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Sample records for controlled clinical polysomnographic

  1. Clinical and polysomnographic course of childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Pizza, Fabio; Franceschini, Christian; Peltola, Hanna; Vandi, Stefano; Finotti, Elena; Ingravallo, Francesca; Nobili, Lino; Bruni, Oliviero; Lin, Ling; Edwards, Mark J.; Partinen, Markku; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the natural evolution of cataplexy and polysomnographic features in untreated children with narcolepsy with cataplexy. To this end, clinical, polysomnographic, and cataplexy-video assessments were performed at diagnosis (mean age of 10 ± 3 and disease duration of 1 ± 1 years) and after a median follow-up of 3 years from symptom onset (mean age of 12 ± 4 years) in 21 children with narcolepsy with cataplexy and hypocretin 1 deficiency (tested in 19 subjects). Video assessment was also performed in two control groups matched for age and sex at first evaluation and follow-up and was blindly scored for presence of hypotonic (negative) and active movements. Patients’ data at diagnosis and at follow-up were contrasted, compared with controls, and related with age and disease duration. At diagnosis children with narcolepsy with cataplexy showed an increase of sleep time during the 24 h; at follow-up sleep time and nocturnal sleep latency shortened, in the absence of other polysomnographic or clinical (including body mass index) changes. Hypotonic phenomena and selected facial movements decreased over time and, tested against disease duration and age, appeared as age-dependent. At onset, childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy is characterized by an abrupt increase of total sleep over the 24 h, generalized hypotonia and motor overactivity. With time, the picture of cataplexy evolves into classic presentation (i.e. brief muscle weakness episodes triggered by emotions), whereas total sleep time across the 24 h decreases, returning to more age-appropriate levels. PMID:24142146

  2. Clinical and polysomnographic course of childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Franceschini, Christian; Peltola, Hanna; Vandi, Stefano; Finotti, Elena; Ingravallo, Francesca; Nobili, Lino; Bruni, Oliviero; Lin, Ling; Edwards, Mark J; Partinen, Markku; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Bhatia, Kailash P; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate the natural evolution of cataplexy and polysomnographic features in untreated children with narcolepsy with cataplexy. To this end, clinical, polysomnographic, and cataplexy-video assessments were performed at diagnosis (mean age of 10 ± 3 and disease duration of 1 ± 1 years) and after a median follow-up of 3 years from symptom onset (mean age of 12 ± 4 years) in 21 children with narcolepsy with cataplexy and hypocretin 1 deficiency (tested in 19 subjects). Video assessment was also performed in two control groups matched for age and sex at first evaluation and follow-up and was blindly scored for presence of hypotonic (negative) and active movements. Patients' data at diagnosis and at follow-up were contrasted, compared with controls, and related with age and disease duration. At diagnosis children with narcolepsy with cataplexy showed an increase of sleep time during the 24 h; at follow-up sleep time and nocturnal sleep latency shortened, in the absence of other polysomnographic or clinical (including body mass index) changes. Hypotonic phenomena and selected facial movements decreased over time and, tested against disease duration and age, appeared as age-dependent. At onset, childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy is characterized by an abrupt increase of total sleep over the 24 h, generalized hypotonia and motor overactivity. With time, the picture of cataplexy evolves into classic presentation (i.e., brief muscle weakness episodes triggered by emotions), whereas total sleep time across the 24 h decreases, returning to more age-appropriate levels.

  3. Case Control Polysomnographic Studies of Sleep Disorders in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Ming-Hui; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Pavanni, Ratnagopal; Lim, Li-Ling; Tan, Eng-King

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between a number of primary sleep disorders and Parkinson's disease (PD) is still debated. There are limited case control polysomnographic studies in PD and most of these study sample sizes are small. Methodology/Findings We conducted one of the largest case-control studies involving overnight polysomnographic evaluation, with prospective recruitment of unselected Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls from an Asian population. The cases were recruited from the specialized movement disorder outpatient clinics in a tertiary referral center, and controls from the same geographical locations. All subjects underwent an overnight polysomnographic study and a multiple sleep latency test. A total of 124 subjects including 56 patients and 68 controls frequency-matched for age and sex were included. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients had significantly shorter total sleep time than controls (p = 0.01), lower sleep efficiency (p = 0.001) and increased REM latency (p = 0.007). In patients, multivariate analysis showed that reduced total sleep time was significantly associated with increased age (p = 0.001) and increased levodopa dose (p = 0.032). The mean Insomnia Severity Index was higher in PD patients (9.0±7.1) compared to controls (3.3±3.9, p<0.001). The mean Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was higher in PD patients (9.3±5.9 vs. 5.7±4.8, p<0.001). Nocturnal arousals, obstructive sleep apnea, periodic leg movements and objective abnormal sleepiness were not increased in our patients. Conclusions/Significance Our case-control polysomnographic study, the first-ever performed in an Asian population, revealed altered sleep architecture and reduced sleep in PD patients compared to controls. Reduced total sleep time was associated with increased age and levodopa dose. However, nocturnal arousals, primary sleep disorders and abnormal sleepiness were not increased in our PD patients suggesting that ethnic

