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Sample records for control variance reduction

  1. An Investigation of Nonlinear Controls and Regression-Adjusted Estimators for Variance Reduction in Computer Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    Adjusted Estimators for Variance 1Redutilol in Computer Simutlation by Riichiardl L. R’ r March, 1991 D~issertation Advisor: Peter A.W. Lewis Approved for...OF NONLINEAR CONTROLS AND REGRESSION-ADJUSTED ESTIMATORS FOR VARIANCE REDUCTION IN COMPUTER SIMULATION 12. Personal Author(s) Richard L. Ressler 13a...necessary and identify by block number) This dissertation develops new techniques for variance reduction in computer simulation. It demonstrates that

  2. Variance Reduction for Quantile Estimates in Simulations Via Nonlinear Controls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    linear control depends upon the correlation between the statistic of interest and the control, which is often low. Since statistics often have a nonlinear...interest and the control reduces the effectiveness of the nonlinear control to that of the linear control . However, the data has to be sectioned to

  3. Ant colony method to control variance reduction techniques in the Monte Carlo simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pareja, S.; Vilches, M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2007-09-01

    The ant colony method is used to control the application of variance reduction techniques to the simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators of use in cancer therapy. In particular, splitting and Russian roulette, two standard variance reduction methods, are considered. The approach can be applied to any accelerator in a straightforward way and permits, in addition, to investigate the "hot" regions of the accelerator, an information which is basic to develop a source model for this therapy tool.

  4. Accelerating Monte Carlo image reconstruction of a PMMA phantom through variance reduction techniques for quality control in digital mammography.

    PubMed

    Ramos, M; Ferrer, S; Verdu, G

    2005-01-01

    Mammography is a non-invasive technique used for the detection of breast lesions. The use of this technique in a breast screening program requires a continuous quality control testing in mammography units for ensuring a minimum absorbed glandular dose without modifying image quality. Digital mammography has been progressively introduced in screening centers, since recent evolution of photostimulable phosphor detectors. The aim of this work is the validation of a methodology for reconstructing digital images of a polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) phantom (P01 model) under pure Monte Carlo techniques. A reference image has been acquired for this phantom under automatic exposure control (AEC) mode (28 kV and 14 mAs). Some variance reduction techniques (VRT) have been applied to improve the efficiency of the simulations, defined as the number of particles reaching the imaging system per starting particle. All images have been used and stored in DICOM format. The results prove that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reconstructed images have been increased with the use of the VRT, showing similar values between different employed tallies. As a conclusion, these images could be used during quality control testing for showing any deviation of the exposition parameters from the desired reference level.

  5. Ant colony method to control variance reduction techniques in the Monte Carlo simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators of use in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Pareja, S.; Vilches, M.; Lallena, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators requires large computation times to achieve the level of uncertainty required for radiotherapy. In this context, variance reduction techniques play a fundamental role in the reduction of this computational time. Here we describe the use of the ant colony method to control the application of two variance reduction techniques: Splitting and Russian roulette. The approach can be applied to any accelerator in a straightforward way and permits the increasing of the efficiency of the simulation by a factor larger than 50.

  6. Variance Reduction Factor of Nuclear Data for Integral Neutronics Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, G. Tsuji, M.; Narabayashi, T.

    2015-01-15

    We propose a new quantity, a variance reduction factor, to identify nuclear data for which further improvements are required to reduce uncertainties of target integral neutronics parameters. Important energy ranges can be also identified with this variance reduction factor. Variance reduction factors are calculated for several integral neutronics parameters. The usefulness of the variance reduction factors is demonstrated.

  7. Hybrid biasing approaches for global variance reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zeyun; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S

    2013-02-01

    A new variant of Monte Carlo-deterministic (DT) hybrid variance reduction approach based on Gaussian process theory is presented for accelerating convergence of Monte Carlo simulation and compared with Forward-Weighted Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (FW-CADIS) approach implemented in the SCALE package from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The new approach, denoted the Gaussian process approach, treats the responses of interest as normally distributed random processes. The Gaussian process approach improves the selection of the weight windows of simulated particles by identifying a subspace that captures the dominant sources of statistical response variations. Like the FW-CADIS approach, the Gaussian process approach utilizes particle importance maps obtained from deterministic adjoint models to derive weight window biasing. In contrast to the FW-CADIS approach, the Gaussian process approach identifies the response correlations (via a covariance matrix) and employs them to reduce the computational overhead required for global variance reduction (GVR) purpose. The effective rank of the covariance matrix identifies the minimum number of uncorrelated pseudo responses, which are employed to bias simulated particles. Numerical experiments, serving as a proof of principle, are presented to compare the Gaussian process and FW-CADIS approaches in terms of the global reduction in standard deviation of the estimated responses.

  8. Variance Reduction Using Nonreversible Langevin Samplers.

    PubMed

    Duncan, A B; Lelièvre, T; Pavliotis, G A

    A standard approach to computing expectations with respect to a given target measure is to introduce an overdamped Langevin equation which is reversible with respect to the target distribution, and to approximate the expectation by a time-averaging estimator. As has been noted in recent papers [30, 37, 61, 72], introducing an appropriately chosen nonreversible component to the dynamics is beneficial, both in terms of reducing the asymptotic variance and of speeding up convergence to the target distribution. In this paper we present a detailed study of the dependence of the asymptotic variance on the deviation from reversibility. Our theoretical findings are supported by numerical simulations.

  9. Some variance reduction methods for numerical stochastic homogenization.

    PubMed

    Blanc, X; Le Bris, C; Legoll, F

    2016-04-28

    We give an overview of a series of recent studies devoted to variance reduction techniques for numerical stochastic homogenization. Numerical homogenization requires that a set of problems is solved at the microscale, the so-called corrector problems. In a random environment, these problems are stochastic and therefore need to be repeatedly solved, for several configurations of the medium considered. An empirical average over all configurations is then performed using the Monte Carlo approach, so as to approximate the effective coefficients necessary to determine the macroscopic behaviour. Variance severely affects the accuracy and the cost of such computations. Variance reduction approaches, borrowed from other contexts in the engineering sciences, can be useful. Some of these variance reduction techniques are presented, studied and tested here.

  10. Variance Design and Air Pollution Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrar, Terry A.; Brownstein, Alan B.

    1975-01-01

    Air pollution control authorities were forced to relax air quality standards during the winter of 1972 by granting variances. This paper examines the institutional characteristics of these variance policies from an economic incentive standpoint, sets up desirable structural criteria for institutional design and arrives at policy guidelines for…

  11. Variance Design and Air Pollution Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrar, Terry A.; Brownstein, Alan B.

    1975-01-01

    Air pollution control authorities were forced to relax air quality standards during the winter of 1972 by granting variances. This paper examines the institutional characteristics of these variance policies from an economic incentive standpoint, sets up desirable structural criteria for institutional design and arrives at policy guidelines for…

  12. Monte Carlo variance reduction approaches for non-Boltzmann tallies

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, T.E.

    1992-12-01

    Quantities that depend on the collective effects of groups of particles cannot be obtained from the standard Boltzmann transport equation. Monte Carlo estimates of these quantities are called non-Boltzmann tallies and have become increasingly important recently. Standard Monte Carlo variance reduction techniques were designed for tallies based on individual particles rather than groups of particles. Experience with non-Boltzmann tallies and analog Monte Carlo has demonstrated the severe limitations of analog Monte Carlo for many non-Boltzmann tallies. In fact, many calculations absolutely require variance reduction methods to achieve practical computation times. Three different approaches to variance reduction for non-Boltzmann tallies are described and shown to be unbiased. The advantages and disadvantages of each of the approaches are discussed.

  13. Replicative Use of an External Model in Simulation Variance Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    measures used are confidence interval width reduction, realized coverage, and estimated Mean Square Error. Results of this study indicate analytical...control variates achieve comparable confidence interval width reduction with internal and external control variates. However, the analytical control

  14. Automated variance reduction for Monte Carlo shielding analyses with MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Georgeta

    Variance reduction techniques are employed in Monte Carlo analyses to increase the number of particles in the space phase of interest and thereby lower the variance of statistical estimation. Variance reduction parameters are required to perform Monte Carlo calculations. It is well known that adjoint solutions, even approximate ones, are excellent biasing functions that can significantly increase the efficiency of a Monte Carlo calculation. In this study, an automated method of generating Monte Carlo variance reduction parameters, and of implementing the source energy biasing and the weight window technique in MCNP shielding calculations has been developed. The method is based on the approach used in the SAS4 module of the SCALE code system, which derives the biasing parameters from an adjoint one-dimensional Discrete Ordinates calculation. Unlike SAS4 that determines the radial and axial dose rates of a spent fuel cask in separate calculations, the present method provides energy and spatial biasing parameters for the entire system that optimize the simulation of particle transport towards all external surfaces of a spent fuel cask. The energy and spatial biasing parameters are synthesized from the adjoint fluxes of three one-dimensional Discrete Ordinates adjoint calculations. Additionally, the present method accommodates multiple source regions, such as the photon sources in light-water reactor spent nuclear fuel assemblies, in one calculation. With this automated method, detailed and accurate dose rate maps for photons, neutrons, and secondary photons outside spent fuel casks or other containers can be efficiently determined with minimal efforts.

  15. Variance reduction methods applied to deep-penetration problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    All deep-penetration Monte Carlo calculations require variance reduction methods. Before beginning with a detailed approach to these methods, several general comments concerning deep-penetration calculations by Monte Carlo, the associated variance reduction, and the similarities and differences of these with regard to non-deep-penetration problems will be addressed. The experienced practitioner of Monte Carlo methods will easily find exceptions to any of these generalities, but it is felt that these comments will aid the novice in understanding some of the basic ideas and nomenclature. Also, from a practical point of view, the discussions and developments presented are oriented toward use of the computer codes which are presented in segments of this Monte Carlo course.

  16. Methods for variance reduction in Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bixler, Joel N.; Hokr, Brett H.; Winblad, Aidan; Elpers, Gabriel; Zollars, Byron; Thomas, Robert J.

    2016-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are widely considered to be the gold standard for studying the propagation of light in turbid media. However, due to the probabilistic nature of these simulations, large numbers of photons are often required in order to generate relevant results. Here, we present methods for reduction in the variance of dose distribution in a computational volume. Dose distribution is computed via tracing of a large number of rays, and tracking the absorption and scattering of the rays within discrete voxels that comprise the volume. Variance reduction is shown here using quasi-random sampling, interaction forcing for weakly scattering media, and dose smoothing via bi-lateral filtering. These methods, along with the corresponding performance enhancements are detailed here.

  17. Fringe biasing: A variance reduction technique for optically thick meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley-Stevenson, R. P.

    2013-07-01

    Fringe biasing is a stratified sampling scheme applicable to Monte Carlo thermal radiation transport codes. The thermal emission source in optically thick cells is partitioned into separate contributions from the cell interiors (where the likelihood of the particles escaping the cells is virtually zero) and the 'fringe' regions close to the cell boundaries. Thermal emission in the cell interiors can now be modelled with fewer particles, the remaining particles being concentrated in the fringes so that they are more likely to contribute to the energy exchange between cells. Unlike other techniques for improving the efficiency in optically thick regions (such as random walk and discrete diffusion treatments), fringe biasing has the benefit of simplicity, as the associated changes are restricted to the sourcing routines with the particle tracking routines being unaffected. This paper presents an analysis of the potential for variance reduction achieved from employing the fringe biasing technique. The aim of this analysis is to guide the implementation of this technique in Monte Carlo thermal radiation codes, specifically in order to aid the choice of the fringe width and the proportion of particles allocated to the fringe (which are interrelated) in multi-dimensional simulations, and to confirm that the significant levels of variance reduction achieved in simulations can be understood by studying the behaviour for simple test cases. The variance reduction properties are studied for a single cell in a slab geometry purely absorbing medium, investigating the accuracy of the scalar flux and current tallies on one of the interfaces with the surrounding medium. (authors)

  18. Monte Carlo calculation of specific absorbed fractions: variance reduction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Londoño, G.; García-Pareja, S.; Salvat, F.; Lallena, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present work is to calculate specific absorbed fractions using variance reduction techniques and assess the effectiveness of these techniques in improving the efficiency (i.e. reducing the statistical uncertainties) of simulation results in cases where the distance between the source and the target organs is large and/or the target organ is small. The variance reduction techniques of interaction forcing and an ant colony algorithm, which drives the application of splitting and Russian roulette, were applied in Monte Carlo calculations performed with the code penelope for photons with energies from 30 keV to 2 MeV. In the simulations we used a mathematical phantom derived from the well-known MIRD-type adult phantom. The thyroid gland was assumed to be the source organ and urinary bladder, testicles, uterus and ovaries were considered as target organs. Simulations were performed, for each target organ and for photons with different energies, using these variance reduction techniques, all run on the same processor and during a CPU time of 1.5 · 105 s. For energies above 100 keV both interaction forcing and the ant colony method allowed reaching relative uncertainties of the average absorbed dose in the target organs below 4% in all studied cases. When these two techniques were used together, the uncertainty was further reduced, by a factor of 0.5 or less. For photons with energies below 100 keV, an adapted initialization of the ant colony algorithm was required. By using interaction forcing and the ant colony algorithm, realistic values of the specific absorbed fractions can be obtained with relative uncertainties small enough to permit discriminating among simulations performed with different Monte Carlo codes and phantoms. The methodology described in the present work can be employed to calculate specific absorbed fractions for arbitrary arrangements, i.e. energy spectrum of primary radiation, phantom model and source and target organs.

  19. Improving computational efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations with variance reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, A.

    2013-07-01

    CCFE perform Monte-Carlo transport simulations on large and complex tokamak models such as ITER. Such simulations are challenging since streaming and deep penetration effects are equally important. In order to make such simulations tractable, both variance reduction (VR) techniques and parallel computing are used. It has been found that the application of VR techniques in such models significantly reduces the efficiency of parallel computation due to 'long histories'. VR in MCNP can be accomplished using energy-dependent weight windows. The weight window represents an 'average behaviour' of particles, and large deviations in the arriving weight of a particle give rise to extreme amounts of splitting being performed and a long history. When running on parallel clusters, a long history can have a detrimental effect on the parallel efficiency - if one process is computing the long history, the other CPUs complete their batch of histories and wait idle. Furthermore some long histories have been found to be effectively intractable. To combat this effect, CCFE has developed an adaptation of MCNP which dynamically adjusts the WW where a large weight deviation is encountered. The method effectively 'de-optimises' the WW, reducing the VR performance but this is offset by a significant increase in parallel efficiency. Testing with a simple geometry has shown the method does not bias the result. This 'long history method' has enabled CCFE to significantly improve the performance of MCNP calculations for ITER on parallel clusters, and will be beneficial for any geometry combining streaming and deep penetration effects. (authors)

  20. Delivery Time Variance Reduction in the Military Supply Chain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    greatest amount of delivery time variance. A simulation is developed using ARENA that models cargo shipments into aerial ports in Afghanistan. Design...experiments and a simulation optimizer, OptQuest, are used to determine most effective methods of reducing delivery time variance at individual aerial...ports in Afghanistan as well as the system as a whole. The results indicate that adjustments in port hold times can decrease the overall delivery time variance in the system.

  1. Feasibility Study of Variance Reduction in the Logistics Composite Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    583.113861 1.7 Ybar 1.7219048 91 C15 – Multiple Controls (cont.) Y - Y (bar) product5 product10 product14 product15 product20 sq 5 sq 10 sq 14...simulation called Yμ for which Y is an estimator. Also, assume there is another output variable, X, that is correlated with the Y response and has an...expected value Xμ that is known. Since X is correlated with the Y variable, it is known as the control variable. Now consider the controlled

  2. Sensor/Actuator Selection for the Constrained Variance Control Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delorenzo, M. L.; Skelton, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of designing a linear controller for systems subject to inequality variance constraints is considered. A quadratic penalty function approach is used to yield a linear controller. Both the weights in the quadratic penalty function and the locations of sensors and actuators are selected by successive approximations to obtain an optimal design which satisfies the input/output variance constraints. The method is applied to NASA's 64 meter Hoop-Column Space Antenna for satellite communications. In addition the solution for the control law, the main feature of these results is the systematic determination of actuator design requirements which allow the given input/output performance constraints to be satisfied.

  3. Reduction of variance in measurements of average metabolite concentration in anatomically-defined brain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Ryan J.; Newman, Michael; Nikolaidis, Aki

    2016-11-01

    Multiple methods have been proposed for using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) to measure representative metabolite concentrations of anatomically-defined brain regions. Generally these methods require spectral analysis, quantitation of the signal, and reconciliation with anatomical brain regions. However, to simplify processing pipelines, it is practical to only include those corrections that significantly improve data quality. Of particular importance for cross-sectional studies is knowledge about how much each correction lowers the inter-subject variance of the measurement, thereby increasing statistical power. Here we use a data set of 72 subjects to calculate the reduction in inter-subject variance produced by several corrections that are commonly used to process MRSI data. Our results demonstrate that significant reductions of variance can be achieved by performing water scaling, accounting for tissue type, and integrating MRSI data over anatomical regions rather than simply assigning MRSI voxels with anatomical region labels.

  4. Optimisation of 12 MeV electron beam simulation using variance reduction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamani, J.; Termizi, N. A. S. Mohd; Kamarulzaman, F. N. Mohd; Aziz, M. Z. Abdul

    2017-05-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation for electron beam radiotherapy consumes a long computation time. An algorithm called variance reduction technique (VRT) in MC was implemented to speed up this duration. This work focused on optimisation of VRT parameter which refers to electron range rejection and particle history. EGSnrc MC source code was used to simulate (BEAMnrc code) and validate (DOSXYZnrc code) the Siemens Primus linear accelerator model with the non-VRT parameter. The validated MC model simulation was repeated by applying VRT parameter (electron range rejection) that controlled by global electron cut-off energy 1,2 and 5 MeV using 20 × 107 particle history. 5 MeV range rejection generated the fastest MC simulation with 50% reduction in computation time compared to non-VRT simulation. Thus, 5 MeV electron range rejection utilized in particle history analysis ranged from 7.5 × 107 to 20 × 107. In this study, 5 MeV electron cut-off with 10 × 107 particle history, the simulation was four times faster than non-VRT calculation with 1% deviation. Proper understanding and use of VRT can significantly reduce MC electron beam calculation duration at the same time preserving its accuracy.

  5. Deflation as a method of variance reduction for estimating the trace of a matrix inverse

    DOE PAGES

    Gambhir, Arjun Singh; Stathopoulos, Andreas; Orginos, Kostas

    2017-04-06

    Many fields require computing the trace of the inverse of a large, sparse matrix. The typical method used for such computations is the Hutchinson method which is a Monte Carlo (MC) averaging over matrix quadratures. To improve its convergence, several variance reductions techniques have been proposed. In this paper, we study the effects of deflating the near null singular value space. We make two main contributions. First, we analyze the variance of the Hutchinson method as a function of the deflated singular values and vectors. Although this provides good intuition in general, by assuming additionally that the singular vectors aremore » random unitary matrices, we arrive at concise formulas for the deflated variance that include only the variance and mean of the singular values. We make the remarkable observation that deflation may increase variance for Hermitian matrices but not for non-Hermitian ones. This is a rare, if not unique, property where non-Hermitian matrices outperform Hermitian ones. The theory can be used as a model for predicting the benefits of deflation. Second, we use deflation in the context of a large scale application of "disconnected diagrams" in Lattice QCD. On lattices, Hierarchical Probing (HP) has previously provided an order of magnitude of variance reduction over MC by removing "error" from neighboring nodes of increasing distance in the lattice. Although deflation used directly on MC yields a limited improvement of 30% in our problem, when combined with HP they reduce variance by a factor of over 150 compared to MC. For this, we pre-computated 1000 smallest singular values of an ill-conditioned matrix of size 25 million. Furthermore, using PRIMME and a domain-specific Algebraic Multigrid preconditioner, we perform one of the largest eigenvalue computations in Lattice QCD at a fraction of the cost of our trace computation.« less

  6. Automatic variance reduction for Monte Carlo simulations via the local importance function transform

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.A.

    1996-02-01

    The author derives a transformed transport problem that can be solved theoretically by analog Monte Carlo with zero variance. However, the Monte Carlo simulation of this transformed problem cannot be implemented in practice, so he develops a method for approximating it. The approximation to the zero variance method consists of replacing the continuous adjoint transport solution in the transformed transport problem by a piecewise continuous approximation containing local biasing parameters obtained from a deterministic calculation. He uses the transport and collision processes of the transformed problem to bias distance-to-collision and selection of post-collision energy groups and trajectories in a traditional Monte Carlo simulation of ``real`` particles. He refers to the resulting variance reduction method as the Local Importance Function Transform (LIFI) method. He demonstrates the efficiency of the LIFT method for several 3-D, linearly anisotropic scattering, one-group, and multigroup problems. In these problems the LIFT method is shown to be more efficient than the AVATAR scheme, which is one of the best variance reduction techniques currently available in a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo code. For most of the problems considered, the LIFT method produces higher figures of merit than AVATAR, even when the LIFT method is used as a ``black box``. There are some problems that cause trouble for most variance reduction techniques, and the LIFT method is no exception. For example, the author demonstrates that problems with voids, or low density regions, can cause a reduction in the efficiency of the LIFT method. However, the LIFT method still performs better than survival biasing and AVATAR in these difficult cases.

  7. Discrete velocity computations with stochastic variance reduction of the Boltzmann equation for gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Peter; Varghese, Philip; Goldstein, David

    2014-12-09

    We extend a variance reduced discrete velocity method developed at UT Austin [1, 2] to gas mixtures with large mass ratios and flows with trace species. The mixture is stored as a collection of independent velocity distribution functions, each with a unique grid in velocity space. Different collision types (A-A, A-B, B-B, etc.) are treated independently, and the variance reduction scheme is formulated with different equilibrium functions for each separate collision type. The individual treatment of species enables increased focus on species important to the physics of the flow, even if the important species are present in trace amounts. The method is verified through comparisons to Direct Simulation Monte Carlo computations and the computational workload per time step is investigated for the variance reduced method.

  8. Variance reduction technique in a beta radiation beam using an extrapolation chamber.

    PubMed

    Polo, Ivón Oramas; Souza Santos, William; de Lara Antonio, Patrícia; Caldas, Linda V E

    2017-10-01

    This paper aims to show how the variance reduction technique "Geometry splitting/Russian roulette" improves the statistical error and reduces uncertainties in the determination of the absorbed dose rate in tissue using an extrapolation chamber for beta radiation. The results show that the use of this technique can increase the number of events in the chamber cavity leading to a closer approximation of simulation result with the physical problem. There was a good agreement among the experimental measurements, the certificate of manufacture and the simulation results of the absorbed dose rate values and uncertainties. The absorbed dose rate variation coefficient using the variance reduction technique "Geometry splitting/Russian roulette" was 2.85%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. ADVANTG 3.0.1: AutomateD VAriaNce reducTion Generator

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-17

    Version 00 ADVANTG is an automated tool for generating variance reduction parameters for fixed-source continuous-energy Monte Carlo simulations with MCNP5 V1.60 (CCC-810, not included in this distribution) based on approximate 3-D multigroup discrete ordinates adjoint transport solutions generated by Denovo (included in this distribution). The variance reduction parameters generated by ADVANTG consist of space and energy-dependent weight-window bounds and biased source distributions, which are output in formats that can be directly used with unmodified versions of MCNP5. ADVANTG has been applied to neutron, photon, and coupled neutron-photon simulations of real-world radiation detection and shielding scenarios. ADVANTG is compatible with all MCNP5 geometry features and can be used to accelerate cell tallies (F4, F6, F8), surface tallies (F1 and F2), point-detector tallies (F5), and Cartesian mesh tallies (FMESH).

  10. Estimating thermodynamic expectations and free energies in expanded ensemble simulations: Systematic variance reduction through conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athènes, Manuel; Terrier, Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo methods are primarily used for sampling from a given probability distribution and estimating multi-dimensional integrals based on the information contained in the generated samples. Whenever it is possible, more accurate estimates are obtained by combining Monte Carlo integration and integration by numerical quadrature along particular coordinates. We show that this variance reduction technique, referred to as conditioning in probability theory, can be advantageously implemented in expanded ensemble simulations. These simulations aim at estimating thermodynamic expectations as a function of an external parameter that is sampled like an additional coordinate. Conditioning therein entails integrating along the external coordinate by numerical quadrature. We prove variance reduction with respect to alternative standard estimators and demonstrate the practical efficiency of the technique by estimating free energies and characterizing a structural phase transition between two solid phases.

  11. Neutron Deep Penetration Calculations in Light Water with Monte Carlo TRIPOLI-4® Variance Reduction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yi-Kang

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear decommissioning takes place in several stages due to the radioactivity in the reactor structure materials. A good estimation of the neutron activation products distributed in the reactor structure materials impacts obviously on the decommissioning planning and the low-level radioactive waste management. Continuous energy Monte-Carlo radiation transport code TRIPOLI-4 has been applied on radiation protection and shielding analyses. To enhance the TRIPOLI-4 application in nuclear decommissioning activities, both experimental and computational benchmarks are being performed. To calculate the neutron activation of the shielding and structure materials of nuclear facilities, the knowledge of 3D neutron flux map and energy spectra must be first investigated. To perform this type of neutron deep penetration calculations with the Monte Carlo transport code, variance reduction techniques are necessary in order to reduce the uncertainty of the neutron activation estimation. In this study, variance reduction options of the TRIPOLI-4 code were used on the NAIADE 1 light water shielding benchmark. This benchmark document is available from the OECD/NEA SINBAD shielding benchmark database. From this benchmark database, a simplified NAIADE 1 water shielding model was first proposed in this work in order to make the code validation easier. Determination of the fission neutron transport was performed in light water for penetration up to 50 cm for fast neutrons and up to about 180 cm for thermal neutrons. Measurement and calculation results were benchmarked. Variance reduction options and their performance were discussed and compared.

  12. A model and variance reduction method for computing statistical outputs of stochastic elliptic partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Codina, F.; Nguyen, N. C.; Giles, M. B.; Peraire, J.

    2015-09-01

    We present a model and variance reduction method for the fast and reliable computation of statistical outputs of stochastic elliptic partial differential equations. Our method consists of three main ingredients: (1) the hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) discretization of elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs), which allows us to obtain high-order accurate solutions of the governing PDE; (2) the reduced basis method for a new HDG discretization of the underlying PDE to enable real-time solution of the parameterized PDE in the presence of stochastic parameters; and (3) a multilevel variance reduction method that exploits the statistical correlation among the different reduced basis approximations and the high-fidelity HDG discretization to accelerate the convergence of the Monte Carlo simulations. The multilevel variance reduction method provides efficient computation of the statistical outputs by shifting most of the computational burden from the high-fidelity HDG approximation to the reduced basis approximations. Furthermore, we develop a posteriori error estimates for our approximations of the statistical outputs. Based on these error estimates, we propose an algorithm for optimally choosing both the dimensions of the reduced basis approximations and the sizes of Monte Carlo samples to achieve a given error tolerance. We provide numerical examples to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method.

  13. A model and variance reduction method for computing statistical outputs of stochastic elliptic partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal-Codina, F.; Nguyen, N.C.; Giles, M.B.; Peraire, J.

    2015-09-15

    We present a model and variance reduction method for the fast and reliable computation of statistical outputs of stochastic elliptic partial differential equations. Our method consists of three main ingredients: (1) the hybridizable discontinuous Galerkin (HDG) discretization of elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs), which allows us to obtain high-order accurate solutions of the governing PDE; (2) the reduced basis method for a new HDG discretization of the underlying PDE to enable real-time solution of the parameterized PDE in the presence of stochastic parameters; and (3) a multilevel variance reduction method that exploits the statistical correlation among the different reduced basis approximations and the high-fidelity HDG discretization to accelerate the convergence of the Monte Carlo simulations. The multilevel variance reduction method provides efficient computation of the statistical outputs by shifting most of the computational burden from the high-fidelity HDG approximation to the reduced basis approximations. Furthermore, we develop a posteriori error estimates for our approximations of the statistical outputs. Based on these error estimates, we propose an algorithm for optimally choosing both the dimensions of the reduced basis approximations and the sizes of Monte Carlo samples to achieve a given error tolerance. We provide numerical examples to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method.

  14. Variance reduction in randomised trials by inverse probability weighting using the propensity score

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Elizabeth J; Forbes, Andrew; White, Ian R

    2014-01-01

    In individually randomised controlled trials, adjustment for baseline characteristics is often undertaken to increase precision of the treatment effect estimate. This is usually performed using covariate adjustment in outcome regression models. An alternative method of adjustment is to use inverse probability-of-treatment weighting (IPTW), on the basis of estimated propensity scores. We calculate the large-sample marginal variance of IPTW estimators of the mean difference for continuous outcomes, and risk difference, risk ratio or odds ratio for binary outcomes. We show that IPTW adjustment always increases the precision of the treatment effect estimate. For continuous outcomes, we demonstrate that the IPTW estimator has the same large-sample marginal variance as the standard analysis of covariance estimator. However, ignoring the estimation of the propensity score in the calculation of the variance leads to the erroneous conclusion that the IPTW treatment effect estimator has the same variance as an unadjusted estimator; thus, it is important to use a variance estimator that correctly takes into account the estimation of the propensity score. The IPTW approach has particular advantages when estimating risk differences or risk ratios. In this case, non-convergence of covariate-adjusted outcome regression models frequently occurs. Such problems can be circumvented by using the IPTW adjustment approach. © 2013 The authors. Statistics in Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24114884

  15. Importance sampling variance reduction for the Fokker-Planck rarefied gas particle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collyer, B. S.; Connaughton, C.; Lockerby, D. A.

    2016-11-01

    The Fokker-Planck approximation to the Boltzmann equation, solved numerically by stochastic particle schemes, is used to provide estimates for rarefied gas flows. This paper presents a variance reduction technique for a stochastic particle method that is able to greatly reduce the uncertainty of the estimated flow fields when the characteristic speed of the flow is small in comparison to the thermal velocity of the gas. The method relies on importance sampling, requiring minimal changes to the basic stochastic particle scheme. We test the importance sampling scheme on a homogeneous relaxation, planar Couette flow and a lid-driven-cavity flow, and find that our method is able to greatly reduce the noise of estimated quantities. Significantly, we find that as the characteristic speed of the flow decreases, the variance of the noisy estimators becomes independent of the characteristic speed.

  16. Importance sampling variance reduction for the Fokker–Planck rarefied gas particle method

    SciTech Connect

    Collyer, B.S.; Connaughton, C.; Lockerby, D.A.

    2016-11-15

    The Fokker–Planck approximation to the Boltzmann equation, solved numerically by stochastic particle schemes, is used to provide estimates for rarefied gas flows. This paper presents a variance reduction technique for a stochastic particle method that is able to greatly reduce the uncertainty of the estimated flow fields when the characteristic speed of the flow is small in comparison to the thermal velocity of the gas. The method relies on importance sampling, requiring minimal changes to the basic stochastic particle scheme. We test the importance sampling scheme on a homogeneous relaxation, planar Couette flow and a lid-driven-cavity flow, and find that our method is able to greatly reduce the noise of estimated quantities. Significantly, we find that as the characteristic speed of the flow decreases, the variance of the noisy estimators becomes independent of the characteristic speed.

  17. Variance reduction for Fokker–Planck based particle Monte Carlo schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Gorji, M. Hossein Andric, Nemanja; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-08-15

    Recently, Fokker–Planck based particle Monte Carlo schemes have been proposed and evaluated for simulations of rarefied gas flows [1–3]. In this paper, the variance reduction for particle Monte Carlo simulations based on the Fokker–Planck model is considered. First, deviational based schemes were derived and reviewed, and it is shown that these deviational methods are not appropriate for practical Fokker–Planck based rarefied gas flow simulations. This is due to the fact that the deviational schemes considered in this study lead either to instabilities in the case of two-weight methods or to large statistical errors if the direct sampling method is applied. Motivated by this conclusion, we developed a novel scheme based on correlated stochastic processes. The main idea here is to synthesize an additional stochastic process with a known solution, which is simultaneously solved together with the main one. By correlating the two processes, the statistical errors can dramatically be reduced; especially for low Mach numbers. To assess the methods, homogeneous relaxation, planar Couette and lid-driven cavity flows were considered. For these test cases, it could be demonstrated that variance reduction based on parallel processes is very robust and effective.

  18. MCNPX--PoliMi Variance Reduction Techniques for Simulating Neutron Scintillation Detector Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Shikha

    Scintillation detectors have emerged as a viable He-3 replacement technology in the field of nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards. The scintillation light produced in the detectors is dependent on the energy deposited and the nucleus with which the interaction occurs. For neutrons interacting with hydrogen in organic liquid scintillation detectors, the energy-to-light conversion process is nonlinear. MCNPX-PoliMi is a Monte Carlo Code that has been used for simulating this detailed scintillation physics; however, until now, simulations have only been done in analog mode. Analog Monte Carlo simulations can take long times to run, especially in the presence of shielding and large source-detector distances, as in the case of typical nonproliferation problems. In this thesis, two nonanalog approaches to speed up MCNPX-PoliMi simulations of neutron scintillation detector response have been studied. In the first approach, a response matrix method (RMM) is used to efficiently calculate neutron pulse height distributions (PHDs). This method combines the neutron current incident on the detector face with an MCNPX-PoliMi-calculated response matrix to generate PHDs. The PHD calculations and their associated uncertainty are compared for a polyethylene-shielded and lead-shielded Cf-252 source for three different techniques: fully analog MCNPX-PoliMi, the RMM, and the RMM with source biasing. The RMM with source biasing reduces computation time or increases the figure-of-merit on an average by a factor of 600 for polyethylene and 300 for lead shielding (when compared to the fully analog calculation). The simulated neutron PHDs show good agreement with the laboratory measurements, thereby validating the RMM. In the second approach, MCNPX-PoliMi simulations are performed with the aid of variance reduction techniques. This is done by separating the analog and nonanalog components of the simulations. Inside the detector region, where scintillation light is produced, no variance

  19. Application of fuzzy sets to estimate cost savings due to variance reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Jairo; Ostwald, Phillip F.

    1993-12-01

    One common assumption of models to evaluate the cost of variation is that the quality characteristic can be approximated by a standard normal distribution. Such an assumption is invalid for three important cases: (a) when the random variable is always positive, (b) when manual intervention distorts random variation, and (c) when the variable of interest is evaluated by linguistic terms. This paper applies the Weibull distribution to address nonnormal situations and fuzzy logic theory to study the case of quality evaluated via lexical terms. The approach concentrates on the cost incurred by inspection to formulate a probabilistic-possibilistic model that determines cost savings due to variance reduction. The model is tested with actual data from a manual TIG welding process.

  20. A combined approach of variance-reduction techniques for the efficient Monte Carlo simulation of linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Sempau, J.; Brualla, L.

    2012-05-01

    A method based on a combination of the variance-reduction techniques of particle splitting and Russian roulette is presented. This method improves the efficiency of radiation transport through linear accelerator geometries simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The method named as ‘splitting-roulette’ was implemented on the Monte Carlo code \\scriptsize{{PENELOPE}} and tested on an Elekta linac, although it is general enough to be implemented on any other general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code and linac geometry. Splitting-roulette uses any of the following two modes of splitting: simple splitting and ‘selective splitting’. Selective splitting is a new splitting mode based on the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung photons implemented in the Monte Carlo code \\scriptsize{{PENELOPE}}. Splitting-roulette improves the simulation efficiency of an Elekta SL25 linac by a factor of 45.

  1. A combined approach of variance-reduction techniques for the efficient Monte Carlo simulation of linacs.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M; Sempau, J; Brualla, L

    2012-05-21

    A method based on a combination of the variance-reduction techniques of particle splitting and Russian roulette is presented. This method improves the efficiency of radiation transport through linear accelerator geometries simulated with the Monte Carlo method. The method named as 'splitting-roulette' was implemented on the Monte Carlo code [Formula: see text] and tested on an Elekta linac, although it is general enough to be implemented on any other general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code and linac geometry. Splitting-roulette uses any of the following two modes of splitting: simple splitting and 'selective splitting'. Selective splitting is a new splitting mode based on the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung photons implemented in the Monte Carlo code [Formula: see text]. Splitting-roulette improves the simulation efficiency of an Elekta SL25 linac by a factor of 45.

  2. Efficient Monte Carlo simulation of multileaf collimators using geometry-related variance-reduction techniques.

    PubMed

    Brualla, L; Salvat, F; Palanco-Zamora, R

    2009-07-07

    A technique for accelerating the simulation of multileaf collimators with Monte Carlo methods is presented. This technique, which will be referred to as the movable-skin method, is based on geometrical modifications that do not alter the physical shape of the leaves, but that affect the logical way in which the Monte Carlo code processes the geometry. Zones of the geometry from which secondary radiation can emerge are defined as skins and the radiation transport throughout these zones is simulated accurately, while transport in non-skin zones is modelled approximately. The skins method is general and can be applied to most of the radiation transport Monte Carlo codes used in radiotherapy. The code AUTOLINAC for the automatic generation of the geometry file and the physical parameters required in a simulation of a linac with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE is also introduced. This code has a modularized library of all Varian Clinac machines with their multileaf collimators and electron applicators. AUTOLINAC automatically determines the position of skins and the parameter values employed for other variance-reduction techniques that are adequate for the simulation of a linac. Using the adaptive variance-reduction techniques presented here it is possible to simulate with PENELOPE an entire linac with a fully closed multileaf collimator in two hours. For this benchmark a single core of a 2.8 GHz processor was used and 2% statistical uncertainty (1sigma) of the absorbed dose in water was reached with a voxel size of 2 x 2 x 2 mm(3). Several configurations of the multileaf collimator were simulated and the results were found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  3. Attention-Induced Variance and Noise Correlation Reduction in Macaque V1 Is Mediated by NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Jose L.; Gieselmann, Marc A.; Sanayei, Mehdi; Thiele, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Summary Attention improves perception by affecting different aspects of the neuronal code. It enhances firing rates, it reduces firing rate variability and noise correlations of neurons, and it alters the strength of oscillatory activity. Attention-induced rate enhancement in striate cortex requires cholinergic mechanisms. The neuropharmacological mechanisms responsible for attention-induced variance and noise correlation reduction or those supporting changes in oscillatory activity are unknown. We show that ionotropic glutamatergic receptor activation is required for attention-induced rate variance, noise correlation, and LFP gamma power reduction in macaque V1, but not for attention-induced rate modulations. NMDA receptors mediate attention-induced variance reduction and attention-induced noise correlation reduction. Our results demonstrate that attention improves sensory processing by a variety of mechanisms that are dissociable at the receptor level. PMID:23719166

  4. PWR Facility Dose Modeling Using MCNP5 and the CADIS/ADVANTG Variance-Reduction Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, Edward D; Peplow, Douglas E.; Wagner, John C; Murphy, Brian D; Mueller, Don

    2007-09-01

    The feasibility of modeling a pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) facility and calculating dose rates at all locations within the containment and adjoining structures using MCNP5 with mesh tallies is presented. Calculations of dose rates resulting from neutron and photon sources from the reactor (operating and shut down for various periods) and the spent fuel pool, as well as for the photon source from the primary coolant loop, were all of interest. Identification of the PWR facility, development of the MCNP-based model and automation of the run process, calculation of the various sources, and development of methods for visually examining mesh tally files and extracting dose rates were all a significant part of the project. Advanced variance reduction, which was required because of the size of the model and the large amount of shielding, was performed via the CADIS/ADVANTG approach. This methodology uses an automatically generated three-dimensional discrete ordinates model to calculate adjoint fluxes from which MCNP weight windows and source bias parameters are generated. Investigative calculations were performed using a simple block model and a simplified full-scale model of the PWR containment, in which the adjoint source was placed in various regions. In general, it was shown that placement of the adjoint source on the periphery of the model provided adequate results for regions reasonably close to the source (e.g., within the containment structure for the reactor source). A modification to the CADIS/ADVANTG methodology was also studied in which a global adjoint source is weighted by the reciprocal of the dose response calculated by an earlier forward discrete ordinates calculation. This method showed improved results over those using the standard CADIS/ADVANTG approach, and its further investigation is recommended for future efforts.

  5. Optimization under uncertainty: Adaptive variance reduction, adaptive metamodeling, and investigation of robustness measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Juan Camilo

    This dissertation offers computational and theoretical advances for optimization under uncertainty problems that utilize a probabilistic framework for addressing such uncertainties, and adopt a probabilistic performance as objective function. Emphasis is placed on applications that involve potentially complex numerical and probability models. A generalized approach is adopted, treating the system model as a "black-box" and relying on stochastic simulation for evaluating the probabilistic performance. This approach can impose, though, an elevated computational cost, and two of the advances offered in this dissertation aim at decreasing the computational burden associated with stochastic simulation when integrated with optimization applications. The first one develops an adaptive implementation of importance sampling (a popular variance reduction technique) by sharing information across the iterations of the numerical optimization algorithm. The system model evaluations from the current iteration are utilized to formulate importance sampling densities for subsequent iterations with only a small additional computational effort. The characteristics of these densities as well as the specific model parameters these densities span are explicitly optimized. The second advancement focuses on adaptive tuning of a kriging metamodel to replace the computationally intensive system model. A novel implementation is considered, establishing a metamodel with respect to both the uncertain model parameters as well as the design variables, offering significant computational savings. Additionally, the adaptive selection of certain characteristics of the metamodel, such as support points or order of basis functions, is considered by utilizing readily available information from the previous iteration of the optimization algorithm. The third advancement extends to a different application and considers the assessment of the appropriateness of different candidate robust designs. A novel

  6. Implementation of hybrid variance reduction methods in a multi group Monte Carlo code for deep shielding problems

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, E.; Palmer, T. S.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the work that has been done to implement variance reduction techniques in a three dimensional, multi group Monte Carlo code - Tortilla, that works within the frame work of the commercial deterministic code - Attila, is presented. This project is aimed to develop an integrated Hybrid code that seamlessly takes advantage of the deterministic and Monte Carlo methods for deep shielding radiation detection problems. Tortilla takes advantage of Attila's features for generating the geometric mesh, cross section library and source definitions. Tortilla can also read importance functions (like adjoint scalar flux) generated from deterministic calculations performed in Attila and use them to employ variance reduction schemes in the Monte Carlo simulation. The variance reduction techniques that are implemented in Tortilla are based on the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling) method and the LIFT (Local Importance Function Transform) method. These methods make use of the results from an adjoint deterministic calculation to bias the particle transport using techniques like source biasing, survival biasing, transport biasing and weight windows. The results obtained so far and the challenges faced in implementing the variance reduction techniques are reported here. (authors)

  7. Bias and variance reduction in estimating the proportion of true-null hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yebin; Gao, Dexiang; Tong, Tiejun

    2015-01-01

    When testing a large number of hypotheses, estimating the proportion of true nulls, denoted by \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\pi _0$\\end{document}, becomes increasingly important. This quantity has many applications in practice. For instance, a reliable estimate of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\pi _0$\\end{document} can eliminate the conservative bias of the Benjamini–Hochberg procedure on controlling the false discovery rate. It is known that most methods in the literature for estimating \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\pi _0$\\end{document} are conservative. Recently, some attempts have been paid to reduce such estimation bias. Nevertheless, they are either over bias corrected or suffering from an unacceptably large estimation variance. In this paper, we propose a new method for estimating \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\pi _0$\\end{document} that aims to reduce the bias and variance of the estimation simultaneously. To achieve this, we first utilize the probability density functions of false-null \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage

  8. Inheritance Beyond Plain Heritability: Variance-Controlling Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xia; Pettersson, Mats; Rönnegård, Lars; Carlborg, Örjan

    2012-01-01

    The phenotypic effect of a gene is normally described by the mean-difference between alternative genotypes. A gene may, however, also influence the phenotype by causing a difference in variance between genotypes. Here, we reanalyze a publicly available Arabidopsis thaliana dataset [1] and show that genetic variance heterogeneity appears to be as common as normal additive effects on a genomewide scale. The study also develops theory to estimate the contributions of variance differences between genotypes to the phenotypic variance, and this is used to show that individual loci can explain more than 20% of the phenotypic variance. Two well-studied systems, cellular control of molybdenum level by the ion-transporter MOT1 and flowering-time regulation by the FRI-FLC expression network, and a novel association for Leaf serration are used to illustrate the contribution of major individual loci, expression pathways, and gene-by-environment interactions to the genetic variance heterogeneity. PMID:22876191

  9. Does Public Sector Control Reduce Variance in School Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Lant; Viarengo, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Does the government control of school systems facilitate equality in school quality? Whether centralized or localized control produces more equality depends not only on what "could" happen in principle, but also on what does happen in practice. We use the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) database to examine the…

  10. Does Public Sector Control Reduce Variance in School Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Lant; Viarengo, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Does the government control of school systems facilitate equality in school quality? Whether centralized or localized control produces more equality depends not only on what "could" happen in principle, but also on what does happen in practice. We use the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) database to examine the…

  11. Extensions of output variance constrained controllers to hard constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, R.; Zhu, G.

    1989-01-01

    Covariance Controllers assign specified matrix values to the state covariance. A number of robustness results are directly related to the covariance matrix. The conservatism in known upperbounds on the H infinity, L infinity, and L (sub 2) norms for stability and disturbance robustness of linear uncertain systems using covariance controllers is illustrated with examples. These results are illustrated for continuous and discrete time systems. **** ONLY 2 BLOCK MARKERS FOUND -- RETRY *****

  12. Variance reduction through robust design of boundary conditions for stochastic hyperbolic systems of equations

    SciTech Connect

    Nordström, Jan Wahlsten, Markus

    2015-02-01

    We consider a hyperbolic system with uncertainty in the boundary and initial data. Our aim is to show that different boundary conditions give different convergence rates of the variance of the solution. This means that we can with the same knowledge of data get a more or less accurate description of the uncertainty in the solution. A variety of boundary conditions are compared and both analytical and numerical estimates of the variance of the solution are presented. As an application, we study the effect of this technique on Maxwell's equations as well as on a subsonic outflow boundary for the Euler equations.

  13. Designing a robust minimum variance controller using discrete slide mode controller approach.

    PubMed

    Alipouri, Yousef; Poshtan, Javad

    2013-03-01

    Designing minimum variance controllers (MVC) for nonlinear systems is confronted with many difficulties. The methods able to identify MIMO nonlinear systems are scarce. Harsh control signals produced by MVC are among other disadvantages of this controller. Besides, MVC is not a robust controller. In this article, the Vector ARX (VARX) model is used for simultaneously modeling the system and disturbance in order to tackle these disadvantages. For ensuring the robustness of the control loop, the discrete slide mode controller design approach is used in designing MVC and generalized MVC (GMVC). The proposed method for controller design is tested on a nonlinear experimental Four-Tank benchmark process and is compared with nonlinear MVCs designed by neural networks. In spite of the simplicity of designing GMVCs for the VARX models with uncertainty, the results show that the proposed method is accurate and implementable.

  14. Flagged uniform particle splitting for variance reduction in proton and carbon ion track-structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Méndez, José; Schuemann, Jan; Incerti, Sebastien; Paganetti, Harald; Schulte, Reinhard; Faddegon, Bruce

    2017-08-01

    deviations) for endpoints (1) and (2), within 2% (1 standard deviation) for endpoint (3). In conclusion, standard particle splitting variance reduction techniques can be successfully implemented in Monte Carlo track structure codes.

  15. A novel hybrid scattering order-dependent variance reduction method for Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transfer in cloudy atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Cui, Shengcheng; Yang, Jun; Gao, Haiyang; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Zhibo

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel hybrid scattering order-dependent variance reduction method to accelerate the convergence rate in both forward and backward Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations involving highly forward-peaked scattering phase function. This method is built upon a newly developed theoretical framework that not only unifies both forward and backward radiative transfer in scattering-order-dependent integral equation, but also generalizes the variance reduction formalism in a wide range of simulation scenarios. In previous studies, variance reduction is achieved either by using the scattering phase function forward truncation technique or the target directional importance sampling technique. Our method combines both of them. A novel feature of our method is that all the tuning parameters used for phase function truncation and importance sampling techniques at each order of scattering are automatically optimized by the scattering order-dependent numerical evaluation experiments. To make such experiments feasible, we present a new scattering order sampling algorithm by remodeling integral radiative transfer kernel for the phase function truncation method. The presented method has been implemented in our Multiple-Scaling-based Cloudy Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (MSCART) model for validation and evaluation. The main advantage of the method is that it greatly improves the trade-off between numerical efficiency and accuracy order by order.

  16. LMI-Based Fuzzy Optimal Variance Control of Airfoil Model Subject to Input Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swei, Sean S.M.; Ayoubi, Mohammad A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study of fuzzy optimal variance control problem for dynamical systems subject to actuator amplitude and rate constraints. Using Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy modeling and dynamic Parallel Distributed Compensation technique, the stability and the constraints can be cast as a multi-objective optimization problem in the form of Linear Matrix Inequalities. By utilizing the formulations and solutions for the input and output variance constraint problems, we develop a fuzzy full-state feedback controller. The stability and performance of the proposed controller is demonstrated through its application to the airfoil flutter suppression.

  17. Fast variance reduction for steady-state simulation and sensitivity analysis of stochastic chemical systems using shadow function estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Lygeros, John; Khammash, Mustafa

    2014-07-01

    We address the problem of estimating steady-state quantities associated to systems of stochastic chemical kinetics. In most cases of interest, these systems are analytically intractable, and one has to resort to computational methods to estimate stationary values of cost functions. In this work, we introduce a novel variance reduction algorithm for stochastic chemical kinetics, inspired by related methods in queueing theory, in particular the use of shadow functions. Using two numerical examples, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method for the calculation of steady-state parametric sensitivities and evaluate its performance in comparison to other estimation methods.

  18. VR-BFDT: A variance reduction based binary fuzzy decision tree induction method for protein function prediction.

    PubMed

    Golzari, Fahimeh; Jalili, Saeed

    2015-07-21

    In protein function prediction (PFP) problem, the goal is to predict function of numerous well-sequenced known proteins whose function is not still known precisely. PFP is one of the special and complex problems in machine learning domain in which a protein (regarded as instance) may have more than one function simultaneously. Furthermore, the functions (regarded as classes) are dependent and also are organized in a hierarchical structure in the form of a tree or directed acyclic graph. One of the common learning methods proposed for solving this problem is decision trees in which, by partitioning data into sharp boundaries sets, small changes in the attribute values of a new instance may cause incorrect change in predicted label of the instance and finally misclassification. In this paper, a Variance Reduction based Binary Fuzzy Decision Tree (VR-BFDT) algorithm is proposed to predict functions of the proteins. This algorithm just fuzzifies the decision boundaries instead of converting the numeric attributes into fuzzy linguistic terms. It has the ability of assigning multiple functions to each protein simultaneously and preserves the hierarchy consistency between functional classes. It uses the label variance reduction as splitting criterion to select the best "attribute-value" at each node of the decision tree. The experimental results show that the overall performance of the proposed algorithm is promising.

