this system, flight test techniques used during envelope expansion, and results for the low- and high-angle-of-attack programs. Through out the paper, lessons learned will be discussed to illustrate the problems associated with the implementation of complex flight control systems.

  4. Lessons learned on the Ground Test Accelerator control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, A.J.; Weiss, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    When we initiated the control system design for the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA), we envisioned a system that would be flexible enough to handle the changing requirements of an experimental project. This control system would use a developers` toolkit to reduce the cost and time to develop applications for GTA, and through the use of open standards, the system would accommodate unforeseen requirements as they arose. Furthermore, we would attempt to demonstrate on GTA a level of automation far beyond that achieved by existing accelerator control systems. How well did we achieve these goals? What were the stumbling blocks to deploying the control system, and what assumptions did we make about requirements that turned out to be incorrect? In this paper we look at the process of developing a control system that evolved into what is now the ``Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System`` (EPICS). Also, we assess the impact of this system on the GTA project, as well as the impact of GTA on EPICS. The lessons learned on GTA will be valuable for future projects.

  5. RSRA/X-Wing flight control system development - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corliss, Lloyd D.; Dunn, William R.; Morrison, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    The X-Wing, in concept, marries the efficiencies of a helicopter and fixed wing aircraft through the use of a four-bladed wing/rotor that can be rotated or stopped in flight. The RSRA/X-Wing flight test program was a technology demonstration of this concept which, after three successful flights, was discontinued in late 1987. In spite of many technical challenges in this program, such as the use of circulation control, the fabrication of a large all-composite rotor, the development of an advanced, quadruplex digital flight control system, and the need for higher harmonic control, no major technical problems had been encountered at the time of the stop-work order. This paper addresses the issues of flight control system development and focuses on lessons learned. As with other such programs, software development was the most consuming issue. Other subjects of discussion include the problems of balancing program goals with technical goals, software- and hard-ware-related problems, safety issues, and system testing.

  6. Lessons Learned and Flight Results from the F15 Intelligent Flight Control System Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the lessons learned and flight results from the F15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) project is shown. The topics include: 1) F-15 IFCS Project Goals; 2) Motivation; 3) IFCS Approach; 4) NASA F-15 #837 Aircraft Description; 5) Flight Envelope; 6) Limited Authority System; 7) NN Floating Limiter; 8) Flight Experiment; 9) Adaptation Goals; 10) Handling Qualities Performance Metric; 11) Project Phases; 12) Indirect Adaptive Control Architecture; 13) Indirect Adaptive Experience and Lessons Learned; 14) Gen II Direct Adaptive Control Architecture; 15) Current Status; 16) Effect of Canard Multiplier; 17) Simulated Canard Failure Stab Open Loop; 18) Canard Multiplier Effect Closed Loop Freq. Resp.; 19) Simulated Canard Failure Stab Open Loop with Adaptation; 20) Canard Multiplier Effect Closed Loop with Adaptation; 21) Gen 2 NN Wts from Simulation; 22) Direct Adaptive Experience and Lessons Learned; and 23) Conclusions

  7. International Space Station Passive Thermal Control System Analysis, Top Ten Lessons-Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iovine, John

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has been on-orbit for over 10 years, and there have been numerous technical challenges along the way from design to assembly to on-orbit anomalies and repairs. The Passive Thermal Control System (PTCS) management team has been a key player in successfully dealing with these challenges. The PTCS team performs thermal analysis in support of design and verification, launch and assembly constraints, integration, sustaining engineering, failure response, and model validation. This analysis is a significant body of work and provides a unique opportunity to compile a wealth of real world engineering and analysis knowledge and the corresponding lessons-learned. The analysis lessons encompass the full life cycle of flight hardware from design to on-orbit performance and sustaining engineering. These lessons can provide significant insight for new projects and programs. Key areas to be presented include thermal model fidelity, verification methods, analysis uncertainty, and operations support.

  8. Lessons Learned from Application of System and Software Level RAMS Analysis to a Space Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, N.; Esper, A.

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this article represents the results of applying RAMS analysis to a critical space control system, both at system and software levels. The system level RAMS analysis allowed the assignment of criticalities to the high level components, which was further refined by a tailored software level RAMS analysis. The importance of the software level RAMS analysis in the identification of new failure modes and its impact on the system level RAMS analysis is discussed. Recommendations of changes in the software architecture have also been proposed in order to reduce the criticality of the SW components to an acceptable minimum. The dependability analysis was performed in accordance to ECSS-Q-ST-80, which had to be tailored and complemented in some aspects. This tailoring will also be detailed in the article and lessons learned from the application of this tailoring will be shared, stating the importance to space systems safety evaluations. The paper presents the applied techniques, the relevant results obtained, the effort required for performing the tasks and the planned strategy for ROI estimation, as well as the soft skills required and acquired during these activities.

  9. NASA Ares I Launch Vehicle Roll and Reaction Control Systems Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butt, Adam; Popp, Chris G.; Jernigan, Frankie R.; Paseur, Lila F.; Pitts, Hank M.

    2011-01-01

    On April 15, 2010 President Barak Obama made the official announcement that the Constellation Program, which included the Ares I launch vehicle, would be canceled. NASA s Ares I launch vehicle was being designed to launch the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, returning humans to the moon, Mars, and beyond. It consisted of a First Stage (FS) five segment solid rocket booster and a liquid J-2X Upper Stage (US) engine. Roll control for the FS was planned to be handled by a dedicated Roll Control System (RoCS), located on the connecting interstage. Induced yaw or pitch moments experienced during FS ascent would have been handled by vectoring of the booster nozzle. After FS booster separation, the US Reaction Control System (ReCS) would have provided the US Element with three degrees of freedom control as needed. The lessons learned documented in this paper will be focused on the technical designs and producibility of both systems along with the partnership between NASA and Boeing, who was on contract to build the Ares I US Element, which included the FS RoCS and US ReCS. In regards to partnership, focus will be placed on integration along with technical work accomplished by Boeing with special emphasis on each task order. In summary, this paper attempts to capture key lessons learned that should be helpful in the development of future launch vehicle RCS designs.

  10. NASA Ares I Launch Vehicle Roll and Reaction Control Systems Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butt, Adam; Popp, Chris G.; Jernigan, Frankie R.; Paseur, Lila F.; Pitts, Hank M.

    2011-01-01

    On April 15, 2010 President Barak Obama made the official announcement that the Constellation Program, which included the Ares I launch vehicle, would be canceled. NASA s Ares I launch vehicle was being designed to launch the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, returning humans to the moon, Mars, and beyond. It consisted of a First Stage (FS) five segment solid rocket booster and a liquid J-2X Upper Stage (US) engine. Roll control for the FS was planned to be handled by a dedicated Roll Control System (RoCS), located on the connecting interstage. Induced yaw or pitch moments experienced during FS ascent would have been handled by vectoring of the booster nozzle. After FS booster separation, the US Reaction Control System (ReCS) would have provided the US Element with three degrees of freedom control as needed. The lessons learned documented in this paper will be focused on the technical designs and producibility of both systems along with the partnership between NASA and Boeing, who was on contract to build the Ares I US Element, which included the FS RoCS and US ReCS. In regards to partnership, focus will be placed on integration along with technical work accomplished by Boeing with special emphasis on each task order. In summary, this paper attempts to capture key lessons learned that should be helpful in the development of future launch vehicle RCS designs.

  11. Design lessons from using programmable controllers in the MFTF-B personnel safety and interlocks system

    SciTech Connect

    Branum, J.D.

    1983-11-29

    Applying programmable controllers in critical applications such as personnel safety and interlocks systems requires special considerations in the design of both hardware and software. All modern programmable controller systems feature extensive internal diagnostic capabilities to protect against problems such as program memory errors; however most, if not all present designs lack an intrinsic capability for detecting and countering failures on the field-side of their I/O modules. Many of the most common styles of I/O modules can also introduce potentially dangerous sneak circuits, even without component failure. This paper presents the most significant lessons learned to date in the design of the MFTF-B Personnel Safety and Interlocks System, which utilizes two non-redundant programmable controllers with over 800 I/O points each. Specific problems recognized during the design process as well as those discovered during initial testing and operation are discussed along with their specific solutions in hardware and software.

  12. Lessons from the quantum control landscape: Robust optimal control of quantum systems and optimal control of nonlinear Schrodinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocker, David Lance

    The control of quantum systems occurs across a broad range of length and energy scales in modern science, and efforts have demonstrated that locating suitable controls to perform a range of objectives has been widely successful. The justification for this success arises from a favorable topology of a quantum control landscape, defined as a mapping of the controls to a cost function measuring the success of the operation. This is summarized in the landscape principle that no suboptimal extrema exist on the landscape for well-suited control problems, explaining a trend of successful optimizations in both theory and experiment. This dissertation explores what additional lessons may be gleaned from the quantum control landscape through numerical and theoretical studies. The first topic examines the experimentally relevant problem of assessing and reducing disturbances due to noise. The local curvature of the landscape is found to play an important role on noise effects in the control of targeted quantum unitary operations, and provides a conceptual framework for assessing robustness to noise. Software for assessing noise effects in quantum computing architectures was also developed and applied to survey the performance of current quantum control techniques for quantum computing. A lack of competition between robustness and perfect unitary control operation was discovered to fundamentally limit noise effects, and highlights a renewed focus upon system engineering for reducing noise. This convergent behavior generally arises for any secondary objective in the situation of high primary objective fidelity. The other dissertation topic examines the utility of quantum control for a class of nonlinear Hamiltonians not previously considered under the landscape principle. Nonlinear Schrodinger equations are commonly used to model the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), one of the largest known quantum objects. Optimizations of BEC dynamics were performed in which the

  13. Lessons Learned from the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) Rack 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) Rack 1 and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for the ECLS equipment in this rack.

  14. Lessons Learned from the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) Rack 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) Rack 1 and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for the ECLS equipment in this rack.

  15. Designing Specification Languages for Process Control Systems: Lessons Learned and Steps to the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy G.; Heimdahl, Mats P. E.; Reese, Jon Damon

    1999-01-01

    Previously, we defined a blackbox formal system modeling language called RSML (Requirements State Machine Language). The language was developed over several years while specifying the system requirements for a collision avoidance system for commercial passenger aircraft. During the language development, we received continual feedback and evaluation by FAA employees and industry representatives, which helped us to produce a specification language that is easily learned and used by application experts. Since the completion of the PSML project, we have continued our research on specification languages. This research is part of a larger effort to investigate the more general problem of providing tools to assist in developing embedded systems. Our latest experimental toolset is called SpecTRM (Specification Tools and Requirements Methodology), and the formal specification language is SpecTRM-RL (SpecTRM Requirements Language). This paper describes what we have learned from our use of RSML and how those lessons were applied to the design of SpecTRM-RL. We discuss our goals for SpecTRM-RL and the design features that support each of these goals.

  16. Importance Of Quality Control in Reducing System Risk, a Lesson Learned From The Shuttle and a Recommendation for Future Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safie, Fayssal M.; Messer, Bradley P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents lessons learned from the Space Shuttle return to flight experience and the importance of these lessons learned in the development of new the NASA Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). Specifically, the paper discusses the relationship between process control and system risk, and the importance of process control in improving space vehicle flight safety. It uses the External Tank (ET) Thermal Protection System (TPS) experience and lessons learned from the redesign and process enhancement activities performed in preparation for Return to Flight after the Columbia accident. The paper also, discusses in some details, the Probabilistic engineering physics based risk assessment performed by the Shuttle program to evaluate the impact of TPS failure on system risk and the application of the methodology to the CLV.

  17. A general systems approach to suicide prevention: lessons from cardiac prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Sanddal, Nels D; Sanddal, Teri L; Berman, Alan L; Silverman, Morton M

    2003-01-01

    The pathology of cardiac disease includes genetic, physical, biochemical, psychological, social, and environmental vectors. Factors contributing to suicide have been identified in these same areas. Survival from an acute cardiac event requires a systematized and multisectoral response. Communities that do not have systematized response capabilities to acute cardiac events have poorer survival outcomes. Suicide prevention and control may also be responsive to an integrated community response system. This paper examines the development of a community cardiac care model, explores potential parallels for a community suicide prevention and control model, and outlines a general systems theory framework for a suicide prevention and control system.

  18. Promoting Systems Thinking through Biology Lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Werner; Mischo, Christoph

    2010-04-01

    This study's goal was to analyze various teaching approaches within the context of natural science lessons, especially in biology. The main focus of the paper lies on the effectiveness of different teaching methods in promoting systems thinking in the field of Education for Sustainable Development. The following methods were incorporated into the study: special lessons designed to promote systems thinking, a computer-simulated scenario on the topic "ecosystem forest," and a combination of both special lessons and the computer simulation. These groups were then compared to a control group. A questionnaire was used to assess systems thinking skills of 424 sixth-grade students of secondary schools in Germany. The assessment differentiated between a conceptual understanding (measured as achievement score) and a reflexive justification (measured as justification score) of systems thinking. The following control variables were used: logical thinking, grades in school, memory span, and motivational goal orientation. Based on the pretest-posttest control group design, only those students who received both special instruction and worked with the computer simulation showed a significant increase in their achievement scores. The justification score increased in the computer simulation condition as well as in the combination of computer simulation and lesson condition. The possibilities and limits of promoting various forms of systems thinking by using realistic computer simulations are discussed.

  19. System safety management lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Piatt, J.A.

    1989-05-01

    The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and Acquisition directed the Army Safety Center to provide an audit of the causes of accidents and safety of use restrictions on recently fielded systems by tracking residual hazards back through the acquisition process. The objective was to develop ''lessons learned'' that could be applied to the acquisition process to minimize mishaps in fielded systems. System safety management lessons learned are defined as Army practices or policies, derived from past successes and failures, that are expected to be effective in eliminating or reducing specific systemic causes of residual hazards. They are broadly applicable and supportive of the Army structure and acquisition objectives. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Engineering Lessons Learned and Systems Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Systems Engineering is fundamental to good engineering, which in turn depends on the integration and application of engineering lessons learned. Thus, good Systems Engineering also depends on systems engineering lessons learned from within the aerospace industry being documented and applied. About ten percent of the engineering lessons learned documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System are directly related to Systems Engineering. A key issue associated with lessons learned datasets is the communication and incorporation of this information into engineering processes. As part of the NASA Technical Standards Program activities, engineering lessons learned datasets have been identified from a number of sources. These are being searched and screened for those having a relation to Technical Standards. This paper will address some of these Systems Engineering Lessons Learned and how they are being related to Technical Standards within the NASA Technical Standards Program, including linking to the Agency's Interactive Engineering Discipline Training Courses and the life cycle for a flight vehicle development program.

  1. Soft systems, hard lessons.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, B

    2000-12-01

    This paper is concerned with practical experiences of achieving human factors and safety interventions in the nuclear power and process control industries. It rests upon the premise that, although human factors (HF) and safety may be technological in approach, they nevertheless must operate in a socio-technical environment, within companies with corporate structures and cultures, interacting with regulatory authorities. A crucial ingredient to the successful implementation and integration of human factors into company practices and procedures is therefore the nature of the inter-relationships between human factors personnel and those who control the existing procedures determining all aspects of the design and operational processes. Such inter-relationships can largely determine whether HF is implemented or not. These human-human interactions and interfaces in a socio-technical system may be referred to as soft systems. When training in human factors, much of the training is concerned with technical aspects of the discipline. However, when entering industry or consultancy, one quickly discovers that technical aspects are usually the least of one's problems. This paper is concerned with experiences and guidance to better help the human factors professional starting out in industry. There is little scientific method in the paper. It is, instead, a distillation of this author's and others' experiences in acting either as a practitioner or consultant, or as leader of a human factors unit in industries that have at times been reluctant or even hostile about the perceived 'invasion' of human factors. However, to avoid being purely anecdotal, the experiences are placed in a framework concerned with the life cycle of integrating human factors into an industry, from being the first HF person in a company, to the development of a successful unit, or the absorption of a successful unit into other departments. Within this framework a range of strategic aspects are dealt with

  2. A Study of the Handling of Lessons Processing in Lessons Learned Systems and Application to Lessons Learned System Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Lessons Learned Program ................................................................70...Learned System is guided by a standard. The standard is DOE-STD-7501-99, The DOE Corporate Lessons Learned Program , December 1999. The following...to avoid recurrence. These defining aspects of the Department of Energy Lessons Learned Program are consistent with aspects of the Center for

  3. Engineering Lessons Learned and Systems Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Systems Engineering is fundamental to good engineering, which in turn depends on the integration and application of engineering lessons learned and technical standards. Thus, good Systems Engineering also depends on systems engineering lessons learned from within the aerospace industry being documented and applied. About ten percent of the engineering lessons learned documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System are directly related to Systems Engineering. A key issue associated with lessons learned datasets is the communication and incorporation of this information into engineering processes. Systems Engineering has been defined (EINIS-632) as "an interdisciplinary approach encompassing the entire technical effort to evolve and verify an integrated and life-cycle balanced set of system people, product, and process solutions that satisfy customer needs". Designing reliable space-based systems has always been a goal for NASA, and many painful lessons have been learned along the way. One of the continuing functions of a system engineer is to compile development and operations "lessons learned" documents and ensure their integration into future systems development activities. They can produce insights and information for risk identification identification and characterization. on a new project. Lessons learned files from previous projects are especially valuable in risk

  4. Engineering Lessons Learned and Systems Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Systems Engineering is fundamental to good engineering, which in turn depends on the integration and application of engineering lessons learned and technical standards. Thus, good Systems Engineering also depends on systems engineering lessons learned from within the aerospace industry being documented and applied. About ten percent of the engineering lessons learned documented in the NASA Lessons Learned Information System are directly related to Systems Engineering. A key issue associated with lessons learned datasets is the communication and incorporation of this information into engineering processes. Systems Engineering has been defined (EINIS-632) as "an interdisciplinary approach encompassing the entire technical effort to evolve and verify an integrated and life-cycle balanced set of system people, product, and process solutions that satisfy customer needs". Designing reliable space-based systems has always been a goal for NASA, and many painful lessons have been learned along the way. One of the continuing functions of a system engineer is to compile development and operations "lessons learned" documents and ensure their integration into future systems development activities. They can produce insights and information for risk identification identification and characterization. on a new project. Lessons learned files from previous projects are especially valuable in risk

  5. Tobacco control: lessons learnt in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Vathesatogkit, Prakit; Charoenca, Naowarut

    2011-01-01

    This review of legislation, obstacles faced, and challenges to be met, outlines present tobacco control lessons learnt in Thailand. A review of over twenty years of tobacco control experience in Thailand is provided in seven areas including policy formulation and the role of civil society, as well as in essential WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control areas. A descriptive, historical review shows how stakeholders, policies and resources were mobilized in Thailand, and what lessons resource-challenged countries might use from the Thai experience.

  6. Lessons Learned from the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Matt; Patel, Deepak; Bradshaw, Heather; Robinson, Frank; Neuberger, Dave

    2016-01-01

    The ICESat-2 Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) instrument is an upcoming Earth Science mission focusing on the effects of climate change. The flight instrument passed all environmental testing at GSFC (Goddard Space Flight Center) and is now ready to be shipped to the spacecraft vendor for integration and testing. This presentation walks through the lessons learned from design, hardware, analysis and testing perspective. ATLAS lessons learned include general thermal design, analysis, hardware, and testing issues as well as lessons specific to laser systems, two-phase thermal control, and optical assemblies with precision alignment requirements.

  7. Control of nematode parasites with agents acting on neuro-musculature systems: lessons for neuropeptide ligand discovery.

    PubMed

    Martin, Richard J; Robertson, Alan P

    2010-01-01

    rates are now often less than 100% and resistance of parasites to agents acting on the neuromuscular systems is present in a wide range of parasites of animals and humans hosts. In the face of this resistance the development of novel and effective agents is an urgent and imperative need. New drugs which act on the neuromuscular system have an advantage for medication for animals and humans because they have a rapid therapeutic effect within 3 hours of administration. The effects on the neuromuscular system include: spastic paralysis with drugs like levamisole and pyrantel; flaccid paralysis as with piperazine; or disruption of other vital muscular activity as with ivermectin. Figure 1 B and C, illustrates an example ofa spastic effect oflevamisole on infectious L3 larvae of Ostertagia ostertagiae, a parasite of pigs. The effect was produced within minutes of the in vitro application oflevamisole. In this chapter we comment on the properties of existing agents that have been used to control nematode parasites and that have an action on neuromuscular systems. We then draw attention to resistance that has developed to these compounds and comment on their toxicity and spectra of actions. We hope that some of the lessons that the use of these compounds has taught us may to be applied to any novel neuropeptide ligand that may be introduced. Our aim is then is to provide some warning signs for recognized but dangerous obstacles.

  8. Lesson 6: Using the Checklist to Work through System Requirements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lesson 6 describes how these same requirements are presented in the CROMERR System Checklist (which was introduced in Lesson 4). You may want to refer to the checklist as you step through this lesson.

  9. Recognition and Emergency Care of Wounds: Bleeding Control and Bandaging. First Responder Training, Lesson Plan No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upton, Robert

    Designed for a 40-hour course in first-responder medical training, this lesson plan teaches students how to control bleeding and bandage wounds. This lesson includes discussions on skin, the circulatory system, and blood; describes seven types of wounds; and explains four bleeding control methods. The lesson plan begins with information on the…

  10. Receiver System: Lessons Learned from Solar Two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, R. Z.

    2002-03-01

    The Boeing Company fabricated the Solar Two receiver as a subcontractor for the Solar Two project. The receiver absorbed sunlight reflected from the heliostat field. A molten-nitrate-salt heat transfer fluid was pumped from a storage tank at grade level, heated from 290 to 565DGC by the receiver mounted on top of a tower, then flowed back down into another storage tank. To make electricity, the hot salt was pumped through a steam generator to produce steam that powered a conventional Rankine steam turbine/generator. This evaluation identifies the most significant Solar Two receiver system lessons learned from the Mechanical Design, Instrumentation and Control, Panel Fabrication, Site Construction, Receiver System Operation, and Management from the perspective of the receiver designer/manufacturer. The lessons learned on the receiver system described here consist of two parts: the Problem and one or more identified Solutions. The appendix summarizes an inspection of the advanced receiver panel developed by Boeing that was installed and operated in the Solar Two receiver.

  11. Receiver System: Lessons Learned From Solar Two

    SciTech Connect

    LITWIN, ROBERT Z.; PACHECO, JAMES E.

    2002-03-01

    The Boeing Company fabricated the Solar Two receiver as a subcontractor for the Solar Two project. The receiver absorbed sunlight reflected from the heliostat field. A molten-nitrate-salt heat transfer fluid was pumped from a storage tank at grade level, heated from 290 to 565 C by the receiver mounted on top of a tower, then flowed back down into another storage tank. To make electricity, the hot salt was pumped through a steam generator to produce steam that powered a conventional Rankine steam turbine/generator. This evaluation identifies the most significant Solar Two receiver system lessons learned from the Mechanical Design, Instrumentation and Control, Panel Fabrication, Site Construction, Receiver System Operation, and Management from the perspective of the receiver designer/manufacturer. The lessons learned on the receiver system described here consist of two parts: the Problem and one or more identified Solutions. The appendix summarizes an inspection of the advanced receiver panel developed by Boeing that was installed and operated in the Solar Two receiver.

  12. Effectiveness of a Case-Based System in Lesson Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saad, A.; Chung, P. W. H.; Dawson, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Lesson planning imposes a significant burden on teachers as they need to prepare different lesson plans for different classes according to various constraints. SmartLP, a case-based lesson planning system, has been implemented as a means of assisting teachers in constructing quality lesson plans more quickly. SmartLP enables teachers to retrieve…

  13. Effectiveness of a Case-Based System in Lesson Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saad, A.; Chung, P. W. H.; Dawson, C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Lesson planning imposes a significant burden on teachers as they need to prepare different lesson plans for different classes according to various constraints. SmartLP, a case-based lesson planning system, has been implemented as a means of assisting teachers in constructing quality lesson plans more quickly. SmartLP enables teachers to retrieve…

  14. From Bridges and Rockets, Lessons for Software Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C. Michael

    2004-01-01

    Although differences exist between building software systems and building physical structures such as bridges and rockets, enough similarities exist that software engineers can learn lessons from failures in traditional engineering disciplines. This paper draws lessons from two well-known failures the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in 1940 and the destruction of the space shuttle Challenger in 1986 and applies these lessons to software system development. The following specific applications are made: (1) the verification and validation of a software system should not be based on a single method, or a single style of methods; (2) the tendency to embrace the latest fad should be overcome; and (3) the introduction of software control into safety-critical systems should be done cautiously.

  15. Historical problem areas: Lessons learned for expendable and reusable vehicle propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fester, Dale A.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: expendable launch vehicle lessons learned, upper stage/transfer vehicle lessons learned, shuttle systems - reuse, and reusable system issues and lessons learned.

  16. Global lessons from Nigeria's ebolavirus control strategy.

    PubMed

    Elemuwa, Chris; Kutalek, Ruth; Ali, Mohammad; Mworozi, Edison; Kochhar, Sonali; Rath, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The current Ebola virus disease outbreak challenged medical and public health systems in West Africa. In Nigeria, the existing infrastructure of the polio surveillance system was leveraged rapidly to contain the spread of Ebola virus. We highlight important lessons learnt from the successful implementation of Ebola virus disease surveillance strategies, which should be amplified further to prepare the ground for successful vaccination programs. Close collaboration between national and international stakeholders as well as public/private partnerships will be instrumental in future Ebola virus immunization strategies.

  17. Very Large System Dynamics Models - Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Leonard Malczynski

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides lessons learned from developing several large system dynamics (SD) models. System dynamics modeling practice emphasize the need to keep models small so that they are manageable and understandable. This practice is generally reasonable and prudent; however, there are times that large SD models are necessary. This paper outlines two large SD projects that were done at two Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Idaho National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes the models and then discusses some of the valuable lessons learned during these two modeling efforts.

  18. Space Station Control Moment Gyroscope Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurrisi, Charles; Seidel, Raymond; Dickerson, Scott; Didziulis, Stephen; Frantz, Peter; Ferguson, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Four 4760 Nms (3510 ft-lbf-s) Double Gimbal Control Moment Gyroscopes (DGCMG) with unlimited gimbal freedom about each axis were adopted by the International Space Station (ISS) Program as the non-propulsive solution for continuous attitude control. These CMGs with a life expectancy of approximately 10 years contain a flywheel spinning at 691 rad/s (6600 rpm) and can produce an output torque of 258 Nm (190 ft-lbf)1. One CMG unexpectedly failed after approximately 1.3 years and one developed anomalous behavior after approximately six years. Both units were returned to earth for failure investigation. This paper describes the Space Station Double Gimbal Control Moment Gyroscope design, on-orbit telemetry signatures and a summary of the results of both failure investigations. The lessons learned from these combined sources have lead to improvements in the design that will provide CMGs with greater reliability to assure the success of the Space Station. These lessons learned and design improvements are not only applicable to CMGs but can be applied to spacecraft mechanisms in general.

  19. Promoting Systems Thinking through Biology Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riess, Werner; Mischo, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    This study's goal was to analyze various teaching approaches within the context of natural science lessons, especially in biology. The main focus of the paper lies on the effectiveness of different teaching methods in promoting systems thinking in the field of Education for Sustainable Development. The following methods were incorporated into the…

  20. Promoting Systems Thinking through Biology Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riess, Werner; Mischo, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    This study's goal was to analyze various teaching approaches within the context of natural science lessons, especially in biology. The main focus of the paper lies on the effectiveness of different teaching methods in promoting systems thinking in the field of Education for Sustainable Development. The following methods were incorporated into the…

  1. 2000 Worldwide Joint Lessons Learned Conference. Forging a Future Joint Lessons Learned System. (Joint Center for Lessons Learned Special Bulletin. Volume 3, Special Issue 1, January 2001)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    for the Joint Lessons Learned Program Configuration Management Board ...................... 6 Advanced Lessons Management System (ALMS... lessons learned program can succeed in isolation. The success of the conference was largely due to the interaction and contribution of the attendees...governing instruction for the Joint Lessons Learned Program (JLLP). The modified instruction now serves as a comprehensive, single-source reference

  2. Scheduling lessons learned from the Autonomous Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringer, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    The Autonomous Power System (APS) project at NASA LeRC is designed to demonstrate the applications of integrated intelligent diagnosis, control, and scheduling techniques to space power distribution systems. The project consists of three elements: the Autonomous Power Expert System (APEX) for Fault Diagnosis, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR); the Autonomous Intelligent Power Scheduler (AIPS) to efficiently assign activities start times and resources; and power hardware (Brassboard) to emulate a space-based power system. The AIPS scheduler was tested within the APS system. This scheduler is able to efficiently assign available power to the requesting activities and share this information with other software agents within the APS system in order to implement the generated schedule. The AIPS scheduler is also able to cooperatively recover from fault situations by rescheduling the affected loads on the Brassboard in conjunction with the APEX FDIR system. AIPS served as a learning tool and an initial scheduling testbed for the integration of FDIR and automated scheduling systems. Many lessons were learned from the AIPS scheduler and are now being integrated into a new scheduler called SCRAP (Scheduler for Continuous Resource Allocation and Planning). This paper will service three purposes: an overview of the AIPS implementation, lessons learned from the AIPS scheduler, and a brief section on how these lessons are being applied to the new SCRAP scheduler.

  3. Military trauma system in Afghanistan: lessons for civil systems?

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jeffrey A; Morrison, Jonathan J; Rasmussen, Todd E

    2013-12-01

    This review focuses on development and maturation of the tactical evacuation and en route care capabilities of the military trauma system in Afghanistan and discusses hard-learned lessons that may have enduring relevance to civilian trauma systems. Implementation of an evidence-based, data-driven performance improvement programme in the tactical evacuation and en route care elements of the military trauma system in Afghanistan has delivered measured improvements in casualty care outcomes. Transfer of the lessons learned in the military trauma system operating in Afghanistan to civilian trauma systems with a comparable burden of prolonged evacuation times may be realized in improved patient outcomes in these systems.

  4. Army Programs: Army Lessons Learned Program: System Development and Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-10

    Army Regulation 11–33 Army Programs Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application Headquarters Department of the Army Washington...Army Programs: Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s...Pages 14 SUMMARY of CHANGE AR 11–33 Army Lessons Learned Program : System Development and Application This revision-- o Establishes a system to identify

  5. MTI system design & operations lessons learned.

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Max Louis; Kay, Randolph Rex; Brock, Brian C.

    2003-06-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager Satellite (MTI), launched on March 12, 2000, has now surpassed its one-year mission requirement and its three-year mission goal. Primary and secondary program objectives regarding the development and evaluation of space-based multispectral and thermal imaging technology for nonproliferation treaty monitoring and other national security and civilian application have been met. Valuable lessons have also been learned, both from things that worked especially well and from shortcomings and anomalies encountered. This paper addresses lessons associated with the satellite, ground station and system operations, while companion papers address lessons associated with radiometric calibration, band-to-band registration and scientific processes and results. Things addressed in this paper that went especially well include overall satellite design, ground station design, system operations, and integration and test. Anomalies and other problems addressed herein include gyro and mass storage unit failures, battery under-voltage trips, a blown fuse, unexpected effects induced by communication link noise, ground station problems, and anomalies resulting from human error. In spite of MTI's single-string design, the operations team has been successful in working around these problems, and the satellite continues to collect valuable mission data.

  6. MTI system design and operations lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Max L.; Kay, R. R.; Brock, Brian C.

    2004-01-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager Satellite (MTI), launched on March 12, 2000, has now surpassed its one-year mission requirement and its three-year mission goal. Primary and secondary program objectives regarding the development and evaluation of space-based multispectral and thermal imaging technology for nonproliferation treaty monitoring and other national security and civilian application have been met. Valuable lessons have also been learned, both from things that worked especially well and from shortcomings and anomalies encountered. This paper addresses lessons associated with the satellite, ground station and system operations, while companion papers address lessons associated with radiometric calibration, band-to-band registration and scientific processes and results. Things addressed in this paper that went especially well include overall satellite design, ground station design, system operations, and integration and test. Anomalies and other problems addressed herein include gyro and mass storage unit failures, battery under-voltage trips, a blown fuse, unexpected effects induced by communication link noise, ground station problems, and anomalies resulting from human error. In spite of MTI"s single-string design, the operations team has been successful in working around these problems, and the satellite continues to collect valuable mission data.

  7. MTI system design and operations lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Max L.; Kay, R. R.; Brock, Brian C.

    2003-12-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager Satellite (MTI), launched on March 12, 2000, has now surpassed its one-year mission requirement and its three-year mission goal. Primary and secondary program objectives regarding the development and evaluation of space-based multispectral and thermal imaging technology for nonproliferation treaty monitoring and other national security and civilian application have been met. Valuable lessons have also been learned, both from things that worked especially well and from shortcomings and anomalies encountered. This paper addresses lessons associated with the satellite, ground station and system operations, while companion papers address lessons associated with radiometric calibration, band-to-band registration and scientific processes and results. Things addressed in this paper that went especially well include overall satellite design, ground station design, system operations, and integration and test. Anomalies and other problems addressed herein include gyro and mass storage unit failures, battery under-voltage trips, a blown fuse, unexpected effects induced by communication link noise, ground station problems, and anomalies resulting from human error. In spite of MTI"s single-string design, the operations team has been successful in working around these problems, and the satellite continues to collect valuable mission data.

  8. Lessons from interactions within the cassava green mite fungal pathogen Neozygites tanajoae system and prospects for microbial control using Entomophthorales.

    PubMed

    Hountondji, Fabien C C

    2008-12-01

    Most fungal pathogens lack the capacity to search for their host but rather develop sit-and-wait strategies that favour contact with them. The success of these strategies depends upon the interactions of the pathogen with its host, the host plant and the environmental conditions, which altogether determine its transmissibility. Given the limited success that has characterized application of sustainable microbial control, particularly using Entomophthorales, interaction studies have been conducted with the entomophthoralean fungus Neozygites tanajoae, pathogenic to the cassava green mite (CGM), Mononychellus tanajoa, to help understand differences observed between laboratory and field performances of this pathogen. Reciprocal pathogen-host interactions as well as tritrophic interactions involving the host plant were studied. It was found that herbivory triggers the release of volatiles that promote sporulation of isolates of N. tanajoae, whereas the host mite avoids haloes of spores of this pathogen. However, the host mite does not avoid the pathogen when inside the mummified fungus-killed cadaver. The status of microbial control of CGM in Africa is reviewed and implications of these interactions are discussed for prospective application of microbial control using Entomophthorales.

  9. The Network Operations Control Center upgrade task: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherif, J. S.; Tran, T.-L.; Lee, S.

    1994-01-01

    This article synthesizes and describes the lessons learned from the Network Operations Control Center (NOCC) upgrade project, from the requirements phase through development and test and transfer. At the outset, the NOCC upgrade was being performed simultaneously with two other interfacing and dependent upgrades at the Signal Processing Center (SPC) and Ground Communications Facility (GCF), thereby adding a significant measure of complexity to the management and overall coordination of the development and transfer-to-operations (DTO) effort. Like other success stories, this project carried with it the traditional elements of top management support and exceptional dedication of cognizant personnel. Additionally, there were several NOCC-specific reasons for success, such as end-to-end system engineering, adoption of open-system architecture, thorough requirements management, and use of appropriate off-the-shelf technologies. On the other hand, there were several difficulties, such as ill-defined external interfaces, transition issues caused by new communications protocols, ambivalent use of two sets of policies and standards, and mistailoring of the new JPL management standard (due to the lack of practical guidelines). This article highlights the key lessons learned, as a means of constructive suggestions for the benefit of future projects.

  10. LDEF electronic systems: Successes, failures, and lessons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Emmett; Porter, Dave; Smith, Dave; Brooks, Larry; Levorsen, Joe; Mulkey, Owen

    1991-01-01

    Following the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) retrieval, the Systems Special Investigation Group (SIG) participated in an extensive series of tests of various electronic systems, including the NASA provided data and initiate systems, and some experiment systems. Overall, these were found to have performed remarkably well, even though most were designed and tested under limited budgets and used at least some nonspace qualified components. However, several anomalies were observed, including a few which resulted in some loss of data. The postflight test program objectives, observations, and lessons learned from these examinations are discussed. All analyses are not yet complete, but observations to date will be summarized, including the Boeing experiment component studies and failure analysis results related to the Interstellar Gas Experiment. Based upon these observations, suggestions for avoiding similar problems on future programs are presented.

  11. A Management Information System for Construction Management Lessons-Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    use of lessons-learned. The thesis examined the potential for developing an on-line management information system (MIS) to provide better storage and...that should be considered when developing a construction management oriented, lessons-learned management information system for the Civil Engineering

  12. "Why Didn't it Work?" Lessons From a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-based Personally Controlled Health Management System for Adults with Asthma.

    PubMed

    Lau, Annie Y S; Arguel, Amaël; Dennis, Sarah; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Coiera, Enrico

    2015-12-15

    Personally controlled health management systems (PCHMS), which may include a personal health record (PHR), health management tools, and information resources, have been advocated as a next-generation technology to improve health behaviors and outcomes. There have been successful trials of PCHMS in various health settings. However, there is mixed evidence for whether consumers will use these systems over the long term and whether they ultimately lead to improved health outcomes and behaviors. The aim was to test whether use of a PCHMS by consumers can increase the uptake or updating of a written asthma action plan (AAP) among adults with asthma. A 12-month parallel 2-group randomized controlled trial was conducted. Participants living with asthma were recruited nationally in Australia between April and August 2013, and randomized 1:1 to either the PCHMS group or control group (online static educational content). The primary outcome measure was possession of an up-to-date written AAP poststudy. Secondary measures included (1) utilizing the AAP; (2) planned or unplanned visits to a health care professional for asthma-related concerns; (3) severe asthma exacerbation, inadequately controlled asthma, or worsening of asthma that required a change in treatment; and (4) number of days lost from work or study due to asthma. Ancillary analyses examined reasons for adoption or nonadoption of the intervention. Outcome measures were collected by online questionnaire prestudy, monthly, and poststudy. A total of 330 eligible participants were randomized into 1 of 2 arms (intervention: n=154; control: n=176). Access to the PCHMS was not associated with a significant difference in any of the primary or secondary outcomes. Most participants (80.5%, 124/154) did not access the intervention or accessed it only once. Despite the intervention being effective in other preventive care settings, system use was negligible and outcome changes were not seen as a result. Consumers must perceive

  13. Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    BOYES, JOHN D.; DE ANA, MINDI FARBER; TORRES, WENCESLANO

    1999-09-01

    The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a distributed battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Storage Systems Program at Sandia National Laboratories has followed the progress of all stages of the project since its inception. It directly supported the critical battery room cooling system design by conducting laboratory thermal testing of a scale model of the battery under simulated operating conditions. The Puerto Rico facility is at present the largest operating battery storage system in the world and is successfully providing frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reserve to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. The owner-operator, PREPA, and the architect/engineer, vendors, and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation. In documenting these lessons, this report will help PREPA and other utilities in planning to build large energy storage systems.

  14. Rat Control Lesson Plan for Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Media Learning Corp., Rochester, NY.

    This teacher guide was developed to assist teachers of elementary children in their preparation to teach some lessons on rat control. The overall objectives include determining the level of student understanding about rats, developing student attitudes toward rats, developing the student's ability to identify the rat's weapons, identifying those…

  15. Lessons Learned from the Puerto Rico Battery Energy Storage System

    SciTech Connect

    Boyes, John D.; De Anda, Mindi Farber; Torres, Wenceslao

    1999-08-11

    The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) installed a battery energy storage system in 1994 at a substation near San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was patterned after two other large energy storage systems operated by electric utilities in California and Germany. The Puerto Rico facility is presently the largest operating battery storage system in the world and has successfully provided frequency control, voltage regulation, and spinning reseme to the Caribbean island. The system further proved its usefulness to the PREPA network in the fall of 1998 in the aftermath of Hurricane Georges. However, the facility has suffered accelerated cell failures in the past year and PREPA is committed to restoring the plant to full capacity. This represents the first repowering of a large utility battery facility. PREPA and its vendors and contractors learned many valuable lessons during all phases of project development and operation, which are summarized in this paper.

  16. On-line controlled documents: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrell, R.C.; Steele, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    Placing Controlled Documents on-line on a computer network seems like the solution to many problems, one being distribution, with a path toward a paperless office. However, many problems presented themselves as we were designing the system and placing the documents on-line. Although we planned and established a Process Management Team to help work out the bugs, we still encountered many obstacles in the process. This presentation will cover the ``trials and tribulations`` of placing Controlled Documents on a computer network at three different sites. We will discuss the process we went through, the problems we encountered, the software we used, and how we got management to buy into the process.

  17. Human Systems Integration in Practice: Constellation Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Constellation program provided a unique testbed for Human Systems Integration (HSI) as a fundamental element of the Systems Engineering process. Constellation was the first major program to have HSI mandated by NASA's Human Rating document. Proper HSI is critical to the success of any project that relies on humans to function as operators, maintainers, or controllers of a system. HSI improves mission, system and human performance, significantly reduces lifecycle costs, lowers risk and minimizes re-design. Successful HSI begins with sufficient project schedule dedicated to the generation of human systems requirements, but is by no means solely a requirements management process. A top-down systems engineering process that recognizes throughout the organization, human factors as a technical discipline equal to traditional engineering disciplines with authority for the overall system. This partners with a bottoms-up mechanism for human-centered design and technical issue resolution. The Constellation Human Systems Integration Group (HSIG) was a part of the Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) organization within the program office, and existed alongside similar groups such as Flight Performance, Environments & Constraints, and Integrated Loads, Structures and Mechanisms. While the HSIG successfully managed, via influence leadership, a down-and-in Community of Practice to facilitate technical integration and issue resolution, it lacked parallel top-down authority to drive integrated design. This presentation will discuss how HSI was applied to Constellation, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers. This presentation will discuss how Human Systems Integration (HSI) was applied to NASA's Constellation program, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers on how to accomplish this critical function.

  18. Life Functions and Cells: Level II, Unit 7, Lesson 1; Cell Structure: Lesson 2; Tissues, Organs, Systems: Lesson 3; Growth and Nutrition: Lesson 4; Metabolism: Lesson 5. Advanced General Education Program. A High School Self-Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for high-school level contains lessons on: Life Functions and Cells; Cell Structure; Tissues, Organs, Systems; Growth and Nutrition; and Metabolism. Each of the lessons concludes with a Mastery Test to be completed by the student. (DB)

  19. CHIPS microsatellite optical system: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholl, M. J.; Gaines, Geoff; Sirk, Martin; Taylor, Ellen; Hurwitz, Mark

    2008-08-01

    The Cosmic Hot Interstellar Plasma Spectrometer (CHIPS) observatory launched on 12 January 2003, and was the first and only successful GSFC UNEX (NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center University Explorer class) mission. The UNEX program was conceived by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as a new class of Explorer mission charged with demonstrating that significant science and/or technology experiments can be performed by small satellites with constrained budgets and a limited schedule. The purpose of the observatory was to examine details of the local bubble thermal pressure, spatial distribution and ionization history. The observatory was also used to observe solar spectra, both scattered from the Lunar surface and via a fortuitous 2nd order scattering path. CHIPS confirmed that spectral features within the 90-260Å band were much dimmer than was predicted by contemporary theories, and operated four years beyond its design lifetime. The observatory was placed in an extended safe-hold mode in April of 2008 for budgetary purposes. The spectrometer consisted of six spectrograph channels which delivered >λ/100 resolution spectra to a single detector. Cost constraints of UNEX led to a design based on a traditional aluminum structure, and an instrument with a large field of view (5° x 26°). All optical and optomechanical systems on the spectrometer performed flawlessly on orbit. We discuss the challenges, difficulties and lessons learned during the design, fabrication and execution stages of the mission.

  20. SWS CoCo: Lessons Learned about Distributed Multi-Platform Software Development and Configuration Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huygen, R.; Boxhoorn, D.; Roelfsema, P. R.; Sym, N.; Vandenbussche, B.; Wieprecht, E.

    This paper describes how the ISO-SWS development team developed the Interactive Analysis (IA) software in a distributed environment. When it became clear that IA would be developed by at least three institutes that were geographically distributed, a platform-independent configuration control system (CoCo) was designed that could control the software development in terms of version control and access control, and distribute the software in a consistent and automatic way. The CoCo system incorporates also tracking of problem reports. Over the years the development team has gained experience in distributed software development and maintenance. The lessons learned from this experience are discussed.

  1. Gemini Observatory base facility operations: systems engineering process and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serio, Andrew; Cordova, Martin; Arriagada, Gustavo; Adamson, Andy; Close, Madeline; Coulson, Dolores; Nitta, Atsuko; Nunez, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    Gemini North Observatory successfully began nighttime remote operations from the Hilo Base Facility control room in November 2015. The implementation of the Gemini North Base Facility Operations (BFO) products was a great learning experience for many of our employees, including the author of this paper, the BFO Systems Engineer. In this paper we focus on the tailored Systems Engineering processes used for the project, the various software tools used in project support, and finally discuss the lessons learned from the Gemini North implementation. This experience and the lessons learned will be used both to aid our implementation of the Gemini South BFO in 2016, and in future technical projects at Gemini Observatory.

  2. LDCM Ground System. Network Lesson Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Edd, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) and the lessons learned in implementing the network that was assembled to allow for the acquisition, archiving and distribution of the data from the Landsat mission. The objective of the LDCM is to continue the acquisition, archiving, and distribution of moderate-resolution multispectral imagery affording global, synoptic, and repetitive coverage of the earth's land surface at a scale where natural and human-induced changes can be detected, differentiated, characterized, and monitored over time. It includes a review of the ground network, including a block diagram of the ground network elements (GNE) and a review of the RF design and testing. Also included is a listing of the lessons learned.

  3. Plants and Photosynthesis: Level III, Unit 3, Lesson 1; The Human Digestive System: Lesson 2; Functions of the Blood: Lesson 3; Human Circulation and Respiration: Lesson 4; Reproduction of a Single Cell: Lesson 5; Reproduction by Male and Female Cells: Lesson 6; The Human Reproductive System: Lesson 7; Genetics and Heredity: Lesson 8; The Nervous System: Lesson 9; The Glandular System: Lesson 10. Advanced General Education Program. A High School Self-Study Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Job Corps.

    This self-study program for the high-school level contains lessons in the following subjects: Plants and Photosynthesis; The Human Digestive System; Functions of the Blood; Human Circulation and Respiration; Reproduction of a Single Cell; Reproduction by Male and Female Cells; The Human Reproductive System; Genetics and Heredity; The Nervous…

  4. Instructor's Plan: A Lesson Planning Expert System for School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Dennis A.; And Others

    The product of several years of research and development at Brigham Young University, Instructor's Plan (IP) is an expert system for rapid lesson design and authoring. Its primary audience is preservice and inservice school teachers. It will run on IBM PC, XT, AT, and PS/2 systems and compatibles with a color monitor and at least one floppy disk…

  5. The Marine Corps Lesson Learned System: An Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    system. Organizational learning , Lessons learned, After action reports, Information systems....and investigates what changes in organizational functioning can be attributed to MCLLS. The research shows that MCLLS has improved organizational ... learning but has room for improvement. The thesis contains recommendations to improve program use by addressing the needs of the potential users of the

  6. [Lessons learned from tobacco control in Spain].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Esteve; Villalbí, Joan R; Córdoba, Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    The growing involvement in Spain by civil society in the demand for tobacco control policies has been notable. The basis for the creation of the National Committee for Tobacco Prevention was established in 2004. At the end of that year, an intensive intervention was aimed at specifying, in law, the regulatory actions in the National Plan for Tobacco Prevention. This would facilitate a qualitative leap, taking advantage of the legal transposition of the European directive on advertising. With broad political consensus, the Law 28/2005 was established regarding sanitary measures for tobacco and the regulation of the sale, supply and consumption of tobacco products. The objective stated in this law is to prevent the initiation of tobacco consumption, especially among youth, guarantee the right of non-smokers to breathe air free from tobacco smoke and make quitting this habit easier for people who wish to do so. The main issues included are the prohibition of tobacco advertising and the limitation of tobacco consumption in common work areas and enclosed public spaces. The new law has replaced the previous rules in Spain, which were some of the most permissive in the European Union in terms of tobacco sales, advertising limitations and restrictions on smoking locations. It is clear that there is still much to be done. At this time, more social support needs to be generated in favor of the new regulations, and an important effort needs to be made to educate the public.