  4. Periodic limb movement disorder : a clinical and polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Dhanuka, A K; Singh, G

    2001-12-01

    Periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) is one of the commonest neurological disorders and causes significant disability, if left untreated. However, it is rarely diagnosed in clinical practice, probably due to lack of awareness and/or lack of necessary diagnostic facilities. Restless leg syndrome (RLS), aging, pregnancy, uraemia, iron deficiency, polyneuropathy are some of the common causes of secondary PLMD. Clinical presentation, polysomnographic findings and management of six patients of PLMD have been discussed in this report.

  5. Clinical and polysomnographic features of patients with Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mungan, Semra; Ozcan, Murat; Orhan, Gurdal; Titiz, Ayse; Arli, Berna; Koseoglu, Sabri; Ak, Fikri; Dere, Haci Huseyin

    2016-05-01

    To reveal clinical and polysomnographic features in patients treated for restless leg syndrome, and to examine the compatibility of sleep data and clinical features. The study was conducted at the Department of Neurology, Ankara Numune Training and Education Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, and comprised patients who presented to the outpatient clinic between January and July 2014 who were diagnosed with restless leg syndrome based on the International RestIess Leg Syndrome Study Group criteria. Patients underwent polysomnography test in spontaneous sleep in a single room. SPSS 18 was used for statistical analyses. Of the 18 patients, 13(72%)were females and 5(28%)were males. Overall mean age was 51.56±11.57years (range: 23-66 years). Fourteen (77.8%) patients reported insomnia; 10(55.5%) patients had excessive daytime sleepiness; 13(72.2%) reported snoring; and 3(17%) had apnoea. Mean International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale score was 26.11±7.9 (range: 16-40).Mean Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was 9.17±5.1 (range: 0-20). Restless leg syndrome was more common in women and the most common complaint was insomnia.

  6. Polysomnographic Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Description and Certification Information / Polysomnographic Technology Polysomnographic Technology Occupational Description Polysomnographic technologists perform sleep tests and work with physicians to provide information needed ...

  7. Clinical and polysomnographic characteristics of excessive daytime sleepiness in children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiwon; Na, Geonyoub; Joo, Eun Yeon; Lee, Munhyang; Lee, Jeehun