  19. Fast patient-specific Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations via the correlated sampling variance reduction technique

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Andrew; Le, Yi; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2012-01-01

    . On an AMD 1090T processor, computing times of 38 and 21 sec were required to achieve an average statistical uncertainty of 2% within the prostate (1 × 1 × 1 mm3) and breast (0.67 × 0.67 × 0.8 mm3) CTVs, respectively. Conclusions: CMC supports an additional average 38–60 fold improvement in average efficiency relative to conventional uncorrelated MC techniques, although some voxels experience no gain or even efficiency losses. However, for the two investigated case studies, the maximum variance within clinically significant structures was always reduced (on average by a factor of 6) in the therapeutic dose range generally. CMC takes only seconds to produce an accurate, high-resolution, low-uncertainly dose distribution for the low-energy PSB implants investigated in this study. PMID:22320816

  20. Minimum variance system identification with application to digital adaptive flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotob, S.; Kaufman, H.

    1975-01-01

    A new on-line minimum variance filter for the identification of systems with additive and multiplicative noise is described which embodies both accuracy and computational efficiency. The resulting filter is shown to use both the covariance of the parameter vector itself and the covariance of the error in identification. A bias reduction scheme can be used to yield asymptotically unbiased estimates. Experimental results for simulated linearized lateral aircraft motion in a digital closed loop mode are presented, showing the utility of the identification schemes.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of X-ray imaging and spectroscopy experiments using quadric geometry and variance reduction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golosio, Bruno; Schoonjans, Tom; Brunetti, Antonio; Oliva, Piernicola; Masala, Giovanni Luca

    2014-03-01

    The simulation of X-ray imaging experiments is often performed using deterministic codes, which can be relatively fast and easy to use. However, such codes are generally not suitable for the simulation of even slightly more complex experimental conditions, involving, for instance, first-order or higher-order scattering, X-ray fluorescence emissions, or more complex geometries, particularly for experiments that combine spatial resolution with spectral information. In such cases, simulations are often performed using codes based on the Monte Carlo method. In a simple Monte Carlo approach, the interaction position of an X-ray photon and the state of the photon after an interaction are obtained simply according to the theoretical probability distributions. This approach may be quite inefficient because the final channels of interest may include only a limited region of space or photons produced by a rare interaction, e.g., fluorescent emission from elements with very low concentrations. In the field of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, this problem has been solved by combining the Monte Carlo method with variance reduction techniques, which can reduce the computation time by several orders of magnitude. In this work, we present a C++ code for the general simulation of X-ray imaging and spectroscopy experiments, based on the application of the Monte Carlo method in combination with variance reduction techniques, with a description of sample geometry based on quadric surfaces. We describe the benefits of the object-oriented approach in terms of code maintenance, the flexibility of the program for the simulation of different experimental conditions and the possibility of easily adding new modules. Sample applications in the fields of X-ray imaging and X-ray spectroscopy are discussed. Catalogue identifier: AERO_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERO_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland

  2. Minimum variance control in presence of actuator saturation in adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulcsár, Caroline; Raynaud, Henri-François; Petit, Cyril; Conan, Jean-Marc

    2008-07-01

    Voltage saturation mechanisms are always present on deformable mirrors (DMs) used in adaptive optics (AO) systems, so as to prevent possibly irreversible degradation of the DM. This may happen most often in a strong turbulence context, where too high voltage values are computed by control algorithms trying to compensate for high phase shifts. In minimum variance control, it is well known that input saturation in linear systems destroys separation, leading to untractable optimal control problems. We show that, in the absence of DM's dynamics, separation and certainty equivalence hold in AO even when saturations are present on the system. The optimal control can then be computed by solving a constrained projection problem. As this is computationally intensive, we also propose a sub-optimal control with lower computational burden, which guarantees optimal estimation of the turbulent phase. Optimal and suboptimal controls show a dramatic improvement in performance (measured by the Strehl ratio) compared with those obtained with integral controllers equipped with adequate clipping and anti-wind-up mechanisms. All simulation results are obtained in bad seeing conditions using a VLT Paranal type configuration.

  3. Analysis of latent variance reduction methods in phase space Monte Carlo calculations for 6, 10 and 18 MV photons by using MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzati, A. O.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2013-02-01

    In this study, azimuthal particle redistribution (APR), and azimuthal particle rotational splitting (APRS) methods are implemented in MCNPX2.4 source code. First of all, the efficiency of these methods was compared to two tallying methods. The APRS is more efficient than the APR method in track length estimator tallies. However in the energy deposition tally, both methods have nearly the same efficiency. Latent variance reduction factors were obtained for 6, 10 and 18 MV photons as well. The APRS relative efficiency contours were obtained. These obtained contours reveal that by increasing the photon energies, the contours depth and the surrounding areas were further increased. The relative efficiency contours indicated that the variance reduction factor is position and energy dependent. The out of field voxels relative efficiency contours showed that latent variance reduction methods increased the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation efficiency in the out of field voxels. The APR and APRS average variance reduction factors had differences less than 0.6% for splitting number of 1000.

  4. Robust control chart for change point detection of process variance in the presence of disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huat, Ng Kooi; Midi, Habshah

    2015-02-01

    A conventional control chart for detecting shifts in variance of a process is typically developed where in most circumstances the nominal value of variance is unknown and based upon one of the essential assumptions that the underlying distribution of the quality characteristic is normal. However, this is not always the case as it is fairly evident that the statistical estimates used for these charts are very sensitive to the occurrence of occasional outliers. This is for the reason that the robust control charts are put forward when the underlying normality assumption is not met, and served as a remedial measure to the problem of contamination in process data. Realizing that the existing approach, namely Biweight A pooled residuals method, appears to be resistance to localized disturbances but lack of efficiency when there are diffuse disturbances. To be concrete, diffuse disturbances are those that have equal change of being perturbed by any observation, while a localized disturbance will have effect on every member of a certain subsample or subsamples. Since the efficiency of estimators in the presence of disturbances can rely heavily upon whether the disturbances are distributed throughout the observations or concentrated in a few subsamples. Hence, to this end, in this paper we proposed a new robust MBAS control chart by means of subsample-based robust Modified Biweight A scale estimator in estimating the process standard deviation. It has strong resistance to both localized and diffuse disturbances as well as high efficiency when no disturbances are present. The performance of the proposed robust chart was evaluated based on some decision criteria through Monte Carlo simulation study.

  5. Minimum Variance Distortionless Response Beamformer with Enhanced Nulling Level Control via Dynamic Mutated Artificial Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Kiong, Tiong Sieh; Salem, S. Balasem; Paw, Johnny Koh Siaw; Sankar, K. Prajindra

    2014-01-01

    In smart antenna applications, the adaptive beamforming technique is used to cancel interfering signals (placing nulls) and produce or steer a strong beam toward the target signal according to the calculated weight vectors. Minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming is capable of determining the weight vectors for beam steering; however, its nulling level on the interference sources remains unsatisfactory. Beamforming can be considered as an optimization problem, such that optimal weight vector should be obtained through computation. Hence, in this paper, a new dynamic mutated artificial immune system (DM-AIS) is proposed to enhance MVDR beamforming for controlling the null steering of interference and increase the signal to interference noise ratio (SINR) for wanted signals. PMID:25003136

  6. Controller reduction by preserving impulse response energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Su, Tzu-Jeng

    1989-01-01

    A model order reduction algorithm based on a Krylov recurrence formulation is developed to reduce order of controllers. The reduced-order controller is obtained by projecting the full-order LQG controller onto a Krylov subspace in which either the controllability or the observability grammian is equal to the identity matrix. The reduced-order controller preserves the impulse response energy of the full-order controller and has a parameter-matching property. Two numerical examples drawn from other controller reduction literature are used to illustrate the efficacy of the proposed reduction algorithm.

  7. Model reduction methods for control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunipace, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    Several different model reduction methods are developed and detailed implementation information is provided for those methods. Command files to implement the model reduction methods in a proprietary control law analysis and design package are presented. A comparison and discussion of the various reduction techniques is included.

  8. Bias Reduction in Estimating Variance Components of Phytoplankton Existence at Na Thap River Based on Logistics Linear Mixed Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisanti, R.; Notodiputro, K. A.; Sadik, K.; Lim, A.

    2017-03-01

    There are two approaches in estimating variance components, i.e. linearity and integral approaches. However the estimates of variance components produced by both methods are known to be biased. Firth (1993) has introduced parameter estimation for correcting the bias of the maximum likelihood estimates. This method is within the class of linear models, especially the Restricted Maximum Likelihood (REML) method, and the resulting estimator is known as the Firth estimator. In this paper we discuss the bias correction method applied to a logistic linear mixed model in analyzing the existence of Synedra phytoplankton along Na Thap river in Thailand. The Firth adjusted Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) is similar to REML but it shows the characteristic of generalized linear mixed model. We evaluated the Firth adjustment method by means of simulations and the result showed that the unadjusted MLE produced 95% confidence intervals which were narrower when compare to the Firth method. However, the probability coverage of the interval for unadjusted MLE was lower than 95%, whereas for the Firth method the probability coverage is approximately 95%. These results were also consistent with the variance estimation of the Synedra phytoplankton existence. It was shown that the variance estimates of Firth adjusted MLE was lower than the unadjusted MLE.

  9. Genetic control of residual variance of yearling weight in Nellore beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Iung, L H S; Neves, H H R; Mulder, H A; Carvalheiro, R

    2017-04-01

    There is evidence for genetic variability in residual variance of livestock traits, which offers the potential for selection for increased uniformity of production. Different statistical approaches have been employed to study this topic; however, little is known about the concordance between them. The aim of our study was to investigate the genetic heterogeneity of residual variance on yearling weight (YW; 291.15 ± 46.67) in a Nellore beef cattle population; to compare the results of the statistical approaches, the two-step approach and the double hierarchical generalized linear model (DHGLM); and to evaluate the effectiveness of power transformation to accommodate scale differences. The comparison was based on genetic parameters, accuracy of EBV for residual variance, and cross-validation to assess predictive performance of both approaches. A total of 194,628 yearling weight records from 625 sires were used in the analysis. The results supported the hypothesis of genetic heterogeneity of residual variance on YW in Nellore beef cattle and the opportunity of selection, measured through the genetic coefficient of variation of residual variance (0.10 to 0.12 for the two-step approach and 0.17 for DHGLM, using an untransformed data set). However, low estimates of genetic variance associated with positive genetic correlations between mean and residual variance (about 0.20 for two-step and 0.76 for DHGLM for an untransformed data set) limit the genetic response to selection for uniformity of production while simultaneously increasing YW itself. Moreover, large sire families are needed to obtain accurate estimates of genetic merit for residual variance, as indicated by the low heritability estimates (<0.007). Box-Cox transformation was able to decrease the dependence of the variance on the mean and decreased the estimates of genetic parameters for residual variance. The transformation reduced but did not eliminate all the genetic heterogeneity of residual variance

  10. Noise Reduction Through Circulation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munro, Scott E.; Ahuja, K. K.; Englar, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Circulation control technology uses tangential blowing around a rounded trailing edge or a leading edge to change the force and moment characteristics of an aerodynamic body. This technology has been applied to circular cylinders, wings, helicopter rotors, and even to automobiles for improved aerodynamic performance. Only limited research has been conducted on the acoustic of this technology. Since wing flaps contribute to the environmental noise of an aircraft, an alternate blown high lift system without complex mechanical flaps could prove beneficial in reducing the noise of an approaching aircraft. Thus, in this study, a direct comparison of the acoustic characteristics of high lift systems employing a circulation control wing configuration and a conventional wing flapped configuration has been made. These results indicate that acoustically, a circulation control wing high lift system could be considerably more acceptable than a wing with conventional mechanical flaps.

  11. Launch Control System Message Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Uyen

    2014-01-01

    System Monitoring and Control (SMC) message browsers receive many messages daily that operators do not need to see. My job is to reduce the number of messages so that warning and emergency messages can be seen easily and therefore, responded to promptly. There are two methods to reduce messages: duplicate and state-based message correlations. With duplicate message correlation, SMC display the message the first time it shows up. The next times it occurs, a duplicate number will count the number of times the message appears. State-based message correlation is a process in which more informative messages acknowledge less useful ones and send them to history. I also work on correcting the severity level and text formats of messages. I follow two SMC message filtering tenets as I'm working on this project. Firstly, before filtering an offending message, a non-conformance (NC) must be created in order to attempt fixing that message through hardware or software. Only after the NC assessment states that it cannot fix an offending message, it can be filtered by SMC. Secondly, per Launch Control System (LCS) Coding Standards, SMC does not send information messages to the active message browser unless it's a response to an operator action.

  12. Directional Variance Adjustment: Bias Reduction in Covariance Matrices Based on Factor Analysis with an Application to Portfolio Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Daniel; Hatrick, Kerr; Hesse, Christian W.; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lemm, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Robust and reliable covariance estimates play a decisive role in financial and many other applications. An important class of estimators is based on factor models. Here, we show by extensive Monte Carlo simulations that covariance matrices derived from the statistical Factor Analysis model exhibit a systematic error, which is similar to the well-known systematic error of the spectrum of the sample covariance matrix. Moreover, we introduce the Directional Variance Adjustment (DVA) algorithm, which diminishes the systematic error. In a thorough empirical study for the US, European, and Hong Kong stock market we show that our proposed method leads to improved portfolio allocation. PMID:23844016

  13. Directional variance adjustment: bias reduction in covariance matrices based on factor analysis with an application to portfolio optimization.

    PubMed

    Bartz, Daniel; Hatrick, Kerr; Hesse, Christian W; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Lemm, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Robust and reliable covariance estimates play a decisive role in financial and many other applications. An important class of estimators is based on factor models. Here, we show by extensive Monte Carlo simulations that covariance matrices derived from the statistical Factor Analysis model exhibit a systematic error, which is similar to the well-known systematic error of the spectrum of the sample covariance matrix. Moreover, we introduce the Directional Variance Adjustment (DVA) algorithm, which diminishes the systematic error. In a thorough empirical study for the US, European, and Hong Kong stock market we show that our proposed method leads to improved portfolio allocation.

  14. Drift reduction with drift control adjuvants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Five new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  15. Drift reduction with drift control adjuvants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Numerous drift reduction adjuvants and spray deposition aids are available to applicators of crop production and protection chemicals. Performance of many of the newly introduced drift control adjuvants has not been well documented for aerial application. Four new drift control adjuvants were sele...

  16. Analysis and application of minimum variance discrete time system identification. [for adaptive control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotob, S.; Kaufman, H.

    1976-01-01

    An on-line minimum variance parameter identifier is developed which embodies both accuracy and computational efficiency. The formulation results in a linear estimation problem with both additive and multiplicative noise. The resulting filter which utilizes both the covariance of the parameter vector itself and the covariance of the error in identification is proven to be mean square convergent and mean square consistent. The MV parameter identification scheme is then used to construct a stable state and parameter estimation algorithm.

  17. Three Averaging Techniques for Reduction of Antenna Temperature Variance Measured by a Dicke Mode, C-Band Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackenzie, Anne I.; Lawrence, Roland W.

    2000-01-01

    As new radiometer technologies provide the possibility of greatly improved spatial resolution, their performance must also be evaluated in terms of expected sensitivity and absolute accuracy. As aperture size increases, the sensitivity of a Dicke mode radiometer can be maintained or improved by application of any or all of three digital averaging techniques: antenna data averaging with a greater than 50% antenna duty cycle, reference data averaging, and gain averaging. An experimental, noise-injection, benchtop radiometer at C-band showed a 68.5% reduction in Delta-T after all three averaging methods had been applied simultaneously. For any one antenna integration time, the optimum 34.8% reduction in Delta-T was realized by using an 83.3% antenna/reference duty cycle.

  18. On the multiple imputation variance estimator for control-based and delta-adjusted pattern mixture models.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongqiang

    2017-04-13

    Control-based pattern mixture models (PMM) and delta-adjusted PMMs are commonly used as sensitivity analyses in clinical trials with non-ignorable dropout. These PMMs assume that the statistical behavior of outcomes varies by pattern in the experimental arm in the imputation procedure, but the imputed data are typically analyzed by a standard method such as the primary analysis model. In the multiple imputation (MI) inference, Rubin's variance estimator is generally biased when the imputation and analysis models are uncongenial. One objective of the article is to quantify the bias of Rubin's variance estimator in the control-based and delta-adjusted PMMs for longitudinal continuous outcomes. These PMMs assume the same observed data distribution as the mixed effects model for repeated measures (MMRM). We derive analytic expressions for the MI treatment effect estimator and the associated Rubin's variance in these PMMs and MMRM as functions of the maximum likelihood estimator from the MMRM analysis and the observed proportion of subjects in each dropout pattern when the number of imputations is infinite. The asymptotic bias is generally small or negligible in the delta-adjusted PMM, but can be sizable in the control-based PMM. This indicates that the inference based on Rubin's rule is approximately valid in the delta-adjusted PMM. A simple variance estimator is proposed to ensure asymptotically valid MI inferences in these PMMs, and compared with the bootstrap variance. The proposed method is illustrated by the analysis of an antidepressant trial, and its performance is further evaluated via a simulation study. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  19. How large are actor and partner effects of personality on relationship satisfaction? The importance of controlling for shared method variance.

    PubMed

    Orth, Ulrich

    2013-10-01

    Previous research suggests that the personality of a relationship partner predicts not only the individual's own satisfaction with the relationship but also the partner's satisfaction. Based on the actor-partner interdependence model, the present research tested whether actor and partner effects of personality are biased when the same method (e.g., self-report) is used for the assessment of personality and relationship satisfaction and, consequently, shared method variance is not controlled for. Data came from 186 couples, of whom both partners provided self- and partner reports on the Big Five personality traits. Depending on the research design, actor effects were larger than partner effects (when using only self-reports), smaller than partner effects (when using only partner reports), or of about the same size as partner effects (when using self- and partner reports). The findings attest to the importance of controlling for shared method variance in dyadic data analysis.

  20. Innovative Flow Control Concepts for Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John C.; Whalen, Edward A.; Eppink, Jenna L.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Alexander, Michael G.; Andino, Marlyn Y.

    2016-01-01

    This paper highlights the technology development of two flow control concepts for aircraft drag reduction. The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project worked with Boeing to demonstrate these two concepts on a specially outfitted Boeing 757 ecoDemonstrator during the spring of 2015. The first flow control concept used Active Flow Control (AFC) to delay flow separation on a highly deflected rudder and increase the side force that it generates. This may enable a smaller vertical tail to provide the control authority needed in the event of an engine failure during takeoff and landing, while still operating in a conventional manner over the rest of the flight envelope. Thirty-one sweeping jet AFC actuators were installed and successfully flight-tested on the vertical tail of the 757 ecoDemonstrator. Pilot feedback, flow cone visualization, and analysis of the flight test data confirmed that the AFC is effective, as a smoother flight and enhanced rudder control authority were reported. The second flow control concept is the Insect Accretion Mitigation (IAM) innovation where surfaces were engineered to mitigate insect residue adhesion on a wing's leading edge. This is necessary because something as small as an insect residue on the leading edge of a laminar flow wing design can cause turbulent wedges that interrupt laminar flow, resulting in an increase in drag and fuel use. Several non-stick coatings were developed by NASA and applied to panels that were mounted on the leading edge of the wing of the 757 ecoDemonstrator. The performance of the coated surfaces was measured and validated by the reduction in the number of bug adhesions relative to uncoated control panels flown simultaneously. Both flow control concepts (i.e., sweeping jet actuators and non-stick coatings) for drag reduction were the culmination of several years of development, from wind tunnel tests to flight tests, and produced valuable data for the advancement of modern aircraft designs

  1. A Comprehensive Comparison of Normalization Methods for Loading Control and Variance Stabilization of Reverse-Phase Protein Array Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenbin; Ju, Zhenlin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Akbani, Rehan

    2014-01-01

    Loading control (LC) and variance stabilization of reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) data have been challenging mainly due to the small number of proteins in an experiment and the lack of reliable inherent control markers. In this study, we compare eight different normalization methods for LC and variance stabilization. The invariant marker set concept was first applied to the normalization of high-throughput gene expression data. A set of “invariant” markers are selected to create a virtual reference sample. Then all the samples are normalized to the virtual reference. We propose a variant of this method in the context of RPPA data normalization and compare it with seven other normalization methods previously reported in the literature. The invariant marker set method performs well with respect to LC, variance stabilization and association with the immunohistochemistry/florescence in situ hybridization data for three key markers in breast tumor samples, while the other methods have inferior performance. The proposed method is a promising approach for improving the quality of RPPA data. PMID:25374453

  2. A comprehensive comparison of normalization methods for loading control and variance stabilization of reverse-phase protein array data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbin; Ju, Zhenlin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Akbani, Rehan

    2014-01-01

    Loading control (LC) and variance stabilization of reverse-phase protein array (RPPA) data have been challenging mainly due to the small number of proteins in an experiment and the lack of reliable inherent control markers. In this study, we compare eight different normalization methods for LC and variance stabilization. The invariant marker set concept was first applied to the normalization of high-throughput gene expression data. A set of "invariant" markers are selected to create a virtual reference sample. Then all the samples are normalized to the virtual reference. We propose a variant of this method in the context of RPPA data normalization and compare it with seven other normalization methods previously reported in the literature. The invariant marker set method performs well with respect to LC, variance stabilization and association with the immunohistochemistry/florescence in situ hybridization data for three key markers in breast tumor samples, while the other methods have inferior performance. The proposed method is a promising approach for improving the quality of RPPA data.

  3. Limited variance control in statistical low thrust guidance analysis. [stochastic algorithm for SEP comet Encke flyby mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Difficulties arise in guiding a solar electric propulsion spacecraft due to nongravitational accelerations caused by random fluctuations in the magnitude and direction of the thrust vector. These difficulties may be handled by using a low thrust guidance law based on the linear-quadratic-Gaussian problem of stochastic control theory with a minimum terminal miss performance criterion. Explicit constraints are imposed on the variances of the control parameters, and an algorithm based on the Hilbert space extension of a parameter optimization method is presented for calculation of gains in the guidance law. The terminal navigation of a 1980 flyby mission to the comet Encke is used as an example.

  4. Model reduction for axisymmetric tokamak control

    SciTech Connect

    Tinios, G.; Horne, S. F.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Wolfe, S. M.

    1992-12-31

    We deal with the problem of reducing a complicated electromagnetic passive structure model coupled to a linear plasma response model to a size that allows rapid calculations of gains for plasma position and shape control. We find that model reduction through eigenmode decomposition does not reproduce the input-to-output relationship of the system, unless one has a good idea of which eigenmodes are important. Hankel singular mode decomposition, on the other hand, provides an orthogonal basis for the system response, where the modes are ordered by their importance to the input-to-output relationship. A perturbed equilibrium plasma response model is used together with an electromagnetic model of the Alcator C-MOD passive structure to assess the performance of different model reduction schemes. We find that between 10 and 20 modes are required to give an adequate representation of the passive system. Emphasis is placed on keeping the reduction process independent of the parameters of the plasma we are trying to control.

  5. Robust fuzzy control subject to state variance and passivity constraints for perturbed nonlinear systems with multiplicative noises.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Jer; Huang, Bo-Jyun

    2014-11-01

    The multi-constrained robust fuzzy control problem is investigated in this paper for perturbed continuous-time nonlinear stochastic systems. The nonlinear system considered in this paper is represented by a Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model with perturbations and state multiplicative noises. The multiple performance constraints considered in this paper include stability, passivity and individual state variance constraints. The Lyapunov stability theory is employed to derive sufficient conditions to achieve the above performance constraints. By solving these sufficient conditions, the contribution of this paper is to develop a parallel distributed compensation based robust fuzzy control approach to satisfy multiple performance constraints for perturbed nonlinear systems with multiplicative noises. At last, a numerical example for the control of perturbed inverted pendulum system is provided to illustrate the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed multi-constrained robust fuzzy control method. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Wind Turbine Control for Load Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossanyi, E. A.

    2003-07-01

    This article reviews techniques for the control of wind turbines during power production. Pitch control is used primarily to limit power in high winds, but it also has an important effect on structural loads. Particularly as turbines become larger, there is increasing interest in designing controllers to mitigate loads as far as possible. Torque control in variable-speed turbines is used primarily to maximize energy capture below rated wind speed, and to limit the torque above rated, but it can also be used to reduce certain loads. The design of the control algorithms is clearly of prime importance. Additional sensors such as accelerometers and load sensors can also help the controller to achieve its objectives more effectively. By controlling the pitch of each blade independently, it is also possible to achieve important further reductions in loading. It is important to be able to quantify the benefits of any new controller. Although computer simulations are useful, field trials are also vital. The variability of the real wind means that particular care is needed in the design of the trials.

  7. [Dynamic variance of intracellular metabolic energies under rhythmical control for dissolved oxygen in PHB mixed cultivation].

    PubMed

    Qian, Z W; Tohyama, M; Hua, Q; Shimizu, K

    2001-07-01

    The mixed cultivation using cheaper carbon source-wasted food material contained glucose and lactate at the same time was conducted in 5L fermentor, within which glucose was converted to lactate by L. delbrueckii in anaerobic condition and the lactate was converted to PHB by R. eutropha in aerobic condition. Considering dissolved oxygen concentration may affect the level of intracellular ATP and NADPH of the metabolic pathways for R. eutropha in lactate under autotrophy or heterotrophy, rhythmical oscillated control for DO based on chaos control method was consequently presented. This method was employed to satisfy two strains for opposite oxygen preferences, moreover, excite the intracellular metabolic energy simultaneously. The values examined through spectrophotofluorimetry represented that both ATP and NADPH exhibited fluctuations in accordance with the DO rhythm. By means of this control design, the concentration of PHB can be doubled than the usual under stable DO control.

  8. Feedback Control for Noise Reduction Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Jerry H.

    2002-12-01

    As part of Langley Research Center's continuing noise reduction program, an active noise control system (ANC) is being developed to suppress noise inside an aircraft cabin. This interior noise reduction system consists of the following major components: 1. Several accelerometers. 2. An input amplifier. 3. A digital signal processor (DSP) system that includes an analog to digital converter (ADC) and a digital to analog converter (DAC). 4. A high voltage power amplifier. 5. PZT actuators. 6. Power supply and distribution. The accelerometers detect interior panel vibrations. The accelerometer signals are fed to the input amplifier where they are conditioned prior to being sent to the ADC. The DSP receives the digitized signals form the ADC, processes these signals, and sends the result to the DAC. The DAC's analog output is used as input to the high voltage power amplifier. The power amplifier drives the PZT actuators to cancel noise form 50 to 1,300 Hz. The specific area of concern for this work was development of a DSP system that could be used for an actual flight demonstration. It was decided to base the system on a commercially available DSP board, the Spectrum Digital eZdsp. This was complicated by the fact that the ADC and DAC capabilities available on the eZdsp board were not sufficient to meet the system specification. Designing and fabricating a special ADC and DAC daughter card for the eZdsp circumvented this problem. The DSP system hardware has been successfully tested and is currently being integrated into the complete noise reduction system. This work has been completed in collaboration with another ASEE Fellow, Dr.William Edmonson from Hampton University and was conducted under the direction of the principle investigator, Dr. Qamar A. Shams of the Instrumentation Systems Development Branch, as part of a continuing noise reduction program.

  9. Orthogonal control of expression mean and variance by epigenetic features at different genomic loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Siddharth S.; Foley, Jonathan E.; Limsirichai, Prajit; Schaffer, David V.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-05-05

    While gene expression noise has been shown to drive dramatic phenotypic variations, the molecular basis for this variability in mammalian systems is not well understood. Gene expression has been shown to be regulated by promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment. However, the exact contribution of these two factors in regulating expression noise has not been explored. Using a dual-reporter lentiviral model system, we deconvolved the influence of the promoter sequence to systematically study the contribution of the chromatin environment at different genomic locations in regulating expression noise. By integrating a large-scale analysis to quantify mRNA levels by smFISH and protein levels by flow cytometry in single cells, we found that mean expression and noise are uncorrelated across genomic locations. Furthermore, we showed that this independence could be explained by the orthogonal control of mean expression by the transcript burst size and noise by the burst frequency. Finally, we showed that genomic locations displaying higher expression noise are associated with more repressed chromatin, thereby indicating the contribution of the chromatin environment in regulating expression noise.

  10. Orthogonal control of expression mean and variance by epigenetic features at different genomic loci

    DOE PAGES

    Dey, Siddharth S.; Foley, Jonathan E.; Limsirichai, Prajit; ...

    2015-05-05

    While gene expression noise has been shown to drive dramatic phenotypic variations, the molecular basis for this variability in mammalian systems is not well understood. Gene expression has been shown to be regulated by promoter architecture and the associated chromatin environment. However, the exact contribution of these two factors in regulating expression noise has not been explored. Using a dual-reporter lentiviral model system, we deconvolved the influence of the promoter sequence to systematically study the contribution of the chromatin environment at different genomic locations in regulating expression noise. By integrating a large-scale analysis to quantify mRNA levels by smFISH andmore » protein levels by flow cytometry in single cells, we found that mean expression and noise are uncorrelated across genomic locations. Furthermore, we showed that this independence could be explained by the orthogonal control of mean expression by the transcript burst size and noise by the burst frequency. Finally, we showed that genomic locations displaying higher expression noise are associated with more repressed chromatin, thereby indicating the contribution of the chromatin environment in regulating expression noise.« less

  11. Model Reduction for Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enns, D. F.

    1985-01-01

    An approach and a technique for effectively obtaining reduced order mathematical models of a given large order model for the purposes of synthesis, analysis and implementation of control systems is developed. This approach involves the use of an error criterion which is the H-infinity norm of a frequency weighted error between the full and reduced order models. The weightings are chosen to take into account the purpose for which the reduced order model is intended. A previously unknown error bound in the H-infinity norm for reduced order models obtained from internally balanced realizations was obtained. This motivated further development of the balancing technique to include the frequency dependent weightings. This resulted in the frequency weighted balanced realization and a new model reduction technique. Two approaches to designing reduced order controllers were developed. The first involves reducing the order of a high order controller with an appropriate weighting. The second involves linear quadratic Gaussian synthesis based on a reduced order model obtained with an appropriate weighting.

  12. Association analysis using next-generation sequence data from publicly available control groups: the robust variance score statistic.

    PubMed

    Derkach, Andriy; Chiang, Theodore; Gong, Jiafen; Addis, Laura; Dobbins, Sara; Tomlinson, Ian; Houlston, Richard; Pal, Deb K; Strug, Lisa J

    2014-08-01

    Sufficiently powered case-control studies with next-generation sequence (NGS) data remain prohibitively expensive for many investigators. If feasible, a more efficient strategy would be to include publicly available sequenced controls. However, these studies can be confounded by differences in sequencing platform; alignment, single nucleotide polymorphism and variant calling algorithms; read depth; and selection thresholds. Assuming one can match cases and controls on the basis of ethnicity and other potential confounding factors, and one has access to the aligned reads in both groups, we investigate the effect of systematic differences in read depth and selection threshold when comparing allele frequencies between cases and controls. We propose a novel likelihood-based method, the robust variance score (RVS), that substitutes genotype calls by their expected values given observed sequence data. We show theoretically that the RVS eliminates read depth bias in the estimation of minor allele frequency. We also demonstrate that, using simulated and real NGS data, the RVS method controls Type I error and has comparable power to the 'gold standard' analysis with the true underlying genotypes for both common and rare variants. An RVS R script and instructions can be found at strug.research.sickkids.ca, and at https://github.com/strug-lab/RVS. lisa.strug@utoronto.ca Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Association analysis using next-generation sequence data from publicly available control groups: the robust variance score statistic

    PubMed Central

    Derkach, Andriy; Chiang, Theodore; Gong, Jiafen; Addis, Laura; Dobbins, Sara; Tomlinson, Ian; Houlston, Richard; Pal, Deb K.; Strug, Lisa J.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Sufficiently powered case–control studies with next-generation sequence (NGS) data remain prohibitively expensive for many investigators. If feasible, a more efficient strategy would be to include publicly available sequenced controls. However, these studies can be confounded by differences in sequencing platform; alignment, single nucleotide polymorphism and variant calling algorithms; read depth; and selection thresholds. Assuming one can match cases and controls on the basis of ethnicity and other potential confounding factors, and one has access to the aligned reads in both groups, we investigate the effect of systematic differences in read depth and selection threshold when comparing allele frequencies between cases and controls. We propose a novel likelihood-based method, the robust variance score (RVS), that substitutes genotype calls by their expected values given observed sequence data. Results: We show theoretically that the RVS eliminates read depth bias in the estimation of minor allele frequency. We also demonstrate that, using simulated and real NGS data, the RVS method controls Type I error and has comparable power to the ‘gold standard’ analysis with the true underlying genotypes for both common and rare variants. Availability and implementation: An RVS R script and instructions can be found at strug.research.sickkids.ca, and at https://github.com/strug-lab/RVS. Contact: lisa.strug@utoronto.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24733292

  14. Development of new source diagnostic methods and variance reduction techniques for Monte Carlo eigenvalue problems with a focus on high dominance ratio problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenner, Michael T.

    Obtaining the solution to the linear Boltzmann equation is often is often a daunting task. The time-independent form is an equation of six independent variables which cannot be solved analytically in all but some special problems. Instead, numerical approaches have been devised. This work focuses on improving Monte Carlo methods for its solution in eigenvalue form. First, a statistical method of stationarity detection called the KPSS test adapted as a Monte Carlo eigenvalue source convergence test. The KPSS test analyzes the source center of mass series which was chosen since it should be indicative of overall source behavior, and is physically easy to understand. A source center of mass plot alone serves as a good visual source convergence diagnostic. The KPSS test and three different information theoretic diagnostics were implemented into the well known KENOV.a code inside of the SCALE (version 5) code package from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and compared through analysis of a simple problem and several difficult source convergence benchmarks. Results showed that the KPSS test can add to the overall confidence by identifying more problematic simulations than without its usage. Not only this, the source center of mass information on hand visually aids in the understanding of the problem physics. The second major focus of this dissertation concerned variance reduction methodologies for Monte Carlo eigenvalue problems. The CADIS methodology, based on importance sampling, was adapted to the eigenvalue problems. It was shown that the straight adaption of importance sampling can provide a significant variance reduction in determination of keff (in cases studied up to 30%?). A modified version of this methodology was developed which utilizes independent deterministic importance simulations. In this new methodology, each particle is simulated multiple times, once to every other discretized source region utilizing the importance for that region only. Since each particle

  15. [Harm reduction strategy in tobacco control].

    PubMed

    Gorini, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    .Thus, California Department of Health Services prohibits promotion of snus and medicinal nicotine as a harm reduction strategy. However, the US Federal Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, signed by President Obama in 2009, places tobacco products under FDA jurisdiction: FDA must define criteria for lowering carcinogens and toxicants in tobacco products, making more available medicinal nicotine, evaluating PREPs, creating a federal Tobacco Control Agency.Which approaches is Italy going to follow?

  16. Helicopter Control Energy Reduction Using Moving Horizontal Tail

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Tugrul; Sal, Firat

    2015-01-01

    Helicopter moving horizontal tail (i.e., MHT) strategy is applied in order to save helicopter flight control system (i.e., FCS) energy. For this intention complex, physics-based, control-oriented nonlinear helicopter models are used. Equations of MHT are integrated into these models and they are together linearized around straight level flight condition. A specific variance constrained control strategy, namely, output variance constrained Control (i.e., OVC) is utilized for helicopter FCS. Control energy savings due to this MHT idea with respect to a conventional helicopter are calculated. Parameters of helicopter FCS and dimensions of MHT are simultaneously optimized using a stochastic optimization method, namely, simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation (i.e., SPSA). In order to observe improvement in behaviors of classical controls closed loop analyses are done. PMID:26180841

  17. Controlling financial variables--purchasing, inventory control, and waste reduction.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, P W

    1984-02-01

    Purchasing, inventory control, and waste reduction techniques designed to minimize nonpersonnel expenditures are reviewed. Cost-saving purchasing mechanisms described include competitive bidding, contract negotiation, group purchasing, and primary wholesaler purchasing. The relative benefits of basic inventory management methods, including the ABC method, minimum and maximum levels, economic order quantity and value, and volume discount evaluation, are described. Waste and pilferage reducing methods discussed are unit dose drug distribution, i.v. admixture systems, and policies for use of i.v. sets and infusion pumps. Pharmacy departments in all institutions can reduce costs.

  18. Control Strategies to Achieve Air Pollution Reduction

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Considerations in designing an effective control strategy related to air quality, controlling pollution sources, need for regional or national controls, steps to developing a control strategy, and additional EPA resources.

  19. Principled Variance Reduction Techniques for Real Time Patient-Specific Monte Carlo Applications within Brachytherapy and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Andrew Joseph

    This dissertation describes the application of two principled variance reduction strategies to increase the efficiency for two applications within medical physics. The first, called correlated Monte Carlo (CMC) applies to patient-specific, permanent-seed brachytherapy (PSB) dose calculations. The second, called adjoint-biased forward Monte Carlo (ABFMC), is used to compute cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scatter projections. CMC was applied for two PSB cases: a clinical post-implant prostate, and a breast with a simulated lumpectomy cavity. CMC computes the dose difference, DeltaD, between the highly correlated dose computing homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. The particle transport in the heterogeneous geometry assumed a purely homogeneous environment, and altered particle weights accounted for bias. Average gains of 37 to 60 are reported from using CMC, relative to un-correlated Monte Carlo (UMC) calculations, for the prostate and breast CTV's, respectively. To further increase the efficiency up to 1500 fold above UMC, an approximation called interpolated correlated Monte Carlo (ICMC) was applied. ICMC computes DeltaD using CMC on a low-resolution (LR) spatial grid followed by interpolation to a high-resolution (HR) voxel grid followed. The interpolated, HR DeltaD is then summed with a HR, pre-computed, homogeneous dose map. ICMC computes an approximate, but accurate, HR heterogeneous dose distribution from LR MC calculations achieving an average 2% standard deviation within the prostate and breast CTV's in 1.1 sec and 0.39 sec, respectively. Accuracy for 80% of the voxels using ICMC is within 3% for anatomically realistic geometries. Second, for CBCT scatter projections, ABFMC was implemented via weight windowing using a solution to the adjoint Boltzmann transport equation computed either via the discrete ordinates method (DOM), or a MC implemented forward-adjoint importance generator (FAIG). ABFMC, implemented via DOM or FAIG, was tested for a

  20. Variance Reduction in a Dataset of Normal Macular Ganglion Cell Plus Inner Plexiform Layer Thickness Maps with Application to Glaucoma Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Knighton, Robert W.; Gregori, Giovanni; Budenz, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the similarities and differences in the shape of the macular ganglion cell plus inner plexiform layers (GCL+IPL) in a healthy human population, and seek methods to reduce population variance and improve discriminating power. Methods. Macular images of the right eyes of 23 healthy subjects were obtained with spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The thickness of GCL+IPL was determined by manual segmentation, areas with blood vessels were removed, and the resulting maps were fit by smooth surfaces in polar coordinates centered on the fovea. Results. The mean GCL+IPL thickness formed a horizontal elliptical annulus. The variance increased toward the center and was highest near the foveal edge. Individual maps differed in foveal size and overall GCL+IPL thickness. Foveal size correction by radially shifting individual maps to the same foveal size as the mean map reduced perifoveal variance. Thickness alignment by shifting individual maps axially, then radially, to match the mean map reduced overall variance. These transformations had very little effect on the population mean. Conclusions. Simple transformations of individual GCL+IPL thickness maps to a canonical form can considerably reduce the population variance in a sample of normal eyes, likely improving the ability to discriminate abnormal maps. The transformations considered here preserve the local geometry of the thickness maps. When used on a patient's map, they can produce a deviation map that provides a meaningful measurement of the size of local thickness deviations and allows estimation of the number of ganglion cells lost in a glaucomatous defect. PMID:22562512

  1. Internet Gaming Disorder Explains Unique Variance in Psychological Distress and Disability After Controlling for Comorbid Depression, OCD, ADHD, and Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Pearcy, Benjamin T D; McEvoy, Peter M; Roberts, Lynne D

    2017-02-01

    This study extends knowledge about the relationship of Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) to other established mental disorders by exploring comorbidities with anxiety, depression, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and assessing whether IGD accounts for unique variance in distress and disability. An online survey was completed by a convenience sample that engages in Internet gaming (N = 404). Participants meeting criteria for IGD based on the Personal Internet Gaming Disorder Evaluation-9 (PIE-9) reported higher comorbidity with depression, OCD, ADHD, and anxiety compared with those who did not meet the IGD criteria. IGD explained a small proportion of unique variance in distress (1%) and disability (3%). IGD accounted for a larger proportion of unique variance in disability than anxiety and ADHD, and a similar proportion to depression. Replications with clinical samples using longitudinal designs and structured diagnostic interviews are required.

  2. The entropy reduction engine: Integrating planning, scheduling, and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Mark; Bresina, John L.; Kedar, Smadar T.

    1991-01-01

    The Entropy Reduction Engine, an architecture for the integration of planning, scheduling, and control, is described. The architecture is motivated, presented, and analyzed in terms of its different components; namely, problem reduction, temporal projection, and situated control rule execution. Experience with this architecture has motivated the recent integration of learning. The learning methods are described along with their impact on architecture performance.

  3. Robot arm dynamic model reduction for control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Lee, S.

    1983-01-01

    General methods are described by which the mathematical complexities of explicit and exact state equations of robot arms can be reduced to a simplified and compact state equation representation without introducing significant errors into the robot arm dynamic model. The model reduction methods are based on homogeneous coordinates and on the Langrangian algorithm for robot arm dynamics, and utilize matrix, vector and numeric analysis techniques. The derivation of differential vector representation of centripetal and Coriolis forces which has not yet been established in the literature is presented.

  4. Boundary-layer control for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.

    1988-01-01

    Although the number of possible applications of boundary-layer control is large, a discussion is given only of those that have received the most attention recently at NASA Langley Research Center to improve airfoil drag characteristics. This research concerns stabilizing the laminar boundary layer through geometric shaping (natural laminar flow, NLF) and active control involving the removal of a portion of the laminar boundary layer (laminar flow control, LFC) either through discrete slots or a perforated surface. At low Reynolds numbers, a combination of shaping and forced transition has been used to achieve the desired run of laminar flow and control of laminar separation. In the design of both natural laminar flow and laminar flow control airfoils and wings, boundary layer stability codes play an important role. A discussion of some recent stability calculations using both incompressible and compressible codes is given.

  5. Reduction in Clinical Variance Using Targeted Design Changes in Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) Order Sets: Impact on Hospitalized Children with Acute Asthma Exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, B R; Hart, K W; Rucker, D W

    2012-01-01

    Unwarranted variance in healthcare has been associated with prolonged length of stay, diminished health and increased cost. Practice variance in the management of asthma can be significant and few investigators have evaluated strategies to reduce this variance. We hypothesized that selective redesign of order sets using different ways to frame the order and physician decision-making in a computerized provider order entry system could increase adherence to evidence-based care and reduce population-specific variance. The study focused on the use of an evidence-based asthma exacerbation order set in the electronic health record (EHR) before and after order set redesign. In the Baseline period, the EHR was queried for frequency of use of an asthma exacerbation order set and its individual orders. Important individual orders with suboptimal use were targeted for redesign. Data from a Post-Intervention period were then analyzed. In the Baseline period there were 245 patient visits in which the acute asthma exacerbation order set was selected. The utilization frequency of most orders in the order set during this period exceeded 90%. Three care items were targeted for intervention due to suboptimal utilization: admission weight, activity center use and peak flow measurements. In the Post-Intervention period there were 213 patient visits. Order set redesign using different default order content resulted in significant improvement in the utilization of orders for all 3 items: admission weight (79.2% to 94.8% utilization, p<0.001), activity center (84.1% to 95.3% utilization, p<0.001) and peak flow (18.8% to 55.9% utilization, p<0.001). Utilization of peak flow orders for children ≥8 years of age increased from 42.7% to 94.1% (p<0.001). Details of order set design greatly influence clinician prescribing behavior. Queries of the EHR reveal variance associated with ordering frequencies. Targeting and changing order set design elements in a CPOE system results in improved

  6. Practice reduces task relevant variance modulation and forms nominal trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osu, Rieko; Morishige, Ken-Ichi; Nakanishi, Jun; Miyamoto, Hiroyuki; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2015-12-01

    Humans are capable of achieving complex tasks with redundant degrees of freedom. Much attention has been paid to task relevant variance modulation as an indication of online feedback control strategies to cope with motor variability. Meanwhile, it has been discussed that the brain learns internal models of environments to realize feedforward control with nominal trajectories. Here we examined trajectory variance in both spatial and temporal domains to elucidate the relative contribution of these control schemas. We asked subjects to learn reaching movements with multiple via-points, and found that hand trajectories converged to stereotyped trajectories with the reduction of task relevant variance modulation as learning proceeded. Furthermore, variance reduction was not always associated with task constraints but was highly correlated with the velocity profile. A model assuming noise both on the nominal trajectory and motor command was able to reproduce the observed variance modulation, supporting an expression of nominal trajectories in the brain. The learning-related decrease in task-relevant modulation revealed a reduction in the influence of optimal feedback around the task constraints. After practice, the major part of computation seems to be taken over by the feedforward controller around the nominal trajectory with feedback added only when it becomes necessary.

  7. Practice reduces task relevant variance modulation and forms nominal trajectory.

    PubMed

    Osu, Rieko; Morishige, Ken-ichi; Nakanishi, Jun; Miyamoto, Hiroyuki; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2015-12-07

    Humans are capable of achieving complex tasks with redundant degrees of freedom. Much attention has been paid to task relevant variance modulation as an indication of online feedback control strategies to cope with motor variability. Meanwhile, it has been discussed that the brain learns internal models of environments to realize feedforward control with nominal trajectories. Here we examined trajectory variance in both spatial and temporal domains to elucidate the relative contribution of these control schemas. We asked subjects to learn reaching movements with multiple via-points, and found that hand trajectories converged to stereotyped trajectories with the reduction of task relevant variance modulation as learning proceeded. Furthermore, variance reduction was not always associated with task constraints but was highly correlated with the velocity profile. A model assuming noise both on the nominal trajectory and motor command was able to reproduce the observed variance modulation, supporting an expression of nominal trajectories in the brain. The learning-related decrease in task-relevant modulation revealed a reduction in the influence of optimal feedback around the task constraints. After practice, the major part of computation seems to be taken over by the feedforward controller around the nominal trajectory with feedback added only when it becomes necessary.

  8. Parametric Uncertainty Reduction in Robust Multivariable Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    presents a method for reducing the Dumber of parametric un- certainties used in the design of a robust Ho, controller. The resulting controller is shown...determining robust stability can be de- duced from Figure 2.9. Stability in the loop containing the perturbation requires that for all frequencies det {I... det (I + MA) = 01 {minAEA(a(A) I det (J + MA) = 0)1’ otherwise 15 It can be shown that the SSV has the following properties (Doyle, 1982): 1. F(oM) =1

  9. Optical Model Reduction and Robust Feedback Control for Aerodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-29

    LQR ) control formulation, roughly 1210 Riccati unknowns need to be calculated for a discretized flow model describing 610 states. Existing computing...1 Optimal Model Reduction and Robust Feedback Control for Aerodynamics AFoSR Grant AF-FA9550-08-1-0450 Seddik M. Djouadi Department of...methods of model reduction that integrate feedback active flow control with applications to nonlinear convection and turbulent flows governed by

  10. Model Reduction for Flow Analysis and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, Clarence W.; Dawson, Scott T. M.

    2017-01-01

    Advances in experimental techniques and the ever-increasing fidelity of numerical simulations have led to an abundance of data describing fluid flows. This review discusses a range of techniques for analyzing such data, with the aim of extracting simplified models that capture the essential features of these flows, in order to gain insight into the flow physics, and potentially identify mechanisms for controlling these flows. We review well-developed techniques, such as proper orthogonal decomposition and Galerkin projection, and discuss more recent techniques developed for linear systems, such as balanced truncation and dynamic mode decomposition (DMD). We then discuss some of the methods available for nonlinear systems, with particular attention to the Koopman operator, an infinite-dimensional linear operator that completely characterizes the dynamics of a nonlinear system and provides an extension of DMD to nonlinear systems.

  11. Tiltrotor Vibration Reduction Through Higher Harmonic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Settle, T. Ben

    1997-01-01

    The results of a joint NASA/Army/Bell Helicopter Textron wind-tunnel test to assess the potential of higher harmonic control (HHC) for reducing vibrations in tiltrotor aircraft operating in the airplane mode of flight, and to evaluate the effectiveness of a Bell-developed HHC algorithm called MAVSS (Multipoint Adaptive Vibration Suppression System) are presented. The test was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel using an unpowered 1/5-scale semispan aeroelastic model of the V-22 which was modified to incorporate an HHC system employing both the rotor swashplate and the wing flaperon. The effectiveness of the swashplate and the flaperon acting either singly or in combination in reducing IP and 3P wing vibrations over a wide range of tunnel airspeeds and rotor rotational speeds was demonstrated. The MAVSS algorithm was found to be robust to variations in tunnel airspeed and rotor speed, requiring only occasional on-line recalculations of the system transfer matrix. HHC had only a small (usually beneficial) effect on blade loads but increased pitch link loads by 25%. No degradation in aeroelastic stability was noted for any of the conditions tested.

  12. Higher Harmonic Control for Tiltrotor Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Settle, T. Ben

    1997-01-01

    The results of a joint NASA/Army/Bell Helicopter Textron wind-tunnel test to assess the potential of higher harmonic control (HHC) for reducing vibrations in tiltrotor aircraft operating in the airplane mode of flight, and to evaluate the effectiveness of a Bell-developed HHC algorithm called MAVSS (Multipoint Adaptive Vibration Suppression System) are presented. The test was conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel using an unpowered 1/5- scale semispan aeroelastic model of the V-22 which was modified to incorporate an HHC system employing both the rotor swashplate and the wing flaperon. The effectiveness of the swashplate and the flaperon acting either singly or in combination in reducing 1P and 3P wing vibrations over a wide range of tunnel airspeeds and rotor rotational speeds was demonstrated. The MAVSS algorithm was found to be robust to variations in tunnel airspeed and rotor speed, requiring only occasion-al on-line recalculations of the system transfer matrix.

  13. Magnetostrictively actuated control flaps for vibration reduction in helicopter rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Millott, T.; Friedmann, P.P.