  7. Lessons Learned from Pit Viper System Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Catalan, Michael A.; Bailey, Sharon A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Baker, Carl P.; Valdez, Patrick L.

    2002-08-08

    The Pit Viper is a tele-operated system intended to enhance worker safety while simultaneously improving the efficiency of pit operations at the Hanford Site. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components were used in an attempt to increase system reliability and reduce integration difficulties. The Pit Viper, as is, provides significant improvement over the current baseline approach. During integration, multiple areas where technology development would enhance the effectiveness of the system were identified. Most notable of these areas were the manipulator control system, tool design, and tool handling. Various issues were identified regarding the interfacing of the Pit Viper with the Tank Farm environment and the maturity of remote/ robotic systems for unstructured environments.

  8. Everyday robotic action: lessons from human action control

    PubMed Central

    de Kleijn, Roy; Kachergis, George; Hommel, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Robots are increasingly capable of performing everyday human activities such as cooking, cleaning, and doing the laundry. This requires the real-time planning and execution of complex, temporally extended sequential actions under high degrees of uncertainty, which provides many challenges to traditional approaches to robot action control. We argue that important lessons in this respect can be learned from research on human action control. We provide a brief overview of available psychological insights into this issue and focus on four principles that we think could be particularly beneficial for robot control: the integration of symbolic and subsymbolic planning of action sequences, the integration of feedforward and feedback control, the clustering of complex actions into subcomponents, and the contextualization of action-control structures through goal representations. PMID:24672474

  9. Everyday robotic action: lessons from human action control.

    PubMed

    de Kleijn, Roy; Kachergis, George; Hommel, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Robots are increasingly capable of performing everyday human activities such as cooking, cleaning, and doing the laundry. This requires the real-time planning and execution of complex, temporally extended sequential actions under high degrees of uncertainty, which provides many challenges to traditional approaches to robot action control. We argue that important lessons in this respect can be learned from research on human action control. We provide a brief overview of available psychological insights into this issue and focus on four principles that we think could be particularly beneficial for robot control: the integration of symbolic and subsymbolic planning of action sequences, the integration of feedforward and feedback control, the clustering of complex actions into subcomponents, and the contextualization of action-control structures through goal representations.

  10. Signal Systems of Lesson Settings and the Task-Related Behavior of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kounin, Jacob S.; Gump, Paul V.

    1974-01-01

    Teachers were videotaped teaching lessons. Lessons were seen as signal systems to participants. These signal systems were characterized along dimensions of continuity, insulation, and intrusiveness. Task involvement was used as the criterion. Results indicate most successful to least successful lessons, based on signal systems. (Author/SE)

  11. Signal Systems of Lesson Settings and the Task-Related Behavior of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kounin, Jacob S.; Gump, Paul V.

    1974-01-01

    Teachers were videotaped teaching lessons. Lessons were seen as signal systems to participants. These signal systems were characterized along dimensions of continuity, insulation, and intrusiveness. Task involvement was used as the criterion. Results indicate most successful to least successful lessons, based on signal systems. (Author/SE)

  12. Global health diplomacy for obesity prevention: lessons from tobacco control.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Chantal; Dubé, Laurette

    2010-07-01

    To date the global health diplomacy agenda has focused primarily on infectious diseases. Policymakers have not dedicated the same level of attention to chronic diseases, despite their rising contribution to the global burden of disease. Negotiation of the Framework convention on tobacco control provides an apt example from global health diplomacy to tackle diet-related chronic diseases. What lessons can be learned from this experience for preventing obesity? This article looks at why a global policy response is necessary, at the actors and interests involved in the negotiations, and at the forum for diplomacy.

  13. Lessons from Adaptive Level One Accelerator (ALOA) System Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Brambora, Clifford; Ghuman, Parminder; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Adaptive Level One Accelerator (ALOA) system was developed as part of the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) project. The reconfigurable computing technologies were investigated for Level 1 satellite telemetry data processing to achieve computing acceleration and cost reduction for the next-generation Level 1 data processing systems. The MODIS instrument calibration algorithm was implemented using reconfigurable a computer. The system development process and the lessons learned throughout the design cycle are summarized in this paper.

  14. Lessons from Adaptive Level One Accelerator (ALOA) System Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Brambora, Clifford; Ghuman, Parminder; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Adaptive Level One Accelerator (ALOA) system was developed as part of the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) project. The reconfigurable computing technologies were investigated for Level 1 satellite telemetry data processing to achieve computing acceleration and cost reduction for the next-generation Level 1 data processing systems. The MODIS instrument calibration algorithm was implemented using reconfigurable a computer. The system development process and the lessons learned throughout the design cycle are summarized in this paper.

  15. Implementing Indigenous community control in health care: lessons from Canada.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Josée G; Dwyer, Judith

    2015-11-10

    Objective Over past decades, Australian and Canadian Indigenous primary healthcare policies have focused on supporting community controlled Indigenous health organisations. After more than 20 years of sustained effort, over 89% of eligible communities in Canada are currently engaged in the planning, management and provision of community controlled health services. In Australia, policy commitment to community control has also been in place for more than 25 years, but implementation has been complicated by unrealistic timelines, underdeveloped change management processes, inflexible funding agreements and distrust. This paper discusses the lessons from the Canadian experience to inform the continuing efforts to achieve the implementation of community control in Australia.Methods We reviewed Canadian policy and evaluation grey literature documents, and assessed lessons and recommendations for relevance to the Australian context.Results Our analysis yielded three broad lessons. First, implementing community control takes time. It took Canada 20 years to achieve 89% implementation. To succeed, Australia will need to make a firm long term commitment to this objective. Second, implementing community control is complex. Communities require adequate resources to support change management. And third, accountability frameworks must be tailored to the Indigenous primary health care context to be meaningful.Conclusions We conclude that although the Canadian experience is based on a different context, the processes and tools created to implement community control in Canada can help inform the Australian context.What is known about the topic? Although Australia has promoted Indigenous control over primary healthcare (PHC) services, implementation remains incomplete. Enduring barriers to the transfer of PHC services to community control have not been addressed in the largely sporadic attention to this challenge to date, despite significant recent efforts in some jurisdictions

  16. Russian Quality Assessment System in Education: Key Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolotov, V.; Valdman, I.; Kovaleva, G.; Pinskaya, M.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines key lessons learned by Russia while developing national assessment system in education. It shows that reforms are more likely to succeed backed with sustained political support, clearly defined goals or priorities, gradual introduction, and open discussion with stakeholders. [This article was translated by Lucy Gunderson.

  17. ATLAS LTCS Vertically Challenged System Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Deepak; Garrison, Matt; Ku, Jentung

    2014-01-01

    Re-planning of LTCS TVAC testing and supporting RTA (Receiver Telescope Assembly) Test Plan and Procedure document preparation. The Laser Thermal Control System (LTCS) is designed to maintain the lasers onboard Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) at their operational temperatures. In order to verify the functionality of the LTCS, a thermal balance test of the thermal hardware was performed. During the first cold start of the LTCS, the Loop Heat Pipe (LHP) was unable to control the laser mass simulators temperature. The control heaters were fully on and the loop temperature remained well below the desired setpoint. Thermal analysis of the loop did not show these results. This unpredicted behavior of the LTCS was brought up to a panel of LHP experts. Based on the testing and a review of all the data, there were multiple diagnostic performed in order to narrow down the cause. The prevailing theory is that gravity is causing oscillating flow within the loop, which artificially increased the control power needs. This resulted in a replan of the LTCS test flow and the addition of a GSE heater to allow vertical operation.

  18. Outbreak of Legionnaires' disease on a cruise ship: lessons for international surveillance and control.

    PubMed

    Regan, C M; McCann, B; Syed, Q; Christie, P; Joseph, C; Colligan, J; McGaffin, A

    2003-06-01

    A sporadic case of Legionnaires' disease was linked to travel on a cruise ship. Investigation identified two further cases of Legionnaires' Disease and one case of non-pneumonic Legionella infection. An Incident Team confirmed the source to be the ship's water system and control measures were instituted that included pasteurisation, super chlorination and chlorine dioxide dosing. The Public Health Laboratory Service (PHLS) Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre (CDSC), through the European Surveillance Scheme for Travel Associated Legionnaires' Disease, identified three previous cases associated with the same ship's water system including one fatality. Lessons for the international surveillance and control of Legionnaires' disease on cruise ships are discussed.

  19. MODIS Science Algorithms and Data Systems Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Robert E.; Ridgway, Bill L.; Patt, Fred S.; Masuoka, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    For almost 10 years, standard global products from NASA's Earth Observing System s (EOS) two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors are being used world-wide for earth science research and applications. This paper discusses the lessons learned in developing the science algorithms and the data systems needed to produce these high quality data products for the earth sciences community. Strong science team leadership and communication, an evolvable and scalable data system, and central coordination of QA and validation activities enabled the data system to grow by two orders of magnitude from the initial at-launch system to the current system able to reprocess data from both the Terra and Aqua missions in less than a year. Many of the lessons learned from MODIS are already being applied to follow-on missions.

  20. Designing and evaluating health systems level hypertension control interventions for African-Americans: lessons from a pooled analysis of three cluster randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, Valory N; Chan, Wenyaw; Hyman, David J; Feldman, Penny; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Schwartz, Joseph E; McDonald, Margaret; Einhorn, Paula; Tobin, Jonathan N

    2015-01-01

    African-Americans (AAs) have a high prevalence of hypertension and their blood pressure (BP) control on treatment still lags behind other groups. In 2004, NHLBI funded five projects that aimed to evaluate clinically feasible interventions to effect changes in medical care delivery leading to an increased proportion of AA patients with controlled BP. Three of the groups performed a pooled analysis of trial results to determine: 1) the magnitude of the combined intervention effect; and 2) how the pooled results could inform the methodology for future health-system level BP interventions. Using a cluster randomized design, the trials enrolled AAs with uncontrolled hypertension to test interventions targeting a combination of patient and clinician behaviors. The 12-month Systolic BP (SBP) and Diastolic BP (DBP) effects of intervention or control cluster assignment were assessed using mixed effects longitudinal regression modeling. 2,015 patients representing 352 clusters participated across the three trials. Pooled BP slopes followed a quadratic pattern, with an initial decline, followed by a rise toward baseline, and did not differ significantly between intervention and control clusters: SBP linear coefficient = -2.60±0.21 mmHg per month, p<0.001; quadratic coefficient = 0.167± 0.02 mmHg/month, p<0.001; group by time interaction group by time group x linear time coefficient=0.145 ± 0.293, p=0.622; group x quadratic time coefficient= -0.017 ± 0.026, p=0.525). RESULTS were similar for DBP. The individual sites did not have significant intervention effects when analyzed separately. Investigators planning behavioral trials to improve BP control in health systems serving AAs should plan for small effect sizes and employ a "run-in" period in which BP can be expected to improve in both experimental and control clusters.

  1. Designing and Evaluating Health Systems Level Hypertension Control Interventions for African-Americans: Lessons from a Pooled Analysis of Three Cluster Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Pavlik, Valory N.; Chan, Wenyaw; Hyman, David J.; Feldman, Penny; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Schwartz, Joseph E.; McDonald, Margaret; Einhorn, Paula; Tobin, Jonathan N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives African-Americans (AAs) have a high prevalence of hypertension and their blood pressure (BP) control on treatment still lags behind other groups. In 2004, NHLBI funded five projects that aimed to evaluate clinically feasible interventions to effect changes in medical care delivery leading to an increased proportion of AA patients with controlled BP. Three of the groups performed a pooled analysis of trial results to determine: 1) the magnitude of the combined intervention effect; and 2) how the pooled results could inform the methodology for future health-system level BP interventions. Methods Using a cluster randomized design, the trials enrolled AAs with uncontrolled hypertension to test interventions targeting a combination of patient and clinician behaviors. The 12-month Systolic BP (SBP) and Diastolic BP (DBP) effects of intervention or control cluster assignment were assessed using mixed effects longitudinal regression modeling. Results 2,015 patients representing 352 clusters participated across the three trials. Pooled BP slopes followed a quadratic pattern, with an initial decline, followed by a rise toward baseline, and did not differ significantly between intervention and control clusters: SBP linear coefficient = −2.60±0.21 mmHg per month, p<0.001; quadratic coefficient = 0.167± 0.02 mmHg/month, p<0.001; group by time interaction group by time group x linear time coefficient=0.145 ± 0.293, p=0.622; group x quadratic time coefficient= −0.017 ± 0.026, p=0.525). Results were similar for DBP. The individual sites did not have significant intervention effects when analyzed separately. Conclusion Investigators planning behavioral trials to improve BP control in health systems serving AAs should plan for small effect sizes and employ a “run-in” period in which BP can be expected to improve in both experimental and control clusters. PMID:25808682

  2. ATST systems engineering: project update and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Robert P.

    2008-07-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) project is near the end of its design and development phase and ready to begin construction. This paper describes the current status of ATST and a few of the lessons learned during design and development from a systems-engineering perspective. It highlights some of the important differences between nighttime and daytime solar observing with emphasis on the resulting impacts on telescope design and operational concepts. We have had to adopt somewhat non-standard primary mirror polish specifications to support our requirement to observe the sun's corona very close to solar limb. Our suite of image-quality error budgets are examined to show the progression of system requirements that are derived from each use case, and the value of Monte Carlo simulations as a means of controlling user expectations. We discuss PDMWorks® Enterprise and other elements of our configuration management system as well as the tools we have developed (and are developing) to document the requirements flow-down and to establish a trace-back mechanism. We expect to use this trace-back capability during contract negotiations and later in the fabrication process to quickly assess the potential impact of any exceptions to our specifications that may be requested by our vendors.

  3. CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

    1962-10-30

    A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

  4. Lessons Learned Using a Relational Database for System Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Stahlhut, Richard W.; McCallie, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Before a new system is brought on-line, data from an old system frequently needs to be massaged prior to loading into the new system. To determine if 4-GL tools could be used in these projects, a relational database management system, Oracle, was used to convert our old ADT system's data into the format required by the new system. In doing so, we learned several important performance lessons regarding proper structuring of SQL statements and database tuning. Although the ADT system data were successfully manipulated using this 4-GL product, one should understand database tuning and consider the options carefully before embarking on a large-scale conversion.

  5. Resurrected DSCOVR Propulsion System - Challenges and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varia, Apurva P.; Scroggins, Ashley R.

    2015-01-01

    The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), formerly known as Triana, is a unique mission, not because of its objectives but because of how long it was in storage before launch. The Triana spacecraft was built in the late 90s and later renamed as DSCOVR, but the project was canceled before the spacecraft was launched. The nearly-complete spacecraft was put in controlled storage for 10 years, until the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provided funding for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to refurbish the spacecraft. On February 11, 2015, DSCOVR was launched on a Falcon 9 v1.1 from launch complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This paper describes the DSCOVR propulsion system, which utilizes ten 4.5 N thrusters in blowdown mode to perform Midcourse Correction (MCC) maneuvers, Lissajous Orbit Insertion (LOI) at Lagrangian point L1, momentum unloading maneuvers, and station keeping delta-v maneuvers at L1. This paper also describes the testing that was performed, including susbsystem-level and spacecraft-level tests, to verify the propulsion system's integrity for flight. Finally, this paper concludes with a discussion of the challenges and lessons learned during this unique mission, including replacement of a bent thruster and installation of an auxiliary heater over existing propellant line heaters.

  6. Implementing a regional oncology information system: approach and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Evans, W.K.; Ashbury, F.D.; Hogue, G.L.; Smith, A.; Pun, J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Paper-based medical record systems are known to have major problems of inaccuracy, incomplete data, poor accessibility, and challenges to patient confidentiality. They are also an inefficient mechanism of record-sharing for interdisciplinary patient assessment and management, and represent a major problem for keeping current and monitoring quality control to facilitate improvement. To address those concerns, national, regional, and local health care authorities have increased the pressure on oncology practices to upgrade from paper-based systems to electronic health records. Objectives Here, we describe and discuss the challenges to implementing a region-wide oncology information system across four independent health care organizations, and we describe the lessons learned from the initial phases that are now being applied in subsequent activities of this complex project. Results The need for change must be shared across centres to increase buy-in, adoption, and implementation. It is essential to establish physician leadership, commitment, and engagement in the process. Work processes had to be revised to optimize use of the new system. Culture change must be included in the change management strategy. Furthermore, training and resource requirements must be thoroughly planned, implemented, monitored, and modified as required for effective adoption of new work processes and technology. Interfaces must be established with multiple existing electronic systems across the region to ensure appropriate patient flow. Periodic assessment of the existing project structure is necessary, and adjustments are often required to ensure that the project meets its objectives. Conclusions The implementation of region-wide oncology information systems across different health practice locations has many challenges. Leadership is essential. A strong, collaborative information-sharing strategy across the region and with the supplier is essential to identify, discuss, and resolve

  7. Mebuilder: An Object-Oriented Lesson Authoring System for Procedural Skills

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    example of how domain model information is passed parametrically to the instructional model . The best authoring systems make this information flow as...lesson but simplify the lesson building process for the teacher. c. Modeling Unknown Information A very common property among diagnostic lessons is...that the student does not know all the information that is true in a state. However, any lesson could have a need to model what a student knows or

  8. Heritage Systems Engineering Lessons from NASA Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barley, Bryan; Newhouse, Marilyn; Clardy, Dennon

    2010-01-01

    In the design and development of complex spacecraft missions, project teams frequently assume the use of advanced technology systems or heritage systems to enable a mission or reduce the overall mission risk and cost. As projects proceed through the development life cycle, increasingly detailed knowledge of the advanced and heritage systems within the spacecraft and mission environment identifies unanticipated technical issues. Resolving these issues often results in cost overruns and schedule impacts. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery & New Frontiers (D&NF) Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently studied cost overruns and schedule delays for 5 missions. The goal was to identify the underlying causes for the overruns and delays, and to develop practical mitigations to assist the D&NF projects in identifying potential risks and controlling the associated impacts to proposed mission costs and schedules. The study found that optimistic hardware/software inheritance and technology readiness assumptions caused cost and schedule growth for all five missions studied. The cost and schedule growth was not found to be the result of technical hurdles requiring significant technology development. The projects institutional inheritance and technology readiness processes appear to adequately assess technology viability and prevent technical issues from impacting the final mission success. However, the processes do not appear to identify critical issues early enough in the design cycle to ensure project schedules and estimated costs address the inherent risks. In general, the overruns were traceable to: an inadequate understanding of the heritage system s behavior within the proposed spacecraft design and mission environment; an insufficient level of development experience with the heritage system; or an inadequate scoping of the systemwide impacts necessary to implement an advanced technology for space flight applications

  9. Nuclear Instrumentation and Control Cyber Testbed Considerations – Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Gray; Robert Anderson; Julio G. Rodriguez; Cheol-Kwon Lee

    2014-08-01

    Abstract: Identifying and understanding digital instrumentation and control (I&C) cyber vulnerabilities within nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities, is critical if nation states desire to operate nuclear facilities safely, reliably, and securely. In order to demonstrate objective evidence that cyber vulnerabilities have been adequately identified and mitigated, a testbed representing a facility’s critical nuclear equipment must be replicated. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has built and operated similar testbeds for common critical infrastructure I&C for over ten years. This experience developing, operating, and maintaining an I&C testbed in support of research identifying cyber vulnerabilities has led the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute of the Republic of Korea to solicit the experiences of INL to help mitigate problems early in the design, development, operation, and maintenance of a similar testbed. The following information will discuss I&C testbed lessons learned and the impact of these experiences to KAERI.

  10. Lessons from tobacco control for advocates of healthy transport.

    PubMed

    Mindell, J

    2001-06-01

    Many parallels can be drawn between cigarettes and motor vehicles, smoking and car driving, and the tobacco and the auto/oil industries. Those promoting healthy and sustainable transport policies can learn lessons from tobacco control activities over the past 50 years. Evidence-based legislation is more effective than negotiated voluntary agreements between industry and government. Media advocacy is crucial to reframe the issues to allow changes in national policies that facilitate healthier choices. Worthwhile public health policies seen as a threat by multinational companies will be opposed by them but active national and international networks of healthcare professionals, voluntary organizations, charities and their supporters can match the political power of these industries.

  11. Marine Corps Lessons Learned System (MCLLS) User’s Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-20

    20 AUGUST 1993 Prepared by the Institute for Simulation and Training University of Central Florida FOREWORD The Marine Corps Lessons Learned...System (MCLLS) User’s Manual (Version 4.0), dated 20 August 1993, was prepared by the Institute for Simulation and Training of the University of Central...Search/Narrow/Administrative Data/Subject Window .. 33 Figure 27 Search AND/OR Choice Window ....................... 33 Figure 28 Range Search Screen

  12. Officer Performance Evaluation Systems. Lessons Learned from Experience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    halting inflation, renewing the importance of the OER in the selection program and improving feedback to officers, were not enough to overcome the...appraisal": In many organizations, supervisors report that they hold p>eriodic appraisal interviews and give honest feedback , while their subordin- ates...OJEaNo 521.80^ 521.806 ’r631 WOMuMnMO ?J;?5^^ PERFORMANCE EVALUATION SYSTEMS: LESSONS LEARNED FROM EXPERI- ENCE W ^RSONAL AUTXORlSl Larson

  13. Possible lessons from the tobacco experience for obesity control.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Shawna L; Green, Lawrence W; Rosenthal, Abby C; Husten, Corinne G; Khan, Laura Kettel; Dietz, William H

    2003-04-01

    Although obesity is increasing to epidemic proportions in many developed countries, some of these same countries are reporting substantial reductions in tobacco use. Unlike tobacco, food and physical activity are essential to life. Yet similar psychological, social, and environmental factors as well as advertising pressures influence the usage patterns of all 3. These similarities suggest that there may be commonalities between factors involved in controlling obesity and tobacco. This review, therefore, seeks to draw lessons from the tobacco experience for the organization of more successful obesity control. Smoking cessation counseling by physicians has been found to be one of the most clinically effective and cost-effective of all disease prevention interventions. When used alone, however, it cannot decrease the cultural acceptability of tobacco and the pressures and cues to smoke. Research and evaluation have shown the key elements of tobacco control to be (1) clinical intervention and management, (2) educational strategies, (3) regulatory efforts, (4) economic approaches, and (5) the combination of all of these into comprehensive programs that address multiple facets of the environment simultaneously. For each element, we present the evidence outlining its importance for tobacco control, discuss its application to date in obesity control, and suggest areas for further research. Viewing all of the elements involved and recognizing their synergistic effects draws researchers and practitioners back from an exclusive concentration on their particular setting to consider how they might seek to influence other settings in which individuals and populations must negotiate desired changes in nutrition and physical activity.

  14. Customizing the JPL Multimission Ground Data System: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Susan C.; Louie, John J.; Guerrero, Ana Maria; Hurley, Daniel; Flora-Adams, Dana

    1994-01-01

    The Multimission Ground Data System (MGDS) at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has brought improvements and new technologies to mission operations. It was designed as a generic data system to meet the needs of multiple missions and avoid re-inventing capabilities for each new mission and thus reduce costs. It is based on adaptable tools that can be customized to support different missions and operations scenarios. The MGDS is based on a distributed client/server architecture, with powerful Unix workstations, incorporating standards and open system architectures. The distributed architecture allows remote operations and user science data exchange, while also providing capabilities for centralized ground system monitor and control. The MGDS has proved its capabilities in supporting multiple large-class missions simultaneously, including the Voyager, Galileo, Magellan, Ulysses, and Mars Observer missions. The Operations Engineering Lab (OEL) at JPL has been leading Customer Adaptation Training (CAT) teams for adapting and customizing MGDS for the various operations and engineering teams. These CAT teams have typically consisted of only a few engineers who are familiar with operations and with the MGDS software and architecture. Our experience has provided a unique opportunity to work directly with the spacecraft and instrument operations teams and understand their requirements and how the MGDS can be adapted and customized to minimize their operations costs. As part of this work, we have developed workstation configurations, automation tools, and integrated user interfaces at minimal cost that have significantly improved productivity. We have also proved that these customized data systems are most successful if they are focused on the people and the tasks they perform and if they are based upon user confidence in the development team resulting from daily interactions. This paper will describe lessons learned in adapting JPL's MGDS to fly the Voyager, Galileo, and Mars

  15. Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Lessons Learned during Advanced Controls Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A.

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes some of the problems encountered while conducting tests on the Controls Advanced Research Turbine installed at the National Wind Technology Center. It also discusses some of the peculiarities of the C-code used to control the CART and discusses the fault protection routine, Turbine safety, and some of its failures.

  16. Lessons from risk assessment of countermine robotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, Isaac; Moses, Franklin L.; Aeillo, Matthew P.

    2011-05-01

    The U.S. Army's desire for increased standoff distances between Soldiers and disguised explosive threats has yielded a complex new technical challenge: augment existing small military robots with state-of-the-art detection and neutralization technology. The magnitude of the challenge is increased by the need for reliable autonomy that allows the robot to operate in different environments (e.g., complex and urban terrains, confined areas, and underground locations). This paper describes lessons learned during efforts in 2008-09 to identify and remediate risks of developing a countermine robot system. It also addresses issues that need attention to achieve total mission success. The work studied three phases of a robotic countermine system: move to a threat area, investigate that area with sensor(s), and neutralize detected threats. Each of these phases is essential, yet attention tends to focus on the third one. The focus of this paper is on risks and lessons pertaining to the first two. What was learned about moving a countermine robot to the area of expected threats? What is necessary for a robot to maneuver sensors and have the maximum probability of detection (Pd) of hazards while minimizing the false alarm rate (FAR)? This paper presents observations during demonstration and test events over the past 2 years. From those observations, lessons learned are summarized as a foundation for realizing a countermine robot and a path forward.

  17. System 80+{trademark} standard design incorporates radiation protection lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Crom, T.D.; Naugle, C.L.; Turk, R.S.

    1995-03-01

    Many lessons have been learned from the current generation of nuclear plants in the area of radiation protection. The following paper will outline how the lessons learned have been incorporated into the design and operational philosophy of the System 80+{trademark} Standard Design currently under development by ABB Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) with support from Duke Engineering and Services, Inc. and Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation in the Balance-of-Plant design. The System 80+{trademark} Standard Design is a complete nuclear power plant for national and international markets, designed in direct response to utility needs for the 1990`s, and scheduled for Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Design Certification under the new standardization rule (10 CFR Part 52). System 80+{trademark} is a natural extension of System 80{sup R} technology, an evolutionary change based on proven Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde in Arizona and under construction at Yonggwang in the Republic of Korea. The System 80+{trademark} Containment and much of the Balance of Plant design is based upon Duke Power Company`s Cherokee Plant, which was partially constructed in the late 1970`s, but, was later canceled (due to rapid declined in electrical load growth). The System 80+{trademark} Standard Design meets the requirements given in the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) Requirements Document. One of these requirements is to limit the occupational exposure to 100 person-rem/yr. This paper illustrates how this goal can be achieved through the incorporation of lessons learned, innovative design, and the implementation of a common sense approach to operation and maintenances practices.

  18. Lessons from the German Dual System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyslop, Alisha

    2012-01-01

    Most average Americans know more about the food in Germany than the education structure, but its emphasis on a dual system of education and training has a number of insights to offer to American career and technical educators. This author had the opportunity to observe firsthand the vocational education and training system, or "VET"…

  19. Apollo Lesson Sampler: Apollo 13 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a two-part case study of the Apollo 13 accident. The first lesson contains an overview of the electrical system hardware on the Apollo spacecraft, providing a context for the details of the oxygen tank explosion, and the failure chain reconstruction that led to the conditions present at the time of the accident. Given this background, the lesson then covers the tank explosion and immediate damage to the spacecraft, and the immediate response of Mission Control to what they saw. Part 2 of the lesson picks up shortly after the explosion of the oxygen tank on Apollo 13, and discusses how Mission Control gained insight to and understanding of the damage in the aftermath. Impacts to various spacecraft systems are presented, along with Mission Control's reactions and plans for in-flight recovery leading to a successful entry. Finally, post-flight vehicle changes are presented along with the lessons learned.

  20. Apollo Lesson Sampler: Apollo 13 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a two-part case study of the Apollo 13 accident. The first lesson contains an overview of the electrical system hardware on the Apollo spacecraft, providing a context for the details of the oxygen tank explosion, and the failure chain reconstruction that led to the conditions present at the time of the accident. Given this background, the lesson then covers the tank explosion and immediate damage to the spacecraft, and the immediate response of Mission Control to what they saw. Part 2 of the lesson picks up shortly after the explosion of the oxygen tank on Apollo 13, and discusses how Mission Control gained insight to and understanding of the damage in the aftermath. Impacts to various spacecraft systems are presented, along with Mission Control's reactions and plans for in-flight recovery leading to a successful entry. Finally, post-flight vehicle changes are presented along with the lessons learned.

  1. Computational design of ICCP systems: Lessons learned and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    DeGiorgi, V.G.; Lucas, K.E.

    1999-07-01

    Computational modeling using boundary element techniques has been proposed for design and evaluation of shipboard impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems. LaPlace's equation, the governing differential equation for electrochemical corrosion, is well suited for solution by the boundary element method. There has been much work performed in this field during the past two decades. Computational modeling efforts designed to validate boundary element procedures are reviewed. US Navy ship systems discussed are CG-59, CG-66, and CVN-068. Computational analysis accuracy is determined by comparison with physical scale modeling experimental results. Lessons learned from the analysis described are summarized. Advantages and disadvantages of boundary element modeling are discussed.

  2. Empirical performance of the calibrated self-controlled cohort analysis within temporal pattern discovery: lessons for developing a risk identification and analysis system.

    PubMed

    Norén, G Niklas; Bergvall, Tomas; Ryan, Patrick B; Juhlin, Kristina; Schuemie, Martijn J; Madigan, David

    2013-10-01

    Observational healthcare data offer the potential to identify adverse drug reactions that may be missed by spontaneous reporting. The self-controlled cohort analysis within the Temporal Pattern Discovery framework compares the observed-to-expected ratio of medical outcomes during post-exposure surveillance periods with those during a set of distinct pre-exposure control periods in the same patients. It utilizes an external control group to account for systematic differences between the different time periods, thus combining within- and between-patient confounder adjustment in a single measure. To evaluate the performance of the calibrated self-controlled cohort analysis within Temporal Pattern Discovery as a tool for risk identification in observational healthcare data. Different implementations of the calibrated self-controlled cohort analysis were applied to 399 drug-outcome pairs (165 positive and 234 negative test cases across 4 health outcomes of interest) in 5 real observational databases (four with administrative claims and one with electronic health records). Performance was evaluated on real data through sensitivity/specificity, the area under receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC), and bias. The calibrated self-controlled cohort analysis achieved good predictive accuracy across the outcomes and databases under study. The optimal design based on this reference set uses a 360 days surveillance period and a single control period 180 days prior to new prescriptions. It achieved an average AUC of 0.75 and AUC >0.70 in all but one scenario. A design with three separate control periods performed better for the electronic health records database and for acute renal failure across all data sets. The estimates for negative test cases were generally unbiased, but a minor negative bias of up to 0.2 on the RR-scale was observed with the configurations using multiple control periods, for acute liver injury and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The calibrated self-controlled

  3. Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS) on U.S. Army Facilities: Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Laboratory N AD-A228 572 Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS) on U.S. Army Facilities: Lessons Learned by Richard G. Lampo Jonathan C...SUBTITLE 5. FUND NG NUM13ERS Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS) on U.S. Army Facilities: PE 4A162731 Lessons Learned PR AT41 6. AUTHOR(S...EIFS insulation 16. PRJCE CODE walls lessons learned 17 SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 19. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. LIMITATION

  4. Canadian health system reforms: lessons for Australia?

    PubMed

    Marchildon, Gregory P

    2005-02-01

    This paper analyses recent health reform agenda in Canada. From 1988 until 1997, the first phase of reforms focused on service integration through regionalisation and a rebalancing of services from illness care to prevention and wellness. The second phase, which has been layered onto the ongoing first phase, is concerned with fiscal sustainability from a provincial perspective, and the fundamental nature of the system from a national perspective. Despite numerous commissions and studies, some questions remain concerning the future direction of the public system. The Canadian reform experience is compared with recent Australian health reform initiatives in terms of service integration through regionalisation, primary care reform, Aboriginal health, the public-private debate, intergovernmental relations and the role of the federal government.

  5. Lessons Learned: M1 Abrams Tank System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-15

    coupled with an Allison X1100-3B hydrokinetic transmission to provide four forward and two reverse speeds. Turbine engine use has significant...Performance Advanced Suspension 1500 HP Turbine Engine Hydrokinetic Transmission MAINTAINABILITY Onboard Malfunction Detection System Modular Engine...features of the Ml Abrams Tank are shown in Figures 1-2 and 1-3, respectively. The tank uses a 1500 horsepower AVCO Lycoming regenerative turbine engine

  6. TOPEX/Poseidon electrical power system -- Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, P.R.K.; Richardson, R.; Sherwood, R.

    1996-12-31

    The main objective of the TOPEX/Poseidon Spacecraft is to monitor the world`s oceans for scientific study of weather and climate prediction, coastal storm warning and maritime safety. The operational conditions of this satellite imposed challenging requirements for the on-board Electrical Power System (EPS). Going through various phases of its development and on-orbit performance verifications, there were certain events and/or circumstances the authors would have liked to avoid. Some circumstances were avoided with preventative measures, other potentially detrimental events were not. Thus, a number of very valuable lessons were learned which are presented in this paper.

  7. LANSCE personnel access control system

    SciTech Connect

    Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R.; Hall, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. The Personnel Access Control System (PACS) is a component of the RSS that is designed to prevent personnel access to areas where prompt radiation is a hazard. PACS was designed to replace several older personnel safety systems (PSS) with a single modem unified design. Lessons learned from the operation over the last 20 years were incorporated into a redundant sensor, single-point failure safe, fault tolerant, and tamper-resistant system that prevents access to the beam areas by controlling the access keys and beam stoppers. PACS uses a layered philosophy to the physical and electronic design. The most critical assemblies are battery backed up, relay logic circuits; less critical devices use Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for timing functions and communications. Outside reviewers have reviewed the operational safety of the design. The design philosophy, lessons learned, hardware design, software design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.

  8. Lessons Learned from Pit Viper System Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Catalan, Michael A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.

    2002-04-11

    Tele-operated and robotic systems operated in unstructured field environments pose unique challenges for tool design. Since field tasks are not always well defined and the robot work area usually cannot be designed for ease of operation, the tools must be versatile. It's important to carefully consider the orientation of the grip the robot takes on the tool, as it's not easily changed in the field. The stiffness of the robot and the possibility of robot positioning errors encourages the use of non-contact or minimal-contact tooling. While normal hand tools can usually be modified for use by the robot, this is not always the most effective approach. It's desirable to have tooling that is relatively independent of the robot; in this case, the robot places the tool near the desired work location and the tool performs its task relatively independently. Here we consider the adaptation of a number of tools for cleanup of a radioactively contaminated piping junction and valve pit. The tasks to be considered are debris removal (small nuts and bolts and pipe up to 100 mm in diameter), size reduction, surface cleaning, and support of past practice crane-based methods for working in the pits.

  9. Remote damage control during the attacks on Paris: Lessons learned by the Paris Fire Brigade and evolutions in the rescue system.

    PubMed

    Lesaffre, Xavier; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre; Violin, Yann; Frattini, Benoit; Rivet, Catherine; Stibbe, Olivier; Faure, Florian; Godefroy, Anne; Gallet, Jean-Claude; Ausset, Sylvain

    2017-03-20

    On November 13, 2015, in 40 minutes, Paris suffered 4 suicide bombers attacks, shootings at 3 different restaurant terraces and an attack on the Bataclan concert hall resulting in 130 dead and 495 wounded. How did the Parisian rescue system respond and how did it evolve since?We proved we could deploy quickly wide prehospital and hospital resources and teams' equipment and preparedness is being further developed. In order to secure a swifter initial response we need a better integration of the operators of the rescue chain with a simpler and more robust organization as well as improved communications channels. We must continue to anticipate and prepare for possible future attacks.

  10. Lessons Learned from the Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Node 1 flew to the International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A during December 1998. To date the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has learned a lot of lessons from this module based on its history of approximately two years of acceptance testing on the ground and currently its twelve years on-orbit. This paper will provide an overview of the ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Node 1 Temperature and Humidity Control (THC) subsystem and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for this subsystem and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for these subsystems based on problems prelaunch, problems encountered on-orbit, and operational problems/concerns. It is hoped that documenting these lessons learned from ISS will help in preventing them in future Programs. 1

  11. Production of an Automated Lesson for Use on the Audio Visual Response System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowse, Nancy

    The development, production, and evaluation of an automated lesson for use on the Audio Visual Response System (AVR System 400) is described in this paper. Establishment of learning objectives was the central focus of the lesson development process, followed by script development and the planning and design of illustrative materials. These…

  12. Lessons Learned Study Final Report for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Laak, Jim; Brumfield, M. Larry; Moore, Arlene A.; Anderson, Brooke; Dempsey, Jim; Gifford, Bob; Holloway, Chip; Johnson, Keith

    2004-01-01

    This report is the final product of a 90-day study performed for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. The study was to assemble lessons NASA has learned from previous programs that could help the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate pursue the Exploration vision. It focuses on those lessons that should have the greatest significance to the Directorate during the formulation of program and mission plans. The study team reviewed a large number of lessons learned reports and data bases, including the Columbia Accident Investigation Board and Rogers Commission reports on the Shuttle accidents, accident reports from robotic space flight systems, and a number of management reviews by the Defense Sciences Board, Government Accountability Office, and others. The consistency of the lessons, findings, and recommendations validate the adequacy of the data set. In addition to reviewing existing databases, a series of workshops was held at each of the NASA centers and headquarters that included senior managers from the current workforce as well as retirees. The full text of the workshop reports is included in Appendix A. A lessons learned website was opened up to permit current and retired NASA personnel and on-site contractors to input additional lessons as they arise. These new lessons, when of appropriate quality and relevance, will be brought to the attention of managers. The report consists of four parts: Part 1 provides a small set of lessons, called the Executive Lessons Learned, that represent critical lessons that the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate should act on immediately. This set of Executive Lessons and their supporting rationale have been reviewed at length and fully endorsed by a team of distinguished NASA alumni; Part 2 contains a larger set of lessons, called the Selected Lessons Learned, which have been chosen from the lessons database and center workshop reports on the basis of their specific significance and relevance to the near

  13. Randomised controlled trial of Alexander technique lessons, exercise, and massage (ATEAM) for chronic and recurrent back pain

    PubMed Central

    Lewith, George; Webley, Fran; Evans, Maggie; Beattie, Angela; Middleton, Karen; Barnett, Jane; Ballard, Kathleen; Oxford, Frances; Smith, Peter; Yardley, Lucy; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Sharp, Debbie

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of lessons in the Alexander technique, massage therapy, and advice from a doctor to take exercise (exercise prescription) along with nurse delivered behavioural counselling for patients with chronic or recurrent back pain. Design Factorial randomised trial. Setting 64 general practices in England. Participants 579 patients with chronic or recurrent low back pain; 144 were randomised to normal care, 147 to massage, 144 to six Alexander technique lessons, and 144 to 24 Alexander technique lessons; half of each of these groups were randomised to exercise prescription. Interventions Normal care (control), six sessions of massage, six or 24 lessons on the Alexander technique, and prescription for exercise from a doctor with nurse delivered behavioural counselling. Main outcome measures Roland Morris disability score (number of activities impaired by pain) and number of days in pain. Results Exercise and lessons in the Alexander technique, but not massage, remained effective at one year (compared with control Roland disability score 8.1: massage -0.58, 95% confidence interval -1.94 to 0.77, six lessons -1.40, -2.77 to -0.03, 24 lessons -3.4, -4.76 to -2.03, and exercise -1.29, -2.25 to -0.34). Exercise after six lessons achieved 72% of the effect of 24 lessons alone (Roland disability score -2.98 and -4.14, respectively). Number of days with back pain in the past four weeks was lower after lessons (compared with control median 21 days: 24 lessons -18, six lessons -10, massage -7) and quality of life improved significantly. No significant harms were reported. Conclusions One to one lessons in the Alexander technique from registered teachers have long term benefits for patients with chronic back pain. Six lessons followed by exercise prescription were nearly as effective as 24 lessons. Trial registration National Research Register N0028108728. PMID:18713809

  14. Lessons learned in over 100 zebra mussel control applications at industrial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    McGough, C.M.; Gilland, P.H.; Muia, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    Since their introduction into US waterways, Zebra Mussels (Dreissena polymorphae) have spread rapidly throughout the Great Lakes and Mississippi regions. These mussels have continued to colonize the intake pipes of industrial water supplies and water distribution systems throughout the affected areas. Their colonization has compromised plant safety and production efficiency, and steadily increased costs to water users. The design of each industrial plant water distribution system is unique. A comprehensive zebra mussel control strategy using the best available options must be considered in each specific situation. This paper discusses the successful use of one strategy (a quaternary ammonia-based molluscicide) in the battle against zebra mussels. The commercial life cycle of an industrial molluscicide began with initial toxicity screening in the laboratory. The evaluation continued at plant sites through field trials and applications. Lessons learned from these experiences helped direct the efforts toward the development of a second generation program.

  15. Emergency preparedness and public health systems lessons for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Margaret E

    2008-06-01

    Low- and middle-income countries, where emerging diseases often make their debut, are also likely to bear the harshest consequences of a potential influenza pandemic. Yet public health systems in developing countries are underfunded, understaffed, and in many cases struggling to deal with the existing burden of disease. As a result, developed countries are beginning to expand assistance for emergency preparedness to the developing world. Given developing countries' weak infrastructure and many competing public health priorities, it is not clear how to best direct these resources. Evidence from the U.S. and other developed countries suggests that some investments in bioterror and pandemic emergency preparedness, although initially implemented as vertical programs, have the potential to strengthen the general public health infrastructure. This experience may hold some lessons for how global funds for emergency preparedness could be invested in developing countries to support struggling public health systems in responding to current health priorities as well as potential future public health threats.

  16. Satellite-instrument system engineering best practices and lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueler, Carl F.

    2009-08-01

    This paper focuses on system engineering development issues driving satellite remote sensing instrumentation cost and schedule. A key best practice is early assessment of mission and instrumentation requirements priorities driving performance trades among major instrumentation measurements: Radiometry, spatial field of view and image quality, and spectral performance. Key lessons include attention to technology availability and applicability to prioritized requirements, care in applying heritage, approaching fixed-price and cost-plus contracts with appropriate attention to risk, and assessing design options with attention to customer preference as well as design performance, and development cost and schedule. A key element of success either in contract competition or execution is team experience. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of success, however, is thorough requirements analysis and flowdown to specifications driving design performance with sufficient parameter margin to allow for mistakes or oversights - the province of system engineering from design inception to development, test and delivery.

  17. Family planning and sexual health organizations: management lessons for health system reform.

    PubMed

    Ambegaokar, Maia; Lush, Louisiana

    2004-10-01

    Advocates of health system reform are calling for, among other things, decentralized, autonomous managerial and financial control, use of contracting and incentives, and a greater reliance on market mechanisms in the delivery of health services. The family planning and sexual health (FP&SH) sector already has experience of these. In this paper, we set forth three typical means of service provision within the FP&SH sector since the mid-1900s: independent not-for-profit providers, vertical government programmes and social marketing programmes. In each case, we present the context within which the service delivery mechanism evolved, the management techniques that characterize it and the lessons learned in FP&SH that are applicable to the wider debate about improving health sector management. We conclude that the FP&SH sector can provide both positive and negative lessons in the areas of autonomous management, use of incentives to providers and acceptors, balancing of centralization against decentralization, and employing private sector marketing and distribution techniques for delivering health services. This experience has not been adequately acknowledged in the debates about how to improve the quality and quantity of health services for the poor in developing countries. Health sector reform advocates and FP&SH advocates should collaborate within countries and regions to apply these management lessons. Copyright 2004 Oxford University Press

  18. The Effects of Program Control, Learner Control, and Learner Control with Advisement Lesson Control Strategies on Anxiety and Learning from Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coorough, Randall P.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three computer-assisted instruction (CAI) locus of instructional control strategies--learner control, learner control with advisement, and program control--on posttest performance and anxiety. The instructional content was a lesson addressing the effects of alcohol on the body. To examine the…

  19. Prototyping with Application Generators: Lessons Learned from the Naval Aviation Logistics Command Management Information System Case

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    Prototyping with Application Generators: Lessons Learned from the Naval Aviation Logistics Command Management Information System Case. This study... management information system to automate manual Naval aviation maintenance tasks-NALCOMIS. With the use of a fourth-generation programming language

  20. Clinical trials in systemic sclerosis: lessons learned and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Steen, Virginia D; Furst, Daniel E; Seibold, James R

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is complex and largely unclear. The clinical heterogeneity of the disease and its progression over a number of years makes the choice of endpoints in the design of clinical trials difficult. The overwhelming need in this disease is to diagnose it early and identify those patients who will benefit most from early, aggressive treatment that potentially can alter the clinical disease course. To achieve this, innumerable challenges must be overcome. This article reviews data from recent clinical trials and the lessons derived from retrospective observational studies, databases, and patient registries. Taken together, these observations will help to improve our understanding of the diverse clinical course of SSc and permit refinement of existing outcome measures for the design of future clinical trials, in which the likelihood of observing a positive treatment effect with the drugs at our disposal will be maximized. PMID:17767745

  1. Lessons not to make light of (when designing optical systems for space)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Stephen E.

    2015-09-01

    There is a range of lessons learned when taking an optical system from design through deployment in space. I will summarize some key lessons and observations related to both airborne and spaceborne optical systems with an emphasis on light weighted optics and space telescopes. Areas discussed encompass 1) the initial architecture and system trades as constrained by system error budgets, 2) manufacturing considerations, 3) testing implications, and 4) real and perceived cost impacts.

  2. “Why Didn’t it Work?” Lessons From a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-based Personally Controlled Health Management System for Adults with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Arguel, Amaël; Dennis, Sarah; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Coiera, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Background Personally controlled health management systems (PCHMS), which may include a personal health record (PHR), health management tools, and information resources, have been advocated as a next-generation technology to improve health behaviors and outcomes. There have been successful trials of PCHMS in various health settings. However, there is mixed evidence for whether consumers will use these systems over the long term and whether they ultimately lead to improved health outcomes and behaviors. Objective The aim was to test whether use of a PCHMS by consumers can increase the uptake or updating of a written asthma action plan (AAP) among adults with asthma. Methods A 12-month parallel 2-group randomized controlled trial was conducted. Participants living with asthma were recruited nationally in Australia between April and August 2013, and randomized 1:1 to either the PCHMS group or control group (online static educational content). The primary outcome measure was possession of an up-to-date written AAP poststudy. Secondary measures included (1) utilizing the AAP; (2) planned or unplanned visits to a health care professional for asthma-related concerns; (3) severe asthma exacerbation, inadequately controlled asthma, or worsening of asthma that required a change in treatment; and (4) number of days lost from work or study due to asthma. Ancillary analyses examined reasons for adoption or nonadoption of the intervention. Outcome measures were collected by online questionnaire prestudy, monthly, and poststudy. Results A total of 330 eligible participants were randomized into 1 of 2 arms (intervention: n=154; control: n=176). Access to the PCHMS was not associated with a significant difference in any of the primary or secondary outcomes. Most participants (80.5%, 124/154) did not access the intervention or accessed it only once. Conclusions Despite the intervention being effective in other preventive care settings, system use was negligible and outcome changes

  3. Lessons Learned and Technical Standards: A Logical Marriage for Future Space Systems Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Paul S.; Garcia, Danny; Vaughan, William W.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database of engineering lessons learned that corresponds with relevant technical standards will be a valuable asset to those engaged in studies on future space vehicle developments, especially for structures, materials, propulsion, control, operations and associated elements. In addition, this will enable the capturing of technology developments applicable to the design, development, and operation of future space vehicles as planned in the Space Launch Initiative. Using the time-honored tradition of passing on lessons learned while utilizing the newest information technology, NASA has launched an intensive effort to link lessons learned acquired through various Internet databases with applicable technical standards. This paper will discuss the importance of lessons learned, the difficulty in finding relevant lessons learned while engaged in a space vehicle development, and the new NASA effort to relate them to technical standards that can help alleviate this difficulty.