    2017-08-18

    This study aimed to delineate the clinical and polysomnography (PSG) characteristics of sleep disorders in children with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Between February 2002 and June 2015, 622 pediatric patients with EDS were evaluated with overnight PSG and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test at the Samsung Medical Center. The medical records; questionnaire responses about depression, sleepiness, sleep habits; and sleep study data of 133 patients without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were reviewed retrospectively. The patients (63 girls, 70 boys) slept for an average of 7 h 30 min and 8 h 44 min on weekdays and weekends, respectively. The mean Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was 11.01 ± 4.09 and did not differ significantly among sleep disorders. Among the 102 patients who completed the depression questionnaire, 53 showed depressive feelings, which were moderate or severe in 39, with no significant differences among specific sleep disorders. Thirty-four patients exhibited normal PSG results. Seventeen of them were concluded as not having any sleep disorders, and the others as having delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD). Narcolepsy (n = 78) was the most common disorder, followed by DSPD (n = 17) and idiopathic hypersomnia (n = 12). Pediatric patients with EDS had various sleep disorders and some did not have any sleep disorder despite EDS. More than half the patients with EDS showed depressive feelings affecting their daily lives. For pediatric patients with EDS, a systematic diagnostic approach including questionnaires for sleep habits and emotion and PSG is essential for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Polysomnographic Findings and Clinical Correlates in Huntington Disease: A Cross-Sectional Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Piano, Carla; Losurdo, Anna; Della Marca, Giacomo; Solito, Marcella; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Provini, Federica; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Cortelli, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the sleep pattern and the motor activity during sleep in a cohort of patients affected by Huntington disease (HD). Design: Cross-sectional cohort study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients: Thirty HD patients, 16 women and 14 men (mean age 57.3 ± 12.2 y); 30 matched healthy controls (mean age 56.5 ± 11.8 y). Interventions: Subjective sleep evaluation: Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS); Berlin's Questionnaire, interview for restless legs syndrome (RLS), questionnaire for REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Clinical evaluation: disease duration, clinical severity (unified Huntington disease motor rating scale [UHDMRS]), genetic tests. Laboratory-based full-night attended video-polysomnography (V-PSG). Measurements and Results: The duration of the disease was 9.4 ± 4.4 y, UHMDRS score was 55.5 ± 23.4, CAG repeats were 44.3 ± 4.1. Body mass index was 21.9 ± 4.0 kg/m2. No patients or caregivers reported poor sleep quality. Two patients reported symptoms of RLS. Eight patients had an ESS score ≥ 9. Eight patients had high risk of obstructive sleep apnea. At the RBD questionnaire, two patients had a pathological score. HD patients, compared to controls, showed shorter sleep, reduced sleep efficiency index, and increased arousals and awakenings. Four patients presented with sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Periodic limb movements (PLMs) during wake and sleep were observed in all patients. No episode of RBD was observed in the V-PSG recordings, and no patients showed rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia. The disease duration correlated with ESS score (P < 0.02). UHMDRS correlated positively with the ESS score (P < 0.005), and negatively with the percentage of REM sleep. Conclusions: Patients with Huntington disease showed a severe sleep disruption and a high prevalence of periodic limb movements, but no evidence of sleep disordered breathing or REM sleep behavior disorder. Citation: Piano C, Losurdo A, Della Marca G, Solito M

  9. Defining the phenotype of restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED): a clinical and polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Galbiati, Andrea; Marelli, Sara; Cusmai, Maria; Gasperi, Alessandro; Oldani, Alessandro; Zucconi, Marco; Padovani, Alessandro; Ferini Strambi, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Clinical features variability between familial and sporadic restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED) has been previously reported. With this retrospective cohort study, we aimed to determine the clinical and polysomnographic characteristics of 400 RLS/WED patients. Patients with familial RLS/WED were significantly younger than sporadic RLS/WED, while clinical and polysomnographic characteristics were similar in both groups. No difference was found for the age-at-onset between idiopathic and secondary RLS/WED. Periodic limb movements (PLM) index and REM sleep time were higher in idiopathic RLS/WED. Time of onset of symptoms was in the evening or at bedtime in 28.04 and 37.80% of patients, respectively, while in 21.34% of patients onset was more than 1 h after sleep onset. Impulse control and compulsive behaviours (ICBs) were found in 13.29% patients on dopamine agonist therapy. Our analyses support the hypothesis that patients with a familial history of RLS/WED may have a genetic component. Nevertheless, the dichotomy between early and late onset disease seems to be less sharp than previously reported. A large proportion of RLS/WED patients can have atypical features, therefore making the diagnosis challenging. Some cases can be missed even when the patient refers to a sleep specialist, as revealed by the partial absence of daytime symptoms, the high comorbidity with insomnia and other sleep complaints and the high percentage of symptoms beginning after sleep onset. This draws attention on the importance of a careful evaluation of the patient, to recognize potentially treatable secondary forms of RLS/WED.

  10. Clinical and Polysomnographic Predictors of the Natural History of Poor Sleep in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Bixler, Edward O.; Singareddy, Ravi; Shaffer, Michele L.; Calhoun, Susan L.; Karataraki, Maria; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Liao, Duanping