    1994-12-31

    High vibration levels can impose constraints on helicopter operations and hinder passenger acceptance. Vibration reduction using blade root pitch control introduces a significant power penalty and may adversely affect the airworthiness of the flight control system. Comparable levels of vibration reduction can be achieved using considerably less power through an actively controlled trailing edge flap mounted on the blade. Such a device would have no effect on helicopter airworthiness since it is controlled by a loop separate from the primary flight control system which utilizes the swashplate. Control flap actuation using the magnetostrictive material Terfenol-D is studied in this paper by designing a minimum weight actuator, subject to a set of actuation and stress constraints. The resulting device is capable of producing vibration reduction in excess of 90% at cruise conditions.

  14. Geochemical and microbiological controls on dissimilatory iron reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2006-06-01

    Recent experimental studies permit development of conceptual and quantitative models of microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction at circumneutral pH that can be compared to and contrasted with established models of abiotic mineral dissolution. The findings collectively support a model for controls on enzymatic reduction that differs fundamentally from those applied to abiotic reductive dissolution as a result of two basic phenomena: (1) the relatively minor influence of oxide mineralogical and thermodynamic properties on rates of enzymatic reduction compared to abiotic reductive dissolution, and (2) the major limitation which sorption and/or surface precipitation of biogenic Fe(II) on residual oxide and Fe(III)-reducing bacterial cell surfaces poses to enzymatic electron transfer in the presence of excess electron donor. Parallel studies with two well-characterized Fe(III)-reducing organisms ( Shewanella putrefaciens and Geobacter sulfurreducens) lead to common conclusions regarding the importance of these phenomena in regulating the rate and long-term extent of Fe(III) oxide reduction. Models in which rates of enzymatic reduction are limited by Fe(III)-reducing bacterial cell density together with the abundance of 'available' oxide surface sites (as controlled by oxide surface area and the accumulation of surface-bound biogenic Fe(II)) provide an adequate macroscopic description of controls on the initial rate and long-term extent of oxide reduction. To cite this article: E.E. Roden, C. R. Geoscience 338 (2006).

  15. A flicker reduction control strategy using an adaptive var compensator

    SciTech Connect

    Jatskevich, J.; Wasynczuk, O.; Conrad, L.

    1999-11-01

    A detailed computer model of a power network with loads, resistance welders and an Adaptive Var Compensator (AVC) has been developed and used to determine the effectiveness of the AVC on the reduction of observable flicker at neighboring loads. Flicker severity is determined using the UIE/IEC flickermeter methodology. Different control strategies for the AVC are considered and compared with respect to flicker reduction. A new flicker adaptive control (FAC) strategy is proposed that can be used for both power factor correction and flicker reduction. The measurement technique used in the FAC is shown to be accurate even in presence of significant harmonic distortion.

  16. Temperature-controlled radiofrequency tonsil reduction in children.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Lionel M

    2003-05-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of temperature-controlled radiofrequency tonsil reduction in the treatment of children with a sleep-related breathing disorder associated with tonsillar obstructive hypertrophy. Prospective, nonrandomized, case series feasibility study of children meeting the criteria for tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy for the treatment of an obstructive sleep-related breathing disorder. Community-based hospital. Patients Ten children, aged 4 to 13 years, presenting consecutively to a community-based otolaryngology practice with tonsillar or adenotonsillar obstructive hypertrophy implicated clinically in causing a sleep-related breathing disorder; their parents consenting to temperature-controlled radiofrequency tonsil reduction instead of surgical tonsillectomy. Intervention Temperature-controlled radiofrequency tonsil reduction, along with surgical adenoidectomy, if adenoids were present, under general anesthesia. Tonsil size reduction, treatment morbidity, and symptom improvement with follow-up to 1 year. Baseline and 3-month posttreatment polysomnographic data were used. There was a reduction in tonsil size at 1 year of 75.0% on average, without evidence of regrowth during the 1-year follow-up. All children were drinking liquids in the recovery room, and most were eating soft diets within 6 hours; 8 of the 10 children were eating a normal diet by day 5. On average, the return to normal activity was 3.9 days, with 2.9 days of parental loss of work time. Quality-of-life variables all improved. Snore indexes decreased by 88.6%. Polysomnography at 3 months revealed an 84.2% reduction in the apnea index and a 52.3% reduction in the apnea/hypopnea index. There were no complications. Temperature-controlled radiofrequency tonsil reduction seems to be a safe, effective, and minimally morbid treatment for tonsil hypertrophy in children with obstructive sleep-related breathing disorders.

  17. Model reduction in integrated controls-structures design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman G.

    1993-01-01

    It is the objective of this paper to present a model reduction technique developed for the integrated controls-structures design of flexible structures. Integrated controls-structures design problems are typically posed as nonlinear mathematical programming problems, where the design variables consist of both structural and control parameters. In the solution process, both structural and control design variables are constantly changing; therefore, the dynamic characteristics of the structure are also changing. This presents a problem in obtaining a reduced-order model for active control design and analysis which will be valid for all design points within the design space. In other words, the frequency and number of the significant modes of the structure (modes that should be included) may vary considerably throughout the design process. This is also true as the locations and/or masses of the sensors and actuators change. Moreover, since the number of design evaluations in the integrated design process could easily run into thousands, any feasible order-reduction method should not require model reduction analysis at every design iteration. In this paper a novel and efficient technique for model reduction in the integrated controls-structures design process, which addresses these issues, is presented.

  18. 42 CFR 456.525 - Request for renewal of variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from...

  19. 42 CFR 456.521 - Conditions for granting variance requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from...

  20. Small-molecule control of protein function through Staudinger reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ji; Liu, Qingyang; Morihiro, Kunihiko; Deiters, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Using small molecules to control the function of proteins in live cells with complete specificity is highly desirable, but challenging. Here we report a small-molecule switch that can be used to control protein activity. The approach uses a phosphine-mediated Staudinger reduction to activate protein function. Genetic encoding of an ortho-azidobenzyloxycarbonyl amino acid using a pyrrolysyl transfer RNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair in mammalian cells enables the site-specific introduction of a small-molecule-removable protecting group into the protein of interest. Strategic placement of this group renders the protein inactive until deprotection through a bioorthogonal Staudinger reduction delivers the active wild-type protein. This developed methodology was applied to the conditional control of several cellular processes, including bioluminescence (luciferase), fluorescence (enhanced green fluorescent protein), protein translocation (nuclear localization sequence), DNA recombination (Cre) and gene editing (Cas9).

  1. Control of the ST7 Disturbance Reduction System Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, P. G.; Hsu, O. C,; ODonnell, J. R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Technology 7 (ST7) experiment will perform an on-orbit system-level validation of two specific Disturbance Reduction System technologies: colloidal micronewton thrusters and drag-free control. The ST7 Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) is designed to maintain the spacecraft s position with respect to a free-floating test mass while limiting the residual accelerations of that test mass over the frequency range of 1 to 30 mHz. This paper presents the overall design and analysis of the spacecraft drag-free and attitude controllers, with particular attention given to its primary mission mode. These controllers close the loop between the drag-free sensors and the colloidal micronewton thrusters.

  2. Consequences and controls of bacterial sulfate reduction in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction is an integral part of the geochemical cycles of carbon and sulfur. To better understand the environmental consequences of sulfate reduction and to further clarify the factors controlling this important biogeochemical process, rates of sulfate reduction were measured in Long Island Sound sediments and in controlled laboratory experiments using the /sup 35/S-SO/sub 4/= radiotracer technique. Four sediment localities (NWC, FOAM, Sachem, and BH) in the Sound, with different sedimentation rates and different macrofaunal populations, were chosen for study. Geochemical evidence from the FOAM site, based on the rate data, supports the use of a simple stoichiometric model for overall organic matter decomposition in the zone of sulfate reduction. Once other less important factors affecting the rate of sulfate reduction have been considered, both the laboratory and field work in the present study show that the rate of organic matter decomposition via sulfate reduction is ultimately dependant on the quality and quantity of the organic matter undergoing decomposition. In order to quantify this widely accepted statement, a multiple, first-order rate equation for organic matter decomposition in marine sediments is developed and its validity proven by laboratory experiments. The salient feature of this model is developed and its validity proven by laboratory experiments. The salient feature of this model is the hypothesis that a finite number of organic matter types exist, each with their own particular decay constant. The significance of the different organic matter fractions in the model is discussed in terms of general models for organic matter diagenesis and preservation.

  3. An iterative algorithm combining model reduction and control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, C.; Kim, J. H.; Zhu, G.; Liu, K.; Skelton, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    A design strategy which integrates model reduction by modal cost analysis and a multiobjective controller design is proposed. The necessary modeling and control algorithms are easily programmed in Matlab standard software. Hence, this method is very practical for controller design for large space structures. The design algorithm also solves the very important problem of tuning multiple loop controllers (multi-input, multi-output, or MIMO). Instead of the single gain change that is used in standard root locus and gain and phase margin theories, this method tunes multiple loop controllers from low to high gain in a systematic way in the design procedure. This design strategy is applied to NASA's Mini-Mast system.

  4. An iterative algorithm combining model reduction and control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, C.; Kim, J. H.; Zhu, G.; Liu, K.; Skelton, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    A design strategy which integrates model reduction by modal cost analysis and a multiobjective controller design is proposed. The necessary modeling and control algorithms are easily programmed in Matlab standard software. Hence, this method is very practical for controller design for large space structures. The design algorithm also solves the very important problem of tuning multiple loop controllers (multi-input, multi-output, or MIMO). Instead of the single gain change that is used in standard root locus and gain and phase margin theories, this method tunes multiple loop controllers from low to high gain in a systematic way in the design procedure. This design strategy is applied to NASA's Mini-Mast system.

  5. Reduction of particle deposition on substrates using temperature gradient control

    DOEpatents

    Rader, Daniel J.; Dykhuizen, Ronald C.; Geller, Anthony S.

    2000-01-01

    A method of reducing particle deposition during the fabrication of microelectronic circuitry is presented. Reduction of particle deposition is accomplished by controlling the relative temperatures of various parts of the deposition system so that a large temperature gradient near the surface on which fabrication is taking place exists. This temperature gradient acts to repel particles from that surface, thereby producing cleaner surfaces, and thus obtaining higher yields from a given microelectronic fabrication process.

  6. Genetic control of the environmental variance for birth weight in seven generations of a divergent selection experiment in mice.

    PubMed

    Formoso-Rafferty, N; Cervantes, I; Ibáñez-Escriche, N; Gutiérrez, J P

    2016-06-01

    Data from seven generations of a divergent selection experiment designed for environmental variability of birth weight were analysed to estimate genetic parameters and to explore signs of selection response. A total of 10 783 birth weight records from 638 females and 1127 litters in combination with 10 007 pedigree records were used. Each record of birth weight was assigned to the mother of the pup in a heteroscedastic model, and after seven generations of selection, evidence of success in the selection process was shown. A Bayesian analysis showed that success of the selection process started from the first generation for birth weight and from the second generation for its environmental variability. Genetic parameters were estimated across generations. However, only from the third generation onwards were the records useful to consider the results to be reliable. The results showed a consistent positive and low genetic correlation between the birth weight trait and its environmental variability, which could allow an independent selection process. This study has demonstrated that the genetic control of the birth weight environmental variability is possible in mice. Nevertheless, before the results are applied directly in farm animals, it would be worth confirming any other implications on other important traits, such as robustness, longevity and welfare.

  7. An alternative method for noise analysis using pixel variance as part of quality control procedures on digital mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwman, R.; Young, K.; Lazzari, B.; Ravaglia, V.; Broeders, M.; van Engen, R.

    2009-11-01

    According to the European Guidelines for quality assured breast cancer screening and diagnosis, noise analysis is one of the measurements that needs to be performed as part of quality control procedures on digital mammography systems. However, the method recommended in the European Guidelines does not discriminate sufficiently between systems with and without additional noise besides quantum noise. This paper attempts to give an alternative and relatively simple method for noise analysis which can divide noise into electronic noise, structured noise and quantum noise. Quantum noise needs to be the dominant noise source in clinical images for optimal performance of a digital mammography system, and therefore the amount of electronic and structured noise should be minimal. For several digital mammography systems, the noise was separated into components based on the measured pixel value, standard deviation (SD) of the image and the detector entrance dose. The results showed that differences between systems exist. Our findings confirm that the proposed method is able to discriminate systems based on their noise performance and is able to detect possible quality problems. Therefore, we suggest to replace the current method for noise analysis as described in the European Guidelines by the alternative method described in this paper.

  8. A Cosmic Variance Cookbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2011-04-01

    Deep pencil beam surveys (<1 deg2) are of fundamental importance for studying the high-redshift universe. However, inferences about galaxy population properties (e.g., the abundance of objects) are in practice limited by "cosmic variance." This is the uncertainty in observational estimates of the number density of galaxies arising from the underlying large-scale density fluctuations. This source of uncertainty can be significant, especially for surveys which cover only small areas and for massive high-redshift galaxies. Cosmic variance for a given galaxy population can be determined using predictions from cold dark matter theory and the galaxy bias. In this paper, we provide tools for experiment design and interpretation. For a given survey geometry, we present the cosmic variance of dark matter as a function of mean redshift \\bar{z} and redshift bin size Δz. Using a halo occupation model to predict galaxy clustering, we derive the galaxy bias as a function of mean redshift for galaxy samples of a given stellar mass range. In the linear regime, the cosmic variance of these galaxy samples is the product of the galaxy bias and the dark matter cosmic variance. We present a simple recipe using a fitting function to compute cosmic variance as a function of the angular dimensions of the field, \\bar{z}, Δz, and stellar mass m *. We also provide tabulated values and a software tool. The accuracy of the resulting cosmic variance estimates (δσ v /σ v ) is shown to be better than 20%. We find that for GOODS at \\bar{z}=2 and with Δz = 0.5, the relative cosmic variance of galaxies with m *>1011 M sun is ~38%, while it is ~27% for GEMS and ~12% for COSMOS. For galaxies of m * ~ 1010 M sun, the relative cosmic variance is ~19% for GOODS, ~13% for GEMS, and ~6% for COSMOS. This implies that cosmic variance is a significant source of uncertainty at \\bar{z}=2 for small fields and massive galaxies, while for larger fields and intermediate mass galaxies, cosmic variance is

  9. A COSMIC VARIANCE COOKBOOK

    SciTech Connect

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Newman, Jeffrey A. E-mail: rix@mpia.de E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu

    2011-04-20

    Deep pencil beam surveys (<1 deg{sup 2}) are of fundamental importance for studying the high-redshift universe. However, inferences about galaxy population properties (e.g., the abundance of objects) are in practice limited by 'cosmic variance'. This is the uncertainty in observational estimates of the number density of galaxies arising from the underlying large-scale density fluctuations. This source of uncertainty can be significant, especially for surveys which cover only small areas and for massive high-redshift galaxies. Cosmic variance for a given galaxy population can be determined using predictions from cold dark matter theory and the galaxy bias. In this paper, we provide tools for experiment design and interpretation. For a given survey geometry, we present the cosmic variance of dark matter as a function of mean redshift z-bar and redshift bin size {Delta}z. Using a halo occupation model to predict galaxy clustering, we derive the galaxy bias as a function of mean redshift for galaxy samples of a given stellar mass range. In the linear regime, the cosmic variance of these galaxy samples is the product of the galaxy bias and the dark matter cosmic variance. We present a simple recipe using a fitting function to compute cosmic variance as a function of the angular dimensions of the field, z-bar , {Delta}z, and stellar mass m{sub *}. We also provide tabulated values and a software tool. The accuracy of the resulting cosmic variance estimates ({delta}{sigma}{sub v}/{sigma}{sub v}) is shown to be better than 20%. We find that for GOODS at z-bar =2 and with {Delta}z = 0.5, the relative cosmic variance of galaxies with m{sub *}>10{sup 11} M{sub sun} is {approx}38%, while it is {approx}27% for GEMS and {approx}12% for COSMOS. For galaxies of m{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, the relative cosmic variance is {approx}19% for GOODS, {approx}13% for GEMS, and {approx}6% for COSMOS. This implies that cosmic variance is a significant source of uncertainty at z

  10. Supersonic impinging jet noise reduction using a hybrid control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Alex; Kumar, Rajan

    2015-07-01

    Control of the highly resonant flowfield associated with supersonic impinging jet has been experimentally investigated. Measurements were made in the supersonic impinging jet facility at the Florida State University for a Mach 1.5 ideally expanded jet. Measurements included unsteady pressures on a surface plate near the nozzle exit, acoustics in the nearfield and beneath the impingement plane, and velocity field using particle image velocimetry. Both passive control using porous surface and active control with high momentum microjet injection are effective in reducing nearfield noise and flow unsteadiness over a range of geometrical parameters; however, the type of noise reduction achieved by the two techniques is different. The passive control reduces broadband noise whereas microjet injection attenuates high amplitude impinging tones. The hybrid control, a combination of two control methods, reduces both broadband and high amplitude impinging tones and surprisingly its effectiveness is more that the additive effect of the two control techniques. The flow field measurements show that with hybrid control the impinging jet is stabilized and the turbulence quantities such as streamwise turbulence intensity, transverse turbulence intensity and turbulent shear stress are significantly reduced.

  11. Integrated Model Reduction and Control of Aircraft with Flexible Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Zhu, Guoming G.; Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an integrated approach to the modeling and control of aircraft with exible wings. The coupled aircraft rigid body dynamics with a high-order elastic wing model can be represented in a nite dimensional state-space form. Given a set of desired output covariance, a model reduction process is performed by using the weighted Modal Cost Analysis (MCA). A dynamic output feedback controller, which is designed based on the reduced-order model, is developed by utilizing output covariance constraint (OCC) algorithm, and the resulting OCC design weighting matrix is used for the next iteration of the weighted cost analysis. This controller is then validated for full-order evaluation model to ensure that the aircraft's handling qualities are met and the uttering motion of the wings suppressed. An iterative algorithm is developed in CONDUIT environment to realize the integration of model reduction and controller design. The proposed integrated approach is applied to NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) for demonstration.

  12. New plant and controller order reduction results with weighted balancing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Brett; Schmidt, David K.

    1991-01-01

    A frequency-response error analysis for frequency-weighted internally balanced (FWIB) truncation is extended and an exact error bound for a case of order reduction by one state is presented. An approximate error bound for a general case of order reduction by more than one state, assuming that only small controllability-observability measures are truncated, is considered. FWIB residualization is presented, and it is shown that a frequency-response error analysis yields results similar to those found for FWIB truncation. It is concluded that FWIB truncation and residualization can be used in a coordinated manner consistent with classical truncation and residualization in order to obtain accuracy higher than that possible from either technique used alone.

  13. Possibilities for drag reduction by boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, I.

    1946-01-01

    The mechanics of laminar boundary layer transition are reviewed. Drag possibilities for boundary layer control are analyzed using assumed conditions of transition Reynolds number, inlet loss, number of slots, blower efficiency, and duct losses. Although the results of such analysis are highly favorable, those obtained by experimental investigations yield conflicting results, showing only small gains, and sometimes losses. Reduction of this data indicates that there is a lower limit to the quantity of air which must be removed at the slot in order to stabilize the laminar flow. The removal of insufficient air permits transition to occur while the removal of excessive amounts of air results in high power costs, with a net drag increases. With the estimated value of flow coefficient and duct losses equal to half the dynamic pressure, drag reductions of 50% may be obtained; with twice this flow coefficient, the drag saving is reduced to 25%.

  14. Responsible and controlled use: Older cannabis users and harm reduction

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Nicholas; Sales, Paloma; Averill, Sheigla; Murphy, Fiona; Sato, Sye-Ok; Murphy, Sheigla

    2015-01-01

    Background Cannabis use is becoming more accepted in mainstream society. In this paper, we use Zinberg’s classic theoretical framework of drug, set, and setting to elucidate how older adult cannabis users managed health, social and legal risks in a context of normalized cannabis use. Methods We present selected findings from our qualitative study of Baby Boomer (born 1946–1964) cannabis users in the San Francisco Bay Area. Data collection consisted of a recorded, in-depth life history interview followed by a questionnaire and health survey. Qualitative interviews were analyzed to discover the factors of cannabis harm reduction from the users’ perspectives. Results Interviewees made harm reduction choices based on preferred cannabis derivatives and routes of administration, as well as why, when, where, and with whom to use. Most interviewees minimized cannabis-related harms so they could maintain social functioning in their everyday lives. Responsible and controlled use was described as moderation of quantity and frequency of cannabis used, using in appropriate settings, and respect for non-users. Users contributed to the normalization of cannabis use through normification. Conclusion Participants followed rituals or cultural practices, characterized by sanctions that helped define “normal” or “acceptable” cannabis use. Users contributed to cannabis normalization through their harm reduction methods. These cultural practices may prove to be more effective than formal legal prohibitions in reducing cannabis-related harms. Findings also suggest that users with access to a regulated market (medical cannabis dispensaries) were better equipped to practice harm reduction. More research is needed on both cannabis culture and alternative routes of administration as harm reduction methods. PMID:25911027

  15. Responsible and controlled use: Older cannabis users and harm reduction.

    PubMed

    Lau, Nicholas; Sales, Paloma; Averill, Sheigla; Murphy, Fiona; Sato, Sye-Ok; Murphy, Sheigla

    2015-08-01

    Cannabis use is becoming more accepted in mainstream society. In this paper, we use Zinberg's classic theoretical framework of drug, set, and setting to elucidate how older adult cannabis users managed health, social and legal risks in a context of normalized cannabis use. We present selected findings from our qualitative study of Baby Boomer (born 1946-1964) cannabis users in the San Francisco Bay Area. Data collection consisted of a recorded, in-depth life history interview followed by a questionnaire and health survey. Qualitative interviews were analyzed to discover the factors of cannabis harm reduction from the users' perspectives. Interviewees made harm reduction choices based on preferred cannabis derivatives and routes of administration, as well as why, when, where, and with whom to use. Most interviewees minimized cannabis-related harms so they could maintain social functioning in their everyday lives. Responsible and controlled use was described as moderation of quantity and frequency of cannabis used, using in appropriate settings, and respect for non-users. Users contributed to the normalization of cannabis use through normification. Participants followed rituals or cultural practices, characterized by sanctions that helped define "normal" or "acceptable" cannabis use. Users contributed to cannabis normalization through their harm reduction methods. These cultural practices may prove to be more effective than formal legal prohibitions in reducing cannabis-related harms. Findings also suggest that users with access to a regulated market (medical cannabis dispensaries) were better equipped to practice harm reduction. More research is needed on both cannabis culture and alternative routes of administration as harm reduction methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Closed-loop stability and performance analysis of least-squares and minimum-variance control algorithms for multiconjugate adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Luc

    2005-02-20

    Recent progress has been made to compute efficiently the open-loop minimum-variance reconstructor (MVR) for multiconjugate adaptive optics systems by a combination of sparse matrix and iterative techniques. Using spectral analysis, I show that a closed-loop laser guide star multiconjugate adaptive optics control algorithm consisting of MVR cascaded with an integrator control law is unstable. Tosolve this problem, a computationally efficient pseudo-open-loop control (POLC) method was recently proposed. I give a theoretical proof of the stability of this method and demonstrate its superior performance and robustness against misregistration errors compared with conventional least-squares control. This can be accounted for by the fact that POLC incorporates turbulence statistics through its regularization term that can be interpreted as spatial filtering, yielding increased robustness to misregistration. For the Gemini-South 8-m telescope multiconjugate system and for median Cerro Pachon seeing, the performance of POLC in terms of rms wave-front error averaged over a 1-arc min field of view is approximately three times superior to that of a least-squares reconstructor. Performance degradation due to 30% translational misregistration on all three mirrors is approximately a 30% increased rms wave-front error, whereas a least-squares reconstructor is unstable at such a misregistration level.

  17. Biogeochemical controls on interactions of microbial iron and sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M. F.; Paper, J. M.; Haller, B. R.; Shodunke, G. O.; Marquart, K. A.; Jin, Q.

    2016-12-01

    Although iron and sulfate reduction are two of the most common microbial electron accepting processes in anoxic settings, the relative influences of environmental factors that guide interactions between each are poorly known. Identifying these factors is a key to predicting how those interactions will respond to future environmental changes. In this study, we used semi-continuous bioreactors to examine the influence of pH, electron donor flux, and sulfate availability. The reactors contained 100 mL of aqueous media and 1 g of marsh sediment amended with goethite (1 mmol). One set of reactors received acidic media (pH 6) while the other set received alkaline media (pH 7.5). Media for both sets of reactors included acetate (0.25 and 1 mM), which served as an electron donor, and sulfate (2.5 mM). We also included sets of sulfate-deficient and acetate-deficient control reactors. We maintained a fluid residence time of 35 days in the reactors by sampling and feeding them every seven days during the 91-day incubation. Our results show that, under the conditions tested, pH had a larger influence on the balance between each reaction than acetate concentration. In acidic reactors, the molar amount of iron reduced exceeded the amount of sulfate reduced by a factor of 3 in reactors receiving media with 0 and 0.25 mM acetate and a factor of 2 in reactors receiving 1 mM acetate. Under alkaline conditions, iron and sulfate were reduced in nearly equal proportions, regardless of influent acetate concentration. Results from sulfate-deficient control reactors show that the presence of sulfate reduction increased the extent of iron reduction in all reactors, but particularly those with alkaline pH. Under acidic conditions, the amount of iron reduced was greater by a factor of 1.2 if sulfate reduction occurred simultaneously than if it did not. Under alkaline conditions, that factor increased to 8.2. Hence, pH influenced the extent to which sulfate reduction promoted iron reduction.

  18. Reduction of wind tunnel wall interference by controlled wall flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, S. (Editor); Joppa, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    An alternate method of testing was developed in which flow through the porous walls of the tunnel was actively controlled so as to approximate free air conditions in the neighborhood of the model during the test. The amount and distribution of the controlled flow through the walls is computed using a potential flow representation of the model based on the measured lift. Theoretical analysis is presented to prove the convergence of the method to free air conditions and to substantiate the general three-dimensional theory of operation when the normal flow distribution is continuous. A two-dimensional tunnel was constructed to evaluate the concept. Results show that substantial reduction of wall interference may be achieved with relatively low values of porosity of actively controlled walls.

  19. Reduction of propeller noise by active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bschorr, O.; Kubanke, D.

    1992-04-01

    Active noise control, a method of cancelling noise by means of interference with a secondary anti-noise source, is now in full development. The first commercial application of this technique is in the case of active electronically controlled head sets. The next step will be the active noise cancellation in air ducts and in passenger cabins. The aim of this paper is to assess the possibilities of the anti-noise technique for reducing propeller noise. First, by a mathematical simulation the theoretical noise reduction on the ground was calculated and found to be promising for further investigations. In the case of the periodic engine and propeller noise, for example, with only a single anti-noise source, the noise foot prints of the lower propeller harmonics can be reduced by up to 10 dB. In laboratory tests the theoretical values will be confirmed experimentally. For cancellation of the periodic noise one can use synchronous anti-noise generators. Compared with the engine and propeller noise the reduction of jet noise by the anti-noise technique is much more difficult. Therefore a sensor and controlling unit are necessary because of the stochastic nature of jet noise. Since aircraft noise is a severe problem, all methods are to be considered.

  20. [Reduction of juvenile obesity by programmed physical exercise and controlled diet].

    PubMed

    Sente, Jelena; Jakonić, Dragoslav; Smajić, Miroslav; Mihajlović, Ilona; Vasić, Goran; Romanov, Romana; Marić, Lela

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is the most common disease of nutrition and is the consequence of reduced movement. Unfortunately, this problem is increasingly present in juvenile age, so that the pediatric outpatient offices are dominated by obese young people. The aim of this study was to evaluate and quantify the effects of the reducing treatment for juvenile obesity conducted by programmed physical exercise and controlled diet. We tested a sample of 136 respondents of both sexes (76 girls and 60 boys) aged 13 +/- 0.6 years. This prospective study took 3 months in 2007 using the experimental methods of longitudinal weather precision. The data obtained after the measurement were processed by the use of statistical programs to calculate the basic and dispersion parameters. To determine the difference between the initial and final measurements we applied the univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) and differences in the variables system in the space were determined by multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). The results of ANOVA in the form of F values indicated that the differences between the initial and final measurements in all parameters of circumference dimensionality and subcutaneous fat tissue are significant (p = 0.00). Also, differences in parameters of body constitution and indicators of alimentation showed a high statistical significance (p = 0.00). The results of multivariante analysis (MANOVA), using Wilk's Lambda test, also indicated that the differences between initial and final measurements in the area of anthropometric measures and indicators of alimentation and constitution, were statistically significant (p = 0.00). Application of physical exercise and controlled diet leads to a significant reduction of anthropometric parameters and anthropological indicators of alimentation.

  1. VPSim: Variance propagation by simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.; Coulter, C.A.; Prommel, J.

    1997-12-01

    One of the fundamental concepts in a materials control and accountability system for nuclear safeguards is the materials balance (MB). All transfers into and out of a material balance area are measured, as are the beginning and ending inventories. The resulting MB measures the material loss, MB = T{sub in} + I{sub B} {minus} T{sub out} {minus} I{sub E}. To interpret the MB, the authors must estimate its measurement error standard deviation, {sigma}{sub MB}. When feasible, they use a method usually known as propagation of variance (POV) to estimate {sigma}{sub MB}. The application of POV for estimating the measurement error variance of an MB is straightforward but tedious. By applying POV to individual measurement error standard deviations they can estimate {sigma}{sub MB} (or more generally, they can estimate the variance-covariance matrix, {Sigma}, of a sequence of MBs). This report describes a new computer program (VPSim) that uses simulation to estimate the {Sigma} matrix of a sequence of MBs. Given the proper input data, VPSim calculates the MB and {sigma}{sub MB}, or calculates a sequence of n MBs and the associated n-by-n covariance matrix, {Sigma}. The covariance matrix, {Sigma}, contains the variance of each MB in the diagonal entries and the covariance between pairs of MBs in the off-diagonal entries.

  2. Space Technology 7 Disturbance Reduction System - precision control flight Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmain, Andrew J.; Dunn, Charles; Folkner, William; Hruby, Vlad; Spence, Doug; O'Donnell, James; Markley, Landis; Maghami, Peiman; Hsu, Oscar; Demmons, N.; hide

    2005-01-01

    The NASA New Millennium Program Space Technology 7 (ST7) project will validate technology for precision spacecraft control. The Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) will be part of the European Space Agency's LISA Pathfinder project. The DRS will control the position of the spacecraft relative to a reference to an accuracy of one nanometer over time scales of several thousand seconds. To perform the control, the spacecraft will use a new colloid thruster technology. The thrusters will operate over the range of 5 to 30 micro-Newtons with precision of 0.1 micro- Newton. The thrust will be generated by using a high electric field to extract charged droplets of a conducting colloid fluid and accelerating them with a precisely adjustable voltage. The control reference will be provided by the European LISA Technology Package, which will include two nearly freefloating test masses. The test mass positions and orientations will be measured using a capacitance bridge. The test mass position and attitude will be adjustable using electrostatically applied forces and torques. The DRS will control the spacecraft position with respect to one test mass while minimizing disturbances on the second test mass. The dynamic control system will cover eighteen degrees of freedom: six for each of the test masses and six for the spacecraft. After launch in late 2009 to a low Earth orbit, the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft will be maneuvered to a halo orbit about the Earth-Sun L1 Lagrange point for operations.

  3. Space Technology 7 Disturbance Reduction System - precision control flight Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmain, Andrew J.; Dunn, Charles; Folkner, William; Hruby, Vlad; Spence, Doug; O'Donnell, James; Markley, Landis; Maghami, Peiman; Hsu, Oscar; Demmons, N.; Roy, T.; Gasdaska, C.; Young, J.; Connolly, W.; McCormick, R.; Gasdaska, C.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA New Millennium Program Space Technology 7 (ST7) project will validate technology for precision spacecraft control. The Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) will be part of the European Space Agency's LISA Pathfinder project. The DRS will control the position of the spacecraft relative to a reference to an accuracy of one nanometer over time scales of several thousand seconds. To perform the control, the spacecraft will use a new colloid thruster technology. The thrusters will operate over the range of 5 to 30 micro-Newtons with precision of 0.1 micro- Newton. The thrust will be generated by using a high electric field to extract charged droplets of a conducting colloid fluid and accelerating them with a precisely adjustable voltage. The control reference will be provided by the European LISA Technology Package, which will include two nearly freefloating test masses. The test mass positions and orientations will be measured using a capacitance bridge. The test mass position and attitude will be adjustable using electrostatically applied forces and torques. The DRS will control the spacecraft position with respect to one test mass while minimizing disturbances on the second test mass. The dynamic control system will cover eighteen degrees of freedom: six for each of the test masses and six for the spacecraft. After launch in late 2009 to a low Earth orbit, the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft will be maneuvered to a halo orbit about the Earth-Sun L1 Lagrange point for operations.

  4. Dose reduction in pediatric computed tomography with automated exposure control.

    PubMed

    Alibek, Sedat; Brand, Martin; Suess, Christoph; Wuest, Wolfgang; Uder, Michael; Greess, Holger

    2011-06-01

    Since the introduction of computed tomographic (CT) imaging in the 1970s, the number of examinations has increased steadily. CT imaging is an essential part of routine workup in diagnostic radiology. The great advantage of multidetector computed tomography is the acquisition of a large amount of data in a short time period, thus speeding up diagnostic procedures. To protect patients from unnecessary radiation exposure, different approaches have been developed. In this study, the efficacy of automated exposure control (AEC) software in multidetector CT imaging with a focus on dose reduction in pediatric examinations was assessed. Between August 2004 and September 2005, a total of 71 children (40 male, 31 female; age range, 2-13 years; mean age, 7.2 years) were examined using a multisource CT scanner. Three different regions (chest, upper abdomen, and pelvis) were examined. Overall image quality was assessed with a subjective scale (1 = excellent, 2 = diagnostic, 3 = nondiagnostic). For all examinations, AEC was used. From the scanner's patient protocol, dose-length product, volume CT dose index, and tube current-time product were calculated for each examination. With AEC, a mean dose reduction of 30.6% was calculated. Images were rated as excellent (n = 39) or diagnostic (n = 32). Nondiagnostic image quality was not seen. Dose-length product and volume CT dose index were reduced by 30.4% and 29.5%, respectively. Overall, a mean dose reduction of 30.1% of the effective dose (5.8 ± 3.1 vs 8.4 ± 4.6 mSv) was achieved (P < .001). With AEC software, a mean dose reduction of 30% without any loss in diagnostic image quality is possible. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The quantum Allan variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabuda, Krzysztof; Leroux, Ian D.; Demkowicz-Dobrzański, Rafał

    2016-08-01

    The instability of an atomic clock is characterized by the Allan variance, a measure widely used to describe the noise of frequency standards. We provide an explicit method to find the ultimate bound on the Allan variance of an atomic clock in the most general scenario where N atoms are prepared in an arbitrarily entangled state and arbitrary measurement and feedback are allowed, including those exploiting coherences between succeeding interrogation steps. While the method is rigorous and general, it becomes numerically challenging for large N and long averaging times.

  6. Quality control by cocaine users: underdeveloped harm reduction strategies.

    PubMed

    Decorte, T

    2001-12-01

    The use of any drug involves both values and rules of conduct (social sanctions) and patterns of behavior (social rituals). Based on an ethnographic study (1996-1999) among 111 cocaine users from the metropolitan area of Antwerp (Belgium), the self-regulatory mechanisms surrounding the methods of controlling the quality of a drug are described. Users' perceptions of reliable and unreliable sources of cocaine, quality and adulteration of cocaine and quality control techniques are confronted with objective information. It is argued that these informal control mechanisms may be crucial factors in the controlled use of any intoxicant, but myths are an important ingredient of the observed rituals, which indicates that knowledge about certain drugs and the best ways to use them in a safe way is still underdeveloped. Users are left to their own folk-experimental devices for testing tools or techniques, and many aspects of the natural processes of social learning are generally not based on objective information. Future harm reduction interventions should therefore also stimulate the development and dissemination of effective informal control mechanisms among illicit drug users. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Spatiotemporal control to eliminate cardiac alternans using isostable reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2017-03-01

    Cardiac alternans, an arrhythmia characterized by a beat-to-beat alternation of cardiac action potential durations, is widely believed to facilitate the transition from normal cardiac function to ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Alternans arises due to an instability of a healthy period-1 rhythm, and most dynamical control strategies either require extensive knowledge of the cardiac system, making experimental validation difficult, or are model independent and sacrifice important information about the specific system under study. Isostable reduction provides an alternative approach, in which the response of a system to external perturbations can be used to reduce the complexity of a cardiac system, making it easier to work with from an analytical perspective while retaining many of its important features. Here, we use isostable reduction strategies to reduce the complexity of partial differential equation models of cardiac systems in order to develop energy optimal strategies for the elimination of alternans. Resulting control strategies require significantly less energy to terminate alternans than comparable strategies and do not require continuous state feedback.

  8. Conversations across Meaning Variance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Progressive interpretations of scientific theories have long been denounced as naive, because of the inescapability of meaning variance. The charge reportedly applies to recent realist moves that focus on theory-parts rather than whole theories. This paper considers the question of what "theory-parts" of epistemic significance (if any) relevantly…

  9. Conversations across Meaning Variance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Progressive interpretations of scientific theories have long been denounced as naive, because of the inescapability of meaning variance. The charge reportedly applies to recent realist moves that focus on theory-parts rather than whole theories. This paper considers the question of what "theory-parts" of epistemic significance (if any) relevantly…

  10. Naive Analysis of Variance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, W. John

    2012-01-01

    The Analysis of Variance is often taught in introductory statistics courses, but it is not clear that students really understand the method. This is because the derivation of the test statistic and p-value requires a relatively sophisticated mathematical background which may not be well-remembered or understood. Thus, the essential concept behind…

  11. Minimum variance geographic sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, G. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Resource inventories require samples with geographical scatter, sometimes not as widely spaced as would be hoped. A simple model of correlation over distances is used to create a minimum variance unbiased estimate population means. The fitting procedure is illustrated from data used to estimate Missouri corn acreage.

  12. A combined model reduction algorithm for controlled biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Thomas J; van der Graaf, Piet H; Tindall, Marcus J

    2017-02-13

    Systems Biology continues to produce increasingly large models of complex biochemical reaction networks. In applications requiring, for example, parameter estimation, the use of agent-based modelling approaches, or real-time simulation, this growing model complexity can present a significant hurdle. Often, however, not all portions of a model are of equal interest in a given setting. In such situations methods of model reduction offer one possible approach for addressing the issue of complexity by seeking to eliminate those portions of a pathway that can be shown to have the least effect upon the properties of interest. In this paper a model reduction algorithm bringing together the complementary aspects of proper lumping and empirical balanced truncation is presented. Additional contributions include the development of a criterion for the selection of state-variable elimination via conservation analysis and use of an 'averaged' lumping inverse. This combined algorithm is highly automatable and of particular applicability in the context of 'controlled' biochemical networks. The algorithm is demonstrated here via application to two examples; an 11 dimensional model of bacterial chemotaxis in Escherichia coli and a 99 dimensional model of extracellular regulatory kinase activation (ERK) mediated via the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor pathways. In the case of the chemotaxis model the algorithm was able to reduce the model to 2 state-variables producing a maximal relative error between the dynamics of the original and reduced models of only 2.8% whilst yielding a 26 fold speed up in simulation time. For the ERK activation model the algorithm was able to reduce the system to 7 state-variables, incurring a maximal relative error of 4.8%, and producing an approximately 10 fold speed up in the rate of simulation. Indices of controllability and observability are additionally developed and demonstrated throughout the paper. These provide

  13. Multivariable frequency weighted model order reduction for control synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, David K.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative criteria are presented for model simplification, or order reduction, such that the reduced order model may be used to synthesize and evaluate a control law, and the stability robustness obtained using the reduced order model will be preserved when controlling the full-order system. The error introduced due to model simplification is treated as modeling uncertainty, and some of the results from multivariate robustness theory are brought to bear on the model simplification problem. A numerical procedure developed previously is shown to lead to results that meet the necessary criteria. The procedure is applied to reduce the model of a flexible aircraft. Also, the importance of the control law itself, in meeting the modeling criteria, is underscored. An example is included that demonstrates that an apparently robust control law actually amplifies modest modeling errors in the critical frequency region, and leads to undesirable results. The cause of this problem is associated with the canceling of lightly damped transmission zeroes in the plant. An attempt is made to expand on some of the earlier results and to further clarify the theoretical basis behind the proposed methodology.

  14. Automated Boiler Combustion Controls for Emission Reduction and Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-12-02

    In the late 1980s, then President Bush visited Krakow, Poland. The terrible air quality theremotivated him to initiate a USAID-funded program, managed by DOE, entitled "Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program." The primary objective of this program was to encourage the formation of commercial ventures between U.S. and Polish firms to provide equipment and/or services to reduce pollution from low-emission sources in Krakow, Poland. This program led to the award of a number of cooperative agreements, including one to Control Techtronics International. The technical objective of CTI's cooperative agreement is to apply combustion controls to existing boiler plants in Krakow and transfer knowledge and technology through a joint U.S. and Polish commercial venture. CTI installed automatic combustion controls on five coal boilers for the district heating system in Krakow. Three of these were for domestic hot-water boilers, and two were for steam for industrial boilers. The following results have occurred due to the addition of CTI's combustion controls on these five existing boilers: ! 25% energy savings ! 85% reduction in particulate emissions The joint venture company CTI-Polska was then established. Eleven additional technical and costing proposals were initiated to upgrade other coal boilers in Krakow. To date, no co-financing has been made available on the Polish side. CTI-Polska continues in operation, serving customers in Russia and Ukraine. Should the market in Poland materialize, the joint venture company is established there to provide equipment and service.

  15. INDUSTRIAL BOILER RETROFIT FOR NOX CONTROL: COMBINED SELECTIVE NONCATALYTIC REDUCTION AND SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes retrofitting and testing a 590 kW (2 MBtu/hr), oil-fired, three-pass, fire-tube package boiler with a combined selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. The system demonstrated 85% nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduction w...

  16. INDUSTRIAL BOILER RETROFIT FOR NOX CONTROL: COMBINED SELECTIVE NONCATALYTIC REDUCTION AND SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes retrofitting and testing a 590 kW (2 MBtu/hr), oil-fired, three-pass, fire-tube package boiler with a combined selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. The system demonstrated 85% nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduction w...

  17. Controller Design for the ST7 Disturbance Reduction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peiman; Markley, F. Landis; Dennehey, Neil; Houghton, Martin B.; Folkner, William M.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Space Technology 7 experiment will perform an on-orbit system-level validation of two specific Disturbance Reduction System technologies: a gravitational reference sensor employing a free-floating test mass and a set of micro-Newton colloidal thrusters. The Disturbance Reduction System is designed to maintain a spacecraft's position with respect to the free-floating test mass to less than 10 nm/ square root of Hz, over the frequency range 10(exp -3) Hz to 10(exp -2) Hz. This paper presents the design and analysis of the coupled drag-free and attitude control system that closes the loop between the gravitational reference sensor and the micro-Newton thrusters while incorporating star tracker data at low frequencies. The effects of actuation and measurement noise and disturbances on the spacecraft and test masses are evaluated in a seven-degree-of-freedom planar model incorporating two translational and one rotational degrees of freedom for the spacecraft and two translational degrees of freedom for each test mass.

  18. Dimensionality reduction in control and coordination of the human hand.

    PubMed

    Vinjamuri, Ramana; Sun, Mingui; Chang, Cheng-Chun; Lee, Heung-No; Sclabassi, Robert J; Mao, Zhi-Hong

    2010-02-01

    The concept of kinematic synergies is proposed to address the dimensionality reduction problem in control and coordination of the human hand. This paper develops a method for extracting kinematic synergies from joint-angular-velocity profiles of hand movements. Decomposition of a limited set of synergies from numerous movements is a complex optimization problem. This paper splits the decomposition process into two stages. The first stage is to extract synergies from rapid movement tasks using singular value decomposition (SVD). A bank of template functions is then created from shifted versions of the extracted synergies. The second stage is to find weights and onset times of the synergies based on l(1) -minimization, whose solutions provide sparse representations of hand movements using synergies.

  19. Active control for drag reduction in turbulent channel flow: the opposition control schemes revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin-Shan; Huang, Wei-Xi; Xu, Chun-Xiao

    2016-10-01

    The opposition control schemes first proposed by Choi et al (1994 J. Fluid Mech. 262 75) employing wall-normal (v) and spanwise (w) velocity are revisited in the present study by performing direct numerical simulation to turbulent channel flow at R{e}τ = 180. Special attention is paid to the combined control, in which the wall-normal and spanwise velocities are imposed at the wall just instantaneously opposite to those at a small distance to the wall. In comparison to the v- and w-controls, combined-control could achieve the best drag reduction rate and control efficiency, with the greatest suppression of turbulence intensities. The influence of control on the statistical properties of vortices is scrutinized. By control, the numbers of vortices with every circulation and radius apparently decrease at the same normal location near the wall, while the vortex radius scaled by the actual wall-friction velocity almost remains the same. The streamwise vortices and the induced Reynolds shear stress undergo the greatest suppression by combined control. It is shown that combined control achieves a better efficacy, attributed to the co-work of the mechanisms of the v- and w-controls. At a higher Reynolds number R{e}τ = 1000, combined control is also more effective than v- and w-controls. The better suppression effect on the outer large scales is the primary reason for the larger drag reduction rate in combined control.

  20. Spectral Ambiguity of Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    We study the extent to which knowledge of Allan variance and other finite-difference variances determines the spectrum of a random process. The variance of first differences is known to determine the spectrum. We show that, in general, the Allan variance does not. A complete description of the ambiguity is given.

  1. Variance, Genetic Control, and Spatial Phenotypic Plasticity of Morphological and Phenological Traits in Prunus spinosa and Its Large Fruited Forms (P. x fruticans)

    PubMed Central

    Vander Mijnsbrugge, Kristine; Turcsán, Arion; Depypere, Leander; Steenackers, Marijke

    2016-01-01

    growth site with the shortest growing season while interestingly, the leaf width was enlarged. Leaf size traits appeared more plastic on the long shoots compared to the short shoots, although partitioning of variance did not display a lesser genetic control. PMID:27857718

  2. Reduction and reconstruction methods for simulation and control of fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhanhua

    In this thesis we develop model reduction/reconstruction methods that are applied to simulation and control of fluids. In the first part of the thesis, we focus on development of dimension reduction methods that compute reduced-order models (at the order of 101˜2) of systems with high-dimensional states (at the order of 105˜8) that are typical in computational fluid dynamics. The reduced-order models are then used for feedback control design for the full systems, as the control design tools are usually applicable only to systems of order up to 10 4. First, we show that a widely-used model reduction method for stable linear timeinvariant (LTI) systems, the approximate balanced truncation method (also called balanced POD), yields identical reduced-order models as Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), a well-known method in system identification. Unlike ERA, Balanced POD generates sets of modes that are useful in controller/observer design and systems analysis. On the other hand, ERA is more computationally efficient and does not need data from adjoint systems, which cannot be constructed in experiments and are often costly to construct and simulate numerically. The equivalence of ERA and balanced POD leads us to further design a version of ERA that works for unstable (linear) systems with one-dimensional unstable eigenspace and is equivalent to a recently developed version of balanced POD for unstable systems. We consider further generalization of balanced POD/ERA methods for linearized time-periodic systems around an unstable orbit. Four algorithms are presented: the lifted balanced POD/lifted ERA and the periodic balanced POD/periodic ERA. The lifting approach generates a LTI reduced-order model that updates the system once every period, and the periodic approach generates a periodic reduced-order model. By construction the lifted ERA is the most computationally efficient algorithm and it does not need adjoint data. By removing periodicity in periodic balanced

  3. Adaptive control of an active seat for occupant vibration reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Zengkang; Hillis, Andrew J.; Darling, Jocelyn

    2015-08-01

    The harmful effects on human performance and health caused by unwanted vibration from vehicle seats are of increasing concern. This paper presents an active seat system to reduce the vibration level transmitted to the seat pan and the occupants' body under low frequency periodic excitation. Firstly, the detail of the mechanical structure is given and the active seat dynamics without external load are characterized by vibration transmissibility and frequency responses under different excitation forces. Owing the nonlinear and time-varying behaviour of the proposed system, a Filtered-x least-mean-square (FXLMS) adaptive control algorithm with on-line Fast-block LMS (FBLMS) identification process is employed to manage the system operation for high vibration cancellation performance. The effectiveness of the active seat system is assessed through real-time experimental tests using different excitation profiles. The system identification results show that an accurate estimation of the secondary path is achieved by using the FBLMS on-line technique. Substantial reduction is found for cancelling periodic vibration containing single and multiple frequencies. Additionally, the robustness and stability of the control system are validated through transient switching frequency tests.

  4. A cooperative reduction model for regional air pollution control in China that considers adverse health effects and pollutant reduction costs.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yujing; Zhao, Laijun; Xue, Jian; Hu, Qingmi; Xu, Xiang; Wang, Hongbo

    2016-12-15

    How to effectively control severe regional air pollution has become a focus of global concern recently. The non-cooperative reduction model (NCRM) is still the main air pollution control pattern in China, but it is both ineffective and costly, because each province must independently fight air pollution. Thus, we proposed a cooperative reduction model (CRM), with the goal of maximizing the reduction in adverse health effects (AHEs) at the lowest cost by encouraging neighboring areas to jointly control air pollution. CRM has two parts: a model of optimal pollutant removal rates using two optimization objectives (maximizing the reduction in AHEs and minimizing pollutant reduction cost) while meeting the regional pollution control targets set by the central government, and a model that allocates the cooperation benefits (i.e., health improvement and cost reduction) among the participants according to their contributions using the Shapley value method. We applied CRM to the case of sulfur dioxide (SO2) reduction in Yangtze River Delta region. Based on data from 2003 to 2013, and using mortality due to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases as the health endpoints, CRM saves 437 more lives than NCRM, amounting to 12.1% of the reduction under NCRM. CRM also reduced costs by US $65.8×10(6) compared with NCRM, which is 5.2% of the total cost of NCRM. Thus, CRM performs significantly better than NCRM. Each province obtains significant benefits from cooperation, which can motivate them to actively cooperate in the long term. A sensitivity analysis was performed to quantify the effects of parameter values on the cooperation benefits. Results shown that the CRM is not sensitive to the changes in each province's pollutant carrying capacity and the minimum pollutant removal capacity, but sensitive to the maximum pollutant reduction capacity. Moreover, higher cooperation benefits will be generated when a province's maximum pollutant reduction capacity increases.