  4. Synthetic vision system flight test results and lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radke, Jeffrey

    1993-01-01

    Honeywell Systems and Research Center developed and demonstrated an active 35 GHz Radar Imaging system as part of the FAA/USAF/Industry sponsored Synthetic Vision System Technology Demonstration (SVSTD) Program. The objectives of this presentation are to provide a general overview of flight test results, a system level perspective that encompasses the efforts of the SVSTD and Augmented VIsual Display (AVID) programs, and more importantly, provide the AVID workshop participants with Honeywell's perspective on the lessons that were learned from the SVS flight tests. One objective of the SVSTD program was to explore several known system issues concerning radar imaging technology. The program ultimately resolved some of these issues, left others open, and in fact created several new concerns. In some instances, the interested community has drawn improper conclusions from the program by globally attributing implementation specific issues to radar imaging technology in general. The motivation for this presentation is therefore to provide AVID researchers with a better understanding of the issues that truly remain open, and to identify the perceived issues that are either resolved or were specific to Honeywell's implementation.

  5. Global change, parasite transmission and disease control: lessons from ecology

    PubMed Central

    Boag, Brian; Ellison, Amy R.; Morgan, Eric R.; Murray, Kris; Pascoe, Emily L.; Sait, Steven M.; Booth, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Parasitic infections are ubiquitous in wildlife, livestock and human populations, and healthy ecosystems are often parasite rich. Yet, their negative impacts can be extreme. Understanding how both anticipated and cryptic changes in a system might affect parasite transmission at an individual, local and global level is critical for sustainable control in humans and livestock. Here we highlight and synthesize evidence regarding potential effects of ‘system changes’ (both climatic and anthropogenic) on parasite transmission from wild host–parasite systems. Such information could inform more efficient and sustainable parasite control programmes in domestic animals or humans. Many examples from diverse terrestrial and aquatic natural systems show how abiotic and biotic factors affected by system changes can interact additively, multiplicatively or antagonistically to influence parasite transmission, including through altered habitat structure, biodiversity, host demographics and evolution. Despite this, few studies of managed systems explicitly consider these higher-order interactions, or the subsequent effects of parasite evolution, which can conceal or exaggerate measured impacts of control actions. We call for a more integrated approach to investigating transmission dynamics, which recognizes these complexities and makes use of new technologies for data capture and monitoring, and to support robust predictions of altered parasite dynamics in a rapidly changing world. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Opening the black box: re-examining the ecology and evolution of parasite transmission’. PMID:28289256

  6. Development of Constellation's Launch Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lougheed, Kirk D.; Peaden, Cary J.

    2010-01-01

    The paper focuses on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Constellation Program's Launch Control System (LCS) development effort at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). It provides a brief history of some preceding efforts to provide launch control and ground processing systems for other NASA programs, and some lessons learned from those experiences. It then provides high level descriptions of the LCS mission, objectives, organization, architecture, and progress. It discusses some of our development tenets, including our use of standards based design and use of off-the-shelf products whenever possible, incremental development cycles, and highly reliable, available, and supportable enterprise class system servers. It concludes with some new lessons learned and our plans for the future.

  7. Cost Estimation and Control for Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Vanhook, Michael E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Good program management practices, cost analysis, cost estimation, and cost control for aerospace flight systems are interrelated and depend upon each other. The best cost control process cannot overcome poor design or poor systems trades that lead to the wrong approach. The project needs robust Technical, Schedule, Cost, Risk, and Cost Risk practices before it can incorporate adequate Cost Control. Cost analysis both precedes and follows cost estimation -- the two are closely coupled with each other and with Risk analysis. Parametric cost estimating relationships and computerized models are most often used. NASA has learned some valuable lessons in controlling cost problems, and recommends use of a summary Project Manager's checklist as shown here.

  8. Cost Estimation and Control for Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Walter E.; Vanhook, Michael E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Good program management practices, cost analysis, cost estimation, and cost control for aerospace flight systems are interrelated and depend upon each other. The best cost control process cannot overcome poor design or poor systems trades that lead to the wrong approach. The project needs robust Technical, Schedule, Cost, Risk, and Cost Risk practices before it can incorporate adequate Cost Control. Cost analysis both precedes and follows cost estimation -- the two are closely coupled with each other and with Risk analysis. Parametric cost estimating relationships and computerized models are most often used. NASA has learned some valuable lessons in controlling cost problems, and recommends use of a summary Project Manager's checklist as shown here.

  9. Gain control in molecular information processing: lessons from neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemenman, Ilya

    2012-04-01

    Statistical properties of environments experienced by biological signaling systems in the real world change, which necessitates adaptive responses to achieve high fidelity information transmission. One form of such adaptive response is gain control. Here, we argue that a certain simple mechanism of gain control, understood well in the context of systems neuroscience, also works for molecular signaling. The mechanism allows us to transmit more than 1 bit (on or off) of information about the signal independent of the signal variance. It does not require additional molecular circuitry beyond that already present in many molecular systems, and in particular, it does not depend on existence of feedback loops. The mechanism provides a potential explanation for abundance of ultrasensitive response curves in biological regulatory networks.

  10. Lessons from Archimedes, a system for planning and executing mechanical assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Strip, D.

    1992-04-01

    Archimedes is a prototype mechanical assembly system which generates and executes robot assembly programs from a CAD model input. The system seeks to increase flexibility in robotic mechanical assembly applications by automating the programming task. Input is a solid model of the finished assembly, augmented by additional design information such as weld specifications. Parts relationships and geometric constraints are deduced from the solid model. A rule-based planner generates a ``generic`` assembly plan that satisfies the geometric constraints, as well as other constraints embodied in the rules. A plan compiler then converts the generic plan into code specific to an application environment. Other outputs include fixture designs, workcell layout information, object-recognition (vision) routines, grasp plans, and executable code for controlling the robot and workcell accessories. Lessons from operating and demonstrating the system are presented, with a particular emphasis on the implications for future systems. 12 refs.

  11. Lessons from Archimedes, a system for planning and executing mechanical assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Strip, D.

    1992-01-01

    Archimedes is a prototype mechanical assembly system which generates and executes robot assembly programs from a CAD model input. The system seeks to increase flexibility in robotic mechanical assembly applications by automating the programming task. Input is a solid model of the finished assembly, augmented by additional design information such as weld specifications. Parts relationships and geometric constraints are deduced from the solid model. A rule-based planner generates a generic'' assembly plan that satisfies the geometric constraints, as well as other constraints embodied in the rules. A plan compiler then converts the generic plan into code specific to an application environment. Other outputs include fixture designs, workcell layout information, object-recognition (vision) routines, grasp plans, and executable code for controlling the robot and workcell accessories. Lessons from operating and demonstrating the system are presented, with a particular emphasis on the implications for future systems. 12 refs.

  12. Lessons learned from China's healthcare system and nursing profession.

    PubMed

    Ungos, Kristin; Thomas, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    To examine the healthcare policy and the nursing profession in China and to share insights learned from that country, which can be used to inform health-policy decision makers in the US. Despite their significant cultural, political, and historical differences, many healthcare issues are the same for China and the US. Both countries face rising healthcare costs and widening disparities between wealthy and poor individuals, and between urban and rural sectors. Some of the ideas that can be gleaned from China's healthcare system include rewarding physicians for prescribing preventive services; using trained laypeople as gatekeepers to the healthcare system in rural areas; communicating to the public and to health-policy decision makers the importance of nurses so that staffing, work conditions, and professional status can be improved; and including nurses in health-policy decisions. Lessons learned from China's healthcare policy and healthcare system have implications for public health policy change that could lead to improved patient outcomes in the US. The current changing global health environment calls for healthcare providers to learn from and work with our international neighbors to improve health outcomes for all patients.

  13. Capturing flight system test engineering expertise: Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, Irene Wong

    1991-01-01

    Within a few years, JPL will be challenged by the most active mission set in history. Concurrently, flight systems are increasingly more complex. Presently, the knowledge to conduct integration and test of spacecraft and large instruments is held by a few key people, each with many years of experience. JPL is in danger of losing a significant amount of this critical expertise, through retirement, during a period when demand for this expertise is rapidly increasing. The most critical issue at hand is to collect and retain this expertise and develop tools that would ensure the ability to successfully perform the integration and test of future spacecraft and large instruments. The proposed solution was to capture and codity a subset of existing knowledge, and to utilize this captured expertise in knowledge-based systems. First year results and activities planned for the second year of this on-going effort are described. Topics discussed include lessons learned in knowledge acquisition and elicitation techniques, life-cycle paradigms, and rapid prototyping of a knowledge-based advisor (Spacecraft Test Assistant) and a hypermedia browser (Test Engineering Browser). The prototype Spacecraft Test Assistant supports a subset of integration and test activities for flight systems. Browser is a hypermedia tool that allows users easy perusal of spacecraft test topics. A knowledge acquisition tool called ConceptFinder which was developed to search through large volumes of data for related concepts is also described and is modified to semi-automate the process of creating hypertext links.

  14. Individual variation and population dynamics: lessons from a simple system.

    PubMed

    Benton, T G

    2012-01-19

    The mapping of environment, through variation in individuals' life histories, to dynamics can be complex and often poorly known. Consequently, it is not clear how important it is dynamically. To explore this, I incorporated lessons from an empirical system, a soil mite, into an individual-based model. Individuals compete for resource and allocate this according to eight 'genetic' rules that specify investment in growth or reserves (which influences survival or fecundity), size at maturation and reproductive allocation. Density dependence, therefore, emerges from competition for food, limiting individual's growth and fecundity. We use this model to examine the role that genetic and phenotypically plastic variation plays in dynamics, by fixing phenotypes, by allowing phenotypes to vary plastically and by creating genetic variation between individuals. Variation, and how it arises, influences short- and long-run dynamics in a way comparable in magnitude with halving food supply. In particular, by switching variation on and off, it is possible to identify a range of processes necessary to capture the dynamics of the 'full model'. Exercises like this can help identify key processes and parameters, but a concerted effort is needed across many different systems to search for shared understanding of both process and modelling.

  15. Several CASE Lessons Can Improve Students' Control of Variables Reasoning Scheme Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babai, Reuven; Levit-Dori, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    This study addressed one aspect of scientific reasoning, the control of variables reasoning scheme. We explored whether a short intervention aimed at accelerating this reasoning scheme by CASE lessons would improve students' ability to apply this scheme in problems related to the biology curriculum. About 120 students from grade nine were assessed…

  16. Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

    2012-01-17

    The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

  17. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains papers on analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: modeling and control of electric power systems, dynamic state estimation techniques, optimal power flow algorithms, and neural networks in power systems.

  18. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This volume covers topics pertaining to analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: computer relaying in power systems, power system generation expansion, expert systems for power systems, and power flow algorithms.

  19. Evaluating Policy, Systems, and Environmental Change Interventions: Lessons Learned From CDC's Prevention Research Centers.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Sally; Leeman, Jennifer; McCarthy, William J; Bastani, Roshan; Carter-Edwards, Lori; Clark, Heather; Garney, Whitney; Gustat, Jeanette; Hites, Lisle; Nothwehr, Faryle; Kegler, Michelle

    2015-10-15

    The field of public health is increasingly implementing initiatives intended to make policies, systems, and environments (PSEs) more supportive of healthy behaviors, even though the evidence for many of these strategies is only emerging. Our objective was 3-fold: 1) to describe evaluations of PSE-change programs in which the evaluators followed the steps of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health, 2) to share the resulting lessons learned, and 3) to assist future evaluators of PSE-change programs with their evaluation design decisions. Seven Prevention Research Centers (PRCs) applied CDC's framework to evaluate their own PSE-change initiatives. The PRCs followed each step of the framework: 1) engage stakeholders, 2) describe program, 3) focus evaluation design, 4) gather credible evidence, 5) justify conclusions, and 6) ensure use and share lessons learned. Evaluation stakeholders represented a range of sectors, including public health departments, partner organizations, and community members. Public health departments were the primary stakeholders for 4 of the 7 evaluations. Four PRCs used logic models to describe the initiatives being evaluated. Their evaluations typically included both process and outcome questions and used mixed methods. Evaluation findings most commonly focused on contextual factors influencing change (process) and the adoption or implementation of PSE-change strategies (outcome). Evaluators shared lessons learned through various channels to reach local stakeholders and broader public health audiences. Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health is applicable to evaluations of PSE-change initiatives. Using this framework to guide such evaluations builds practice-based evidence for strategies that are increasingly being used to promote healthful behaviors.

  20. Evaluating Policy, Systems, and Environmental Change Interventions: Lessons Learned From CDC’s Prevention Research Centers

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Jennifer; McCarthy, William J.; Bastani, Roshan; Carter-Edwards, Lori; Clark, Heather; Garney, Whitney; Gustat, Jeanette; Hites, Lisle; Nothwehr, Faryle; Kegler, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The field of public health is increasingly implementing initiatives intended to make policies, systems, and environments (PSEs) more supportive of healthy behaviors, even though the evidence for many of these strategies is only emerging. Our objective was 3-fold: 1) to describe evaluations of PSE-change programs in which the evaluators followed the steps of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health, 2) to share the resulting lessons learned, and 3) to assist future evaluators of PSE-change programs with their evaluation design decisions. Methods Seven Prevention Research Centers (PRCs) applied CDC’s framework to evaluate their own PSE-change initiatives. The PRCs followed each step of the framework: 1) engage stakeholders, 2) describe program, 3) focus evaluation design, 4) gather credible evidence, 5) justify conclusions, and 6) ensure use and share lessons learned. Results Evaluation stakeholders represented a range of sectors, including public health departments, partner organizations, and community members. Public health departments were the primary stakeholders for 4 of the 7 evaluations. Four PRCs used logic models to describe the initiatives being evaluated. Their evaluations typically included both process and outcome questions and used mixed methods. Evaluation findings most commonly focused on contextual factors influencing change (process) and the adoption or implementation of PSE-change strategies (outcome). Evaluators shared lessons learned through various channels to reach local stakeholders and broader public health audiences. Conclusion Framework for Program Evaluation in Public Health is applicable to evaluations of PSE-change initiatives. Using this framework to guide such evaluations builds practice-based evidence for strategies that are increasingly being used to promote healthful behaviors. PMID:26469947

  1. Association between swimming lessons and drowning in childhood: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Ruth A; Taneja, Gitanjali Saluja; Haynie, Denise L; Trumble, Ann C; Qian, Cong; Klinger, Ron M; Klebanoff, Mark A

    2009-03-01

    To estimate the association between swimming lessons and the risk of drowning among children aged 1 to 19 years. Case-control study. Cases were identified from medical examiners'/coroners' offices between mid-2003 and mid-2005. Jurisdictions included the states of Maryland and North Carolina, 14 districts (33 counties) in Florida, 3 counties in California, 1 county in Texas, and 1 county in New York. Cases were children and adolescents aged 1 to 19 years who died of unintentional drowning. Interviews were conducted with 88 families of children who drowned and 213 matched controls. Main Exposure Swimming lessons. Main Outcome Measure Death due to unintentional drowning. Drownings that were intentional, of undetermined intent, or that occurred under conditions in which swimming ability was unlikely to impact risk (eg, in ice water or bathtubs) were excluded. Of the 61 cases in the 1- to 4-year age group, 2 (3%) had participated in formal swimming lessons vs 35 of 134 matched controls (26%) (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01-0.97). Among the 27 cases aged 5 to 19 years, 7 (27%) had ever taken formal swimming lessons vs 42 of 79 matched controls (53%) (adjusted OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.09-1.51). In adjusted analyses, there was no statistically significant association between informal instruction and drowning risk. Participation in formal swimming lessons was associated with an 88% reduction in the risk of drowning in the 1- to 4-year-old children, although our estimates were imprecise and 95% CIs included risk reductions ranging from 3% to 99%.

  2. Physically Active Math and Language Lessons Improve Academic Achievement: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Mullender-Wijnsma, Marijke J; Hartman, Esther; de Greeff, Johannes W; Doolaard, Simone; Bosker, Roel J; Visscher, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Using physical activity in the teaching of academic lessons is a new way of learning. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an innovative physically active academic intervention ("Fit & Vaardig op School" [F&V]) on academic achievement of children. Using physical activity to teach math and spelling lessons was studied in a cluster-randomized controlled trial. Participants were 499 children (mean age 8.1 years) from second- and third-grade classes of 12 elementary schools. At each school, a second- and third-grade class were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention group participated in F&V lessons for 2 years, 22 weeks per year, 3 times a week. The control group participated in regular classroom lessons. Children's academic achievement was measured before the intervention started and after the first and second intervention years. Academic achievement was measured by 2 mathematics tests (speed and general math skills) and 2 language tests (reading and spelling). After 2 years, multilevel analysis showed that children in the intervention group had significantly greater gains in mathematics speed test (P < .001; effect size [ES] 0.51), general mathematics (P < .001; ES 0.42), and spelling (P < .001; ES 0.45) scores. This equates to 4 months more learning gains in comparison with the control group. No differences were found on the reading test. Physically active academic lessons significantly improved mathematics and spelling performance of elementary school children and are therefore a promising new way of teaching. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Precision digital control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskub, V. G.; Rozov, B. S.; Savelev, V. I.

    This book is concerned with the characteristics of digital control systems of great accuracy. A classification of such systems is considered along with aspects of stabilization, programmable control applications, digital tracking systems and servomechanisms, and precision systems for the control of a scanning laser beam. Other topics explored are related to systems of proportional control, linear devices and methods for increasing precision, approaches for further decreasing the response time in the case of high-speed operation, possibilities for the implementation of a logical control law, and methods for the study of precision digital control systems. A description is presented of precision automatic control systems which make use of electronic computers, taking into account the existing possibilities for an employment of computers in automatic control systems, approaches and studies required for including a computer in such control systems, and an analysis of the structure of automatic control systems with computers. Attention is also given to functional blocks in the considered systems.

  4. FD-CHIRP: hosted payload system engineering lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueler, Carl F.

    2012-10-01

    The Commercially Hosted Infrared Payload (CHIRP) Flight Demonstration (FD-CHIRP) launched 21 Sept 2011 was designated a "resounding success" as the first Wide Field-of-View (WFOV) staring infrared (IR) sensor flown in geostationary earth orbit (GEO) with a primary mission of Missile Warning (MW). FD-CHIRP was an Air Force research and development project initiated in July 2008 via an unsolicited industry proposal aimed to mature and reduce the risk of WFOV sensors and ground processing technologies. Unlike the Defense Support Program (DSP) and the Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) which were acquired via traditional integrated sensor and satellite design, FDCHIRP was developed using the "commercially hosted" approach. The FD-CHIRP host spacecraft and sensor were independently designed, creating significant development risk to the industry proposer, especially under a Firm Fixed Price contract. Yet, within 39 months of contract initiation, FD-CHIRP was launched and successfully operated in GEO to 30 June 2012 at a total cost of 111M including the 82.9M CHIRP commercial-hosting contract and a $28M sensor upgrade. The commercial-hosting contract included sensor and spacecraft modifications, integration and test, design and development of secure Mission Operations and Analysis Centers, launch, and nearly a year of GEO operations with 70 Mbps secure data acquisition. The Air Force extended the contract for six months to continue operations through the end of calendar 2012. This paper outlines system engineering challenges FD-CHIRP overcame and key lessons to smooth development of future commercially hosted missions.

  5. OPTIMUM SYSTEMS CONTROL,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Variational calculus and continuous optimal control, (4) The maximum principle and Hamilton Jacobi theory, (5) Optimum systems control examples, (6...Discrete variational calculus and the discrete maximum principle, (7) Optimum control of distributed parameter systems, (8) Optimum state estimation in

  6. Health security and disease control: lessons from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Frenk, Julio; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio

    2011-12-30

    This paper discusses the controversy between top-down, disease-focused, vertical programs, on the one hand, and activities that have been horizontally integrated into health services, on the other, using as a reference the public health initiatives developed in Mexico in the context of a recent comprehensive health care reform. The main message is that it is possible to achieve a synthesis between vertical and horizontal strategies, and also between public health and personal health care programs. Public health and personal care are the two sides of the health system coin, and both are central to a comprehensive concept of health security. Investments in epidemiological surveillance and response clearly contribute to the control of threats facing nation-states, such as pandemics and biological warfare. At the same time, investments in the protection of individuals from threats that endanger their health would also make our world a safer place.

  7. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G [Tijeras, NM; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  8. Wildlife parasites: lessons for parasite control in livestock.

    PubMed

    Malan, F S; Horak, I G; de Vos, V; van Wyk, J A

    1997-07-31

    For sustainable livestock production it is suggested that the parasitologist take a leaf out of Nature's book in the search for solutions to the mounting problems concerning parasite control. While the farmer has come to regard all parasites affecting livestock as entirely without benefit, indigenous parasites and diseases are normal and play an essential role as interacting components of a natural environment in an ecosystem such as the 19,000 km2-sized Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa. The parasites help to select their hosts for fitness and are assisted by predators and intra-species territorial aggression which continually eliminate the weak individuals from the system. It is essential to guard against the introduction of foreign parasites or infectious agents which have no real ecological niche or role in an established ecosystem, however, as they cause untoward interactions, sometimes of a violent nature. The policy must be to block off or, failing that, to control or eliminate these foreign parasites and diseases as far as possible. Often, when Man intervenes in an ecosystem, it leads to stress, overcrowding and stagnation and predisposes to disease and death. Intensification of the system, as in farming units, denies Nature the chance to manage on its own, because of clashing interests with Man. Frank parasitism and disease should almost invariably be seen as indicators of an imbalance in the ecosystem and should be rectified. Chemicals and vaccines should be used to produce sufficient food for all, but without exploiting Nature, or else Nature will be unable to continue catering for Man's needs.

  9. Space Stirling Cryocooler Contamination Lessons Learned and Recommended Control Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaister, D. S.; Price, K.; Gully, W.; Castles, S.; Reilly, J.

    The most important characteristic of a space cryocooler is its reliability over a lifetime typically in excess of 7 years. While design improvements have reduced the probability of mechanical failure, the risk of internal contamination is still significant and has not been addressed in a consistent approach across the industry. A significant fraction of the endurance test and flight units have experienced some performance degradation related to internal contamination. The purpose of this paper is to describe and assess the contamination issues inside long life, space cryocoolers and to recommend procedures to minimize the probability of encountering contamination related failures and degradation. The paper covers the sources of contamination, the degradation and failure mechanisms, the theoretical and observed cryocooler sensitivity, and the recommended prevention procedures and their impact. We begin with a discussion of the contamination sources, both artificial and intrinsic. Next, the degradation and failure mechanisms are discussed in an attempt to arrive at a contaminant susceptibility, from which we can derive a contamination budget for the machine. This theoretical sensitivity is then compared with the observed sensitivity to illustrate the conservative nature of the assumed scenarios. A number of lessons learned on Raytheon, Ball, Air Force Research Laboratory, and NASA GSFC programs are shared to convey the practical aspects of the contamination problem. Then, the materials and processes required to meet the proposed budget are outlined. An attempt is made to present a survey of processes across industry.

  10. Military Trauma System in Afghanistan: Lessons for Civil Systems?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    of special interest && of outstanding interest 1. Bailey J, Spott MA, Costanzo G, et al. Joint trauma system: development, conceptual framework and...optimal elements [e manual]. US Department of Defense. US Army Institute for Surgical Research; 2012. 2. Eastridge BJ, Costanzo G, Jenkins D, et al

  11. Multivariable Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-01-01

    one). Examples abound of systems with numerous controlled variables, and the modern tendency is toward ever greater utilization of systems and plants of this kind. We call them multivariable control systems (MCS).

  12. MARGINS mini-lessons: A tour of the Mariana Subduction System (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodliffe, A. M.; Oakley, A.

    2009-12-01

    MARGINS mini-lessons provide an efficient way to quickly move cutting edge MARGINS research into the university classroom. Instructors who are not necessarily familiar with the MARGINS program can easily use mini-lessons in a variety of educational settings. The mini-lesson described herein is centered on bathymetric and multi-channel seismic data collected during a 2003 NSF-MARGINS funded marine geophysical survey in the Mariana Basin. Designed as an approximately sixty minute lecture segment, the lesson covers both the techniques used to collect marine geophysical data and a description of the geology of the system. All geological provinces are included, from the subducting Pacific Plate in the east to the remnant arc in the west. Representative seismic lines and bathymetric images are presented for each province, along with a description of key processes including deformation of the subducting plate, serpentinite mud volcanism, forearc faulting, potentially tsunamigenic landslides, arc volcanism, and backarc spreading. The Mariana subduction system mini-lesson requires a computer with an internet connection, powerpoint, Google Earth, and a web-browser. Questions are embedded in the powerpoint presentation that can be adapted to a specific interactive response system as needed. Optimally the lesson should be used in parallel with a GeoWall. A 3-dimensional ArcScene visualization of the Mariana system is available for download through the MARGINS mini-lessons web site. Such visualizations are particularly effective in helping students understand complex three-dimensional systems. If presented in a computer lab students will benefit from being able to explore the Mariana system using tools such as GeoMapApp.

  13. Learning from Successful Skills Development Systems: Lessons from Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the main institutional features of Australia's TVET sector, focussing particularly on the qualifications framework, how it relates to the labour market, and the role of industry. It also looks briefly at two current policy challenges for Australia. Seeking lessons for other countries in the Asia Pacific region, it discusses…

  14. Learning from Successful Skills Development Systems: Lessons from Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the main institutional features of Australia's TVET sector, focussing particularly on the qualifications framework, how it relates to the labour market, and the role of industry. It also looks briefly at two current policy challenges for Australia. Seeking lessons for other countries in the Asia Pacific region, it discusses…

  15. Lesson Learning at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  16. Lesson Learning at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  17. Wisdom Appliance Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrick; Jheng, Jyun-Teng; Tsai, Chen-Chai; Liou, Jia-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Jong, Gwo-Jia

    2017-07-01

    Intelligent appliances wisdom involves security, home care, convenient and energy saving, but the home automation system is still one of the core unit, and also using micro-processing electronics technology to centralized and control the home electrical products and systems, such as: lighting, television, fan, air conditioning, stereo, it composed of front-controller systems and back-controller panels, user using front-controller to control command, and then through the back-controller to powered the device.

  18. Lessons learned during testing of the Enhanced Position Location Reporting System (EPLRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Mark E.; Reska, Raymond S.

    EPLRS is a network of ultrahigh frequency radios managed by a control station. The small, lightweight radio sets can be carried on a soldier's back, mounted on a combat vehicle, or installed in aircraft. The control station providing network management functions is housed in a standard military S-280 shelter. The authors present some of the many lessons learned during the EPLRS testing.

  19. Implementation, monitoring and utilization of an integrated Hospital Information System--lessons from a case study.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Correia, Ricardo João

    2010-01-01

    In most hospitals several heterogeneous Information Systems (IS) store parts of a still scattered patient record. Virtual Patient Records (VPR) are systems that aggregate known data elements about the patient from different IS in real-time. This papers aims to present the main lessons learned from the implementation and the usage during 6 years of a VPR system. Ten major lessons were divided in recommendations for software developers, information managers and institutional policy makers. Implementing and using a VPR is a difficult journey but can generate great value for the institution if most of these recommendations are taken in consideration.

  20. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This volume covers topics related to analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: simulation of multimachine power system dynamics, computer simulation in electric distribution systems, transient stability assessment, dynamic stability analysis, and improved power system control techniques.

  1. Control System Damps Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopf, E. H., Jr.; Brown, T. K.; Marsh, E. L.

    1983-01-01

    New control system damps vibrations in rotating equipment with help of phase-locked-loop techniques. Vibrational modes are controlled by applying suitable currents to drive motor. Control signals are derived from sensors mounted on equipment.

  2. The cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum: Lessons in Biological Control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cactus moth was one of the success stories in classical biological control. In the 1920s, the prickly pear cactus was a serious pest in Australia. The cactus moth was imported from its native habitat in South America and proved so successful in controlling cactus that it was mass reared and exp...

  3. Lessons Learned from Experiments Conducted on Radar Data Management System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    Element Number I Project No. Task -- Work Unit Accession No. 11 Title (Include Security Classification) LESSONS LEARNED FROM EXPERIMENTS CONDUCTED ON...firmly established, an analysis of the experiment can be conducted. The experimental plan and report will be analyzed in Chapter III . 16 III . ANALYSIS...equipped with an ATS and when not, are expected. However, whether or not the ATS eliminates valid air targets remains to be seen. 23 iii 4) :4 I... U C

  4. Orbiter Water Dump Nozzles Redesign Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotter, Hank

    2017-01-01

    Hank Rotter, NASA Technical Fellow for Environmental Control and Life Support System, will provide the causes and lessons learned for the two Space Shuttle Orbiter water dump icicles that formed on the side of the Orbiter. He will present the root causes and the criticality of these icicles, along with the redesign of the water dump nozzles and lessons learned during the redesign phase.

  5. Corrective Action in Low Performing Schools: Lessons for NCLB Implementation from First-Generation Accountability Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintrop, Heinrich; Trujillo, Tina

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores what lessons we can learn from the experiences of states that instituted NCLB-like accountability systems prior to 2001 (here called first-generation accountability systems). We looked at the experiences of three smaller states (Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina), four larger ones (California, Florida, New York, Texas), and…

  6. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module V. Respiratory System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on the respiratory system is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Five units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system; (2) pathophysiology assessment of the patient; (3) pathophysiology and management of…

  7. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module VI. Cardiovascular System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on the cardiovascular system is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Seven units of study are presented: (1) the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system; (2) patient assessment for the cardiac patient; (3) pathophysiology; (4) reading…

  8. Dynamic Lesson Planning in EFL Reading Classes through a New e-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okada, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Yasunobu

    2015-01-01

    This paper illustrates how lesson plans, teaching styles and assessment can be dynamically adapted on a real-time basis during an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) reading classroom session by using a new e-learning system named iBELLEs (interactive Blended English Language Learning Enhancement system). iBELLEs plays a crucial role in filling…

  9. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager, far right, is pictured with panelists from the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned event in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the center, are Ernie Reyes, retired, former Apollo 1 senior operations manager; and John Tribe, retired, former Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. At far left is Zulie Cipo, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program event support team lead. The theme of the program was "To there and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  10. Control and dynamic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Leondes, C.T. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    This book covers analysis and control system techniques for electric power systems. Topics include: concurrent processing in power system analysis, power system protection, voltage collapse, reliability techniques in large electric power systems, optimization in hydroelectric systems, and linear programming methods for optimal energy plant operation.

  11. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, at left, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager, presents a certificate to John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer, during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the program was "To there and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  12. Lessons learned: design, start-up, and operation of cryogenic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, W. M.; Bagley, R. E.; Motew, S.; Young, P.-W.

    2014-11-01

    Cryogenic systems involving a pumped cryogenic fluid, such as liquid nitrogen (LN2), require careful design since the cryogen is close to its boiling point and cold. At 1 atmosphere, LN2 boils at 77.4 K (-320.4 F). These systems, typically, are designed to transport the cryogen, use it for process heat removal, or for generation of gas (GN2) for process use. As the design progresses, it is important to consider all aspects of the design including, cryogen storage, pressure control and safety relief systems, thermodynamic conditions, equipment and instrument selection, materials, insulation, cooldown, pump start-up, maximum design and minimum flow rates, two phase flow conditions, heat flow, process control to meet and maintain operating conditions, piping integrity, piping loads on served equipment, warm-up, venting, and shut-down. "Cutting corners" in the design process can result in stalled start-ups, field rework, schedule hits, or operational restrictions. Some of these "lessoned learned" are described in this paper.

  13. Remote Systems Experience at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory--A Summary of Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Noakes, Mark W; Burgess, Thomas W; Rowe, John C

    2011-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long history in the development of remote systems to support the nuclear environment. ORNL, working in conjunction with Central Research Laboratories, created what is believed to be the first microcomputer-based implementation of dual-arm master-slave remote manipulation. As part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program, ORNL developed the dual-arm advanced servomanipulator focusing on remote maintainability for systems exposed to high radiation fields. ORNL also participated in almost all of the various technical areas of the U.S. Department of Energy s Robotics Technology Development Program, while leading the Decontamination and Decommissioning and Tank Waste Retrieval categories. Over the course of this involvement, ORNL has developed a substantial base of working knowledge as to what works when and under what circumstances for many types of remote systems tasks as well as operator interface modes, control bandwidth, and sensing requirements to name a few. By using a select list of manipulator systems that is not meant to be exhaustive, this paper will discuss history and outcome of development, field-testing, deployment, and operations from a lessons learned perspective. The final outcome is a summary paper outlining ORNL experiences and guidelines for transition of developmental remote systems to real-world hazardous environments.

  14. Intelligent flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of flight control systems can be enhanced by designing them to emulate functions of natural intelligence. Intelligent control functions fall in three categories. Declarative actions involve decision-making, providing models for system monitoring, goal planning, and system/scenario identification. Procedural actions concern skilled behavior and have parallels in guidance, navigation, and adaptation. Reflexive actions are spontaneous, inner-loop responses for control and estimation. Intelligent flight control systems learn knowledge of the aircraft and its mission and adapt to changes in the flight environment. Cognitive models form an efficient basis for integrating 'outer-loop/inner-loop' control functions and for developing robust parallel-processing algorithms.

  15. [Global polio eradication program: fundamental lessons for the control of infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Miyamura, Tatsuo

    2009-12-01

    Because of its unapparent infection and viral diversity, poliomyelitis is difficult infectious diseases to control globally. Nevertheless, effective vaccinations, global surveillance network, development of accurate viral diagnosis prompted the historical challenge, global polio eradication initiative (GPEI). Wild polio viruses are now confined in four countries, Nigeria, India, Pakistan and Afghanistan. However, at the very end stage of this program, it has been stagnated because of various reasons. From this, we can learn good lessons to control other infectious diseases including measles, influenza and etc. To share the passion to eradicate miserable infectious disease, poliomyelitis is the key.

  16. Boiler control systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.

    2005-07-01

    The book provides in-depth coverage on how to safely and reliably control the firing of a boiler. Regardless of the capacity or fuel, certain fundamental control systems are required for boiler control. Large utility systems are more complex due to the number of burners and the overall capacity and equipment. This book covers engineering details on control systems and provides specific examples of boiler control including configuration and tuning. References to requirements are based on the 2004 NFPA 85 along with other ISA standards. Detailed chapters cover: Boiler fundamentals including piping and instrument diagrams (P&IDs) and a design basis checklist; Control of boilers, from strategies and bumpless transfer to interlock circuitry and final control elements; Furnace draft; Feedwater; Coal-fired boilers; Fuel and air control; Steam temperature; Burner management systems; Environment; and Control valve sizing. 2 apps.

  17. Digital Optical Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, David H.; Tipton, Charles A.; Christmann, Charles E.; Hochhausler, Nils P.

    1988-09-01

    We describe the digital optical control system (DOGS), a state-of-the-art controller for electrical feedback in an optical system. The need for a versatile optical controller arose from a number of unique experiments being performed by the Air Force Weapons Laboratory. These experiments use similar detectors and actuator-controlled mirrors, but the control requirements vary greatly. The experiments have in common a requirement for parallel control systems. The DOGS satisfies these needs by allowing several control systems to occupy a single chassis with one master controller. The architecture was designed to allow upward compatibility with future configurations. Combinations of off-the-shelf and custom boards are configured to meet the requirements of each experiment. The configuration described here was used to control piston error to X/80 at a wavelength of 0.51 Am. A peak sample rate of 8 kHz, yielding a closed loop bandwidth of 800 Hz, was achieved.

  18. Intermittent Control Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Thomas L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The technique of intermittent control systems for air quality control as developed and used by the Tennessee Valley Authority is investigated. Although controversial, all Tennessee Valley Authority sulfur dioxide elimination programs are scheduled to be operational this year. Existing or anticipated intermittent control systems are identified. (BT)

  19. Intermittent Control Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Thomas L.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    The technique of intermittent control systems for air quality control as developed and used by the Tennessee Valley Authority is investigated. Although controversial, all Tennessee Valley Authority sulfur dioxide elimination programs are scheduled to be operational this year. Existing or anticipated intermittent control systems are identified. (BT)

  20. Ergatic dynamic control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlov, V. V. (Editor); Drozdova, T. I. (Editor); Antomonov, Y. G. (Editor); Golego, V. N. (Editor); Ivakhnenko, A. G. (Editor); Meleshev, A. M. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Synthesis and analysis of systems containing a man in their control circuits are considered. The concepts of ergonomics and ergatic systems are defined, and tasks and problems of ergonomics are outlined. The synthesis of the structure of an astronautic ergatic organism is presented, as well as the synthesis of nonstationary ergatic systems. Problems of selecting the criteria for complex systems are considered, and the results are presented from a study of ergatic control systems with any degree of human participation.

  1. Lessons Learned from the Space Shuttle Engine Hydrogen Flow Control Valve Poppet Breakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Hugo E.; Damico, Stephen; Brewer, John

    2011-01-01

    The Main Propulsion System (MPS) uses three Flow Control Valves (FCV) to modulate the flow of pressurant hydrogen gas from the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSME) to the hydrogen External Tank (ET). This maintains pressure in the ullage volume as the liquid level drops, preserving ET structural integrity and assuring the engines receive a sufficient amount of head pressure. On Space Transportation System (STS)-126 (2009), with only a handful of International Space Station (ISS) assembly flights from the end of the Shuttle program, a portion of a single FCV?s poppet head broke off at about a minute and a half after liftoff. The risk of the poppet head failure is that the increased flow area through the FCV could result in excessive gaseous hydrogen flow back to the external tank, which could result in overboard venting of hydrogen ullage pressure. If the hydrogen venting were to occur in first stage (i.e., lower atmosphere), a flammability hazard exists that could lead to catastrophic loss of crew and vehicle. Other failure risks included particle impact damage to MPS downstream hardware. Although the FCV design had been plagued by contamination-related sluggish valve response problems prior to a redesign at STS-80 (1996), contamination was ruled out as the cause of the STS-126 failure. Employing a combination of enhanced hardware inspection and a better understanding of the consequences of a poppet failure, safe flight rationale for subsequent flights (STS-119 and later) was achieved. This paper deals with the technical lessons learned during the investigation and mitigation of this problem at a time when assembly flights were each in the critical path to Space Station success.

  2. Robust Control Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    Controller ................... 38 Sampled-Data Performance Analysis ............. 44 Doyle and Stein Technique in Discrete-Time Systems - 1...48 Doyle and Stein Technique in Discretd-Time System.s - 2 ................................. 50 Enhancing Robustness of... Technique Extended to Sampled-Data Controllers ................ 73 G715 Robustness Enhancement by Directly D"?C TAB E

  3. Lessons learned from a sperm morphology quality control programme.

    PubMed

    Franken, D R; Kruger, T F

    2006-12-01

    Although sperm morphology is the sperm parameter that is consistently correlated with in vitro and in vivo fertilisation, its value is often challenged due to discrepancies in reports. As sperm morphology is subjectively evaluated, the outcome of the report is entirely based on the experience and technical skill of the laboratory technician responsible for semen analyses. The study aimed to record the value of quarterly monitoring and refresher courses on morphology reading skills of technicians over a period of 40 months. Nineteen individuals from 12 different andrology laboratories were enrolled to a sperm morphology quality control programme after initial training sessions. Five of the 19 participants attended annual refresher courses. Two limits of error, namely +/- 0.5 SD and +/- 0.2 SD scores, were used to record technician deviation from the reference laboratory. Fifteen of the 19 individuals (78%) consistently reported sperm morphology readings that were within the +/- 0.5 SD limits of error. Furthermore, five of the participants, who attended annual refresher training courses, consistently reported results that were within the +/- 0.2 SD limits of error. For the first time, it has been illustrated that excellent sperm morphology reading skills can be achieved and maintained by initial training sessions, followed up with a continuous external quality control programme and annual refresher courses.

  4. Lessons Learned JSC Micro-Wireless Instrumentation Systems on Space Shuttle and International Space Station CANEUS 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studor, George

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on lessons learned from NASA Johnson Space Center's micro-wireless instrumentation is shown. The topics include: 1) Background, Rationale and Vision; 2) NASA JSC/Structural Engineering Approach & History; 3) Orbiter Wing Leading Edge Impact Detection System; 4) WLEIDS Confidence and Micro-WIS Lessons Learned; and 5) Current Projects and Recommendations.

  5. An Evaluation of Geographic Information Systems in Social Studies Lessons: Teachers' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aladag, Elif

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), used increasingly in primary and secondary education across the world, in social studies lessons in Turkey. In line with this aim, 14 social studies teachers working in the province of Aydin, Turkey received a 6-hour training course about GIS during the…

  6. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module VII. Central Nervous System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on the central nervous system is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians. Four units of study are presented: (1) anatomy and physiology; (2) assessment of patients with neurological problems; (3) pathophysiology and management of neurological problems; (4)…

  7. Control of Nonlinear Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-26

    6-7 C. Minimum Energy Regulators for Commutative Bilinear Systems .................... ........ 8-9 D. Control Law.s for Certain Aerospace...class of nonlinear systems (3,10]. (c) Minimum energy regulators for commutative bilinear systems [3,10]. (D) Control laws for certain aerospace...With Delay in Control," IEEE Trans. on Auto Contr., Vol. AC-20, pp. 702-704, 1975, and [3].) - !. 8 C. Minimum Energy Regulators for Commutative Bilinear

  8. Control Systems & LEED

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperman, Alissa; Dieckmann, John; Brodrick, James

    2012-06-01

    This article discusses the LEED guidelines (2009 v3), and corresponding points, that can only be attained using control systems for lighting, HVAC, and/or the entire building. Integrating and centralizing control systems allows for better building management, energy savings and can potentially award 29 points towards certification across the following categories: Sustainable Sites, Energy & Atmosphere, and Indoor Air Quality. In closing, potential energy savings are highlighted and the overall market potential for control systems are summarized.

  9. Lessons learned from pilot errors using automated systems in advanced technology aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Byers, J.C.; Haney, L.N.; Ostrom, L.T.; Reece, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored a project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to investigate pilot errors that occur during interaction with automated systems in advanced technology ( glass cockpit'') aircraft. In particular, we investigated the causes and potential corrective measures for pilot errors that resulted in altitude deviation incidents (i.e. failure to capture or maintain the altitude assigned by air traffic control). To do this, we analyzed altitude deviation events that have been reported in the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), NASA's data base of incidents self-reported by pilots and air traffic controllers. We developed models of the pilot tasks that are performed to capture and maintain altitude. Two types of models were developed to provide complementary perspectives of these tasks: sequential models and functional models. Both types of models show the errors that occur in actual altitude deviation events in advanced technology aircraft. Then, errors from the ASRS data base were categorized according to the models, to help understand the potential causes of the different error types. This paper summarizes the methodology used to analyze pilot errors, the lessons learned from the study of altitude deviation errors, and the application of these results for the introduction of advanced technology in nuclear power plants.

  10. Lessons learned from pilot errors using automated systems in advanced technology aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Byers, J.C.; Haney, L.N.; Ostrom, L.T.; Reece, W.J.

    1993-04-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored a project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to investigate pilot errors that occur during interaction with automated systems in advanced technology (``glass cockpit``) aircraft. In particular, we investigated the causes and potential corrective measures for pilot errors that resulted in altitude deviation incidents (i.e. failure to capture or maintain the altitude assigned by air traffic control). To do this, we analyzed altitude deviation events that have been reported in the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), NASA`s data base of incidents self-reported by pilots and air traffic controllers. We developed models of the pilot tasks that are performed to capture and maintain altitude. Two types of models were developed to provide complementary perspectives of these tasks: sequential models and functional models. Both types of models show the errors that occur in actual altitude deviation events in advanced technology aircraft. Then, errors from the ASRS data base were categorized according to the models, to help understand the potential causes of the different error types. This paper summarizes the methodology used to analyze pilot errors, the lessons learned from the study of altitude deviation errors, and the application of these results for the introduction of advanced technology in nuclear power plants.

  11. The ILC control system.

    SciTech Connect

    Carwardine, J.; Saunders, C.; Arnold, N.; Lenkszus, F.; Rehlich, K.; Simrock, S.; Banerjee, b.; Chase, B.; Gottschalk, E.; Joireman, P.; Kasley, P.; Lackey, S.; McBride, P.; Pavlicek, V.; Patrick, J.; Votava, M.; Wolbers, S.; Furukawa, K.; Michizono, S.; Larson, R.S.; Downing, R.; DESY; FNAL; SLAC

    2007-01-01

    Since the last ICALEPCS, a small multi-region team has developed a reference design model for a control system for the International Linear Collider as part of the ILC Global Design Effort. The scale and performance parameters of the ILC accelerator require new thinking in regards to control system design. Technical challenges include the large number of accelerator systems to be controlled, the large scale of the accelerator facility, the high degree of automation needed during accelerator operations, and control system equipment requiring 'Five Nines' availability. The R&D path for high availability touches the control system hardware, software, and overall architecture, and extends beyond traditional interfaces into the technical systems. Software considerations for HA include fault detection through exhaustive out-of-band monitoring and automatic state migration to redundant systems, while the telecom industry's emerging ATCA standard - conceived, specified, and designed for High Availability - is being evaluated for suitability for ILC front-end electronics.

  12. Control and optimization system

    DOEpatents

    Xinsheng, Lou

    2013-02-12

    A system for optimizing a power plant includes a chemical loop having an input for receiving an input parameter (270) and an output for outputting an output parameter (280), a control system operably connected to the chemical loop and having a multiple controller part (230) comprising a model-free controller. The control system receives the output parameter (280), optimizes the input parameter (270) based on the received output parameter (280), and outputs an optimized input parameter (270) to the input of the chemical loop to control a process of the chemical loop in an optimized manner.

  13. Intelligent Control Systems Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loparo, Kenneth A.

    1994-01-01

    Results of a three phase research program into intelligent control systems are presented. The first phase looked at implementing the lowest or direct level of a hierarchical control scheme using a reinforcement learning approach assuming no a priori information about the system under control. The second phase involved the design of an adaptive/optimizing level of the hierarchy and its interaction with the direct control level. The third and final phase of the research was aimed at combining the results of the previous phases with some a priori information about the controlled system.

  14. Integrated blending control system

    SciTech Connect

    Cogbill, R.B.; Dodd, T.J.; Heilman, P.W.; Heronemus, D.L.; Sears, L.R.; Berryman, L.N.; Baker, R.L.; Guffee, L.E.; Prucha, D.A.; Roberts, D.M.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes a proppant control system. It comprises: storage bin means for storing particulate material; surge bin means for receiving a flow of the particulate material from the storage bin means; first conveyor means for providing a flow of particulate material to the surge bin means from the storage bin means; second conveyor means for transferring a controllable quantity of the particulate material from the surge bin means; and proppant control means. The control means include: first speed control means for remotely controlling the speed of the first conveyor means; and second speed control means for remotely controlling the speed of the second conveyor means.