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Approximately 8-10% of the general population suffers from chronic insomnia, whereas another 20-30% of the population has insomnia symptoms at any given time (i.e., poor sleep). However, few longitudinal studies have examined risk factors of the natural history of poor sleep, and none have examined the role of polysomnographic (PSG) variables. Design: Representative longitudinal study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: From a random, general population sample of 1,741 individuals of the adult Penn State Cohort, 1,395 were followed up after 7.5 yr. Measurements: Full medical evaluation and 1-night PSG at baseline and telephone interview at follow-up. Results: The rate of incident poor sleep was 18.4%. Physical (e.g., obesity, sleep apnea, and ulcer) and mental (e.g., depression) health conditions and behavioral factors (e.g., smoking and alcohol consumption) increased the odds of incident poor sleep as compared to normal sleep. The rates of persistent, remitted, and poor sleepers who developed chronic insomnia were 39%, 44%, and 17%, respectively. Risk factors for persistent poor sleep were physical health conditions combined with psychologic distress. Shorter objective sleep duration and a family history of sleep problems were risk factors for poor sleep evolving into chronic insomnia. Conclusions: Poor sleep appears to be primarily a symptom of physical and mental health conditions, whereas the persistence of poor sleep is associated with psychologic distress. Importantly, sleep apnea appears to be associated with incident poor sleep but not with chronic insomnia. Finally, this study suggests that objective short sleep duration in poor sleepers is a biologic marker of genetic predisposition to chronic insomnia. Citation: Fernandez-Mendoza J; Vgontzas AN; Bixler EO; Singareddy R; Shaffer ML; Calhoun SL; Karataraki M; Vela-Bueno A; Liao D. Clinical and polysomnographic predictors of the natural history of poor sleep in the general population

  11. Clinical assessment and polysomnographic study of sleep apnea in a Chinese population of snorers*

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chuan; Jiang, Jing-bo; Wu, Hong-cheng; Wu, Shi-bo; Yu, Bi-yun; Tang, Yao-dong

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: While an increasing number of people who snore are seeking medical consultations, the clinical characteristics of snorers are rarely reported. The aim of this study is to characterize the clinical and polysomnographic features in a population of snorers. Methods: A total of 490 subjects were examined retrospectively. The clinical history, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores, physical examination, and full-night polysomnography (PSG) data were obtained for all the subjects. The correlations between the neck circumference, waist circumference, ESS scores, body mass index (BMI), and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients were explored. The gender and age differences in OSA patients were analyzed. Results: OSA was diagnosed in 84.7% of the sample, with 21.2% of the patients having a mild form, 15.4% having a moderate form, and 63.4% having a severe form of OSA. The ESS scores, neck circumference, waist circumference, and BMI were positively correlated with AHI in OSA patients. The ESS scores and BMI were negatively correlated with nadir oxygen saturation (SaO2). A greater number of men than women exhibited moderate to severe forms of the disease. OSA affects the work of males more commonly compared with females. Nocturia was a more common complaint in elderly OSA patients. Heart diseases coexisted more frequently with OSA in elderly patients. Conclusions: In a population of snorers, OSA is the most common condition identified. The ESS scores and BMI were well correlated with the severity of the disease. Men had a more severe form of OSA than women. Nocturia frequently occurred in elderly OSA patients, as did the coexistence of heart disease. PMID:25743123

  12. Clinical, polysomnographic, and CPAP titration features of obstructive sleep apnea: Mixed versus purely obstructive type.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ahm; Lee, Gha-Hyun; Chung, Yoo-Sam; Kim, Woo Sung

    2015-08-15

    To determine whether obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients with mixed sleep apnea (MSA) have different clinical, polysomnographic, and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration findings compared to OSAS patients without MSA. We retrospectively reviewed the records of OSAS patients who had undergone CPAP titration and categorized them into pure-OSA and mixed-OSA groups. Demographic features, daytime sleepiness, and apnea severity were compared between the two groups using univariate and multivariate analyses. CPAP titration findings were also compared between the two groups. One hundred and ninety-five subjects (n=126 pure-OSA; n=69 mixed-OSA) were included in the analysis. Compared to the pure-OSA group, the mixed-OSA group had a higher percentage of males (p=0.003) and a higher body mass index (p=0.044), Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (p=0.028), and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis, older age, male sex, and higher body mass index were independently associated with mixed-OSA before PSG study. When using AHI as a covariable, the higher AHI with older age, male sex, and daytime sleepiness was independently related to mixed-OSA. The mixed-OSA group had a higher percentage of patients with complex sleep apnea, a lower percentage of patients with optimal titration, and a higher titrated pressure than the pure-OSA group. Severe OSA, older age, male sex, obesity, and daytime sleepiness were related to mixed-OSA. Complex sleep apnea, less optimal titration, and a higher titrated CPAP were also associated with MSA in OSAS patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical and polysomnographic features of a large Turkish pedigree with restless leg syndrome and periodic limb movements.