  5. The clinical evaluation of International Normalized Ratio variability and control in conventional oral anticoagulant administration by use of the variance growth rate.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, S; Jespersen, J; Poller, L

    2013-08-01

    The time in target International Normalized Ratio (INR) range (TIR) is used to assess the control and intensity of oral anticoagulation, but it does not measure variation in the INR. The value of assessing INR variability by use of the variance growth rate (VGR) as a predictor of events was investigated in patients treated with warfarin. Three different methods of VGR determination (A, B1, and B2) together with the TIR were studied. Method A measures both INR variability and control, but methods B1 and B2 measure variability only. The VGR and TIR were determined over three time periods: overall follow-up to an event, and 6 months and 3 months before an event. Six hundred and sixty-one control patients were matched to 158 cases (bleeding, thromboembolism, or death). With all VGR methods, the risk of an event was greater in unstable patients at 6 months before an event than in stable patients. Method A demonstrated the greatest risk 3 months before an event in the unstable VGR group as compared with the stable group (odds ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.9-5.7, P < 0.005). The risk of an event was 1.9 times greater in patients with a low TIR (< 39%) than in those with a high TIR (> 80%) in the 3-month period (P = 0.02). Risk of bleeding was significantly greater in the 3-month period in patients with unstable VGR, with the greatest risk found with method B2 (P < 0.01). Patients with unstable anticoagulation have a significantly increased risk of 'clinical events' at 3 and 6 months before an event. The VGR can be incorporated into computer-dosage programs, and may offer additional safety when oral anticoagulation is monitored. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  6. Nominal analysis of "variance".

    PubMed

    Weiss, David J

    2009-08-01

    Nominal responses are the natural way for people to report actions or opinions. Because nominal responses do not generate numerical data, they have been underutilized in behavioral research. On those occasions in which nominal responses are elicited, the responses are customarily aggregated over people or trials so that large-sample statistics can be employed. A new analysis is proposed that directly associates differences among responses with particular sources in factorial designs. A pair of nominal responses either matches or does not; when responses do not match, they vary. That analogue to variance is incorporated in the nominal analysis of "variance" (NANOVA) procedure, wherein the proportions of matches associated with sources play the same role as do sums of squares in an ANOVA. The NANOVA table is structured like an ANOVA table. The significance levels of the N ratios formed by comparing proportions are determined by resampling. Fictitious behavioral examples featuring independent groups and repeated measures designs are presented. A Windows program for the analysis is available.

  7. 40 CFR 52.1390 - Missoula variance provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provision. The Missoula City-County Air Pollution Control Program's Chapter X, Variances, which was adopted... with section 110(i) of the Clean Air Act, which prohibits any State or EPA from granting a variance...

  8. 40 CFR 52.1390 - Missoula variance provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provision. The Missoula City-County Air Pollution Control Program's Chapter X, Variances, which was adopted... with section 110(i) of the Clean Air Act, which prohibits any State or EPA from granting a variance...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1390 - Missoula variance provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provision. The Missoula City-County Air Pollution Control Program's Chapter X, Variances, which was adopted... with section 110(i) of the Clean Air Act, which prohibits any State or EPA from granting a variance...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1390 - Missoula variance provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provision. The Missoula City-County Air Pollution Control Program's Chapter X, Variances, which was adopted... with section 110(i) of the Clean Air Act, which prohibits any State or EPA from granting a variance...

  11. [Reduction and control of school bullying is urgently needed].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y J; Wang, S Y

    2017-03-10

    School bullying and campus violence is a widespread social problem in the world. School bullying is characterized by its repeatability and suddenness, which could make the victims suffering from both psychological and health damage, and even affect their personality growth. Government should pay close attention to the reduction and control of school bullying and campus violence by establishing school bullying emergency response system and preparedness plan. The school and teacher's role and legal responsibility in the service and management in schools should be cleared and defined. It is necessary to help teachers conduct early detection and intervention for school bullying, conduct morality, mental health and legal educations in students to teach them to act according to the law and protect themselves according to the law and help them identify and avoid risks, encourage the establishment of rescue facility and web of anti-school bullying by non-government organizations, and set hotline for school bullying incident to reduce the incidence of school bullying.

  12. Launch Control System Master Console Event Message Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Uyen

    2014-01-01

    System monitoring and control (SMC) message browsers receive so many messages daily that operators do not need to see. Important messages are often mixed up among the less important ones. My job is to reduce the messages displayed in the message browser so that warning and emergency messages can be seen easily and therefore, responded promptly. There are multiple methods to achieve this. Firstly, duplicate messages should not appear many times in the message browser. Instead, the message should appear only once but with a number that counts the times that it appears. This method is called duplicate message suppression. Secondly, messages that update the most recent state (e.g. up/down) of a component should replace the old-state messages. This method is called state based message correlation. Thirdly, messages that display "normal" alarm level should be suppressed unless it's a response to an operator action. In addition to message reduction, I also work on correcting the severity level and text formats on messages.

  13. Efficiency control of dietary pesticide intake reduction by human biomonitoring.

    PubMed

    Göen, Thomas; Schmidt, Lukas; Lichtensteiger, Walter; Schlumpf, Margret

    2017-03-01

    In spite of food safety controls for pesticide residues, a conventional diet still leads to a noticeable exposure of the general population to several pesticides. In a pilot study the response of exposure reduction by organic diet intervention on the urinary levels of pesticide metabolites was investigated. In the study two adult individuals were kept on a conventional diet for 11days and morning urine voids were collected at the last four days of the period. Afterwards, the participants switched to exclusively organic food intake for 18days and likewise morning urine samples were collected at the last four days of this period. In the urine samples six pyrethroid metabolites, six dialkylphosphates, four phenolic parameter for organophosphate pesticides and carbamates, 6-chloronicotinic acid (ClNA) as parameter for neonicotinoid insecticides, seven phenoxy herbicides, glyphosate and its metabolite AMPA were quantified using gas chromatographic mass spectrometric methods. Generally, the comparative analyses revealed greater shares as well as higher levels of the parameters in the samples taken during the common diet period compared to the organic diet period. Considerable decrease of the levels was found for almost all pyrethroid metabolites, dialkyphosphates and phenoxy herbicids, as well as for the phenolic metabolites 4-nitrophenol and 3,5,6-trichloropyridinol. In contrast, higher values were found for the organic diet period for ClNA and the metabolite of coumaphos in one of the volunteers. The present study confirms the results of former studies which indicated that an organic diet intervention results in considerable lower exposure to organophosphate pesticides and pyrethroids. It also verifies the former experience that monitoring of urinary parameters for non-persistent pesticides permits a reliable efficiency control of short-time effects by dietary interventions. Additionally to former studies, the results of the present study highlight the need of an

  14. 49 CFR 171.6 - Control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act... § 171.6 Control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose and scope. This section collects... Management and Budget (OMB) under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. This section complies with the...

  15. 46 CFR 502.991 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 502.991 Section 502.991 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Paperwork Reduction Act § 502.991 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. This section displays the control numbers assigned to information...

  16. 37 CFR 1.419 - Display of currently valid control number under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... control number under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 1.419 Section 1.419 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... CASES International Processing Provisions General Information § 1.419 Display of currently valid control number under the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C...

  17. COST OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) APPLICATION FOR NOX CONTROL ON COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides a methodology for estimating budgetary costs associated with retrofit applications of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology on coal-fired boilers. SCR is a postcombustion nitrogen oxides (NOx) control technology capable of providing NOx reductions >90...

  18. COST OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) APPLICATION FOR NOX CONTROL ON COAL-FIRED BOILERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report provides a methodology for estimating budgetary costs associated with retrofit applications of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology on coal-fired boilers. SCR is a postcombustion nitrogen oxides (NOx) control technology capable of providing NOx reductions >90...

  19. Lead-Lag Control for Helicopter Vibration and Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandhi, Farhan

    1995-01-01

    As a helicopter transitions from hover to forward flight, the main rotor blades experience an asymmetry in flow field around the azimuth, with the blade section tangential velocities increasing on the advancing side and decreasing on the retreating side. To compensate for the reduced dynamic pressure on the retreating side, the blade pitch angles over this part of the rotor disk are increased. Eventually, a high enough forward speed is attained to produce compressibility effects on the advancing side of the rotor disk and stall on the retreating side. The onset of these two phenomena drastically increases the rotor vibratory loads and power requirements, thereby effectively establishing a limit on the maximum achievable forward speed. The alleviation of compressibility and stall (and the associated decrease in vibratory loads and power) would potentially result in an increased maximum forward speed. In the past, several methods have been examined and implemented to reduce the vibratory hub loads. Some of these methods are aimed specifically at alleviating vibration at very high flight speeds and increasing the maximum flight speed, while others focus on vibration reduction within the conventional flight envelope. Among the later are several types passive as well as active schemes. Passive schemes include a variety of vibration absorbers such as mechanical springs, pendulums, and bifilar absorbers. These mechanism are easy to design and maintain, but incur significant weight and drag penalties. Among the popular active control schemes in consideration are Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) and Individual Blade Control (IBC). HHC uses a conventional swash plate to generate a multi-cyclic pitch input to the blade. This requires actuators capable of sufficiently high power and bandwidth, increasing the cost and weight of the aircraft. IBC places actuators in the rotating reference frame, requiring the use of slip rings capable of transferring enough power to the actuators

  20. Managing Air Quality - Control Strategies to Achieve Air Pollution Reduction

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Considerations in designing an effective control strategy related to air quality, controlling pollution sources, need for regional or national controls, steps to developing a control strategy, and additional EPA resources.

  1. Cosmology without cosmic variance

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Cai, Yan -Chuan

    2011-10-01

    The growth of structures in the Universe is described by a function G that is predicted by the combination of the expansion history of the Universe and the laws of gravity within it. We examine the improvements in constraints on G that are available from the combination of a large-scale galaxy redshift survey with a weak gravitational lensing survey of background sources. We describe a new combination of such observations that in principle this yields a measure of the growth rate that is free of sample variance, i.e. the uncertainty in G can be reduced without bound by increasing the number of redshifts obtained within a finite survey volume. The addition of background weak lensing data to a redshift survey increases information on G by an amount equivalent to a 10-fold increase in the volume of a standard redshift-space distortion measurement - if the lensing signal can be measured to sub-per cent accuracy. This argues that a combined lensing and redshift survey over a common low-redshift volume of the Universe is a more powerful test of general relativity than an isolated redshift survey over larger volume at high redshift, especially as surveys begin to cover most of the available sky.

  2. Cosmology without cosmic variance

    DOE PAGES

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Cai, Yan -Chuan

    2011-10-01

    The growth of structures in the Universe is described by a function G that is predicted by the combination of the expansion history of the Universe and the laws of gravity within it. We examine the improvements in constraints on G that are available from the combination of a large-scale galaxy redshift survey with a weak gravitational lensing survey of background sources. We describe a new combination of such observations that in principle this yields a measure of the growth rate that is free of sample variance, i.e. the uncertainty in G can be reduced without bound by increasing themore » number of redshifts obtained within a finite survey volume. The addition of background weak lensing data to a redshift survey increases information on G by an amount equivalent to a 10-fold increase in the volume of a standard redshift-space distortion measurement - if the lensing signal can be measured to sub-per cent accuracy. This argues that a combined lensing and redshift survey over a common low-redshift volume of the Universe is a more powerful test of general relativity than an isolated redshift survey over larger volume at high redshift, especially as surveys begin to cover most of the available sky.« less

  3. 42 CFR 456.521 - Conditions for granting variance requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from Time...) of this section, the administrator may grant a variance for a specific remote facility if the agency...

  4. Phonocardiographic diagnosis of aortic ball variance.

    PubMed

    Hylen, J C; Kloster, F E; Herr, R H; Hull, P Q; Ames, A W; Starr, A; Griswold, H E

    1968-07-01

    Fatty infiltration causing changes in the silastic poppet of the Model 1000 series Starr-Edwards aortic valve prostheses (ball variance) has been detected with increasing frequency and can result in sudden death. Phonocardiograms were recorded on 12 patients with ball variance confirmed by operation and of 31 controls. Ten of the 12 patients with ball variance were distinguished from the controls by an aortic opening sound (AO) less than half as intense as the aortic closure sound (AC) at the second right intercostal space (AO/AC ratio less than 0.5). Both AO and AC were decreased in two patients with ball variance, with the loss of the characteristic high frequency and amplitude of these sounds. The only patient having a diminished AO/AC ratio (0.42) without ball variance at reoperation had a clot extending over the aortic valve struts. The phonocardiographic findings have been the most reliable objective evidence of ball variance in patients with Starr-Edwards aortic prosthesis of the Model 1000 series.

  5. 46 CFR 502.991 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork... PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Paperwork Reduction Act § 502.991 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. This section displays the control numbers assigned to...

  6. 46 CFR 502.991 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork... PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Paperwork Reduction Act § 502.991 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. This section displays the control numbers assigned to...

  7. Reduction of structural weight, costs and complexity of a control system in the active vibration reduction of flexible structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daraji, A. H.; Hale, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper concerns the active vibration reduction of a flexible structure with discrete piezoelectric sensors and actuators in collocated pairs bonded to its surface. In this study, a new fitness and objective function is proposed to determine the optimal number of actuators, based on variations in the average closed loop dB gain margin reduction for all of the optimal piezoelectric pairs and on the modes that are required to be attenuated using the optimal linear quadratic control scheme. The aim of this study is to find the minimum number of optimally located sensor/actuator pairs, which can achieve the same vibration reduction as a greater number, in order to reduce the cost, complexity and power requirement of the control system. This optimization was done using a genetic algorithm. The technique may be applied to any lightly damped structure, and is demonstrated here by attenuating the first six vibration modes of a flat cantilever plate. It is shown that two sensor/actuator pairs, located and controlled optimally, give almost the same vibration reduction as ten pairs. These results are validated by comparing the open and closed loop time responses and actuator feedback voltages for various numbers of piezoelectric pairs using the ANSYS finite element package and a proportional differential control scheme.

  8. 46 CFR 150.105 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 150.105 Section 150.105 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control numbers... Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). The...

  9. 46 CFR 170.020 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 170.020 Section 170.020 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and... subchapter by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (44 U...

  10. 46 CFR 167.01-20 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 167.01-20 Section 167.01-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control... of Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq...

  11. 46 CFR 188.01-15 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 188.01-15 Section 188.01-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control... of Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq...

  12. 9 CFR 590.18 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 590.18 Section 590.18 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND... Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control numbers assigned to... the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980, Pub. L. 96-511. (b) Display. 7 CFR section where identified and...

  13. 46 CFR 159.001-9 - OMB Control Numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 159.001-9 Section 159.001-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... General § 159.001-9 OMB Control Numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980, (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). The Coast Guard intends that this section comply...

  14. 46 CFR 159.001-9 - OMB Control Numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 159.001-9 Section 159.001-9 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... General § 159.001-9 OMB Control Numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose... Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980, (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). The Coast Guard intends that this section comply...

  15. 46 CFR 70.01-15 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 70.01-15 Section 70.01-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control numbers... Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). The...

  16. 46 CFR 70.01-15 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 70.01-15 Section 70.01-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control numbers... Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). The...

  17. 46 CFR 515.91 - OMB control number assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 515.91 Section 515.91 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN... TRANSPORTATION INTERMEDIARIES Privacy Act and Paperwork Reduction Act Notice Freight Forwarding Fees and Compensation § 515.91 OMB control number assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. The Commission has...

  18. 46 CFR 147.8 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 147.8 Section 147.8 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control numbers... Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). The...

  19. Controller reduction for effective interdisciplinary design of active structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balas, Mark J.; Quan, Ralph

    1989-01-01

    Control problems of large aerospace structures are intrinsically interdisciplinary and require strategies which address the complete interaction between flexible structures, electromechanical actuators and sensors, and feedback control algorithms. Current research and future directions which will require an interdisciplinary team effort in dynamics, control and optimization of such structures are being surveyed. It is generally agreed that the dynamics of space structures require large scale discrete modeling, resulting in thousands of discrete unknowns. Proven control strategies, on the other hand, employ a low order controller that is based on a reduced order model of structures. Integration of such low order controllers and large scale dynamics models often leads to serious deterioration of the closed loop stability margin and even instability. To alleviate this stability deterioration while low order controllers remain effective, the following approach was investigated: (1) retain low order controllers based on reduced order models of structures as the basic control strategy; (2) introduce a compensator that will directly account for the deterioration of stability margin due to controller-structure integration; and (3) assess overall performance of the integrated control structure system by developing measures of suboptimality in the combination of (1) and (2). The benefits include: simplicity in the design of basic controllers, thus facilitating the optimization of structure control interactions; increased understanding of the roles of the compensator so as to modify the structure as well as the basic controller, if necessary, for improved performance; and adaptability to localize controllers by viewing the compensator as a systems integration filter.

  20. Application of Circulation Control Technology to Airframe Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Sankar, L. N.; Englar, R. J.; Munro, Scott E.; Li, Yi; Gaeta, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    This report is a summary of the work performed by Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) under NASA Langley Grant NAG-1-2146, which was awarded as a part of NASA's Breakthrough Innovative Technologies (BIT) initiative. This was a three-year program, with a one-year no-cost extension. Each year's study has been an integrated effort consisting of computational fluid dynamics, experimental aerodynamics, and detailed noise and flow measurements. Year I effort examined the feasibility of reducing airframe noise by replacing the conventional wing systems with a Circulation Control Wing (CCW), where steady blowing was used through the trailing edge of the wing over a Coanda surface. It was shown that the wing lift increases with CCW blowing and indeed for the same lift, a CCW wing was shown to produce less noise. Year 2 effort dealt with a similar study on the role of pulsed blowing on airframe noise. The main objective of this portion of the study was to assess whether pulse blowing from the trailing edge of a CCW resulted in more, less, or the same amount of radiated noise to the farfield. Results show that a reduction in farfield noise of up to 5 dB is measured when pulse flow is compared with steady flow for an equivalent lift configuration. This reduction is in the spectral region associated with the trailing edge jet noise. This result is due to the unique advantage that pulsed flow has over steady flow. For a range of frequencies, more lift is experienced with the same mass flow as the steady case. Thus, for an equivalent lift and slot height, the pulsed system can operate at lower jet velocities, and hence lower jet noise. The computational analysis showed that for a given time-averaged mass flow rate, pulsed jets give a higher value of C(sub l) and a higher L/D than equivalent steady jets. This benefit is attributable to higher instantaneous jet velocities, and higher instantaneous C(sub mu) values for the pulsed jet. Pulsed jet benefits increase at higher

  1. Variance components in discrete force production tasks.

    PubMed

    Varadhan, S K M; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2010-09-01

    better adjustments of the timing accuracy, which helps achieve comparable force variance in tasks with different rates of force production. This does not happen in discrete tasks. The lack of scaling of the anticipatory changes in the synergy index with ramp time is the first reported feature that distinguishes anticipatory synergy adjustments from anticipatory postural adjustments. We discuss the differences between the cyclic and discrete tasks within a hierarchical control scheme offered by Schöner.

  2. Variance Components in Discrete Force Production Tasks

    PubMed Central

    SKM, Varadhan; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    tasks was associated with better adjustments of the timing accuracy, which helps achieve comparable force variance in tasks with different rates of force production. This does not happen in discrete tasks. The lack of scaling of the anticipatory changes in the synergy index with ramp time represent is the first reported feature that distinguishes anticipatory synergy adjustments from anticipatory postural adjustments. We discuss the differences between the cyclic and discrete tasks within a hierarchical control scheme offered by Schöner. PMID:20680251

  3. Plant-order Reduction for I-PD Controller Design and Its Application to Flight Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Hiroyuki; Ochi, Yoshimasa

    This paper proposes an I-PD (integral preceded by proportional-derivative) controller design with a more rational method of plant-order reduction to the second order than the method previously proposed by the authors, where parameter-space search was employed. In the new method, first, the fractional balanced reduction is applied to the original single-input-single-output plant. Then, the reduced-order model is adjusted via the homotopy method in terms of the ν-gap metric. The method can also be applied to a plant that is not stable but stabilizable by state feedback in the same way. The resultant PID controller designed based on the optimal servomechanism using the second-order plant model provides preferable properties as a linear quadratic regulator (LQR), if the ν-gap can be made sufficiently small. Moreover, it can be extended to a model-following type by adding a reference model and a feedforward compensator to improve the output responses without decreasing the stability margins. The effectiveness and usefulness of the proposed method are demonstrated through design examples including an application to flight control and numerical simulations.

  4. Energy scaling and reduction in controlling complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Wang, Le-Zhi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Recent works revealed that the energy required to control a complex network depends on the number of driving signals and the energy distribution follows an algebraic scaling law. If one implements control using a small number of drivers, e.g. as determined by the structural controllability theory, there is a high probability that the energy will diverge. We develop a physical theory to explain the scaling behaviour through identification of the fundamental structural elements, the longest control chains (LCCs), that dominate the control energy. Based on the LCCs, we articulate a strategy to drastically reduce the control energy (e.g. in a large number of real-world networks). Owing to their structural nature, the LCCs may shed light on energy issues associated with control of nonlinear dynamical networks. PMID:27152220

  5. Energy scaling and reduction in controlling complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Zhong; Wang, Le-Zhi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Recent works revealed that the energy required to control a complex network depends on the number of driving signals and the energy distribution follows an algebraic scaling law. If one implements control using a small number of drivers, e.g. as determined by the structural controllability theory, there is a high probability that the energy will diverge. We develop a physical theory to explain the scaling behaviour through identification of the fundamental structural elements, the longest control chains (LCCs), that dominate the control energy. Based on the LCCs, we articulate a strategy to drastically reduce the control energy (e.g. in a large number of real-world networks). Owing to their structural nature, the LCCs may shed light on energy issues associated with control of nonlinear dynamical networks.

  6. 49 CFR 110.7 - Control Number under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS PUBLIC SECTOR TRAINING AND PLANNING GRANTS § 110.7 Control Number under the Paperwork Reduction Act. The Office of Management and Budget control number assigned to collection of information in...

  7. 49 CFR 110.7 - Control Number under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS PUBLIC SECTOR TRAINING AND PLANNING GRANTS § 110.7 Control Number under the Paperwork Reduction Act. The Office of Management and Budget control number assigned to collection of information in...

  8. Active Flap Control of the SMART Rotor for Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Steven R.; Anand, R. Vaidyanathan; Straub, Friedrich K.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Active control methodologies were applied to a full-scale active flap rotor obtained during a joint Boeing/ DARPA/NASA/Army test in the Air Force National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex 40- by 80-foot anechoic wind tunnel. The active flap rotor is a full-scale MD 900 helicopter main rotor with each of its five blades modified to include an on-blade piezoelectric actuator-driven flap with a span of 18% of radius, 25% of chord, and located at 83% radius. Vibration control demonstrated the potential of active flaps for effective control of vibratory loads, especially normal force loads. Active control of normal force vibratory loads using active flaps and a continuous-time higher harmonic control algorithm was very effective, reducing harmonic (1-5P) normal force vibratory loads by 95% in both cruise and approach conditions. Control of vibratory roll and pitch moments was also demonstrated, although moment control was less effective than normal force control. Finally, active control was used to precisely control blade flap position for correlation with pretest predictions of rotor aeroacoustics. Flap displacements were commanded to follow specific harmonic profiles of 2 deg or more in amplitude, and the flap deflection errors obtained were less than 0.2 deg r.m.s.

  9. Active Flap Control of the SMART Rotor for Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Steven R.; Anand, R. Vaidyanathan; Straub, Friedrich K.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Active control methodologies were applied to a full-scale active flap rotor obtained during a joint Boeing/ DARPA/NASA/Army test in the Air Force National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex 40- by 80-foot anechoic wind tunnel. The active flap rotor is a full-scale MD 900 helicopter main rotor with each of its five blades modified to include an on-blade piezoelectric actuator-driven flap with a span of 18% of radius, 25% of chord, and located at 83% radius. Vibration control demonstrated the potential of active flaps for effective control of vibratory loads, especially normal force loads. Active control of normal force vibratory loads using active flaps and a continuous-time higher harmonic control algorithm was very effective, reducing harmonic (1-5P) normal force vibratory loads by 95% in both cruise and approach conditions. Control of vibratory roll and pitch moments was also demonstrated, although moment control was less effective than normal force control. Finally, active control was used to precisely control blade flap position for correlation with pretest predictions of rotor aeroacoustics. Flap displacements were commanded to follow specific harmonic profiles of 2 deg or more in amplitude, and the flap deflection errors obtained were less than 0.2 deg r.m.s.

  10. The Space Technology-7 Disturbance Reduction System Precision Control Flight Validation Experiment Control System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, James R.; Hsu, Oscar C.; Maghami, Peirman G.; Markley, F. Landis

    2006-01-01

    As originally proposed, the Space Technology-7 Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) project, managed out of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, was designed to validate technologies required for future missions such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). The two technologies to be demonstrated by DRS were Gravitational Reference Sensors (GRSs) and Colloidal MicroNewton Thrusters (CMNTs). Control algorithms being designed by the Dynamic Control System (DCS) team at the Goddard Space Flight Center would control the spacecraft so that it flew about a freely-floating GRS test mass, keeping it centered within its housing. For programmatic reasons, the GRSs were descoped from DRS. The primary goals of the new mission are to validate the performance of the CMNTs and to demonstrate precise spacecraft position control. DRS will fly as a part of the European Space Agency (ESA) LISA Pathfinder (LPF) spacecraft along with a similar ESA experiment, the LISA Technology Package (LTP). With no GRS, the DCS attitude and drag-free control systems make use of the sensor being developed by ESA as a part of the LTP. The control system is designed to maintain the spacecraft s position with respect to the test mass, to within 10 nm/the square root of Hz over the DRS science frequency band of 1 to 30 mHz.

  11. Evaluation of climate modeling factors impacting the variance of streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Aamery, N.; Fox, J. F.; Snyder, M.

    2016-11-01

    The present contribution quantifies the relative importance of climate modeling factors and chosen response variables upon controlling the variance of streamflow forecasted with global climate model (GCM) projections, which has not been attempted in previous literature to our knowledge. We designed an experiment that varied climate modeling factors, including GCM type, project phase, emission scenario, downscaling method, and bias correction. The streamflow response variable was also varied and included forecasted streamflow and difference in forecast and hindcast streamflow predictions. GCM results and the Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) were used to predict streamflow for a wet, temperate watershed in central Kentucky USA. After calibrating the streamflow model, 112 climate realizations were simulated within the streamflow model and then analyzed on a monthly basis using analysis of variance. Analysis of variance results indicate that the difference in forecast and hindcast streamflow predictions is a function of GCM type, climate model project phase, and downscaling approach. The prediction of forecasted streamflow is a function of GCM type, project phase, downscaling method, emission scenario, and bias correction method. The results indicate the relative importance of the five climate modeling factors when designing streamflow prediction ensembles and quantify the reduction in uncertainty associated with coupling the climate results with the hydrologic model when subtracting the hindcast simulations. Thereafter, analysis of streamflow prediction ensembles with different numbers of realizations show that use of all available realizations is unneeded for the study system, so long as the ensemble design is well balanced. After accounting for the factors controlling streamflow variance, results show that predicted average monthly change in streamflow tends to follow precipitation changes and result in a net increase in the average annual precipitation and

  12. 49 CFR 110.7 - Control Number under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Control Number under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 110.7 Section 110.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS... Reduction Act. The Office of Management and Budget control number assigned to collection of information in...

  13. 29 CFR 1918.4 - OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 1918.4 Section 1918.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... § 1918.4 OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act. The following list identifies the 29 CFR...

  14. 29 CFR 1915.8 - OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 1915.8 Section 1915.8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... General Provisions § 1915.8 OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act. The following sections...

  15. 7 CFR 20.12 - OMB control number assigned pursuant to Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false OMB control number assigned pursuant to Paperwork Reduction Act. 20.12 Section 20.12 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EXPORT SALES REPORTING REQUIREMENTS § 20.12 OMB control number assigned pursuant to Paperwork Reduction Act. The...

  16. Controlled black liquor viscosity reduction through salting-in

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.E.; Khan, S.A.; Spontak, R.J.

    1996-08-01

    Black liquor viscosity increases exponentially with solids content and therefore causes processing problems for the paper industry by being a limiting factor in the Kraft pulp process. This study investigates a new approach for achieving viscosity reduction by salting-in black liquor through the addition of thiocyanate salts. These salts generally increase the solubility of the polymer constituents in black liquor, leading to a decrease in its viscosity. Several thiocyanate salts capable of reducing liquor viscosity by more than two orders of magnitude have been identified, with viscosity reduction greatest at high solids content. Salting-in of black liquor depends on the cation paired with the thiocyanate anion, as well as on solution pH and temperature. Comparative studies reveal the most effective viscosity-reducing agent of the series examined and that lignin plays an important role in the viscosity behavior of both unmodified and salted-in black liquor at high solids concentrations. These experimental findings are interpreted in terms of the underlying principles that describe salting-in and how it affects aqueous solution structure.

  17. Clock Genes Explain a Large Proportion of Phenotypic Variance in Systolic Blood Pressure and This Control Is Not Modified by Environmental Temperature.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Hassan S; Aslibekyan, Stella; Scheer, Frank A J L; Smith, Caren E; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Jacques, Paul; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Tucker, Katherine L; Arnett, Donna K; Ordovás, José M

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal variation in blood pressure (BP) is regulated, in part, by an endogenous circadian clock; however, few human studies have identified associations between clock genes and BP. Accounting for environmental temperature may be necessary to correct for seasonal bias. We examined whether environmental temperature on the day of participants' assessment was associated with BP, using adjusted linear regression models in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) (n = 819) and the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study (BPRHS) (n = 1,248) cohorts. We estimated phenotypic variance in BP by 18 clock genes and examined individual single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations with BP using an additive genetic model, with further consideration of environmental temperature. In GOLDN, each additional 1 °C increase in environmental temperature was associated with 0.18 mm Hg lower systolic BP [SBP; β ± SE = -0.18 ± 0.05 mm Hg; P = 0.0001] and 0.10mm Hg lower diastolic BP [DBP; -0.10 ± 0.03 mm Hg; P = 0.001]. Similar results were seen in the BPRHS for SBP only. Clock genes explained a statistically significant proportion of the variance in SBP [V G/V P ± SE = 0.071 ± 0.03; P = 0.001] in GOLDN, but not in the BPRHS, and we did not observe associations between individual SNPs and BP. Environmental temperature did not influence the identified genetic associations. We identified clock genes that explained a statistically significant proportion of the phenotypic variance in SBP, supporting the importance of the circadian pathway underlying cardiac physiology. Although temperature was associated with BP, it did not affect results with genetic markers in either study. Therefore, it does not appear that temperature measures are necessary for interpreting associations between clock genes and BP. Trials related to this study were registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00083369 (Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Triglycerides) and NCT01231958 (Boston Puerto

  18. Sampling Errors of Variance Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Piet F.

    A study on sampling errors of variance components was conducted within the framework of generalizability theory by P. L. Smith (1978). The study used an intuitive approach for solving the problem of how to allocate the number of conditions to different facets in order to produce the most stable estimate of the universe score variance. Optimization…

  19. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  20. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  1. Spatially distributed control for optimal drag reduction of the flow past a circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, Philippe; Hildebrand, Roland; Cottet, Georges-Henri; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    We report high drag reduction in direct numerical simulations of controlled flows past circular cylinders at Reynolds numbers of 300 and 1000. The flow is controlled by the azimuthal component of the tangential velocity of the cylinder surface. Starting from a spanwise-uniform velocity profile that leads to high drag reduction, the optimization procedure identifies, for the same energy input, spanwise-varying velocity profiles that lead to higher drag reduction. The three-dimensional variations of the velocity field, corresponding to modes A and B of three-dimensional wake instabilities, are largely responsible for this drag reduction. The spanwise wall velocity variations introduce streamwise vortex braids in the wake that are responsible for reducing the drag induced by the primary spanwise vortices shed by the cylinder. The results demonstrate that extending two-dimensional controllers to three-dimensional flows is not optimal as three-dimensional control strategies can lead efficiently to higher drag reduction.

  2. Multiple Comparison Procedures when Population Variances Differ.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olejnik, Stephen; Lee, JaeShin

    A review of the literature on multiple comparison procedures suggests several alternative approaches for comparing means when population variances differ. These include: (1) the approach of P. A. Games and J. F. Howell (1976); (2) C. W. Dunnett's C confidence interval (1980); and (3) Dunnett's T3 solution (1980). These procedures control the…

  3. Shock wave strength reduction by passive control using perforated plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerffer, Piotr; Szulc, Oskar

    2007-05-01

    Strong, normal shock wave, terminating a local supersonic area on an airfoil, not only limits aerodynamic performance but also becomes a source of a high-speed impulsive helicopter noise. The application of a passive control system (a cavity covered by a perforated plate) on a rotor blade should reduce the noise created by a moving shock. This article covers the numerical implementation of the Bohning/Doerffer transpiration law into the SPARC code and includes an extended validation against the experimental data for relatively simple geometries of transonic nozzles. It is a first step towards a full simulation of a helicopter rotor equipped with a noise reducing passive control device in hover and in forward flight conditions.

  4. Model reduction and feedback control of transitional channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilak, Milos

    This dissertation examines the use of reduced-order models for design of linear feedback controllers for fluid flows. The focus is on transitional channel flow, a canonical shear flow case with a simple geometry yet complex dynamics. Reduced-order models of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, which describe the evolution of perturbations in transitional channel flow, are computed using two methods for snapshot-based balanced truncation, Balanced Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (BPOD) and Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA). The performance of these models in feedback control is evaluated in both linearized and nonlinear Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of channel flow. The first part of the dissertation describes the application of BPOD to very large systems, and the detailed evaluation of the resulting reduced-order models. Exact balanced truncation, a standard method from control theory, is not computationally tractable for very large systems, such as those typically encountered in fluid flow simulations. The BPOD method, introduced by Rowley (2005), provides a close approximation. We first show that the approximation is indeed close by applying the method to a 1-D linear perturbation to channel flow at a single spatial wavenumber pair, for which exact balanced truncation is tractable. Next, as the first application of BPOD to a very high-dimensional linear system, we show that reduced-order BPOD models of a localized 3-D perturbation capture the dynamics very well. Moreover, the BPOD models significantly outperform standard Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) models, as illustrated by a striking example where models using the POD modes that capture most of the perturbation energy fail to capture the perturbation dynamics. Next, reduced-order models of a complete control system for linearized channel flow are obtained using ERA, a computationally efficient method that results in the same reduced-order models as BPOD. Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG

  5. 46 CFR 148.7 - OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 148.7 Section 148.7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act. The information collection requirements in this part...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.8 - OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 1910.8 Section 1910.8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... under the Paperwork Reduction Act. The following sections or paragraphs each contain a collection of...

  7. 29 CFR 1917.4 - OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 1917.4 Section 1917.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... under the Paperwork Reduction Act. The following list identifies the 29 CFR citations for sections or...

  8. Small Drinking Water System Variances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Small system variances allow a small system to install and maintain technology that can remove a contaminant to the maximum extent that is affordable and protective of public health in lieu of technology that can achieve compliance with the regulation.

  9. Model and controller reduction of large-scale structures based on projection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildin, Eduardo

    The design of low-order controllers for high-order plants is a challenging problem theoretically as well as from a computational point of view. Frequently, robust controller design techniques result in high-order controllers. It is then interesting to achieve reduced-order models and controllers while maintaining robustness properties. Controller designed for large structures based on models obtained by finite element techniques yield large state-space dimensions. In this case, problems related to storage, accuracy and computational speed may arise. Thus, model reduction methods capable of addressing controller reduction problems are of primary importance to allow the practical applicability of advanced controller design methods for high-order systems. A challenging large-scale control problem that has emerged recently is the protection of civil structures, such as high-rise buildings and long-span bridges, from dynamic loadings such as earthquakes, high wind, heavy traffic, and deliberate attacks. Even though significant effort has been spent in the application of control theory to the design of civil structures in order increase their safety and reliability, several challenging issues are open problems for real-time implementation. This dissertation addresses with the development of methodologies for controller reduction for real-time implementation in seismic protection of civil structures using projection methods. Three classes of schemes are analyzed for model and controller reduction: nodal truncation, singular value decomposition methods and Krylov-based methods. A family of benchmark problems for structural control are used as a framework for a comparative study of model and controller reduction techniques. It is shown that classical model and controller reduction techniques, such as balanced truncation, modal truncation and moment matching by Krylov techniques, yield reduced-order controllers that do not guarantee stability of the closed-loop system, that

  10. Method of controlled reduction of nitroaromatics by enzymatic reaction with oxygen sensitive nitroreductase enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Manish M.; Campbell, James A.

    1998-01-01

    A method for the controlled reduction of nitroaromatic compounds such as nitrobenzene and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by enzymatic reaction with oxygen sensitive nitroreductase enzymes, such as ferredoxin NADP oxidoreductase.

  11. Method of controlled reduction of nitroaromatics by enzymatic reaction with oxygen sensitive nitroreductase enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Shah, M.M.; Campbell, J.A.

    1998-07-07

    A method is described for the controlled reduction of nitroaromatic compounds such as nitrobenzene and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene by enzymatic reaction with oxygen sensitive nitroreductase enzymes, such as ferredoxin NADP oxidoreductase. 6 figs.

  12. 46 CFR 167.01-20 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS General Provisions § 167.01-20 OMB control numbers assigned... of Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1980 (44 U.S.C. 3501 et...

  13. Interior Noise Reduction by Adaptive Feedback Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Tae W.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the possible use of adaptive digital filtering techniques in simultaneous, multiple-mode identification of the modal parameters of a vibrating structure in real-time. It is intended that the results obtained from this project will be used for state estimation needed in adaptive structural acoustics control. The work done in this project is basically an extension of the work on real-time single mode identification, which was performed successfully using a digital signal processor (DSP) at NASA, Langley. Initially, in this investigation the single mode identification work was duplicated on a different processor, namely the Texas Instruments TMS32OC40 DSP. The system identification results for the single mode case were very good. Then an algorithm for simultaneous two mode identification was developed and tested using analytical simulation. When it successfully performed the expected tasks, it was implemented in real-time on the DSP system to identify the first two modes of vibration of a cantilever aluminum beam. The results of the simultaneous two mode case were good but some problems were identified related to frequency warping and spurious mode identification. The frequency warping problem was found to be due to the bilinear transformation used in the algorithm to convert the system transfer function from the continuous-time domain to the discrete-time domain. An alternative approach was developed to rectify the problem. The spurious mode identification problem was found to be associated with high sampling rates. Noise in the signal is suspected to be the cause of this problem but further investigation will be needed to clarify the cause. For simultaneous identification of more than two modes, it was found that theoretically an adaptive digital filter can be designed to identify the required number of modes, but the algebra became very complex which made it impossible to implement in the DSP system used in this study

  14. 46 CFR 69.29 - OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork...) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS General § 69.29 OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control...

  15. 46 CFR 159.001-9 - OMB Control Numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false OMB Control Numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork... General § 159.001-9 OMB Control Numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control numbers assigned to information collection...

  16. 46 CFR 69.29 - OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork...) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS General § 69.29 OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control...

  17. 46 CFR 540.91 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork... SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE PASSENGER VESSEL FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY General § 540.91 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. This section displays the control numbers assigned...

  18. 46 CFR 25.01-5 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork... VESSELS REQUIREMENTS Application § 25.01-5 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control numbers assigned to...

  19. 46 CFR 69.29 - OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork...) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS General § 69.29 OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control...

  20. 46 CFR 147.8 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork...) DANGEROUS CARGOES HAZARDOUS SHIPS' STORES General Provisions § 147.8 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control...

  1. 46 CFR 30.01-2 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork... GENERAL PROVISIONS Administration § 30.01-2 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control numbers assigned to...

  2. 46 CFR 150.105 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork...) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.105 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the control...

  3. 46 CFR 565.13 - OMB control number assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control number assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act 565.13 Section 565.13 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AND ACTIONS TO ADDRESS RESTRICTIVE FOREIGN MARITIME PRACTICES CONTROLLED CARRIERS § 565.13 OMB control number assigned pursuant to...

  4. A Control Concept for Large Flexible Spacecraft Using Order Reduction Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, G.; Roth, H.

    1985-01-01

    Results found during the investigation of control problems of large flexible spacecraft are given. A triple plate configuration of such a spacecraft is defined and studied. The model is defined by modal data derived from infinite element modeling. The order reduction method applied is briefly described. An attitude control concept with low and high authority control has been developed to design an attitude controller for the reduced model. The stability and response of the original system together with the reduced controller is analyzed.

  5. Reduction of interior sound fields in flexible cylinders by active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of interior sound reduction through active control of a thin flexible shell's vibrational response are presently evaluated in view of an analytical model. The noise source is a single exterior acoustic monopole. The active control model is evaluated for harmonic excitation; the results obtained indicate spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 20 dB over the source plane, for acoustic resonant conditions inside the cavity.

  6. Reduction of interior sound fields in flexible cylinders by active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of interior sound reduction through active control of a thin flexible shell's vibrational response are presently evaluated in view of an analytical model. The noise source is a single exterior acoustic monopole. The active control model is evaluated for harmonic excitation; the results obtained indicate spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 20 dB over the source plane, for acoustic resonant conditions inside the cavity.

  7. Reduction of Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise by Active Rotor Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Yung H.; Gmelin, Bernd; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Brooks, Thomas F.; Philippe, Jean J.; Prieur, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise is one of the most severe noise sources and is very important both in community annoyance and military detection. Research over the decades has substantially improved basic physical understanding of the mechanisms generating rotor blade-vortex interaction noise and also of controlling techniques, particularly using active rotor control technology. This paper reviews active rotor control techniques currently available for rotor blade vortex interaction noise reduction, including higher harmonic pitch control, individual blade control, and on-blade control technologies. Basic physical mechanisms of each active control technique are reviewed in terms of noise reduction mechanism and controlling aerodynamic or structural parameters of a blade. Active rotor control techniques using smart structures/materials are discussed, including distributed smart actuators to induce local torsional or flapping deformations, Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  8. Frequency Weighted Discrete-Time Controller Order Reduction Using Bilinear Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimaghaee, Paknosh; Noroozi, Navid

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses a new method for order reduction of linear time invariant discrete-time controller. This method leads to a new algorithm for controller reduction when a discrete time controller is used to control a continuous time plant. In this algorithm, at first, a full order controller is designed in s-plane. Then, bilinear transformation is applied to map the closed loop system to z-plane. Next, new closed loop controllability and observability grammians are calculated in z-plane. Finally, balanced truncation idea is used to reduce the order of controller. The stability property of the reduced order controller is discussed. To verify the effectiveness of our method, a reduced controller is designed for four discs system.

  9. Reduction of chronic abdominal pain in patients with inflammatory bowel disease through transcranial direct current stimulation: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Volz, Magdalena S; Farmer, Annabelle; Siegmund, Britta

    2016-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is frequently associated with chronic abdominal pain (CAP). Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been proven to reduce chronic pain. This study aimed to investigate the effects of tDCS in patients with CAP due to IBD. This randomized, sham-controlled, double blind, parallel-designed study included 20 patients with either Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis with CAP (≥3/10 on the visual analog scale (VAS) in 3/6 months). Anodal or sham tDCS was applied over the primary motor cortex for 5 consecutive days (2 mA, 20 minutes). Assessments included VAS, pressure pain threshold, inflammatory markers, and questionnaires on quality of life, functional and disease specific symptoms (Irritable Bowel Syndrome-Severity Scoring System [IBS-SSS]), disease activity, and pain catastrophizing. Follow-up data were collected 1 week after the end of the stimulation. Statistical analyses were performed using analysis of variance and t tests. There was a significant reduction of abdominal pain in the anodal tDCS group compared with sham tDCS. This effect was evident in changes in VAS and pressure pain threshold on the left and right sides of the abdomen. In addition, 1 week after stimulation, pain reduction remained significantly decreased in the right side of the abdomen. There was also a significant reduction in scores on pain catastrophizing and on IBS-SSS when comparing both groups. Inflammatory markers and disease activity did not differ significantly between groups throughout the experiment. Transcranial direct current stimulation proved to be an effective and clinically relevant therapeutic strategy for CAP in IBD. The analgesic effects observed are unrelated to inflammation and disease activity, which emphasizes central pain mechanisms in CAP.

  10. Harm reduction with pharmacotherapy for homeless people with alcohol dependence: protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Collins, Susan E; Saxon, Andrew J; Duncan, Mark H; Smart, Brian F; Merrill, Joseph O; Malone, Daniel K; Jackson, T Ron; Clifasefi, Seema L; Joesch, Jutta; Ries, Richard K

    2014-07-01

    Interventions requiring abstinence from alcohol are neither preferred by nor shown to be highly effective with many homeless individuals with alcohol dependence. It is therefore important to develop lower-threshold, patient-centered interventions for this multimorbid and high-utilizing population. Harm-reduction counseling requires neither abstinence nor use reduction and pairs a compassionate style with patient-driven goal-setting. Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), a monthly injectable formulation of an opioid receptor antagonist, reduces craving and may support achievement of harm-reduction goals. Together, harm-reduction counseling and XR-NTX may support alcohol harm reduction and quality-of-life improvement. Study aims include testing: a) the relative efficacy of XR-NTX and harm-reduction counseling compared to a community-based, supportive-services-as-usual control, b) theory-based mediators of treatment effects, and c) treatment effects on publicly funded service costs. This RCT involves four arms: a) XR-NTX+harm-reduction counseling, b) placebo+harm-reduction counseling, c) harm-reduction counseling only, and d) community-based, supportive-services-as-usual control conditions. Participants are currently/formerly homeless, alcohol dependent individuals (N=300). Outcomes include alcohol variables (i.e., craving, quantity/frequency, problems and biomarkers), health-related quality of life, and publicly funded service utilization and associated costs. Mediators include 10-point motivation rulers and the Penn Alcohol Craving Scale. XR-NTX and harm-reduction counseling are administered every 4weeks over the 12-week treatment course. Follow-up assessments are conducted at weeks 24 and 36. If found efficacious, XR-NTX and harm-reduction counseling will be well-positioned to support reductions in alcohol-related harm, decreases in costs associated with publicly funded service utilization, and increases in quality of life among homeless, alcohol

  11. Harm reduction with pharmacotherapy for homeless people with alcohol dependence: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Susan E.; Saxon, Andrew J.; Duncan, Mark H.; Smart, Brian F.; Merrill, Joseph O.; Malone, Daniel K.; Jackson, T. Ron; Clifasefi, Seema L.; Joesch, Jutta; Ries, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Interventions requiring abstinence from alcohol are neither preferred by nor shown to be highly effective with many homeless individuals with alcohol dependence. It is therefore important to develop lower-threshold, patient-centered interventions for this multimorbid and high-utilizing population. Harm-reduction counseling requires neither abstinence nor use reduction and pairs a compassionate style with patient-driven goal-setting. Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), a monthly injectable formulation of an opioid receptor antagonist, reduces craving and may support achievement of harm-reduction goals. Together, harm-reduction counseling and XR-NTX may support alcohol harm reduction and quality-of-life improvement. Aims Study aims include testing: a) the relative efficacy of XR-NTX and harm-reduction counseling compared to a community-based, supportive-services-as-usual control, b) theory-based mediators of treatment effects, and c) treatment effects on publicly funded service costs. Methods This RCT involves four arms: a) XR-NTX+harm-reduction counseling, b) placebo+harm-reduction counseling, c) harm-reduction counseling only, and d) community-based, supportive-services-as-usual control conditions. Participants are currently/formerly homeless, alcohol dependent individuals (N=300). Outcomes include alcohol variables (i.e., craving, quantity/frequency, problems and biomarkers), health-related quality of life, and publicly funded service utilization and associated costs. Mediators include 10-point motivation rulers and the Penn Alcohol Craving Scale. XR-NTX and harm-reduction counseling are administered every 4 weeks over the 12-week treatment course. Follow-up assessments are conducted at weeks 24 and 36. Discussion If found efficacious, XR-NTX and harm-reduction counseling will be well-positioned to support reductions in alcohol-related harm, decreases in costs associated with publicly funded service utilization, and increases in quality of life among

  12. Controller design for wind turbine load reduction via multiobjective parameter synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, A. F.; Weiβ, F. A.

    2016-09-01

    During the design process for a wind turbine load reduction controller many different, sometimes conflicting requirements must be fulfilled simultaneously. If the requirements can be expressed as mathematical criteria, such a design problem can be solved by a criterion-vector and multi-objective design optimization. The software environment MOPS (Multi-Objective Parameter Synthesis) supports the engineer for such a design optimization. In this paper MOPS is applied to design a multi-objective load reduction controller for the well-known DTU 10 MW reference wind turbine. A significant reduction in the fatigue criteria especially the blade damage can be reached by the use of an additional Individual Pitch Controller (IPC) and an additional tower damper. This reduction is reached as a trade-off with an increase of actuator load.

  13. Identifying sensitive sources and key control handles for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Sweetapple, Christine; Fu, Guangtao; Butler, David

    2014-10-01

    This research investigates the effects of adjusting control handle values on greenhouse gas emissions from wastewater treatment, and reveals critical control handles and sensitive emission sources for control through the combined use of local and global sensitivity analysis methods. The direction of change in emissions, effluent quality and operational cost resulting from variation of control handles individually is determined using one-factor-at-a-time sensitivity analysis, and corresponding trade-offs are identified. The contribution of each control handle to variance in model outputs, taking into account the effects of interactions, is then explored using a variance-based sensitivity analysis method, i.e., Sobol's method, and significant second order interactions are discovered. This knowledge will assist future control strategy development and aid an efficient design and optimisation process, as it provides a better understanding of the effects of control handles on key performance indicators and identifies those for which dynamic control has the greatest potential benefits. Sources with the greatest variance in emissions, and therefore the greatest need to monitor, are also identified. It is found that variance in total emissions is predominantly due to changes in direct N2O emissions and selection of suitable values for wastage flow rate and aeration intensity in the final activated sludge reactor is of key importance. To improve effluent quality, costs and/or emissions, it is necessary to consider the effects of adjusting multiple control handles simultaneously and determine the optimum trade-off.

  14. Parameterization of Incident and Infragravity Swash Variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockdon, H. F.; Holman, R. A.; Sallenger, A. H.