  15. LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUS WASTE STORAGE TANK VAPOR CONTROL ATTEMPTS ON SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) & DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) FARMS

    SciTech Connect

    BAKER, D.M.

    2004-08-03

    This report forms the basis for a feasibility study and conceptual design to control vapor emissions from waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The Carbtrol, Vapor Mixing, and High Efficiency Gas Absorber (HEGA) vapor controls were evaluated to determine the lessons learned from previous failed vapor control attempts. This document illustrates the resulting findings based on that evaluation.

  16. Sustainability in a state comprehensive cancer control coalition: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Renee A; Chapman, Kathryn; Graf, Gavin; Stanfield, Bret; Waterbor, John W

    2014-03-01

    The Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Control Coalition (ACCCC) has developed an integrated and coordinated approach to reducing cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, and to improving the quality of life for cancer survivors, their families, and their caregivers. The ACCCC is currently in a maintenance phase and a formal plan for sustainability of the coalition was needed to keep the members engaged and productive. A training session in coalition sustainability conducted in 2013 identified the following elements as essential to success: (1) increased marketing of the coalition by simplifying its mission; (2) improved networking including flexibility in coalition meeting location and attendance; (3) increased membership satisfaction through transformational leadership; (4) revision of the working structure of committees and improved accountability; and (5) enhancement of partner satisfaction with coalition activities designed to recruit and retain new partners. A self-administered membership satisfaction survey was given to assess coalition mission, meeting logistics, organization, capacity building, and coalition goals. Results indicated that the subcategories of communication, mission, and meeting logistics were rated satisfied to very satisfied on a five-point scale. Although the ACCCC had clearly written goals, improvement could be made in leadership participation and new member orientation could be improved. Most members rated their parent organization as highly involved with the ACCCC and many offered suggestions on capacity building. Results of the sustainability training have clarified the ACCCC's plans to ensure coalition viability and improve strategies to inform stakeholders of the benefits of participation in the coalition.

  17. System safety management lessons learned from the US Army acquisition process

    SciTech Connect

    Piatt, J.A.

    1989-05-01

    The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research, Development and Acquisition directed the Army Safety Center to provide an audit of the causes of accidents and safety of use restrictions on recently fielded systems by tracking residual hazards back through the acquisition process. The objective was to develop lessons learned'' that could be applied to the acquisition process to minimize mishaps in fielded systems. System safety management lessons learned are defined as Army practices or policies, derived from past successes and failures, that are expected to be effective in eliminating or reducing specific systemic causes of residual hazards. They are broadly applicable and supportive of the Army structure and acquisition objectives. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was given the task of conducting an independent, objective appraisal of the Army's system safety program in the context of the Army materiel acquisition process by focusing on four fielded systems which are products of that process. These systems included the Apache helicopter, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV), the Tube Launched, Optically Tracked, Wire Guided (TOW) Missile and the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV). The objective of this study was to develop system safety management lessons learned associated with the acquisition process. The first step was to identify residual hazards associated with the selected systems. Since it was impossible to track all residual hazards through the acquisition process, certain well-known, high visibility hazards were selected for detailed tracking. These residual hazards illustrate a variety of systemic problems. Systemic or process causes were identified for each residual hazard and analyzed to determine why they exist. System safety management lessons learned were developed to address related systemic causal factors. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  18. LSST camera control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Stuart; Thaler, Jon; Schalk, Terry; Huffer, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The LSST Camera Control System (CCS) will manage the activities of the various camera subsystems and coordinate those activities with the LSST Observatory Control System (OCS). The CCS comprises a set of modules (nominally implemented in software) which are each responsible for managing one camera subsystem. Generally, a control module will be a long lived "server" process running on an embedded computer in the subsystem. Multiple control modules may run on a single computer or a module may be implemented in "firmware" on a subsystem. In any case control modules must exchange messages and status data with a master control module (MCM). The main features of this approach are: (1) control is distributed to the local subsystem level; (2) the systems follow a "Master/Slave" strategy; (3) coordination will be achieved by the exchange of messages through the interfaces between the CCS and its subsystems. The interface between the camera data acquisition system and its downstream clients is also presented.

  19. Randomised controlled trial of Alexander technique lessons, exercise, and massage (ATEAM) for chronic and recurrent back pain: economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hollinghurst, Sandra; Sharp, Debbie; Ballard, Kathleen; Barnett, Jane; Beattie, Angela; Evans, Maggie; Lewith, George; Middleton, Karen; Oxford, Frances; Webley, Fran; Little, Paul

    2008-12-11

    An economic evaluation of therapeutic massage, exercise, and lessons in the Alexander technique for treating persistent back pain. Cost consequences study and cost effectiveness analysis at 12 month follow-up of a factorial randomised controlled trial. 579 patients with chronic or recurrent low back pain recruited from primary care. Normal care (control), massage, and six or 24 lessons in the Alexander technique. Half of each group were randomised to a prescription for exercise from a doctor plus behavioural counselling from a nurse. Costs to the NHS and to participants. Comparison of costs with Roland-Morris disability score (number of activities impaired by pain), days in pain, and quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Comparison of NHS costs with QALY gain, using incremental cost effectiveness ratios and cost effectiveness acceptability curves. Intervention costs ranged from pound30 for exercise prescription to pound596 for 24 lessons in Alexander technique plus exercise. Cost of health services ranged from pound50 for 24 lessons in Alexander technique to pound124 for exercise. Incremental cost effectiveness analysis of single therapies showed that exercise offered best value ( pound61 per point on disability score, pound9 per additional pain-free day, pound2847 per QALY gain). For two-stage therapy, six lessons in Alexander technique combined with exercise was the best value (additional pound64 per point on disability score, pound43 per additional pain-free day, pound5332 per QALY gain). An exercise prescription and six lessons in Alexander technique alone were both more than 85% likely to be cost effective at values above pound20 000 per QALY, but the Alexander technique performed better than exercise on the full range of outcomes. A combination of six lessons in Alexander technique lessons followed by exercise was the most effective and cost effective option.

  20. Data quality assurance and control in cognitive research: Lessons learned from the PREDICT-HD study.

    PubMed

    Westervelt, Holly James; Bernier, Rachel A; Faust, Melanie; Gover, Mary; Bockholt, H Jeremy; Zschiegner, Roland; Long, Jeffrey D; Paulsen, Jane S

    2017-09-01

    We discuss the strategies employed in data quality control and quality assurance for the cognitive core of Neurobiological Predictors of Huntington's Disease (PREDICT-HD), a long-term observational study of over 1,000 participants with prodromal Huntington disease. In particular, we provide details regarding the training and continual evaluation of cognitive examiners, methods for error corrections, and strategies to minimize errors in the data. We present five important lessons learned to help other researchers avoid certain assumptions that could potentially lead to inaccuracies in their cognitive data. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Control system design guide

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Bourassa, Norman; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-05-01

    The ''Control System Design Guide'' (Design Guide) provides methods and recommendations for the control system design process and control point selection and installation. Control systems are often the most problematic system in a building. A good design process that takes into account maintenance, operation, and commissioning can lead to a smoothly operating and efficient building. To this end, the Design Guide provides a toolbox of templates for improving control system design and specification. HVAC designers are the primary audience for the Design Guide. The control design process it presents will help produce well-designed control systems that achieve efficient and robust operation. The spreadsheet examples for control valve schedules, damper schedules, and points lists can streamline the use of the control system design concepts set forth in the Design Guide by providing convenient starting points from which designers can build. Although each reader brings their own unique questions to the text, the Design Guide contains information that designers, commissioning providers, operators, and owners will find useful.

  2. Novel microsatellite control system

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Frigo, J.R.; Tilden, M.W.

    1996-12-31

    The authors are developing extremely simple yet quite capable analog pulse-coded neural networks for smaller-faster-cheaper spacecraft attitude and control systems. They will demonstrate a prototype microsatellite that uses the novel control system to autonomously stabilize itself in the ambient magnetic field and point itself at the brightest available light source.

  3. Systems Modelling and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershenbaum, L. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes aims, objectives content, and instructional strategies of a course in systems modelling and control at Imperial College, England. Major problem areas include multivariable control system design, estimation and filtering, and the design and use of adaptive "self-tuning" regulators. (Author/JN)

  4. Influenza A (H1N1-2009) pandemic in Singapore--public health control measures implemented and lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Tay, Joanne; Ng, Yeuk Fan; Cutter, Jeffery L; James, Lyn

    2010-04-01

    We describe the public health control measures implemented in Singapore to limit the spread of influenza A (H1N1-2009) and mitigate its social effects. We also discuss the key learning points from this experience. Singapore's public health control measures were broadly divided into 2 phases: containment and mitigation. Containment strategies included the triage of febrile patients at frontline healthcare settings, admission and isolation of confirmed cases, mandatory Quarantine Orders (QO) for close contacts, and temperature screening at border entry points. After sustained community transmission became established, containment shifted to mitigation. Hospitals only admitted H1N1-2009 cases based on clinical indications, not for isolation. Mild cases were managed in the community. Contact tracing and QOs tapered off, and border temperature screening ended. The 5 key lessons learnt were: (1) Be prepared, but retain flexibility in implementing control measures; (2) Surveillance, good scientific information and operational research can increase a system's ability to manage risk during a public health crisis; (3) Integrated systems-level responses are essential for a coherent public health response; (4) Effective handling of manpower surges requires creative strategies; and (5) Communication must be strategic, timely, concise and clear. Singapore's effective response to the H1N1-2009 pandemic, founded on experience in managing the 2003 SARS epidemic, was a whole-of-government approach towards pandemic preparedness planning. Documenting the measures taken and lessons learnt provides a learning opportunity for both doctors and policy makers, and can help fortify Singapore's ability to respond to future major disease outbreaks.

  5. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  6. Analyzing Feedback Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Interactive controls analysis (INCA) program developed to provide user-friendly environment for design and analysis of linear control systems, primarily feedback control. Designed for use with both small- and large-order systems. Using interactive-graphics capability, INCA user quickly plots root locus, frequency response, or time response of either continuous-time system or sampled-data system. Configuration and parameters easily changed, allowing user to design compensation networks and perform sensitivity analyses in very convenient manner. Written in Pascal and FORTRAN.

  7. Cockpit control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesnewski, David; Snow, Russ M.; Paufler, Dave; Schnieder, George; Athousake, Roxanne; Combs, Lisa

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide a detail design for the cockpit control system of the Viper PFT. The statement of work for this project requires provisions for control of the ailerons, elevator, rudder, and elevator trim. The system should provide adjustment for pilot stature, rigging, and maintenance. MIL-STD-1472 is used as a model for human factors criterion. The system is designed to the pilot limit loading outlined in FAR part 23.397. The general philosophy behind this design is to provide a simple, reliable control system which will withstand the daily abuse that is experienced in the training environment without excessive cost or weight penalties.

  8. Successfully maintaining program funding during trying times: lessons from tobacco control programs in five states.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David E; Reynolds, Jennifer H; Luke, Douglas A; Mueller, Nancy B; Eischen, Monica H; Jordan, Jerelyn; Lancaster, R Brick; Marcus, Stephen E; Vallone, Donna

    2007-01-01

    Despite negative financial conditions in recent years, several states were able to successfully maintain funding for tobacco prevention and control, which provided an opportunity to understand the factors associated with success. One explanation may be the level of long-term program sustainability in some states. According to a model developed by Saint Louis University researchers, the five elements critical to tobacco control sustainability are state political and financial climate; community awareness and capacity; program structure and administration; funding stability and planning; and surveillance and evaluation. Five states (Nebraska, New York, Indiana, Virginia, and Colorado) maintained funding for their tobacco control programs. Four of these states gained additional legislative appropriations or prevented a massive reduction; Colorado used a statewide ballot initiative to increase funding. On the basis of the sustainability framework, case studies, and prior research, the major lessons learned for maintaining funding were the importance of (1) strong and experienced leadership, (2) broad and deep organizational and community ties, (3) coordinated efforts, (4) strategic use of surveillance and evaluation data, (5) active dissemination of information about program successes, and (6) policy maker champions. The sustainability framework and lessons learned may provide valuable insights for other public health programs facing funding threats.

  9. Control system testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittler, W. H.; Collart, R. E.

    1984-08-01

    A three stage process of ground testing of the Space Telescope Pointing Control System is used for verification prior to on-orbit operation. First, development tests are conducted in a laboratory environment using flight/engineering model control sensor and actuators configured with an engineering model of the flight computer and data management system breadboards. These development tests validate the results of computer simulations predicting control system performance. Integration tests bring together flight system elements and software interfaced to a software simulation of vehicle dynamics to confirm closed loop performance. The final ground test phase, flight systems testing, is conducted on the fully assembled Space Telescope, verifies interfaces with the Fine Guidance Sensors and includes a thermal vacuum testing period. During the final test phase, the Point Control System is exercised with the dynamics simulator running in real time.

  10. THE INTEGRATION OF ENGINEERED AND INSTITUTIONAL CONTROLS: A CASE STUDY APPROACH WITH LESSONS LEARNED FROM PREVIOUSLY CLOSED SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Kostelnik; James H. Clarke; Jerry L. Harbour

    2005-02-01

    Environmental remediation efforts that are underway at hundreds of contaminated sites in the United States will not be able to remediate large portions of those sites to conditions that would permit unrestricted access. Rather, large volumes of waste materials, contaminated soils and cleanup residuals will have to be isolated either in place or in new, often on-site, disposal cells with long term monitoring, maintenance and institutional control needs. The challenge continues to be to provide engineering systems and controls that can ensure the protection of public health and the environment over very long time horizons (hundreds to perhaps thousands of years) with minimal intervention. Effective long term management of legacy hazardous and nuclear waste requires an integrated approach that addresses both the engineered containment and control system itself and the institutional controls and other responsibilities that are needed. Decisions concerning system design, monitoring and maintenance, and the institutional controls that will be employed are best done through a "risk-nformed, performance-based" approach. Such an approach should incorporate an analysis of potential "failure" modes and consequences for all important system features, together with lessons learned from experience with systems already in place. The authors will present the preliminary results of a case study approach that included several sites where contamination isolation systems including institutional controls have been implemented. The results are being used together with failure trees and logic diagrams that have been developed for both the engineered barriers and the institutional controls. The use of these analytical tools to evaluate the potential for different levels of failure and associated consequences will be discussed. Of special interest is the robustness of different approaches to providing long-term protection through redundancy and defense in depth.

  11. PRESSURE SYSTEM CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Esselman, W.H.; Kaplan, G.M.

    1961-06-20

    The control of pressure in pressurized liquid systems, especially a pressurized liquid reactor system, may be achieved by providing a bias circuit or loop across a closed loop having a flow restriction means in the form of an orifice, a storage tank, and a pump connected in series. The subject invention is advantageously utilized where control of a reactor can be achieved by response to the temperature and pressure of the primary cooling system.

  12. Drone Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Drones, subscale vehicles like the Firebees, and full scale retired military aircraft are used to test air defense missile systems. The DFCS (Drone Formation Control System) computer, developed by IBM (International Business Machines) Federal Systems Division, can track ten drones at once. A program called ORACLS is used to generate software to track and control Drones. It was originally developed by Langley and supplied by COSMIC (Computer Software Management and Information Center). The program saved the company both time and money.

  13. Power Systems Control Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    James Davidson

    2005-01-01

    A diagram provided in the report depicts the complexity of the power systems control architecture used by the national power structure. It shows the structural hierarchy and the relationship of the each system to those other systems interconnected to it. Each of these levels provides a different focus for vulnerability testing and has its own weaknesses. In evaluating each level, of prime concern is what vulnerabilities exist that provide a path into the system, either to cause the system to malfunction or to take control of a field device. An additional vulnerability to consider is can the system be compromised in such a manner that the attacker can obtain critical information about the system and the portion of the national power structure that it controls.

  14. Digital flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Vanlandingham, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The design of stable feedback control laws for sampled-data systems with variable rate sampling was investigated. These types of sampled-data systems arise naturally in digital flight control systems which use digital actuators where it is desirable to decrease the number of control computer output commands in order to save wear and tear of the associated equipment. The design of aircraft control systems which are optimally tolerant of sensor and actuator failures was also studied. Detection of the failed sensor or actuator must be resolved and if the estimate of the state is used in the control law, then it is also desirable to have an estimator which will give the optimal state estimate even under the failed conditions.

  15. Desiccant humidity control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amazeen, J. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    A regenerable sorbent system was investigated for controlling the humidity and carbon dioxide concentration of the space shuttle cabin atmosphere. The sorbents considered for water and carbon dioxide removal were silica gel and molecular sieves. Bed optimization and preliminary system design are discussed along with system optimization studies and weight penalites.

  16. Control Oriented System Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    The research goals for this grant were to obtain algorithms for control oriented system identification is to construct dynamical models of systems...and measured information. Algorithms for this type of nonlinear system identification have been given that produce models suitable for gain scheduled

  17. Load Control System Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Trudnowski, Daniel

    2015-04-03

    This report summarizes the results of the Load Control System Reliability project (DOE Award DE-FC26-06NT42750). The original grant was awarded to Montana Tech April 2006. Follow-on DOE awards and expansions to the project scope occurred August 2007, January 2009, April 2011, and April 2013. In addition to the DOE monies, the project also consisted of matching funds from the states of Montana and Wyoming. Project participants included Montana Tech; the University of Wyoming; Montana State University; NorthWestern Energy, Inc., and MSE. Research focused on two areas: real-time power-system load control methodologies; and, power-system measurement-based stability-assessment operation and control tools. The majority of effort was focused on area 2. Results from the research includes: development of fundamental power-system dynamic concepts, control schemes, and signal-processing algorithms; many papers (including two prize papers) in leading journals and conferences and leadership of IEEE activities; one patent; participation in major actual-system testing in the western North American power system; prototype power-system operation and control software installed and tested at three major North American control centers; and, the incubation of a new commercial-grade operation and control software tool. Work under this grant certainly supported the DOE-OE goals in the area of “Real Time Grid Reliability Management.”

  18. IGISOL control system modernization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koponen, J.; Hakala, J.

    2016-06-01

    Since 2010, the IGISOL research facility at the Accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä has gone through major changes. Comparing the new IGISOL4 facility to the former IGISOL3 setup, the size of the facility has more than doubled, the length of the ion transport line has grown to about 50 m with several measurement setups and extension capabilities, and the accelerated ions can be fed to the facility from two different cyclotrons. The facility has evolved to a system comprising hundreds of manual, pneumatic and electronic devices. These changes have prompted the need to modernize also the facility control system taking care of monitoring and transporting the ion beams. In addition, the control system is also used for some scientific data acquisition tasks. Basic guidelines for the IGISOL control system update have been remote control, safety, usability, reliability and maintainability. Legacy components have had a major significance in the control system hardware and for the renewed control system software the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) has been chosen as the architectural backbone.

  19. Lessons learned from the NEPTUNE power system and other deep-sea adventures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2005-01-01

    The development of underwater science systems presents some challenging technical issues. It seems that the best efforts of the engineers and scientists involved are sometimes inadequate, and projects that once seemed straightforward end up being late, or overbudget, or cancelled. This paper will review some of the lessons that may be learned from the examples of three science projects in the deep ocean: the DUMAND neutrino detector, the H20 observatory, and the power system part of the NEPTUNE regional cabled observatory.

  20. Lessons Learned while Exploring Cloud-Native Architectures for NASA EOSDIS Applications and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilone, Dan

    2016-01-01

    As new, high data rate missions begin collecting data, the NASAs Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) archive is projected to grow roughly 20x to over 300PBs by 2025. To prepare for the dramatic increase in data and enable broad scientific inquiry into larger time series and datasets, NASA has been exploring the impact of applying cloud technologies throughout EOSDIS. In this talk we will provide an overview of NASAs prototyping and lessons learned in applying cloud architectures.

  1. Lessons learned from the NEPTUNE power system and other deep-sea adventures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2005-01-01

    The development of underwater science systems presents some challenging technical issues. It seems that the best efforts of the engineers and scientists involved are sometimes inadequate, and projects that once seemed straightforward end up being late, or overbudget, or cancelled. This paper will review some of the lessons that may be learned from the examples of three science projects in the deep ocean: the DUMAND neutrino detector, the H20 observatory, and the power system part of the NEPTUNE regional cabled observatory.

  2. HETDEX tracker control system design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beno, Joseph H.; Hayes, Richard; Leck, Ron; Penney, Charles; Soukup, Ian

    2012-09-01

    To enable the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment, The University of Texas at Austin Center for Electromechanics and McDonald Observatory developed a precision tracker and control system - an 18,000 kg robot to position a 3,100 kg payload within 10 microns of a desired dynamic track. Performance requirements to meet science needs and safety requirements that emerged from detailed Failure Modes and Effects Analysis resulted in a system of 13 precision controlled actuators and 100 additional analog and digital devices (primarily sensors and safety limit switches). Due to this complexity, demanding accuracy requirements, and stringent safety requirements, two independent control systems were developed. First, a versatile and easily configurable centralized control system that links with modeling and simulation tools during the hardware and software design process was deemed essential for normal operation including motion control. A second, parallel, control system, the Hardware Fault Controller (HFC) provides independent monitoring and fault control through a dedicated microcontroller to force a safe, controlled shutdown of the entire system in the event a fault is detected. Motion controls were developed in a Matlab-Simulink simulation environment, and coupled with dSPACE controller hardware. The dSPACE real-time operating system collects sensor information; motor commands are transmitted over a PROFIBUS network to servo amplifiers and drive motor status is received over the same network. To interface the dSPACE controller directly to absolute Heidenhain sensors with EnDat 2.2 protocol, a custom communication board was developed. This paper covers details of operational control software, the HFC, algorithms, tuning, debugging, testing, and lessons learned.

  3. Automated Subsystem Control for Life Support System (ASCLSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, Roger F.

    1987-01-01

    The Automated Subsystem Control for Life Support Systems (ASCLSS) program has successfully developed and demonstrated a generic approach to the automation and control of space station subsystems. The automation system features a hierarchical and distributed real-time control architecture which places maximum controls authority at the lowest or process control level which enhances system autonomy. The ASCLSS demonstration system pioneered many automation and control concepts currently being considered in the space station data management system (DMS). Heavy emphasis is placed on controls hardware and software commonality implemented in accepted standards. The approach demonstrates successfully the application of real-time process and accountability with the subsystem or process developer. The ASCLSS system completely automates a space station subsystem (air revitalization group of the ASCLSS) which moves the crew/operator into a role of supervisory control authority. The ASCLSS program developed over 50 lessons learned which will aide future space station developers in the area of automation and controls..

  4. Heritage and Advanced Technology Systems Engineering Lessons Learned from NASA Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barley, Bryan; Newhouse, Marilyn; Clardy, Dennon

    2010-01-01

    In the design and development of complex spacecraft missions, project teams frequently assume the use of advanced technology systems or heritage systems to enable a mission or reduce the overall mission risk and cost. As projects proceed through the development life cycle, increasingly detailed knowledge of the advanced and heritage systems within the spacecraft and mission environment identifies unanticipated technical issues. Resolving these issues often results in cost overruns and schedule impacts. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery & New Frontiers (D&NF) Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently studied cost overruns and schedule delays for 5 missions. The goal was to identify the underlying causes for the overruns and delays, and to develop practical mitigations to assist the D&NF projects in identifying potential risks and controlling the associated impacts to proposed mission costs and schedules. The study found that optimistic hardware/software inheritance and technology readiness assumptions caused cost and schedule growth for four of the five missions studied. The cost and schedule growth was not found to result from technical hurdles requiring significant technology development. The projects institutional inheritance and technology readiness processes appear to adequately assess technology viability and prevent technical issues from impacting the final mission success. However, the processes do not appear to identify critical issues early enough in the design cycle to ensure project schedules and estimated costs address the inherent risks. In general, the overruns were traceable to: an inadequate understanding of the heritage system s behavior within the proposed spacecraft design and mission environment; an insufficient level of development experience with the heritage system; or an inadequate scoping of the system-wide impacts necessary to implement an advanced technology for space flight

  5. SSRF Beamline Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L. F.; Liu, P.; Zhang, Z. H.; Hu, C.; Mi, Q. R.; Wu, Y. F.; Gong, P. R.; Zhu, Z. X.; Li, Z.

    2010-06-23

    There are seven beamlines in the Phase-I of SSRF. Five of them are equipped with Insertion Devices, while two with Bending Magnets. The beamline control system is based on the standard hardware and software architecture. The VME(PowerPC) with VxWorks is used for motion control, while the personal computers with Scientific Linux are the front end controllers of equipment protection and personnel safety systems. The control software is developed under EPICS which makes various experimental programs of Blu-Ice, LabView, VC and SPEC conveniently access Monochromators, mirror chambers and other optical components.

  6. Staffing the ISS Control Centers: Lessons Learned from Long-Duration Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Carrie D.; Horvath, Timothy J.; Davis, Sally P.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has been in operation with a permanent human presence in space for over five years, and plans for continued operations stretch ten years into the future. Ground control and support operations are, likewise, a 15-year enterprise. This long-term, 24-hour per day, 7 day per week support has presented numerous challenges in the areas of ground crew training, initial and continued certification, and console staffing. The Mission Control Center in Houston, Texas and the Payload Operations Center in Huntsville, Alabama have both tackled these challenges, with similar, yet distinct, approaches. This paper describes the evolution of the staffing and training policies of both control centers in a chronological progression. The relative merits and shortcomings of the various policies employed are discussed and a summary of "lessons learned" is presented. Finally, recommendations are made as best practices for future long-term space missions.

  7. Staffing the ISS Control Centers: Lessons Learned from Long-Duration Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Carrie D.; Horvath, Timothy J.; Davis, Sally P.

    2006-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has been in operation with a permanent human presence in space for over five years, and plans for continued operations stretch ten years into the future. Ground control and support operations are, likewise, a 15-year enterprise. This long-term, 24-hour per day, 7 day per week support has presented numerous challenges in the areas of ground crew training, initial and continued certification, and console staffing. The Mission Control Center in Houston, Texas and the Payload Operations Center in Huntsville, Alabama have both tackled these challenges, with similar, yet distinct, approaches. This paper describes the evolution of the staffing and training policies of both control centers in a chronological progression. The relative merits and shortcomings of the various policies employed are discussed and a summary of "lessons learned" is presented. Finally, recommendations are made as best practices for future long-term space missions.

  8. What is system control?

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1999-11-01

    Just as the aviation industry needs air-traffic controllers to manage the movement of airplanes for safety and commerce, so too, the electricity industry requires system operators. The electrical-system-control functions encompass a range of activities that support commercial transactions and maintain bulk-power reliability. As part of a project for the Edison Electric Institute, the authors examined the functions and costs of system control and the issues that need to be resolved in a restructured electricity industry (Hirst and Kirby 1998).

  9. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to a remotely controllable mixing system in which a plurality of mixing assemblies are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly employs a central chamber and two outer, upper and lower chambers. Valves are positioned between chambers, and these valves for a given mixing assembly are operated by upper and lower control rotors, which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors. Additionally, a hoop is compressed around upper control rotors and a hoop is compressed around lower control rotors to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors and drive rotors. The drive rollers are driven by a motor.

  10. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    Digital techniques are discussed for application to the servo and control systems of large antennas. The tracking loop for an antenna at a STADAN tracking site is illustrated. The augmentation mode is also considered.

  11. Linear Hereditary Control Systems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Relationships between external and internal models for systems with time lags are discussed. The use of various canonical forms for the models in solving optimal control problems is considered. (Author)

  12. Lessons Learned while Exploring Cloud-Native Architectures for NASA EOSDIS Applications and Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilone, D.

    2016-12-01

    As new, high data rate missions begin collecting data, the NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) archive is projected to grow roughly 20x to over 300PBs by 2025. To prepare for the dramatic increase in data and enable broad scientific inquiry into larger time series and datasets, NASA has been exploring the impact of applying cloud technologies throughout EOSDIS. In this talk we will provide an overview of NASA's prototyping and lessons learned in applying cloud architectures to: Highly scalable and extensible ingest and archive of EOSDIS data Going "all-in" on cloud based application architectures including "serverless" data processing pipelines and evaluating approaches to vendor-lock in Rethinking data distribution and approaches to analysis in a cloud environment Incorporating and enforcing security controls while minimizing the barrier for research efforts to deploy to NASA compliant, operational environments. NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) is a coordinated series of satellites for long term global observations. NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a multi-petabyte-scale archive of environmental data that supports global climate change research by providing end-to-end services from EOS instrument data collection to science data processing to full access to EOS and other earth science data. On a daily basis, the EOSDIS ingests, processes, archives and distributes over 3 terabytes of data from NASA's Earth Science missions representing over 6000 data products ranging from various types of science disciplines. EOSDIS has continually evolved to improve the discoverability, accessibility, and usability of high-impact NASA data spanning the multi-petabyte-scale archive of Earth science data products.

  13. Designing to Sample the Unknown: Lessons from OSIRIS-REx Project Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, David; Mink, Ronald; Linn, Timothy; Wood, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    On September 8, 2016, the third NASA New Frontiers mission launched on an Atlas V 411. The Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) will rendezvous with asteroid Bennu in 2018, collect a sample in 2020, and return that sample to Earth in September 2023. The development team has overcome a number of challenges in order to design and build a system that will make contact with an unexplored, airless, low-gravity body. This paper will provide an overview of the mission, then focus in on the system-level challenges and some of the key system-level processes. Some of the lessons here are unique to the type of mission, like discussion of operating at a largely-unknown, low-gravity object. Other lessons, particularly from the build phase, have broad implications. The OSIRIS-REx risk management process was particularly effective in achieving an on-time and under-budget development effort. The systematic requirements management and verification and the system validation also helped identify numerous potential problems. The final assessment of the OSIRIS-REx performance will need to wait until the sample is returned in 2023, but this post-launch assessment will capture some of the key systems-engineering lessons from the development team.

  14. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  15. Flight control actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Gaines, Louie T. (Inventor); Evans, Paul S. (Inventor); Kern, James I. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A flight control actuation system comprises a controller, electromechanical actuator and a pneumatic actuator. During normal operation, only the electromechanical actuator is needed to operate a flight control surface. When the electromechanical actuator load level exceeds 40 amps positive, the controller activates the pneumatic actuator to offset electromechanical actuator loads to assist the manipulation of flight control surfaces. The assistance from the pneumatic load assist actuator enables the use of an electromechanical actuator that is smaller in size and mass, requires less power, needs less cooling processes, achieves high output forces and adapts to electrical current variations. The flight control actuation system is adapted for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, and other flight vehicles, especially flight vehicles that are large in size and travel at high velocities.

  16. Lessons Learned from the Node 1 Atmosphere Control and Storage and Water Recovery and Management Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Node 1 flew to the International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A during December 1998. To date the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has learned a lot of lessons from this module based on its history of approximately two years of acceptance testing on the ground and currently its twelve years on-orbit. This paper will provide an overview of the ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Node 1 Atmosphere Control and Storage (ACS) and Water Recovery and Management (WRM) subsystems and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for these subsystems based on problems prelaunch, problems encountered on-orbit, and operational problems/concerns. It is hoped that documenting these lessons learned from ISS will help in preventing them in future Programs.

  17. Lessons Learned from the Node 1 Atmosphere Control and Storage and Water Recovery and Management Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Node 1 flew to the International Space Station (ISS) on Flight 2A during December 1998. To date the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has learned a lot of lessons from this module based on its history of approximately two years of acceptance testing on the ground and currently its twelve years on-orbit. This paper will provide an overview of the ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Node 1 Atmosphere Control and Storage (ACS) and Water Recovery and Management (WRM) subsystems and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for these subsystems based on problems prelaunch, problems encountered on-orbit, and operational problems/concerns. It is hoped that documenting these lessons learned from ISS will help in preventing them in future Programs.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  19. Liquid Level Control System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A system for controlling liquid flow from an inlet into a tank comprising a normally closed poppet valve controlled by dual pressure chambers each...containing a diaphragm movable by the pressure of the liquid in the inlet to cause the valve to close. Pressure against the diaphragms is relieved by

  20. Rotor control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Michael P. (Inventor); Maciolek, Joseph R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A helicopter rotor control system (13) including a stop azimuth controller (32) for establishing the value of a deceleration command (15') to a deceleration controller (23), a transition azimuth predictor (41) and a position reference generator (55), which are effective during the last revolution of said rotor (14) to establish a correction indication (38) to adjust the deceleration command (15') to ensure that one of the rotor blades (27) stops at a predetermined angular position.

  1. Comparing U.S. Army suicide cases to a control sample: initial data and methodological lessons.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Cynthia L; Reger, Mark A; Smolenski, Derek J; Fullerton, Nicole R

    2014-10-01

    Identification of risk and protective factors for suicide is a priority for the United States military, especially in light of the recent steady increase in military suicide rates. The Department of Defense Suicide Event Report contains comprehensive data on suicides for active duty military personnel, but no analogous control data is available to permit identification of factors that differentially determine suicide risk. This proof-of-concept study was conducted to determine the feasibility of collecting such control data. The study employed a prospective case-control design in which control cases were randomly selected from a large Army installation at a rate of four control participants for every qualifying Army suicide. Although 111 Army suicides were confirmed during the study period, just 27 control soldiers completed the study. Despite the small control sample, preliminary analyses comparing suicide cases to controls identified several factors more frequently reported for suicide cases, including recent failed intimate relationships, outpatient mental health history, mood disorder diagnosis, substance abuse history, and prior self-injury. No deployment-related risk factors were found. These data are consistent with existing literature and form a foundation for larger control studies. Methodological lessons learned regarding study design and recruitment are discussed to inform future studies.

  2. Computer controlled antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raumann, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    The application of small computers using digital techniques for operating the servo and control system of large antennas is discussed. The advantages of the system are described. The techniques were evaluated with a forty foot antenna and the Sigma V computer. Programs have been completed which drive the antenna directly without the need for a servo amplifier, antenna position programmer or a scan generator.

  3. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; O'Connor, David; Partrick, Richard; Orzechowski, Pawel; Spitter, Connie; Lillie, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  4. ACCESS Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Alexander, James; Trauger, John; Moody, Dwight; Egerman, Robert; Vallone, Phillip; Elias, Jason; Hejal, Reem; Camelo, Vanessa; Bronowicki, Allen; hide

    2010-01-01

    ACCESS (Actively-Corrected Coronograph for Exoplanet System Studies) was one of four medium-class exoplanet concepts selected for the NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study (ASMCS) program in 2008/2009. The ACCESS study evaluated four major coronograph concepts under a common space observatory. This paper describes the high precision pointing control system (PCS) baselined for this observatory.

  5. CNEOST Control Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhao, H. B.; Xia, Y.; Lu, H.; Li, B.

    2015-03-01

    In 2013, CNEOST (China Near Earth Object Survey Telescope) adapted its hardware system for the new CCD camera. Based on the new system architecture, the control software is re-designed and implemented. The software system adopts the message passing mechanism via WebSocket protocol, and improves its flexibility, expansibility, and scalability. The user interface with responsive web design realizes the remote operating under both desktop and mobile devices. The stable operating of software system has greatly enhanced the operation efficiency while reducing the complexity, and has also made a successful attempt for the future system design of telescope and telescope cloud.

  6. Information Survivability Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    interfaces with higher-level (e.g., Federal Reserve ) and lower-level (e.g., branch) control systems. A hierarchical structure is natural to support...level hierarchical banking system with branch banks at the leaves, money-center banks in the middle, and the Federal Reserve system at the root...center in question, then the check deposit request is routed there. If not, then the check must be routed through the Federal Reserve . Checks for small

  7. The ISOLDE control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloose, I.; Pace, A.

    1994-12-01

    The two CERN isotope separators named ISOLDE have been running on the new Personal Computer (PC) based control system since April 1992. The new architecture that makes heavy use of the commercial software and hardware of the PC market has been implemented on the 1700 geographically distributed control channels of the two separators and their experimental area. Eleven MSDOS Intel-based PCs with approximately 80 acquisition and control boards are used to access the equipment and are controlled from three PCs running Microsoft Windows used as consoles through a Novell Local Area Network. This paper describes the interesting solutions found and discusses the reduced programming workload and costs that have been obtained.

  8. Comparing Health Systems in Four Countries: Lessons for the United States

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lawrence D.

    2003-01-01

    The Rekindling Reform initiative examined the health systems of 4 countries: Canada, France, Germany, and Great Britain (United Kingdom). From the 4 country reports published in this issue of the American Journal of Public Health, 10 crosscutting themes emerge: (1) coverage, (2) funding, (3) costs, (4) providers, (5) integration, (6) markets, (7) analysis, (8) supply, (9) satisfaction, and (10) leadership. Lessons for the United States are presented under each point. PMID:12511384

  9. TRMM On Orbit Attitude Control System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Brent; Placanica, Sam; Morgenstern, Wendy

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Attitude Control System (ACS) along with detailed in-flight performance results for each operational mode. The TRMM spacecraft is an Earth-pointed, zero momentum bias satellite launched on November 27, 1997 from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan designed to monitor and study tropical rainfall and the associated release of energy. Launched to provide a validation for poorly known rainfall data sets generated by global climate models, TRMM has demonstrated its utility by reducing uncertainties in global rainfall measurements by a factor of two. The ACS is comprised of Attitude Control Electronics (ACE), an Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA), Digital Sun Sensors (DSS), Inertial Reference Units (IRU), Three Axis Magnetometers (TAM), Coarse Sun Sensors (CSS), Magnetic Torquer Bars (MTB), Reaction Wheel Assemblies (RWA), Engine Valve Drivers (EVD) and thrusters. While in Mission Mode, the ESA provides roll and pitch axis attitude error measurements and the DSS provide yaw updates twice per orbit. In addition, the TAM in combination with the IRU and DSS can be used to provide pointing in a contingency attitude determination mode which does not rely on the ESA. Although the ACS performance to date has been highly successful, lessons were learned during checkout and initial on-orbit operation. This paper describes the design, on-orbit checkout, performance and lessons learned for the TRMM ACS.

  10. From ecological test site to geographic information system: lessons for the 1980's

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, Robert H.

    1981-01-01

    Geographic information systems were common elements in two kinds of interdisciplinary regional demonstration projects in the 1970's. Ecological test sits attempted to provide for more efficient remote-sensing data delivery for regional environmental management. Regional environmental systems analysis attempted to formally describe and model the interacting regional social and environmental processes, including the resource-use decision making process. Lessons for the 1980's are drawn from recent evaluations and assessments of these programs, focusing on cost, rates of system development and technology transfer, program coordination, integrative analysis capability, and the involvement of system users and decision makers.

  11. Lessons Learned from the Space Shuttle Engine Cutoff System (ECO) Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Hugo E.; Welzyn, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter's main engine cutoff (ECO) system first failed ground checkout in April, 2005 during a first tanking test prior to Return-to-Flight. Despite significant troubleshooting and investigative efforts that followed, the root cause could not be found and intermittent anomalies continued to plague the Program. By implementing hardware upgrades, enhancing monitoring capability, and relaxing the launch rules, the Shuttle fleet was allowed to continue flying in spite of these unexplained failures. Root cause was finally determined following the launch attempts of STS-122 in December, 2007 when the anomalies repeated, which allowed drag-on instrumentation to pinpoint the fault (the ET feedthrough connector). The suspect hardware was removed and provided additional evidence towards root cause determination. Corrective action was implemented and the system has performed successfully since then. This white paper presents the lessons learned from the entire experience, beginning with the anomalies since Return-to-Flight through discovery and correction of the problem. To put these lessons in better perspective for the reader, an overview of the ECO system is presented first. Next, a chronological account of the failures and associated investigation activities is discussed. Root cause and corrective action are summarized, followed by the lessons learned.

  12. LSST control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Germán; Warner, Michael; Krabbendam, Victor

    2006-06-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a large, wide-field ground-based telescope designed to obtain sequential images of the entire visible sky every few nights. The LSST, in spite of its large field of view and short 15 second exposures, requires a very accurate pointing and tracking performance. The high efficiency specified for the whole system implies that observations will be acquired in blind pointing mode and tracking demands calculated from blind pointing as well. This paper will provide a high level overview of the LSST Control System (LCS) and details of the Telescope Control System (TCS), explaining the characteristics of the system components and the interactions among them. The LCS and TCS will be designed around a distributed architecture to maximize the control efficiency and to support the highly robotic nature of the LSST System. In addition to its control functions, the LCS will capture, organize and store system wide state information, to make it available for monitoring, evaluation and calibration processes. An evaluation of the potential communications middleware software to be utilized for data transport, is also included.

  13. Neural Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2003-01-01

    The Neural Flight Control System (NFCS) was developed to address the need for control systems that can be produced and tested at lower cost, easily adapted to prototype vehicles and for flight systems that can accommodate damaged control surfaces or changes to aircraft stability and control characteristics resulting from failures or accidents. NFCS utilizes on a neural network-based flight control algorithm which automatically compensates for a broad spectrum of unanticipated damage or failures of an aircraft in flight. Pilot stick and rudder pedal inputs are fed into a reference model which produces pitch, roll and yaw rate commands. The reference model frequencies and gains can be set to provide handling quality characteristics suitable for the aircraft of interest. The rate commands are used in conjunction with estimates of the aircraft s stability and control (S&C) derivatives by a simplified Dynamic Inverse controller to produce virtual elevator, aileron and rudder commands. These virtual surface deflection commands are optimally distributed across the aircraft s available control surfaces using linear programming theory. Sensor data is compared with the reference model rate commands to produce an error signal. A Proportional/Integral (PI) error controller "winds up" on the error signal and adds an augmented command to the reference model output with the effect of zeroing the error signal. In order to provide more consistent handling qualities for the pilot, neural networks learn the behavior of the error controller and add in the augmented command before the integrator winds up. In the case of damage sufficient to affect the handling qualities of the aircraft, an Adaptive Critic is utilized to reduce the reference model frequencies and gains to stay within a flyable envelope of the aircraft.

  14. Neural Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundy-Burlet, Karen

    2003-01-01

    The Neural Flight Control System (NFCS) was developed to address the need for control systems that can be produced and tested at lower cost, easily adapted to prototype vehicles and for flight systems that can accommodate damaged control surfaces or changes to aircraft stability and control characteristics resulting from failures or accidents. NFCS utilizes on a neural network-based flight control algorithm which automatically compensates for a broad spectrum of unanticipated damage or failures of an aircraft in flight. Pilot stick and rudder pedal inputs are fed into a reference model which produces pitch, roll and yaw rate commands. The reference model frequencies and gains can be set to provide handling quality characteristics suitable for the aircraft of interest. The rate commands are used in conjunction with estimates of the aircraft s stability and control (S&C) derivatives by a simplified Dynamic Inverse controller to produce virtual elevator, aileron and rudder commands. These virtual surface deflection commands are optimally distributed across the aircraft s available control surfaces using linear programming theory. Sensor data is compared with the reference model rate commands to produce an error signal. A Proportional/Integral (PI) error controller "winds up" on the error signal and adds an augmented command to the reference model output with the effect of zeroing the error signal. In order to provide more consistent handling qualities for the pilot, neural networks learn the behavior of the error controller and add in the augmented command before the integrator winds up. In the case of damage sufficient to affect the handling qualities of the aircraft, an Adaptive Critic is utilized to reduce the reference model frequencies and gains to stay within a flyable envelope of the aircraft.

  15. SERVOMOTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    MacNeille, S.M.

    1958-12-01

    Control systems for automatic positioning of an electric motor operated vapor valve are described which is operable under the severe conditions existing in apparatus for electro-magnetlcally separating isotopes. In general, the system includes a rotor for turning the valve comprising two colls mounted mutually perpendicular to each other and also perpendicular to the magnetic field of the isotope separating apparatus. The coils are furnished with both a-c and d- c current by assoclate control circuitry and a position control is provided for varying the ratlo of the a-c currents in the coils and at the same time, but in an inverse manner, the ratio between the d-c currents in the coils is varied. With the present system the magnitude of the motor torque is constant for all valves of the rotor orientatlon angle.

  16. REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    MacNeill, J.H.; Estabrook, J.Y.

    1960-05-10

    A reactor control system including a continuous tape passing through a first coolant passageway, over idler rollers, back through another parallel passageway, and over motor-driven rollers is described. Discrete portions of fuel or poison are carried on two opposed active sections of the tape. Driving the tape in forward or reverse directions causes both active sections to be simultaneously inserted or withdrawn uniformly, tending to maintain a more uniform flux within the reactor. The system is particularly useful in mobile reactors, where reduced inertial resistance to control rod movement is important.

  17. Celsius Control system.

    PubMed

    Badjatia, Neeraj

    2004-01-01

    The Celsius Control system (Innercool Therapies, Inc.) is an intravascular cooling catheter system consisting of the Celsius Control catheter,circulating set, and the Celsius Control console. Based on clinical studies, the system has recently received Food and Drug Administration approval for use as a device to induce, maintain, and reverse mild hypothermia in neurosurgical patients in surgery and recovery/intensive care, and is currently being marketed in the 10.7 Fr and 14 Fr catheter sizes. It works to regulate temperature by circulating sterile saline through the Celsius Control console, which contains an integrated assembly comprising a temperature and pressure sensing block,supply and return lines, and a 20-{m} filter with connective tubing and an independent heat exchanger and pump. The system relies on digital core temperature readings from either esophageal or bladder temperature probes. After the system is turned on, approximately 150 mL of sterile saline solution is pumped through the console and is cooled to achieve the preset temperature. This cooled saline subsequently circulates from the console through the catheter in a closed-loop manner. The distal portion of the catheter incorporates a flexible distal metallic heat transfer element that is designed to allow for direct exchange of thermal energy with blood circulating around the catheter.

  18. Optical controlled keyboard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzyński, Łukasz; Długosz, Dariusz; Niewiarowski, Bartosz; Zajkowski, Maciej

    2011-06-01

    Control systems of our computers are common devices, based on the manipulation of keys or a moving ball. Completely healthy people have no problems with the operation of such devices. Human disability makes everyday activities become a challenge and create trouble. When a man can not move his hands, the work becomes difficult or often impossible. Controlled optical keyboard is a modern device that allows to bypass the limitations of disability limbs. The use of wireless optical transmission allows to control computer using a laser beam, which cooperates with the photodetectors. The article presents the construction and operation of non-contact optical keyboard for people with disabilities.

  19. Modern tandem control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, J. R.; Marsaudon, J. C.

    1993-04-01

    Nowadays, tandem electrostatic accelerators can benefit greatly from the growing possibilities provided by modern control facilities. Controlling an electrostatic accelerator first requires the solution of technological problems raised by the necessity of fitting inside the tank equipment which is highly stressed by the physical environment. Then, these controls can take advantage of new techniques which appear on the market. Present computer technology provides cheap powerful workstations for efficient operator interfacing, and new modular and distributed control concepts have been developed for general use in experimental physics, in data acquisition and in control systems. The general trend towards standardization is now accepted for both hardware and software and this brings benefits to the designer and the user.

  20. Shock absorber control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Y.; Ohira, M.; Ushida, M.; Miyagawa, T.; Shimodaira, T.

    1987-01-13

    A shock absorber control system is described for controlling a dampening force of a shock absorber of a vehicle comprising: setting means for setting a desired dampening force changeable within a predetermined range; drive means for driving the shock absorber to change the dampening force of the shock absorber linearly; control means for controlling the drive means in accordance with the desired dampening force when the setting of the desired dampening force has been changed; detecting means for detecting an actual dampening force of the shock absorber; and correcting means for correcting the dampening force of the shock absorber by controlling the drive means in accordance with a difference between the desired dampening force and the detected actual dampening force.

  1. Engine speed control system

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, K.