    PubMed

    Babacan-Yildiz, Gülsen; Gürsoy, Esra; Kolukisa, Mehmet; Karaköse, Fatmanur; Akkoyunlu, Emin M; Celebi, Arif; Lohmann, Ebba

    2013-05-01

    Restless leg syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movements (PLMS) are common neurological diseases often associated with insomnia. A familial aggregation in RLS has been identified since it was first described; however, inheritance patterns of RLS/PLMS are poorly understood and their exact pathophysiology is not well-known. We have identified a Turkish pedigree with RLS/PLMS, which is a rare condition, in five generations of a family, including nine affected family members. A detailed clinical evaluation of the family was conducted with the help of polysomnographic recording, electrophysiological findings, and biochemical parameters. The proband is a 38-year-old male member of the family who first started to show symptoms at the age of 29. All the patients from this family have been diagnosed with RLS, according to the criteria of the International RLS Study Group. Disease onset was early in all cases and even earlier in the younger generation. Three affected individuals also had PLMS on polysomnographic recordings. To our knowledge, this is the first Turkish family in which nine individuals in five generations are affected. We suggest an important effect of anticipation and genetic impact of the diseases and describe specific clinical features. Further investigation of clinical, genetic, and biochemical similarities between PLMS and RLS may yield important clues, adding to our understanding of the pathophysiology of these common diseases.

  14. Polysomnographic Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... The technologist keeps a log of observations including sleep stages and clinical events, changes in procedure, and significant ... patients. After the sleep study the technologist scores sleep/wake stages using professionally accepted guidelines; scores clinical events (such ...

  15. NREM-related parasomnias in Machado-Joseph disease: clinical and polysomnographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Giselle Melo Fontes; Pedroso, José Luiz; Dos Santos, Diogo Fernandes; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Do Prado, Lucila Bizari Fernandes; De Carvalho, Luciane Bizari Coin; Barsottini, Orlando G P; Do Prado, Gilmar Fernandes

    2016-02-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorders that affect the cerebellum and its connections, and have a marked clinical and genetic variability. Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3)--MJD/SCA3--is the most common SCA worldwide. MJD/SCA3 is characterized classically by progressive ataxia and variable other motor and non-motor symptoms. Sleep disorders are common, and include rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder (RBD), restless legs syndrome (RLS), insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, excessive fragmentary myoclonus and sleep apnea. This study aims to focus upon determining the presence or not of non-REM (NREM)-related parasomnias in MJD/SCA 3, using data from polysomnography (PSG) and clinical evaluation. Forty-seven patients with clinical and genetic diagnosis of MJD/SCA3 and 47 control subjects were evaluated clinically and by polysomnography. MJD/SCA3 patients had a higher frequency of arousals from slow wave sleep (P < 0.001), parasomnia complaints (confusional arousal/sleep terrors, P = 0.001; RBD, P < 0.001; and nightmares, P < 0.001), REM sleep without atonia (P < 0.001), periodic limb movements of sleep index (PLMSi) (P < 0.001), percentage of N3 sleep (P < 0.001) and percentage of N1 sleep (P < 0.001). These data show that NREM-related parasomnias must be included in the spectrum of sleep disorders in MJD/SCA3 patients. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Sleep Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Sleep Research Society.

  16. Polysomnographic Findings and Clinical Correlates in Huntington Disease: A Cross-Sectional Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Piano, Carla; Losurdo, Anna; Della Marca, Giacomo; Solito, Marcella; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Provini, Federica; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Cortelli, Pietro