    2002-12-01

    By clearly defining the forcing and morphologic controls of swash variance in both the incident and infragravity frequency bands, we are able to derive a more complete parameterization for extreme runup that may be applicable to a wide range of beach and wave conditions. It is expected that the dynamics of the incident and infragravity bands will have different dependencies on offshore wave conditions and local beach slopes. For example, previous studies have shown that swash variance in the incident band depends on foreshore beach slope while the infragravity variance depends more on a weighted mean slope across the surf zone. Because the physics of each band is parameterized differently, the amount that each frequency band contributes to the total swash variance will vary from site to site and, often, at a single site as the profile configuration changes over time. Using water level time series (measured at the shoreline) collected during nine dynamically different field experiments, we test the expected behavior of both incident and infragravity swash and the contribution each makes to total variance. At the dissipative sites (Iribarren number, \\xi0, <0.3) located in Oregon and the Netherlands, the incident band swash is saturated with respect to offshore wave height. Conversely, on the intermediate and reflective beaches, the amplitudes of both incident and infragravity swash variance grow with increasing offshore wave height. While infragravity band swash at all sites appears to increase linearly with offshore wave height, the magnitudes of the response are somewhat greater on reflective beaches than on dissipative beaches. This means that for the same offshore wave conditions the swash on a steeper foreshore will be larger than that on a more gently sloping foreshore. The potential control of the surf zone slope on infragravity band swash is examined at Duck, North Carolina, (0.3 < \\xi0 < 4.0), where significant differences in the relationship between swash

  15. Climate Control Load Reduction Strategies for Electric Drive Vehicles in Warm Weather

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, M. A.; Chaney, L.; Rugh, J. P.

    2015-04-30

    Passenger compartment climate control is one of the largest auxiliary loads on a vehicle. Like conventional vehicles, electric vehicles (EVs) require climate control to maintain occupant comfort and safety, but cabin heating and air conditioning have a negative impact on driving range for all electric vehicles. Range reduction caused by climate control and other factors is a barrier to widespread adoption of EVs. Reducing the thermal loads on the climate control system will extend driving range, thereby reducing consumer range anxiety and increasing the market penetration of EVs. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have investigated strategies for vehicle climate control load reduction, with special attention toward EVs. Outdoor vehicle thermal testing was conducted on two 2012 Ford Focus Electric vehicles to evaluate thermal management strategies for warm weather, including solar load reduction and cabin pre-ventilation. An advanced thermal test manikin was used to assess a zonal approach to climate control. In addition, vehicle thermal analysis was used to support testing by exploring thermal load reduction strategies, evaluating occupant thermal comfort, and calculating EV range impacts. Through stationary cooling tests and vehicle simulations, a zonal cooling configuration demonstrated range improvement of 6%-15%, depending on the drive cycle. A combined cooling configuration that incorporated thermal load reduction and zonal cooling strategies showed up to 33% improvement in EV range.

  16. Krylov vector methods for model reduction and control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Tzu-Jeng; Craig, Roy R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Krylov vectors and the concept of parameter matching are combined here to develop model-reduction algorithms for structural dynamics systems. The method is derived for a structural dynamics system described by a second-order matrix differential equation. The reduced models are shown to have a promising application in the control of flexible structures. It can eliminate control and observation spillovers while requiring only the dynamic spillover terms to be considered. A model-order reduction example and a flexible structure control example are provided to show the efficacy of the method.

  17. 46 CFR 504.91 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 504.91 Section 504.91 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PROCEDURES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS § 504.91 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to...

  18. 46 CFR 540.91 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 540.91 Section 540.91 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN... that agencies display a current control number assigned by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each agency information collection requirement: Section Current OMB Control No....

  19. 46 CFR 540.91 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 540.91 Section 540.91 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN... that agencies display a current control number assigned by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each agency information collection requirement: Section Current OMB Control No....

  20. 46 CFR 540.91 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Reduction Act. 540.91 Section 540.91 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN... that agencies display a current control number assigned by the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each agency information collection requirement: Section Current OMB Control No....

  1. 46 CFR 401.105 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 401.105 Section 401.105 Shipping COAST GUARD (GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE), DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE REGULATIONS General § 401.105 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the...

  2. 46 CFR 401.105 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 401.105 Section 401.105 Shipping COAST GUARD (GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE), DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE REGULATIONS General § 401.105 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the...

  3. 46 CFR 401.105 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 401.105 Section 401.105 Shipping COAST GUARD (GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE), DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE REGULATIONS General § 401.105 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the...

  4. 46 CFR 401.105 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 401.105 Section 401.105 Shipping COAST GUARD (GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE), DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE REGULATIONS General § 401.105 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the...

  5. 46 CFR 401.105 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 401.105 Section 401.105 Shipping COAST GUARD (GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE), DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GREAT LAKES PILOTAGE REGULATIONS General § 401.105 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the...

  6. 46 CFR 110.01-2 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 110.01-2 Section 110.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Applicability § 110.01-2 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to...

  7. 46 CFR 504.91 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 504.91 Section 504.91 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PROCEDURES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS § 504.91 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the...

  8. 46 CFR 504.91 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 504.91 Section 504.91 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PROCEDURES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS § 504.91 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the...

  9. 46 CFR 504.91 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 504.91 Section 504.91 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PROCEDURES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS § 504.91 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the...

  10. 46 CFR 504.91 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 504.91 Section 504.91 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PROCEDURES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ANALYSIS § 504.91 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the...

  11. 46 CFR 515.91 - OMB control number assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control number assigned pursuant to the Paperwork... Compensation § 515.91 OMB control number assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. The Commission has..., as amended. In accordance with that Act, agencies are required to display a currently valid...

  12. 46 CFR 67.14 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork...) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS General § 67.14 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the...

  13. 46 CFR 67.14 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork...) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS General § 67.14 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the...

  14. 46 CFR 67.14 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork...) DOCUMENTATION AND MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS General § 67.14 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. (a) Purpose. This section collects and displays the...

  15. 46 CFR 515.91 - OMB control number assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false OMB control number assigned pursuant to the Paperwork... Compensation § 515.91 OMB control number assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. The Commission has..., as amended. In accordance with that Act, agencies are required to display a currently valid...

  16. 46 CFR 107.05 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 107.05 Section 107.05 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.05 OMB control numbers assigned...

  17. 46 CFR 107.05 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 107.05 Section 107.05 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.05 OMB control numbers assigned...

  18. 46 CFR 107.05 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 107.05 Section 107.05 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.05 OMB control numbers assigned...

  19. 46 CFR 107.05 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 107.05 Section 107.05 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.05 OMB control numbers assigned...

  20. 46 CFR 107.05 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 107.05 Section 107.05 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION General § 107.05 OMB control numbers assigned...

  1. 46 CFR 110.01-2 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 110.01-2 Section 110.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Applicability § 110.01-2 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to...

  2. 46 CFR 110.01-2 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 110.01-2 Section 110.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Applicability § 110.01-2 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to...

  3. 46 CFR 110.01-2 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 110.01-2 Section 110.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Applicability § 110.01-2 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to...

  4. 46 CFR 110.01-2 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 110.01-2 Section 110.01-2 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Applicability § 110.01-2 OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to...

  5. 18 CFR 389.101 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 389.101 Section 389.101 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES OMB CONTROL...

  6. 46 CFR 50.01-20 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 50.01-20 Section 50.01-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING GENERAL PROVISIONS Basis and Purpose of Regulations § 50.01-20 OMB control numbers...

  7. 46 CFR 188.01-15 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 188.01-15 Section 188.01-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Authority and Purpose § 188.01-15 OMB control numbers...

  8. 46 CFR 188.01-15 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 188.01-15 Section 188.01-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Authority and Purpose § 188.01-15 OMB control numbers...

  9. 42 CFR 456.522 - Content of request for variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from Time..., mental hospital, and ICF located within a 50-mile radius of the facility; (e) The distance and...

  10. 42 CFR 456.525 - Request for renewal of variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from Time...'s satisfaction, that the remote facility continues to meet the requirements of §§ 456.521 through...

  11. Harm reduction in U.S. tobacco control: Constructions in textual news media.

    PubMed

    Eversman, Michael H

    2015-06-01

    U.S. tobacco control has long emphasized abstinence, yet quitting smoking is hard and cessation rates low. Tobacco harm reduction alternatives espouse substituting cigarettes with safer nicotine and tobacco products. Policy shifts embracing tobacco harm reduction have increased media attention, yet it remains controversial. Discourse theory posits language as fluid, and socially constructed meaning as neither absolute nor neutral, elevating certain views over others while depicting "discursive struggle" between them. While an abstinence-based framework dominates tobacco policy, discourse theory suggests constructions of nicotine and tobacco use can change, for example by positioning tobacco harm reduction more favorably. Textual discourse analysis was used to explore constructions of tobacco harm reduction in 478 (308 original) U.S. textual news media articles spanning 1996-2014. Using keyword database sampling, retrieved articles were analyzed first as discrete recording units and then to identify emergent thematic content. Constructions of tobacco harm reduction shifted over this time, revealing tension among industry and policy interests through competing definitions of tobacco harm reduction, depictions of its underlying science, and accounts of regulatory matters including tobacco industry support for harm reduction and desired marketing and taxation legislation. Heightened salience surrounding tobacco harm reduction and electronic cigarettes suggests their greater acceptance in U.S. tobacco control. Various media depictions construct harm reduction as a temporary means to cessation, and conflict with other constructions of it that place no subjective value on continued "safer" tobacco/nicotine use. Constructions of science largely obscure claims of the veracity of tobacco harm reduction, with conflict surrounding appropriate public health benchmarks for tobacco policy and health risks of nicotine use. Taxation policies and e-cigarette pricing relative to

  12. Controllable reduction of graphene oxide and its application during the fabrication of high dielectric constant composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Xu, Peng; Yao, Haibo; Chen, Wenhui; Zhao, Jianying; Kang, Chuanqing; Bian, Zheng; Gao, Lianxun; Guo, Haiquan

    2017-10-01

    The synthesis of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) with various reduction extents was carried out in organic solvent using 1,4-diiodobutane as the reducing agent at moderate temperatures. Results showed that the C/O ratio of RGO nanosheet surface could be tailored by adjusting the ratio of graphene oxide (GO) and reducing agent. The controllable reduction strategy was applied to the fabrication of high dielectric constant graphene/polyimide composites via the in situ reduction of GO. The reduction extents of RGO in polymer matrix can be readily manipulated just through altering the addition of the reducing agent. The dielectric constants of gaphene/polyimide composites were significantly enhanced with the increasing of the reduction extent of RGO. Moreover, the mechanical properties of the composites were also affected by the reduction extent of RGO due to the decreases of the oxygen functional groups of RGO surface. Hence, the in situ controllable reduction of GO should be quite an ideal method for the fabrication of high dielectric constant composites with the tunable combination properties.

  13. Highly controllable and green reduction of graphene oxide to flexible graphene film with high strength

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Wubo; Zhao, Zongbin; Hu, Han; Gogotsi, Yury; Qiu, Jieshan

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Highly controllable and green reduction of GO to chemical converted graphene (CCG) was achieved with sodium citrate as a facile reductant. Self-assembly of the as-made CCG sheets results in a flexible CCG film, of which the tensile strength strongly depends on the deoxygenation degree of graphene sheets. - Highlights: • Graphene was synthesized by an effective and environmentally friendly approach. • We introduced a facile X-ray diffraction analysis method to investigate the reduction process from graphene oxide to graphene. • Flexible graphene films were prepared by self-assembly of the graphene sheets. • The strength of the graphene films depends on the reduction degree of graphene. - Abstract: Graphene film with high strength was fabricated by the assembly of graphene sheets derived from graphene oxide (GO) in an effective and environmentally friendly approach. Highly controllable reduction of GO to chemical converted graphene (CCG) was achieved with sodium citrate as a facile reductant, in which the reduction process was monitored by XRD analysis and UV–vis absorption spectra. Self-assembly of the as-made CCG sheets results in a flexible CCG film. This method may open an avenue to the easy and scalable preparation of graphene film with high strength which has promising potentials in many fields where strong, flexible and electrically conductive films are highly demanded.

  14. Analysis of Variance: Variably Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Gordon B.; Vowler, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    These authors have previously described how to use the "t" test to compare two groups. In this article, they describe the use of a different test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare more than two groups. ANOVA is a test of group differences: do at least two of the means differ from each other? ANOVA assumes (1) normal distribution…

  15. Active Vibration Control for Helicopter Interior Noise Reduction Using Power Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, J.; Chevva, K.; Sun, F.; Blanc, A.; Kim, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes work performed by United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) under Contract NNL11AA06C. The objective of this program is to develop technology to reduce helicopter interior noise resulting from multiple gear meshing frequencies. A novel active vibration control approach called Minimum Actuation Power (MAP) is developed. MAP is an optimal control strategy that minimizes the total input power into a structure by monitoring and varying the input power of controlling sources. MAP control was implemented without explicit knowledge of the phasing and magnitude of the excitation sources by driving the real part of the input power from the controlling sources to zero. It is shown that this occurs when the total mechanical input power from the excitation and controlling sources is a minimum. MAP theory is developed for multiple excitation sources with arbitrary relative phasing for single or multiple discrete frequencies and controlled by a single or multiple controlling sources. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of MAP for structural vibration reduction of a realistic rotorcraft interior structure. MAP control resulted in significant average global vibration reduction of a single frequency and multiple frequency excitations with one controlling actuator. Simulations also demonstrate the potential effectiveness of the observed vibration reductions on interior radiated noise.

  16. Back propagation neural network based control for the heating system of a polysilicon reduction furnace.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuhua; Chen, Kai; Bai, Libing; Dai, Meizhi

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the Back Propagation (BP) neural network based control strategy is proposed for the heating system of a polysilicon reduction furnace. It is applied to obtain the control signal I(d), which is used to adjust the heating power through operations of the silicon core temperature, furnace temperature, silicon core voltage, and resistance of the current control cycle. With the control signal I(d) the polycrystalline silicon can be heated from room temperature to the required temperature smoothly and steadily. The proposed BP network applied in this paper can obtain the accurate control signal I(d) and achieve the precise control purpose. This paper presents the principle of the BP network and demonstrates the effectiveness of the BP network in the heating system of a polysilicon reduction furnace by combining the simulation analysis with experimental results.

  17. Use of host population reduction to control wildlife infection: rabbits and paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, R S; Marion, G; White, P C L; Hutchings, M R

    2009-01-01

    Reduction in wildlife populations is a common method for the control of livestock infections which have wildlife hosts, but its success is dependent on the characteristics of the infection itself, as well as on the spatial and social structure of the wildlife host. Paratuberculosis (Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis; Map) is a widespread and difficult infection to control in livestock populations and also has possible links to Crohn's disease in humans. Rabbits have recently been identified as a key wildlife species in terms of paratuberculosis persistence in the environment and risk to the wider host community, including cattle. Here we use a spatially explicit stochastic simulation model of Map dynamics in rabbit populations to quantify the effects of rabbit population control on infection persistence. The model parameters were estimated from empirical studies of rabbit population dynamics and rabbit-to-rabbit routes of Map transmission. Three rabbit control strategies were compared: single unrepeated population reductions based on removing individual animals; single unrepeated population reductions based on removal of entire social groups; and repeated annual population reductions based on removing individual animals. Unrealistically high rabbit culls (>95% population reduction) are needed if infection is to be eradicated from local rabbit populations with a single one-off population reduction event, either of individuals or social groups. Repeated annual culls are more effective at reducing the prevalence of infection in rabbit populations and eradicating infection. However, annual population reductions of >40% are required over extended periods of time (many years). Thus, using an approach which is both highly conservative and parsimonious with respect to estimating lower bounds on the time to eradicate the infection, we find that Map is extremely persistent in rabbit populations and requires significant and prolonged effort to achieve control.

  18. Distributed Parameter Control of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for Diesel-Powered Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakravesh, Hallas

    The main scope of this work is to design a distributed parameter control for SCR, which is modelled by using coupled hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs). This is a boundary control problem where the control objectives are to reduce the amount of NOx emissions and ammonia slip as far as possible. Two strategies are used to control SCR. The first strategy includes using the direct transcription (DT) as the open-loop control technique. The second strategy includes the design of a closed-loop control technique that uses a new numerical method developed in this work, which combines the method of characteristics and spectral decomposition, and the characteristic-based nonlinear model predictive control (CBNMPC) as the control algorithm. The results show that the designed advanced controllers are able to achieve very high control performance in terms of NOx and ammonia slip reduction.

  19. Application of reduced-order controller to turbulent flows for drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keun H.; Cortelezzi, Luca; Kim, John; Speyer, Jason

    2001-05-01

    A reduced-order linear feedback controller is designed and applied to turbulent channel flow for drag reduction. From the linearized two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations a distributed feedback controller, which produces blowing/suction at the wall based on the measured turbulent streamwise wall-shear stress, is derived using model reduction techniques and linearquadratic-Gaussian/loop-transfer-recovery control synthesis. The quadratic cost criterion used for synthesis is composed of the streamwise wall-shear stress, which includes the control effort of blowing/suction. This distributed two-dimensional controller developed from a linear system theory is shown to reduce the skin friction by 10% in direct numerical simulations of a low-Reynolds number turbulent nonlinear channel flow. Spanwise shear-stress variation, not captured by the distributed two-dimensional controller, is suppressed by augmentation of a simple spanwise ad hoc control scheme. This augmented three-dimensional controller, which requires only the turbulent streamwise velocity gradient, results in a further reduction in the skin-friction drag. It is shown that the input power requirement is significantly less than the power saved by reduced drag. Other turbulence characteristics affected by these controllers are also discussed.

  20. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an active control surface located on the blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using individual blade control (IBC), which is implemented by an individually controlled aerodynamic surface located on each blade, is presented. For this exploratory study, a simple offset-hinged spring restrained model of the blade is used with fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics for each blade. Deterministic controllers based on local and global system models are implemented to reduce 4/rev hub loads using both an actively controlled aerodynamic surface on each blade as well as conventional IBC, where the complete blade undergoes cyclic pitch change. The effectiveness of the two approaches for simultaneous reduction of the 4/rev hub shears and hub moments is compared. Conventional IBC requires considerably more power to achieve approximately the same level of vibration reduction as that obtained by implementing IBC using an active control surface located on the outboard segment of the blade. The effect of blade torsional flexibility on the vibration reduction effectiveness of the actively controlled surface was also considered and it was found that this parameter has a very substantial influence.

  1. Vibration reduction in helicopter rotors using an active control surface located on the blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millott, T. A.; Friedmann, P. P.

    1992-01-01

    A feasibility study of vibration reduction in a four-bladed helicopter rotor using individual blade control (IBC), which is implemented by an individually controlled aerodynamic surface located on each blade, is presented. For this exploratory study, a simple offset-hinged spring restrained model of the blade is used with fully coupled flap-lag-torsional dynamics for each blade. Deterministic controllers based on local and global system models are implemented to reduce 4/rev hub loads using both an actively controlled aerodynamic surface on each blade as well as conventional IBC, where the complete blade undergoes cyclic pitch change. The effectiveness of the two approaches for simultaneous reduction of the 4/rev hub shears and hub moments is compared. Conventional IBC requires considerably more power to achieve approximately the same level of vibration reduction as that obtained by implementing IBC using an active control surface located on the outboard segment of the blade. The effect of blade torsional flexibility on the vibration reduction effectiveness of the actively controlled surface was also considered and it was found that this parameter has a very substantial influence.

  2. Combined wind turbine fatigue and ultimate load reduction by individual blade control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y.; Leithead, W. E.

    2014-06-01

    If each blade of the wind turbine has individual pitch actuator, there is possibility of employing the pitch system to mitigate structural loads through advanced control methods. Previously, considerable reduction of blade lifetime equivalent fatigue loads has been achieved by Individual Blade Control (IBC) and in addition, it has also been shown the potential in blade ultimate loads reduction. However, both fatigue and ultimate loads impact on the design and life of wind turbine blades. In this paper, the design and application of IBC that concurrently reduce both blade fatigue and ultimate loads is investigated. The contributions of blade load spectral components, which are 1P, 2P and edgewise mode from blade in-plane and/or out-of-plane bending moments, are firstly explored. Four different control options for reducing various combinations of these load components are compared. In response to the different spectral peaks of both fatigue and ultimate loads, the controller has been designed so that it can act on different frequency components which vary with wind speed. The performance of the IBC controller on fatigue and ultimate load reduction is assessed by simulating a 5MW exemplar wind turbine. Simulation results show that with a proper selection of controlling inputs at different wind speed, the use of a single combined IBC can achieve satisfactory reduction on both fatigue and ultimate loads.

  3. Stress Variances Among Informal Hospice Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Washington, Karla; Burt, Stephanie; Shaunfield, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Care interventions are not routinely provided for hospice caregivers, despite widespread documentation of the burden and toll of the caregiving experience. Assessing caregivers for team interventions (ACT) proposes that holistic patient and family care includes ongoing caregiver needs assessment of primary, secondary, and intrapsychic stressors. In this study, our goal was to describe the variance in stressors for caregivers to establish evidence for the ACT theoretical framework. We used secondary interview data from a randomized controlled trial to analyze hospice caregiver discussions about concerns. We found variances in stress types, suggesting that caregiver interventions should range from knowledge and skill building to cognitive-behavioral interventions that aid in coping. Family members who assume the role of primary caregiver for a dying loved one need to be routinely assessed by hospice providers for customized interventions. PMID:22673093

  4. Detecting structural variances of Co3O4 catalysts by controlling beam-induced sample alterations in the vacuum of a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kisielowski, C; Frei, H; Specht, P; Sharp, I D; Haber, J A; Helveg, S

    2017-01-01

    This article summarizes core aspects of beam-sample interactions in research that aims at exploiting the ability to detect single atoms at atomic resolution by mid-voltage transmission electron microscopy. Investigating the atomic structure of catalytic Co3O4 nanocrystals underscores how indispensable it is to rigorously control electron dose rates and total doses to understand native material properties on this scale. We apply in-line holography with variable dose rates to achieve this goal. Genuine object structures can be maintained if dose rates below ~100 e/Å(2)s are used and the contrast required for detection of single atoms is generated by capturing large image series. Threshold doses for the detection of single atoms are estimated. An increase of electron dose rates and total doses to common values for high resolution imaging of solids stimulates object excitations that restructure surfaces, interfaces, and defects and cause grain reorientation or growth. We observe a variety of previously unknown atom configurations in surface proximity of the Co3O4 spinel structure. These are hidden behind broadened diffraction patterns in reciprocal space but become visible in real space by solving the phase problem. An exposure of the Co3O4 spinel structure to water vapor or other gases induces drastic structure alterations that can be captured in this manner.

  5. Detecting structural variances of Co3O4 catalysts by controlling beam-induced sample alterations in the vacuum of a transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Kisielowski, C.; Frei, H.; Specht, P.; ...

    2016-11-02

    This article summarizes core aspects of beam-sample interactions in research that aims at exploiting the ability to detect single atoms at atomic resolution by mid-voltage transmission electron microscopy. Investigating the atomic structure of catalytic Co3O4 nanocrystals underscores how indispensable it is to rigorously control electron dose rates and total doses to understand native material properties on this scale. We apply in-line holography with variable dose rates to achieve this goal. Genuine object structures can be maintained if dose rates below ~100 e/Å2s are used and the contrast required for detection of single atoms is generated by capturing large image series. Thresholdmore » doses for the detection of single atoms are estimated. An increase of electron dose rates and total doses to common values for high resolution imaging of solids stimulates object excitations that restructure surfaces, interfaces, and defects and cause grain reorientation or growth. We observe a variety of previously unknown atom configurations in surface proximity of the Co3O4 spinel structure. These are hidden behind broadened diffraction patterns in reciprocal space but become visible in real space by solving the phase problem. Finallly, an exposure of the Co3O4 spinel structure to water vapor or other gases induces drastic structure alterations that can be captured in this manner.« less

  6. Intra-Operative Fluid Management in Adult Neurosurgical Patients Undergoing Intracranial Tumour Surgery: Randomised Control Trial Comparing Pulse Pressure Variance (PPV) and Central Venous Pressure (CVP)

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Serina Ruth; Kumar, Amar Nandha; Korula, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluid management in neurosurgery presents specific challenges to the anaesthesiologist. Dynamic para-meters like Pulse Pressure Variation (PPV) have been used successfully to guide fluid management. Aim To compare PPV against Central Venous Pressure (CVP) in neurosurgical patients to assess hemodynamic stability and perfusion status. Materials and Methods This was a single centre prospective randomised control trial at a tertiary care centre. A total of 60 patients undergoing intracranial tumour excision in supine and lateral positions were randomised to two groups (Group 1, CVP n=30), (Group 2, PPV n=30). Intra-operative fluid management was titrated to maintain baseline CVP in Group 1(5-10cm of water) and in Group 2 fluids were given to maintain PPV less than 13%. Acid base status, vital signs and blood loss were monitored. Results Although intra-operative hypotension and acid base changes were comparable between the groups, the patients in the CVP group had more episodes of hypotension requiring fluid boluses in the first 24 hours post surgery. {CVP group median (25, 75) 2400ml (1850, 3110) versus PPV group 2100ml (1350, 2200) p=0.03} The patients in the PPV group received more fluids than the CVP group which was clinically significant. {2250 ml (1500, 3000) versus 1500ml (1200, 2000) median (25, 75) (p=0.002)}. The blood loss was not significantly different between the groups The median blood loss in the CVP group was 600ml and in the PPV group was 850 ml; p value 0.09. Conclusion PPV can be used as a reliable index to guide fluid management in neurosurgical patients undergoing tumour excision surgery in supine and lateral positions and can effectively augment CVP as a guide to fluid management. Patients in PPV group had better hemodynamic stability and less post operative fluid requirement. PMID:27437329

  7. Comparison of individual pitch and smart rotor control strategies for load reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumley, C.; Leithead, W.; Jamieson, P.; Bossanyi, E.; Graham, M.

    2014-06-01

    Load reduction is increasingly seen as an essential part of controller and wind turbine design. On large multi-MW wind turbines that experience high levels of wind shear and turbulence across the rotor, individual pitch control and smart rotor control are being considered. While individual pitch control involves adjusting the pitch of each blade individually to reduce the cyclic loadings on the rotor, smart rotor control involves activating control devices distributed along the blades to alter the local aerodynamics of the blades. Here we investigate the effectiveness of using a DQ-axis control and a distributed (independent) control for both individual pitch and trailing edge flap smart rotor control. While load reductions are similar amongst the four strategies across a wide range of variables, including blade root bending moments, yaw bearing and shaft, the pitch actuator requirements vary. The smart rotor pitch actuator has reduced travel, rates, accelerations and power requirements than that of the individual pitch controlled wind turbines. This benefit alone however would be hard to justify the added design complexities of using a smart rotor, which can be seen as an alternative to upgrading the pitch actuator and bearing. In addition, it is found that the independent control strategy is apt at roles that the collective pitch usually targets, such as tower motion and speed control, and it is perhaps here, in supplementing other systems, that the future of the smart rotor lies.

  8. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Le Maître, O. P.; Knio, O. M.; Moraes, A.

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  9. Numerical Investigation of Rotorcraft Fuselage Drag Reduction Using Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Schaeffler, Norman W.

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of unsteady zero-net-mass-flux jets for fuselage drag reduction was evaluated numerically on a generic rotorcraft fuselage in forward flight with a rotor. Previous efforts have shown significant fuselage drag reduction using flow control for an isolated fuselage by experiment and numerical simulation. This work will evaluate a flow control strategy, that was originally developed on an isolated fuselage, in a more relevant environment that includes the effects of a rotor. Evaluation of different slot heights and jet velocity ratios were performed. Direct comparisons between an isolated fuselage and rotor/fuselage simulations were made showing similar flow control performance at a -3deg fuselage angle-of-attack condition. However, this was not the case for a -5deg angle-of-attack condition where the performance between the isolated fuselage and rotor/fuselage were different. The fuselage flow control resulted in a 17% drag reduction for a peak C(sub mu) of 0.0069 in a forward flight simulation where mu = 0:35 and CT/sigma = 0:08. The CFD flow control results also predicted a favorable 22% reduction of the fuselage download at this same condition, which can have beneficial compounding effects on the overall performance of the vehicle. This numerical investigation was performed in order to provide guidance for a future 1/3 scale wind tunnel experiment to be performed at the NASA 14-by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel.

  10. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    The third-difference approach to modified Allan variance (MVAR) leads to a tractable formula for a measure of MVAR estimator confidence, the equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), in the presence of power-law phase noise. The effect of estimation stride on edf is tabulated. A simple approximation for edf is given, and its errors are tabulated. A theorem allowing conservative estimates of edf in the presence of compound noise processes is given.

  11. Comparison of imputation variance estimators.

    PubMed

    Hughes, R A; Sterne, Jac; Tilling, K

    2016-12-01

    Appropriate imputation inference requires both an unbiased imputation estimator and an unbiased variance estimator. The commonly used variance estimator, proposed by Rubin, can be biased when the imputation and analysis models are misspecified and/or incompatible. Robins and Wang proposed an alternative approach, which allows for such misspecification and incompatibility, but it is considerably more complex. It is unknown whether in practice Robins and Wang's multiple imputation procedure is an improvement over Rubin's multiple imputation. We conducted a critical review of these two multiple imputation approaches, a re-sampling method called full mechanism bootstrapping and our modified Rubin's multiple imputation procedure via simulations and an application to data. We explored four common scenarios of misspecification and incompatibility. In general, for a moderate sample size (n = 1000), Robins and Wang's multiple imputation produced the narrowest confidence intervals, with acceptable coverage. For a small sample size (n = 100) Rubin's multiple imputation, overall, outperformed the other methods. Full mechanism bootstrapping was inefficient relative to the other methods and required modelling of the missing data mechanism under the missing at random assumption. Our proposed modification showed an improvement over Rubin's multiple imputation in the presence of misspecification. Overall, Rubin's multiple imputation variance estimator can fail in the presence of incompatibility and/or misspecification. For unavoidable incompatibility and/or misspecification, Robins and Wang's multiple imputation could provide more robust inferences. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Implications of Limited Thermophilicity of Nitrite Reduction for Control of Sulfide Production in Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Chen, Chuan; Okpala, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate reduction to nitrite in oil fields appears to be more thermophilic than the subsequent reduction of nitrite. Concentrated microbial consortia from oil fields reduced both nitrate and nitrite at 40 and 45°C but only nitrate at and above 50°C. The abundance of the nirS gene correlated with mesophilic nitrite reduction activity. Thauera and Pseudomonas were the dominant mesophilic nitrate-reducing bacteria (mNRB), whereas Petrobacter and Geobacillus were the dominant thermophilic NRB (tNRB) in these consortia. The mNRB Thauera sp. strain TK001, isolated in this study, reduced nitrate and nitrite at 40 and 45°C but not at 50°C, whereas the tNRB Petrobacter sp. strain TK002 and Geobacillus sp. strain TK003 reduced nitrate to nitrite but did not reduce nitrite further from 50 to 70°C. Testing of 12 deposited pure cultures of tNRB with 4 electron donors indicated reduction of nitrate in 40 of 48 and reduction of nitrite in only 9 of 48 incubations. Nitrate is injected into high-temperature oil fields to prevent sulfide formation (souring) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which are strongly inhibited by nitrite. Injection of cold seawater to produce oil creates mesothermic zones. Our results suggest that preventing the temperature of these zones from dropping below 50°C will limit the reduction of nitrite, allowing more effective souring control. IMPORTANCE Nitrite can accumulate at temperatures of 50 to 70°C, because nitrate reduction extends to higher temperatures than the subsequent reduction of nitrite. This is important for understanding the fundamentals of thermophilicity and for the control of souring in oil fields catalyzed by SRB, which are strongly inhibited by nitrite. PMID:27208132

  13. Torque Ripple Reduction in Direct Torque Control Based Induction Motor using Intelligent Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar, Ambarapu; Vijaya Kumar, M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents intelligent control scheme together with conventional control scheme to overcome the problems with uncertainties in the structure encountered with classical model based design of induction motor drive based on direct torque control (DTC). It allows high dynamic performance to be obtained with very simple hysteresis control scheme. Direct control of the torque and flux is achieved by proper selection of inverter voltage space vector through a lookup table. This paper also presents the application of intelligent controllers like neural network and fuzzy logic controllers to control induction machines with DTC. Intelligent controllers are used to emulate the state selector of the DTC. With implementation of intelligent controllers the system is also verified and proved to be operated stably with reduced torque ripple. The proposed method validity and effectiveness has been verified by computer simulations using Matlab/Simulink®. These results are compared with the ones obtained with a classical DTC using proportional integral speed controller.

  14. Variance in the Efficacy of Brief Interventions to Reduce Hazardous and Harmful Alcohol Consumption Between Injury and Noninjury Patients in Emergency Departments: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Elzerbi, Catherine; Donoghue, Kim; Boniface, Sadie; Drummond, Colin

    2017-06-29

    We adopt a comparative framework to measure the extent to which variance in the efficacy of alcohol brief interventions to reduce hazardous and harmful drinking at less than or equal to 5-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up in emergency department settings can be determined by differences between study populations (targeted injury and noninjury specific). A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials published before September 2016 was undertaken. Twenty-three high-quality and methodologically similar randomized controlled trials were eligible, with a total number of 15,173 participants included. Primary outcome measure was efficacy of brief intervention compared with a control group in reducing quantity of alcohol consumed. An inverse variance model was applied to measure the effect of treatment in standard mean differences for brief intervention and control groups. At 6-month follow-up, an effect in favor of brief intervention over control was identified for targeted injury studies (standardized mean difference=-0.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.17 to -0.02; I(2)=0%). For pooled noninjury-specific studies, small benefits of brief intervention were evident at less than or equal to 5-month follow-up (standardized mean difference=-0.15; 95% CI -0.24 to -0.07; I(2)=0%), at 6-month follow-up (standardized mean difference=-0.08; 95% CI -0.14 to -0.01; I(2)=1%), and at 12-month follow-up (standardized mean difference=-0.08; 95% CI -0.15 to -0.01; I(2)=0%). Meta-analysis identified noninjury-specific studies as associated with better response to brief intervention than targeted injury studies. However, the inclusion of injured patients with noninjured ones in the experimental and control groups of noninjury-specific studies limited the interpretation of this finding. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of opposition control to disks actuators for turbulent drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosh Aghdam, Sohrab; Ricco, Pierre; Seddighi, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations have been performed to study an active control technique in which the steadily rotating flush-mounted of either disks or rings is combined with the opposition control approach of Choi et al. (J. Fluid Mech. 262, 75). Active blowing and suction are applied such that the controlled velocity on the wall has the same amplitude but opposite sign to that of the optimum detection plane at y+ = 15 . Various configurations are examined using the out-of-phase v and w control, and the steadily rotating discs and rings. The net drag reduction and turbulence structure of the controlled cases are studied and compared with those when individual controls are applied. The results show that when the ``optimum'' rotating disks case of Ricco and Hahn (J. Fluid Mech. 722, 267) are used together with the opposition control of wall-normal velocity, an additional drag reduction of 5% is achieved. Moreover, in the particular case where the disks are replaced with the rings configuration, the drag reduction is better improved reaching a value of 30%. Airbus Group.

  16. The role of harm reduction in controlling HIV among injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    Wodak, Alex; McLeod, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Injecting drug users (IDU) now account for one in 10 new HIV infections world wide. Yet it has been known since the early 1990s that HIV among IDU can be effectively, safely and cost-effectively controlled by the early and vigorous implementation of a comprehensive package of strategies known as ’harm reduction’. This concept means that decreasing drug-related harms is accorded an even higher priority than reduction of drug consumption. Strategies required involve: explicit and peer-based education about the risk of HIV from sharing injecting equipment; needle syringe programmes; drug treatment (including especially opiate substitution treatment) and community development. Many countries experiencing or threatened by an HIV epidemic among IDU have now adopted harm reduction but often implementation has been too little and too late. Although coverage is slowly improving in many countries, HIV is still spreading faster among IDU than harm reduction programmes while coverage in correctional centres lags far behind community settings. The scientific debate about harm reduction is now over. National and international support for harm reduction is growing while almost all the major UN organizations responsible for drug policy now support harm reduction. Only a small number of countries, led by the USA, are still vehemently opposed to harm reduction. Excessive reliance on drug law enforcement remains the major barrier to increased adoption of harm reduction. Sometimes zealous drug law enforcement undermines harm reduction. A more balanced approach to drug law enforcement is required with illicit drug use recognized primarily as a health and social problem. PMID:18641473

  17. Quantitative Cyber Risk Reduction Estimation Methodology for a Small Scada Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Miles A. McQueen; Wayne F. Boyer; Mark A. Flynn; George A. Beitel

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new methodology for obtaining a quick quantitative measurement of the risk reduction achieved when a control system is modified with the intent to improve cyber security defense against external attackers. The proposed methodology employs a directed graph called a compromise graph, where the nodes represent stages of a potential attack and the edges represent the expected time-to-compromise for differing attacker skill levels. Time-to-compromise is modeled as a function of known vulnerabilities and attacker skill level. The methodology was used to calculate risk reduction estimates for a specific SCADA system and for a specific set of control system security remedial actions. Despite an 86% reduction in the total number of vulnerabilities, the estimated time-to-compromise was increased only by about 3 to 30% depending on target and attacker skill level.

  18. Controlled Reduction with Unactuated Cyclic Variables: Application to 3D Bipedal Walking with Passive Yaw Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Righetti, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows that viscous damping can shape momentum conservation laws in a manner that stabilizes yaw rotation and enables steering for underactuated 3D walking. We first show that unactuated cyclic variables can be controlled by passively shaped conservation laws given a stabilizing controller in the actuated coordinates. We then exploit this result to realize controlled geometric reduction with multiple unactuated cyclic variables. We apply this underactuated control strategy to a five-link 3D biped to produce exponentially stable straight-ahead walking and steering in the presence of passive yawing. PMID:25554709

  19. Controlled Reduction with Unactuated Cyclic Variables: Application to 3D Bipedal Walking with Passive Yaw Rotation.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Robert D; Righetti, Ludovic

    2013-10-01

    This paper shows that viscous damping can shape momentum conservation laws in a manner that stabilizes yaw rotation and enables steering for underactuated 3D walking. We first show that unactuated cyclic variables can be controlled by passively shaped conservation laws given a stabilizing controller in the actuated coordinates. We then exploit this result to realize controlled geometric reduction with multiple unactuated cyclic variables. We apply this underactuated control strategy to a five-link 3D biped to produce exponentially stable straight-ahead walking and steering in the presence of passive yawing.

  20. Fit 5 Kids TV reduction program for Latino preschoolers: A cluster randomized controlled trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reducing Latino preschoolers' TV viewing is needed to reduce their risk of obesity and other chronic diseases. This study's objective was to evaluate the Fit 5 Kids (F5K) TV reduction program's impact on Latino preschooler's TV viewing. The study design was a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT...

  1. Reductions in Anxiety and Improvements in Teaching Associated with Cue-Controlled Relaxation Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzicki, Joseph A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Examined efficacy of cue-controlled relaxation in reducing anxiety of two elementary school teachers. Both teachers exhibited significant reductions in motoric manifestations of anxiety. Both showed increases in rewarding behavior. They reduced disapproving behavior to zero on most days. Training in self-management of stress significantly affected…

  2. INVESTIGATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION IMPACT ON MERCURY SPECIATION UNDER SIMULATED NOX EMISSION CONTROL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology is being increasingly applied for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from coal-fired boilers. Some recent field and pilot studies suggest that the operation of SCR could affect the chemical form of mercury in the coal com...

  3. 27 CFR 25.5 - OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 25.5 Section 25.5 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of...

  4. 29 CFR 1915.8 - OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false OMB control numbers under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 1915.8 Section 1915.8 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS FOR SHIPYARD...

  5. 27 CFR 25.5 - OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 25.5 Section 25.5 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of...

  6. 27 CFR 25.5 - OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 25.5 Section 25.5 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of...

  7. 27 CFR 25.5 - OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 25.5 Section 25.5 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of...

  8. 27 CFR 25.5 - OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false OMB control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 25.5 Section 25.5 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of...

  9. 15 CFR 806.18 - OMB control numbers assigned to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false OMB control numbers assigned to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 806.18 Section 806.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DIRECT...

  10. INVESTIGATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION IMPACT ON MERCURY SPECIATION UNDER SIMULATED NOX EMISSION CONTROL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology is being increasingly applied for controlling emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from coal-fired boilers. Some recent field and pilot studies suggest that the operation of SCR could affect the chemical form of mercury in the coal com...

  11. 46 CFR 1.01-35 - OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false OMB control numbers assigned pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act. 1.01-35 Section 1.01-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC ORGANIZATION, GENERAL COURSE AND METHODS GOVERNING MARINE SAFETY FUNCTIONS...

  12. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Gagel, Bernd . E-mail: BGagel@UKAachen.de; Demirel, Cengiz M.P.; Kientopf, Aline; Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc; Stanzel, Sven; Breuer, Christian; Asadpour, Branka; Jansen, Thomas; Holy, Richard; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Eble, Michael J.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins.

  13. Drag reduction of a car model by linear genetic programming control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruiying; Noack, Bernd R.; Cordier, Laurent; Borée, Jacques; Harambat, Fabien

    2017-08-01

    We investigate open- and closed-loop active control for aerodynamic drag reduction of a car model. Turbulent flow around a blunt-edged Ahmed body is examined at ReH≈ 3× 105 based on body height. The actuation is performed with pulsed jets at all trailing edges (multiple inputs) combined with a Coanda deflection surface. The flow is monitored with 16 pressure sensors distributed at the rear side (multiple outputs). We apply a recently developed model-free control strategy building on genetic programming in Dracopoulos and Kent (Neural Comput Appl 6:214-228, 1997) and Gautier et al. (J Fluid Mech 770:424-441, 2015). The optimized control laws comprise periodic forcing, multi-frequency forcing and sensor-based feedback including also time-history information feedback and combinations thereof. Key enabler is linear genetic programming (LGP) as powerful regression technique for optimizing the multiple-input multiple-output control laws. The proposed LGP control can select the best open- or closed-loop control in an unsupervised manner. Approximately 33% base pressure recovery associated with 22% drag reduction is achieved in all considered classes of control laws. Intriguingly, the feedback actuation emulates periodic high-frequency forcing. In addition, the control identified automatically the only sensor which listens to high-frequency flow components with good signal to noise ratio. Our control strategy is, in principle, applicable to all multiple actuators and sensors experiments.

  14. Point defect reduction in wide bandgap semiconductors by defect quasi Fermi level control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, P.; Hoffmann, M. P.; Kaess, F.; Bryan, Z.; Bryan, I.; Bobea, M.; Klump, A.; Tweedie, J.; Kirste, R.; Mita, S.; Gerhold, M.; Collazo, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2016-11-01

    A theoretical framework for a general approach to reduce point defect density in materials via control of defect quasi Fermi level (dQFL) is presented. The control of dQFL is achieved via excess minority carrier generation. General guidelines for controlling dQFL that lead to a significant reduction in compensating point defects in any doped material is proposed. The framework introduces and incorporates the effects of various factors that control the efficacy of the defect reduction process such as defect level, defect formation energy, bandgap, and excess minority carrier density. Modified formation energy diagrams are proposed, which illustrate the effect of the quasi Fermi level control on the defect formation energies. These formation energy diagrams provide powerful tools to determine the feasibility and requirements to produce the desired reduction in specified point defects. An experimental study of the effect of excess minority carriers on point defect incorporation in GaN and AlGaN shows an excellent quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions. Illumination at energies larger than the bandgap is employed as a means to generate excess minority carriers. The case studies with CN in Si doped GaN, H and VN in Mg doped GaN and VM-2ON in Si doped Al0.65Ga0.35N revealed a significant reduction in impurities in agreement with the proposed theory. Since compensating point defects control the material performance (this is particularly challenging in wide and ultra wide bandgap materials), dQFL control is a highly promising technique with wide scope and may be utilized to improve the properties of various materials systems and performance of devices based upon them.

  15. Genotypic-specific variance in Caenorhabditis elegans lifetime fecundity

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, S Anaid; Viney, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Organisms live in heterogeneous environments, so strategies that maximze fitness in such environments will evolve. Variation in traits is important because it is the raw material on which natural selection acts during evolution. Phenotypic variation is usually thought to be due to genetic variation and/or environmentally induced effects. Therefore, genetically identical individuals in a constant environment should have invariant traits. Clearly, genetically identical individuals do differ phenotypically, usually thought to be due to stochastic processes. It is now becoming clear, especially from studies of unicellular species, that phenotypic variance among genetically identical individuals in a constant environment can be genetically controlled and that therefore, in principle, this can be subject to selection. However, there has been little investigation of these phenomena in multicellular species. Here, we have studied the mean lifetime fecundity (thus a trait likely to be relevant to reproductive success), and variance in lifetime fecundity, in recently-wild isolates of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that these genotypes differed in their variance in lifetime fecundity: some had high variance in fecundity, others very low variance. We find that this variance in lifetime fecundity was negatively related to the mean lifetime fecundity of the lines, and that the variance of the lines was positively correlated between environments. We suggest that the variance in lifetime fecundity may be a bet-hedging strategy used by this species. PMID:25360248

  16. Relating the Hadamard Variance to MCS Kalman Filter Clock Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutsell, Steven T.

    1996-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) Master Control Station (MCS) currently makes significant use of the Allan Variance. This two-sample variance equation has proven excellent as a handy, understandable tool, both for time domain analysis of GPS cesium frequency standards, and for fine tuning the MCS's state estimation of these atomic clocks. The Allan Variance does not explicitly converge for the nose types of alpha less than or equal to minus 3 and can be greatly affected by frequency drift. Because GPS rubidium frequency standards exhibit non-trivial aging and aging noise characteristics, the basic Allan Variance analysis must be augmented in order to (a) compensate for a dynamic frequency drift, and (b) characterize two additional noise types, specifically alpha = minus 3, and alpha = minus 4. As the GPS program progresses, we will utilize a larger percentage of rubidium frequency standards than ever before. Hence, GPS rubidium clock characterization will require more attention than ever before. The three sample variance, commonly referred to as a renormalized Hadamard Variance, is unaffected by linear frequency drift, converges for alpha is greater than minus 5, and thus has utility for modeling noise in GPS rubidium frequency standards. This paper demonstrates the potential of Hadamard Variance analysis in GPS operations, and presents an equation that relates the Hadamard Variance to the MCS's Kalman filter process noises.

  17. Variance propagation by simulation (VPSim)

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.L.; Coulter, C.A.; Prommel, J.M.

    1997-07-01

    The application of propagation of variance (POV) for estimating the variance of a material balance is straightforward but tedious. Several computer codes exist today to help perform POV. Examples include MAWST (`materials accounting with sequential testing,` used by some Department of Energy sites) and VP (`variance propagation,` used for training). Also, some sites have such simple error models that custom `spreadsheet like` calculations are adequate. Any software to perform POV will have its strengths and weaknesses. A main disadvantage of MAWST is probably its limited form of error models. This limited form forces the user to use cryptic pseudo measurements to effectively extend the allowed error models. A common example is to include sampling error in the total random error by dividing the actual measurement into two pseudo measurements. Because POV can be tedious and input files can be presented in multiple ways to MAWST, it is valuable to have an alternative method to compare results. This paper describes a new code, VPSim, that uses Monte Carlo simulation to do POV. VPSim does not need to rely on pseudo measurements. It is written in C++, runs under Windows NT, and has a user friendly interface. VPSim has been tested on several example problems, and in this paper we compare its results to results from MAWST. We also describe its error models and indicate the structure of its input files. A main disadvantage of VPSim is its long run times. If many simulations are required (20,000 or more, repeated two or more times) and if each balance period has many (10,000 or more) measurements, then run times can be one-half hour or more. For small and modest sized problems, run times are a few minutes. The main advantage of VPSim is that its input files are simple to construct, and therefore also are relatively easy to inspect.

  18. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    A paper at the 1992 FCS showed how to express the modified Allan variance (mvar) in terms of the third difference of the cumulative sum of time residuals. Although this reformulated definition was presented merely as a computational trick for simplifying the calculation of mvar estimates, it has since turned out to be a powerful theoretical tool for deriving the statistical quality of those estimates in terms of their equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), defined for an estimator V by edf V = 2(EV)2/(var V). Confidence intervals for mvar can then be constructed from levels of the appropriate 2 distribution.

  19. Mitral disc-valve variance

    PubMed Central

    Berroya, Renato B.; Escano, Fernando B.

    1972-01-01

    This report deals with a rare complication of disc-valve prosthesis in the mitral area. A significant disc poppet and struts destruction of mitral Beall valve prostheses occurred 20 and 17 months after implantation. The resulting valve incompetence in the first case contributed to the death of the patient. The durability of Teflon prosthetic valves appears to be in question and this type of valve probably will be unacceptable if there is an increasing number of disc-valve variance in the future. Images PMID:5017573

  20. Adaptive Vibration Reduction Controls for a Cryocooler With a Passive Balancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George; Cairelli, James E.; Traylor, Ryan M.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper an adaptive vibration reduction control (AVRC) design is described for a Stirling cryocooler combined with a passive balancer. The AVRC design was based on a mass-spring model of the cooler and balancer, and the AVRC algorithm described in this paper was based on an adaptive binary search. Results are shown comparing the baseline uncontrolled cooler with no balancer, the cooler with the balancer, and, finally, the cooler with the balancer and the AVRC. The comparison shows that it may be possible to meet stringent vibration reduction requirements without an active balancer.

  1. Early Implementation of THAM for ICP Control: Therapeutic Hypothermia Avoidance and Reduction in Hypertonics/Hyperosmotics.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, F A; Gillman, L M; Teitelbaum, J; West, M

    2014-01-01

    Background. Tromethamine (THAM) has been demonstrated to reduce intracranial pressure (ICP). Early consideration for THAM may reduce the need for other measures for ICP control. Objective. To describe 4 cases of early THAM therapy for ICP control and highlight the potential to avoid TH and paralytics and achieve reduction in sedation and hypertonic/hyperosmotic agent requirements. Methods. We reviewed the charts of 4 patients treated with early THAM for ICP control. Results. We identified 2 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and 2 with traumatic brain injury (TBI) receiving early THAM for ICP control. The mean time to initiation of THAM therapy was 1.8 days, with a mean duration of 5.3 days. In all patients, after 6 to 12 hours of THAM administration, ICP stability was achieved, with reduction in requirements for hypertonic saline and hyperosmotic agents. There was a relative reduction in mean hourly hypertonic saline requirements of 89.1%, 96.1%, 82.4%, and 97.0% for cases 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively, comparing pre- to post-THAM administration. Mannitol, therapeutic hypothermia, and paralytics were avoided in all patients. Conclusions. Early administration of THAM for ICP control could potentially lead to the avoidance of other ICP directed therapies. Prospective studies of early THAM administration are warranted.

  2. Coupled rotor-flexible fuselage vibration reduction using open loop higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computer facility. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselae vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control is required.