    1983-02-01

    An idle control system for an automobile internal combustion engine includes an idle control unit for controlling the operation of an electromagnetically operated actuator. While the engine has a combustible mixture intake passage leading to the engine and a throttle valve operatively positioned inside the mixture intake passage for controlling the flow of a combustible air-fuel mixture towards the engine, the actuator is utilized to adjust either the effective cross sectional area of a bypass air passage leading from the air source to the mixture intake passage at a position downstream of the throttle valve or the opening of the throttle valve, to control the engine speed during idling to a predetermined value.

  2. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controllable mixing system (210) in which a plurality of mixing assemblies (10a-10e) are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly (10) employs a central chamber (16) and two outer, upper and lower, chambers (12, 14). Valves (18, 20) are positioned between chambers, and these valves (18, 20) for a given mixing assembly (10) are operated by upper and lower control rotors (29), which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors (270, 270b). Additionally, a hoop (278) is compressed around upper control rotors (29) and a hoop (278b) is compressed around lower control rotors (29) to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors (29) and drive rotors (270, 270b). The drive rollers (270, 270b) are driven by a motor (213).

  3. RHIC control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, D. S.; Binello, S.; Buxton, W.; Clifford, T.; D'Ottavio, T.; Hartmann, H.; Hoff, L. T.; Katz, R.; Kennell, S.; Kerner, T.; Laster, J.; Lee, R. C.; Marusic, A.; Michnoff, R.; Morris, J.; Oerter, B. R.; Olsen, R.; Piacentino, J.; Skelly, J. F.

    2003-03-01

    The RHIC control system architecture is hierarchical and consists of two physical layers with a fiber-optic network connection. The Front-End Level systems consist of VME chassis with processors running a real-time operating system and both VME I/O modules and remote bus interfaces. Accelerator device software interfaces are implemented as objects in C++. The network implementation uses high speed, switched Ethernet technology. Specialized hardware modules were built for waveform control of power supplies, multiplexed signal acquisition, and timing services. The Console Level systems are Unix workstations. A strong emphasis has been given to developing highly reusable, standard software tools for use in building physics and diagnostic application software.

  4. Fielding Army Weapon Systems: Experiences and Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    A3 Tank; Vulcan/Chaparral System M198 Howitzer; Improved TOW Vehicle, M901, TACFIRE Black Hawk Helicopter,, AH-lS Cobra Helicopter; o TSQ -73 Missile...new systems. These included TACFIRE, M198 Howitzer, BlackHawk helicopter, and TSQ -73 Missile Minder. Other systems, also fielded in 1979, that...901 TSQ -73 Missile Minder AH-lS Cobra Helicopter (fielded in 1977-78) Detailed descriptions of these systems are in Annex B. Rather than discuss

  5. NASA's Earth Science Data Systems - Lessons Learned and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2010-01-01

    In order to meet the increasing demand for Earth Science data, NASA has significantly improved the Earth Science Data Systems over the last two decades. This improvement is reviewed in this slide presentation. Many Earth Science disciplines have been able to access the data that is held in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) at the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) that forms the core of the data system.

  6. Lessons about Virtual-Environment Software Systems from 20 years of VE building

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Russell M.; Jerald, Jason; VanderKnyff, Chris; Wendt, Jeremy; Borland, David; Marshburn, David; Sherman, William R.; Whitton, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    What are desirable and undesirable features of virtual-environment (VE) software architectures? What should be present (and absent) from such systems if they are to be optimally useful? How should they be structured? To help answer these questions we present experience from application designers, toolkit designers, and VE system architects along with examples of useful features from existing systems. Topics are organized under the major headings of: 3D space management, supporting display hardware, interaction, event management, time management, computation, portability, and the observation that less can be better. Lessons learned are presented as discussion of the issues, field experiences, nuggets of knowledge, and case studies. PMID:20567602

  7. The ALMA Real Time Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Jeffrey S.; Juerges, Thomas A.; Marson, Ralph G.

    2009-01-01

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is a revolutionary millimeter and submillimeter array being developed on the Atacama plateau of northern Chile. An international partnership lead by NRAO, ESO, and NAOJ this powerful and flexible telescope will provide unprecedented observations of this relatively unexplored frequency range. The control subsystem for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array must coordinate the monitor and control of at least sixty six antennas (in four different styles), two correlators, and all of the ancillary equipment (samplers, local oscillators, front ends, etc.). This equipment will be spread over tens of kilometers and operated remotely. Operation of the array requires a robust, scalable, and maintainable real time control system. The real time control system is responsible for monitoring and control of any devices where there are fixed deadlines. Examples in the ALMA context are antenna pointing and fringe tracking. Traditionally the real time portion of a large software system is an intricate and error prone portion of the software. As a result the real time portion is very expensive in terms of effort expended both during construction and during maintenance phases of a project. The ALMA real time control system uses a Linux based real time operating system to interact with the hardware and the CORBA based ALMA Common Software to communicate in the distributed computing environment. Mixing the requirements of real time computing and the non-deterministic CORBA middleware has produced an interesting design. We discuss the architecture, design, and implementation of the ALMA real time control system. Highlight some lessons learned along the way, and justify our assertion that this should be the last large scale real time control system in radio astronomy.

  8. The next step in translational research: lessons learned from the first preclinical randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Llovera, Gemma; Liesz, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    For years, low reproducibility of preclinical trials and poor translation of promising preclinical therapies to the clinic have posed major challenges to translational research in most biomedical fields. To overcome the limitations that stand between experimental and clinical research, international consortia have attempted to establish standardized guidelines for study design and for reporting the resulting data. In addition, multicenter preclinical randomized controlled trials (pRCTs) have been proposed as a suitable tool for 'bridging the gap' between experimental research and clinical trials. We recently reported the design and results of the first such pRCT in which we confirmed the feasibility of using a coordinated approach with standardized protocols in collaboration with independent multinational research centers. However, despite its successes, this first pRCT also had several difficulties, particularly with respect to following the protocols established in the study design and analyzing the data. Here, we review our experiences performing the study, and we analyze and discuss the lessons learned from performing the first pRCT. Moreover, we provide suggestions regarding how obstacles can be overcome to improve the performance and outcome of future pRCT studies. Translational research is hampered by low reproducibility of preclinical studies and countless failed clinical trials. International consortia have proposed preclinical multicenter trials as an intermediate step to overcome this 'translational roadblock'. We have recently performed the first such preclinical randomized controlled trial (pRCT) by adopting key elements of clinical study design to preclinical research. In this review, we discuss the lessons learned from this trial and provide suggestions how to optimize future pRCTs. This article is part of the 60th Anniversary special issue.

  9. How to build an information gathering and processing system: lessons from naturally and artificially intelligent systems.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Jackie; Demery, Zoe P; Arriola-Rios, Veronica; Sloman, Aaron

    2012-02-01

    Imagine a situation in which you had to design a physical agent that could collect information from its environment, then store and process that information to help it respond appropriately to novel situations. What kinds of information should it attend to? How should the information be represented so as to allow efficient use and re-use? What kinds of constraints and trade-offs would there be? There are no unique answers. In this paper, we discuss some of the ways in which the need to be able to address problems of varying kinds and complexity can be met by different information processing systems. We also discuss different ways in which relevant information can be obtained, and how different kinds of information can be processed and used, by both biological organisms and artificial agents. We analyse several constraints and design features, and show how they relate both to biological organisms, and to lessons that can be learned from building artificial systems. Our standpoint overlaps with Karmiloff-Smith (1992) in that we assume that a collection of mechanisms geared to learning and developing in biological environments are available in forms that constrain, but do not determine, what can or will be learnt by individuals.

  10. Lessons to be Learned from Natural Control of HIV – Future Directions, Therapeutic, and Preventive Implications

    PubMed Central

    Shasha, David; Walker, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating data generated from persons who naturally control HIV without the need for antiretroviral treatment has led to significant insights into the possible mechanisms of durable control of AIDS virus infection. At the center of this control is the HIV-specific CD8 T cell response, and the basis for this CD8-mediated control is gradually being revealed. Genome wide association studies coupled with HLA sequence data implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major genetic factor modulating durable control of HIV, but host genetic factors account for only around 20% of the variability in control. Other factors including specific functional characteristics of the TCR clonotypes generated in vivo, targeting of vulnerable regions of the virus that lead to fitness impairing mutations, immune exhaustion, and host restriction factors that limit HIV replication all have been shown to additionally contribute to control. Moreover, emerging data indicate that the CD8+ T cell response may be critical for attempts to purge virus infected cells following activation of the latent reservoir, and thus lessons learned from elite controllers (ECs) are likely to impact the eradication agenda. On-going efforts are also needed to understand and address the role of immune activation in disease progression, as it becomes increasingly clear that durable immune control in ECs comes at a cost. Taken together, the research achievements in the attempt to unlock the mechanisms behind natural control of HIV will continue to be an important source of insights and ideas in the continuous search after an effective HIV vaccine, and for the attempts to achieve a sterilizing or functional cure in HIV positive patients with progressive infection. PMID:23805139

  11. Active control system trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yore, E. E.; Gunderson, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The active control concepts which achieve the benefit of improved mission performance and lower cost and generate system trends towards improved dynamic performance, more integration, and digital fly by wire mechanization are described. Analytical issues and implementation requirements and tools and approaches developed to address the analytical and implementation issues are briefly discussed.

  12. Timing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Gordon A. (Inventor); Wells, Jr., George H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A timing control system is disclosed which is particularly useful in connection with simulated mortar shells. Special circuitry is provided to assure that the shell does not overshoot, but rather detonates early in case of an improper condition; this ensures that ground personnel will not be harmed by a delayed detonation. The system responds to an externally applied frequency control code which is configured to avoid any confusion between different control modes. A premature detonation routine is entered in case an improper time-setting signal is entered, or if the shell is launched before completion of the time-setting sequence. Special provisions are also made for very early launch situations and improper detonator connections. An alternate abort mode is provided to discharge the internal power supply without a detonation in a manner that can be externally monitored, thereby providing a mechanism for non-destructive testing. The abort mode also accelerates the timing function for rapid testing.

  13. Electric turbocompound control system

    DOEpatents

    Algrain, Marcelo C.

    2007-02-13

    Turbocompound systems can be used to affect engine operation using the energy in exhaust gas that is driving the available turbocharger. A first electrical device acts as a generator in response to turbocharger rotation. A second electrical device acts as a motor to put mechanical power into the engine, typically at the crankshaft. Apparatus, systems, steps, and methods are described to control the generator and motor operations to control the amount of power being recovered. This can control engine operation closer to desirable parameters for given engine-related operating conditions compared to actual. The electrical devices can also operate in "reverse," going between motor and generator functions. This permits the electrical device associated with the crankshaft to drive the electrical device associated with the turbocharger as a motor, overcoming deficient engine operating conditions such as associated with turbocharger lag.

  14. Timing control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiker, Gordon A.; Wells, George H., Jr.

    1987-09-01

    A timing control system is disclosed which is particularly useful in connection with simulated mortar shells. Special circuitry is provided to assure that the shell does not over shoot, but rather detonates early in case of an improper condition; this ensures that ground personnel will not be harmed by a delayed detonation. The system responds to an externally applied frequency control code which is configured to avoid any confusion between different control modes. A premature detonation routine is entered in case an improper time-setting signal is entered, or if the shell is launched before completion of the time-setting sequence. Special provisions are also made for very early launch situations and improper detonator connections. An alternate abort mode is provided to discharge the internal power supply without a detonation in a manner that can be externally monitored, thereby providing a mechanism for non-destructive testing. The abort mode also accelerates the timing function for rapid testing.

  15. Timing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, Gordon A. (Inventor); Wells, George H., Jr. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A timing control system is disclosed which is particularly useful in connection with simulated mortar shells. Special circuitry is provided to assure that the shell does not over shoot, but rather detonates early in case of an improper condition; this ensures that ground personnel will not be harmed by a delayed detonation. The system responds to an externally applied frequency control code which is configured to avoid any confusion between different control modes. A premature detonation routine is entered in case an improper time-setting signal is entered, or if the shell is launched before completion of the time-setting sequence. Special provisions are also made for very early launch situations and improper detonator connections. An alternate abort mode is provided to discharge the internal power supply without a detonation in a manner that can be externally monitored, thereby providing a mechanism for non-destructive testing. The abort mode also accelerates the timing function for rapid testing.

  16. Embedding research in health systems: lessons from complexity theory.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Louise; Wolfe, Charles; McKevitt, Christopher

    2016-07-22

    Internationally, there has been increasing focus on creating health research systems. This article aims to investigate the challenges of implementing apparently simple strategies to support the development of a health research system. We focus on a case study of an English National Health Service Hospital Trust that sought to implement the national recommendation that health organisations should introduce a statement about research on all patient admission letters. We apply core concepts from complexity theory to the case study and undertake a documentary analysis of the email dialogue between staff involved in implementing this initiative. The process of implementing a research statement in patient admission letters in one clinical service took 1 year and 21 days. The length of time needed was influenced firstly by adaptive self-organisation, underpinned by competing interests. Secondly, it was influenced by the relationship between systems, rather than simply being a product of issues within those systems. The relationship between the health system and the research system was weaker than might have been expected. Responsibilities were unclear, leading to confusion and delayed action. Conventional ways of thinking about organisations suggest that change happens when leaders and managers change the strategic vision, structure or procedures in an organisation and then persuade others to rationally implement the strategy. However, health research systems are complex adaptive systems characterised by high levels of unpredictability due to self-organisation and systemic interactions, which give rise to 'emergent' properties. We argue for the need to study how micro-processes of organisational dynamics may give rise to macro patterns of behaviour and strategic organisational direction and for the use of systems approaches to investigate the emergent properties of health research systems.

  17. Telerobot control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G. (Inventor); Tso, Kam S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to an operator interface for controlling a telerobot to perform tasks in a poorly modeled environment and/or within unplanned scenarios. The telerobot control system includes a remote robot manipulator linked to an operator interface. The operator interface includes a setup terminal, simulation terminal, and execution terminal for the control of the graphics simulator and local robot actuator as well as the remote robot actuator. These terminals may be combined in a single terminal. Complex tasks are developed from sequential combinations of parameterized task primitives and recorded teleoperations, and are tested by execution on a graphics simulator and/or local robot actuator, together with adjustable time delays. The novel features of this invention include the shared and supervisory control of the remote robot manipulator via operator interface by pretested complex tasks sequences based on sequences of parameterized task primitives combined with further teleoperation and run-time binding of parameters based on task context.

  18. Cryogenic Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Goloborod'ko, S.; /Fermilab

    1989-02-27

    The control system (CS) for the cryogenic arrangement of the DO Liquid Argon Calorimeter consists of a Texas instruments 560/565 Programmable Logical Controller (PLC), two remote bases with Remote Base Controllers and a corresponding set of input/output (I/O) modules, and a PC AST Premium 286 (IBM AT Compatible). The PLC scans a set of inputs and provides a set of outputs based on a ladder logic program and PID control loops. The inputs are logic or analog (current, voltage) signals from equipment status switches or transducers. The outputs are logic or analog (current or voltage) signals for switching solenoids and positioning pneumatic actuators. Programming of the PLC is preformed by using the TISOFT2/560/565 package, which is installed in the PC. The PC communicates to the PLC through a serial RS232 port and provides operator interface to the cryogenic process using Xpresslink software.

  19. Navigating institutional complexity in the health sector: lessons from tobacco control in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Lencucha, Raphael; Magati, Peter; Drope, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

     This research examines the institutional dynamics of tobacco control following the establishment of Kenya's 2007 landmark tobacco control legislation. Our analysis focuses specifically on coordination challenges within the health sector.  We conducted semi-structured interviews with key informants (n = 17) involved in tobacco regulation and control in Kenya. We recruited participants from different offices and sectors of government and non-governmental organizations.  We find that the main challenges toward successful implementation of tobacco control are a lack of coordination and clarity of mandate of the principal institutions involved in tobacco control efforts. In a related development, the passage of a new constitution in 2010 created structural changes that have affected the successful implementation of the country's tobacco control legislation.  We discuss how proponents of tobacco control navigated these two overarching institutional challenges. These findings point to the institutional factors that influence policy implementation extending beyond the traditional focus on the dynamic between government and the tobacco industry. These findings specifically point to the intragovernmental challenges that bear on policy implementation. The findings suggest that for effective implementation of tobacco control legislation and regulation, there is need for increased cooperation among institutions charged with tobacco control, particularly within or involving the Ministry of Health. Decisive leadership was also widely presented as a component of successful institutional reform.  This study points to the importance of coordinating policy development and implementation across levels of government and the need for leadership and clear mandates to guide cooperation within the health sector. The Kenyan experience offers useful lessons in the pitfalls of institutional incoherence, but more importantly, the value of investing in and then promoting well

  20. Private Agricultural Extension System in Kenya: Practice and Policy Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muyanga, Milu; Jayne, T. S.

    2008-01-01

    Private extension system has been at the centre of a debate triggered by inefficient public agricultural extension. The debate is anchored on the premise that the private sector is more efficient in extension service delivery. This study evaluates the private extension system in Kenya. It employs qualitative and quantitative methods. The results…

  1. Space Moves: Adding Movement to Solar System Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Deborah Bainer; Heidorn, Brent

    2009-01-01

    Earth and space science figure prominently in the National Science Education Standards for levels 5-8 (NRC 1996). The Earth in the Solar System standard focuses on students' ability to understand (1) the composition of the solar system (Earth, Moon, Sun, planets with their moons, and smaller objects like asteroids and comets) and (2) that…

  2. System Quality Risk Assessment: Applications and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Gelston, Gariann M.; Smith, Michael A.; Schwartz, Deborah S.

    2006-12-05

    News Releases Court Audits When does research become a verifiable product? When do the tools used to solve a problem become part of the research "system" and thus fall under the quality standard requirements? What should/is the system be used for? Research Typically Starts Small

  3. Space Moves: Adding Movement to Solar System Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Deborah Bainer; Heidorn, Brent

    2009-01-01

    Earth and space science figure prominently in the National Science Education Standards for levels 5-8 (NRC 1996). The Earth in the Solar System standard focuses on students' ability to understand (1) the composition of the solar system (Earth, Moon, Sun, planets with their moons, and smaller objects like asteroids and comets) and (2) that…

  4. A sustainable primary care system: lessons from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Faber, Marjan J; Burgers, Jako S; Westert, Gert P

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch primary care system has drawn international attention, because of its high performance at low cost. Primary care practices are easily accessible during office hours and collaborate in a unique out-of-hours system. After the reforms in 2006, there are no copayments for patients receiving care in the primary care practice in which they are registered. Financial incentives support the transfer of care from hospital specialists to primary care physicians, and task delegation from primary care physicians to practice nurses. Regional collaborative care groups of primary care practices offer disease management programs. The quality assessment system and the electronic medical record system are predominantly driven by health care professionals. Bottom-up and top-down activities contributed to a successful Dutch primary care system.

  5. Microprocessor control for standardized power control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. G.; Perry, E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of microcomputers in space-oriented power systems as a replacement for existing inflexible analog type controllers has been proposed. This study examines multiprocessor systems, various modularity concepts and presents a conceptualized power system incorporating a multiprocessor controller as well as preliminary results from a breadboard model of the proposed system.

  6. Cleared for Launch - Lessons Learned from the OSIRIS-REx System Requirements Verification Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Craig; Adams, Angela; Williams, Bradley; Goodloe, Colby

    2017-01-01

    Requirements verification of a large flight system is a challenge. It is especially challenging for engineers taking on their first role in space systems engineering. This paper describes our approach to verification of the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) system requirements. It also captures lessons learned along the way from developing systems engineers embroiled in this process. We begin with an overview of the mission and science objectives as well as the project requirements verification program strategy. A description of the requirements flow down is presented including our implementation for managing the thousands of program and element level requirements and associated verification data. We discuss both successes and methods to improve the managing of this data across multiple organizational interfaces. Our approach to verifying system requirements at multiple levels of assembly is presented using examples from our work at instrument, spacecraft, and ground segment levels. We include a discussion of system end-to-end testing limitations and their impacts to the verification program. Finally, we describe lessons learned that are applicable to all emerging space systems engineers using our unique perspectives across multiple organizations of a large NASA program.

  7. Support of an Active Science Project by a Large Information System: Lessons for the EOS Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelici, Gary L.; Skiles, J. W.; Popovici, Lidia Z.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of large information systems to support the changing data requirements of active science projects is being tested in a NASA collaborative study. This paper briefly profiles both the active science project and the large information system involved in this effort and offers some observations about the effectiveness of the project support. This is followed by lessons that are important for those participating in large information systems that need to support active science projects or that make available the valuable data produced by these projects. We learned in this work that it is difficult for a large information system focused on long term data management to satisfy the requirements of an on-going science project. For example, in order to provide the best service, it is important for all information system staff to keep focused on the needs and constraints of the scientists in the development of appropriate services. If the lessons learned in this and other science support experiences are not applied by those involved with large information systems of the EOS (Earth Observing System) era, then the final data products produced by future science projects may not be robust or of high quality, thereby making the conduct of the project science less efficacious and reducing the value of these unique suites of data for future research.

  8. Support of an Active Science Project by a Large Information System: Lessons for the EOS Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelici, Gary L.; Skiles, J. W.; Popovici, Lidia Z.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of large information systems to support the changing data requirements of active science projects is being tested in a NASA collaborative study. This paper briefly profiles both the active science project and the large information system involved in this effort and offers some observations about the effectiveness of the project support. This is followed by lessons that are important for those participating in large information systems that need to support active science projects or that make available the valuable data produced by these projects. We learned in this work that it is difficult for a large information system focused on long term data management to satisfy the requirements of an on-going science project. For example, in order to provide the best service, it is important for all information system staff to keep focused on the needs and constraints of the scientists in the development of appropriate services. If the lessons learned in this and other science support experiences are not applied by those involved with large information systems of the EOS (Earth Observing System) era, then the final data products produced by future science projects may not be robust or of high quality, thereby making the conduct of the project science less efficacious and reducing the value of these unique suites of data for future research.

  9. System engineering and science projects: lessons from MeerKAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapp, Francois

    2016-08-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a large science project planning to commence construction of the world's largest Radio Telescope after 2018. MeerKAT is one of the precursor projects to the SKA, based on the same site that will host the SKA Mid array in the central Karoo area of South Africa. From the perspective of signal processing hardware development, we analyse the challenges that MeerKAT encountered and extrapolate them to SKA in order to prepare the System Engineering and Project Management methods that could contribute to a successful completion of SKA. Using the MeerKAT Digitiser, Correlator/Beamformer and Time and Frequency Reference Systems as an example, we will trace the risk profile and subtle differences in engineering approaches of these systems over time and show the effects of varying levels of System Engineering rigour on the evolution of their risk profiles. It will be shown that the most rigorous application of System Engineering discipline resulted in the most substantial reduction in risk over time. Since the challenges faced by SKA are not limited to that of MeerKAT, we also look into how that translates to a system development where there is substantial complexity in both the created system as well as the creating system. Since the SKA will be designed and constructed by consortia made up from the ten member countries, there are many additional complexities to the organisation creating the system - a challenge the MeerKAT project did not encounter. Factors outside of engineering, for instance procurement models and political interests, also play a more significant role, and add to the project risks of SKA when compared to MeerKAT.

  10. [New vector control measures implemented between 2005 and 2011 on Reunion Island: lessons learned from chikungunya epidemic].

    PubMed

    Bâville, M; Dehecq, J S; Reilhes, O; Margueron, T; Polycarpe, D; Filleul, L

    2012-03-01

    A major chikungunya outbreak concerned 38% of people living in Reunion Island in 2005-2006. Chikungunya is an arthropod-born-virus disease conveyed by mosquitoes called Aedes albopictus. The health agency in Indian Ocean is responsible for vector control. Previously, in the early 40s, vector control concerned only malaria prophylaxis in La Réunion. Then, during the chikungunya outbreak, a new vector control team was installed and learned from this epidemic. The lessons drawn from chikungunya outbreak in La Réunion are about global executive management and organization linked the local partners and population. The lessons also concern technical topics such as the need of scientific research about vectors and vector-control methods. Finally, the regional cooperation in Indian Ocean (Réunion, Maurice, Seychelles, Comoros, Madagascar) has to be developed to share epidemiologic and entomologic data in order to prevent new chikungunya or dengue outbreak.

  11. Management control system description

    SciTech Connect

    Bence, P. J.

    1990-10-01

    This Management Control System (MCS) description describes the processes used to manage the cost and schedule of work performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Richland, Washington. Westinghouse Hanford will maintain and use formal cost and schedule management control systems, as presented in this document, in performing work for the DOE-RL. This MCS description is a controlled document and will be modified or updated as required. This document must be approved by the DOE-RL; thereafter, any significant change will require DOE-RL concurrence. Westinghouse Hanford is the DOE-RL operations and engineering contractor at the Hanford Site. Activities associated with this contract (DE-AC06-87RL10930) include operating existing plant facilities, managing defined projects and programs, and planning future enhancements. This document is designed to comply with Section I-13 of the contract by providing a description of Westinghouse Hanford's cost and schedule control systems used in managing the above activities. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Dynamitron control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisanti, Thomas F.

    2005-12-01

    The Dynamitron control system utilizes the latest personal computer technology in control circuitry and components. Both the DPC-2000 and newer Millennium series of control systems make use of their modular architecture in both software and hardware to keep up with customer and engineering demands. This also allows the main structure of the software to remain constant for the user while software drivers are easily changed as hardware demands are modified and improved. The system is presented as four units; the Remote I/O (Input/Output), Local Analog and Digital I/O, Operator Interface and the Main Computer. The operator is provided with a selection of many informative screen displays. The control program handles all graphic screen displays and the updating of these screens directly; it does not communicate to a display terminal. This adds to the quick response and excellent operator feedback received while operating the accelerator. The CPU also has the ability to store and record all process variable setpoints for each product that will be treated. All process parameters are printed to a report at regular intervals during a process run for record keeping.

  13. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer, answers questions during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned event in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the presentation was "To There and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  14. Lessons learned from the NEPTUNE power system, and other deep-sea adventures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    2006-11-01

    The development of underwater science systems presents some challenging technical issues. It seems that the best efforts of the engineers and scientists involved are sometimes inadequate, and projects that once seemed straightforward end up being late or over-budget, or cancelled. This paper will review some of the lessons that may be learned from the examples of three science projects in the deep ocean: the Deep Underwater Muon and Neutrino Detector neutrino detector, the H2O observatory, and the power system part of the NEPTUNE regional cabled observatory.

  15. High Gain Antenna System Deployment Mechanism Integration, Characterization, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parong, Fil; Russell, Blair; Garcen, Walter; Rose, Chris; Johnson, Chris; Huber, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The integration and deployment testing of the High Gain Antenna System (HGAS) for the Global Precipitation Measurement mission is summarized. The HGAS deployment mechanism is described. The gravity negation system configuration and its influence on vertical, ground-based deployment tests are presented with test data and model predictions. A focus is made on the late discovery and resolution of a potentially mission-degrading deployment interference condition. The interaction of the flight deployment mechanism, gravity-negation mechanism, and use of dynamic modeling is described and lessons learned presented

  16. High Gain Antenna System Deployment Mechanism Integration, Characterization, and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parong, Fil; Russell, Blair; Garcen, Walter; Rose, Chris; Johnson, Chris; Huber, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The integration and deployment testing of the High Gain Antenna System for the Global Precipitation Measurement mission is summarized. The HGAS deployment mechanism is described. The gravity negation system configuration and its influence on vertical, ground-based, deployment tests are presented with test data and model predictions. A focus is made on the late discovery and resolution of a potentially mission degrading deployment interference condition. The interaction of the flight deployment mechanism, gravity negation mechanism, and use of dynamic modeling is described and lessons learned presented.

  17. A generic system for critiquing physicians' prescriptions: usability, satisfaction and lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Ebrahiminia, Vahid; Seroussi, Brigitte; Bouaud, Jacques; Simon, Christia; Favre, Madeleine; Falcoff, Hector; Venot, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems have been developed to help physicians to take clinical guidelines into account during consultations. The ASTI critiquing module is one such systems; it provides the physician with automatic criticisms when a drug prescription does not follow the guidelines. It was initially developed for hypertension and type 2 diabetes, but is designed to be generic enough for application to all chronic diseases. We present here the results of usability and satisfaction evaluations for the ASTI critiquing module, obtained with GPs for a newly implemented guideline concerning dyslipaemia, and we discuss the lessons learnt and the difficulties encountered when building a generic DSS for critiquing physicians' prescriptions.

  18. Administrative compensation for medical injuries: lessons from three foreign systems.

    PubMed

    Mello, Michelle M; Kachalia, Allen; Studdert, David M

    2011-07-01

    The United States requires patients injured by medical negligence to seek compensation through lawsuits, an approach that has drawbacks related to fairness, cost, and impact on medical care. Several countries, including New Zealand, Sweden, and Denmark, have replaced litigation with administrative compensation systems for patients who experience an avoidable medical injury. Sometimes called "no-fault" systems, such schemes enable patients to file claims for compensation without using an attorney. A governmental or private adjudicating organization uses neutral medical experts to evaluate claims of injury and does not require patients to prove that health care providers were negligent in order to receive compensation. Information from claims is used to analyze opportunities for patient safety improvement. The systems have successfully limited liability costs while improving injured patients' access to compensation. American policymakers may find many of the elements of these countries' systems to be transferable to demonstration projects in the U.S.

  19. Lessons learned in systems thinking approach for evaluation planning.

    PubMed

    Williams, John C; Costich, Julia; Hacker, William D; Davis, James S

    2010-01-01

    The role of systems thinking is addressed in the context of a public health department-academic collaboration to plan the evaluation of a learning management system. Findings suggest new directions for public health practitioners and researchers who are responsible for ensuring that public health workforce training efforts, and other programs and services, have the intended impact on public health workers' competence and the public's health.

  20. Lessons from Jurassic Park: patients as complex adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Katerndahl, David A

    2009-08-01

    With realization that non-linearity is generally the rule rather than the exception in nature, viewing patients and families as complex adaptive systems may lead to a better understanding of health and illness. Doctors who successfully practise the 'art' of medicine may recognize non-linear principles at work without having the jargon needed to label them. Complex adaptive systems are systems composed of multiple components that display complexity and adaptation to input. These systems consist of self-organized components, which display complex dynamics, ranging from simple periodicity to chaotic and random patterns showing trends over time. Understanding the non-linear dynamics of phenomena both internal and external to our patients can (1) improve our definition of 'health'; (2) improve our understanding of patients, disease and the systems in which they converge; (3) be applied to future monitoring systems; and (4) be used to possibly engineer change. Such a non-linear view of the world is quite congruent with the generalist perspective.

  1. The Media and Controlled Substances; Anti-Drug Legislation. Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laverdure, Sharon

    1991-01-01

    Provides two lesson plans for classroom use. Focuses on media influence on the use of alcohol and tobacco and on regulatory laws and their effect on drug use. Identifies connections that can be made to textbooks and magazine articles, as well as suggestions for opening, developing, and concluding each lesson. (DK)

  2. Lesson Study to Scale up Research-Based Knowledge: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Fractions Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine; Perry, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of fractions eludes many U.S. students, and research-based knowledge about fraction, such as the utility of linear representations, has not broadly influenced instruction. This randomized trial of lesson study supported by mathematical resources assigned 39 educator teams across the United States to locally managed lesson study…

  3. Promoting system-level learning from project-level lessons

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, Amos A. de; Runhaar, Hens A.C.; Runhaar, Piety R.; Kolhoff, Arend J.; Driessen, Peter P.J.

    2012-02-15

    A growing number of low and middle income nations (LMCs) have adopted some sort of system for environmental impact assessment (EIA). However, generally many of these EIA systems are characterised by a low performance in terms of timely information dissemination, monitoring and enforcement after licencing. Donor actors (such as the World Bank) have attempted to contribute to a higher performance of EIA systems in LMCs by intervening at two levels: the project level (e.g. by providing scoping advice or EIS quality review) and the system level (e.g. by advising on EIA legislation or by capacity building). The aims of these interventions are environmental protection in concrete cases and enforcing the institutionalisation of environmental protection, respectively. Learning by actors involved is an important condition for realising these aims. A relatively underexplored form of learning concerns learning at EIA system-level via project level donor interventions. This 'indirect' learning potentially results in system changes that better fit the specific context(s) and hence contribute to higher performances. Our exploratory research in Ghana and the Maldives shows that thus far, 'indirect' learning only occurs incidentally and that donors play a modest role in promoting it. Barriers to indirect learning are related to the institutional context rather than to individual characteristics. Moreover, 'indirect' learning seems to flourish best in large projects where donors achieved a position of influence that they can use to evoke reflection upon system malfunctions. In order to enhance learning at all levels donors should thereby present the outcomes of the intervention elaborately (i.e. discuss the outcomes with a large audience), include practical suggestions about post-EIS activities such as monitoring procedures and enforcement options and stimulate the use of their advisory reports to generate organisational memory and ensure a better information dissemination.

  4. Solar energy control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, J. R.

    1981-12-01

    A solar energy control system for a hot air type solar energy heating system wherein thermocouples are arranged to sense the temperature of a solar collector, a space to be heated, and a top and bottom of a heat storage unit is disclosed. Pertinent thermocouples are differentially connected together, and these are employed to effect the operation of dampers, a fan, and an auxiliary heat source. In accomplishing this, the differential outputs from the thermocouples are amplified by a single amplifier by multiplexing techniques. Additionally, the amplifier is corrected as to offset by including as one multiplex channel a common reference signal.

  5. Immunodeficiency and autoimmunity: lessons from systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Grammatikos, Alexandros P.; Tsokos, George C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that systemic autoimmunity and immunodeficiency are not separate entities, but rather interconnected processes. Immunodeficiency results from distinct defects of the immune response and primarily presents as infections, but also frequently with autoimmune features. Systemic autoimmunity is the combined effect of multiple genetic variations, infectious and immunoregulatory factors that result in dominant autoimmune manifestations in addition to frequent and opportunistic infections. The overlap in disease manifestations and symptoms suggests that immunodeficiency should be considered in the presence of autoimmunity, and vice versa. In this review, we present the shared or similar aspects of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity using systemic lupus erythematosus as a paradigm and discuss the implications for clinical care. PMID:22177735

  6. Lessons learned in transitioning to an open systems environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, Dillard E.; Green, David S.; Steger, Warren L.

    1994-01-01

    Software development organizations, both commercial and governmental, are undergoing rapid change spurred by developments in the computing industry. To stay competitive, these organizations must adopt new technologies, skills, and practices quickly. Yet even for an organization with a well-developed set of software engineering models and processes, transitioning to a new technology can be expensive and risky. Current industry trends are leading away from traditional mainframe environments and toward the workstation-based, open systems world. This paper presents the experiences of software engineers on three recent projects that pioneered open systems development for NASA's Flight Dynamics Division of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC).

  7. The UMC control system

    SciTech Connect

    Dallard, K.E.; Adams, R.J.

    1983-05-01

    The control system for the Central Cormorant Underwater Manifold Centre (UMC) is an important step forward in developing the technology of subsea production. It provides reliable, fast operation of over 250 UMC valves and sensors at a distance of 7 kilometres. Included in the paper is an overview of the complete control system with selected components described in more detail. Principal guidelines which shaped the final design configuration are also discussed and problems encountered during design and manufacture are highlighted. The paper stresses the thorough testing that was an essential requirement prior to installation. Finally, general conclusions are drawn about the approach taken which would be of benefit to similar projects in the future.

  8. Challenges and Lessons Learned From Resurrecting a Legacy Research Flight Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dees, Ray A.; Moua, Cheng M.

    2010-01-01

    Resurrecting the legacy Inner Loop Thrust Vectoring research flight controller to investigate the tail shock region brought unique challenges. This report documents these challenges and lessons learned from a stability and controls perspective. The flight test approach for flight envelope expansion and probing tests, as well as limited flight test results, are presented. Recent advances in sonic boom reduction technology have contributed to a resurgent interest in civilian supersonic cruise flight. These advances have focused only on fore body shaping, however, and little, if any, experimental flight data are available to develop and validate design tools for the tail shock region. In January of 2009, the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center completed research flights to investigate the tail shock region of a highly modified F-15 aircraft by probing the shock waves around it, using another F-15 aircraft. To adjust the lift distribution and plume shape, a decade-old research flight controller from the Inner Loop Thrust Vectoring project was required. To investigate the tail shock region, the lift distribution was changed by adjusting the canard position, and the plume shape was changed by adjusting the nozzle area and thrust vectoring.

  9. Linking Secondary and Postsecondary Systems: Lessons from Indiana. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Youth Policy Forum, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This issue brief is focused on policies and practices that improve college and career readiness by strengthening the transition from high school to postsecondary education. The brief is largely based on a February, 2009 American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) field trip to Indiana, and details the cross-system efforts implemented to help more of the…

  10. Lessons from Restructuring the University of Maine System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattenaude, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Even before the international financial crisis, the University of Maine System was looking at a $42.8 million projected annual shortfall between revenues and expenses within four years if it continued business as usual. In this article, the author describes the approach used to deal with a rapidly growing structural gap in the finances of the…

  11. OAJ control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, J. L.; Yanes-Díaz, A.; Rueda-Teruel, S.; Luis-Simoes, R.; Chueca, S.; Lasso-Cabrera, N. M.; Bello, R.; Jiménez, D.; Suárez, O.; Guillén, L.; López-Alegre, G.; Rodríguez, M. A.; de Castro, S.; Nevot, C.; Sánchez-Artigot, J.; Moles, M.; Cenarro, A. J.; Marín-Franch, A.; Ederoclite, A.; Varela, J.; Valdivielso, L.; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D.; López-Sainz, A.; Hernández-Fuertes, J.; Díaz-Martín, M. C.; Iglesias-Marzoa, R.; Abril, J.; Lamadrid, J. L.; Maicas, N.; Rodríguez, S.; Tilve, V.; Civera, T.; Muniesa, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    The Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ) is a new astronomical facility located at the Sierra de Javalambre (Teruel, Spain) whose primary role will be to conduct all-sky astronomical surveys leveraging two unprecedented telescopes with unusually large fields of view: the JST/T250, a 2.55 m telescope with a 3 deg field of view, and the JAST/T80, an 83 cm telescope with a 2 deg field of view. The immediate objective of these telescopes for the next years is carrying out two unique photometric surveys covering several thousands square degrees: J-PAS and J-PLUS, each of them with a wide range of scientific applications, like e.g. large structure cosmology and Dark Energy, galaxy evolution, supernovae, Milky Way structure and exoplanets. JST and JAST will be equipped with panoramic cameras being developed within the J-PAS collaboration, JPCam and T80Cam respectively, which make use of large format (˜10{k}×10{k}) CCDs covering the entire focal plane. CEFCA engineering team has been designing the OAJ control system as a global concept to manage, monitor, control and service the observatory systems, not only astronomical but also infrastructure and other facilities. We will give an overview of OAJ's control system from an engineering point of view.

  12. NASA Crew Exploration Vehicle, Thermal Protection System, Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Reuther, James

    2008-01-01

    The Orion (CEV) thermal protection system (TPS) advanced development project (ADP) was initiated in late 2006 to reduce developmental risk by significant investment in multiple heat shield architectural solutions that can meet the needs both the Low Earth orbit (LEO) and Lunar return missions. At the same time, the CEV TPS ADP was also charged with developing a preliminary design for the heat shield to meet the PDR requirement and at the time of the PDR, transfer the design to Lockheed- Martin, the prime contractor. We reported on the developmental activities of the first 18 months at the IPPW5 in Bordeaux, France, last summer. In June 08, at the time of the IPPW6, the CEV TPS ADP would have nearly completed the preparation for the Orion PDR and would be close to the original three-year mark. We plan to report on the progress at the Atlanta workshop. In the past year, Orion TPS ADP investment in TPS Technology, especially in PICA ablative Heat-shield design, development, testing and engineering (DDTE) has paid off in enabling MSL mission to switch from SLA 561 V heat shield to PICA heat shield. CEV TPS ADP considered SLA 561 V as a candidate for LEO missions and our testing identified failure modes in SLA and as a result, we dropped SLA for further evaluation. This close synergy between two projects is a highly visible example of how investment in technology areas can and does benefit multiple missions. In addition, CEV TPS ADP has been able to revive the Apollo ablative system namely AVCOAT honeycomb architecture as an alternate to the baseline PICA architecture and we plan to report the progress we have made in AVCOAT. CEV TPS ADP has invested considerable resources in developing analytical models for PICA and AVCOAT, material property measurements that is essential to the design of the heat-shield, in arcjet testing, in understanding the differences between different arc jet facilities, namely NASA Ames, NASA JSC and Air Force's AEDC, and in Non

  13. Lessons learned from MARECS and ECS EMC system tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, I. D.

    1982-07-01

    The advantages to spacecraft EMC control of comparing cable-coupled emission levels, measured by test probes mounted on the cable harnesses of MARECS and ECS with predictions obtained by SEMCAP modelling are shown. The use of simple tests and deductions to investigate discrepancies is advocated. The MARECS-ECS experience enabled common resistance coupling to be determined and showed that misleading effects of high background emissions were probably due to Earth loops in the test configuration. It highlighted difficulties in interpreting measurements made by photographic recording of spectrum analyzer displays, and underlined the logical implications of the variability of the bundle-shielding effect on the EMC validation of sister spacecraft.

  14. Lessons learned from an Internet GP information system.

    PubMed

    Briggs, J S; Bradley, M P

    1998-01-01

    We describe the prototype of an application that in actual use would allow GPs to find out more information about consultants at hospitals. This would aid the GP in making the decision about which consultant a patient should be referred to. The requirements of the application from the GP's perspective are described, together with some of the issues that have to be resolved before hospitals can provide the necessary information in a standard format. The application is implemented as a client--server system using standard Internet technologies such as Java and HTML. This architecture has a number of advantages but also revealed some issues concerning security and the format of data, among other things. The project showed that there is a desire for such a system and that that desire can be fulfilled at a relatively low cost.

  15. Visual disturbance with systemic symptoms: old lessons revisited.

    PubMed

    Hume, Megan E; Fernandes, Peter M; MacLean, Kirsty; McRorie, Euan; Davenport, Richard

    2016-10-25

    We describe a retired physician who presented with visual disturbance and systemic symptoms. The presence of general malaise, headache and scalp tenderness, with raised inflammatory markers, suggested that giant cell arteritis (GCA) was the likely diagnosis. Rapid response to initial steroid therapy and histological evidence of inflammation in the temporal artery supported this diagnosis. The character of these visual symptoms was, however, atypical for GCA. The patient, who had heart valve disease, subsequently deteriorated and developed further symptoms warranting investigation of bacterial endocarditis. Retinal emboli are a recognised complication of endocarditis, which could account for these visual symptoms. Moreover, interpretation of the temporal artery biopsy is limited in the context of existing steroid therapy. Our patient was consequently diagnosed with bacterial endocarditis. This case reminds us to consider the wider differential diagnoses for headache, visual disturbance and systemic symptoms, where echocardiogram and blood cultures may be crucial to reach the diagnosis.

  16. Polio Endgame: Lessons Learned From the Immunization Systems Management Group.

    PubMed

    Zipursky, Simona; Vandelaer, Jos; Brooks, Alan; Dietz, Vance; Kachra, Tasleem; Farrell, Margaret; Ottosen, Ann; Sever, John L; Zaffran, Michel J

    2017-07-01

    The Immunization Systems Management Group (IMG) was established to coordinate and oversee objective 2 of the Polio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018, namely, (1) introduction of ≥1 dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine in all 126 countries using oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) only as of 2012, (2) full withdrawal of OPV, starting with the withdrawal of its type 2 component, and (3) using polio assets to strengthen immunization systems in 10 priority countries. The IMG's inclusive, transparent, and partnership-focused approach proved an effective means of leveraging the comparative and complementary strengths of each IMG member agency. This article outlines 10 key factors behind the IMG's success, providing a potential set of guiding principles for the establishment and implementation of other interagency collaborations and initiatives beyond the polio sphere. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  17. Lessons From Army System Developments. Volume 2: Case Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Aeronautics (AIAA), February 1983, p37 22 44 E-Mail response to questions regarding SIG-D, Dr. Paul Jacobs, January, 2002 45 Steven Low, E-mail response...at the time, Mr. James Ambrose, his predecessor Dr. Walter LaBerge , as well as the CEO of Hughes Aircraft Corporation (and former Director of... LaBerge provided oversight and assistance to the warhead integration and aerodynamic performance of TOVV-2. Dr. LaBerge was a systems engineer with

  18. Building inclusive health innovation systems: lessons from India.

    PubMed

    Abrol, Dinesh; Sundararaman, T; Madhavan, Harilal; Joseph, K J

    2016-11-03

    This article presents an overview of the changes that are taking place within the public and private health innovation systems in India including delivery of medical care, pharmaceutical products, medical devices, and Indian traditional medicine. The nature of the flaws that exist in the health innovation system is pinpointed. The response by the government, the health, technology and medical institutions, and the evolving industry is addressed on a national level. The article also discusses how the alignment of policies and institutions was developed within the scope of national health innovation systems, and how the government and the industry are dealing with the challenges to integrate health system, industry, and social policy development processes. Resumo: O artigo apresenta um panorama das mudanças atualmente em curso dentro dos sistemas público e privado de inovação em saúde na Índia, incluindo a prestação de serviços médicos, produtos farmacêuticos, dispositivos médicos e medicina tradicional indiana. É destacada a natureza das falhas que existem nos sistemas de inovação em saúde. As respostas do governo, das instituições médicas, de saúde e tecnologia e indústrias envolvidas, são abordadas em nível nacional. O artigo também discute como foi desenvolvido o alinhamento de políticas e instituições no escopo dos sistemas nacionais de inovação em saúde, e como governo e indústria estão lidando com os desafios para integrar o sistema de saúde, a indústria e o desenvolvimento de políticas sociais.

  19. Promoting central nervous system regeneration: lessons from cranial nerve I.

    PubMed

    Ruitenberg, Marc J; Vukovic, Jana

    2008-01-01

    The olfactory nerve differs from cranial nerves III-XII in that it contains a specialised type of glial cell, called 'olfactory ensheathing cell' (OEC), rather than Schwann cells. In addition, functional neurogenesis persists postnatally in the olfactory system, i.e. the primary olfactory pathway continuously rebuilds itself throughout adult life. The presence of OECs in the olfactory nerve is thought to be critical to this continuous growth process. Because of this intrinsic capacity for self-repair, the mammalian olfactory system has proved as a useful model in neuroregeneration studies. In addition, OECs have been used in transplantation studies to promote pathway regeneration elsewhere in the nervous system. Here, we have reviewed the parameters that allow for repair within the primary olfactory pathway and the role that OECs are thought to play in this process. We conclude that, in addition to intrinsic growth potential, the presence of an aligned substrate to the target structure is a fundamental prerequisite for appropriate restoration of connectivity with the olfactory bulb. Hence, strategies to promote regrowth of injured nerve pathways should incorporate usage of aligned, oriented substrates of OECs or other cellular conduits with additional intervention to boost neuronal cell body responses to injury and/or neutralisation of putative inhibitors.

  20. The influenza vaccine innovation system and lessons for PDPs.

    PubMed

    Huzair, Farah

    2012-03-01

    As Product Development Partnerships (PDPs) emerge and evolve in response to the need for vaccines, this paper re-examines the oldest and most successful PDP in the vaccine field; that which year after year, produces and reinvents influenza vaccines. This paper describes the influenza vaccine production and innovation system and reviews some of its most recent major innovations. Innovation in this system is a result of collaborative partnerships between various actors from both the public and private sector. It is argued that the influenza vaccine innovation system is a Product Development Partnership (PDP), be it an unconventional one, with a central coordination role allocated to the WHO rather than a private company or charitable/not for profit entity. The unusual structure of this PDP overcomes some of the organizational issues surrounding vaccine research and production faced by other documented PDPs. These are first, the need to coordinate knowledge flow via an effective knowledge broker. Second, the need to build in-house capacity and fund essential research and elements of production where private partners find involvement too risky or costly.