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the sleep pattern and the motor activity during sleep in a cohort of patients affected by Huntington disease (HD). Cross-sectional cohort study. Sleep laboratory. Thirty HD patients, 16 women and 14 men (mean age 57.3 ± 12.2 y); 30 matched healthy controls (mean age 56.5 ± 11.8 y). Subjective sleep evaluation: Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS); Berlin's Questionnaire, interview for restless legs syndrome (RLS), questionnaire for REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Clinical evaluation: disease duration, clinical severity (unified Huntington disease motor rating scale [UHDMRS]), genetic tests. Laboratory-based full-night attended video-polysomnography (V-PSG). The duration of the disease was 9.4 ± 4.4 y, UHMDRS score was 55.5 ± 23.4, CAG repeats were 44.3 ± 4.1. Body mass index was 21.9 ± 4.0 kg/m(2). No patients or caregivers reported poor sleep quality. Two patients reported symptoms of RLS. Eight patients had an ESS score ≥ 9. Eight patients had high risk of obstructive sleep apnea. At the RBD questionnaire, two patients had a pathological score. HD patients, compared to controls, showed shorter sleep, reduced sleep efficiency index, and increased arousals and awakenings. Four patients presented with sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Periodic limb movements (PLMs) during wake and sleep were observed in all patients. No episode of RBD was observed in the V-PSG recordings, and no patients showed rapid eye movement (REM) sleep without atonia. The disease duration correlated with ESS score (P < 0.02). UHMDRS correlated positively with the ESS score (P < 0.005), and negatively with the percentage of REM sleep. Patients with Huntington disease showed a severe sleep disruption and a high prevalence of periodic limb movements, but no evidence of sleep disordered breathing or REM sleep behavior disorder. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  17. An observational clinical and video-polysomnographic study of the effects of rotigotine in sleep disorder in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Yue-Chang; Lan, Dan-Mei; Wu, Hui -Juan; Zhao, Zhong-Xin

    2017-05-01

    Sleep disturbance is common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and negatively impacts quality of life. There is little data on how dopamine agonists influence nocturnal sleep in PD, particularly in sleep laboratory data to measure sleep parameters and their changes objectively. The goal of this open-label study was to objectively evaluate the effect of rotigotine on sleep in PD patients by video-polysomnographic methods. A total of 25 PD patients with complaints of nocturnal sleep impairment were enrolled. The sleep quality before and after stable rotigotine therapy was evaluated subjectively through questionnaire assessments and objectively measured by video-polysomnographic methods. The Parkinsonism, depression, anxiety, and quality of life of PD patients were also evaluated through questionnaire assessments. At the end of rotigotine treatment, the PD daytime functioning, motor performance, depression, subjective quality of sleep, and the quality of life improved. Video-polysomnographic analysis showed that the sleep efficiency and stage N1% were increased, while the sleep latency, wake after sleep onset, and the periodic leg movements in sleep index were decreased after rotigotine treatment. Video-polysomnographic analysis confirmed the subjective improvement of sleep after rotigotine treatment. This observation suggests that in PD rotigotine is a treatment option for patients complaining from sleep disturbances.

  18. Correlates of Polysomnographic Sleep Changes in Cocaine Dependence: Self-administration and Clinical Outcomes*

    PubMed Central

    Angarita, Gustavo A.; Canavan, Sofija V.; Forselius, Erica; Bessette, Andrew; Morgan, Peter T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Abstinence from chronic cocaine use is associated with abnormal sleep architecture. As sleep abnormalities are associated with clinical outcome in alcohol dependence, we hypothesized a similar relationship in cocaine dependence. Methods We report data from a cocaine self-administration study (N=12) and the placebo arm of a randomized clinical trial (N=20). Self-administration participants underwent three cocaine self-administration sessions during a three-week inpatient stay. Treatment participants underwent two weeks of inpatient followed by six weeks of outpatient treatment including once-weekly cognitive behavioral therapy. Measurements included polysomnography from early and late in abstinence during the inpatient stays. Clinical outcomes included amount of cocaine self-administered, urine tests, and self-reported use and withdrawal symptoms. Results Change in slow-wave sleep from early to late abstinence (ΔSWS; p=0.05), late abstinence rapid eye movement sleep (REM; p=0.002), and late abstinence total sleep time (p=0.02) were negatively correlated with the amount of cocaine self-administered. Early abstinence REM was positively correlated with withdrawal symptoms (p=0.02). Late abstinence REM was positively correlated with percent negative urines and maximum consecutive number of days abstinent (both p<0.001). ΔSWS was positively correlated with percent negative urines (p=0.03) and participants with increased SWS had greater percent negative urines (p=0.008) and maximum consecutive number of days abstinent (p=0.009). Conclusions Correlations between sleep deficits and amount of cocaine self-administered, clinical outcomes, and severity of withdrawal symptoms underscore the relevance of sleep in clinical outcomes in the treatment of cocaine dependence. PMID:25124303

  19. Clinical and Polysomnographic Features of Kleine-Levin Syndrome: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    ERDEM, Murat; BOLU, Abdullah; GARİP, Beyazıt; KARAMAN, Dursun; YETKİN, Sinan