  3. Coupled rotor-flexible fuselage vibration reduction using open loop higher harmonic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papavassiliou, I.; Friedmann, P. P.; Venkatesan, C.

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental study of vibration prediction and vibration reduction in helicopters using active controls was performed. The nonlinear equations of motion for a coupled rotor/flexible fuselage system have been derived using computer algebra on a special purpose symbolic computer facility. The trim state and vibratory response of the helicopter are obtained in a single pass by applying the harmonic balance technique and simultaneously satisfying the trim and the vibratory response of the helicopter for all rotor and fuselage degrees of freedom. The influence of the fuselage flexibility on the vibratory response is studied. It is shown that the conventional single frequency higher harmonic control is capable of reducing either the hub loads or only the fuselage vibrations but not both simultaneously. It is demonstrated that for simultaneous reduction of hub shears and fuselae vibrations a new scheme called multiple higher harmonic control is required.

  4. 78 FR 38730 - Announcement of Funding Awards for Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control, and Lead Hazard Reduction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control, and Lead Hazard Reduction Demonstration Grant Programs for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 AGENCY: Office of Healthy Homes and Lead... Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control (OHHLHC) Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control, and Lead Hazard Reduction...

  5. 14 CFR 11.201 - Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCEDURES Paperwork Reduction Act Control Numbers § 11.201 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Management and Budget (OMB) control numbers assigned under the Paperwork Reduction Act. 11.201 Section 11.201 Aeronautics and...

  6. A Multifactorial Weight Reduction Programme for Children with Overweight and Asthma: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Willeboordse, Maartje; van de Kant, Kim D. G.; Tan, Frans E. S.; Mulkens, Sandra; Schellings, Julia; Crijns, Yvonne; van der Ploeg, Liesbeth; van Schayck, Constant P.; Dompeling, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that obesity is related to asthma development and severity. However, it is largely unknown whether weight reduction can influence asthma management, especially in children. Objective To determine the effects of a multifactorial weight reduction intervention on asthma management in overweight/obese children with (a high risk of developing) asthma. Methods An 18-month weight-reduction randomized controlled trial was conducted in 87 children with overweight/obesity and asthma. Every six months, measurements of anthropometry, lung function, lifestyle parameters and inflammatory markers were assessed. Analyses were performed with linear mixed models for longitudinal analyses. Results After 18 months, the body mass index-standard deviation score decreased by -0.14±0.29 points (p<0.01) in the intervention group and -0.12±0.34 points (p<0.01) in the control group. This change over time did not differ between groups (p>0.05). Asthma features (including asthma control and asthma-related quality of life) and lung function indices (static and dynamic) improved significantly over time in both groups. The FVC% predicted improved over time by 10.1 ± 8.7% in the intervention group (p<0.001), which was significantly greater than the 6.1 ± 8.4% in the control group (p<0.05). Conclusions & clinical relevance Clinically relevant improvements in body weight, lung function and asthma features were found in both the intervention and control group, although some effects were more pronounced in the intervention group (FVC, asthma control, and quality of life). This implies that a weight reduction intervention could be clinically beneficial for children with asthma. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00998413 PMID:27294869

  7. Controlled Reduction of a Five-Link 3D Biped with Unactuated Yaw.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Robert D

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a formulation of controlled geometric reduction with one degree of underactuation for mechanical systems with an unactuated cyclic variable subject to passive damping. We show that the first control term in the fully actuated case reduces to passive joint-velocity feedback, which can be equivalently provided by viscous friction. The underactuated control strategy is applied to a five-link 3D biped with a hip, torso, knees, and unactuated yaw at the foot contact point. We show asymptotically stable walking in the presence of passive yawing for realistic friction coefficients.

  8. Controlled Reduction of a Five-Link 3D Biped with Unactuated Yaw

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a formulation of controlled geometric reduction with one degree of underactuation for mechanical systems with an unactuated cyclic variable subject to passive damping. We show that the first control term in the fully actuated case reduces to passive joint-velocity feedback, which can be equivalently provided by viscous friction. The underactuated control strategy is applied to a five-link 3D biped with a hip, torso, knees, and unactuated yaw at the foot contact point. We show asymptotically stable walking in the presence of passive yawing for realistic friction coefficients. PMID:25663742

  9. Large space structure model reduction and control system design based upon actuator and sensor influence functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Lang, J. H.; Johnson, T. L.; Shih, S.; Staelin, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    A model reduction procedure based on aggregation with respect to sensor and actuator influences rather than modes is presented for large systems of coupled second-order differential equations. Perturbation expressions which can predict the effects of spillover on both the aggregated and residual states are derived. These expressions lead to the development of control system design constraints which are sufficient to guarantee, to within the validity of the perturbations, that the residual states are not destabilized by control systems designed from the reduced model. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the application of the aggregation and control system design method.

  10. Large space structure model reduction and control system design based upon actuator and sensor influence functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Lang, J. H.; Johnson, T. L.; Shih, S.; Staelin, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    A model reduction procedure based on aggregation with respect to sensor and actuator influences rather than modes is presented for large systems of coupled second-order differential equations. Perturbation expressions which can predict the effects of spillover on both the aggregated and residual states are derived. These expressions lead to the development of control system design constraints which are sufficient to guarantee, to within the validity of the perturbations, that the residual states are not destabilized by control systems designed from the reduced model. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the application of the aggregation and control system design method.

  11. Model Reduction and Thermal Regulation by Model Predictive Control of a New Cylindricity Measuring Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouderbala, K.; Girault, M.; Videcoq, E.; Nouira, H.; Salgado, J.; Petit, D.

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with the thermal regulation at the 10 level of a high-accuracy cylindricity measurement machine subject to thermal disturbances, generated by four heat sources (laser interferometers). A reduced model identified from simulated data using the modal identification method was associated with a model predictive controller (MPC). The control was applied to minimize the thermal perturbation effects on the principal organ of the cylindricity measurement machine. A parametric study of the penalization coefficient was conducted, which validated the robustness of the controller. The association of both reduced model and MPC allowed significant reduction of the effects of the disturbances on the temperature, a promising result for future applications.

  12. Cosmic Strings and Cosmic Variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangui, Alejandro; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    1995-07-01

    By using a simple analytical model based on counting random multiple impulses inflicted on photons by a network of cosmic strings we show how to construct the general q-point temperature correlation function of the cosmic microwave background radiation. Our analysis is especially sensible for large angular scales where the Kaiser-Stebbins effect is dominant. Then we concentrate on the four-point function and, in particular, on its zero-lag limit, namely, the excess kurtosis parameter, for which we obtain a predicted value of ˜10-2. In addition, we estimate the cosmic variance for the kurtosis due to a Gaussian fluctuation field, showing its dependence on the primordial spectral index of density fluctuations n and finding agreement with previous published results for the particular case of a flat Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum. Our value for the kurtosis compares well with previous analyses but falls below the threshold imposed by the cosmic variance when commonly accepted parameters from string simulations are considered. In particular the non-Gaussian signal is found to be inversely proportional to the scaling number of defects, as could be expected by the central limit theorem.

  13. Reduction of the radiating sound of a submerged finite cylindrical shell structure by active vibration control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-02-06

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  14. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  15. Fuzzy crane control with sensorless payload deflection feedback for vibration reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoczek, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    Different types of cranes are widely used for shifting cargoes in building sites, shipping yards, container terminals and many manufacturing segments where the problem of fast and precise transferring a payload suspended on the ropes with oscillations reduction is frequently important to enhance the productivity, efficiency and safety. The paper presents the fuzzy logic-based robust feedback anti-sway control system which can be applicable either with or without a sensor of sway angle of a payload. The discrete-time control approach is based on the fuzzy interpolation of the controllers and crane dynamic model's parameters with respect to the varying rope length and mass of a payload. The iterative procedure combining a pole placement method and interval analysis of closed-loop characteristic polynomial coefficients is proposed to design the robust control scheme. The sensorless anti-sway control application developed with using PAC system with RX3i controller was verified on the laboratory scaled overhead crane.

  16. Blood pressure control and the reduction of left atrial overload is essential for controlling atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Yasuko; Kawamura, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Naka; Sato, Nobuyuki; Kikuchi, Kenjiro; Hasebe, Naoyuki

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the ideal control of atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with hypertensive patients depends on the usage of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors or whether it occurs regardless of the kind of antihypertensive agents used. The control of AF was compared in 112 outpatients between 1) those with or without the administration of RAS inhibitors, and 2) those with an ideal or poor control of the blood pressure (BP) regardless of the kind of antihypertensive therapy used. The therapies with or without RAS inhibitors did not yield any significant difference in the AF control states, even though RAS inhibitors had been administered to the patient group with a high proportion of organic heart disease. The ideal BP control group exhibited a significantly better AF control in comparison to the poor BP control group. The former group had a significantly smaller left atrial diameter determined by ultrasonic echocardiography. BP control itself may essentially be important for preventing AF in the general patient population. Poor BP control seemed to have an affect on worsening AF possibly via left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, followed by left atrial overload.

  17. A Wavelet Perspective on the Allan Variance.

    PubMed

    Percival, Donald B

    2016-04-01

    The origins of the Allan variance trace back 50 years ago to two seminal papers, one by Allan (1966) and the other by Barnes (1966). Since then, the Allan variance has played a leading role in the characterization of high-performance time and frequency standards. Wavelets first arose in the early 1980s in the geophysical literature, and the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) became prominent in the late 1980s in the signal processing literature. Flandrin (1992) briefly documented a connection between the Allan variance and a wavelet transform based upon the Haar wavelet. Percival and Guttorp (1994) noted that one popular estimator of the Allan variance-the maximal overlap estimator-can be interpreted in terms of a version of the DWT now widely referred to as the maximal overlap DWT (MODWT). In particular, when the MODWT is based on the Haar wavelet, the variance of the resulting wavelet coefficients-the wavelet variance-is identical to the Allan variance when the latter is multiplied by one-half. The theory behind the wavelet variance can thus deepen our understanding of the Allan variance. In this paper, we review basic wavelet variance theory with an emphasis on the Haar-based wavelet variance and its connection to the Allan variance. We then note that estimation theory for the wavelet variance offers a means of constructing asymptotically correct confidence intervals (CIs) for the Allan variance without reverting to the common practice of specifying a power-law noise type a priori. We also review recent work on specialized estimators of the wavelet variance that are of interest when some observations are missing (gappy data) or in the presence of contamination (rogue observations or outliers). It is a simple matter to adapt these estimators to become estimators of the Allan variance. Finally we note that wavelet variances based upon wavelets other than the Haar offer interesting generalizations of the Allan variance.

  18. Optimal control based on adaptive model reduction approach to control transfer phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulghelou, Mourad; Allery, Cyrille

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of optimal control is to act on a set of parameters characterizing a dynamical system to achieve a target dynamics. In order to reduce CPU time and memory storage needed to perform control on evolution systems, it is possible to use reduced order models (ROMs). The mostly used one is the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD). However the bases constructed in this way are sensitive to the configuration of the dynamical system. Consequently, the need of full simulations to build a basis for each configuration is time consuming and makes that approach still relatively expensive. In this paper, to overcome this difficulty we suggest to use an adequate bases interpolation method. It consists in computing the associated bases to a distribution of control parameters. These bases are afterwards called in the control algorithm to build a reduced basis adapted to a given control parameter. This interpolation method involves results of the calculus of Geodesics on Grassmann manifold.

  19. Quantitative Risk reduction estimation Tool For Control Systems, Suggested Approach and Research Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Miles McQueen; Wayne Boyer; Mark Flynn; Sam Alessi

    2006-03-01

    For the past year we have applied a variety of risk assessment technologies to evaluate the risk to critical infrastructure from cyber attacks on control systems. More recently, we identified the need for a stand alone control system risk reduction estimation tool to provide owners and operators of control systems with a more useable, reliable, and credible method for managing the risks from cyber attack. Risk is defined as the probability of a successful attack times the value of the resulting loss, typically measured in lives and dollars. Qualitative and ad hoc techniques for measuring risk do not provide sufficient support for cost benefit analyses associated with cyber security mitigation actions. To address the need for better quantitative risk reduction models we surveyed previous quantitative risk assessment research; evaluated currently available tools; developed new quantitative techniques [17] [18]; implemented a prototype analysis tool to demonstrate how such a tool might be used; used the prototype to test a variety of underlying risk calculational engines (e.g. attack tree, attack graph); and identified technical and research needs. We concluded that significant gaps still exist and difficult research problems remain for quantitatively assessing the risk to control system components and networks, but that a useable quantitative risk reduction estimation tool is not beyond reach.

  20. Progress Towards Fuselage Drag Reduction via Active Flow Control: A Combined CFD and Experimental Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffler, Norman W.; Allan, Brian G.; Lienard, Caroline; LePape, Arnaud

    2010-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental effort has been undertaken to study fuselage drag reduction on a generic, non-proprietary rotorcraft fuselage by the application of active ow control. Fuselage drag reduction is an area of research interest to both the United States and France and this area is being worked collaboratively as a task under the United States/France Memorandum of Agreement on Helicopter Aeromechanics. In the first half of this task, emphasis is placed on the US generic fuselage, the ROBIN-mod7, with the experimental work being conducted on the US side and complementary US and French CFD analysis of the baseline and controlled cases. Fuselage simulations were made using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes ow solvers and with multiple turbulence models. Comparisons were made to experimental data for numerical simulations of the isolated fuselage and for the fuselage as installed in the tunnel, which includes modeling of the tunnel contraction, walls, and support fairing. The numerical simulations show that comparisons to the experimental data are in good agreement when the tunnel and model support are included. The isolated fuselage simulations compare well to each other, however, there is a positive shift in the centerline pressure when compared to the experiment. The computed flow separation locations on the rear ramp region had only slight differences with and without the tunnel walls and model support. For the simulations, the flow control slots were placed at several locations around the flow separation lines as a series of eight slots that formed a nearly continuous U-shape. Results from the numerical simulations resulted in an estimated 35% fuselage drag reduction from a steady blowing flow control configuration and a 26% drag reduction for unsteady zero-net-mass flow control configuration. Simulations with steady blowing show a delayed flow separation at the rear ramp of the fuselage that increases the surface pressure acting on the ramp

  1. Climate Control Load Reduction Strategies for Electric Drive Vehicles in Cold Weather

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, Matthew A.; Chaney, Larry; Rugh, John P.

    2016-04-05

    When operated, the climate control system is the largest auxiliary load on a vehicle. This load has significant impact on fuel economy for conventional and hybrid vehicles, and it drastically reduces the driving range of all electric vehicles (EVs). Heating is even more detrimental to EV range than cooling because no engine waste heat is available. Reducing the thermal loads on the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system will extend driving range and increase the market penetration of EVs. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have evaluated strategies for vehicle climate control load reduction with special attention toward grid connected electric vehicles. Outdoor vehicle thermal testing and computational modeling were used to assess potential strategies for improved thermal management and to evaluate the effectiveness of thermal load reduction technologies. A human physiology model was also used to evaluate the impact on occupant thermal comfort. Experimental evaluations of zonal heating strategies demonstrated a 5.5% to 28.5% reduction in cabin heating energy over a 20-minute warm-up. Vehicle simulations over various drive cycles show a 6.9% to 18.7% improvement in EV range over baseline heating using the most promising zonal heating strategy investigated. A national-level analysis was conducted to determine the overall national impact. If all vehicles used the best zonal strategy, the range would be improved by 7.1% over the baseline heating range. This is a 33% reduction in the range penalty for heating.

  2. Turbulent Boundary Layer Drag Reduction by Active Control of Streak Transient Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Flint; Corke, Thomas; Hussain, Fazle; Duong, Alan; McGowan, Ryan; Jasinski, Chrisotpher; Simmons, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    Experiments are reported employing a novel method of large-scale active flow control that was designed to intervene in Streak Transient Growth (STG) which was first postulated by Schoppa and Hussain as the primary mechanism in the production of streamwise vorticity in wall-bounded turbulence. We term the actuator SLIPPS ("Smart Longitudinal Instability Prevention via Plasma Surface). It consists of a new pulsed-DC plasma actuator array that is mounted flush with the wall in a zero pressure gradient, high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. The array induces a near-wall spanwise mean velocity component that is comparable in magnitude to the local friction velocity. This prevents the lift-up of low-speed streaks, thereby limiting their flanking wall-normal vorticity, which has been shown to be a critical parameter is STG. Experiments demonstrate friction drag reduction of up to 68%. Measured drag reduction is found to scale with the actuator array spanwise inter-electrode spacing, with the maximum drag reduction corresponding to the simultaneous control of approximately 8-10 low-speed streaks. Due to the unique voltage-current characteristics of the pulsed-DC actuator, the drag reduction is obtained with net power savings. Supported by NASA Langley under NNX15CL65P.

  3. Climate Control Load Reduction Strategies for Electric Drive Vehicles in Cold Weather: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, Matthew; Chaney, Lawrence; Rugh, John

    2016-03-31

    When operated, the climate control system is the largest auxiliary load on a vehicle. This load has significant impact on fuel economy for conventional and hybrid vehicles, and it drastically reduces the driving range of all electric vehicles (EVs). Heating is even more detrimental to EV range than cooling because no engine waste heat is available. Reducing the thermal loads on the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system will extend driving range and increase the market penetration of EVs. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have evaluated strategies for vehicle climate control load reduction with special attention toward grid connected electric vehicles. Outdoor vehicle thermal testing and computational modeling were used to assess potential strategies for improved thermal management and to evaluate the effectiveness of thermal load reduction technologies. A human physiology model was also used to evaluate the impact on occupant thermal comfort. Experimental evaluations of zonal heating strategies demonstrated a 5.5% to 28.5% reduction in cabin heating energy over a 20-minute warm-up. Vehicle simulations over various drive cycles show a 6.9% to 18.7% improvement in EV range over baseline heating using the most promising zonal heating strategy investigated. A national-level analysis was conducted to determine the overall national impact. If all vehicles used the best zonal strategy, the range would be improved by 7.1% over the baseline heating range. This is a 33% reduction in the range penalty for heating.

  4. Kinetics and corrosion products of aqueous nitrate reduction by iron powder without reaction conditions control.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaomeng; Guan, Xiaohong; Ma, Jun; Ai, Hengyu

    2009-01-01

    Although considerable research has been conducted on nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron powder (Fe0), these studies were mostly operated under anaerobic conditions with invariable pH that was unsuitable for practical application. Without reaction conditions (dissolved oxygen or reaction pH) control, this work aimed at subjecting the kinetics of denitrification by microscale Fe0 (160-200 mesh) to analysis the factors affecting the denitrification of nitrate and the composition of iron reductive products coating upon the iron surface. Results of the kinetics study have indicated that a higher initial concentration of nitrate would yield a greater reaction rate constant. The reduction rate of nitrate increased with increasing Fe0 dosage. The reaction can be described as a pseudo-first order reaction with respect to nitrate concentration or Fe0 dosage. Experimental results also suggested that nitrate reduction by microscale Fe0 without reaction condition control primarily was an acid-driven surface-mediated process, and the reaction order was 0.65 with respect to hydrogen ion concentration. The analyses of X-ray diffractometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that a black coating, consisted of Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and FeO(OH), was formed on the surface of iron grains as an iron corrosion product when the system initial pH was lower than 5. The proportion of FeO(OH) increased as reaction time went on, whereas the proportion of Fe3O4 decreased.

  5. Chapter 10: A Hilbert Space Approach To Variance Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-16

    text are presented in Avellaneda et al. (2001), and in Avellaneda and Gamba (2000). Consider the standard CV setting: (Y1,X1), . . . , (Yn,Xn) are...imization objective; this is the subject of Avellaneda and Gamba (2000), and Avellaneda et al. (2001). The important case of f(w) = w2 is considered next... Avellaneda , M., Buff, R., Friedman, C., Grandchamp, N., Kruk, L., Newman, J., 2001. Weighted Monte Carlo: A new technique for calibrating asset- pricing

  6. Global variance reduction for Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S.

    2013-07-01

    Over the past few decades, hybrid Monte-Carlo-Deterministic (MC-DT) techniques have been mostly focusing on the development of techniques primarily with shielding applications in mind, i.e. problems featuring a limited number of responses. This paper focuses on the application of a new hybrid MC-DT technique: the SUBSPACE method, for reactor analysis calculation. The SUBSPACE method is designed to overcome the lack of efficiency that hampers the application of MC methods in routine analysis calculations on the assembly level where typically one needs to execute the flux solver in the order of 10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} times. It places high premium on attaining high computational efficiency for reactor analysis application by identifying and capitalizing on the existing correlations between responses of interest. This paper places particular emphasis on using the SUBSPACE method for preparing homogenized few-group cross section sets on the assembly level for subsequent use in full-core diffusion calculations. A BWR assembly model is employed to calculate homogenized few-group cross sections for different burn-up steps. It is found that using the SUBSPACE method significant speedup can be achieved over the state of the art FW-CADIS method. While the presented speed-up alone is not sufficient to render the MC method competitive with the DT method, we believe this work will become a major step on the way of leveraging the accuracy of MC calculations for assembly calculations. (authors)

  7. ADVANTG An Automated Variance Reduction Parameter Generator, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Scott W.; Johnson, Seth R.; Bevill, Aaron M.; Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Daily, Charles R.; Evans, Thomas M.; Wagner, John C.; Johnson, Jeffrey O.; Grove, Robert E.

    2015-08-01

    The primary objective of ADVANTG is to reduce both the user effort and the computational time required to obtain accurate and precise tally estimates across a broad range of challenging transport applications. ADVANTG has been applied to simulations of real-world radiation shielding, detection, and neutron activation problems. Examples of shielding applications include material damage and dose rate analyses of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor (Risner and Blakeman 2013) and the ITER Tokamak (Ibrahim et al. 2011). ADVANTG has been applied to a suite of radiation detection, safeguards, and special nuclear material movement detection test problems (Shaver et al. 2011). ADVANTG has also been used in the prediction of activation rates within light water reactor facilities (Pantelias and Mosher 2013). In these projects, ADVANTG was demonstrated to significantly increase the tally figure of merit (FOM) relative to an analog MCNP simulation. The ADVANTG-generated parameters were also shown to be more effective than manually generated geometry splitting parameters.

  8. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of azilsartan therapy for blood pressure reduction.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hisato; Mizuno, Yusuke; Niwa, Masao; Goto, Shin-Nosuke; Umemoto, Takuya

    2014-05-01

    Although there have been a number of azilsartan trials, no meta-analysis of the findings has been conducted to date. We performed the first meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of azilsartan therapy for the reduction of blood pressure (BP) in patients with hypertension. MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from the beginning of the records through March 2013 using web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). Eligible studies were prospective randomized controlled trials of azilsartan (including azilsartan medoxomil) vs. any control therapy that reported clinic or 24-h mean BP as an outcome. For each study, data for the changes from baseline to final clinic systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) in both the azilsartan group and the control group were used to generate mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Of 27 potentially relevant articles screened initially, 7 reports of randomized trials of azilsartan or azilsartan medoxomil therapy enrolling a total of 6152 patients with hypertension were identified and included. Pooled analysis suggested a significant reduction in BP changes among patients randomized to 40 mg of azilsartan vs. control therapy (clinic SBP: -4.20 mm Hg; 95% CI: -6.05 to -2.35 mm Hg; P<0.00001; clinic DBP: -2.58 mm Hg; 95% CI: -3.69 to -1.48 mm Hg; P<0.00001; 24-h mean SBP: -3.33 mm Hg; 95% CI: -4.74 to -1.93 mm Hg; P<0.00001; 24-h mean DBP: -2.12 mm Hg; 95% CI: -2.74 to -1.49 mm Hg; P<0.00001). In conclusion, azilsartan therapy appears to provide a greater reduction in BP than control therapy in patients with hypertension.

  9. Analytic variance estimates of Swank and Fano factors.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Benjamin; Badano, Aldo; Samuelson, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Variance estimates for detector energy resolution metrics can be used as stopping criteria in Monte Carlo simulations for the purpose of ensuring a small uncertainty of those metrics and for the design of variance reduction techniques. The authors derive an estimate for the variance of two energy resolution metrics, the Swank factor and the Fano factor, in terms of statistical moments that can be accumulated without significant computational overhead. The authors examine the accuracy of these two estimators and demonstrate how the estimates of the coefficient of variation of the Swank and Fano factors behave with data from a Monte Carlo simulation of an indirect x-ray imaging detector. The authors' analyses suggest that the accuracy of their variance estimators is appropriate for estimating the actual variances of the Swank and Fano factors for a variety of distributions of detector outputs. The variance estimators derived in this work provide a computationally convenient way to estimate the error or coefficient of variation of the Swank and Fano factors during Monte Carlo simulations of radiation imaging systems.

  10. Variance estimation for systematic designs in spatial surveys.

    PubMed

    Fewster, R M

    2011-12-01

    In spatial surveys for estimating the density of objects in a survey region, systematic designs will generally yield lower variance than random designs. However, estimating the systematic variance is well known to be a difficult problem. Existing methods tend to overestimate the variance, so although the variance is genuinely reduced, it is over-reported, and the gain from the more efficient design is lost. The current approaches to estimating a systematic variance for spatial surveys are to approximate the systematic design by a random design, or approximate it by a stratified design. Previous work has shown that approximation by a random design can perform very poorly, while approximation by a stratified design is an improvement but can still be severely biased in some situations. We develop a new estimator based on modeling the encounter process over space. The new "striplet" estimator has negligible bias and excellent precision in a wide range of simulation scenarios, including strip-sampling, distance-sampling, and quadrat-sampling surveys, and including populations that are highly trended or have strong aggregation of objects. We apply the new estimator to survey data for the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, and find that the reported coefficient of variation for estimated density is 20% using approximation by a random design, 17% using approximation by a stratified design, and 11% using the new striplet estimator. This large reduction in reported variance is verified by simulation.

  11. A synchronous generator stabilizer design using neuro inverse controller and error reduction network

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.M.; Hyun, S.H.; Lee, J.H.

    1996-11-01

    A neuro power system stabilizer (PSS) is developed for multimachine power systems. Each machine is identified in its inverse relation by an artificial neural network named Inverse Dynamics Neural Network (IDNN) off line, which is used as a local inverse controller. The control error due to the interactions between generators is predicted and compensated through another network called Error Reduction Network (ERN). The ERN consists of several IDNNs in the linear combination form. In most neuro controllers, two neural nets are required, one for system emulation, the other for control. In the proposed controller, the only network requiring training is the IDNN. Simulations are performed on two typical cases: an unstable single machine power system of non-minimum phase, and a multimachine power system.

  12. Control of a selective catalytic reduction system based on NARMA-L2 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W. M.; Wang, Y. J.; Zheng, T. X.; Zhou, T. L.; Zhang, Y.; Tan, R.

    2017-03-01

    The plant of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system is characterized by significant nonlinearity, time delay and temperature sensitivity. In order to control the urea injection accurately, the (nonlinear auto regressive moving average) NARMA-L2 model based control is applied to the SCR system. In this paper, a data-based technique is taken and a model of the plant is identified on the basis of input-output data. Then the identified model is used to the design of a NARMA-L2 controller. Simulation of the NARMA-L2 model based control for the SCR system is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority. The comparison results show better performance over the traditional PID control.

  13. Heavy Class Helicopter Fuselage Model Drag Reduction by Active Flow Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio, F.

    2017-08-01

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of helicopter blunt fuselage drag reduction using active flow control is being carried out within the European Clean Sky program. The objective is to demonstrate the capability of several active flow technologies to decrease fuselage drag by alleviating the flow separation occurring in the rear area of some helicopters. The work is performed on a simplified blunt fuselage at model-scale. Two different flow control actuators are considered for evaluation: steady blowing, unsteady blowing (or pulsed jets). Laboratory tests of each individual actuator are first performed to assess their performance and properties. The fuselage model is then equipped with these actuators distributed in 3 slots located on the ramp bottom edge. This paper addresses the promising results obtained during the wind-tunnel campaign, since significant drag reductions are achieved for a wide range of fuselage angles of attack and yaw angles without detriment of the other aerodynamic characteristics.

  14. Size control of noble metal clusters and metallic heterostructures through the reduction kinetics of metal precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevonkaev, Igor V.; Herein, Daniel; Jeske, Gerald; Goia, Dan V.

    2014-07-01

    Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties.Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03045a

  15. Dimension reduction by balanced truncation: application to light-induced control of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Bung, Boris; Hartmann, Carsten; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schütte, Christof

    2011-07-07

    In linear control, balanced truncation is known as a powerful technique to reduce the state-space dimension of a system. Its basic principle is to identify a subspace of jointly easily controllable and observable states and then to restrict the dynamics to this subspace without changing the overall response of the system. This work deals with a first application of balanced truncation to the control of open quantum systems which are modeled by the Liouville-von Neumann equation within the Lindblad formalism. Generalization of the linear theory has been proposed to cope with the bilinear terms arising from the coupling between the control field and the quantum system. As an example we choose the dissipative quantum dynamics of a particle in an asymmetric double well potential driven by an external control field, monitoring population transfer between the potential wells as a control target. The accuracy of dimension reduction is investigated by comparing the populations obtained for the truncated system versus those for the original system. The dimension of the model system can be reduced very efficiently where the degree of reduction depends on temperature and relaxation rate.

  16. Warped functional analysis of variance.

    PubMed

    Gervini, Daniel; Carter, Patrick A

    2014-09-01

    This article presents an Analysis of Variance model for functional data that explicitly incorporates phase variability through a time-warping component, allowing for a unified approach to estimation and inference in presence of amplitude and time variability. The focus is on single-random-factor models but the approach can be easily generalized to more complex ANOVA models. The behavior of the estimators is studied by simulation, and an application to the analysis of growth curves of flour beetles is presented. Although the model assumes a smooth latent process behind the observed trajectories, smootheness of the observed data is not required; the method can be applied to irregular time grids, which are common in longitudinal studies.

  17. Magnitudes of biomarker reductions in response to controlled reductions in cigarettes smoked per day: a one-week clinical confinement study.

    PubMed

    Theophilus, Eugenia H; Coggins, Christopher R E; Chen, Peter; Schmidt, Eckhardt; Borgerding, Michael F

    2015-03-01

    Tobacco toxicant-related exposure reduction is an important tool in harm reduction. Cigarette per day reduction (CPDR) occurs as smokers migrate from smoking cigarettes to using alternative tobacco/nicotine products, or quit smoking. Few reports characterize the dose-response relationships between CPDR and effects on exposure biomarkers, especially at the low end of CPD exposure (e.g., 5 CPD). We present data on CPDR by characterizing magnitudes of biomarker reductions. We present data from a well-controlled, one-week clinical confinement study in healthy smokers who were switched from smoking 19-25 CPD to smoking 20, 10, 5 or 0 CPD. Biomarkers were measured in blood, plasma, urine, and breath, and included smoke-related toxicants, urine mutagenicity, smoked cigarette filter analyses (mouth level exposure), and vital signs. Many of the biomarkers (e.g., plasma nicotine) showed strong CPDR dose-response reductions, while others (e.g., plasma thiocyanate) showed weaker dose-response reductions. Factors that lead to lower biomarker reductions include non-CPD related contributors to the measured response (e.g., other exposure sources from environment, life style, occupation; inter-individual variability). This study confirms CPDR dose-responsive biomarkers and suggests that a one-week design is appropriate for characterizing exposure reductions when smokers switch from cigarettes to new tobacco products.

  18. Total reduction of distorted echelle spectrograms - An automatic procedure. [for computer controlled microdensitometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. C.; Title, A. M.

    1975-01-01

    A total reduction procedure, notable for its use of a computer-controlled microdensitometer for semi-automatically tracing curved spectra, is applied to distorted high-dispersion echelle spectra recorded by an image tube. Microdensitometer specifications are presented and the FORTRAN, TRACEN and SPOTS programs are outlined. The intensity spectrum of the photographic or electrographic plate is plotted on a graphic display. The time requirements are discussed in detail.

  19. Newly-Developed Adaptive Noise Absorption Control Technology for High Speed Fan Noise Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Koh, Masaharu; Ozaki, Shunichi; Yokochi, Makoto; Sato, Takuo

    The paper describes about a newly-developed adaptive noise absorption control (AAC) technology I for fan noise reduction and about proof test results of the technology. The AAC technology adaptively controls the reactance part of acoustic impedance of duct liners with mobile reflective plates and large acoustic chambers, absorbs fan tones and broadband noise together, and achieves larger overall fan noise reduction over a wide fan speed range. For actual proof of the technology, adaptive duct liner I was made on trial basis and was examined. The test result clarifies that the duct liner I could reduce fan noise larger than O.A. SPL 10dB (A) at max fan speed of 6000rpm, including reduction of low frequency noise and fundamental BPF tone and harmonics of 18dB at maximum. In response to fan speed change, the reflective plate movement control could achieve the large peak frequency shift and peak level increase in the acoustic absorption spectra, and could reduce fan noise larger than O.A. SPL 9dB (A) over the fan speed range from 1000 to 6000rpm.

  20. 40 CFR 52.2183 - Variance provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) South Dakota § 52.2183 Variance provision. The revisions to the variance provisions in Chapter 74:26:01:31.01 of the South Dakota Air Pollution...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2183 - Variance provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) South Dakota § 52.2183 Variance provision. The revisions to the variance provisions in Chapter 74:26:01:31.01 of the South Dakota Air Pollution...

  2. 40 CFR 52.2183 - Variance provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) South Dakota § 52.2183 Variance provision. The revisions to the variance provisions in Chapter 74:26:01:31.01 of the South Dakota Air Pollution...

  3. 40 CFR 52.2183 - Variance provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) South Dakota § 52.2183 Variance provision. The revisions to the variance provisions in Chapter 74:26:01:31.01 of the South Dakota Air Pollution...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2183 - Variance provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) South Dakota § 52.2183 Variance provision. The revisions to the variance provisions in Chapter 74:26:01:31.01 of the South Dakota Air Pollution...

  5. Randomized controlled trial of mindfulness-based stress reduction for prehypertension.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Joel W; Fresco, David M; Myerscough, Rodney; van Dulmen, Manfred H M; Carlson, Linda E; Josephson, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is an increasingly popular practice demonstrated to alleviate stress and treat certain health conditions. MBSR may reduce elevated blood pressure (BP). Treatment guidelines recommend life-style modifications for BP in the prehypertensive range (systolic BP [SBP] 120-139 mm Hg or diastolic BP [DBP] 80-89 mm Hg), followed by antihypertensives if BP reaches hypertensive levels. MBSR has not been thoroughly evaluated as a treatment of prehypertension. A randomized clinical trial of MBSR for high BP was conducted to determine whether BP reductions associated with MBSR exceed those observed for an active control condition consisting of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training. Fifty-six men (43%) and women (57%) averaging (standard deviation) 50.3 (6.5) years of age (91% white) with unmedicated BP in the prehypertensive range were randomized to 8 weeks of MBSR or PMR delivered in a group format. Treatment sessions were administered by one treatment provider and lasted approximately 2.5 hours each week. Clinic BP was the primary outcome measure. Ambulatory BP was a secondary outcome measure. Analyses were based on intent to treat. Patients randomized to MBSR exhibited a 4.8-mm Hg reduction in clinic SBP, which was larger than the 0.7-mm Hg reduction observed for PMR (p = .016). Those randomized to MBSR exhibited a 1.9-mm Hg reduction in DBP compared with a 1.2-mm Hg increase for PMR (p = .008). MBSR did not result in larger decreases in ambulatory BP than in PMR. MBSR resulted in a reduction in clinic SBP and DBP compared with PMR. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00440596.

  6. Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction for Prehypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Joel W.; Fresco, David M.; Myerscough, Rodney; van Dulmen, Manfred; Carlson, Linda E.; Josephson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is an increasingly popular practice demonstrated to alleviate stress and treat certain health conditions. MBSR may reduce elevated blood pressure (BP). Treatment guidelines recommend lifestyle modifications for BP in the prehypertensive range (SBP 120–139 or DBP 80–89), followed by antihypertensives if BP reaches hypertensive levels. MBSR has not been thoroughly evaluated as a treatment for prehypertension. A randomized clinical trial of MBSR for high BP was conducted to determine whether BP reductions associated with MBSR exceed those observed for an active control condition consisting of progressive muscle relaxation training (PMR). Methods 56 men (43%) and women (57%) averaging 50.3 (SD = 6.5) years of age (91% Caucasian) with unmedicated BP in the prehypertensive range were randomized to 8 weeks of MBSR or PMR delivered in a group format. Treatment sessions were administered by 1 treatment provider and lasted approximately 2.5 hours each week. Clinic BP was the primary outcome measure. Ambulatory BP was a secondary outcome measure. Results Analyses were based on intent-to-treat. Patients randomized to MBSR exhibited a 4.8 mm Hg reduction in clinic SBP, which was larger than the 0.7 mm Hg reduction observed for PMR, p = .016. Those randomized to MBSR exhibited a 1.9 mm Hg reduction in DBP, compared to a 1.2 mm Hg increase for PMR, p = .008. MBSR did not result in larger decreases in ambulatory BP than PMR. Conclusions MBSR resulted in a reduction in clinic SBP and DBP compared to PMR. PMID:24127622

  7. Controls on Arsenic Retention in Surface and Subsurface Environments: Resolving the Impact of Iron Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufano, K.; Fendorf, S.

    2007-12-01

    A transition from oxidizing to reducing conditions has long been implicated in increasing aqueous As concentrations. Confounding processes controlling the release of As, reductive transformation of ferrihydrite, a common Fe(III) (hydr)oxide, has recently been shown to promote As retention rather than release. Elucidating the processes controlling As desorption and subsequent migration in surface and subsurface environments and how environmental factors (for example, availability of labile carbon and duration/extent of flooding) affect these processes will allow predictions to be made regarding long-term stability of As in soil and sediment. In turn, this can aid in evaluating the likelihood of having measurable As in groundwater. To better resolve these processes, here we examine As desorption from ferrihydrite-coated sands pre-sorbed with As(III) at circumneutral pH under Fe-reducing conditions with the dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium (DIRB) Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN- 32. We reveal that upon iron reduction, transformation of As-bearing ferrihydrite results in As(III) retention. However, over time there is a shift from reductive transformation to reductive dissolution of the As-bearing Fe phase(s) coupled with prolonged release of As to the aqueous phase. Our results suggest that arsenic retention may increase or decrease depending on the type of iron oxide, secondary iron transformations, and duration of reducing conditions. Immediately following a transition to anaerobic conditions there is potential for As retention on newly formed ferric/ferrous (hydr)oxide phases; however prolonged reduction will result in both the dissolution of ferric/ferrous (hydr)oxides and release of aqueous arsenic.

  8. Poverty impacts of foot-and-mouth disease and the poverty reduction implications of its control.

    PubMed

    Perry, B D; Rich, K M

    2007-02-17

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remains one of the most important livestock diseases of the world, given its highly infectious nature, its broad economic impacts on animal wellbeing and productivity, and its implications for successful access to domestic and export markets for livestock and products. The impacts of the disease vary markedly between developed and developing countries, and also within many developing countries. These differences in impact shape some markedly heterogeneous incentives for FMD control and eradication, which become of particular importance when setting priorities for poverty reduction in developing countries. Some consider that the benefits from FMD control accrue only to the better off in such societies and, as such, may not be a priority for investments targeted at poverty reduction. But is that view justified? Others see the control of FMD as a major development opportunity in a globalised environment. In this paper, Brian Perry and Karl Rich summarise the differential impacts of FMD and its control, and link these findings with the growing understanding of how the control of this globally important disease may contribute to the processes of pro-poor growth in certain countries of the developing world.

  9. The validation of an active control intervention for Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR).

    PubMed

    MacCoon, Donal G; Imel, Zac E; Rosenkranz, Melissa A; Sheftel, Jenna G; Weng, Helen Y; Sullivan, Jude C; Bonus, Katherine A; Stoney, Catherine M; Salomons, Tim V; Davidson, Richard J; Lutz, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Most of the extant literature investigating the health effects of mindfulness interventions relies on wait-list control comparisons. The current article specifies and validates an active control condition, the Health Enhancement Program (HEP), thus providing the foundation necessary for rigorous investigations of the relative efficacy of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and for testing mindfulness as an active ingredient. 63 participants were randomized to either MBSR (n = 31) or HEP (n = 32). Compared to HEP, MBSR led to reductions in thermal pain ratings in the mindfulness- but not the HEP-related instruction condition (η(2) = .18). There were significant improvements over time for general distress (η(2) = .09), anxiety (η(2) = .08), hostility (η(2) = .07), and medical symptoms (η(2) = .14), but no effects of intervention. Practice was not related to change. HEP is an active control condition for MBSR while remaining inert to mindfulness. These claims are supported by results from a pain task. Participant-reported outcomes (PROs) replicate previous improvements to well-being in MBSR, but indicate that MBSR is no more effective than a rigorous active control in improving these indices. These results emphasize the importance of using an active control condition like HEP in studies evaluating the effectiveness of MBSR.

  10. Transonic Drag Reduction Through Trailing-Edge Blowing on the FAST-MAC Circulation Control Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Jones, Gregory S.; Milholen, William E., II; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2017-01-01

    A third wind tunnel test of the FAST-MAC circulation control semi-span model was completed in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center where the model was configured for transonic testing of the cruise configuration with 0deg flap detection to determine the potential for transonic drag reduction with the circulation control blowing. The model allowed independent control of four circulation control plenums producing a high momentum jet from a blowing slot near the wing trailing edge that was directed over a 15% chord simple-hinged ap. Recent upgrades to transonic semi-span flow control testing at the NTF have demonstrated an improvement to overall data repeatability, particularly for the drag measurement, that allows for increased confidence in the data results. The static thrust generated by the blowing slot was removed from the wind-on data using force and moment balance data from wind-o thrust tares. This paper discusses the impact of the trailing-edge blowing to the transonic aerodynamics of the FAST-MAC model in the cruise configuration, where at flight Reynolds numbers, the thrust-removed corrected data showed that an overall drag reduction and increased aerodynamic efficiency was realized as a consequence of the blowing.

  11. VARAN: A Linear Model Variance Analysis Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Charles E.; And Others

    This memorandum is the manual for the VARAN (VARiance ANalysis) program, which is the latest addition to a series of computer programs for multivariate analysis of variance. As with earlier programs, analysis of variance, univariate and multivariate, is the main target of the program. Correlation analysis of all types is available with printout in…

  12. Speed Variance and Its Influence on Accidents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Nicholas J.; Gadirau, Ravi

    A study was conducted to investigate the traffic engineering factors that influence speed variance and to determine to what extent speed variance affects accident rates. Detailed analyses were carried out to relate speed variance with posted speed limit, design speeds, and other traffic variables. The major factor identified was the difference…

  13. Preliminary Assessment of Optimal Longitudinal-Mode Control for Drag Reduction through Distributed Aeroelastic Shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, Corey; Nguyen, Nhan; Lohn, Jason; Dolan, John

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of advanced lightweight materials is resulting in a new generation of lighter, flexible, more-efficient airframes that are enabling concepts for active aeroelastic wing-shape control to achieve greater flight efficiency and increased safety margins. These elastically shaped aircraft concepts require non-traditional methods for large-scale multi-objective flight control that simultaneously seek to gain aerodynamic efficiency in terms of drag reduction while performing traditional command-tracking tasks as part of a complete guidance and navigation solution. This paper presents results from a preliminary study of a notional multi-objective control law for an aeroelastic flexible-wing aircraft controlled through distributed continuous leading and trailing edge control surface actuators. This preliminary study develops and analyzes a multi-objective control law derived from optimal linear quadratic methods on a longitudinal vehicle dynamics model with coupled aeroelastic dynamics. The controller tracks commanded attack-angle while minimizing drag and controlling wing twist and bend. This paper presents an overview of the elastic aircraft concept, outlines the coupled vehicle model, presents the preliminary control law formulation and implementation, presents results from simulation, provides analysis, and concludes by identifying possible future areas for research

  14. Fine-Tuning the Properties of Doped Multifunctional Materials by Controlled Reduction of Dopants.

    PubMed

    Barroux, Hugo; Jiang, Tengfei; Paul, Camille; Massuyeau, Florian; Génois, Romain; Gordon, Elijah E; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan; Jobic, Stéphane; Gautier, Romain

    2017-03-02

    The physical properties of doped multifunctional compounds are commonly tuned by controlling the amount of dopants, but this control is limited because all the properties are influenced simultaneously by this single parameter. Here, we present a strategy that enables the fine-tuning of a specific combination of properties by controlling the reduction of dopants. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by optimizing the near-IR photoluminescence of strontium titanate SrTiO3 :Ni for potential applications in biomedicine for a range of absorbance in the visible/near-IR region. We discussed how material properties, such as luminescence, conductivity, or photocatalytic properties can be designed by carefully controlling the ratio of dopants in different oxidation states.

  15. Extended Onshore Control of a Floating Wind Turbine with Wave Disturbance Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, S.; Knudsen, T.; Bak, T.

    2014-12-01

    Reaching for higher wind resources beyond the water depth limitations of monopile wind turbines, there has arisen the alternative of using floating wind turbines. But the response of wave induced loads significantly increases for floating wind turbines. Applying conventional onshore control strategies to floating wind turbines has been shown to impose negative damped oscillations in fore-aft due to the low natural frequency of the floating structure. Thus, we suggest a control loop extension of the onshore controller which stabilizes the system and reduces the wave disturbance. The results shows that when adding the suggested control loop with disturbance reduction to the system, improved performance is observed in power fluctuations, blade pitch activity, and platform oscillations.

  16. DEMONSTRATION OF AN ADVANCED INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SIMULTANEOUS EMISSIONS REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Suzanne Shea; Randhir Sehgal; Ilga Celmins; Andrew Maxson

    2002-02-01

    The primary objective of the project titled ''Demonstration of an Advanced Integrated Control System for Simultaneous Emissions Reduction'' was to demonstrate at proof-of-concept scale the use of an online software package, the ''Plant Environmental and Cost Optimization System'' (PECOS), to optimize the operation of coal-fired power plants by economically controlling all emissions simultaneously. It combines physical models, neural networks, and fuzzy logic control to provide both optimal least-cost boiler setpoints to the boiler operators in the control room, as well as optimal coal blending recommendations designed to reduce fuel costs and fuel-related derates. The goal of the project was to demonstrate that use of PECOS would enable coal-fired power plants to make more economic use of U.S. coals while reducing emissions.

  17. Photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2 using heterogeneous catalysts with controlled nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shunji; Zhang, Qinghong; Liu, Guodong; Wang, Ye

    2016-01-04

    The development of efficient artificial photocatalysts and photoelectrocatalysts for the reduction of CO2 with H2O to fuels and chemicals has attracted much attention in recent years. Although the state-of-the-art for the production of fuels or chemicals from CO2 using solar energy is still far from practical consideration, rich knowledge has been accumulated to understand the key factors that determine the catalytic performances. This Feature article highlights recent advances in the photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2 with H2O using heterogeneous semiconductor-based catalysts. The effects of structural aspects of semiconductors, such as crystalline phases, particle sizes, morphologies, exposed facets and heterojunctions, on their catalytic behaviours are discussed. The roles of different types of cocatalysts and the impact of their nanostructures on surface CO2 chemisorption and reduction are also analysed. The present article aims to provide insights into the rational design of efficient heterogeneous catalysts with controlled nanostructures for the photocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic reduction of CO2 with H2O.

  18. Control Modes of the ST7 Disturbance Reduction System Flight Validation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, P. G.; Hsu, O. C.; Markley, F. L.; O'Donnell, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Technology 7 experiment will perform an on-orbit system-level validation of two specific Disturbance Reduction System technologies: a gravitational reference sensor employing a free-floating test mass and a set of micro-Newton colloidal thrusters. The ST7 Disturbance Reduction System is designed to maintain the spacecraft s position with respect to a free-floating test mass to less than 10 nm/the square root of Hz over the frequency range of 1 to 30 mHz. This requirement will help ensure that the residual accelerations on the test masses (beyond gravitational acceleration) will be below the ST7 goal of 300 (1 + [f/3 mHz](sup 2)) pm/s(sup 2)/the square root of Hz. This paper presents the overall design and analysis of the spacecraft drag-free and attitude controllers being designed by NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center. These controllers close the loop between the GRS and the micro-Newton colloidal thrusters. The ST7 DRS comprises three control systems: the attitude control system to maintain a sun-pointing attitude, the drag free control to center the spacecraft about the test masses, and the test mass suspension control. There are five control modes in the operation of the ST7-DRS, starting from the attitude-only mode and leading to the challenging science mode. The design and analysis of each of the control modes are presented. An 18-DOF model is developed to capture the essential dynamics of the ST7-DRS package. It includes all rigid-body dynamics of the spacecraft and two test masses (three translations and three rotations for the spacecraft and each of the test masses). Actuation and measurement noise and major disturbance sources acting on the spacecraft and test masses are modeled.

  19. Study of active rotor control for in-plane rotor noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tianxiao

    This research consists of two parts: the main part of this research is the study of active rotor control for in-plane rotor noise reduction. The objective of this part of the research is to develop a methodology to find a loading solution that results in noise reduction at a single observer or over an area (at multiple observers), and propose potential active devices that may realize the loading solution to reduce in-plane noise. Another part of the research is the study of thickness noise prediction method, which aims to develop a new thickness noise prediction method able to provide fast and relatively accurate thickness noise prediction. In this research, a new thickness noise prediction method, called dual compact thickness noise model is developed. In this dual compact model, at each radial location, the airfoil is divided into two parts and the uniform pressure distribution is integrated on the front and rear part respectively. This generates two loading lines acting at different chordwise locations, and the loading noise generated by these two loading lines reproduces the acoustic signal of the normal thickness noise. The positions of the two loading lines are determined to be .... = 0.133 and .... = 0.867 in a baseline case by matching normal thickness noise and the dual compact result at an in-plane observer directly ahead of the rotor. The dual compact thickness noise model is validated through thickness noise computation for a wide variety of cases, in which different airfoils, blade planforms, and tip Mach numbers, are considered. The dual compact thickness noise result is in good agreement with normal thickness noise for each case. Additionally, the locations of the two loading lines are kept unchanged for all the cases. The computation time is significantly reduced by using the dual compact thickness noise model as compared to the normal thickness noise computation (typically 25 times faster). Finally, the accuracy of dual compact thickness noise

  20. Global Gravity Wave Variances from Aura MLS: Characteristics and Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    The gravity wave (GW)-resolving capabilities of 118-GHz saturated thermal radiances acquired throughout the stratosphere by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite are investigated and initial results presented. Because the saturated (optically thick) radiances resolve GW perturbations from a given altitude at different horizontal locations, variances are evaluated at 12 pressure altitudes between 21 and 51 km using the 40 saturated radiances found at the bottom of each limb scan. Forward modeling simulations show that these variances are controlled mostly by GWs with vertical wavelengths z 5 km and horizontal along-track wavelengths of y 100-200 km. The tilted cigar-shaped three-dimensional weighting functions yield highly selective responses to GWs of high intrinsic frequency that propagate toward the instrument. The latter property is used to infer the net meridional component of GW propagation by differencing the variances acquired from ascending (A) and descending (D) orbits. Because of improved vertical resolution and sensitivity, Aura MLS GW variances are 5?8 times larger than those from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) MLS. Like UARS MLS variances, monthly-mean Aura MLS variances in January and July 2005 are enhanced when local background wind speeds are large, due largely to GW visibility effects. Zonal asymmetries in variance maps reveal enhanced GW activity at high latitudes due to forcing by flow over major mountain ranges and at tropical and subtropical latitudes due to enhanced deep convective generation as inferred from contemporaneous MLS cloud-ice data. At 21-28-km altitude (heights not measured by the UARS MLS), GW variance in the tropics is systematically enhanced and shows clear variations with the phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation, in general agreement with GW temperature variances derived from radiosonde, rocketsonde, and limb-scan vertical profiles.