  1. EUnetHTA information management system: development and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Chalon, Patrice X; Kraemer, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the techniques used in achieving consensus on common standards to be implemented in the EUnetHTA Information Management System (IMS); and to describe how interoperability between tools was explored. Three face to face meetings were organized to identify and agree on common standards to the development of online tools. Two tools were created to demonstrate the added value of implementing interoperability standards at local levels. Developers of tools outside EUnetHTA were identified and contacted. Four common standards have been agreed on by consensus; and consequently all EUnetHTA tools have been modified or designed accordingly. RDF Site Summary (RSS) has demonstrated a good potential to support rapid dissemination of HTA information. Contacts outside EUnetHTA resulted in direct collaboration (HTA glossary, HTAi Vortal), evaluation of options for interoperability between tools (CRD HTA database) or a formal framework to prepare cooperation on concrete projects (INAHTA projects database). While being entitled a project on IT infrastructure, the work program was also about people. When having to agree on complex topics, fostering a cohesive group dynamic and hosting face to face meetings brings added value and enhances understanding between partners. The adoption of widespread standards enhanced the homogeneity of the EUnetHTA tools and should thus contribute to their wider use, therefore, to the general objective of EUnetHTA. The initiatives on interoperability of systems need to be developed further to support a general interoperable information system that could benefit the whole HTA community.

  2. Controlled battery charging system

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, D.B.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes a controlled battery charging system for charging a battery having terminals. It comprises: a transformer having a primary coil connected to a source of alternating current, and a secondary coil having output leads and a center tap, full wave rectifier means connected to the output leads to the secondary coil, the rectifier means including a pair of gate controlled rectifiers having direct current output leads, a battery charging circuit connected to the output leads to the rectifiers and having output means electrically contacting the terminals of a battery to be charged, a unijunction relaxation oscillator circuit connected to the rectifiers to trigger the gate controlled rectifiers into conduction to produce a DC charging current in the charging circuit, an electronic current limiting control circuit comprising a current limiting amplifier having a positive input, a negative input, and an output, a resistive line connected to center tap, a negative input lead connecting the center tap to the negative input of the current limiting amplifier, voltage input means connected to the positive input for supplying a voltage to the current limiting amplifier more positive than a voltage supplied to the negative input, voltage supply means connecting the current limiting amplifier to the battery charging circuit, and control means connecting the output of the current limiting amplifier to the unijunction relaxation oscillator circuit operative to turn off the DC charging circuit when the charging current exceeds a predetermined current value.

  3. Lessons from the Army’s Future Combat Systems Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    2004.02, high Power Li-Ion Batteries; Mto 03- 06, Silicon Carbide ( SiC ); Mto-03-08 May 06 MGV006, MGV 0078, MGV0126, MGV0125, and MGV0243 20A...prime power units, and high-density power electronics (incor- porating advanced materials such as silicon carbide and high-temperature silicon ). The...System Silicon carbide power electronics for MGV and manufacturing capabilities rDeCoM, tArDeC, ArL Silicon Carbide Power electronics Mantech

  4. Engineered containment and control systems : nurturing nature.

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonell, M.; Clarke, J.; Smith, E.; Dunn, J.; Waugh, J.; Environmental Assessment; Vanderbilt Univ.; ORNL; Kleinfelder; U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office

    2004-06-01

    The development of engineered containment and control systems for contaminated sites must consider the environmental setting of each site. The behaviors of both contaminated materials and engineered systems are affected by environmental conditions that will continue to evolve over time as a result of such natural processes as climate change, ecological succession, pedogenesis, and landform changes. Understanding these processes is crucial to designing, implementing, and maintaining effective systems for sustained health and environmental protection. Traditional engineered systems such as landfill liners and caps are designed to resist natural processes rather than working with them. These systems cannot be expected to provide long-term isolation without continued maintenance. In some cases, full-scale replacement and remediation may be required within 50 years, at an effort and cost much higher than for the original cleanup. Approaches are being developed to define smarter containment and control systems for stewardship sites, considering lessons learned from implementing prescriptive waste disposal regulations enacted since the 1970s. These approaches more effectively involve integrating natural and engineered systems; enhancing sensors and predictive tools for evaluating performance; and incorporating information on failure events, including precursors and consequences, into system design and maintenance. An important feature is using natural analogs to predict environmental conditions and system responses over the long term, to accommodate environmental change in the design process, and, as possible, to engineer containment systems that mimic favorable natural systems. The key emphasis is harmony with the environment, so systems will work with and rely on natural processes rather than resisting them. Implementing these new integrated systems will reduce current requirements for active management, which are resource-intensive and expensive.

  5. Engineered containment and control systems: nurturing nature.

    PubMed

    Clarke, James H; MacDonell, Margaret M; Smith, Ellen D; Dunn, R Jeffrey; Waugh, W Jody

    2004-06-01

    The development of engineered containment and control systems for contaminated sites must consider the environmental setting of each site. The behaviors of both contaminated materials and engineered systems are affected by environmental conditions that will continue to evolve over time as a result of such natural processes as climate change, ecological succession, pedogenesis, and landform changes. Understanding these processes is crucial to designing, implementing, and maintaining effective systems for sustained health and environmental protection. Traditional engineered systems such as landfill liners and caps are designed to resist natural processes rather than working with them. These systems cannot be expected to provide long-term isolation without continued maintenance. In some cases, full-scale replacement and remediation may be required within 50 years, at an effort and cost much higher than for the original cleanup. Approaches are being developed to define smarter containment and control systems for stewardship sites, considering lessons learned from implementing prescriptive waste disposal regulations enacted since the 1970s. These approaches more effectively involve integrating natural and engineered systems; enhancing sensors and predictive tools for evaluating performance; and incorporating information on failure events, including precursors and consequences, into system design and maintenance. An important feature is using natural analogs to predict environmental conditions and system responses over the long term, to accommodate environmental change in the design process, and, as possible, to engineer containment systems that mimic favorable natural systems. The key emphasis is harmony with the environment, so systems will work with and rely on natural processes rather than resisting them. Implementing these new integrated systems will reduce current requirements for active management, which are resource-intensive and expensive.

  6. Lessons from local engagement in Latin American health systems

    PubMed Central

    Meads, Geoffrey D.; Griffiths, Frances E.; Goode, Sarah D.; Iwami, Michiyo

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Objectives  To examine the management of recent policies for stronger patient and public involvement in Latin American health systems, identifying common features and describing local practice examples of relevance to the UK. Context  Participation is a core principle of many contemporary policies for health system reform. In Latin America, as in the UK, it is frequently associated with innovations in primary care services and their organizational developments. This shared interest in alternative models of local engagement offers new opportunities for collaborative research and policy development. Design  Commissioned by UK policy makers, a 4‐year research programme was designed to promote exchanges with international counterparts focusing on how modern reform policies are being implemented. The selected countries possessed comparable principles and timeframes for their reforms. A series of individual country case studies were undertaken. Data were drawn from literature and documentary reviews; semi‐structured interviews with national policy makers and expert advisers; and with management representatives at local exemplar sites. The aggregate data were subjected to thematic analysis applying a model for sustainable development. Results  Six common factors were identified in Latin American policies for stronger patient and public involvement. From these the most significant transferable learning for the UK relates to the position and status of professions and non‐governmental agencies. Illustrative case exemplars were located in each of the eight countries studied. PMID:17986076

  7. MIRADAS control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosich Minguell, Josefina; Garzón Lopez, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    The Mid-resolution InfRAreD Astronomical Spectrograph (MIRADAS, a near-infrared multi-object echelle spectrograph operating at spectral resolution R=20,000 over the 1-2.5μm bandpass) was selected in 2010 by the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) partnership as the next-generation near-infrared spectrograph for the world's largest optical/infrared telescope, and is being developed by an international consortium. The MIRADAS consortium includes the University of Florida, Universidad de Barcelona, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Institut de Física d'Altes Energies, Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya and Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. This paper shows an overview of the MIRADAS control software, which follows the standards defined by the telescope to permit the integration of this software on the GTC Control System (GCS). The MIRADAS Control System is based on a distributed architecture according to a component model where every subsystem is selfcontained. The GCS is a distributed environment written in object oriented C++, which runs components in different computers, using CORBA middleware for communications. Each MIRADAS observing mode, including engineering, monitoring and calibration modes, will have its own predefined sequence, which are executed in the GCS Sequencer. These sequences will have the ability of communicating with other telescope subsystems.

  8. Crawling the Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore Larrieu

    2009-10-01

    Information about accelerator operations and the control system resides in various formats in a variety of places on the lab network. There are operating procedures, technical notes, engineering drawings, and other formal controlled documents. There are programmer references and API documentation generated by tools such as doxygen and javadoc. There are the thousands of electronic records generated by and stored in databases and applications such as electronic logbooks, training materials, wikis, and bulletin boards and the contents of text-based configuration files and log files that can also be valuable sources of information. The obvious way to aggregate all these sources is to index them with a search engine that users can then query from a web browser. Toward this end, the Google "mini" search appliance was selected and implemented because of its low cost and its simple web-based configuration and management. In addition to crawling and indexing electronic documents, the appliance provides an API that has been used to supplement search results with live control system data such as current values of EPICS process variables and graphs of recent data from the archiver.

  9. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager, welcomes participants to the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The program's theme was "To There and Back Again." Guest panelists included Charlie Duke, former Apollo 16 astronaut and member of the Apollo 1 Emergency Egress Investigation Team; Ernie Reyes, retired, Apollo 1 senior operations engineer; and John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  10. Gas turbine engine control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idelchik, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A control system and method of controlling a gas turbine engine. The control system receives an error signal and processes the error signal to form a primary fuel control signal. The control system also receives at least one anticipatory demand signal and processes the signal to form an anticipatory fuel control signal. The control system adjusts the value of the anticipatory fuel control signal based on the value of the error signal to form an adjusted anticipatory signal and then the adjusted anticipatory fuel control signal and the primary fuel control signal are combined to form a fuel command signal.

  11. Designing the accident and emergency system: lessons from manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Walley, P

    2003-03-01

    To review the literature on manufacturing process design and demonstrate applicability in health care. Literature review and application of theory using two years activity data from two healthcare communities and extensive observation of activities over a six week period by seven researchers. It was possible to identify patient flows that could be used to design treatment processes around the needs of the patient. Some queues are built into existing treatment processes and can be removed by better process design. Capacity imbalance, not capacity shortage, causes some unnecessary waiting in accident and emergency departments. Clinicians would find that modern manufacturing theories produce more acceptable designs of systems. In particular, good quality is seen as a necessary pre-requisite of fast, efficient services.

  12. Designing the accident and emergency system: lessons from manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Walley, P

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To review the literature on manufacturing process design and demonstrate applicability in health care. Methods: Literature review and application of theory using two years activity data from two healthcare communities and extensive observation of activities over a six week period by seven researchers. Results: It was possible to identify patient flows that could be used to design treatment processes around the needs of the patient. Some queues are built into existing treatment processes and can be removed by better process design. Capacity imbalance, not capacity shortage, causes some unnecessary waiting in accident and emergency departments. Conclusions: Clinicians would find that modern manufacturing theories produce more acceptable designs of systems. In particular, good quality is seen as a necessary pre-requisite of fast, efficient services. PMID:12642523

  13. The Spanish health care system: lessons for newly industrialized countries.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, E; Gallo de Puelles, P; Jovell, A J

    1999-06-01

    This article summarizes the organization, financing, and delivery of health care services in Spain, and discusses the elements that made it possible to maintain high levels of health among the population, while spending comparatively fewer resources on the health care system than most industrialized countries. The case of Spain is of particular interest for newly industrialized countries, because of the fast evolution that it has undergone in recent years. Considered, by United Nations' economic standards, a developing country until 1964, Spain became in a few years the fastest growing economy in the world after Japan. By the early 1970s the infant mortality rate was already lower than in Britain or the United States.

  14. Lessons learned from past experience with intensive livestock management systems.

    PubMed

    Cronin, G M; Rault, J L; Glatz, P C

    2014-04-01

    The main impetus for 'modern' intensive animal production occurred after the Second World War, when Western governments developed policies to increase the availability of cheap, safe food for their populations. Livestock benefit under intensive husbandry by protection from environmental extremes and predators, and better nutritional and health management. Nevertheless, there are costs to the animal, such as impaired social behaviour, limited choice of living environment or pen mates, poor environmental stimulation and behavioural restrictions. The rapid progress in genetic selection of production traits has also, in some cases, adversely affected welfare by creating anatomical and metabolic problems. Above all, the intensively housed animal is heavily reliant on the stockperson and, therefore, inadequate care and husbandry practices by the stockperson may be the largest welfare risk. In a future in which the food supply may be limited as the world's population grows and land availability shrinks, intensive animal production is likely to expand. At the same time, ethical considerations surrounding intensive farming practices may also become more prominent. Novel technologies provide the opportunity to enhance both the productivity and welfare of intensively kept animals. Developing countries are also establishing more intensive commercial systems to meet their growing need for animal protein. Intensive livestock production in such countries has the potential for major expansion, particularly if such developments address the key constraints of poor welfare, inadequate nutrition, poor reproduction, poor housing, and high mortality often seen with traditional systems, and if farmer access to emerging market opportunities is improved. However, as shown by previous experience, inadequate regulation and staff who lack the appropriate training to care for the welfare of intensively housed livestock can be major challenges to overcome.

  15. Systems Engineering Lessons Learned for Class D Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Piatek, Irene; Moore, Josh; Calvert, Derek

    2015-01-01

    One of NASA's goals within human exploration is to determine how to get humans to Mars safely and to live and work on the Martian surface. To accomplish this goal, several smaller missions act as stepping-stones to the larger end goal. NASA uses these smaller missions to develop new technologies and learn about how to survive outside of Low Earth Orbit for long periods. Additionally, keeping a cadence of these missions allows the team to maintain proficiency in the complex art of bringing spacecraft to fruition. Many of these smaller missions are robotic in nature and have smaller timescales, whereas there are others that involve crew and have longer mission timelines. Given the timelines associated with these various missions, different levels of risk and rigor need to be implemented to be more in line with what is appropriate for the mission. Thus, NASA has four different classifications that range from Class A to Class D based on the mission details. One of these projects is the Resource Prospector (RP) Mission, which is a multi-center and multi-institution collaborative project to search for volatiles in the polar regions of the Moon. The RP mission is classified as a Class D mission and as such, has the opportunity to more tightly manage, and therefore accept, greater levels of risk. The requirements for Class D missions were at the forefront of the design and thus presented unique challenges in vehicle development and systems engineering processes. This paper will discuss the systems engineering process at NASA and how that process is tailored for Class D missions, specifically the RP mission.

  16. Cold ischemic organ preservation: lessons from natural systems.

    PubMed

    Storey, Kenneth B

    2004-07-01

    Mammalian hibernators offer natural models for investigating solutions to the metabolic injuries that accrue during cold ischemic storage of human organs removed for transplant. Knowledge of the biochemical mechanisms that regulate and stabilize metabolism to ensure long-term viability in the hypometabolic, hypothermic state of hibernation could lead to applied treatments that could increase the time that excised organs can be maintained in cold storage and/or improve recovery of function after implantation. New research has documented the widespread role of reversible protein phosphorylation control of metabolism in achieving the coordinated suppression of metabolic rate that greatly extends viability during torpor. Analysis of hibernation-induced gene expression is proving to be of crucial importance for identifying the genes and proteins that are up-regulated to address organ-specific concerns during torpor. In particular, the power of complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) array screening is identifying families of proteins that are up-regulated during hibernation (eg, serpins, heat shock proteins, antioxidants, membrane transporters) and highlighting previously unrecognized areas of cellular metabolism as contributing to the hibernation phenotype. These offer new targets for innovative applied treatments that could enhance cytoprotection and cold ischemia survival of organ explants.

  17. Thermoelectric Converter for Loop Heat Pipe Temperature Control: Experience and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the theoretical background and implementation methodology of using a thermoelectric converter (TEC) for operating temperature control of a loop heat pipe (LHP). In particular, experimental results from ambient and thermal vacuum tests of an LHP are presented for illustrations. The most commonly used state-of-the-art method to control the LHP operating temperature is to cold bias its compensation chamber (CC) and use an electrical heater to maintain the CC at the desired set point temperature. Although effective, this approach has its shortcomings in that the electrical heater can only provide heating to the CC, and the required power can be large under certain conditions. An alternative method is to use a TEC, which is capable of providing both heating and cooling to the CC. In this method, one side of the TEC is attached to the CC, and the other side is connected to the evaporator via a thermal strap. Using a bipolar power supply and a control algorithm, a TEC can function as a heater or a cooler, depending on the direction of the current flow. Extensive ground tests of several LHPs have demonstrated that a TEC can provide very tight temperature control for the CC. It also offers several additional advantages: (1) The LHP can operate at temperatures below its natural operating temperature at low heat loads; (2) The required heater power for a TEC is much less than that for an electrical heater; and (3) It enhances the LHP start-up success. Although the concept of using a TEC for LHP temperature control is simple, there are many factors to be considered in its implementation for space applications because the TEC is susceptible to the shear stress and yet has to sustain the dynamic load under the spacecraft launch environment. The added features that help the TEC to withstand the dynamic load will inevitably affect the TEC thermal performance. Some experiences and lessons learned are addressed in this paper.

  18. Lessons Learned In Developing Multiple Distributed Planning Systems for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, Theresa G.; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The planning processes for the International Space Station (ISS) Program are quite complex. Detailed mission planning for ISS on-orbit operations is a distributed function. Pieces of the on-orbit plan are developed by multiple planning organizations, located around the world, based on their respective expertise and responsibilities. The "pieces" are then integrated to yield the final detailed plan that will be executed onboard the ISS. Previous space programs have not distributed the planning and scheduling functions to this extent. Major ISS planning organizations are currently located in the United States (at both the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)), in Russia, in Europe, and in Japan. Software systems have been developed by each of these planning organizations to support their assigned planning and scheduling functions. Although there is some cooperative development and sharing of key software components, each planning system has been tailored to meet the unique requirements and operational environment of the facility in which it operates. However, all the systems must operate in a coordinated fashion in order to effectively and efficiently produce a single integrated plan of ISS operations, in accordance with the established planning processes. This paper addresses lessons learned during the development of these multiple distributed planning systems, from the perspective of the developer of one of the software systems. The lessons focus on the coordination required to allow the multiple systems to operate together, rather than on the problems associated with the development of any particular system. Included in the paper is a discussion of typical problems faced during the development and coordination process, such as incompatible development schedules, difficulties in defining system interfaces, technical coordination and funding for shared tools, continually evolving planning concepts/requirements, programmatic

  19. Lessons Learned in Developing Multiple Distributed Planning Systems for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, Theresa G.

    2002-01-01

    The planning processes for the International Space Station (ISS) Program are quite complex. Detailed mission planning for ISS on-orbit operations is a distributed function. Pieces of the on-orbit plan are developed by multiple planning organizations, located around the world, based on their respective expertise and responsibilities. The pieces are then integrated to yield the final detailed plan that will be executed onboard the ISS. Previous space programs have not distributed the planning and scheduling functions to this extent. Major ISS planning organizations are currently located in the United States (at both the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)), in Russia, in Europe, and in Japan. Software systems have been developed by each of these planning organizations to support their assigned planning and scheduling functions. Although there is some cooperative development and sharing of key software components, each planning system has been tailored to meet the unique requirements and operational environment of the facility in which it operates. However, all the systems must operate in a coordinated fashion in order to effectively and efficiently produce a single integrated plan of ISS operations, in accordance with the established planning processes. This paper addresses lessons learned during the development of these multiple distributed planning systems, from the perspective of the developer of one of the software systems. The lessons focus on the coordination required to allow the multiple systems to operate together, rather than on the problems associated with the development of any particular system. Included in the paper is a discussion of typical problems faced during the development and coordination process, such as incompatible development schedules, difficulties in defining system interfaces, technical coordination and funding for shared tools, continually evolving planning concepts/requirements, programmatic and

  20. Implementing drought early warning systems: policy lessons and future needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Ana; Werner, Micha; Maia, Rodrigo; Garrote, Luis; Nyabeze, Washington

    2014-05-01

    Drought forecasting and Warning provides the potential of reducing impacts to society due to drought events. The implementation of effective drought forecasting and warning, however, requires not only science to support reliable forecasting, but also adequate policy and societal response. Here we propose a protocol to develop drought forecasting and early warning based in the international cooperation of African and European institutions in the DEWFORA project (EC, 7th Framework Programme). The protocol includes four major phases that address the scientific knowledge and the social capacity to use the knowledge: (a) What is the science available? Evaluating how signs of impending drought can be detected and predicted, defining risk levels, and analysing of the signs of drought in an integrated vulnerability approach. (b) What are the societal capacities? In this the institutional framework that enables policy development is evaluated. The protocol gathers information on vulnerability and pending hazard in advance so that early warnings can be declared at sufficient lead time and drought mitigation planning can be implemented at an early stage. (c) How can science be translated into policy? Linking science indicators into the actions/interventions that society needs to implement, and evaluating how policy is implemented. Key limitations to planning for drought are the social capacities to implement early warning systems. Vulnerability assessment contributes to identify these limitations and therefore provides crucial information to policy development. Based on the assessment of vulnerability we suggest thresholds for management actions to respond to drought forecasts and link predictive indicators to relevant potential mitigation strategies. Vulnerability assessment is crucial to identify relief, coping and management responses that contribute to a more resilient society. (d) How can society benefit from the forecast? Evaluating how information is provided to

  1. Local efficiency in fluvial systems: Lessons from Icicle Bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerin, Tasnuba; Phillips, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Development of fluvial systems is often described and modeled in terms of principles related to maxima, minima, or optima of various hydraulic or energy parameters that can generally be encompassed by a principle of efficiency selection (more efficient flow routes tend to be preferentially selected and enhanced). However, efficiency selection is highly localized, and the cumulative effects of these local events may or may not produce more efficient pathways at a broader scale. This is illustrated by the case of Icicle Bend on Shawnee Run, a limestone bedrock stream in central Kentucky. Field evidence indicates that a paleochannel was abandoned during downcutting of the stream, and the relocation was analyzed using a flow partitioning model. The bend represents abandonment of a steeper, straighter, more efficient channel at the reach scale in favor of a longer, currently less steep and less efficient flow path. This apparently occurred owing to capture of Shawnee Run flow by a subsurface karst flow path that was subsequently exhumed. The development of Icicle Bend illustrates the local nature of efficiency selection and the role of historical contingency in geomorphic evolution.

  2. BLTC control system software

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.B., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-10

    This is a direct revision to Rev. 0 of the BLTC Control System Software. The entire document is being revised and released as HNF-SD-FF-CSWD-025, Rev 1. The changes incorporated by this revision include addition of a feature to automate the sodium drain when removing assemblies from sodium wetted facilities. Other changes eliminate locked in alarms during cold operation and improve the function of the Oxygen Analyzer. See FCN-620498 for further details regarding these changes. Note the change in the document number prefix, in accordance with HNF-MD-003.

  3. Smog control system

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    A smog control system is designed comprised of fans or blowers which are located to introduce air into a smog particle destruction chamber operated with laser energy. The smog particles are broken down and the air is passed into a filtering chamber which may adopt the form of a liquid charcoal chamber. The air may be bubbled through the liquid charcoal and the effluent may then be passed into a freshening agent chamber. The air may then pass as an effluent from the freshening agent chamber. A liquid charcoal supply may be connected to the liquid charcoal chamber and the recovered liquid charcoal which has been spent may be reused for other purposes.

  4. Lessons Learned from Quantitative Dynamical Modeling in Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Julie; Matteson, Andrew; Schelke, Max; Kaschek, Daniel; Hug, Sabine; Kreutz, Clemens; Harms, Brian D.; Theis, Fabian J.; Klingmüller, Ursula; Timmer, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Due to the high complexity of biological data it is difficult to disentangle cellular processes relying only on intuitive interpretation of measurements. A Systems Biology approach that combines quantitative experimental data with dynamic mathematical modeling promises to yield deeper insights into these processes. Nevertheless, with growing complexity and increasing amount of quantitative experimental data, building realistic and reliable mathematical models can become a challenging task: the quality of experimental data has to be assessed objectively, unknown model parameters need to be estimated from the experimental data, and numerical calculations need to be precise and efficient. Here, we discuss, compare and characterize the performance of computational methods throughout the process of quantitative dynamic modeling using two previously established examples, for which quantitative, dose- and time-resolved experimental data are available. In particular, we present an approach that allows to determine the quality of experimental data in an efficient, objective and automated manner. Using this approach data generated by different measurement techniques and even in single replicates can be reliably used for mathematical modeling. For the estimation of unknown model parameters, the performance of different optimization algorithms was compared systematically. Our results show that deterministic derivative-based optimization employing the sensitivity equations in combination with a multi-start strategy based on latin hypercube sampling outperforms the other methods by orders of magnitude in accuracy and speed. Finally, we investigated transformations that yield a more efficient parameterization of the model and therefore lead to a further enhancement in optimization performance. We provide a freely available open source software package that implements the algorithms and examples compared here. PMID:24098642

  5. Lessons learned from quantitative dynamical modeling in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Raue, Andreas; Schilling, Marcel; Bachmann, Julie; Matteson, Andrew; Schelker, Max; Schelke, Max; Kaschek, Daniel; Hug, Sabine; Kreutz, Clemens; Harms, Brian D; Theis, Fabian J; Klingmüller, Ursula; Timmer, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Due to the high complexity of biological data it is difficult to disentangle cellular processes relying only on intuitive interpretation of measurements. A Systems Biology approach that combines quantitative experimental data with dynamic mathematical modeling promises to yield deeper insights into these processes. Nevertheless, with growing complexity and increasing amount of quantitative experimental data, building realistic and reliable mathematical models can become a challenging task: the quality of experimental data has to be assessed objectively, unknown model parameters need to be estimated from the experimental data, and numerical calculations need to be precise and efficient. Here, we discuss, compare and characterize the performance of computational methods throughout the process of quantitative dynamic modeling using two previously established examples, for which quantitative, dose- and time-resolved experimental data are available. In particular, we present an approach that allows to determine the quality of experimental data in an efficient, objective and automated manner. Using this approach data generated by different measurement techniques and even in single replicates can be reliably used for mathematical modeling. For the estimation of unknown model parameters, the performance of different optimization algorithms was compared systematically. Our results show that deterministic derivative-based optimization employing the sensitivity equations in combination with a multi-start strategy based on latin hypercube sampling outperforms the other methods by orders of magnitude in accuracy and speed. Finally, we investigated transformations that yield a more efficient parameterization of the model and therefore lead to a further enhancement in optimization performance. We provide a freely available open source software package that implements the algorithms and examples compared here.

  6. Airflow control system

    DOEpatents

    Motszko, Sean Ronald; McEnaney, Ryan Patrick; Brush, Jeffrey Alan; Zimmermann, Daniel E.

    2007-03-13

    A dual airflow control system for an environment having a first air zone and a second air zone. The system includes a first input device operable to generate a first input signal indicative of a desired airflow to the first zone and a second input device operable to generate a second input signal indicative of a desired airflow to the second zone. First and second flow regulators are configured to regulate airflow to the first and second zones, respectively, such that the first and second regulators selectively provide the airflow to each of the first and second zones based on the first and second input signals. A single actuator is associated with the first and second flow regulators. The actuator is operable to simultaneously actuate the first and second flow regulators based on an input from the first and second input devices to allow the desired airflows to the first and the second zones.

  7. CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL ROOM WITH SPRINKLER SYSTEM CONTROLS, INCLUDING MANUAL CONTROL BOXES FOR THE VENTILATION SYSTEM AND A PLC SWITCH FOR AUTOMATIC CO (CARBON MONOXIDE) SYSTEM. THE AIR TESTING SYSTEM IS FREE STANDING AND THE FANS ARE COMPUTER-OPERATED. - Alaskan Way Viaduct and Battery Street Tunnel, Seattle, King County, WA

  8. Reengineering a database for clinical trials management: lessons for system architects.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C A; Nadkarni, P; Marenco, L; Karras, B T; Lu, C; Schacter, L; Fisk, J M; Miller, P L

    2000-10-01

    This paper describes the process of enhancing Trial/DB, a database system for clinical studies management. The system's enhancements have been driven by the need to maximize the effectiveness of developer personnel in supporting numerous and diverse users, of study designers in setting up new studies, and of administrators in managing ongoing studies. Trial/DB was originally designed to work over a local area network within a single institution, and basic architectural changes were necessary to make it work over the Internet efficiently as well as securely. Further, as its use spread to diverse communities of users, changes were made to let the processes of study design and project management adapt to the working styles of the principal investigators and administrators for each study. The lessons learned in the process should prove instructive for system architects as well as managers of electronic patient record systems.

  9. Establishing a provincial patient safety and learning system: pilot project results and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Doug; Taylor, Annemarie; Miller, Georgene; Hait, Valoria; Matsui, Irene; Bharadwaj, Manish; Devine, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    An effective safety event reporting system is an essential part of a comprehensive patient safety program. In British Columbia, we are implementing a provincial web-based event reporting tool and learning system called the BC Patient Safety and Learning System (PSLS). In this paper, we describe and report the results of our pilot study in a neonatal intensive care unit at BC Women's Hospital in Vancouver. Our approach aimed to foster a culture of safety by using the technology implementation to facilitate organizational learning about patient safety and to promote sustainable reporting behaviours. Results showed that PSLS was enthusiastically adopted by staff and enabled efficient reporting, promoted timely and complete follow-up activities and facilitated quality improvement. Our lessons learned laid the foundation for the provincial rollout of PSLS and may be of interest to those implementing similar systems elsewhere.

  10. Design and Validation of MAPS for Educators: A Performance Support System to Guide Media Selection for Lesson Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Wei-Chen; Kalota, Faisal

    2013-01-01

    The importance of adopting technology-supported performance systems for on-the-job learning and training is well-recognized in a networked economy. In this study, we present a performance support system (PSS) designed to support technology integration for lesson design. The goal is to support educators in the development of appropriate and…

  11. Implications of the Lessons Learned from a State Systems Change Initiative on Transition for Youth with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David R.; Guy, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    Identifies lessons learned from the State Systems Change Initiative on Transition for Youth with Disabilities, such as: (1) the need for such initiatives to recognize political, economic, and social factors; (2) the need for systems change to be a dynamic and continuous improvement process; and (3) the value of using federal legislative mandates…

  12. Institutionalizing a Comprehensive Tobacco-Cessation Protocol in an Indigenous Health System: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Santos, LorrieAnn; Braun, Kathryn; Aea, Kamuela; Shearer, Leimomi

    2008-01-01

    Background Native Hawaiians have high smoking prevalence and high lung cancer mortality rates. Objectives To describe a comprehensive tobacco cessation protocol and share lessons learned in institutionalizing it across the five Native Hawaiian Health Care Systems (NHHCS). Methods NHHCS representatives worked together to culturally tailor the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality protocol for smoking cessation. Process objectives included number of staff trained in tobacco cessation, inclusion of the Tobacco User Guide Sheet (TUGS) in the intake process and medical record, and expansion of programs for smokers who want to quit. Outcome objectives included percent of individuals asked about smoking status and percent of identified smokers that received brief intervention, set a quit date, were linked to services, and remained smoke-free for 90 days. Results After 18 months, the NHHCS were at different stages of protocol adoption. More successful NHHCS were more likely to have several champions for the program and administrative support for staff training, new programs, and integrating the TUGS into client charts. They also showed greater success in getting smokers to set a quit date and remain smoke-free for 90 days. Conclusion Although the five NHHCS helped design the protocol, each operates independently. More effort and time are needed to help each system overcome internal barriers to institutionalizing a new protocol and to facilitate support for tobacco-cessation champions among medical records and data management supervisors. These lessons may be useful to other organizations that want to institutionalize a comprehensive tobacco-cessation protocol. PMID:20208308

  13. Thrust-Vector-Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Control gains computed via matrix Riccati equation. Software-based system controlling aim of gimbaled rocket motor on spacecraft adaptive and optimal in sense it adjusts control gains in response to feedback, according to optimizing algorithm based on cost function. Underlying control concept also applicable, with modifications, to thrust-vector control on vertical-takeoff-and-landing airplanes, control of orientations of scientific instruments, and robotic control systems.

  14. Compiling comprehensive national health statistics in a fragmented health information system: lessons learned from Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Asmar, M K; Yeretzian, J S; Rady, A

    2016-04-19

    In view of the rapid health transition faced by the country and a highly dominant private sector, the issue of obtaining reliable health statistics is becoming a priority for Lebanon. This paper reviews the process of compiling and disseminating national health statistics from the multitude of public, private and nongovernmental partners in the country. The lessons learned from preparing two editions of the National health statistics report in Lebanon allow identification of some challenges and strengths of the current health information system in Lebanon. The experience emphasizes the need for a close partnership with all stakeholders, an efficient management system, adequate human resources and predefined systems and procedures. The process would benefit from having an interactive website for exchange of data and information among stakeholders and the public. The existence of clear guidelines with consistent definitions and standardized forms would also facilitate the collection and analysis of data.

  15. Transforming a traditional safety net into a coordinated care system: lessons from healthy San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Katz, Mitchell H; Brigham, Tangerine M

    2011-02-01

    Since 2007, San Francisco, California, has transformed its traditional safety-net health care "system"-in reality, an amalgam of a public hospital, private nonprofit hospitals, public and private clinics, and community health centers-into a comprehensive health care program called Healthy San Francisco. The experience offers lessons in how other local safety-net systems can prepare for profound changes under health reform. By July 2010, 53,546 adults had enrolled (70-89 percent of uninsured adults in San Francisco), and satisfaction is high (94 percent). Unnecessary emergency department visits were less common among enrollees (7.9 percent) than among Medicaid managed care recipients (15 percent). These findings indicate that other safety-net systems would do well to invest in information technology, establish primary care homes, increase coordination of care, and improve customer service as provisions of the national health care reform law phase in.

  16. Intravenous medication safety and smart infusion systems: lessons learned and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Carol A; Hayes, Judy; Saniuk, Catherine; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Bates, David W

    2005-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine report To Err Is Human: Building a Safe Health System greatly increased national awareness of the need to improve patient safety in general and medication safety in particular. Infusion-related errors are associated with the greatest risk of harm, and "smart" (computerized) infusion systems are currently available that can avert high-risk errors and provide previously unavailable data for continuous quality improvement (CQI) efforts. As healthcare organizations consider how to invest scarce dollars, infusion nurses have a key role to play in assessing need, evaluating technology, and selecting and implementing specific products. This article reviews the need to improve intravenous medication safety. It describes smart infusion systems and the results they have achieved. Finally, it details the lessons learned and the opportunities identified through the use of smart infusion technology at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts.

  17. Pollution control system

    SciTech Connect

    Voliva, B.H.; Bernstein, I.B.

    1984-09-25

    A pollution control system is disclosed wherein condensable pollutants are removed from a high-temperature gas stream by counterflow contact in a vertical tower with downwardly flowing, relatively cool absorbent oil. The absorbent is at a sufficiently low temperature so as to rapidly condense a portion of the pollutants in order to form a fog of fine droplets of pollutant entrained by the gas stream, which fog is incapable of being absorbed by the absorbent. The remainder of the condensable pollutants is removed by downwardly flowing absorbent oil, and the gas and entrained fog are directed from the tower to gas/droplet separation means, such as an electrostatic precipitator. The fog is thereby separated from the gas and substantially pollutant-free gas is discharged to the atmosphere.

  18. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system wherein a welding torch having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features include an actively cooled electrode holder which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm, and a weld pool contour detector comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom, being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  19. Basic control systems engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.H.; Yang, C.

    1997-12-31

    This book is one of the latest at the basic or introductory level, which is addressed to undergraduate juniors and seniors across several engineering disciplines such as mechanical, chemical, aerospace, and electrical. In fact, the background of the authors include electrical and aerospace engineering, respectively. The book contains the standard material presented at the undergraduate level. However, there appears to have been a serious attempt by the authors to address several practical implementation issues such as actuator saturation and other nonlinearities, bandwidth limitations, etc. In addition, there is an elementary consideration of the control of discrete event dynamical systems, a subject that has not traditionally been considered in elementary texts, but which nevertheless is increasingly important in industrial applications.

  20. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  1. Lessons Learned in Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. C.; Ryan, R. S.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    2011-01-01

    This Contractor Report (CR) is a compilation of Lessons Learned in approximately 55 years of engineering experience by each James C. Blair, Robert S. Ryan, and Luke A. Schutzenhofer. The lessons are the basis of a course on Lessons Learned that has been taught at Marshall Space Flight Center. The lessons are drawn from NASA space projects and are characterized in terms of generic lessons learned from the project experience, which are further distilled into overarching principles that can be applied to future projects. Included are discussions of the overarching principles followed by a listing of the lessons associated with that principle. The lesson with sub-lessons are stated along with a listing of the project problems the lesson is drawn from, then each problem is illustrated and discussed, with conclusions drawn in terms of Lessons Learned. The purpose of this CR is to provide principles learned from past aerospace experience to help achieve greater success in future programs, and identify application of these principles to space systems design. The problems experienced provide insight into the engineering process and are examples of the subtleties one experiences performing engineering design, manufacturing, and operations.

  2. Overview, Control Strategies, and Lessons Learned in the CDC Response to the 2014-2016 Ebola Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Bell, Beth P; Damon, Inger K; Jernigan, Daniel B; Kenyon, Thomas A; Nichol, Stuart T; O'Connor, John P; Tappero, Jordan W

    2016-07-08

    During 2014-2016, CDC, working with U.S. and international partners, mounted a concerted response to end the unprecedented epidemic of Ebola virus disease (Ebola) in West Africa. CDC's response, which was the largest in the agency's history, was directed simultaneously at controlling the epidemic in West Africa and strengthening preparedness for Ebola in the United States. Although experience in responding to approximately 20 Ebola outbreaks since 1976 had provided CDC and other international responders an understanding of the disease and how to stop its spread, the epidemic in West Africa presented new and formidable challenges. The initial response was slow and complicated for several reasons, including wide geographic spread of cases, poor public health and societal infrastructure, sociodemographic factors, local unfamiliarity with Ebola, and distrust of government and health care workers. In the United States, widespread public alarm erupted after Ebola cases were diagnosed in Dallas, Texas, and New York City, New York. CDC, in collaboration with its U.S. and international counterparts, applied proven public health strategies as well as innovative new approaches to help control the Ebola epidemic in West Africa and strengthen public health readiness in the United States. Lessons learned include the recognition that West African and other countries need effective systems to detect and stop infectious disease threats, the need for stronger international surge capacity for times when countries are overwhelmed by an outbreak, and the importance of improving infection prevention and control in health care settings. The activities summarized in this report would not have been possible without collaboration with many U.S. and international partners (http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/2014-west-africa/partners.html).

  3. Turbocharger control system

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabata, Y.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a turbocharger control system utilized in an internal combustion engine having a turbocharger turbine with a downstream passage, a combustion chamber, an exhaust treatment device, an actuator, a link mechanism connected to the actuator, a compressor, and a throttle valve. The engine also has an engine intake manifold, air flow passage means leading from the compressor to the throttle valve and an exhaust passage leading from the combustion chamber. The system comprises: bypass passage means connecting the exhaust passage leading from the combustion chamber to the turbocharger turbine with the downstream passage of the turbine so as to connect the combustion chamber directly to the exhaust treatment device around the turbine; a waste gate valve connected to the actuator by means of the link mechanism so as to close the bypass passage wherein the actuator comprises a first chamber continuously communicating with atmospheric pressure, a second chamber connected to the air flow passage means leading from the compressor to the throttle valve, and a third chamber connected to the engine intake manifold; first spring means interposed in the first chamber for biasing the waste gate valve toward a closed position; and second spring means interposed in the third chamber and having a stronger spring load characteristic than the first spring means for biasing the waste gate valve towards an opened position.

  4. Environment control system

    DOEpatents

    Sammarone, Dino G.

    1978-01-01

    A system for controlling the environment of an enclosed area in nuclear reactor installations. The system permits the changing of the environment from nitrogen to air, or from air to nitrogen, without the release of any radioactivity or process gas to the outside atmosphere. In changing from a nitrogen to an air environment, oxygen is inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate which the nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture is removed from the enclosed area. The nitrogen-oxygen gas mixture removed from the enclosed area is mixed with hydrogen, the hydrogen recombining with the oxygen present in the gas to form water. The water is then removed from the system and, if it contains any radioactive products, can be utilized to form concrete, which can then be transferred to a licensed burial site. The process gas is purified further by stripping it of carbon dioxide and then distilling it to remove any xenon, krypton, and other fission or non-condensable gases. The pure nitrogen is stored as either a cryogenic liquid or a gas. In changing from an air to nitrogen environment, the gas is removed from the enclosed area, mixed with hydrogen to remove the oxygen present, dried, passed through adsorption beds to remove any fission gases, and reinserted into the enclosed area. Additionally, the nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change, is inserted into the enclosed area, the nitrogen from both sources being inserted into the enclosed area at the same rate as the removal of the gas from the containment area. As designed, the amount of nitrogen stored during the nitrogen to air change substantially equals that required to replace oxygen removed during an air to nitrogen change.

  5. Can Land Managers Control Japanese Knotweed? Lessons from Control Tests in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbart, Emmanuel; Mahy, Grégory; Weickmans, Bernard; Henriet, François; Crémer, Sébastien; Pieret, Nora; Vanderhoeven, Sonia; Monty, Arnaud

    2012-12-01

    Japanese knotweed Fallopia japonica is an extremely abundant invasive plant in Belgium and surrounding countries. To date, no eradication method is available for land managers facing the invasion of this rhizomatous plant. We tested different chemical herbicides with two application methods (spraying and stem injection), as well as mechanical treatments, on knotweed clones throughout southern Belgium. The tested control methods were selected to be potentially usable by managers, e.g., using legally accepted rates for herbicides. Stem volume, height and density reduction were assessed after one or two years, depending on the control method. Labor estimations were made for each control method. No tested control method completely eradicated the clones. Stem injection with glyphosate-based herbicide (3.6 kg ha-1 of acid equivalent glyphosate) caused the most damage, i.e., no sprouting shoots were observed the year following the injection. The following year, though, stunted shoots appeared. Among the mechanical control methods, repeated cuts combined with native tree transplanting most appreciably reduced knotweed development. The most efficient methods we tested could curb knotweed invasion, but are not likely to be effective in eradicating the species. As such, they should be included in a more integrated restoration strategy, together with prevention and public awareness campaigns.

  6. Can land managers control Japanese knotweed? Lessons from control tests in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Delbart, Emmanuel; Mahy, Grégory; Weickmans, Bernard; Henriet, François; Crémer, Sébastien; Pieret, Nora; Vanderhoeven, Sonia; Monty, Arnaud

    2012-12-01

    Japanese knotweed Fallopia japonica is an extremely abundant invasive plant in Belgium and surrounding countries. To date, no eradication method is available for land managers facing the invasion of this rhizomatous plant. We tested different chemical herbicides with two application methods (spraying and stem injection), as well as mechanical treatments, on knotweed clones throughout southern Belgium. The tested control methods were selected to be potentially usable by managers, e.g., using legally accepted rates for herbicides. Stem volume, height and density reduction were assessed after one or two years, depending on the control method. Labor estimations were made for each control method. No tested control method completely eradicated the clones. Stem injection with glyphosate-based herbicide (3.6 kg ha(-1) of acid equivalent glyphosate) caused the most damage, i.e., no sprouting shoots were observed the year following the injection. The following year, though, stunted shoots appeared. Among the mechanical control methods, repeated cuts combined with native tree transplanting most appreciably reduced knotweed development. The most efficient methods we tested could curb knotweed invasion, but are not likely to be effective in eradicating the species. As such, they should be included in a more integrated restoration strategy, together with prevention and public awareness campaigns.

  7. Thermal control system technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Wilbert E.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on thermal control systems technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: heat rejection; heat acquisition and transport; monitoring and control; passive thermal control; and analysis and test verification.

  8. NSLS control system upgrade status

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.; Ramamoorthy, S.; Tang, Y.; Flannigan, J.; Sathe, S.; Keane, J.; Krinsky, S.

    1993-07-01

    The NSLS control system initially installed in 1978 has undergone several modifications but the basic system architecture remained relatively unchanged. The need for faster response, increased reliability and better diagnostics made the control system upgrade a priority. Since the NSLS runs continuously, major changes to the control system are difficult. The upgrade plan had to allow continuous incremental changes to the control system without having any detrimental effect on operations. The plan had to provide for immediate improvement in a few key areas, such as data access rates, and be complete in a short time. At present, most accelerator operations utilize the upgraded control system.

  9. Lessons learned in creating spacecraft computer systems: Implications for using Ada (R) for the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomayko, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-five years of spacecraft onboard computer development have resulted in a better understanding of the requirements for effective, efficient, and fault tolerant flight computer systems. Lessons from eight flight programs (Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Shuttle, Mariner, Voyager, and Galileo) and three reserach programs (digital fly-by-wire, STAR, and the Unified Data System) are useful in projecting the computer hardware configuration of the Space Station and the ways in which the Ada programming language will enhance the development of the necessary software. The evolution of hardware technology, fault protection methods, and software architectures used in space flight in order to provide insight into the pending development of such items for the Space Station are reviewed.

  10. Lessons Learned for Cx PRACA. Constellation Program Problem Reporting, Analysis and Corrective Action Process and System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelle, Pido I.; Ratterman, Christian; Gibbs, Cecil

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Constellation Program Problem Reporting, Analysis and Corrective Action Process and System (Cx PRACA). The goal of the Cx PRACA is to incorporate Lessons learned from the Shuttle, ISS, and Orbiter programs by creating a single tool for managing the PRACA process, that clearly defines the scope of PRACA applicability and what must be reported, and defines the ownership and responsibility for managing the PRACA process including disposition approval authority. CxP PRACA is a process, supported by a single information gathering data module which will be integrated with a single CxP Information System, providing interoperability, import and export capability making the CxP PRACA a more effective and user friendly technical and management tool.

  11. The fall and redemption of people and systems: potential lessons from the "star wars" saga.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Anthony P S; Jamora, Maria Jasmin

    2007-01-01

    Through an analysis of the fall and redemption of Anakin Skywalker and the Galactic Republic of the Star Wars saga, educators may be able to convey valuable lessons to students learning about child and adolescent psychiatry and to junior psychiatrists learning about psychiatric administration and liaison. Specifically, educators may be able to convey that 1) when caring for patients who have succumbed or are at risk of succumbing to "darkness" in the modern psychiatric sense (e.g., violence and criminal behavior), it is important to recognize risk factors as well as protective factors that can lead to successful "salvation"; and 2) when administering or serving as a liaison to systems of care, it is important to acknowledge and heal dysfunctions in the relevant "system."

  12. Lessons-learned from the document production system redevelopment (DPS/R)

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, M.J.; Baird, R.R.; Heckart, D.G.

    1996-05-01

    Increased complexity of the computing environment is probably the most universal observation of developers going into Client/Server computing. The Lessons Learned document Provides some condensed bits of expertise gained by the Document Production System Redevelopment team. The intent is to distribute in a simplified format the knowledge the authors have gained, and to promote discussion of certain areas having unresolved or less-than-perfect resolution. Included are first, a description of the hardware and software used. The lists of hardware and software are a good basic guide for the components of a robust data server and provide a framework for subsequent discussion of technical points learned during the development. The second part of the document is a discussion of fine points about Novell, Sybase and Visual Basic as applied to the DPS/R development. Areas covered include the hardware of the database server, Novell operating system, Sybase database tools and Visual Basic.

  13. Networked control of microgrid system of systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Magdi S.; Rahman, Mohamed Saif Ur; AL-Sunni, Fouad M.

    2016-08-01

    The microgrid has made its mark in distributed generation and has attracted widespread research. However, microgrid is a complex system which needs to be viewed from an intelligent system of systems perspective. In this paper, a network control system of systems is designed for the islanded microgrid system consisting of three distributed generation units as three subsystems supplying a load. The controller stabilises the microgrid system in the presence of communication infractions such as packet dropouts and delays. Simulation results are included to elucidate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy.

  14. Lessons Learned From Developing Three Generations of Remote Sensing Science Data Processing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilmes, Curt; Fleig, Albert J.

    2005-01-01

    The Biospheric Information Systems Branch at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center has developed three generations of Science Investigator-led Processing Systems for use with various remote sensing instruments. The first system is used for data from the MODIS instruments flown on NASA s Earth Observing Systems @OS) Terra and Aqua Spacecraft launched in 1999 and 2002 respectively. The second generation is for the Ozone Measuring Instrument flying on the EOS Aura spacecraft launched in 2004. We are now developing a third generation of the system for evaluation science data processing for the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) to be flown by the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) in 2006. The initial system was based on large scale proprietary hardware, operating and database systems. The current OMI system and the OMPS system being developed are based on commodity hardware, the LINUX Operating System and on PostgreSQL, an Open Source RDBMS. The new system distributes its data archive across multiple server hosts and processes jobs on multiple processor boxes. We have created several instances of this system, including one for operational processing, one for testing and reprocessing and one for applications development and scientific analysis. Prior to receiving the first data from OMI we applied the system to reprocessing information from the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) and Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments flown from 1978 until now. The system was able to process 25 years (108,000 orbits) of data and produce 800,000 files (400 GiB) of level 2 and level 3 products in less than a week. We will describe the lessons we have learned and tradeoffs between system design, hardware, operating systems, operational staffing, user support and operational procedures. During each generational phase, the system has become more generic and reusable. While the system is not currently shrink wrapped we believe it is to the point where it could be readily

  15. [Lessons learned in the control of Aedes aegypti to address dengue and the emergency of chikungunya in Iquitos, Peru].

    PubMed

    Vilcarromero, Stalin; Casanova, Wilma; Ampuero, Julia S; Ramal-Asayag, Cesar; Siles, Crystyan; Díaz, Gloria; Durand, Salomón; Celis-Salinas, Juan C; Astete, Helvio; Rojas, Percy; Vásquez-La Torre, Gabriela; Marín, Johan; Bazán, Isabel; Alegre, Yuri; Morrison, Amy C; Rodriguez-Ferrucci, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Dengue has affected Iquitos since 1990 causing outbreaks of major impact on public health and for this reason great efforts have been made for its temporal control. Currently, with the expansion of the chikungunya virus in the Americas and the threat of the emergence of the virus in Iquitos, we reflect on lessons learned by way of the activities undertaken in the area of vector control; epidemiological surveillance, diagnosis and clinical management during periods of outbreaks of dengue, in a way that will allow us to better face the threat of an outbreak of chikungunya virus in the largest city in the Peruvian Amazon.

  16. Aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, Greg T. (Inventor); Morgan, Walter R. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A span-loaded, highly flexible flying wing, having horizontal control surfaces mounted aft of the wing on extended beams to form local pitch-control devices. Each of five spanwise wing segments of the wing has one or more motors and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other wing segments, to minimize inter-segment loads. Wing dihedral is controlled by separately controlling the local pitch-control devices consisting of a control surface on a boom, such that inboard and outboard wing segment pitch changes relative to each other, and thus relative inboard and outboard lift is varied.

  17. National Training Course. Emergency Medical Technician. Paramedic. Instructor's Lesson Plans. Module II. Human Systems and Patient Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This instructor's lesson plan guide on human systems and patient assessment is one of fifteen modules designed for use in the training of emergency medical technicians (paramedics). Four units are presented: (1) medical terminology, which covers some common prefixes and suffixes and the use of the medical dictionary; (2) an overview of the…

  18. Developing Information Systems Higher Education--Lessons Learned from an Inter-Organizational R&D Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melin, Ulf; Axelsson, Karin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we focus on lessons learned from developing information systems (IS) higher education in an inter-organizational (IO) network focusing possibilities and challenges. Developing higher education is one area among others where organizing joint efforts in networks are possible. An IO R&D project is described and analyzed in this…

  19. From Innovative Programs to Systemic Education Reform: Lesson from Five Communities. The Final Report of the Benchmark Communities Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSalvatore, Larry; Goldberger, Susan; Steinberg, Adria

    This document presents the lessons of Jobs for the Future's Benchmark Communities Initiative (BCI), a 5-year systemic educational reform initiative launched in 1994 in five communities. Before joining the BCI, the five Benchmark communities had each begun a school-to-career effort. Five key findings from the BCI are outlined: (1) students engaged…

  20. SRS control system upgrade requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.F.

    1998-08-04

    This document defines requirements for an upgrade of the Sodium Removal System (SRS) control system. The upgrade is being performed to solve a number of maintainability and operability issues. The upgraded system will provide the same functions, controls and interlocks as the present system, and in addition provide enhanced functionality in areas discussed in this document.

  1. Recruiting and Surveying Catholic Parishes for Cancer Control Initiatives: Lessons Learned From the CRUZA Implementation Study

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Laura S.; Leyva, Bryan; Rustan, Sarah; Ospino, Hosffman; Negron, Rosalyn; Torres, Maria Idalí; Galeas, Ana V.

    2017-01-01

    Background We describe activities undertaken to conduct organizational surveys among faith-based organizations (FBOs) in Massachusetts (MA) as part of a larger study designed to promote parish-based cancer control programs for Latinos. Methods Catholic parishes located in MA that provided Spanish-language mass were eligible for study participation. Parishes were identified through diocesan records and online directories. Prior to parish recruitment, we implemented a variety of activities to gain support from Catholic leaders at the Diocesan level. We then recruited individual parishes to complete a four-part organizational survey, which assessed: (A) parish leadership; (B) financial resources; (C) involvement in Hispanic ministry; and (D) health and social service offerings. Our goal was to administer each survey component to a parish representatives who could best provide an organizational perspective on the content of each component (e.g., A=pastors; B= Business Managers; C=Hispanic Ministry Leaders; and D= Parish Nurse or Health Ministry leader. Here, we present descriptive statistics on recruitment and survey administration processes. Results Seventy-five percent of eligible parishes responded to the survey and of these, 92% completed all four components. Completed four-part surveys required an average of 16.6 contact attempts. There were an average of 2.1 respondents per site. Pastoral staff were the most frequent respondents (79%), but also required the most contact attempts (M = 9.3, range = 1 to 27). While most interviews were completed by phone (71%), one-quarter were completed during in-person site visits. Conclusions We achieved a high survey completion rate among organizational representatives. Our lessons learned may inform efforts to engage and survey FBOs for public health efforts. PMID:25878192

  2. Lessons learnt from the first controlled human malaria infection study conducted in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Susanne H; Juma, Elizabeth; Salim, Amina; Magiri, Charles; Njenga, Daniel; Molyneux, Sassy; Njuguna, Patricia; Awuondo, Ken; Lowe, Brett; Billingsley, Peter F; Cole, Andrew O; Ogwang, Caroline; Osier, Faith; Chilengi, Roma; Hoffman, Stephen L; Draper, Simon J; Ogutu, Bernhards; Marsh, Kevin

    2015-04-28

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) studies, in which healthy volunteers are infected with Plasmodium falciparum to assess the efficacy of novel malaria vaccines and drugs, have become a vital tool to accelerate vaccine and drug development. CHMI studies provide a cost-effective and expeditious way to circumvent the use of large-scale field efficacy studies to deselect intervention candidates. However, to date few modern CHMI studies have been performed in malaria-endemic countries. An open-label, randomized pilot CHMI study was conducted using aseptic, purified, cryopreserved, infectious P. falciparum sporozoites (SPZ) (Sanaria® PfSPZ Challenge) administered intramuscularly (IM) to healthy Kenyan adults (n = 28) with varying degrees of prior exposure to P. falciparum. The purpose of the study was to establish the PfSPZ Challenge CHMI model in a Kenyan setting with the aim of increasing the international capacity for efficacy testing of malaria vaccines and drugs, and allowing earlier assessment of efficacy in a population for which interventions are being developed. This was part of the EDCTP-funded capacity development of the CHMI platform in Africa. This paper discusses in detail lessons learnt from conducting the first CHMI study in Kenya. Issues pertinent to the African setting, including community sensitization, consent and recruitment are considered. Detailed reasoning regarding the study design (for example, dose and route of administration of PfSPZ Challenge, criteria for grouping volunteers according to prior exposure to malaria and duration of follow-up post CHMI) are given and changes other centres may want to consider for future studies are suggested. Performing CHMI studies in an African setting presents unique but surmountable challenges and offers great opportunity for acceleration of malaria vaccine and drug development. The reflections in this paper aim to aid other centres and partners intending to use the CHMI model in Africa.

  3. A randomized controlled trial of venlafaxine XR for major depressive disorder after spinal cord injury: Methods and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Bombardier, Charles H; Fann, Jesse R; Wilson, Catherine S; Heinemann, Allen W; Richards, J Scott; Warren, Ann Marie; Brooks, Larry; Warms, Catherine A; Temkin, Nancy R; Tate, Denise G

    2014-05-01

    We describe the rationale, design, methods, and lessons learned conducting a treatment trial for major depressive disorder (MDD) or dysthymia in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). A multi-site, double-blind, randomized (1:1) placebo controlled trial of venlafaxine XR for MDD or dysthymia. Subjects were block randomized and stratified by site, lifetime history of substance dependence, and prior history of MDD. Six SCI centers throughout the United States. Across participating centers, 2536 subjects were screened and 133 were enrolled into the trial. Subjects were 18-64 years old and at least 1 month post-SCI. Interventions Twelve-week trial of venlafaxine XR versus placebo using a flexible titration schedule. The primary outcome was improvement in depression severity at 12 weeks. The secondary outcome was improvement in pain. This article includes study methods, modifications prompted by a formative review process, preliminary data on the study sample and lessons learned. We describe common methodological and operational challenges conducting multi-site trials and how we addressed them. Challenges included study organization and decision making, staff training, obtaining human subjects approval, standardization of measurement and treatment, data and safety monitoring, subject screening and recruitment, unblinding and continuity of care, database management, and data analysis. The methodological and operational challenges we faced and the lessons we learned may provide useful information for researchers who aim to conduct clinical trials, especially in the area of medical treatment of depression in people with SCI.

  4. System for controlling apnea

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F

    2015-05-05

    An implanted stimulation device or air control device are activated by an external radar-like sensor for controlling apnea. The radar-like sensor senses the closure of the air flow cavity, and associated control circuitry signals (1) a stimulator to cause muscles to open the air passage way that is closing or closed or (2) an air control device to open the air passage way that is closing or closed.

  5. Development of the National Health Information Systems in Botswana: Pitfalls, prospects and lessons.

    PubMed

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna; Gauld, Robin D C; Hill, Philip C; Barnett, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Studies evaluating development of health information systems in developing countries are limited. Most of the available studies are based on pilot projects or cross-sectional studies. We took a longitudinal approach to analysing the development of Botswana's health information systems. We aimed to: (i) trace the development of the national health information systems in Botswana (ii) identify pitfalls during development and prospects that could be maximized to strengthen the system; and (iii) draw lessons for Botswana and other countries working on establishing or improving their health information systems. This article is based on data collected through document analysis and key informant interviews with policy makers, senior managers and staff of the Ministry of Health and senior officers from various stakeholder organizations. Lack of central coordination, weak leadership, weak policy and regulatory frameworks, and inadequate resources limited development of the national health information systems in Botswana. Lack of attention to issues of organizational structure is one of the major pitfalls. The ongoing reorganization of the Ministry of Health provides opportunity to reposition the health information system function. The current efforts including development of the health information management policy and plan could enhance the health information management system.

  6. Development of the National Health Information Systems in Botswana: Pitfalls, prospects and lessons

    PubMed Central

    Seitio-Kgokgwe, Onalenna; Gauld, Robin D. C.; Hill, Philip C.; Barnett, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies evaluating development of health information systems in developing countries are limited. Most of the available studies are based on pilot projects or cross-sectional studies. We took a longitudinal approach to analysing the development of Botswana’s health information systems. Objectives: We aimed to: (i) trace the development of the national health information systems in Botswana (ii) identify pitfalls during development and prospects that could be maximized to strengthen the system; and (iii) draw lessons for Botswana and other countries working on establishing or improving their health information systems. Methods: This article is based on data collected through document analysis and key informant interviews with policy makers, senior managers and staff of the Ministry of Health and senior officers from various stakeholder organizations. Results: Lack of central coordination, weak leadership, weak policy and regulatory frameworks, and inadequate resources limited development of the national health information systems in Botswana. Lack of attention to issues of organizational structure is one of the major pitfalls. Conclusion: The ongoing reorganization of the Ministry of Health provides opportunity to reposition the health information system function. The current efforts including development of the health information management policy and plan could enhance the health information management system. PMID:26392841

  7. Distributed systems status and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreidler, David; Vickers, David

    1990-01-01

    Concepts are investigated for an automated status and control system for a distributed processing environment. System characteristics, data requirements for health assessment, data acquisition methods, system diagnosis methods and control methods were investigated in an attempt to determine the high-level requirements for a system which can be used to assess the health of a distributed processing system and implement control procedures to maintain an accepted level of health for the system. A potential concept for automated status and control includes the use of expert system techniques to assess the health of the system, detect and diagnose faults, and initiate or recommend actions to correct the faults. Therefore, this research included the investigation of methods by which expert systems were developed for real-time environments and distributed systems. The focus is on the features required by real-time expert systems and the tools available to develop real-time expert systems.

  8. Managing the inventory control system.

    PubMed

    Daniels, C E

    1985-02-01

    The four functions of management--planning, organizing, directing, and controlling--are described in relation to the hospital pharmacy inventory control system. Planning includes the development of inventory system objectives and identification of the resources needed to complete them. Organizing requires the manager to decide on the best method of grouping system activities and resources to complete the objectives in order of priority. Directing is a continual activity that involves obtaining optimal performance from the inventory system resources available. Controlling consists of regulation and verification of inventory system activities. The effective inventory system manager integrates planning, organizing, directing, and controlling in a continuous cycle.

  9. The RHIC cryogenic control system

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, Y.; Sondericker, J.

    1993-08-01

    A cryogenic process control system for the RHIC Project is discussed. It is independent of the main RHIC Control System, consisting of an upgrade of the existing 24.8 Kw helium refrigerator control section with the addition of a ring control section that regulates and monitors all cryogenic signals in the RHIC tunnel. The system is fully automated, which can run without the continuous presence of operators.

  10. Space Shuttle flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, W. J.; Kubiak, E. T.; Peters, W. H.; Saldana, R. L.; Smith, E. E., Jr.; Stegall, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is a control stabilized vehicle with control provided by an all digital, fly-by-wire flight control system. This paper gives a description of the several modes of flight control which correspond to the Shuttle mission phases. These modes are ascent flight control (including open loop first stage steering, the use of four computers operating in parallel and inertial guidance sensors), on-orbit flight control (with a discussion of reaction control, phase plane switching logic, jet selection logic, state estimator logic and OMS thrust vector control), entry flight control and TAEM (terminal area energy management to landing). Also discussed are redundancy management and backup flight control.

  11. X-43A Fluid and Environmental Systems: Ground and Flight Operation and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, Michael Jacob; Grindle, Thomas J.; St.John, Clinton W.; Dowdell, David B.

    2005-01-01

    The X-43A Hyper-X program demonstrated the first successful flights of an airframe integrated scramjet powered hypersonic vehicle. The X-43A vehicles established successive world records for jet-powered vehicles at speeds of Mach 7 and Mach 10. The X-43A vehicle is a subscale version of proposed hypersonic reconnaissance strike aircraft. Scaled down to a length of 12 ft (3.66 m), the lifting body design with high fineness ratio resulted in very small internal space available for fluid systems and their corresponding environmental conditioning systems. Safe testing and operation of the X-43A fluid and environmental systems was critical for mission success, not only for the safety of the flight crew in the NASA B-52B carrier aircraft, but also to maintain the reliability of vehicle systems while exposed to dynamics and hostile conditions encountered during the boost trajectory. The X-43A fluid and environmental systems successfully managed explosive, pyrophoric, inert, and very high pressure gases without incident. This report presents a summary of the checkout and flight validation of the X-43A fluid systems. The testing used for mission assurance is summarized. System performance during captive carry and launch flights is presented. The lessons learned are also discussed.

  12. Automatic Dance Lesson Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yang; Leung, H.; Yue, Lihua; Deng, LiQun

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an automatic lesson generation system is presented which is suitable in a learning-by-mimicking scenario where the learning objects can be represented as multiattribute time series data. The dance is used as an example in this paper to illustrate the idea. Given a dance motion sequence as the input, the proposed lesson generation…

  13. Thermodynamics of feedback controlled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, F. J.; Feito, M.

    2009-04-01

    We compute the entropy reduction in feedback controlled systems due to the repeated operation of the controller. This was the lacking ingredient to establish the thermodynamics of these systems, and in particular of Maxwell’s demons. We illustrate some of the consequences of our general results by deriving the maximum work that can be extracted from isothermal feedback controlled systems. As a case example, we finally study a simple system that performs an isothermal information-fueled particle pumping.

  14. Deploying quantum light sources on nanosatellites I: lessons and perspectives on the optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekara, R.; Tang, Z.; Tan, Y. C.; Cheng, C.; Septriani, B.; Durak, K.; Grieve, J. A.; Ling, A.

    2015-09-01

    The Small Photon Entangling Quantum System is an integrated instrument where the pump, photon pair source and detectors are combined within a single optical tray and electronics package that is no larger than 10cm×10cm×3cm. This footprint enables the instrument to be placed onboard nanosatellites or the CubeLab facility within the International Space Station. The first mission is to understand the different environmental conditions that may affect the operation of an entangled photon source in low Earth orbit. This understanding is crucial for the construction of cost-effective entanglement based experiments that utilize nanosatellite architecture. We will discuss the challenges and lessons we have learned over three years of development and testing of the integrated optical platform and review the perspectives for future advanced experiments.

  15. Electrical Procedures and Environmental Control Systems. Building Maintenance. Module IV. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Garry

    This curriculum guide, one of six modules keyed to the building maintenance competency profile developed by industry and education professionals, provides materials for two units on electrical procedures and environmental control systems. Unit 1, on electrical procedures, includes the following lessons: electrical safety; troubleshooting and…

  16. Electrical Procedures and Environmental Control Systems. Building Maintenance. Module IV. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloan, Garry

    This curriculum guide, one of six modules keyed to the building maintenance competency profile developed by industry and education professionals, provides materials for two units on electrical procedures and environmental control systems. Unit 1, on electrical procedures, includes the following lessons: electrical safety; troubleshooting and…

  17. Supervisory control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, T. B.

    1974-01-01

    The various functions of a computer are considered that serve in connecting the man, with his displays and controls, to an external environment, manipulator activators and the interoceptors that are in the actuators, and to the interosensors and the motors or the actuators to drive the sensors. Projected is an improved exoskeleton mechanism with computer control and some supervisory control that may give a quadriplegic the ability to walk and run around.

  18. Supervisory control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheridan, T. B.

    1974-01-01

    The various functions of a computer are considered that serve in connecting the man, with his displays and controls, to an external environment, manipulator activators and the interoceptors that are in the actuators, and to the interosensors and the motors or the actuators to drive the sensors. Projected is an improved exoskeleton mechanism with computer control and some supervisory control that may give a quadriplegic the ability to walk and run around.

  19. D0 Cryo System Control System Autodialer

    SciTech Connect

    Urbin, J.; /Fermilab

    1990-04-17

    The DO cryogenic system is controlled by a TI565-PLC based control system. This allows the system to be unmanned when in steady state operation. System experts will need to be contacted when system parameters exceed normal operating points and reach alarm setpoints. The labwide FIRUS system provides one alarm monitor and communication link. An autodialer provides a second and more flexible alarm monitor and communication link. The autodialer monitors contact points in the control system and after receiving indication of an alarm accesses a list of experts which it calls until it receives an acknowledgement. There are several manufacturers and distributors of autodialer systems. This EN explains the search process the DO cryo group used to fmd an autodialer system that fit the cryo system's needs and includes information and specs for the unit we chose.

  20. Controls of maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Zhu, S.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.

    1993-06-01

    This study investigates alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. A one-dimensional vehicle with two degrees of freedom, to simulate the German Transrapid Maglev System, is used for suspension control designs. The transient and frequency responses of suspension systems and PSDs of vehicle accelerations are calculated to evaluate different control designs. The results show that active and semi-active control designs indeed improve the response of vehicle and provide an acceptable ride comfort for maglev systems.

  1. Control-System Design Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, Harold P.

    1987-01-01

    Control-theory design package, Optimal Regulator Algorithms for Control of Linear Systems (ORACLS), developed to aid in design of controllers and optimal filters for systems modeled by linear, time-invariant differential and difference equations. Optimal linear quadratic regulator theory, Linear-Quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) problem, most widely accepted method of determining optimal control policy. Provides for solution to time-in-variant continuous or discrete LQG problems. Attractive to control-system designer providing rigorous tool for dealing with multi-input and multi-output dynamic systems in continuous and discrete form. CDO version written in FORTRAN IV. VAX version written in FORTRAN 77.

  2. The ATLAS Detector Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantzsch, K.; Arfaoui, S.; Franz, S.; Gutzwiller, O.; Schlenker, S.; Tsarouchas, C. A.; Mindur, B.; Hartert, J.; Zimmermann, S.; Talyshev, A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Poblaguev, A.; Braun, H.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Kersten, S.; Martin, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Caforio, D.; Sbarra, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Nemecek, S.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Wynne, B.; Banas, E.; Hajduk, Z.; Olszowska, J.; Stanecka, E.; Bindi, M.; Polini, A.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Mandic, I.; Ertel, E.; Marques Vinagre, F.; Ribeiro, G.; Santos, H. F.; Barillari, T.; Habring, J.; Huber, J.; Arabidze, G.; Boterenbrood, H.; Hart, R.; Iakovidis, G.; Karakostas, K.; Leontsinis, S.; Mountricha, E.; Ntekas, K.; Filimonov, V.; Khomutnikov, V.; Kovalenko, S.; Grassi, V.; Mitrevski, J.; Phillips, P.; Chekulaev, S.; D'Auria, S.; Nagai, K.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Aielli, G.; Marchese, F.; Lafarguette, P.; Brenner, R.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment is one of the multi-purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, constructed to study elementary particle interactions in collisions of high-energy proton beams. Twelve different sub detectors as well as the common experimental infrastructure are controlled and monitored by the Detector Control System (DCS) using a highly distributed system of 140 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. Higher level control system layers allow for automatic control procedures, efficient error recognition and handling, manage the communication with external systems such as the LHC controls, and provide a synchronization mechanism with the ATLAS data acquisition system. Different databases are used to store the online parameters of the experiment, replicate a subset used for physics reconstruction, and store the configuration parameters of the systems. This contribution describes the computing architecture and software tools to handle this complex and highly interconnected control system.

  3. Probabilistic Analysis of Passive Safety System Reliability in Advanced Small Modular Reactors: Methodologies and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Grabaskas, David; Bucknor, Matthew; Brunett, Acacia; Grelle, Austin

    2015-06-28

    Many advanced small modular reactor designs rely on passive systems to fulfill safety functions during accident sequences. These systems depend heavily on boundary conditions to induce a motive force, meaning the system can fail to operate as intended due to deviations in boundary conditions, rather than as the result of physical failures. Furthermore, passive systems may operate in intermediate or degraded modes. These factors make passive system operation difficult to characterize with a traditional probabilistic framework that only recognizes discrete operating modes and does not allow for the explicit consideration of time-dependent boundary conditions. Argonne National Laboratory has been examining various methodologies for assessing passive system reliability within a probabilistic risk assessment for a station blackout event at an advanced small modular reactor. This paper describes the most promising options: mechanistic techniques, which share qualities with conventional probabilistic methods, and simulation-based techniques, which explicitly account for time-dependent processes. The primary intention of this paper is to describe the strengths and weaknesses of each methodology and highlight the lessons learned while applying the two techniques while providing high-level results. This includes the global benefits and deficiencies of the methods and practical problems encountered during the implementation of each technique.

  4. Integrated radwaste treatment system lessons learned from 2{1/2} years of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.N.; Fussner, R.J.

    1997-05-01

    The Integrated Radwaste Treatment System (IRTS) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is a pretreatment scheme to reduce the amount of salts in the high-level radioactive waste (vitrification) stream. Following removal of cesium-137 (Cs-137) by ion-exchange in the Supernatant Treatment System (STS), the radioactive waste liquid is volume-reduced by evaporation. Trace amounts of Cs-137 in the resulting distillate are removed by ion-exchange, then the distillate is discharged to the existing plant water treatment system. The concentrated product, 37 to 41 percent solids by weight, is encapsulated in cement producing a stable, low-level waste form. The Integrated Radwaste Treatment System (IRTS) operated in this mode from May 1988 through November 1990, decontaminating 450,000 gallons of high-level waste liquid; evaporating and encapsulating the resulting concentrates into 10,393 71-gallon square drums. A number of process changes and variations from the original operating plan were required to increase the system flow rate and minimize waste volumes. This report provides a summary of work performed to operate the IRTS, including system descriptions, process highlights, and lessons learned.

  5. Duct Flow Control System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    is ejected under pressure tangentially of local duct surfaces through Coanda affected slots at the trailing edge of the duct from which only the...channel passages in order to modify the flow stream through the duct so as to perform certain functions such as thrust control and steerage control effects enhancing vehicle maneuverability.

  6. Fluid delivery control system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  7. Controlled Stochastic Dynamical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-18

    the existence of value functions of two-player zero-sum stochastic differential games Indiana Univ. Math. Journal, 38 (1989), pp 293-314. [6] George ...control problems, Adv. Appl. Prob., 15, (1983) pp 225-254. [10] Karatzas, I. Ocone, D., Wang, H. and Zervos , M., Finite fuel singular control with

  8. Autorotation flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Edward N. (Inventor); Lee, Dong-Chan (Inventor); Aponso, Bimal L. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention provides computer implemented methodology that permits the safe landing and recovery of rotorcraft following engine failure. With this invention successful autorotations may be performed from well within the unsafe operating area of the height-velocity profile of a helicopter by employing the fast and robust real-time trajectory optimization algorithm that commands control motion through an intuitive pilot display, or directly in the case of autonomous rotorcraft. The algorithm generates optimal trajectories and control commands via the direct-collocation optimization method, solved using a nonlinear programming problem solver. The control inputs computed are collective pitch and aircraft pitch, which are easily tracked and manipulated by the pilot or converted to control actuator commands for automated operation during autorotation in the case of an autonomous rotorcraft. The formulation of the optimal control problem has been carefully tailored so the solutions resemble those of an expert pilot, accounting for the performance limitations of the rotorcraft and safety concerns.

  9. Bibliographic Access and Control System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Betsy; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Presents a brief summary of the functions of the Bibliographic Access & Control System (BACS) implemented at the Washington University School of Medicine Library, and outlines the design, development, and uses of the system. Bibliographic control of books and serials and user access to the system are also discussed. (Author/JL)

  10. Moving Object Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method is provided for controlling two objects relatively moveable with respect to each other. A plurality of receivers are provided for detecting a distinctive microwave signal from each of the objects and measuring the phase thereof with respect to a reference signal. The measured phase signal is used to determine a distance between each of the objects and each of the plurality of receivers. Control signals produced in response to the relative distances are used to control the position of the two objects.

  11. A control system framework for the Hobby-Eberly telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Jason; Drory, Niv; Bryant, Randy; Elliott, Linda; Fowler, James; Hill, Gary J.; Landriau, Martin; Leck, Ron; Vattiat, Brian

    2016-08-01

    We present the development framework for the distributed control systems, scripting frontend, and monitoring facilities of the recently upgraded Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). A common flexible control and data acquisition layer in C++, with message passing implemented on top of ZeroMQ, wraps the final designs of each new hardware component including tracking, metrology, instrumentation and calibration equipment. A homogeneous command, response and event layer normalizes the diversity of the lower level software interfaces easing the development of the Telescope Control System (TCS). Applications developed in the framework easily interface to the new tracker and legacy instrumentation of the primary mirror, weather, dome, and tracker support structure. The framework facilitates testing, vetting, and characterization of the telescope and TCS. Examples of the real-time monitoring capabilities and the Python scripting methods of various telescope components yield insight into overall system performance. Lessons learned along the way, future refinements, and anticipated enhancements, are detailed.

  12. Building Leadership Capacity in California's Public Education Systems: Lessons from the SCALE Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Joel

    2014-01-01

    This report documents the history and evolution of the Stuart Foundation California Leaders in Education (SCALE) Initiative through 2014. It tells the story of how the work began, what it entails, and how it has developed across time. The report also identifies lessons learned from the SCALE experience. These lessons can inform the participants of…

  13. Dynamics of Knowledge Transfer in Organizations: Implications for Design of Lessons Learned Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-12

    consultants had found to a variety of problems, a kind of "best practices" and " lessons learned " program . In the first test of Notes, information technology... lessons learned program to distinguish between the need for tacit, complex knowledge and explicit, codified knowledge. Transferring complex knowledge

  14. Supervisory Control of Networked Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-15

    consisting of 3 Koala robots [Lem06b]. The robots are controlled by MICA2 wireless processor modules. The robots communicate over the MICA2’s...preliminary documentation of a wireless autonomous robotic testbed. The system consists of 3 Koala (K-team Inc.) robots that are controlled by the MICA2...by this project. MICA-KoalaBot Hardware: The Koala robot is an autonomous wheeled vehicle that has 16 infrared (IR) proximity sensors around its

  15. Design and Evaluation of an Interactive Exercise Coaching System for Older Adults: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Ofli, Ferda; Kurillo, Gregorij; Obdržálek, Štěpán; Bajcsy, Ruzena; Jimison, Holly; Pavel, Misha

    2016-01-01

    Although the positive effects of exercise on the well-being and quality of independent living for older adults are well-accepted, many elderly individuals lack access to exercise facilities, or the skills and motivation to perform exercise at home. To provide a more engaging environment that promotes physical activity, various fitness applications have been proposed. Many of the available products, however, are geared toward a younger population and are not appropriate or engaging for an older population. To address these issues, we developed an automated interactive exercise coaching system using the Microsoft Kinect. The coaching system guides users through a series of video exercises, tracks and measures their movements, provides real-time feedback, and records their performance over time. Our system consists of exercises to improve balance, flexibility, strength, and endurance, with the aim of reducing fall risk and improving performance of daily activities. In this paper, we report on the development of the exercise system, discuss the results of our recent field pilot study with six independently-living elderly individuals, and highlight the lessons learned relating to the in-home system setup, user tracking, feedback, and exercise performance evaluation. PMID:25594988

  16. Materials degradation in fission reactors: Lessons learned of relevance to fusion reactor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Was, Gary S.

    2007-08-01

    The management of materials in power reactor systems has become a critically important activity in assuring the safe, reliable and economical operation of these facilities. Over the years, the commercial nuclear power reactor industry has faced numerous 'surprises' and unexpected occurrences in materials. Mitigation strategies have sometimes solved one problem at the expense of creating another. Other problems have been solved successfully and have motivated the development of techniques to foresee problems before they occur. This paper focuses on three aspects of fission reactor experience that may benefit future fusion systems. The first is identification of parameters and processes that have had a large impact on the behavior of materials in fission systems such as temperature, dose rate, surface condition, gradients, metallurgical variability and effects of the environment. The second is the development of materials performance and failure models to provide a basis for assuring component integrity. Last is the development of proactive materials management programs that identify and pre-empt degradation processes before they can become problems. These aspects of LWR experience along with the growing experience with materials in the more demanding advanced fission reactor systems form the basis for a set of 'lessons learned' to aid in the successful management of materials in fusion reactor systems.

  17. Overseas testing of a multisensor landmine detection system: results and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keranen, Joe G.; Topolosky, Zeke

    2009-05-01

    The Nemesis detection system has been developed to provide an efficient and reliable unmanned, multi-sensor, groundbased platform to detect and mark landmines. The detection system consists of two detection sensor arrays: a Ground Penetrating Synthetic Aperture Radar (GPSAR) developed by Planning Systems, Inc. (PSI) and an electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor array developed by Minelab Electronics, PTY. Limited. Under direction of the Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD), overseas testing was performed at Kampong Chhnang Test Center (KCTC), Cambodia, from May 12-30, 2008. Test objectives included: evaluation of detection performance, demonstration of real-time visualization and alarm generation, and evaluation of system operational efficiency. Testing was performed on five sensor test lanes, each consisting of a unique soil mixture and three off-road lanes which include curves, overgrowth, potholes, and non-uniform lane geometry. In this paper, we outline the test objectives, procedures, results, and lessons learned from overseas testing. We also describe the current state of the system, and plans for future enhancements and modifications including clutter rejection and feature-level fusion.

  18. Design and Evaluation of an Interactive Exercise Coaching System for Older Adults: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Ofli, Ferda; Kurillo, Gregorij; Obdržálek, Štěpán; Bajcsy, Ruzena; Jimison, Holly Brugge; Pavel, Misha

    2016-01-01

    Although the positive effects of exercise on the well-being and quality of independent living for older adults are well accepted, many elderly individuals lack access to exercise facilities, or the skills and motivation to perform exercise at home. To provide a more engaging environment that promotes physical activity, various fitness applications have been proposed. Many of the available products, however, are geared toward a younger population and are not appropriate or engaging for an older population. To address these issues, we developed an automated interactive exercise coaching system using the Microsoft Kinect. The coaching system guides users through a series of video exercises, tracks and measures their movements, provides real-time feedback, and records their performance over time. Our system consists of exercises to improve balance, flexibility, strength, and endurance, with the aim of reducing fall risk and improving performance of daily activities. In this paper, we report on the development of the exercise system, discuss the results of our recent field pilot study with six independently living elderly individuals, and highlight the lessons learned relating to the in-home system setup, user tracking, feedback, and exercise performance evaluation.

  19. A telerobotic digital controller system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    This system is a network of joint mounted dual axes digital servo-controllers (DDSC), providing control of various joints and end effectors of different robotic systems. This report provides description of and user required information for the Digital Controller System Network (DSCN) and, in particular, the DDSC, Model DDSC-2, developed to perform the controller functions. The DDSC can control 3 phase brushless or brush type DC motors, requiring up to 8 amps. Only four wires, two for power and 2 for serial communication, are required, except for local sensor and motor connections. This highly capable, very flexible, programmable servo-controller, contained on a single, compact printed circuit board measuring only 4.5 x 5.1 inches, is applicable to control systems of all types from sub-arc second precision pointing to control of robotic joints and end effectors. This document concentrates on the robotic applications for the DDSC.

  20. Lessons Learned From the Development, Operation, and Review of Mechanical Systems on the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, and Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinsel, Alison; Jermstad, Wayne; Robertson, Brandan

    2006-01-01

    The Mechanical Design and Analysis Branch at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for the technical oversight of over 30 mechanical systems flying on the Space Shuttle Orbiter and the International Space Station (ISS). The branch also has the responsibility for reviewing all mechanical systems on all Space Shuttle and International Space Station payloads, as part of the payload safety review process, through the Mechanical Systems Working Group (MSWG). These responsibilities give the branch unique insight into a large number of mechanical systems, and problems encountered during their design, testing, and operation. This paper contains narrative descriptions of lessons learned from some of the major problems worked on by the branch during the last two years. The problems are grouped into common categories and lessons learned are stated.

  1. Tests Of Helicopter Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, Kathryn B.; Lebacqz, J. Victor; Hindson, William S.

    1988-01-01

    Advanced control systems being developed for rotorcraft. Report discusses aspects of development of multivariable, explicit-model-following control system for CH-47B fly-by-wire helicopter. Project part of recent trend toward use of highly-augmented, high-gain flight-control systems to assist pilots of military helicopters in performance of demanding tasks and to improve handling qualities of aircraft.

  2. The Alaska Haemophilus influenzae type b experience: lessons in controlling a vaccine-preventable disease.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Rosalyn; Hammitt, Laura; Hennessy, Thomas; Bulkow, Lisa; DeByle, Carolynn; Parkinson, Alan; Cottle, Tammy E; Peters, Helen; Butler, Jay C

    2006-08-01

    Before 1991, Alaska Native children experienced one of the highest rates of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b disease. H influenzae type b vaccine has led to a near-elimination of invasive H influenzae type b disease in the United States. We describe challenges encountered in controlling H influenzae type b disease in Alaska and update the current status of H influenzae disease and carriage in Alaska as lessons to other populations. We reviewed data from statewide H influenzae disease surveillance conducted during 1980-2004. Vaccine coverage data were based on audits from tribal facilities and the National Immunization Survey. H influenzae type b colonization data were based on 6 carriage studies. After universal infant vaccination in 1991, H influenzae type b disease among Alaska Native and non-Native children < 5 years of age decreased by 94% and 96%, respectively. After a 1996 change in H influenzae type b vaccine from polyribosylribitol phosphate-outer membrane protein conjugate vaccine to H influenzae type b oligosaccharide-CRM197 vaccine, the incidence of H influenzae type b disease increased in rural Alaska Natives from 19.8 to 91.1 cases per 100000 per year < 5 years of age. During 2001-2004, with use of polyribosylribitol phosphate-outer membrane protein conjugate vaccine, the rate of H influenzae type b disease in Alaska Native and non-Native children aged < 5 years decreased to 5.4 and 0 per 100000 per year, respectively. In postvaccine studies, H influenzae type b carriage has decreased in Alaska Native children < 5 years of age. H influenzae type b vaccination has resulted in a dramatic decrease in invasive H influenzae type b disease in Alaska; however, despite high rates of H influenzae type b vaccine coverage, H influenzae type b disease rates among rural Alaska Native children < 5 years of age remain higher than the rates among non-Native Alaska and other US children. Equity in disease rates may not be achieved in indigenous populations with

  3. Randomized controlled trial of a collaborative care intervention to manage cancer-related symptoms: lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Jennifer; Geller, David A; Tsung, Allan; Marsh, J Wallis; Dew, Mary Amanda; Spring, Michael; Grady, Jonathan; Likumahuwa, Sonja; Dunlavy, Andrea; Youssef, Michael; Antoni, Michael; Butterfield, Lisa H; Schulz, Richard; Day, Richard; Helgeson, Vicki; Kim, Kevin H; Gamblin, T Clark

    2012-01-01

    Background Collaborative care interventions to treat depression have begun to be tested in settings outside of primary care. However, few studies have expanded the collaborative care model to other settings and targeted comorbid physical symptoms of depression. Purpose The aims of this report were to: (1) describe the design and methods of a trial testing the efficacy of a stepped collaborative care intervention designed to manage cancer-related symptoms and improve overall quality of life in patients diagnosed with hepatobiliary carcinoma; and (2) share the lessons learned during the design, implementation, and evaluation of the trial. Methods The trial was a phase III randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of a stepped collaborative care intervention to reduce depression, pain, and fatigue in patients diagnosed with advanced cancer. The intervention was compared to an enhanced usual care arm. The primary outcomes included the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)-Fatigue, and the FACT-Hepatobiliary. Sociodemographic and disease-specific characteristics were recorded from the medical record; Natural Killer cells and cytokines that are associated with these symptoms and with disease progression were assayed from serum. Results and Discussion The issues addressed include: (1) development of collaborative care in the context of oncology (e.g., timing of the intervention, tailoring of the intervention, ethical issues regarding randomization of patients, and changes in medical treatment over the course of the study); (2) use of a website by chronically ill populations (e.g., design and access to the website, development of the website and intervention, ethical issues associated with website development, website usage, and unanticipated costs associated with website development); (3) evaluation of the efficacy of intervention (e.g., patient preferences, proxy raters

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Howard, D.F.; Motta, E.E.

    1961-06-27

    A method for controlling the excess reactivity in a nuclear reactor throughout the core life while maintaining the neutron flux distribution at the desired level is described. The control unit embodies a container having two electrodes of different surface area immersed in an electrolytic solution of a good neutron sbsorbing metal ion such as boron, gadolinium, or cadmium. Initially, the neutron absorber is plated on the larger electrode to control the greater neutron flux of a freshly refueled core. As the fuel burns up, the excess reactivity decreases and the neutron absorber is then plated onto the smaller electrode so that the number of neutrons absorbed also decreases. The excess reactivity in the core may thus be maintained without the introduction of serious perturbations in the neutron flux distributibn.

  5. An overview of the EOSDIS V0 information management system: Lessons learned from the implementation of a distributed data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Patrick M.

    1994-01-01

    The EOSDIS Version 0 system, released in July, 1994, is a working prototype of a distributed data system. One of the purposes of the V0 project is to take several existing data systems and coordinate them into one system while maintaining the independent nature of the original systems. The project is a learning experience and the lessons are being passed on to the architects of the system which will distribute the data received from the planned EOS satellites. In the V0 system, the data resides on heterogeneous systems across the globe but users are presented with a single, integrated interface. This interface allows users to query the participating data centers based on a wide set of criteria. Because this system is a prototype, we used many novel approaches in trying to connect a diverse group of users with the huge amount of available data. Some of these methods worked and others did not. Now that V0 has been released to the public, we can look back at the design and implementation of the system and also consider some possible future directions for the next generation of EOSDIS.

  6. An overview of the EOSDIS V0 information management system: Lessons learned from the implementation of a distributed data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Patrick M.

    1994-01-01

    The EOSDIS Version 0 system, released in July, 1994, is a working prototype of a distributed data system. One of the purposes of the V0 project is to take several existing data systems and coordinate them into one system while maintaining the independent nature of the original systems. The project is a learning experience and the lessons are being passed on to the architects of the system which will distribute the data received from the planned EOS satellites. In the V0 system, the data resides on heterogeneous systems across the globe but users are presented with a single, integrated interface. This interface allows users to query the participating data centers based on a wide set of criteria. Because this system is a prototype, we used many novel approaches in trying to connect a diverse group of users with the huge amount of available data. Some of these methods worked and others did not. Now that V0 has been released to the public, we can look back at the design and implementation of the system and also consider some possible future directions for the next generation of EOSDIS.

  7. Ground Control System Description Document

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Loros

    2001-07-31

    The Ground Control System contributes to the safe construction and operation of the subsurface facility, including accesses and waste emplacement drifts, by maintaining the configuration and stability of the openings during construction, development, emplacement, and caretaker modes for the duration of preclosure repository life. The Ground Control System consists of ground support structures installed within the subsurface excavated openings, any reinforcement made to the rock surrounding the opening, and inverts if designed as an integral part of the system. The Ground Control System maintains stability for the range of geologic conditions expected at the repository and for all expected loading conditions, including in situ rock, construction, operation, thermal, and seismic loads. The system maintains the size and geometry of operating envelopes for all openings, including alcoves, accesses, and emplacement drifts. The system provides for the installation and operation of sensors and equipment for any required inspection and monitoring. In addition, the Ground Control System provides protection against rockfall for all subsurface personnel, equipment, and the engineered barrier system, including the waste package during the preclosure period. The Ground Control System uses materials that are sufficiently maintainable and that retain the necessary engineering properties for the anticipated conditions of the preclosure service life. These materials are also compatible with postclosure waste isolation performance requirements of the repository. The Ground Control System interfaces with the Subsurface Facility System for operating envelopes, drift orientation, and excavated opening dimensions, Emplacement Drift System for material compatibility, Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System for ground control instrument readings, Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System to support waste emplacement operations, and the Subsurface Excavation System

  8. AUTOMATIC FREQUENCY CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, C.F.; Salisbury, J.D.

    1961-01-10

    A control is described for automatically matching the frequency of a resonant cavity to that of a driving oscillator. The driving oscillator is disconnected from the cavity and a secondary oscillator is actuated in which the cavity is the frequency determining element. A low frequency is mixed with the output of the driving oscillator and the resultant lower and upper sidebands are separately derived. The frequencies of the sidebands are compared with the secondary oscillator frequency. deriving a servo control signal to adjust a tuning element in the cavity and matching the cavity frequency to that of the driving oscillator. The driving oscillator may then be connected to the cavity.

  9. Communicating Networked Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-31

    Bahamas, pages 1010-1015. 64. Carmen Del Vecchio and I.C. Paschalidis, “Supply Contracts with Service Level Requirements”, Proceedings of the IFAC...control using Monte Carlo sensing,” Proc. IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pp. 3058-3063, 2005. 10. S.B. Andersson, A.A. Handzel, V...Analysis, Madrid Spain. 20. S. Andersson and D. Hristu-Varsakelis, “Language-based feedback control using Monte -Carlo sensing”, to be subm. To IEEE Int’l

  10. A hospital system's response to a hurricane offers lessons, including the need for mandatory interfacility drills.

    PubMed

    Verni, Christina

    2012-08-01

    This case study explores the lessons learned when the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, a large, integrated health network in New York, evacuated three hospitals at high risk of flooding from Hurricane Irene in August 2011. The episode resulted in the evacuation, transport, and placement of 947 patients without any resulting deaths or serious injuries. This case demonstrates the utility of having in place a functional evacuation plan, such as the one North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System developed through its own full-scale exercises in the years following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. In those drills, the health system discovered that it needed to abandon its 1:1 matching of patients to available beds in the region in favor of the group transport of patients with similar needs to facilities that could accommodate them. Despite its overall success, the system identified the need for internal improvements, including automated patient tracking through the use of bar-coded wristbands and identification and training of additional backup personnel for its emergency operations center. Among other changes, policy makers at the state and federal levels should consider mandating full-scale interfacility evacuation drills to refine mechanisms to send and receive patients.

  11. TANK 241-AN-102 MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEM PROJECT LESSONS LEARNED

    SciTech Connect

    TAYLOR T; HAGENSEN A; KIRCH NW

    2008-07-07

    During 2007 and 2008, a new Multi-Probe Corrosion Monitoring System (MPCMS) was designed and fabricated for use in double-shell tank 241-AN-102. The system was successfully installed in the tank on May 1, 2008. The 241-AN-102 MPCMS consists of one 'fixed' in-tank probe containing primary and secondary reference electrodes, tank material electrodes, Electrical Resistance (ER) sensors, and stressed and unstressed corrosion coupons. In addition to the fixed probe, the 241-AN-102 MPCMS also contains four standalone coupon racks, or 'removable' probes. Each rack contains stressed and unstressed coupons made of American Society of Testing and Materials A537 CL1 steel, heat-treated to closely match the chemical and mechanical characteristics of the 241-AN-102 tank wall. These coupon racks can be removed periodically to facilitate examination of the attached coupons for corrosion damage. Along the way to successful system deployment and operation, the system design, fabrication, and testing activities presented a number of challenges. This document discusses these challenges and lessons learned, which when applied to future efforts, should improve overall project efficiency.

  12. Lessons learned from the flight of the NASA in-step cryo system experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimura, R.S.; Russo, S.C.; Gilman, D.C.