  1. Global Gravity Wave Variances from Aura MLS: Characteristics and Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    The gravity wave (GW)-resolving capabilities of 118-GHz saturated thermal radiances acquired throughout the stratosphere by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite are investigated and initial results presented. Because the saturated (optically thick) radiances resolve GW perturbations from a given altitude at different horizontal locations, variances are evaluated at 12 pressure altitudes between 21 and 51 km using the 40 saturated radiances found at the bottom of each limb scan. Forward modeling simulations show that these variances are controlled mostly by GWs with vertical wavelengths z 5 km and horizontal along-track wavelengths of y 100-200 km. The tilted cigar-shaped three-dimensional weighting functions yield highly selective responses to GWs of high intrinsic frequency that propagate toward the instrument. The latter property is used to infer the net meridional component of GW propagation by differencing the variances acquired from ascending (A) and descending (D) orbits. Because of improved vertical resolution and sensitivity, Aura MLS GW variances are 5?8 times larger than those from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) MLS. Like UARS MLS variances, monthly-mean Aura MLS variances in January and July 2005 are enhanced when local background wind speeds are large, due largely to GW visibility effects. Zonal asymmetries in variance maps reveal enhanced GW activity at high latitudes due to forcing by flow over major mountain ranges and at tropical and subtropical latitudes due to enhanced deep convective generation as inferred from contemporaneous MLS cloud-ice data. At 21-28-km altitude (heights not measured by the UARS MLS), GW variance in the tropics is systematically enhanced and shows clear variations with the phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation, in general agreement with GW temperature variances derived from radiosonde, rocketsonde, and limb-scan vertical profiles.

  2. Estimation of prediction error variances via Monte Carlo sampling methods using different formulations of the prediction error variance.

    PubMed

    Hickey, John M; Veerkamp, Roel F; Calus, Mario P L; Mulder, Han A; Thompson, Robin

    2009-02-09

    Calculation of the exact prediction error variance covariance matrix is often computationally too demanding, which limits its application in REML algorithms, the calculation of accuracies of estimated breeding values and the control of variance of response to selection. Alternatively Monte Carlo sampling can be used to calculate approximations of the prediction error variance, which converge to the true values if enough samples are used. However, in practical situations the number of samples, which are computationally feasible, is limited. The objective of this study was to compare the convergence rate of different formulations of the prediction error variance calculated using Monte Carlo sampling. Four of these formulations were published, four were corresponding alternative versions, and two were derived as part of this study. The different formulations had different convergence rates and these were shown to depend on the number of samples and on the level of prediction error variance. Four formulations were competitive and these made use of information on either the variance of the estimated breeding value and on the variance of the true breeding value minus the estimated breeding value or on the covariance between the true and estimated breeding values.

  3. Anxiety sensitivity risk reduction in smokers: A randomized control trial examining effects on panic

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Raines, Amanda M.; Allan, Nicholas P.; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Empirical evidence has identified several risk factors for panic psychopathology, including smoking and anxiety sensitivity (AS; the fear of anxiety-related sensations). Smokers with elevated AS are therefore a particularly vulnerable population for panic. Yet, there is little knowledge about how to reduce risk of panic among high AS smokers. The present study prospectively evaluated panic outcomes within the context of a controlled randomized risk reduction program for smokers. Participants (N = 526) included current smokers who all received a state-of-the-art smoking cessation intervention with approximately half randomized to the AS reduction intervention termed Panic-smoking Program (PSP). The primary hypotheses focus on examining the effects of a PSP on panic symptoms in the context of this vulnerable population. Consistent with prediction, there was a significant effect of treatment condition on AS, such that individuals in the PSP condition, compared to those in the control condition, demonstrated greater decreases in AS throughout treatment and the follow-up period. In addition, PSP treatment resulted in lower rates of panic-related symptomatology. Moreover, mediation analyses indicated that reductions in AS resulted in lower panic symptoms. The present study provides the first empirical evidence that brief, targeted psychoeducational interventions can mitigate panic risk among smokers. PMID:26752327

  4. Anxiety sensitivity risk reduction in smokers: A randomized control trial examining effects on panic.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Norman B; Raines, Amanda M; Allan, Nicholas P; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Empirical evidence has identified several risk factors for panic psychopathology, including smoking and anxiety sensitivity (AS; the fear of anxiety-related sensations). Smokers with elevated AS are therefore a particularly vulnerable population for panic. Yet, there is little knowledge about how to reduce risk of panic among high AS smokers. The present study prospectively evaluated panic outcomes within the context of a controlled randomized risk reduction program for smokers. Participants (N = 526) included current smokers who all received a state-of-the-art smoking cessation intervention with approximately half randomized to the AS reduction intervention termed Panic-smoking Program (PSP). The primary hypotheses focus on examining the effects of a PSP on panic symptoms in the context of this vulnerable population. Consistent with prediction, there was a significant effect of treatment condition on AS, such that individuals in the PSP condition, compared to those in the control condition, demonstrated greater decreases in AS throughout treatment and the follow-up period. In addition, PSP treatment resulted in lower rates of panic-related symptomatology. Moreover, mediation analyses indicated that reductions in AS resulted in lower panic symptoms. The present study provides the first empirical evidence that brief, targeted psychoeducational interventions can mitigate panic risk among smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Reduction Expansion Synthesis as Strategy to Control Nitrogen Doping Level and Surface Area in Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Canty, Russell; Gonzalez, Edwin; MacDonald, Caleb; Osswald, Sebastian; Zea, Hugo; Luhrs, Claudia C.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene sheets doped with nitrogen were produced by the reduction-expansion (RES) method utilizing graphite oxide (GO) and urea as precursor materials. The simultaneous graphene generation and nitrogen insertion reactions are based on the fact that urea decomposes upon heating to release reducing gases. The volatile byproducts perform two primary functions: (i) promoting the reduction of the GO and (ii) providing the nitrogen to be inserted in situ as the graphene structure is created. Samples with diverse urea/GO mass ratios were treated at 800 °C in inert atmosphere to generate graphene with diverse microstructural characteristics and levels of nitrogen doping. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to study the microstructural features of the products. The effects of doping on the samples structure and surface area were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, and Brunauer Emmet Teller (BET). The GO and urea decomposition-reduction process as well as nitrogen-doped graphene stability were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) coupled with mass spectroscopy (MS) analysis of the evolved gases. Results show that the proposed method offers a high level of control over the amount of nitrogen inserted in the graphene and may be used alternatively to control its surface area. To demonstrate the practical relevance of these findings, as-produced samples were used as electrodes in supercapacitor and battery devices and compared with conventional, thermally exfoliated graphene. PMID:28793618

  6. Reduction of turbulent boundary layer induced interior noise through active impedance control.

    PubMed

    Remington, Paul J; Curtis, Alan R D; Coleman, Ronald B; Knight, J Scott

    2008-03-01

    The use of a single actuator tuned to an optimum impedance to control the sound power radiated from a turbulent boundary layer (TBL) excited aircraft panel into the aircraft interior is examined. An approach to calculating the optimum impedance is defined and the limitations on the reduction in radiated power by a single actuator tuned to that impedance are examined. It is shown that there are too many degrees of freedom in the TBL and in the radiation modes of the panel to allow a single actuator to control the radiated power. However, if the panel modes are lightly damped and well separated in frequency, significant reductions are possible. The implementation of a controller that presents a desired impedance to a structure is demonstrated in a laboratory experiment, in which the structure is a mass. The performance of such a controller on an aircraft panel is shown to be effective, if the actuator impedance is similar to but not the same as the desired impedance, provided the panel resonances are well separated in frequency and lightly damped.

  7. Host nutrition alters the variance in parasite transmission potential.

    PubMed

    Vale, Pedro F; Choisy, Marc; Little, Tom J

    2013-04-23

    The environmental conditions experienced by hosts are known to affect their mean parasite transmission potential. How different conditions may affect the variance of transmission potential has received less attention, but is an important question for disease management, especially if specific ecological contexts are more likely to foster a few extremely infectious hosts. Using the obligate-killing bacterium Pasteuria ramosa and its crustacean host Daphnia magna, we analysed how host nutrition affected the variance of individual parasite loads, and, therefore, transmission potential. Under low food, individual parasite loads showed similar mean and variance, following a Poisson distribution. By contrast, among well-nourished hosts, parasite loads were right-skewed and overdispersed, following a negative binomial distribution. Abundant food may, therefore, yield individuals causing potentially more transmission than the population average. Measuring both the mean and variance of individual parasite loads in controlled experimental infections may offer a useful way of revealing risk factors for potential highly infectious hosts.

  8. Restricted sample variance reduces generalizability.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Kimberley D

    2013-06-01

    One factor that affects the reliability of observed scores is restriction of range on the construct measured for a particular group of study participants. This study illustrates how researchers can use generalizability theory to evaluate the impact of restriction of range in particular sample characteristics on the generalizability of test scores and to estimate how changes in measurement design could improve the generalizability of the test scores. An observer-rated measure of child self-regulation (Response to Challenge Scale; Lakes, 2011) is used to examine scores for 198 children (Grades K through 5) within the generalizability theory (GT) framework. The generalizability of ratings within relatively developmentally homogeneous samples is examined and illustrates the effect of reduced variance among ratees on generalizability. Forecasts for g coefficients of various D study designs demonstrate how higher generalizability could be achieved by increasing the number of raters or items. In summary, the research presented illustrates the importance of and procedures for evaluating the generalizability of a set of scores in a particular research context.

  9. VARIANCE OF MICROSOMAL PROTEIN AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Differences in the pharmacokinetics of xenobiotics among humans makes them differentially susceptible to risk. Differences in enzyme content can mediate pharmacokinetic differences. Microsomal protein is often isolated fromliver to characterize enzyme content and activity, but no measures exist to extrapolate these data to the intact liver. Measures were developed from up to 60 samples of adult human liver to characterize the content of microsomal protein and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Statistical evaluations are necessary to estimate values far from the mean value. Adult human liver contains 52.9 - 1.476 mg microsomal protein per g; 2587 - 1.84 pmoles CYP2E1 per g; and 5237 - 2.214 pmols CYP3A per g (geometric mean - geometric standard deviation). These values are useful for identifying and testing susceptibility as a function of enzyme content when used to extrapolate in vitro rates of chemical metabolism for input to physiologically based pharmacokinetic models which can then be exercised to quantify the effect of variance in enzyme expression on risk-relevant pharmacokinetic outcomes.

  10. Size and morphology controlled NiSe nanoparticles as efficient catalyst for the reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbarao, Udumula; Marakatti, Vijaykumar S.; Amshumali, Mungalimane K.; Loukya, B.; Singh, Dheeraj Kumar; Datta, Ranjan; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2016-12-01

    Facile and efficient ball milling and polyol methods were employed for the synthesis of nickel selenide (NiSe) nanoparticle. The particle size of the NiSe nanoparticle has been controlled mechanically by varying the ball size in the milling process. The role of the surfactants in the formation of various morphologies was studied. The compounds were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The efficiency of the NiSe nanoparticle as a catalyst was tested for the reduction of para-nitroaniline (PNA) to para-phenyldiamine (PPD) and para-nitrophenol (PNP) to para-aminophenol (PAP) using NaBH4 as the reducing agent. Particle size, morphology and the presence of surfactant played a crucial role in the reduction process.

  11. The reduction of rotorcraft power and vibration using optimally controlled active gurney flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Eui Sung

    The main topic of the present study is the application of active control scheme for the reduction of rotorcraft main rotor power reduction and vibratory load. When the helicopter is operated near its flight boundary, the required power and vibratory loads rapidly increases which impose a limit on the helicopter operation. Various methods were proposed and studied in order to achieve performance improvement under such operating condition. The effect of active control scheme was examined for its impact on the performance improvement and vibration reduction in the present study. Numerical simulations are based on the UH-60A Blackhawk helicopter with an active Gurney flap spanning from 70%R to 80%R of the main rotor. For obtaining the aeroelastic response of the rotor blade, finite element method was used to represent elastic blade. The aerodynamic loads acting on the blade are provided by CFD based 2D lookup table. Prescribed wake model was used to resolve the induced inflow over the rotor disk. The unsteady aerodynamic behavior due to the higher harmonic actuation of active Gurney flap was resolved by the time-domain unsteady aerodynamic model. The first part of preliminary study covers parametric study using Gurney flap. Starting with simple rigid blade representation of the rotor blade, the effect of 1/rev Gurney flap actuation was examined on three different gross weights. The effect of active Gurney flap width, the chordwise location of active Gurney flap, the effect of unsteady aerodynamic model, and the effect of 2/rev actuation frequency were examined. The second part of preliminary study was conducted with the elastic blade model to include the effect of torsion dynamics. Performance improvement using active Gurney flap was examined for maximizing thrust capability at two flight speeds. 1/rev Gurney flap actuation increased the gross weight capability up to 1,000 lbs. Also, 1/rev actuation of Gurney flap increased maximum altitude limit of baseline rotor by 1

  12. Investigation of passive shock wave-boundary layer control for transonic airfoil drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Brower, W. B., Jr.; Bahi, L.; Ross, J.

    1982-01-01

    The passive drag control concept, consisting of a porous surface with a cavity beneath it, was investigated with a 12-percent-thick circular arc and a 14-percent-thick supercritical airfoil mounted on the test section bottom wall. The porous surface was positioned in the shock wave/boundary layer interaction region. The flow circulating through the porous surface, from the downstream to the upstream of the terminating shock wave location, produced a lambda shock wave system and a pressure decrease in the downstream region minimizing the flow separation. The wake impact pressure data show an appreciably drag reduction with the porous surface at transonic speeds. To determine the optimum size of porosity and cavity, tunnel tests were conducted with different airfoil porosities, cavities and flow Mach numbers. A higher drag reduction was obtained by the 2.5 percent porosity and the 1/4-inch deep cavity.

  13. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming.

    PubMed

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction.

  14. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction.

  15. Sexual Function and Depression Outcomes Among Breast Hypertrophy Patients Undergoing Reduction Mammaplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Beraldo, Flávia N M; Veiga, Daniela F; Veiga-Filho, Joel; Garcia, Edgard S; Vilas-Bôas, Gerusa S; Juliano, Yara; Sabino-Neto, Miguel; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2016-04-01

    The breasts are important symbols of femininity and sensuality. Alterations such as breast hypertrophy can affect several aspects of women's quality of life. Breast hypertrophy is a prevalent health condition, which is treated by reduction mammaplasty. The aim of the present study was to assess sexual function and depression outcomes among breast hypertrophy patients undergoing reduction mammaplasty. Sixty breast hypertrophy patients were randomly allocated to a control group (CG) (n = 30) or a breast reduction group (BRG) (n = 30). The patients in the CG were assessed at the first appointment as well as 3 and 6 months later. The patients in the BRG were assessed preoperatively as well as 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Validated instruments, the Female Sexual Function Index and the Beck Depression Inventory, were used to assess sexual function and depression among the subjects. The results of these assessments were compared within and between groups. Twenty-seven and 29 patients in the CG and the BRG, respectively, completed the 6-month follow-up period. At baseline, the groups did not differ significantly with regard to the main demographic data. In the initial assessment, the groups did not differ significantly with regard to Female Sexual Function Index or Beck Depression Inventory scores. Compared with the CG, the BRG reported better sexual function 3 (P = 0.015) and 6 (P = 0.009) months postoperatively. Regarding depression scores, the reduction mammaplasty group had better results 6 months postoperatively (P = 0.014). Reduction mammaplasty positively affected sexual function and depression levels in breast hypertrophy patients.

  16. Efficient control of ultrafast optical nonlinearity of reduced graphene oxide by infrared reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattachraya, S.; Maiti, R.; Das, A. C.; Saha, S.; Mondal, S.; Ray, S. K.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Datta, P. K.

    2016-07-07

    Simultaneous occurrence of saturable absorption nonlinearity and two-photon absorption nonlinearity in the same medium is well sought for the devices like optical limiter and laser mode-locker. Pristine graphene sheet consisting entirely of sp{sup 2}-hybridized carbon atoms has already been identified having large optical nonlinearity. However, graphene oxide (GO), a precursor of graphene having both sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3}-hybridized carbon atom, is increasingly attracting cross-discipline researchers for its controllable properties by reduction of oxygen containing groups. In this work, GO has been prepared by modified Hummers method, and it has been further reduced by infrared (IR) radiation. Characterization of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) by means of Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-Visible absorption measurements confirms an efficient reduction with infrared radiation. Here, we report precise control of non-linear optical properties of RGO in femtosecond regime with increased degrees of IR reduction measured by open aperture z-scan technique. Depending on the intensity, both saturable absorption and two-photon absorption effects are found to contribute to the non-linearity of all the samples. Saturation dominates at low intensity (∼127 GW/cm{sup 2}) while two-photon absorption becomes prominent at higher intensities (from 217 GW/cm{sup 2} to 302 GW/cm{sup 2}). The values of two-photon absorption co-efficient (∼0.0022–0.0037 cm/GW for GO, and ∼0.0128–0.0143 cm/GW for RGO) and the saturation intensity (∼57 GW/cm{sup 2} for GO, and ∼194 GW/cm{sup 2} for RGO) increase with increasing reduction, indicating GO and RGO as novel tunable photonic devices. We have also explained the reason of tunable nonlinear optical properties by using amorphous carbon model.

  17. Efficient control of ultrafast optical nonlinearity of reduced graphene oxide by infrared reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattachraya, S.; Maiti, R.; Das, A. C.; Saha, S.; Mondal, S.; Ray, S. K.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Datta, P. K.

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of saturable absorption nonlinearity and two-photon absorption nonlinearity in the same medium is well sought for the devices like optical limiter and laser mode-locker. Pristine graphene sheet consisting entirely of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms has already been identified having large optical nonlinearity. However, graphene oxide (GO), a precursor of graphene having both sp2 and sp3-hybridized carbon atom, is increasingly attracting cross-discipline researchers for its controllable properties by reduction of oxygen containing groups. In this work, GO has been prepared by modified Hummers method, and it has been further reduced by infrared (IR) radiation. Characterization of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) by means of Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-Visible absorption measurements confirms an efficient reduction with infrared radiation. Here, we report precise control of non-linear optical properties of RGO in femtosecond regime with increased degrees of IR reduction measured by open aperture z-scan technique. Depending on the intensity, both saturable absorption and two-photon absorption effects are found to contribute to the non-linearity of all the samples. Saturation dominates at low intensity (˜127 GW/cm2) while two-photon absorption becomes prominent at higher intensities (from 217 GW/cm2 to 302 GW/cm2). The values of two-photon absorption co-efficient (˜0.0022-0.0037 cm/GW for GO, and ˜0.0128-0.0143 cm/GW for RGO) and the saturation intensity (˜57 GW/cm2 for GO, and ˜194 GW/cm2 for RGO) increase with increasing reduction, indicating GO and RGO as novel tunable photonic devices. We have also explained the reason of tunable nonlinear optical properties by using amorphous carbon model.

  18. Assessment of methods for methyl iodide emission reduction and pest control using a simulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Lifang; Ashworth, Daniel J.; Šimunek, Jirka; Xuan, Richeng; Yates, Scott R.

    2013-02-01

    The increasing registration of the fumigant methyl iodide within the USA has led to more concerns about its toxicity to workers and bystanders. Emission mitigation strategies are needed to protect the public and environmental health while providing effective pest control. The effectiveness of various methods on emissions reduction and pest control was assessed using a process-based mathematical model in this study. Firstly, comparisons between the simulated and laboratory measured emission fluxes and cumulative emissions were made for methyl iodide (MeI) under four emission reduction treatments: 1) control, 2) using soil with high organic matter content (HOM), 3) being covered by virtually impermeable film (VIF), and 4) irrigating soil surface following fumigation (Irrigation). Then the model was extended to simulate a broader range of emission reduction strategies for MeI, including 5) being covered by high density polyethylene (HDPE), 6) increasing injection depth from 30 cm to 46 cm (Deep), 7) HDPE + Deep, 8) adding a reagent at soil surface (Reagent), 9) Reagent + Irrigation, and 10) Reagent + HDPE. Furthermore, the survivability of three types of soil-borne pests (citrus nematodes [Tylenchulus semipenetrans], barnyard seeds [Echinochloa crus-galli], fungi [Fusarium oxysporum]) was also estimated for each scenario. Overall, the trend of the measured emission fluxes as well as total emission were reasonably reproduced by the model for treatments 1 through 4. Based on the numerical simulation, the ranking of effectiveness in total emission reduction was VIF (82.4%) > Reagent + HDPE (73.2%) > Reagent + Irrigation (43.0%) > Reagent (23.5%) > Deep + HDPE (19.3%) > HOM (17.6%) > Deep (13.0%) > Irrigation (11.9%) > HDPE (5.8%). The order for pest control efficacy suggests, VIF had the highest pest control efficacy, followed by Deep + HDPE, Irrigation, Reagent + Irrigation, HDPE, Deep, Reagent + HDPE, Reagent, and HOM. Therefore, VIF is the optimal method disregarding

  19. Aeroelastic Modeling of Elastically Shaped Aircraft Concept via Wing Shaping Control for Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; James Urnes, Sr.

    2012-01-01

    Lightweight aircraft design has received a considerable attention in recent years as a means for improving cruise efficiency. Reducing aircraft weight results in lower lift requirements which directly translate into lower drag, hence reduced engine thrust requirements during cruise. The use of lightweight materials such as advanced composite materials has been adopted by airframe manufacturers in current and future aircraft. Modern lightweight materials can provide less structural rigidity while maintaining load-carrying capacity. As structural flexibility increases, aeroelastic interactions with aerodynamic forces and moments become an increasingly important consideration in aircraft design and aerodynamic performance. Furthermore, aeroelastic interactions with flight dynamics can result in issues with vehicle stability and control. Abstract This paper describes a recent aeroelastic modeling effort for an elastically shaped aircraft concept (ESAC). The aircraft model is based on the rigid-body generic transport model (GTM) originally developed at NASA Langley Research Center. The ESAC distinguishes itself from the GTM in that it is equipped with highly flexible wing structures as a weight reduction design feature. More significantly, the wings are outfitted with a novel control effector concept called variable camber continuous trailing edge (VCCTE) flap system for active control of wing aeroelastic deflections to optimize the local angle of attack of wing sections for improved aerodynamic efficiency through cruise drag reduction and lift enhancement during take-off and landing. The VCCTE flap is a multi-functional and aerodynamically efficient device capable of achieving high lift-to-drag ratios. The flap system is comprised of three chordwise segments that form the variable camber feature of the flap and multiple spanwise segments that form a piecewise continuous trailing edge. By configuring the flap camber and trailing edge shape, drag reduction could be

  20. Intelligent Control for Drag Reduction on the X-48B Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Brian Joseph; Brown, Nelson Andrew; Yoo, Seung Yeun

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the development of an intelligent control technology for in-flight drag reduction. The system is integrated with and demonstrated on the full X-48B nonlinear simulation. The intelligent control system utilizes a peak-seeking control method implemented with a time-varying Kalman filter. Performance functional coordinate and magnitude measurements, or independent and dependent parameters respectively, are used by the Kalman filter to provide the system with gradient estimates of the designed performance function which is used to drive the system toward a local minimum in a steepestdescent approach. To ensure ease of integration and algorithm performance, a single-input single-output approach was chosen. The framework, specific implementation considerations, simulation results, and flight feasibility issues related to this platform are discussed.

  1. Flexible system model reduction and control system design based upon actuator and sensor influence functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Johnson, Timothy L.; Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1987-01-01

    A model reduction technique based on aggregation with respect to sensor and actuator influence functions rather than modes is presented for large systems of coupled second-order differential equations. Perturbation expressions which can predict the effects of spillover on both the reduced-order plant model and the neglected plant model are derived. For the special case of collocated actuators and sensors, these expressions lead to the derivation of constraints on the controller gains that are, given the validity of the perturbation technique, sufficient to guarantee the stability of the closed-loop system. A case study demonstrates the derivation of stabilizing controllers based on the present technique. The use of control and observation synthesis in modifying the dimension of the reduced-order plant model is also discussed. A numerical example is provided for illustration.

  2. Reduction of neonatal pain following administration of 25% lingual dextrose: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Sinojia, Ankit; Dongara, Ashish

    2013-06-01

    Neonates experience painful procedures during routine care. Orally administered, sweet tasting solutions are commonly used in management of neonatal pain. We conducted a double-blind randomized control trial in neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Shri Krishna Hospital, Karamsad-Gujarat-India, of lingual administration of 25% dextrose vs. no intervention, to evaluate reduction of pain following oropharyngeal infant feeding tube insertions. Pain was assessed using Premature Infant Pain Profile score. Almost all the patients in the control group (98%) experienced moderate-to-severe pain as compared with the intervention group (71%). Mean Premature Infant Pain Profile score was statistically significantly lower in the intervention group (8.21) as compared with control group (10.31). (p < 0.001, 95% CI 1.090-3.102). Lingual 25% dextrose is an effective analgesic for relieving pain during orogastric tube insertion.

  3. Decentralized active feedback control approach for vibration and noise reduction through an aircraft fuselage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Gopal; Fuller, Christopher R.; Carneal, J.

    2005-09-01

    Active noise control has been commonly implemented with fully coupled, feed-forward approach, which employs reference sensors on the fuselage/source and error microphones in the radiated field. Implementation limitations include: complexity, delay/causality, and use of microphone error sensors. An alternative approach of feedback control utilizing sensors located on each panel may overcome most of these problems. The sensors on each panel should estimate the sound radiation from the panel and also should de-couple the control from the neighbor actuator signals by primarily observing the control signals on the panel to which it is attached. With this sensing arrangement, multiple, independent single input single output feedback loops applied to each panel in conjunction with an actuator and sound radiation sensor can be utilized. Causality problems are overcome by utilizing feedback control approach with sensors located on the panel as feedback sensors. This paper will present results from laboratory tests, conducted on an aircraft fuselage, which showed that a multiple SISO feedback control approach can provide global reductions of broadband interior noise. These tests demonstrated that the actuator, sensor, and control hardware technology is mature and can be integrated into a reliable, compact system.

  4. An Overview of Latest Model Reduction and Control Methods of Large Flexible Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, J. M.; Lange, W. J., Jr.; Jamshidi, M.

    1985-01-01

    The latest trends and theoretical developments involved with the modeling and control of Large Flexible Space Structures (LFSS) are described. The paper addresses first the basic problems, characteristics, and difficulties inherent in modeling and control of LFSS. Major sources of difficulties and errors are the stiffness and damping operators of the dynamic model. Extensions of Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) theory as applied to LFSS are presented, including frequency-shaped cost functionals and perturbation methods. The minimum data/maximum entropy approach which uses a stochastic design model to overcome difficulties found in the LQG-based methods is described. Latest trends in system theory including balanced realization and singular-value analysis are used to determine reduced order controllers and models. Ad hoc methods such as component cost analysis and modal cost analysis are discussed in context with the closed-loop reduction problem of controller order versus performance. The minimum data/maximum entropy approach also addresses controller order versus performance. Those areas of control science and large scale systems that appear to have an important role in understanding and solving LFSS modeling and control are also identified.

  5. Reward Pays the Cost of Noise Reduction in Motor and Cognitive Control.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Sanjay G; Chong, Trevor T-J; Apps, Matthew A J; Batla, Amit; Stamelou, Maria; Jarman, Paul R; Bhatia, Kailash P; Husain, Masud

    2015-06-29

    Speed-accuracy trade-off is an intensively studied law governing almost all behavioral tasks across species. Here we show that motivation by reward breaks this law, by simultaneously invigorating movement and improving response precision. We devised a model to explain this paradoxical effect of reward by considering a new factor: the cost of control. Exerting control to improve response precision might itself come at a cost--a cost to attenuate a proportion of intrinsic neural noise. Applying a noise-reduction cost to optimal motor control predicted that reward can increase both velocity and accuracy. Similarly, application to decision-making predicted that reward reduces reaction times and errors in cognitive control. We used a novel saccadic distraction task to quantify the speed and accuracy of both movements and decisions under varying reward. Both faster speeds and smaller errors were observed with higher incentives, with the results best fitted by a model including a precision cost. Recent theories consider dopamine to be a key neuromodulator in mediating motivational effects of reward. We therefore examined how Parkinson's disease (PD), a condition associated with dopamine depletion, alters the effects of reward. Individuals with PD showed reduced reward sensitivity in their speed and accuracy, consistent in our model with higher noise-control costs. Including a cost of control over noise explains how reward may allow apparent performance limits to be surpassed. On this view, the pattern of reduced reward sensitivity in PD patients can specifically be accounted for by a higher cost for controlling noise.

  6. Increasing selection response by Bayesian modeling of heterogeneous environmental variances

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heterogeneity of environmental variance among genotypes reduces selection response because genotypes with higher variance are more likely to be selected than low-variance genotypes. Modeling heterogeneous variances to obtain weighted means corrected for heterogeneous variances is difficult in likel...

  7. Initial results of a model rotor higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel experiment on BVI impulsive noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Lehmann, G.; van der Wall, B.

    1989-09-01

    Initial acoustic results are presented from a higher harmonic control (HHC) wind tunnel pilot experiment on helicopter rotor blade-vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise reduction, making use of the DFVLR 40-percent-scaled BO-105 research rotor in the DNW 6m by 8m closed test section. Considerable noise reduction (of several decibels) has been measured for particular HHC control settings, however, at the cost of increased vibration levels and vice versa. The apparently adverse results for noise and vibration reduction by HHC are explained. At optimum pitch control settings for BVI noise reduction, rotor simulation results demonstrate that blade loading at the outer tip region is decreased, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are increased, resulting altogether in reduced BVI noise generation. At optimum pitch control settings for vibration reduction adverse effects on blade loading, vortex strength and blade vortex miss-distance are found.

  8. Generalized Analysis of Molecular Variance

    PubMed Central

    Nievergelt, Caroline M; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J

    2007-01-01

    Many studies in the fields of genetic epidemiology and applied population genetics are predicated on, or require, an assessment of the genetic background diversity of the individuals chosen for study. A number of strategies have been developed for assessing genetic background diversity. These strategies typically focus on genotype data collected on the individuals in the study, based on a panel of DNA markers. However, many of these strategies are either rooted in cluster analysis techniques, and hence suffer from problems inherent to the assignment of the biological and statistical meaning to resulting clusters, or have formulations that do not permit easy and intuitive extensions. We describe a very general approach to the problem of assessing genetic background diversity that extends the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) strategy introduced by Excoffier and colleagues some time ago. As in the original AMOVA strategy, the proposed approach, termed generalized AMOVA (GAMOVA), requires a genetic similarity matrix constructed from the allelic profiles of individuals under study and/or allele frequency summaries of the populations from which the individuals have been sampled. The proposed strategy can be used to either estimate the fraction of genetic variation explained by grouping factors such as country of origin, race, or ethnicity, or to quantify the strength of the relationship of the observed genetic background variation to quantitative measures collected on the subjects, such as blood pressure levels or anthropometric measures. Since the formulation of our test statistic is rooted in multivariate linear models, sets of variables can be related to genetic background in multiple regression-like contexts. GAMOVA can also be used to complement graphical representations of genetic diversity such as tree diagrams (dendrograms) or heatmaps. We examine features, advantages, and power of the proposed procedure and showcase its flexibility by using it to analyze a

  9. Generalized analysis of molecular variance.

    PubMed

    Nievergelt, Caroline M; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J

    2007-04-06

    Many studies in the fields of genetic epidemiology and applied population genetics are predicated on, or require, an assessment of the genetic background diversity of the individuals chosen for study. A number of strategies have been developed for assessing genetic background diversity. These strategies typically focus on genotype data collected on the individuals in the study, based on a panel of DNA markers. However, many of these strategies are either rooted in cluster analysis techniques, and hence suffer from problems inherent to the assignment of the biological and statistical meaning to resulting clusters, or have formulations that do not permit easy and intuitive extensions. We describe a very general approach to the problem of assessing genetic background diversity that extends the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) strategy introduced by Excoffier and colleagues some time ago. As in the original AMOVA strategy, the proposed approach, termed generalized AMOVA (GAMOVA), requires a genetic similarity matrix constructed from the allelic profiles of individuals under study and/or allele frequency summaries of the populations from which the individuals have been sampled. The proposed strategy can be used to either estimate the fraction of genetic variation explained by grouping factors such as country of origin, race, or ethnicity, or to quantify the strength of the relationship of the observed genetic background variation to quantitative measures collected on the subjects, such as blood pressure levels or anthropometric measures. Since the formulation of our test statistic is rooted in multivariate linear models, sets of variables can be related to genetic background in multiple regression-like contexts. GAMOVA can also be used to complement graphical representations of genetic diversity such as tree diagrams (dendrograms) or heatmaps. We examine features, advantages, and power of the proposed procedure and showcase its flexibility by using it to analyze a

  10. Hingeless rotor theory and experiment on vibration reduction by periodic variation of conventional controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sissingh, G. J.; Donham, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The reduction of the n per rev. pitch-, roll- and vertical vibrations of an n-bladed rotor by n per rev. sinusoidal variations of the collective and cyclic controls is investigated. The numerical results presented refer to a four-bladed, 7.5-foot model and are based on frequency response tests conducted under an Army-sponsored research program. The following subjects are treated: extraction of the rotor transfer functions (.073R hub flapping and model thrust versus servo valve command, amplitude and phase), calculation of servo commands (volts) required to compensate .073R hub flapping (3P and 5P) and model thrust (4P), evaluation of the effect of the vibratory control inputs on blade loads, and theoretical prediction of the root flapbending moments generated by 0 to 5P perturbations of the feathering angle and rotor angle of attack. Five operating conditions are investigated covering advance ratios from approximately 0.2 to 0.85. The feasibility of vibration reduction by periodic variation on conventional controls is evaluated.

  11. Supply-side harm reduction strategies: Bolivia's experiment with social control.

    PubMed

    Farthing, Linda; Kohl, Benjamin

    2012-11-01

    Harm reduction approaches to drug control have almost exclusively focussed on consumers in northern countries. This article supports recent analysis that indicates that such policies also hold relevance for producer countries by drawing on recent policy innovations in Bolivia. When Evo Morales, the president of the national coca grower confederation, was elected the country's first indigenous president in 2005, he promised to fundamentally change 25 years of the U.S.-funded "drug war" that had generated repeated human rights violations. The new policy, which implicitly incorporates harm reduction principles combined with respect for human rights, recognizes coca leaf's traditional use and cultural importance and relies on vigorous local organizations to implement a community-based programme called social control. Results to date indicate that Bolivia's social control experience has reduced violence in coca growing communities, ensured small farmers a subsistence income from coca and increased sovereignty, while making a modest contribution to containing expansion of coca cultivation. The programme has registered 50,000 farmers who are allowed to cultivate limited quantities of coca to supply traditional users and helped them gain secure title to their land. This registration is combined with satellite surveillance to guarantee that farmers do not exceed limits established by law. To date, the programme's reach is incomplete and coca is still diverted to the drug trade. Nonetheless, the approach may offer lessons for other drug producer countries, particularly where strong socio-political organizations are found in combination with closeknit communities holding shared cultural values.

  12. Reduction of blade-vortex interaction noise using higher harmonic pitch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Jolly, J. Ralph, Jr.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1989-01-01

    An acoustics test using an aeroelastically scaled rotor was conducted to examine the effectiveness of higher harmonic blade pitch control for the reduction of impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. A four-bladed, 110 in. diameter, articulated rotor model was tested in a heavy gas (Freon-12) medium in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Noise and vibration measurements were made for a range of matched flight conditions, where prescribed (open-loop) higher harmonic pitch was superimposed on the normal (baseline) collective and cyclic trim pitch. For the inflow-microphone noise measurements, advantage was taken of the reverberance in the hard walled tunnel by using a sound power determination approach. Initial findings from on-line data processing for three of the test microphones are reported for a 4/rev (4P) collective pitch control for a range of input amplitudes and phases. By comparing these results to corresponding baseline (no control) conditions, significant noise reductions (4 to 5 dB) were found for low-speed descent conditions, where helicopter BVI noise is most intense. For other rotor flight conditions, the overall noise was found to increase. All cases show increased vibration levels.

  13. Reduction of blade-vortex interaction noise through higher harmonic pitch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Jolly, J. Ralph, Jr.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1990-01-01

    An acoustics test using an aeroelastically scaled rotor was conducted to examine the effectiveness of higher harmonic blade pitch control for the reduction of impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. A four-bladed, 110 in. diameter, articulated rotor model was tested in a heavy gas (Freon-12) medium in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Noise and vibration measurements were made for a range of matched flight conditions, where prescribed (open-loop) higher harmonic pitch was superimposed on the normal (baseline) collective and cyclic trim pitch. For the inflow-microphone noise measurements, advantage was taken of the reverberance in the hard walled tunnel by using a sound power determination approach. Initial findings from on-line data processing for three of the test microphones are reported for a 4/rev (4P) collective pitch control for a range of input amplitudes and phases. By comparing these results to corresponding baseline (no control) conditions, significant noise reductions (4 to 5 dB) were found for low-speed descent conditions, where helicopter BVI noise is most intense. For other rotor flight conditions, the overall noise was found to increase. All cases show increased vibration levels.

  14. Analysis of Variance Components for Genetic Markers with Unphased Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    An ANOVA type general multi-allele (GMA) model was proposed in Wang (2014) on analysis of variance components for quantitative trait loci or genetic markers with phased or unphased genotypes. In this study, by applying the GMA model, we further examine estimation of the genetic variance components for genetic markers with unphased genotypes based on a random sample from a study population. In one locus and two loci cases, we first derive the least square estimates (LSE) of model parameters in fitting the GMA model. Then we construct estimators of the genetic variance components for one marker locus in a Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium population and two marker loci in an equilibrium population. Meanwhile, we explore the difference between the classical general linear model (GLM) and GMA based approaches in association analysis of genetic markers with quantitative traits. We show that the GMA model can retain the same partition on the genetic variance components as the traditional Fisher's ANOVA model, while the GLM cannot. We clarify that the standard F-statistics based on the partial reductions in sums of squares from GLM for testing the fixed allelic effects could be inadequate for testing the existence of the variance component when allelic interactions are present. We point out that the GMA model can reduce the confounding between the allelic effects and allelic interactions at least for independent alleles. As a result, the GMA model could be more beneficial than GLM for detecting allelic interactions.

  15. Control Variate Estimators of Survivor Growth from Point Samples

    Treesearch

    Francis A. Roesch; Paul C. van Deusen

    1993-01-01

    Two estimators of the control variate type for survivor growth from remeasured point samples are proposed and compared with more familiar estimators. The large reductionsin variance, observed in many cases forestimators constructed with control variates, arealso realized in thisapplication. A simulation study yielded consistent reductions in variance which were often...

  16. Subsonic jet noise reduction by fluidic control: The interaction region and the global effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurendeau, E.; Jordan, P.; Bonnet, J. P.; Delville, J.; Parnaudeau, P.; Lamballais, E.

    2008-10-01

    A microjet arrangement comprising both penetration (or immersion) and convergence (jets oriented such that two jets of a pair interact with one another) is used to control a subsonic turbulent jet with a view to noise reduction. The acoustic effect of the so-called fluidevron system is comparable to chevrons and nonconverging microjets as far as the noise reduction is concerned. Detailed experimental measurements are performed for a main jet with Mach and Reynolds numbers of 0.3 and 310 000, respectively. A direct numerical simulation study is performed for a model, plane mixing-layer problem using the immersed-boundary method, in order to help understand the topological features of the fluidevron-mixing-layer interaction. In terms of modifications produced in the flow, two relatively distinct regions are identified: the near-nozzle region, 0<(x/D)<1, where the dynamics are dominated by the fluidevron-main-jet interaction, and the region (x /D)>1, where the jet recovers many of the uncontrolled-jet flow characteristics, but with globally reduced turbulence levels and a longer potential core. The flow structure produced in the near-nozzle region is found to comprise an ejection of fluid from the main jet; the ejection process leads to very high fluctuation levels. This highly turbulent fluid, on being reassimilated by the mixing-layer downstream of the interaction point, has a spectacular local impact on turbulent kinetic energy production and on the entrainment: the former is reduced by 70%, and the latter boosted by 30% over the range 0.2<(x/D)<3. The impact of the flow control on the integral scales of the turbulence is assessed, as these are central to acoustic-analogy-based source models. A significant reduction is found in the radial integral scales, and these are then weighted by the local fluctuation energy in order to assess the impact of the control on the source mechanisms of the flow (considered in the context of Lighthill's formulation of the problem

  17. Selectivity Control of CO2 Reduction in an Inorganic Artificial Photosynthesis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashiba, Hiroshi; Yotsuhashi, Satoshi; Deguchi, Masahiro; Yamada, Yuka; Ohkawa, Kazuhiro

    2013-09-01

    We demonstrated that the selectivity of photo electrochemical CO2 reduction can be controlled in an inorganic artificial photosynthesis system using an AlGaN/GaN photo electrode. By increasing input light intensity and the use of a gold cathode, the Faradaic efficiency of CO dramatically increases from 30% to over 80% while that of H2 decreases. We observed that the cathode potential resulting from illumination determines the ratio of CO and H2. With this system, it is possible to switch the main reaction product from CO to HCOOH, which is also effective even under intense illumination.

  18. Lateral Current Reduction by Voltage Drop Compensator for Multiple Autonomously Controlled UPS Connected in Parallel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eduardo Kazuhide; Kawamura, Atsuo

    An autonomous control for redundant parallelism of uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) connected in parallel has successfully been proposed and discussed in theoretical and experimental terms. This independent control only requires the measurement of the output current. With the computation of the active and reactive currents, proportional-integral-based controllers provide the phase angle and amplitude, respectively, of the output voltage. However, when voltage difference between UPS exists, there is a flow of reactive lateral current, which makes the load sharing disproportional. A preliminary approach to reduce this circulating current considers a high proportional gain in the control equation for output voltage amplitude in order to reduce the offset error. Nevertheless it implies in high variation of the voltage amplitude, so that voltage levels easily reaches the limit, and the respective control equation becomes incapable to compensate any voltage difference. This paper proposes a compensator to counterbalance the voltage drop caused by the proportional gain of the control equation for the voltage amplitude. Implementation in an experimental setup with three UPS with different output rating connected in parallel shows significant reduction of the reactive lateral current, and consequent improvement of the current distribution, including employment of voltage limiters (1%), under various conditions.

  19. Comparison of forgiveness and anger-reduction group treatments: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Daniel B; Wade, Nathaniel G

    2012-01-01

    Interventions to promote forgiveness are effective. However, in what ways and in comparison to what other treatments is still unresolved. College students (n=112) who had been hurt in the past and struggled to overcome their negative experiences of it participated in this study. They were randomly assigned to one of two treatments, one focused on promoting forgiveness and one focused on reducing anger for past hurts, or a waiting list control. Treatment consisted of six 90-minute sessions held in small groups led by one facilitator over the course of 3 weeks. Results of three-level (time within participants within groups) hierarchical linear modeling indicated that the forgiveness treatment (n=41) resulted in greater reductions in hostility and psychological symptoms and more empathy for the offender than the alternative treatment (n=39) and the waitlist (n=32). Participants in both treatment conditions reported greater reductions in desires for revenge than those in the waitlist condition. All participants reported a significant reduction in rumination about the offense. Clinical significance testing mirrored these results. These findings support forgiveness-promoting treatments as effective for reducing psychological symptoms and achieving forgiveness, and suggest that they may be more effective than other types of treatments.

  20. Use of a powered coverlet for moisture removal, skin temperature reduction, odor, and bacteria control.

    PubMed

    Reger, Steven I; Ranganathan, Vinoth K; McNulty, Amy K

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of a powered coverlet (PCL) to control moisture, reduce skin temperature, and help control odor and microbial growth at the skin/support-surface interface. A human torso was simulated using a water temperature-regulated loading gauge. The PCL is a 3-tier coverlet composed of vapor-permeable, liquid-impermeable layers with a foam spacer inbetween and a fan blower to draw moisture and heat away from the patient's skin through the spacer. A fabric moisture reservoir simulated sweating skin. It was placed between the simulated human torso and pressure redistribution support surface. A change in moisture reservoir weight was used to calculate moisture vapor transfer rate; temperature and relative humidity at the support surface interface were recorded as a function of time. To test for odor control, a malodorous compound was applied daily to the coverlet with and without power for 30 days in a laboratory setting. In a separate test, both a PCL and a standard hospital sheet were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus and incubated at 32°C to observe the PCL's ability to mitigate microbial growth. Results indicated a higher moisture vapor transfer rate with the PCL as compared to a standard hospital bed sheet (129.5 g/m/h vs 34.1 g/m/h, P < .005). The PCL also had a larger reduction in skin temperature (1.1ºC vs 0.7ºC, P = .13) when compared to control. Gas chromatography analysis showed that the PCL helped control odor better than a non-PCL (P < .05). At 24 hours, the PCL showed greater than 2 log difference of S aureus over the standard hospital sheet (P < .05). These studies indicate the potential ability of the PCL to remove moisture at the patient/support-surface interface, thus creating a microenvironment with improved moisture management and reduction in odor and microbial growth.

  1. X-ray dose reduction by adaptive source equalization and electronic region-of-interest control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burion, Steve; Sandman, Anne; Bechtel, Kate; Solomon, Edward; Funk, Tobias

    2011-03-01

    Radiation dose is particularly a concern in pediatric cardiac fluoroscopy procedures, which account for 7% of all cardiac procedures performed. The Scanning-Beam Digital X-ray (SBDX) fluoroscopy system has already demonstrated reduced dose in adult patients owing to its high-DQE photon-counting detector, reduced detected scatter, and the elimination of the anti-scatter grid. Here we show that the unique flexible illumination platform of the SBDX system will enable further dose area product reduction, which we are currently developing for pediatric patients, but which will ultimately benefit all patients. The SBDX system has a small-area detector array and a large-area X-ray source with up to 9,000 individually-controlled X-ray focal spots. Each focal spot illuminates a small fraction of the full field of view. To acquire a frame, each focal spot is activated for a fixed number of 1-microsecond periods. Dose reduction is made possible by reducing the number of activations of some of the X-ray focal spots during each frame time. This can be done dynamically to reduce the exposure in areas of low patient attenuation, such as the lung field. This spatially-adaptive illumination also reduces the dynamic range in the full image, which is visually pleasing. Dose can also be reduced by the user selecting a region of interest (ROI) where full image quality is to be maintained. Outside the ROI, the number of activations of each X-ray focal spot is reduced and the image gain is correspondingly increased to maintain consistent image brightness. Dose reduction is dependent on the size of the ROI and the desired image quality outside the ROI. We have developed simulation software that is based on real data and can simulate the performance of the equalization and ROI filtration. This software represents a first step toward real-time implementation of these dose-reduction methods. Our simulations have shown that dose area product reductions of 40% are possible using equalization

  2. Model reduction and temperature uniformity control for rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoropoulou, Artemis-Georgia

    The consideration of Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP) in semiconductor manufacturing has recently been increasing. As a result, control of RTP systems has become of great importance since it is expected to help in addressing uniformity problems that, so far, have been obstructing the acceptance of the method. The spatial distribution appearing in RTP models necessitates the use of model reduction in order to obtain models of a size suitable for use in control algorithms. This dissertation addresses model reduction as well as control issues for RTP systems. A model of a three-zone Rapid Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (RTCVD) system is developed to study the effects of spatial wafer temperature patterns on polysilicon deposition uniformity. A sequence of simulated runs is performed, varying the lamp power profiles so that different wafer temperature modes are excited. The dominant spatial wafer thermal modes are extracted via Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and subsequently used as a set of trial functions to represent both the wafer temperature and deposition thickness. A collocation formulation of Galerkin's method is used to discretize the original modeling equations, giving a low-order model which loses little of the original, high-order model's fidelity. We make use of the excellent predictive capabilities of the reduced model to optimize power inputs to the lamp banks to achieve a desired polysilicon deposition thickness at the end of a run with minimal deposition spatial nonuniformity. Since the results illustrate that the optimization procedure benefits from the use of the reduced-order model, we further utilize the reduced order model for real time Model Based Control. The feedback controller is designed using the Internal Model Control (IMC) structure especially modified to handle systems described by ordinary differential and algebraic equations. The IMC controller is obtained using optimal control theory on singular arcs extended for multi input systems

  3. Sleeper Cab Climate Control Load Reduction for Long-Haul Truck Rest Period Idling

    SciTech Connect

    Lustbader, J. A.; Kreutzer, C.; Adelman, S.; Yeakel, S.; Zehme, J.

    2015-04-29

    Annual fuel use for long-haul truck rest period idling is estimated at 667 million gallons in the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s CoolCab project aims to reduce heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) loads and resulting fuel use from rest period idling by working closely with industry to design efficient long-haul truck climate control systems while maintaining occupant comfort. Enhancing the thermal performance of cab/sleepers will enable smaller, lighter, and more cost-effective idle reduction solutions. In order for candidate idle reduction technologies to be implemented at the original equipment manufacturer and fleet level, their effectiveness must be quantified. To address this need, a number of promising candidate technologies were evaluated through experimentation and modeling to determine their effectiveness in reducing rest period HVAC loads. For this study, load reduction strategies were grouped into the focus areas of solar envelope, occupant environment, and conductive pathways. The technologies selected for a complete-cab package of technologies were “ultra-white” paint, advanced insulation, and advanced curtains. To measure the impact of these technologies, a nationally-averaged solar-weighted reflectivity long-haul truck paint color was determined and applied to the baseline test vehicle. Using the complete-cab package of technologies, electrical energy consumption for long-haul truck daytime rest period air conditioning was reduced by at least 35% for summer weather conditions in Colorado. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's CoolCalc model was then used to extrapolate the performance of the thermal load reduction technologies nationally for 161 major U.S. cities using typical weather conditions for each location over an entire year.