    1996-03-01

    The Cryo System Experiment was developed to validate in near zero-g space a 65 K cryogenic system for focal planes, optics, or other imaging instruments that require continuous cryogenic cooling. Two key cryogenic technologies, designed to improve performance of systems for scientific, commercial and defense applications in space, were successfully demonstrated on NASA{close_quote}s recent shuttle mission, Discovery (STS 63), launched on February 3{endash}11, 1995. The two advanced cryogenic technologies consisted of a 2-watt 65 K long-life low-vibration Stirling cooler, and a diode oxygen heat pipe thermal switch. Presented are highlights of the flight experiment and the effectiveness of lessons learned from the system integration of cryocooler and heat pipe technologies relating to: launch-vibration constraints for the expander cold-tips, a high-compliance thermal strap to minimize side loads on the expander, and the value of on-orbit diagnostics to check status of the cryocooler. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Lessons from a Successful Implementation of a Computerized Provider Order Entry System

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brian R.; Hallstrom, Craig K.; Hart, Kim Ward; Mahoney, Daniela; Lykowski, Gayle

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The electronic health record (EHR) can improve patient safety, care efficiency, cost effectiveness and regulatory compliance. Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) has successfully implemented an Integrating Clinical Information System (ICIS) that includes Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE). This review describes some of the unanticipated challenges and solutions identified during the implementation of ICIS. METHODS Data for this paper was derived from user-generated feedback within the ICIS. Feedback reports were reviewed and placed into categories based on root cause of the issue. Recurring issues or problems which led to potential or actual patient injury are included. RESULTS Nine distinct challenges were identified: 1) Deterioration in communication; 2) Excessive system alerts to users; 3) Unrecognized discontinuation of medications; 4) Unintended loss of orders; 5) Loss of orders during implementation; 6) Amplification of errors; 7) Unintentional generation of patient care orders by system analysts; 8) Persistence of specific patient care order instructions; 9) Verbal orders entered under the incorrect clinician. CONCLUSIONS Unanticipated challenges are expected when implementing EHRs. The implementation plan for any EHR should include methods to identify, evaluate and repair problems quickly. While continued challenges with this complex system are expected, we believe that the EHR will continue to facilitate improved patient care and safety. The lessons learned at CCHMC will permit other institutions to avoid some of these challenges and design robust processes to detect and respond to problems in a timely fashion to ensure implementation success. PMID:23055847

  14. ASSESSING THE IMPACT OF A NEWLY INTRODUCED ELECTRONIC PRESCRIBING SYSTEM ACROSS A PAEDIATRIC DEPARTMENT - LESSONS LEARNED.

    PubMed

    Tsyben, Anastasia; Gooding, Nigel; Kelsall, Wilf

    2016-09-01

    Prescribing audits have shown that the Women's and Children's Directorate reported higher number of prescription errors on the paediatric and neonatal wards compared to other areas in the Trust. Over the last three years a multidisciplinary prescribing team (PT), which included senior clinicians, pharmacists and trainees introduced a number of initiatives to improve the quality of prescribing. Strategies included structured departmental inductions, setting up of designated prescribing areas and reviewing errors with the prescriber. Year on year there were fewer prescribing errors.1 With the introduction of a new electronic prescribing system in October 2014 prescribing error rates were expected to decrease further, eradicating omissions around allergy recording, ward location and drug names. The aim of this abstract is to highlight the impact of the new system and describe lessons learned. In the summer of 2014, all inpatient drug charts across the department were reviewed on three non-consecutive days over a period of three weeks. Prescribing errors were identified by the ward pharmacist. Errors were grouped according to type and further analyzed by the PT. Errors deemed to have no clinical significance were excluded. Error rates were compared to the previous audits performed with identical methodology. Following the introduction of the electronic prescribing system, the ward pharmacists continued to review prescription charts on daily basis and generate regular error reports to notify the staff of new challenges. There were 174 (14%) errors out of 1225 prescriptions on 181 drug charts. The most commonly made mistakes included drug name errors, strength of preparation, allergies and ward documentation, prescriber's signature omissions, and antibiotic review and end dates. The introduction of an electronic system has eliminated drug name, strength of preparation, allergy recording and ward errors. However, serious challenges have been identified: entering of an

  15. Advanced flight control system study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgough, J.; Moses, K.; Klafin, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The architecture, requirements, and system elements of an ultrareliable, advanced flight control system are described. The basic criteria are functional reliability of 10 to the minus 10 power/hour of flight and only 6 month scheduled maintenance. A distributed system architecture is described, including a multiplexed communication system, reliable bus controller, the use of skewed sensor arrays, and actuator interfaces. Test bed and flight evaluation program are proposed.

  16. The CARMA Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwon, C.; Beard, A. D.; Daniel, P.; Hobbs, R.; Scott, S. L.; Kraybill, J. C.; Leitch, E.; Mehringer, D. M.; Plante, R.; Amarnath, N. S.; Pound, M. W.; Rauch, K. P.; Teuben, P. J.

    2004-07-01

    The Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) will be the combination of the BIMA, OVRO, and SZA millimeter arrays. With first light scheduled for 2005, CARMA will be the first heterogeneous millimeter array, combining antennas varying from 3.5 m to 10.4 m in diameter. The controls for CARMA involve creating a uniform interface for all antennas. The antennas are grouped into five independently-controlled sub-arrays, which will be used for scientific observations, engineering, or maintenance. The sub-arrays are controlled by two components: the Sub-array Command Processor (SCP) and the Sub-array Tracker (SAT). While each sub-array has a dedicated SCP for handling command processing, a single SAT computes and distributes slowly varying parameters to the necessary sub-arrays. The sub-array interface uses CORBA distributed objects to physically separate the user interface from the array. This allows for stability in the core engine controlling the array while enabling flexibility in the user interface implementation.

  17. Aircraft landing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor); Hansen, Rolf (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Upon aircraft landing approach, flare path command signals of altitude, vertical velocity and vertical acceleration are generated as functions of aircraft position and velocity with respect to the ground. The command signals are compared with corresponding actual values to generate error signals which are used to control the flight path.

  18. Automatic welder control system

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, D.G.; Mumford, W.E.; Yajie Chen.

    1993-06-15

    A spot welder for joining a plurality of parts is described, said spot welder comprising: an electrode electrically coupled to a weld controller; a first cylinder assembly having a cylinder housing, a piston and piston rod attached thereto for linearly displacing said electrode; a linear variable displacement transducer (LVDT) for detecting the displacement of said piston rod relative to the first cylinder housing and generating a LVDT signal responsive thereto; a microprocessor controlled monitor cooperating with the weld controller for evaluating the LVDT signal occurring during each cylinder movement to determine proper part fit up and to compensate for electrode wear prior to the initiation of welding, for monitoring real time displacement of the electrode as a result of welding, in order to cooperate with the weld controller to vary weld duration responsive to the electrode displacement; and a second cylinder assembly for linearly displacing said first cylinder assembly between a retracted position to facilitate part removal and an extended position in which welding occurs.

  19. INSTRUCTIONAL QUALITY CONTROL SYSTEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MONROE, BRUCE

    A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE, A MAIL SURVEY, AND A TEXTUAL ANALYSIS OF JUNIOR COLLEGE DOCUMENTS INDICATE THAT, WHILE CALIFORNIA JUNIOR COLLEGES ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE QUALITY AND EFFECTIVENESS OF INSTRUCTION, CONTROL OF THAT QUALITY IS RARELY A SYSTEMATIC ROUTINE ENTERPRISE BASED ON EXAMINATION OF BEHAVIOR CHANGES IN STUDENTS FOLLOWING INSTRUCTION.…

  20. The APS control system network

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorowicz, K.V.; McDowell, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    The APS accelerator control system is a distributed system consisting of operator interfaces, a network, and computer-controlled interfaces to hardware. This implementation of a control system has come to be called the {open_quotes}Standard Model.{close_quotes} The operator interface is a UNDC-based workstation with an X-windows graphical user interface. The workstation may be located at any point on the facility network and maintain full functionality. The function of the network is to provide a generalized communication path between the host computers, operator workstations, input/output crates, and other hardware that comprise the control system. The crate or input/output controller (IOC) provides direct control and input/output interfaces for each accelerator subsystem. The network is an integral part of all modem control systems and network performance will determine many characteristics of a control system. This paper will describe the overall APS network and examine the APS control system network in detail. Metrics are provided on the performance of the system under various conditions.

  1. Lessons Learned from the Design, Certification, and Operation of the Space Shuttle Integrated Main Propulsion System (IMPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Hugo E.; Albright, John D.; D'Amico, Stephen J.; Brewer, John M.; Melcher, John C., IV

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Integrated Main Propulsion System (IMPS) consists of the External Tank (ET), Orbiter Main Propulsion System (MPS), and Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs). The IMPS is tasked with the storage, conditioning, distribution, and combustion of cryogenic liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) propellants to provide first and second stage thrust for achieving orbital velocity. The design, certification, and operation of the associated IMPS hardware have produced many lessons learned over the course of the Space Shuttle Program (SSP). A subset of these items will be discussed in this paper for consideration when designing, building, and operating future spacecraft propulsion systems. This paper will focus on lessons learned related to Orbiter MPS and is the first of a planned series to address the subject matter.

  2. Modal control of structural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. F.; Wells, W. R.

    1984-11-01

    There is much interest in the practical control of large space structures such as space transportation systems and large communication satellites. The control task is normally thought of in terms of maintaining specified shape configurations, orientation and alignment, vibration suppression and pointing accuracy, etc. Because of their inherent flexibility, they are generally analyzed as distributed parameter systems which creates difficulties in the design and analysis of controllers for them. Modal control techniques have been developed to bypass problems associated with distributed parameter theory. Modal control is built upon the notion that certain specified system modes can be controlled by appropriate design of the associated closed-loop eigenvalues. This reduces the number of sensors and actuators needed to effect the control of the structure. An undesirable phenomenon, referred to as observation and control spillover, can occur if the number of sensors and actuators used is small. Spillover refers to the phenomenon in which energy intended to go solely into the controlled modes leaks into the uncontrolled modes. This report discusses the control of flexible systems described by a generalized one-dimensional wave equation which relates the structure displacement to the force distribution acting on the structure. Optimal control involving the minimization of a quadratic performance index representing control and modal energy content is considered. Typically this control formulation leads to a state feedback algorithm.

  3. Nonlinear Control Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-18

    in a trim condition is a typical problem of output regulation near an equilibrium setting, tailless or nearly tailless aircraft , such as UCAV’s...control to produce significant nonlinear excursions. Taking advantage of these nonequilibrium nonlinearities in tailless aircraft also promises to...will also have multiple nonlinear axes and a smaller domain of stability than conventional aircraft , involving nonlinear trajectories which cannot be

  4. Organizing Community-Based Data Standards: Lessons from Developing a Successful Open Standard in Systems Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucka, M.

    2015-09-01

    In common with many fields, including astronomy, a vast number of software tools for computational modeling and simulation are available today in systems biology. This wealth of resources is a boon to researchers, but it also presents interoperability problems. Despite working with different software tools, researchers want to disseminate their work widely as well as reuse and extend the models of other researchers. This situation led in the year 2000 to an effort to create a tool-independent, machine-readable file format for representing models: SBML, the Systems Biology Markup Language. SBML has since become the de facto standard for its purpose. Its success and general approach has inspired and influenced other community-oriented standardization efforts in systems biology. Open standards are essential for the progress of science in all fields, but it is often difficult for academic researchers to organize successful community-based standards. I draw on personal experiences from the development of SBML and summarize some of the lessons learned, in the hope that this may be useful to other groups seeking to develop open standards in a community-oriented fashion.

  5. Integrated health system for chronic disease management: lessons learned from France.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Mary; Weinrich, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Rated number one in overall health system performance by the World Health Organization, the French spend less than half the amount on annual health care per capita that the United States spends. One contributing factor may be the attention given to chronic care. Since the mid-1900s, the French have developed regional community-based specialty systems for patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency or failure. COPD is the major cause of respiratory failure, the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, and its prevalence is increasing. Despite the clinical success of home mechanical ventilation and the potential for cost savings, providing such services in the United States remains a challenge. Lessons from France can inform the development of cost-effective chronic care models in the United States In this article, we review the French experience in the context of the United States Supreme Court's Olmstead decision, mandating that people in "more restrictive settings" such as nursing homes be offered community-based supports. We suggest that regional demonstration projects for patients with chronic respiratory failure or insufficiency can provide an important step in the development of effective chronic care systems in the United States

  6. Control of Nonlinear Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    characteristics, and applied to presented small-gain theorems guaranteeing the lack of oscillatory or more complicated behavior in a large class of Lotka ... Volterra systems with predator-prey interactions as well as chemostats, which describe the interaction between microbial species which are competing

  7. Dynamically controlled crystal growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Terry L. (Inventor); Kim, Larry J. (Inventor); Harrington, Michael (Inventor); DeLucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Crystal growth can be initiated and controlled by dynamically controlled vapor diffusion or temperature change. In one aspect, the present invention uses a precisely controlled vapor diffusion approach to monitor and control protein crystal growth. The system utilizes a humidity sensor and various interfaces under computer control to effect virtually any evaporation rate from a number of different growth solutions simultaneously by means of an evaporative gas flow. A static laser light scattering sensor can be used to detect aggregation events and trigger a change in the evaporation rate for a growth solution. A control/follower configuration can be used to actively monitor one chamber and accurately control replicate chambers relative to the control chamber. In a second aspect, the invention exploits the varying solubility of proteins versus temperature to control the growth of protein crystals. This system contains miniature thermoelectric devices under microcomputer control that change temperature as needed to grow crystals of a given protein. Complex temperature ramps are possible using this approach. A static laser light scattering probe also can be used in this system as a non-invasive probe for detection of aggregation events. The automated dynamic control system provides systematic and predictable responses with regard to crystal size. These systems can be used for microgravity crystallization projects, for example in a space shuttle, and for crystallization work under terrestial conditions. The present invention is particularly useful for macromolecular crystallization, e.g. for proteins, polypeptides, nucleic acids, viruses and virus particles.

  8. Virtual Control Systems Environment (VCSE)

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, Will

    2012-10-08

    Will Atkins, a Sandia National Laboratories computer engineer discusses cybersecurity research work for process control systems. Will explains his work on the Virtual Control Systems Environment project to develop a modeling and simulation framework of the U.S. electric grid in order to study and mitigate possible cyberattacks on infrastructure.

  9. SP-100 control system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, R. A.; Halfen, F. J.; Alley, A. D.

    1987-01-01

    SP-100 Control Systems modeling was done using a thermal hydraulic transient analysis model called ARIES-S. The ARIES-S Computer Simulation provides a basis for design, integration and analysis of the reactor including the control and protection systems. It is a modular digital computer simulation written in FORTRAN that operates interactively in real time on a VAX minicomputer.

  10. Control systems on Lie groups.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurdjevic, V.; Sussmann, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    The controllability properties of systems which are described by an evolution equation in a Lie group are studied. The revelant Lie algebras induced by a right invariant system are singled out, and the basic properties of attainable sets are derived. The homogeneous case and the general case are studied, and results are interpreted in terms of controllability. Five examples are given.

  11. Virtual Control Systems Environment (VCSE)

    ScienceCinema

    Atkins, Will

    2016-07-12

    Will Atkins, a Sandia National Laboratories computer engineer discusses cybersecurity research work for process control systems. Will explains his work on the Virtual Control Systems Environment project to develop a modeling and simulation framework of the U.S. electric grid in order to study and mitigate possible cyberattacks on infrastructure.

  12. Control systems on Lie groups.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurdjevic, V.; Sussmann, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    The controllability properties of systems which are described by an evolution equation in a Lie group are studied. The revelant Lie algebras induced by a right invariant system are singled out, and the basic properties of attainable sets are derived. The homogeneous case and the general case are studied, and results are interpreted in terms of controllability. Five examples are given.

  13. Preventative maintenance for control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, G.O.

    1985-05-01

    Preventative maintenance of the control systems should be performed on a required interval. Most manufacturers specify six to twelve month intervals. However, inspections can often be accomplished when the control units or mechanical systems are out of service for a malfunction repair. A procedural checklist for proper maintenance is given.

  14. 14 CFR 25.395 - Control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.395 Control system. (a) Longitudinal, lateral, directional, and drag control system and their supporting structures...

  15. 14 CFR 25.395 - Control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.395 Control system. (a) Longitudinal, lateral, directional, and drag control system and their supporting structures...

  16. 14 CFR 25.395 - Control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.395 Control system. (a) Longitudinal, lateral, directional, and drag control system and their supporting structures...

  17. 14 CFR 25.395 - Control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.395 Control system. (a) Longitudinal, lateral, directional, and drag control system and their supporting structures...

  18. 14 CFR 25.395 - Control system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.395 Control system. (a) Longitudinal, lateral, directional, and drag control system and their supporting structures...

  19. CENTRAL CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1959-09-22

    A control element is presented for neutronic reactors. The element is longitudinally expansible and compressible and remains within the reactor core at all times. The effectiveness of the element as to neutron absorption is varied by longitudinally compressing or expanding the element, the effectiveness being greatest when the element is fullv expanded and least when it is fully compressed. Two embodiments of the invention are described, one being a coiled spring and the other being an element formed from a plurality of interconnected links.

  20. Expert system controlled microwave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Siambis, J.; Bacher, H.; Bemis, T.; Hargreaves, T.; Rogers, R.; Symons, R.; Vaughan, R.; Kolte, G.; Lee, M.

    1995-12-31

    The design, manufacture, reliable, long-life operation and life-time cost-effective performance and recycling of high value microwave tubes can benefit significantly by the introduction and integration of expert system controls in microwave tubes. Expert systems are based on a computer module equipped with (a) sensors to measure the state of the system (b) a database and computational capability to compare the measured state of the system against a programmed state (c) capable of deciding and initiating corrective action on the state of the system through (d) adaptive controls and activators capable of modifying the operating state. The authors have begun the investigation and development of an expert system using the klystron tube L-5838 as a testbed. Initially, all sensors and controls are placed outside the vacuum envelope of the tube in order to minimize the insertion cost of the expert system. They report here on an expert system for the input cavity of the klystron tube.

  1. Digital Fire Control Systems Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-27

    Systems ( DFCS ) for the M119A2 and M777A2. The DFCS is a fully integrated digital fire control system that has weapon platform application to the...Lightweight 155 mm (LW155) Towed Howitzer and the M119A2 Lightweight 105mm Towed Howitzer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Digital Fire Control Systems ( DFCS ) 16...Joint Lightweight 155, has been tasked to develop and maintain the Digital Fire Control Systems ( DFCS ) for the M119A2 and M777A2. The DFCS is a fully

  2. Argonne's atlas control system upgrade.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, F.; Quock, D.; Chapin, B.; Figueroa, J.

    1999-09-27

    The ATLAS facility (Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System) is located at the Argonne National Laboratory. The facility is a tool used in nuclear and atomic physics research, which focuses primarily on heavy-ion physics. The accelerator as well as its control system are evolutionary in nature, and consequently, continue to advance. In 1998 the most recent project to upgrade the ATLAS control system was completed. This paper briefly reviews the upgrade, and summarizes the configuration and features of the resulting control system.

  3. Control of Dynamical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-30

    I, Academic Press, pp. 211-222, 1976. [24] LASALLE , J.P. (with E.N. Onwuchekwa) An Invariance Principle for Vector Liapunov Functions. Dynamical...Press, Inc. pp. XVii-XXi, 1976. V-7 [59] LASALLE , J.P. Stability Theory and Invariance Principles . Chapter 5: Topological Dynamtical Systems...to extend the earlier work of Hurt in [50] in applying the invariance principle to extend Liapunov’s direct method. An exposition of some of these

  4. Selected Lessons Learned in Space Shuttle Orbiter Propulsion and Power Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Francisco J.; Martinez, Hugo; Ryan, Abigail; Westover, Shayne; Davies, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Over its 30 years of space flight history, plus the nearly 10 years of design, development test and evaluation, the Space Shuttle Orbiter is full of lessons learned in all of its numerous and complex subsystems. In the current paper, only selected lessons learned in the areas of the Orbiter propulsion and power subsystems will be described. The particular Orbiter subsystems include: Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), Hydraulics and Water Spray Boiler (WSB), Mechanical Flight Controls, Main Propulsion System (MPS), Fuel Cells and Power Reactant and Storage Devices (PRSD), Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS), Reaction Control System (RCS), Electrical Power Distribution (EPDC), electrical wiring and pyrotechnics. Given the complexity and extensive history of each of these subsystems, and the limited scope of this paper, it is impossible to include most of the lessons learned; instead the attempt will be to present a selected few or key lessons, in the judgment of the authors. Each subsystem is presented separate, beginning with an overview of the hardware and their function, a short description of a few historical problems and their lessons, followed by a more comprehensive table listing of the major subsystem problems and lessons. These tables serve as a quick reference for lessons learned in each subsystem. In addition, this paper will establish common lessons across subsystems as well as concentrate on those lessons which are deemed to have the highest applicability to future space flight programs.

  5. A randomized controlled trial of venlafaxine XR for major depressive disorder after spinal cord injury: Methods and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Bombardier, Charles H.; Fann, Jesse R.; Wilson, Catherine S.; Heinemann, Allen W.; Richards, J. Scott; Warren, Ann Marie; Brooks, Larry; Warms, Catherine A.; Temkin, Nancy R.; Tate, Denise G.

    2014-01-01

    Context/objective We describe the rationale, design, methods, and lessons learned conducting a treatment trial for major depressive disorder (MDD) or dysthymia in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design A multi-site, double-blind, randomized (1:1) placebo controlled trial of venlafaxine XR for MDD or dysthymia. Subjects were block randomized and stratified by site, lifetime history of substance dependence, and prior history of MDD. Setting Six SCI centers throughout the United States. Participants Across participating centers, 2536 subjects were screened and 133 were enrolled into the trial. Subjects were 18–64 years old and at least 1 month post-SCI. Interventions Twelve-week trial of venlafaxine XR versus placebo using a flexible titration schedule. Outcome measures The primary outcome was improvement in depression severity at 12 weeks. The secondary outcome was improvement in pain. Results This article includes study methods, modifications prompted by a formative review process, preliminary data on the study sample and lessons learned. We describe common methodological and operational challenges conducting multi-site trials and how we addressed them. Challenges included study organization and decision making, staff training, obtaining human subjects approval, standardization of measurement and treatment, data and safety monitoring, subject screening and recruitment, unblinding and continuity of care, database management, and data analysis. Conclusions The methodological and operational challenges we faced and the lessons we learned may provide useful information for researchers who aim to conduct clinical trials, especially in the area of medical treatment of depression in people with SCI. PMID:24090228

  6. SNS LINAC RF control system.

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, A. H.; Kwon, S. I.; Prokop, M. S.; Rohlev, T. S.; Thomson, D. W.; Ma, H.

    2002-01-01

    The SNS linac RF control system (RFCS) is currently in development. A system is being installed in a superconducting test stand at Jefferson Laboratory presently. Two systems will soon be installed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and more are due to be installed early next year. The RF control system provides field control for the entire SNS linac, including an RFQ and 6 DTL cavities at 402.5 MHz as well as three different types of cavities at of 805 MHz: 4 CCL cavities, 36 medium beta superconducting (SRF) cavities, and 45 high beta superconducting cavities. In addition to field control, it provides cavity resonance control, and incorporates high power protect functions. This paper will discuss the RFCS design to date, with emphasis on the challenges of providing a universal digital system for use on each of the individual cavity types. The RF control system hardware has been designed to minimize the amount of changes for all of the applications. Through software/firmware modification and changing a couple of frequency-dependent filters, the same control system design can be used for all five cavity types. The SNS is the first to utilize SRF cavities for a pulsed high-current proton accelerator, thereby making RF control especially challenging.

  7. Control principles of complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang-Yu; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-07-01

    A reflection of our ultimate understanding of a complex system is our ability to control its behavior. Typically, control has multiple prerequisites: it requires an accurate map of the network that governs the interactions between the system's components, a quantitative description of the dynamical laws that govern the temporal behavior of each component, and an ability to influence the state and temporal behavior of a selected subset of the components. With deep roots in dynamical systems and control theory, notions of control and controllability have taken a new life recently in the study of complex networks, inspiring several fundamental questions: What are the control principles of complex systems? How do networks organize themselves to balance control with functionality? To address these questions here recent advances on the controllability and the control of complex networks are reviewed, exploring the intricate interplay between the network topology and dynamical laws. The pertinent mathematical results are matched with empirical findings and applications. Uncovering the control principles of complex systems can help us explore and ultimately understand the fundamental laws that govern their behavior.

  8. Uzaybimer Radio Telescope Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbay, R.; Öz, G. K.; Arslan, Ö.; Özeren, F. F.; Küçük, İ.

    2016-12-01

    A 13 meters former NATO radar is being converted into a radio telescope. The radio telescope is controlled by a system which has been developed at UZAYBİMER. The Telescope Control System(TCS) has been designed using modern industrial systems. TCS has been developed in LabView platform in which works Windows embedded OS. The position feedback used on radio telescopes is an industrial EtherCAT standard. ASCOM library is used for astronomical calculations.

  9. Aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisoski, Derek L. (Inventor); Kendall, Greg T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A solar rechargeable, long-duration, span-loaded flying wing, having no fuselage or rudder. Having a two-hundred foot wingspan that mounts photovoltaic cells on most all of the wing's top surface, the aircraft uses only differential thrust of its eight propellers to turn, pitch and yaw. The wing is configured to deform under flight loads to position the propellers such that the control can be achieved. Each of five segments of the wing has one or more motors and photovoltaic arrays, and produces its own lift independent of the other segments, to avoid loading them. Five two-sided photovoltaic arrays, in all, are mounted on the wing, and receive photovoltaic energy both incident on top of the wing, and which is incident also from below, through a bottom, transparent surface.

  10. Emission control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce NOx, SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions from combustion flue gas streams. Continuous concentration of hydrogen peroxide to levels approaching or exceeding propellant-grade hydrogen peroxide facilitates increased system efficiency. In this manner, combustion flue gas streams can be treated for the removal of NOx, SOx and heavy metals, while isolating useful by-products streams of sulfuric acid and nitric acid as well as solids for the recovery of the heavy metals.

  11. Decentralized System Control.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-01

    03-1 UNCLASSIFIED RRDC-TR-85-199 F30662-GI-C-029? F/O 9/2 UL U-- IIII"I 1.25 .4 11fl1.6 N ~ATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS- 1963- * ....% S.A. 7-* S *.S .p...DECENTRALIZED SYSTEM CONTROLDTC JUL 251986 N Carnegie-Mellon University S L~~ E. Douglas Jensen, Raymond K. Clark, Robert P. Colwell. Charlie Y. Hitchcock...Chuck P. Kollar, C. Douglass Locke, John P. Lehoczky, J. Duane Northcutt, Norm L. Pieszkoch, N . Peter M. Schwarz, Lul Sha, Samuel E. Shipman, Hide Tokuda

  12. Active Shimmy Control System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    reviewed by thoe nformation Offite (01) end Is reslesuabe to the National Technical Wnrdstleftiv Oervico (WI2B). At N13..S it iuil be, avail-able th the...Figure 2, - are used only for the passive system. BH and BL are hydraulic (velocity squared) and linear shimmy damper constants, and KALP in the...NOTES KPH i.63E6 1.403E6 x KrI 11.20 5000 .. X &T, ~ ipl, , x KOC 77270 - X KALP 18000 -X IPH 69.7 83.9 X ITH .68 x "ITI, .03 - x ITII2 3.h9 - xIA .o

  13. Fuel control system for an engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogdon, James William (Inventor); Gill, David Keith (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A fuel control system responsive to a power controller and controlling a fuel delivery system. The fuel control system includes a control arm connected to both the power controller and the fuel delivery system, a position sensor connected to the control arm, and a trim controller connected to the control arm at a pivot point and connected to the position sensor.

  14. LESSONS LEARNED IN OPERATING THE HOSE-IN-HOSE SYSTEM FOR TRANSFSERRING SLUDGE AT HANFORDS K-BASINS

    SciTech Connect

    PERES MW

    2008-01-07

    In May 2007, the Department of Energy and the Fluor Hanford K Basin Closure Project completed transferring sludge from the K East Basin to new containers in the K West Basin using a Hose-in-Hose system. This project presented a number of complex and unique technical, operational, and management challenges that had to be resolved to complete the required transfers and satisfy project milestones. The project team (including DOE; regulators; and Fluor management, operations, maintenance, engineering and all other support organizations) found innovative solutions to each challenge. This paper records lessons learned during the operational phase of the sludge transfer via the Hose-In-Hose system. The subject is limited to the operational phase and does not cover design, development, testing or turnover. A discussion of the situation or problem encountered is provided, along with the lesson learned as applicable to a future program or project.

  15. Lessons Learned During Cryogenic Optical Testing of the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrators (AMSDs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James; Reardon, Patrick; Geary, Joseph; Robinson, Brian; Stahl, Philip; Eng, Ron; Kegley, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Optical testing in a cryogenic environment presents a host of challenges above and beyond those encountered during room temperature testing. The Advanced Mirror System Demonstrators (AMSDs) are 1.4 m diameter, ultra light-weight (<20 kg/mA2), off-axis parabolic segments. They are required to have 250 nm PV & 50 nm RMS surface figure error or less at 35 K. An optical testing system, consisting of an Instantaneous Phase Interferometer (PI), a diffractive null corrector (DNC), and an Absolute Distance Meter (ADM), was used to measure the surface figure & radius-of-curvature of these mirrors at the operational temperature within the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Ah4SD program was designed to improve the technology related to the design, fabrication, & testing of such mirrors in support of NASA s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This paper will describe the lessons learned during preparation & cryogenic testing of the AMSDs.

  16. SU-F-P-01: Changing Your Oncology Information System: A Detailed Process and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Abing, C

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation Oncology departments are faced with many options for pairing their treatment machines with record and verify systems. Recently, there is a push to have a single-vendor-solution. In order to achieve this, the department must go through an intense and rigorous transition process. Our department has recently completed this process and now offer a detailed description of the process along with lessons learned. Methods: Our cancer center transitioned from a multi-vendor department to a single-vendor department over the 2015 calendar year. Our staff was partitioned off into superuser groups, an interface team, migration team, and go-live team. Six months after successful implementation, a detailed survey was sent to the radiation oncology department to determine areas for improvement as well as successes in the process. Results: The transition between record and verify systems was considered a complete success. The results of the survey did point out some areas for improving inefficiencies with our staff; both interactions between each other and the vendors. Conclusion: Though this process was intricate and lengthy, it can be made easier with careful planning and detailed designation of project responsibilities. Our survey results and retrospective analysis of the transition are valuable to those wishing to make this change.

  17. Lessons Learned During Cryogenic Optical Testing of the Advanced Mirror System Demonstrators (AMSDs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James; Reardon, Patrick; Geary, Joseph; Robinson, Brian; Stahl, Philip; Eng, Ron; Kegley, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Optical testing in a cryogenic environment presents a host of challenges above and beyond those encountered during room temperature testing. The Advanced Mirror System Demonstrators (AMSDs) are 1.4 m diameter, ultra light-weight (<20 kg/mA2), off-axis parabolic segments. They are required to have 250 nm PV & 50 nm RMS surface figure error or less at 35 K. An optical testing system, consisting of an Instantaneous Phase Interferometer (PI), a diffractive null corrector (DNC), and an Absolute Distance Meter (ADM), was used to measure the surface figure & radius-of-curvature of these mirrors at the operational temperature within the X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Ah4SD program was designed to improve the technology related to the design, fabrication, & testing of such mirrors in support of NASA s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This paper will describe the lessons learned during preparation & cryogenic testing of the AMSDs.

  18. A Tale of Two Chambers: Iterative Approaches and Lessons Learned from Life Support Systems Testing in Altitude Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    The drive for the journey to Mars is in a higher gear than ever before. We are developing new spacecraft and life support systems to take humans to the Red Planet. The journey that development hardware takes before its final incarnation in a fully integrated spacecraft can take years, as is the case for the Orion environmental control and life support system (ECLSS). Through the Pressure Integrated Suit Test (PIST) series, NASA personnel at Johnson Space Center have been characterizing the behavior of a closed loop ECLSS in the event of cabin depressurization. This kind of testing - one of the most hazardous activities performed at JSC - requires an iterative approach, increasing in complexity and hazards). The PIST series, conducted in the Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) 11-ft Chamber, started with unmanned test precursors before moving to a human-in-the-loop phase, and continues to evolve with the eventual goal of a qualification test for the final system that will be installed on Orion. Meanwhile, the Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) program is an effort to research and develop technologies that will work in concert to support habitation on Mars. September 2015 marked the first unmanned HESTIA test, with the goal of characterizing how ECLSS technologies work together in a closed environment. HESTIA will culminate in crewed testing, but it can benefit from the lessons learned from another test that is farther ahead in its development and life cycle. Discussing PIST and HESTIA, this paper illustrates how we approach testing, the kind of information that facility teams need to ensure efficient collaborations and successful testing, and how we can apply what we learn to execute future tests.

  19. Lesson 6: Registration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lesson 6 provides checklist items 1 through 4 are grouped under the Registration Process, where users establish their accounts in the system. This process typically requires users to provide information about them.

  20. Emission control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor); Chung, J. Landy (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus utilizing hydrogen peroxide are useful to reduce SOx and mercury (or other heavy metal) emissions from combustion flue gas streams. The methods and apparatus may further be modified to reduce NOx emissions. Continuous concentration of hydrogen peroxide to levels approaching or exceeding propellant-grade hydrogen peroxide facilitates increased system efficiency. In this manner, combustion flue gas streams can be treated for the removal of SOx and heavy metals, while isolating useful by-products streams of sulfuric acid as well as solids for the recovery of the heavy metals. Where removal of NOx emissions is included, nitric acid may also be isolated for use in fertilizer or other industrial applications.

  1. Adaptable state based control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Robert D. (Inventor); Dvorak, Daniel L. (Inventor); Gostelow, Kim P. (Inventor); Starbird, Thomas W. (Inventor); Gat, Erann (Inventor); Chien, Steve Ankuo (Inventor); Keller, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An autonomous controller, comprised of a state knowledge manager, a control executor, hardware proxies and a statistical estimator collaborates with a goal elaborator, with which it shares common models of the behavior of the system and the controller. The elaborator uses the common models to generate from temporally indeterminate sets of goals, executable goals to be executed by the controller. The controller may be updated to operate in a different system or environment than that for which it was originally designed by the replacement of shared statistical models and by the instantiation of a new set of state variable objects derived from a state variable class. The adaptation of the controller does not require substantial modification of the goal elaborator for its application to the new system or environment.

  2. Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. -F.; Hurley, Francis X.; Huang, Jie; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1996-01-01

    %T Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design%A C-F. Lin%A Francis X. Hurley%A Jie Huang%A F. Y. Hadaegh%J International Conference on Control and Information(psi)995%C Hong Kong%D June 1995%K aeropropulsion, control, system%U http://jpltrs.jpl.nasa.gov/1995/95-0658.pdfAn integrated intelligent control approach is proposed to design a high performance control system for aeropropulsion systems based on advanced sensor processing, nonlinear control and neural fuzzy control integration. Our approach features the following innovations:??e complexity and uncertainty issues are addressed via the distributed parallel processing, learning, and online reoptimization properties of neural networks.??e nonlinear dynamics and the severe coupling can be naturally incorporated into the design framework.??e knowledge base and decision making logic furnished by fuzzy systems leads to a human intelligence enhanced control scheme.In addition, fault tolerance, health monitoring and reconfigurable control strategies will be accommodated by this approach to ensure stability, graceful degradation and reoptimization in the case of failures, malfunctions and damage.!.

  3. Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. -F.; Hurley, Francis X.; Huang, Jie; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1996-01-01

    %T Integrated Aeropropulsion Control System Design%A C-F. Lin%A Francis X. Hurley%A Jie Huang%A F. Y. Hadaegh%J International Conference on Control and Information(psi)995%C Hong Kong%D June 1995%K aeropropulsion, control, system%U http://jpltrs.jpl.nasa.gov/1995/95-0658.pdfAn integrated intelligent control approach is proposed to design a high performance control system for aeropropulsion systems based on advanced sensor processing, nonlinear control and neural fuzzy control integration. Our approach features the following innovations:??e complexity and uncertainty issues are addressed via the distributed parallel processing, learning, and online reoptimization properties of neural networks.??e nonlinear dynamics and the severe coupling can be naturally incorporated into the design framework.??e knowledge base and decision making logic furnished by fuzzy systems leads to a human intelligence enhanced control scheme.In addition, fault tolerance, health monitoring and reconfigurable control strategies will be accommodated by this approach to ensure stability, graceful degradation and reoptimization in the case of failures, malfunctions and damage.!.

  4. Lessons Learned from Analyses of the Improved TOW Vehicle with Implications for Future Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    include consideration for crew- level collective tasks in some type of front- end analysis like ECA. (d) Approximately 5 to 7 years of relevant...front- end analytic technique and a key element in the overall manpower and personnel integration (MANPRINT) program. ECA uses a "lessons learned...front- end analytic methodol- ogy. It uses a "lessons learned" approach, focusing on the indi- vidual soldier tasks performed by operators

  5. Systems Engineering Lessons Learned from Solar Array Structures and Mechanisms Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vipavetz, Kevin; Kraft, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This report has been developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) Risk Management team in close coordination with the Engineering Directorate at LaRC. This document provides a point-in-time, cumulative, summary of actionable key lessons learned derived from the design project. Lessons learned invariably address challenges and risks and the way in which these areas have been addressed. Accordingly the risk management thread is woven throughout the document.

  6. Bead Game Simulation. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripp, Ken

    This lesson plan offers students the opportunity to participate in the three basic economic systems (market, command, and tradition). By working in each of the systems, students will internalize the fundamental values present in each system and will gain insights into the basic advantages and disadvantages of each system. The lesson plan provides…

  7. Review of LCA studies of solid waste management systems – Part I: Lessons learned and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, Alexis; Bakas, Ioannis; Clavreul, Julie; Bernstad, Anna; Niero, Monia; Gentil, Emmanuel; Hauschild, Michael Z.; Christensen, Thomas H.

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • We perform a critical review of 222 LCA studies of solid waste management systems. • Studies mainly concentrated in Europe with little application in developing countries. • Assessments of relevant waste types apart from household waste have been overlooked. • Local specificities of systems prevent a meaningful generalisation of the LCA results. • LCA should support recommendations representative of the local conditions. - Abstract: The continuously increasing solid waste generation worldwide calls for management strategies that integrate concerns for environmental sustainability. By quantifying environmental impacts of systems, life cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool, which can contribute to answer that call. But how, where and to which extent has it been applied to solid waste management systems (SWMSs) until now, and which lessons can be learnt from the findings of these LCA applications? To address these questions, we performed a critical review of 222 published LCA studies of SWMS. We first analysed the geographic distribution and found that the published studies have primarily been concentrated in Europe with little application in developing countries. In terms of technological coverage, they have largely overlooked application of LCA to waste prevention activities and to relevant waste types apart from household waste, e.g. construction and demolition waste. Waste management practitioners are thus encouraged to abridge these gaps in future applications of LCA. In addition to this contextual analysis, we also evaluated the findings of selected studies of good quality and found that there is little agreement in the conclusions among them. The strong dependence of each SWMS on local conditions, such as waste composition or energy system, prevents a meaningful generalisation of the LCA results as we find it in the waste hierarchy. We therefore recommend stakeholders in solid waste management to regard LCA as a tool, which, by its ability of

  8. Intelligent System Controller for remote systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development (OTD) has sponsored the development of the Generic Intelligent System Controller (GISC) for application to the clean up of hazardous waste sites. Of primary interest to the OTD is the development of technologies which result in faster, safer, and cheaper cleanup of hazardous waste sites than possible using conventional approaches. An objective of the GISC development project is to achieve these goals by developing a modular robotics control approach which reduces the time and cost of development by allowing reuse of control system software and uses computer models to improve the safety of remote site cleanup while reducing the time and life cycle costs.

  9. Manual control of unstable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. W.; Hogue, J. R.; Parseghian, Z.

    1986-01-01

    Under certain operational regimes and failure modes, air and ground vehicles can present the human operator with a dynamically unstable or divergent control task. Research conducted over the last two decades has explored the ability of the human operator to control unstable systems under a variety of circumstances. Past research is reviewed and human operator control capabilities are summarized. A current example of automobile directional control under rear brake lockup conditions is also reviewed. A control system model analysis of the driver's steering control task is summarized, based on a generic driver/vehicle model presented at last year's Annual Manual. Results from closed course braking tests are presented that confirm the difficulty the average driver has in controlling the unstable directional dynamics arising from rear wheel lockup.

  10. Position feedback control system

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Jokiel, Jr., Bernhard; Ensz, Mark T.; Watson, Robert D.

    2003-01-01

    Disclosed is a system and method for independently evaluating the spatial positional performance of a machine having a movable member, comprising an articulated coordinate measuring machine comprising: a first revolute joint; a probe arm, having a proximal end rigidly attached to the first joint, and having a distal end with a probe tip attached thereto, wherein the probe tip is pivotally mounted to the movable machine member; a second revolute joint; a first support arm serially connecting the first joint to the second joint; and coordinate processing means, operatively connected to the first and second revolute joints, for calculating the spatial coordinates of the probe tip; means for kinematically constraining the articulated coordinate measuring machine to a working surface; and comparator means, in operative association with the coordinate processing means and with the movable machine, for comparing the true position of the movable machine member, as measured by the true position of the probe tip, with the desired position of the movable machine member.

  11. Commutated automatic gain control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The commutated automatic gain control (AGC) system was designed and built for the prototype Loran-C receiver is discussed. The current version of the prototype receiver, the Mini L-80, was tested initially in 1980. The receiver uses a super jolt microcomputer to control a memory aided phase loop (MAPLL). The microcomputer also controls the input/output, latitude/longitude conversion, and the recently added AGC system. The AGC control adjusts the level of each station signal, such that the early portion of each envelope rise is about at the same amplitude in the receiver envelope detector.

  12. The AMSC network control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, William B.

    1990-01-01

    The American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) is going to construct, launch, and operate a satellite system in order to provide mobile satellite services to the United States. AMSC is going to build, own, and operate a Network Control System (NCS) for managing the communications usage of the satellites, and to control circuit switched access between mobile earth terminals and feeder-link earth stations. An overview of the major NCS functional and performance requirements, the control system physical architecture, and the logical architecture is provided.

  13. Structural interaction with control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, R. B.; Zvara, J.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph which assesses the state of the art of space vehicle design and development is presented. The monograph presents criteria and recommended practices for determining the structural data and a mathematical structural model of the vehicle needed for accurate prediction of structure and control-system interaction; for design to minimize undesirable interactions between the structure and the control system; and for determining techniques to achieve the maximum desirable interactions and associated structural design benefits. All space vehicles are treated, including launch vehicles, spacecraft, and entry vehicles. Important structural characteristics which affect the structural model used for structural and control-system interaction analysis are given.

  14. A universal heliostat control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Fabian; Geiger, Mark; Buck, Reiner

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the development of a universal heliostat control system as part of the AutoR project [1]. The system can control multiple receivers and heliostat types in a single application. The system offers support for multiple operators on different machines and is designed to be as adaptive as possible. Thus, the system can be used for different heliostat field setups with only minor adaptations of the system's source code. This is achieved by extensive usage of modern programming techniques like reflection and dependency injection. Furthermore, the system features co-simulation of a ray tracer, a reference PID-controller implementation for open volumetric receivers and methods for heliostat calibration and monitoring.

  15. MULTIPLE ECH LAUNCHER CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN,M.T; PONCE,D; GRUNLOH,H.J; ELLIS,R.A; GROSNICKLE,W.H; HUMPHREY,R.L

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 The addition of new, high power gyrotrons to the heating and current drive arsenal at DIII-D, required a system upgrade for control of fully steerable ECH Launchers. Each launcher contains two pointing mirrors with two degrees of mechanical freedom. The two flavors of motion are called facet and tilt. Therefore up to four channels of motion per launcher need to be controlled. The system utilizes absolute encoders to indicate mirror position and therefore direction of the microwave beam. The launcher movement is primarily controlled by PLC, but future iterations of design, may require this control to be accomplished by a CPU on fast bus such as Compact PCI. This will be necessary to accomplish real time position control. Safety of equipment and personnel is of primary importance when controlling a system of moving parts. Therefore multiple interlocks and fault status enunciators have been implemented. This paper addresses the design of a Multiple ECH Launcher Control System, and characterizes the flexibility needed to upgrade to a real time position control system in the future.

  16. Weld analysis and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Larry Z. (Inventor); Rodgers, Michael H. (Inventor); Powell, Bradley W. (Inventor); Burroughs, Ivan A. (Inventor); Goode, K. Wayne (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a Weld Analysis and Control System developed for active weld system control through real time weld data acquisition. Closed-loop control is based on analysis of weld system parameters and weld geometry. The system is adapted for use with automated welding apparatus having a weld controller which is capable of active electronic control of all aspects of a welding operation. Enhanced graphics and data displays are provided for post-weld analysis. The system provides parameter acquisition, including seam location which is acquired for active torch cross-seam positioning. Torch stand-off is also monitored for control. Weld bead and parent surface geometrical parameters are acquired as an indication of weld quality. These parameters include mismatch, peaking, undercut, underfill, crown height, weld width, puddle diameter, and other measurable information about the weld puddle regions, such as puddle symmetry, etc. These parameters provide a basis for active control as well as post-weld quality analysis and verification. Weld system parameters, such as voltage, current and wire feed rate, are also monitored and archived for correlation with quality parameters.

  17. Lessons Learned During TBCC Design for the NASA-AFRL Joint System Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Christopher A.; Espinosa, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    NASA and the Air Force Research Laboratory are involved in a Joint System Study (JSS) on Two-Stage-to-Orbit (TSTO) vehicles. The JSS will examine the performance, operability and analysis uncertainty of unmanned, fully reusable, TSTO launch vehicle concepts. NASA is providing a vehicle concept using turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion on the booster stage and an all-rocket orbiter. The variation in vehicle and mission requirements for different potential customers, combined with analysis uncertainties, make it problematic to define optimum vehicle types or concepts, but the study is being used by NASA for tool assessment and development, and to identify technology gaps. Preliminary analyses were performed on the entire TBCC booster concept; then higher-fidelity analyses were performed for particular areas to verify results or reduce analysis uncertainties. Preliminary TBCC system analyses indicated that there would be sufficient thrust margin over its mission portion. The higher fidelity analyses, which included inlet and nozzle performance corrections for significant area mismatches between TBCC propulsion requirements versus the vehicle design, resulted in significant performance penalties from the preliminary results. TBCC system design and vehicle operation assumptions were reviewed to identify items to mitigate these performance penalties. The most promising items were then applied and analyses rerun to update performance predictions. A study overview is given to orient the reader, quickly focusing upon the NASA TBCC booster and low speed propulsion system. Details for the TBCC concept and the analyses performed are described. Finally, a summary of "Lessons Learned" are discussed with suggestions to improve future study efforts.

  18. Advanced program weight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derwa, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    The design and implementation of the Advanced Program Weight Control System (APWCS) are reported. The APWCS system allows the coordination of vehicle weight reduction programs well in advance so as to meet mandated requirements of fuel economy imposed by government and to achieve corporate targets of vehicle weights. The system is being used by multiple engineering offices to track weight reduction from inception to eventual production. The projected annualized savings due to the APWCS system is over $2.5 million.

  19. Comparison of automatic control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppelt, W

    1941-01-01

    This report deals with a reciprocal comparison of an automatic pressure control, an automatic rpm control, an automatic temperature control, and an automatic directional control. It shows the difference between the "faultproof" regulator and the actual regulator which is subject to faults, and develops this difference as far as possible in a parallel manner with regard to the control systems under consideration. Such as analysis affords, particularly in its extension to the faults of the actual regulator, a deep insight into the mechanism of the regulator process.

  20. Operationally efficient reaction controls system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanciullo, Thomas J.; Judd, D. C.

    1993-06-01

    The development of the first flight demonstration of a reaction controls system utilizing O2/H2 propellants is reported. The pressure fed system uses four 500 lbf thrusters and a regulated propellant supply; composite overwrapped propellant tanks and mechanical regulators are used in conjunction with thruster modules containing all the electronics. The discussion covers a general description of the O2/H2 system and its main components, including thrusters, heat exchangers, electronic regulators, gas generators, and turbopump; controls and health monitoring; and systems performance and operations.