  4. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of Swedish snus for smoking reduction and cessation.

    PubMed

    Joksić, Gordana; Spasojević-Tišma, Vera; Antić, Ruza; Nilsson, Robert; Rutqvist, Lars E

    2011-09-13

    Epidemiological studies suggest that smokeless tobacco in the form of Swedish snus has been used by many smokers in Scandinavia to quit smoking, but the efficacy of snus has so far not been evaluated in controlled clinical trials. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial aimed at assessing the efficacy of snus to help adult cigarette smokers in Serbia to substantially reduce, and, eventually, completely stop smoking. The study enrolled 319 healthy smokers aged 20-65 years at two occupational health centers in Belgrade, Serbia. Most of them (81%) expressed an interest to quit rather than just reduce their smoking. Study products were used ad libitum throughout the 48-week study period. The main study objective during the first 24 weeks was smoking reduction. The primary end-point was defined as a biologically verified reduction of ≥ 50% in the average number of smoked cigarettes per day during week 21-24 compared to baseline. During week 25-48 participants were actively instructed to stop smoking completely. Outcome measures of biologically verified, complete smoking cessation included 1-week point prevalence rates at clinical visits after 12, 24, 36, and 48 weeks, as well as 4-, 12- and 24-week continued cessation rates at the week 36 and 48 visits. At the week 24 visit, the proportion of participants who achieved the protocol definition of a ≥ 50% smoking reduction was similar in the two treatment groups. However, the proportion that reported more extreme reductions (≥ 75%) was statistically significantly higher in the snus group than in the placebo group (p < 0.01). The results for biologically verified complete cessation suggested that participants in the snus group were more likely to quit smoking completely than the controls; the odds ratio (snus versus placebo) for the protocol estimates of cessation varied between 1.9 to 3.4, but these ratios were of borderline significance with p-values ranging from 0.04-0.10. Snus

  5. Cardiovascular disease risk reduction in rural China: a clustered randomized controlled trial in Zhejiang

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death in China. Despite government efforts, the majority of hypertensive and diabetic patients in China do not receive proper treatment. Reducing CVD events requires long-term care that is proactive, patient-centred, community-based, and sustainable. We have designed a package of interventions for patients at high risk of CVD to be implemented by family doctors based in township hospitals (providers of primary care) in rural Zhejiang, China. This trial aims to determine whether the systematic CVD risk reduction package results in reduced CVD events among patients at risk of CVD compared with usual care, and whether the package is cost-effective and suitable for routine implementation and scale-up. Methods/Design This is a prospective, open-label, cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) with blinded data analysis. The trial will randomize 67 township hospitals with 31,708 participants in three counties in Zhejiang Province. Participants will be identified from existing health records and will comprise adults aged 50 to 74 years, with a calculated 10-year CVD risk of 20% or higher, or diabetes. In the intervention arm, participants will receive a package of interventions including: 1) healthy lifestyle counseling (smoking cessation, and salt, oil, and alcohol reduction); 2) prescription of a combination of drugs (antihypertensives, aspirin, and statin); and 3) adherence support for drug compliance and healthy lifestyle change. In the control arm, participants will receive usual care for hypertension and diabetes management at individual clinicians’ discretion. The primary outcome is the incidence of severe CVD events over 24 months of follow-up. All CVD events will be defined according to the World Health Organization (WHO) monitoring of trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease (MONICA) definitions, diagnosed at the county hospital or higher level, and reported by the Zhejiang surveillance

  6. Escape from predators and genetic variance in birds.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Møller, A P

    2017-09-12

    Predation is a common cause of death in numerous organisms, and a host of antipredator defences have evolved. Such defences often have a genetic background as shown by significant heritability and microevolutionary responses towards weaker defences in the absence of predators. Flight initiation distance (FID) is the distance at which an individual animal takes flight when approached by a human, and hence, it reflects the life-history compromise between risk of predation and the benefits of foraging. Here, we analysed FID in 128 species of birds in relation to three measures of genetic variation, band sharing coefficient for minisatellites, observed heterozygosity and inbreeding coefficient for microsatellites in order to test whether FID was positively correlated with genetic variation. We found consistently shorter FID for a given body size in the presence of high band sharing coefficients, low heterozygosity and high inbreeding coefficients in phylogenetic analyses after controlling statistically for potentially confounding variables. These findings imply that antipredator behaviour is related to genetic variance. We predict that many threatened species with low genetic variability will show reduced antipredator behaviour and that subsequent predator-induced reductions in abundance may contribute to unfavourable population trends for such species. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  7. A yoga intervention for type 2 diabetes risk reduction: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is a major health problem in many countries including India. Yoga may be an effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategy in India, particularly given its cultural familiarity. Methods This was a parallel, randomized controlled pilot study to collect feasibility and preliminary efficacy data on yoga for diabetes risk factors among people at high risk of diabetes. Primary outcomes included: changes in BMI, waist circumference, fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, insulin, insulin resistance, blood pressure, and cholesterol. We also looked at measures of psychological well-being including changes in depression, anxiety, positive and negative affect and perceived stress. Forty-one participants with elevated fasting blood glucose in Bangalore, India were randomized to either yoga (n = 21) or a walking control (n = 20). Participants were asked to either attend yoga classes or complete monitored walking 3–6 days per week for eight weeks. Randomization and allocation was performed using computer-generated random numbers and group assignments delivered in sealed, opaque envelopes generated by off-site study staff. Data were analyzed based on intention to treat. Results This study was feasible in terms of recruitment, retention and adherence. In addition, yoga participants had significantly greater reductions in weight, waist circumference and BMI versus control (weight −0.8 ± 2.1 vs. 1.4 ± 3.6, p = 0.02; waist circumference −4.2 ± 4.8 vs. 0.7 ± 4.2, p < 0.01; BMI −0.2 ± 0.8 vs. 0.6 ± 1.6, p = 0.05). There were no between group differences in fasting blood glucose, postprandial blood glucose, insulin resistance or any other factors related to diabetes risk or psychological well-being. There were significant reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, anxiety, depression, negative affect and perceived stress in both the yoga intervention and walking

  8. DTC Based Induction Motor Speed Control Using 10-Sector Methodology for Torque Ripple Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavithra, S.; Dinesh Krishna, A. S.; Shridharan, S.

    2014-09-01

    A direct torque control (DTC) drive allows direct and independent control of flux linkage and electromagnetic torque by the selection of optimum inverter switching modes. It is a simple method of signal processing which gives excellent dynamic performance. Also transformation of coordinates and voltage decoupling are not required. However, the possible discrete inverter switching vectors cannot always generate exact stator voltage required, to obtain the demanded electromagnetic torque and flux linkages. This results in the production of ripples in the torque as well as flux waveforms. In the present paper a torque ripple reduction methodology is proposed. In this method the circular locus of flux phasor is divided into 10 sector as compared to six sector divisions in conventional DTC method. The basic DTC scheme and the 10-sector method are simulated and compared for their performance. An analysis is done with sector increment so that finally the torque ripple varies slightly as the sector is increased.

  9. Application of the controlled boundary layer concept for the wall interference reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. I.; Kursakov, I. A.; Streltsov, E. V.

    2016-10-01

    Traditional boundaries of transonic wind tunnels (perforated and slotted walls) have some disadvantages that do not allow to completely remove wall interference on all main aerodynamic characteristics. This article focuses on the results of implementation of new boundary condition based, in general, on the idea of jet boundaries. Authors examine the implementation of the controlled boundary layer on solid walls, which characteristics were artificially increased with the aim of near-wall spoiler grid mounted at the test section entrance. The analysis underlines significant decreasing of wall interference on all main aerodynamic characteristics, including lift coefficient and pitching moment coefficient. We conclude that realization of the controlled boundary layer might become simple and rather effective method of wall-interference reduction.

  10. On the Sequential Control of ITER Poloidal Field Converters for Reactive Power Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hongwen; Fu, Peng; Gao, Ge; Huang, Liansheng; Song, Zhiquan; He, Shiying; Wu, Yanan; Dong, Lin; Wang, Min; Fang, Tongzhen

    2014-12-01

    Sequential control applied to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) poloidal field converter system for the purpose of reactive power reduction is the subject of this investigation. Due to the inherent characteristics of thyristor-based phase-controlled converter, the poloidal field converter system consumes a huge amount of reactive power from the grid, which subsequently results in a voltage drop at the 66 kV busbar if no measure is taken. The installation of a static var compensator rated for 750 MVar at the 66 kV busbar is an essential way to compensate reactive power to the grid, which is the most effective measure to solve the problem. However, sequential control of the multi-series converters provides an additional method to improve the natural power factor and thus alleviate the pressure of reactive power demand of the converter system without any additional cost. In the present paper, by comparing with the symmetrical control technique, the advantage of sequential control in reactive power consumption is highlighted. Simulation results based on SIMULINK are found in agreement with the theoretical analysis.

  11. Global-mode based linear feedback control of a supersonic jet for noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Mahesh; Freund, Jonathan; Bodony, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    The loudest source of high-speed jet noise appears to be describable by unsteady wavepackets that resemble instabilities. We seek to reduce their acoustic impact with a control strategy that uses global modes to model their dynamics and structural sensitivity of the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes operator to identify an effective linear feedback control. For a case with co-located actuators and sensors adjacent the nozzle, we demonstrate the method on an axisymmetric Mach 1.5 jet. Direct numerical simulations using this control show significant noise reduction. Eigenanalysis of the controlled mean flows reveal fundamental changes in the spectrum at frequencies lower than that used by the control, with the quieter flows having unstable eigenvalues that correspond to eigenfunctions without significant support in the acoustic field. A specific trend is observed in the mean flow quantities as the flow becomes quieter, with changes in the mean flow becoming significant only further downstream of the nozzle exit. The quieter flows also have a stable shock-cell structure that extends further downstream. A phase plot of the POD coefficients for the flows show that the quieter flows are more regular in time. Funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  12. Design of state-feedback controllers including sensitivity reduction, with applications to precision pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadass, Z.

    1974-01-01

    The design procedure of feedback controllers was described and the considerations for the selection of the design parameters were given. The frequency domain properties of single-input single-output systems using state feedback controllers are analyzed, and desirable phase and gain margin properties are demonstrated. Special consideration is given to the design of controllers for tracking systems, especially those designed to track polynomial commands. As an example, a controller was designed for a tracking telescope with a polynomial tracking requirement and some special features such as actuator saturation and multiple measurements, one of which is sampled. The resulting system has a tracking performance comparing favorably with a much more complicated digital aided tracker. The parameter sensitivity reduction was treated by considering the variable parameters as random variables. A performance index is defined as a weighted sum of the state and control convariances that sum from both the random system disturbances and the parameter uncertainties, and is minimized numerically by adjusting a set of free parameters.

  13. Optimal guidance and control for investigating aircraft noise-impact reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, E. C.; Carson, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    A methodology for investigating the reduction of community noise impact is reported. This report is concerned with the development of two models to provide data: a guidance generator and an aircraft control generator suitable for various current and advanced types of aircraft. The guidance generator produces the commanded path information from inputs chosen by an operator from a graphic scope display of a land-use map of the terminal area. The guidance generator also produces smoothing at the junctions of straight-line paths.The aircraft control generator determines the optimal set of the available controls such that the aircraft will follow the commanded path. The solutions for the control functions are given and shown to be dependent on the class of aircraft to be considered, that is, whether the thrust vector is rotatable and whether the thrust vector affects the aerodynamic forces. For the class of aircraft possessing a rotatable thrust vector, the solution is redundant; this redundancy is removed by the additional condition that the noise inpact be minimized. Information from both the guidance generator and the aircraft control generator is used by the footprint program to construct the noise footprint.

  14. Chemoselective reduction and oxidation of ketones in water through control of the electron transfer pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Min; Yoo, Ho Sung; Hosono, Hideo; Yang, Jung Woon; Kim, Sung Wng

    2015-01-01

    The selective synthesis of different products from the same starting materials in water, which is the most abundant solvent in nature, is a crucial issue as it maximizes the utilization of materials. Realizing such reactions for ketones is of considerable importance because numerous organic functionalities can be obtained via nucleophilic addition reactions. Herein, we report chemoselective reduction and oxidation reactions of 1,2-diketones in water, which initiates anionic electron transfer from the inorganic electride [Ca24Al28O64]4+·4e−, through controlling the pathway of the electrons to substrates. The generation of different radical species for transient intermediates was the key process required to control the reaction selectivity, which was achieved by reacting the anionic electrons with either diketones or O2, leading to the formation of ketyl dianion and superoxide radicals in the reduction and oxidation reactions, respectively. This methodology that utilizes electrides may provide an alternative to the pulse radiolysis of water in synthetic chemistry. PMID:26020413

  15. “APEC Blue”: Secondary Aerosol Reductions from Emission Controls in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Wild, Oliver; Xu, Weiqi; Chen, Chen; Fu, Pingqing; Du, Wei; Zhou, Libo; Zhang, Qi; Han, Tingting; Wang, Qingqing; Pan, Xiaole; Zheng, Haitao; Li, Jie; Guo, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jianguo; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-02-01

    China implemented strict emission control measures in Beijing and surrounding regions to ensure good air quality during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. We conducted synchronous aerosol particle measurements with two aerosol mass spectrometers at different heights on a meteorological tower in urban Beijing to investigate the variations in particulate composition, sources and size distributions in response to emission controls. Our results show consistently large reductions in secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) of 61–67% and 51–57%, and in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) of 55% and 37%, at 260 m and ground level, respectively, during the APEC summit. These changes were mainly caused by large reductions in accumulation mode particles and by suppression of the growth of SIA and SOA by a factor of 2–3, which led to blue sky days during APEC commonly referred to as “APEC Blue”. We propose a conceptual framework for the evolution of primary and secondary species and highlight the importance of regional atmospheric transport in the formation of severe pollution episodes in Beijing. Our results indicate that reducing the precursors of secondary aerosol over regional scales is crucial and effective in suppressing the formation of secondary particulates and mitigating PM pollution.

  16. The Electrochemical Reduction of Chromium Sesquioxide in Molten Calcium Chloride under Cathodic Potential Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2007-11-01

    Electrochemical polarization and reduction experiments are reported which were performed with a three-terminal cell and a molten salt electrolyte consisting of calcium chloride with additions of calcium oxide. Employing a metal cathode, a graphite anode and a pseudo-reference electrode also made from graphite, polarization measurements were carried out with the aim to validate the performance of the pseudo-reference electrode and to assess the stability of the electrolyte. Using a chromium sesquioxide cathode in conjunction with a graphite anode and a graphite pseudo-reference electrode, electrochemical reduction experiments were conducted under potentiostatic control. The key results are: a graphite pseudo-reference electrode has been shown to be appropriate in the present type of molten salt electrochemical experiments that take place on a time scale of many hours; the conversion of chromium oxide into chromium metal has been accomplished under cathodic potential control and in the absence of calcium metal deposition; a significant amount of calcium oxide in the calcium chloride has been found necessary to preclude anodic chlorine formation throughout the entire experiment; a considerable overpotential has been identified at the anode.

  17. “APEC Blue”: Secondary Aerosol Reductions from Emission Controls in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Wild, Oliver; Xu, Weiqi; Chen, Chen; Fu, Pingqing; Du, Wei; Zhou, Libo; Zhang, Qi; Han, Tingting; Wang, Qingqing; Pan, Xiaole; Zheng, Haitao; Li, Jie; Guo, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jianguo; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    China implemented strict emission control measures in Beijing and surrounding regions to ensure good air quality during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. We conducted synchronous aerosol particle measurements with two aerosol mass spectrometers at different heights on a meteorological tower in urban Beijing to investigate the variations in particulate composition, sources and size distributions in response to emission controls. Our results show consistently large reductions in secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) of 61–67% and 51–57%, and in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) of 55% and 37%, at 260 m and ground level, respectively, during the APEC summit. These changes were mainly caused by large reductions in accumulation mode particles and by suppression of the growth of SIA and SOA by a factor of 2–3, which led to blue sky days during APEC commonly referred to as “APEC Blue”. We propose a conceptual framework for the evolution of primary and secondary species and highlight the importance of regional atmospheric transport in the formation of severe pollution episodes in Beijing. Our results indicate that reducing the precursors of secondary aerosol over regional scales is crucial and effective in suppressing the formation of secondary particulates and mitigating PM pollution. PMID:26891104

  18. Artificial kagome spin ice: dimensional reduction, avalanche control and emergent magnetic monopoles.

    PubMed

    Hügli, R V; Duff, G; O'Conchuir, B; Mengotti, E; Rodríguez, A Fraile; Nolting, F; Heyderman, L J; Braun, H B

    2012-12-28

    Artificial spin-ice systems consisting of nanolithographic arrays of isolated nanomagnets are model systems for the study of frustration-induced phenomena. We have recently demonstrated that monopoles and Dirac strings can be directly observed via synchrotron-based photoemission electron microscopy, where the magnetic state of individual nanoislands can be imaged in real space. These experimental results of Dirac string formation are in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations of the hysteresis of an array of dipoles situated on a kagome lattice with randomized switching fields. This formation of one-dimensional avalanches in a two-dimensional system is in sharp contrast to disordered thin films, where avalanches associated with magnetization reversal are two-dimensional. The self-organized restriction of avalanches to one dimension provides an example of dimensional reduction due to frustration. We give simple explanations for the origin of this dimensional reduction and discuss the disorder dependence of these avalanches. We conclude with the explicit demonstration of how these avalanches can be controlled via locally modified anisotropies. Such a controlled start and stop of avalanches will have potential applications in data storage and information processing.

  19. Bangkok 2004. Drug control, human rights, and harm reduction in the age of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Richard

    2004-12-01

    In many countries, HIV prevalence among people who use illicit drugs is high. Yet many governments resist implementing effective HIV prevention measures, and drug users often lack access to care, treatment, and support, including for HIV/AIDS. Growing evidence indicates the dominant prohibitionist approach to illicit drugs is ineffective--and even counterproductive, blocking or undermining measures shown to reduce harms to drug users and to communities affected by open drug scenes. The growing debate over global drug control policy could shift us collectively away from the current, failed prescriptions to a more rational, pragmatic, and health-promoting framework of harm reduction. This article by Richard Elliott is an abridged version of a paper prepared for "Human Rights at the Margins: HIV/AIDS, Prisoners, Drug Users and the Law," a satellite meeting held in Bangkok on 9 July 2004, and organized by the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network and the Lawyers Collective HIV/AIDS Unit (India). The article briefly outlines the impact of these two different policy approaches, examines international law on drug control, discusses how harm reduction reflects a human rights-based approach to drugs, and assesses some strategies for reforming global policy on illicit drugs.

  20. Treating fibromyalgia with mindfulness-based stress reduction: results from a 3-armed randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Grossman, Paul; Schwarzer, Barbara; Jena, Susanne; Naumann, Johannes; Walach, Harald

    2011-02-01

    Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) is a structured 8-week group program teaching mindfulness meditation and mindful yoga exercises. MBSR aims to help participants develop nonjudgmental awareness of moment-to-moment experience. Fibromyalgia is a clinical syndrome with chronic pain, fatigue, and insomnia as major symptoms. Efficacy of MBSR for enhanced well-being of fibromyalgia patients was investigated in a 3-armed trial, which was a follow-up to an earlier quasi-randomized investigation. A total of 177 female patients were randomized to one of the following: (1) MBSR, (2) an active control procedure controlling for nonspecific effects of MBSR, or (3) a wait list. The major outcome was health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 2 months post-treatment. Secondary outcomes were disorder-specific quality of life, depression, pain, anxiety, somatic complaints, and a proposed index of mindfulness. Of the patients, 82% completed the study. There were no significant differences between groups on primary outcome, but patients overall improved in HRQoL at short-term follow-up (P=0.004). Post hoc analyses showed that only MBSR manifested a significant pre-to-post-intervention improvement in HRQoL (P=0.02). Furthermore, multivariate analysis of secondary measures indicated modest benefits for MBSR patients. MBSR yielded significant pre-to-post-intervention improvements in 6 of 8 secondary outcome variables, the active control in 3, and the wait list in 2. In conclusion, primary outcome analyses did not support the efficacy of MBSR in fibromyalgia, although patients in the MBSR arm appeared to benefit most. Effect sizes were small compared to the earlier, quasi-randomized investigation. Several methodological aspects are discussed, e.g., patient burden, treatment preference and motivation, that may provide explanations for differences. In a 3-armed randomized controlled trial in female patients suffering from fibromyalgia, patients benefited modestly from a mindfulness

  1. Efficacy of dental floss impregnated with chlorhexidine on reduction of supragingival biofilm: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Muniz, F W M G; Sena, K S; de Oliveira, C C; Veríssimo, D M; Carvalho, R S; Martins, R S

    2015-05-01

    The use of a toothbrush has a limited ability to control the dental biofilm in interproximal areas. Therefore, specialized devices, such as dental floss, may be useful for these specific areas. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of dental floss impregnated with 5% chlorhexidine gluconate on the reduction of the supragingival biofilm. This research was parallel, single-blind, controlled and randomized, and contained a sample of thirty dental students from the Faculty of Pharmacy, Dentistry and Nursing of the Federal University of Ceará, Brazil, who were divided equally into three groups. The negative control group (NC) did not utilize any kind of interproximal cleaning; the positive control group (PC) used waxed floss without impregnation twice a day; and the test group (T) used the same dental floss, which was impregnated with 5% chlorhexidine gluconate, twice a day. For all groups, this study lasted for 15 days. The presence of a biofilm was evaluated on four surfaces (mesiobuccal, distobuccal, mesiolingual and distolingual) by the Quigley-Hein Index, resulting in four scores for each tooth. Group T had the lowest plaque scores, showing a significant difference compared to group NC (P < 0.001) and group PC (P < 0.001). Group PC also displayed a significant difference compared to NC (P < 0.001). It was concluded that the use of dental floss impregnated with 5% chlorhexidine gluconate resulted in additional reductions in the supragingival biofilm relative to the results achieved with conventional waxed floss on the anterior teeth of a well-motivated and well-instructed population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. 40 CFR 59.106 - Variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings § 59.106 Variance. (a) Any regulated...

  3. 40 CFR 59.106 - Variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings § 59.106 Variance. (a) Any regulated...

  4. 40 CFR 59.106 - Variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings § 59.106 Variance. (a) Any regulated...

  5. 40 CFR 59.106 - Variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings § 59.106 Variance. (a) Any regulated...

  6. 40 CFR 59.106 - Variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION STANDARDS FOR CONSUMER AND COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards for Automobile Refinish Coatings § 59.106 Variance. (a) Any regulated...

  7. The phenotypic variance gradient - a novel concept.

    PubMed

    Pertoldi, Cino; Bundgaard, Jørgen; Loeschcke, Volker; Barker, James Stuart Flinton

    2014-11-01

    Evolutionary ecologists commonly use reaction norms, which show the range of phenotypes produced by a set of genotypes exposed to different environments, to quantify the degree of phenotypic variance and the magnitude of plasticity of morphometric and life-history traits. Significant differences among the values of the slopes of the reaction norms are interpreted as significant differences in phenotypic plasticity, whereas significant differences among phenotypic variances (variance or coefficient of variation) are interpreted as differences in the degree of developmental instability or canalization. We highlight some potential problems with this approach to quantifying phenotypic variance and suggest a novel and more informative way to plot reaction norms: namely "a plot of log (variance) on the y-axis versus log (mean) on the x-axis, with a reference line added". This approach gives an immediate impression of how the degree of phenotypic variance varies across an environmental gradient, taking into account the consequences of the scaling effect of the variance with the mean. The evolutionary implications of the variation in the degree of phenotypic variance, which we call a "phenotypic variance gradient", are discussed together with its potential interactions with variation in the degree of phenotypic plasticity and canalization.

  8. Weight reduction intervention for obese infertile women prior to IVF: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Einarsson, Snorri; Bergh, Christina; Friberg, Britt; Pinborg, Anja; Klajnbard, Anna; Karlström, Per-Olof; Kluge, Linda; Larsson, Ingrid; Loft, Anne; Mikkelsen-Englund, Anne-Lis; Stenlöf, Kaj; Wistrand, Anna; Thurin-Kjellberg, Ann

    2017-08-01

    Does an intensive weight reduction programme prior to IVF increase live birth rates for infertile obese women? An intensive weight reduction programme resulted in a large weight loss but did not substantially affect live birth rates in obese women scheduled for IVF. Among obese women, fertility and obstetric outcomes are influenced negatively with increased risk of miscarriage and a higher risk of maternal and neonatal complications. A recent large randomized controlled trial found no effect of lifestyle intervention on live birth in infertile obese women. A prospective, multicentre, randomized controlled trial was performed between 2010 and 2016 in the Nordic countries. In total, 962 women were assessed for eligibility and 317 women were randomized. Computerized randomization with concealed allocation was performed in the proportions 1:1 to one of two groups: weight reduction intervention followed by IVF-treatment or IVF-treatment only. One cycle per patient was included. Nine infertility clinics in Sweden, Denmark and Iceland participated. Women under 38 years of age planning IVF, and having a BMI ≥30 and <35 kg/m2 were randomized to two groups: an intervention group (160 patients) with weight reduction before IVF, starting with 12 weeks of a low calorie liquid formula diet (LCD) of 880 kcal/day and thereafter weight stabilization for 2-5 weeks, or a control group (157 patients) with IVF only. In the full analysis set (FAS), the live birth rate was 29.6% (45/152) in the weight reduction and IVF group and 27.5% (42/153) in the IVF only group. The difference was not statistically significant (difference 2.2%, 95% CI: 12.9 to -8.6, P = 0.77). The mean weight change was -9.44 (6.57) kg in the weight reduction and IVF group as compared to +1.19 (1.95) kg in the IVF only group, being highly significant (P < 0.0001). Significantly more live births were achieved through spontaneous pregnancies in the weight reduction and IVF group, 10.5% (16) as compared to the IVF

  9. Dynamic Control System Mode Performance of the Space Technology-7 Disturbance Reduction System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, James R., Jr.; Hsu, Oscar; Maghami, Peiman

    2017-01-01

    The Space Technology-7 (ST-7) Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) is an experiment package aboard the European Space Agency (ESA) LISA Pathfinder spacecraft, launched on December 3, 2015. DRS consists of three primary components: Colloidal MicroNewton Thrusters (CMNTs), an Integrated Avionics Unit (IAU), and flight-software implementing the Command and Data Handling (C&DH) and Dynamic Control System (DCS) algorithms. The CMNTs were designed to provide thrust from 5 to 30 micro Newton, with thrust controllability and resolution of 0.1 micro Newton and thrust noise of 0.1 micro Newton/(square root of (Hz)) in the measurement band from 1-30 mHz. The IAU hosts the C&DH and DCS flight software, as well as interfaces with both the CMNT electronics and the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft. When in control, the DCS uses star tracker attitude data and capacitive or optically-measured position and attitude information from LISA Pathfinder and the LISA Technology Package (LTP) to control the attitude and position of the spacecraft and the two test masses inside the LTP. After completion of the nominal ESA LISA Pathfinder mission, the DRS experiment was commissioned followed by its nominal mission. DRS operations extended over the next five months, interspersed with station keeping, anomaly resolution, and periods where control was handed back to LISA Pathfinder for them to conduct further experiments. The primary DRS mission ended on December 6, 2016, with the experiment meeting all of its Level 1 requirements. The DCS, developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, consists of five spacecraft control modes and six test mass control modes, combined into six 'DRS Mission Modes'. Attitude Control and Zero-G were primarily used to control the spacecraft during initial handover and during many of the CMNT characterization experiments. The other Mission Modes, Drag Free Low Force, 18-DOF Transitional, and 18-DOF, were used to provide drag-free control of the spacecraft about the test

  10. Controlled reduction of red mud waste to produce active systems for environmental applications: heterogeneous Fenton reaction and reduction of Cr(VI).

    PubMed

    Costa, Regina C C; Moura, Flávia C C; Oliveira, Patrícia E F; Magalhães, Fabiano; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2010-02-01

    In this work, controlled reduction of red mud with H(2) was used to produce active systems for two different environmental applications, i.e. the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and the reduction of Cr(VI). Mössbauer, powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analyses and scanning electron microscopy analyses showed that at different temperatures, i.e. 300, 400, 500 and 600 degrees C, H(2) reduces red mud to different phases, mainly Fe(3)O(4), Fe(0)/Fe(3)O(4) and Fe(0). These Fe phases are dispersed on Al, Si and Ti oxides present in the red mud and show high reactivity towards two environmental applications, i.e. the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and the reduction of Cr(VI). Reduction with H(2) at 400 degrees C showed the best results for the oxidation of the model dye methylene blue with H(2)O(2) at neutral pH due to the presence of the composite Fe(0)/Fe(3)O(4). The reduced red mud at 500-600 degrees C produced Fe(0) highly active for the reduction of Cr(VI) in aqueous medium. Another feature of these red mud based system is that after deactivation due to extensive use they can be completely regenerated by simple treatment with H(2). Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Control and reduction of immersion defectivity for yield enhancement at high volume production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Katsushi; Seki, Rei; Sekito, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Masato; Fujiwara, Tomoharu; Iriuchijima, Yasuhiro; Owa, Soichi

    2009-03-01

    Volume device manufacturing using immersion lithography is widely accepted as the solution for patterning IC features below 40 nm half pitch. In order to ensure high yield and steady productivity tight control of defectivity is essential. A major source of defects and tool contamination is the particles introduced by incoming wafers. Particles can be categorized in two groups: particles attached to wafer surface or residues on the wafer edge. Surface or edge peeling of topcoats can also be a source of particle. Adhesion force between topcoat or topcoat-less (TC-less) resist and wafer is one of the most important parameter for particle reduction. Peeling test results proved that TC-less resist has better adhesion performance than topcoat. One of the most commonly used adhesion promoting material is hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS). Application condition of this material is an important factor in preventing wafer edge and surface topcoat peeling. Studies have shown lower temperature and longer application of HMDS shows better adhesion result. Maintaining a clean wafer surface is also a very important factor for particle reduction. Pre-rinse, which can rinse off particles before exposure, was evaluated and the efficiency was confirmed. Edge particles are more effectively reduced by pre-rinse, because weakly attached topcoat and wafer edge residues were effectively removed by pre-rinse. For further particle reduction, edge residue reduction and cut line roughness improvement were evaluated and their effectiveness was confirmed. Lower cut position achieved improved particle counts on both topcoat and TC-less resist; more frequent contact between water and cut-line can weaken the adhesion and consequently peel off topcoat or TC-less resist. Finally the relationship between defectivity and hydrophobicity is analyzed, high Receding Contact Angle (RCA) showed better defectivity result. Topcoat and TC-less process is compared for each defectivity reduction methodology and for

  12. Reward Pays the Cost of Noise Reduction in Motor and Cognitive Control

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Sanjay G.; Chong, Trevor T.-J.; Apps, Matthew A.J.; Batla, Amit; Stamelou, Maria; Jarman, Paul R.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Husain, Masud

    2015-01-01

    Summary Speed-accuracy trade-off is an intensively studied law governing almost all behavioral tasks across species. Here we show that motivation by reward breaks this law, by simultaneously invigorating movement and improving response precision. We devised a model to explain this paradoxical effect of reward by considering a new factor: the cost of control. Exerting control to improve response precision might itself come at a cost—a cost to attenuate a proportion of intrinsic neural noise. Applying a noise-reduction cost to optimal motor control predicted that reward can increase both velocity and accuracy. Similarly, application to decision-making predicted that reward reduces reaction times and errors in cognitive control. We used a novel saccadic distraction task to quantify the speed and accuracy of both movements and decisions under varying reward. Both faster speeds and smaller errors were observed with higher incentives, with the results best fitted by a model including a precision cost. Recent theories consider dopamine to be a key neuromodulator in mediating motivational effects of reward. We therefore examined how Parkinson’s disease (PD), a condition associated with dopamine depletion, alters the effects of reward. Individuals with PD showed reduced reward sensitivity in their speed and accuracy, consistent in our model with higher noise-control costs. Including a cost of control over noise explains how reward may allow apparent performance limits to be surpassed. On this view, the pattern of reduced reward sensitivity in PD patients can specifically be accounted for by a higher cost for controlling noise. PMID:26096975

  13. Variance of vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Ochi, K; Ohashi, T; Nishino, H

    2001-03-01

    Vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) has been thought to originate from sacculus. The variance of this potential and the effectiveness of the adjustments of pInII amplitudes using average muscle tonus of ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle were evaluated. In addition, clinical application of VEMP was examined in patients with acoustic tumors (ATs) and vestibular neurolabyrinthitis (VNL). Prospective evaluation of the VEMP in 18 normal volunteers and 6 patients. Variance and left-right difference of each parameter, including pI latency, nII latency, pInII amplitude, and threshold, was analyzed. Input-output function of pInII amplitude was evaluated. Average muscle tonus was calculated in 20 ears and applied for adjustment of pInII amplitude. Sensitivity of each parameter of VEMP was examined in 3 patients with ATs and 3 patients with VNL. VEMP was present in all 36 ears of 18 control subjects. Thresholds of VEMP for normal subjects were 80 to 95 dB normal hearing level (nHL). The muscle tonus affected pInII amplitude significantly; however, no statistically significant improvement was observed in test-retest investigation after adjustment using muscle tonus. The threshold of the affected side was elevated compared with the non-affected side in all patients with ATs, whereas 2 of 3 patients showed normal pInII-ratio. One patient with VNL presented normal VEMP, whereas 2 patients presented no VEMP to the highest stimulus intensity. Interaural difference of thresholds might be the most useful parameters. Adjustment using average muscle tonus is not necessary when the subject is able to get sufficient muscle tonus.

  14. 42 CFR 456.524 - Notification of Administrator's action and duration of variance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan:...

  15. Areal Control Using Generalized Least Squares As An Alternative to Stratification

    Treesearch

    Raymond L. Czaplewski

    2001-01-01

    Stratification for both variance reduction and areal control proliferates the number of strata, which causes small sample sizes in many strata. This might compromise statistical efficiency. Generalized least squares can, in principle, replace stratification for areal control.

  16. Reduction of Helicopter BVI Noise, Vibration, and Power Consumption Through Individual Blade Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Blaas, Achim; Teves, Dietrich; Kube, Roland; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted with a full-scale BO 105 helicopter rotor to evaluate the potential of open-loop individual blade control (IBC) to improve rotor performance, to reduce blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise, and to alleviate helicopter vibrations. The wind tunnel test was an international collaborative effort between NASA/U.S. Army AFDD, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, Eurocopter Deutschland, and the German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR) and was conducted under the auspices of the U.S./German MOU on Rotorcraft Aeromechanics. In this test the normal blade pitch links of the rotor were replaced by servo-actuators so that the pitch of each blade could be controlled independently of the other blades. The specially designed servoactuators and IBC control system were designed and manufactured by ZF Luftfahrttechnik, GmbH. The wind tunnel test was conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. An extensive amount of measurement information was acquired for each IBC data point. These data include rotor performance, static and dynamic hub forces and moments, rotor loads, control loads, inboard and outboard blade pitch motion, and BVI noise data. The data indicated very significant (80 percent) simultaneous reductions in both BVI noise and hub vibrations could be obtained using multi-harmonic input at the critical descent (terminal approach) condition. The data also showed that performance improvements of up to 7 percent could be obtained using 2P input at high-speed forward flight conditions.

  17. Reduction of Helicopter BVI Noise, Vibration, and Power Consumption Through Individual Blade Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacklin, Stephen A.; Blaas, Achim; Teves, Dietrich; Kube, Roland; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted with a full-scale BO 105 helicopter rotor to evaluate the potential of open-loop individual blade control (IBC) to improve rotor performance, to reduce blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise, and to alleviate helicopter vibrations. The wind tunnel test was an international collaborative effort between NASA/U.S. Army AFDD, ZF Luftfahrttechnik, Eurocopter Deutschland, and the German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR) and was conducted under the auspices of the U.S./German MOU on Rotorcraft Aeromechanics. In this test the normal blade pitch links of the rotor were replaced by servo-actuators so that the pitch of each blade could be controlled independently of the other blades. The specially designed servoactuators and IBC control system were designed and manufactured by ZF Luftfahrttechnik, GmbH. The wind tunnel test was conducted in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center. An extensive amount of measurement information was acquired for each IBC data point. These data include rotor performance, static and dynamic hub forces and moments, rotor loads, control loads, inboard and outboard blade pitch motion, and BVI noise data. The data indicated very significant (80 percent) simultaneous reductions in both BVI noise and hub vibrations could be obtained using multi-harmonic input at the critical descent (terminal approach) condition. The data also showed that performance improvements of up to 7 percent could be obtained using 2P input at high-speed forward flight conditions.

  18. Effective and viable mind-body stress reduction in the workplace: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wolever, Ruth Q; Bobinet, Kyra J; McCabe, Kelley; Mackenzie, Elizabeth R; Fekete, Erin; Kusnick, Catherine A; Baime, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Highly stressed employees are subject to greater health risks, increased cost, and productivity losses than those with normal stress levels. To address this issue in an evidence-based manner, worksite stress management programs must be able to engage individuals as well as capture data on stress, health indices, work productivity, and health care costs. In this randomized controlled pilot, our primary objective was to evaluate the viability and proof of concept for two mind-body workplace stress reduction programs (one therapeutic yoga-based and the other mindfulness-based), in order to set the stage for larger cost-effectiveness trials. A second objective was to evaluate 2 delivery venues of the mindfulness-based intervention (online vs. in-person). Intention-to-treat principles and 2 (pre and post) × 3 (group) repeated-measures analysis of covariance procedures examined group differences over time on perceived stress and secondary measures to clarify which variables to include in future studies: sleep quality, mood, pain levels, work productivity, mindfulness, blood pressure, breathing rate, and heart rate variability (a measure of autonomic balance). Two hundred and thirty-nine employee volunteers were randomized into a therapeutic yoga worksite stress reduction program, 1 of 2 mindfulness-based programs, or a control group that participated only in assessment. Compared with the control group, the mind-body interventions showed significantly greater improvements on perceived stress, sleep quality, and the heart rhythm coherence ratio of heart rate variability. The two delivery venues for the mindfulness program produced basically equivalent results. Both the mindfulness-based and therapeutic yoga programs may provide viable and effective interventions to target high stress levels, sleep quality, and autonomic balance in employees. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Relevance of aerodynamic modelling for load reduction control strategies of two-bladed wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, B.; Cheng, P. W.

    2014-06-01

    A new load reduction concept is being developed for the two-bladed prototype of the Skywind 3.5MW wind turbine. Due to transport and installation advantages both offshore and in complex terrain two-bladed turbine designs are potentially more cost-effective than comparable three-bladed configurations. A disadvantage of two-bladed wind turbines is the increased fatigue loading, which is a result of asymmetrically distributed rotor forces. The innovative load reduction concept of the Skywind prototype consists of a combination of cyclic pitch control and tumbling rotor kinematics to mitigate periodic structural loading. Aerodynamic design tools must be able to model correctly the advanced dynamics of the rotor. In this paper the impact of the aerodynamic modelling approach is investigated for critical operational modes of a two-bladed wind turbine. Using a lifting line free wake vortex code (FVM) the physical limitations of the classical blade element momentum theory (BEM) can be evaluated. During regular operation vertical shear and yawed inflow are the main contributors to periodic blade load asymmetry. It is shown that the near wake interaction of the blades under such conditions is not fully captured by the correction models of BEM approach. The differing prediction of local induction causes a high fatigue load uncertainty especially for two-bladed turbines. The implementation of both cyclic pitch control and a tumbling rotor can mitigate the fatigue loading by increasing the aerodynamic and structural damping. The influence of the time and space variant vorticity distribution in the near wake is evaluated in detail for different cyclic pitch control functions and tumble dynamics respectively. It is demonstrated that dynamic inflow as well as wake blade interaction have a significant impact on the calculated blade forces and need to be accounted for by the aerodynamic modelling approach. Aeroelastic simulations are carried out using the high fidelity multi body

  20. Sustained Pain Reduction Through Affective Self-awareness in Fibromyalgia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Michael C.; Lumley, Mark A.; Stracks, John S.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Williams, David A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Affect and how it is regulated plays a role in pain perception, maintenance of pain, and its resolution. This randomized, controlled trial evaluated an innovative affective self-awareness (ASA) intervention, which was designed to reduce pain and improve functioning in individuals with fibromyalgia. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS Forty-five women with fibromyalgia were randomized to a manualized ASA intervention (n = 24) or wait-list control (n = 21). The intervention began with a one-time physician consultation, followed by 3 weekly, 2-h group sessions based upon a mind-body model of pain. Sessions focused on structured written emotional disclosure and emotional awareness exercises. Outcomes in both conditions were measured by a blinded assessor at baseline, post-intervention, and 6-month follow-up. MEASURES The primary outcome was pain severity (Brief Pain Inventory); secondary outcomes included tender-point threshold and physical function (SF-36 Physical Component Summary). Intent-to-treat analyses compared groups on outcomes using analysis of covariance and on the proportion of patients achieving ≥30% and ≥50% pain reduction at 6 months. RESULTS Adjusting for baseline scores, the intervention group had significantly lower pain severity (p < 0.001), higher self-reported physical function (p < 0.001), and higher tender-point threshold (p = 0.02) at 6 months compared to the control group. From baseline to 6 months, 45.8% of the ASA intervention group had ≥30% reduction in pain severity, compared to none of the controls (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS The affective self-awareness intervention improved pain, tenderness, and self-reported physical function for at least 6 months in women with fibromyalgia compared to wait-list control. This study suggests the value of interventions targeting emotional processes in fibromyalgia, although further studies should evaluate the efficacy of this intervention relative to active

  1. Supporting the President's Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agenda: Transparency and Verification for Nuclear Arms Reductions

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, James E; Meek, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    The President's arms control and nonproliferation agenda is still evolving and the details of initiatives supporting it remain undefined. This means that DOE, NNSA, NA-20, NA-24 and the national laboratories can help define the agenda, and the policies and the initiatives to support it. This will require effective internal and interagency coordination. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda is broad and includes the path-breaking goal of creating conditions for the elimination of nuclear weapons. Responsibility for various elements of the agenda will be widely scattered across the interagency. Therefore an interagency mapping exercise should be performed to identify the key points of engagement within NNSA and other agencies for creating effective policy coordination mechanisms. These can include informal networks, working groups, coordinating committees, interagency task forces, etc. It will be important for NA-20 and NA-24 to get a seat at the table and a functional role in many of these coordinating bodies. The arms control and nonproliferation agenda comprises both mature and developing policy initiatives. The more mature elements such as CTBT ratification and a follow-on strategic nuclear arms treaty with Russia have defined milestones. However, recent press reports indicate that even the START follow-on strategic arms pact that is planned to be complete by the end of 2009 may take significantly longer and be more expansive in scope. The Russians called for proposals to count non-deployed as well as deployed warheads. Other elements of the agenda such as FMCT, future bilateral nuclear arms reductions following a START follow-on treaty, nuclear posture changes, preparations for an international nuclear security summit, strengthened international safeguards and multilateral verification are in much earlier stages of development. For this reason any survey of arms control capabilities within the USG should be structured to address potential needs across the

  2. Randomized controlled pilot study of mindfulness-based stress reduction for persistently fatigued cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Johns, Shelley A; Brown, Linda F; Beck-Coon, Kathleen; Monahan, Patrick O; Tong, Yan; Kroenke, Kurt

    2015-08-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common, persistent, and disabling symptoms associated with cancer and its treatment. Evidence-based treatments that are acceptable to patients are critically needed. This study examined the efficacy of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) for CRF and related symptoms. A sample of 35 cancer survivors with clinically significant CRF was randomly assigned to a 7-week MBSR-based intervention or wait-list control group. The intervention group received training in mindfulness meditation, yoga, and self-regulatory responses to stress. Fatigue interference (primary outcome) and a variety of secondary outcomes (e.g., fatigue severity, vitality, disability, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance) were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and 1-month follow-up. Bonferroni correction was employed to account for multiple comparisons. Controls received the intervention after the 1-month follow-up. Participants in both groups were followed for 6 months after completing their respective MBSR courses to assess maintenance of effects. Compared to controls, the MBSR group reported large post-intervention reductions as assessed by effect sizes (d) in the primary outcome, fatigue interference (d = -1.43, p < 0.001), along with fatigue severity (d = -1.55, p < 0.001), vitality (d = 1.29, p < 0.001), depression (d = -1.30, p < 0.001), and sleep disturbance (d = -0.74, p = 0.001). Results were maintained or strengthened at 1-month follow-up, the point at which significant improvements in disability (d = -1.22, p < 0.002) and anxiety (d = -0.98, p = 0.002) occurred. Improvements in all outcomes were maintained 6 months after completing the course. MBSR adherence was high, with 90% attendance across groups and high rates of participant-reported home practice of mindfulness. Mindfulness-based stress reduction is a promising treatment for CRF and associated symptoms

  3. Nonlinear Epigenetic Variance: Review and Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Kees-Jan; Ploeger, Annemie; Raijmakers, Maartje E. J.; Dolan, Conor V.; van Der Maas, Han L. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a review of empirical evidence that suggests that a substantial portion of phenotypic variance is due to nonlinear (epigenetic) processes during ontogenesis. The role of such processes as a source of phenotypic variance in human behaviour genetic studies is not fully appreciated. In addition to our review, we present simulation studies…

  4. 40 CFR 142.41 - Variance request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Variances Issued by the Administrator Under Section 1415(a) of the Act § 142.41 Variance request. A supplier of water may request the granting of...

  5. 40 CFR 142.41 - Variance request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....41 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Variances Issued by the Administrator Under Section 1415(a) of the Act § 142.41 Variance request. A supplier of water may request the granting of...

  6. 20 CFR 654.402 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SYSTEM Housing for Agricultural Workers Purpose and Applicability § 654.402 Variances. (a... which the employer has taken to protect the health and safety of workers and adequately show that such... the health and safety of the workers. The RA shall send the approved variance to the employer and...

  7. 20 CFR 654.402 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SYSTEM Housing for Agricultural Workers Purpose and Applicability § 654.402 Variances. (a... which the employer has taken to protect the health and safety of workers and adequately show that such... the health and safety of the workers. The RA shall send the approved variance to the employer and...

  8. 20 CFR 654.402 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SYSTEM Housing for Agricultural Workers Purpose and Applicability § 654.402 Variances. (a... which the employer has taken to protect the health and safety of workers and adequately show that such... the health and safety of the workers. The RA shall send the approved variance to the employer and...

  9. 20 CFR 654.402 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SYSTEM Housing for Agricultural Workers Purpose and Applicability § 654.402 Variances. (a... which the employer has taken to protect the health and safety of workers and adequately show that such... the health and safety of the workers. The RA shall send the approved variance to the employer and...

  10. 20 CFR 654.402 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SYSTEM Housing for Agricultural Workers Purpose and Applicability § 654.402 Variances. (a... which the employer has taken to protect the health and safety of workers and adequately show that such... the health and safety of the workers. The RA shall send the approved variance to the employer and...

  11. 10 CFR 851.31 - Variance process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and health standard and, in addition to the content required by paragraph (c) of this section, must.... Contractors desiring a variance from a safety and health standard, or portion thereof, may submit a written... standard, or portion thereof, from which the contractor seeks a variance; (4) A description of the steps...

  12. 10 CFR 851.31 - Variance process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and health standard and, in addition to the content required by paragraph (c) of this section, must.... Contractors desiring a variance from a safety and health standard, or portion thereof, may submit a written... standard, or portion thereof, from which the contractor seeks a variance; (4) A description of the steps...

  13. 10 CFR 851.31 - Variance process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and health standard and, in addition to the content required by paragraph (c) of this section, must.... Contractors desiring a variance from a safety and health standard, or portion thereof, may submit a written... standard, or portion thereof, from which the contractor seeks a variance; (4) A description of the steps...

  14. 10 CFR 1022.16 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Variances. 1022.16 Section 1022.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.16 Variances. (a) Emergency actions. DOE may...

  15. 10 CFR 1022.16 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Variances. 1022.16 Section 1022.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.16 Variances. (a) Emergency actions. DOE may...

  16. 10 CFR 1022.16 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Variances. 1022.16 Section 1022.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.16 Variances. (a) Emergency actions. DOE may...

  17. 10 CFR 1022.16 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Variances. 1022.16 Section 1022.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.16 Variances. (a) Emergency actions. DOE may...

  18. 10 CFR 1022.16 - Variances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Variances. 1022.16 Section 1022.16 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIREMENTS Procedures for Floodplain and Wetland Reviews § 1022.16 Variances. (a) Emergency actions. DOE may...

  19. Nonlinear Epigenetic Variance: Review and Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Kees-Jan; Ploeger, Annemie; Raijmakers, Maartje E. J.; Dolan, Conor V.; van Der Maas, Han L. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a review of empirical evidence that suggests that a substantial portion of phenotypic variance is due to nonlinear (epigenetic) processes during ontogenesis. The role of such processes as a source of phenotypic variance in human behaviour genetic studies is not fully appreciated. In addition to our review, we present simulation studies…

  20. Rheostat Re-Wired: Alternative Hypotheses for the Control of Thioredoxin Reduction Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Kathryn D.; Dey, Mishtu; Bjork, Rebekah E.; Mitra, Sangha; Chobot, Sarah E.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Elliott, Sean J.

    2015-01-01

    Thioredoxins are small soluble proteins that contain a redox-active disulfide (CXXC). These disulfides are tuned to oxidizing or reducing potentials depending on the function of the thioredoxin within the cell. The mechanism by which the potential is tuned has been controversial, with two main hypotheses: first, that redox potential (Em) is specifically governed by a molecular ‘rheostat’—the XX amino acids, which influence the Cys pKa values, and thereby, Em; and second, the overall thermodynamics of protein folding stability regulates the potential. Here, we use protein film voltammetry (PFV) to measure the pH dependence of the redox potentials of a series of wild-type and mutant archaeal Trxs, PFV and glutathionine-equilibrium to corroborate the measured potentials, the fluorescence probe BADAN to measure pKa values, guanidinium-based denaturation to measure protein unfolding, and X-ray crystallography to provide a structural basis for our functional analyses. We find that when these archaeal thioredoxins are probed directly using PFV, both the high and low potential thioredoxins display consistent 2H+:2e- coupling over a physiological pH range, in conflict with the conventional ‘rheostat’ model. Instead, folding measurements reveals an excellent correlation to reduction potentials, supporting the second hypothesis and revealing the molecular mechanism of reduction potential control in the ubiquitous Trx family. PMID:25874934