    2013-01-01

    Kleine-Levin Syndrome (KLS) is a rare disorder characterized intermittent hypersomnia, hyperphagia, hypersexuality, abnormal behaviors, and confusion. Patients are asymptomatic between episodes. The aim of this case series study was to determine the clinical features of patients with KLS and to compare the polysomnography (PSG) findings between symptomatic and asymptomatic periods. We compared the results of PSG investigations performed in symptomatic and asymptomatic periods in six patients diagnosed with KLS at Gulhane Military Medical Faculty Sleep Research Center between 1998 and 2005. The age at onset of KLS was approximately 18 years, the diagnosis delayed 2.67 years, hypersomnia episodes lasted approximately 11.5 days, until the correct diagnosis, the patients had experienced on average 5 episodes. Total sleep time in KLS patients during symptomatic period and stage 2 sleep percent was higher than in asymptomatic period. REM latency was shorter and stage 3 and REM percent was lower in asymptomatic period. The clinical features including the age of onset and episode duration are compatible with those from the previous studies. It was observed that the sleep architecture during symptomatic period was different from that in asymptomatic period.

  20. Gender differences in REM sleep behavior disorder: a clinical and polysomnographic study in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junying; Zhang, Jihui; Li, Yun; Du, Lina; Li, Zhe; Lei, Fei; Wing, Yun-Kwok; Kushida, Clete A; Zhou, Dong; Tang, Xiangdong

    2015-03-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) has been considered a male-predominant parasomnia, and there is little comparative data on potential differences between males and females. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine and characterize gender difference in RBD. Ninety patients diagnosed with RBD were consecutively recruited from a sleep medicine clinic. All patients were assessed by a RBD questionnaire and overnight video polysomnography. Demographic, clinical data, presence of dreams and dream-enacting behaviors, sleep parameters and electromyographic (EMG) activity were compared for male and female patients with RBD. Females were significantly younger than males, both in the mean age of RBD onset (45.3 ± 19.3 vs. 56.2 ± 14.1; p = 0.027) and the mean age at diagnosis (50.4 ± 18.2 vs. 61.1 ± 14.1; p = 0.022). Secondary RBD was 21% in males and 44% in females (p = 0.021). Antidepressant use was more common among females (22%) than males (2%; p = 0.003). There was no significant gender difference in dream content (eg, violent and frightening dreams) of RBD patients. However, females had less dream-enacting behaviors, especially in movement related dreams and falling out of bed. Interestingly, no significant difference was found in the quantification of EMG activity during REM sleep between male and female patients. We found significant gender differences in demographics, associated comorbidities, and dream-related behaviors in patients with RBD. Female RBD patients reported significantly less behavior during dreams, but there was no significant gender difference in EMG activity during REM sleep. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Trimipramine in primary insomnia: results of a polysomnographic double-blind controlled study.

    PubMed

    Riemann, D; Voderholzer, U; Cohrs, S; Rodenbeck, A; Hajak, G; Rüther, E; Wiegand, M H; Laakmann, G; Baghai, T; Fischer, W; Hoffmann, M; Hohagen, F; Mayer, G; Berger, M

    2002-09-01

    In recent years, sedating antidepressants have been increasingly used to treat primary insomnia. Up to now, only one open pilot study with trimipramine and one double-blind placebo-controlled study with doxepin have provided scientific support for this approach in treating primary insomnia. In order to test the hypothesis that sedating antidepressants are useful in the treatment of primary insomnia, the effect of trimipramine on objectively and subjectively measured parameters of sleep was investigated in a double-blind placebo- and lormetazepam-controlled study in a sample of 55 patients with primary insomnia attending outpatient sleep-disorder clinics. Trimipramine was selected since it has shown positive effects on sleep continuity with a lack of REM sleep suppression in studies on depressed patients and in one pilot study on patients with primary insomnia. Trimipramine at an average dose of 100 mg over a period of 4 weeks significantly enhanced sleep efficiency, but not total sleep time (which had been the primary target variable) compared to placebo as measured by polysomnography. Changes in objective sleep parameters were paralleled by changes in subjective sleep parameters. Trimipramine did not suppress REM sleep. Lormetazepam decreased wake time and sleep stage 3 and increased REM sleep compared to placebo. After switching trimipramine to placebo, sleep parameters returned to baseline. There was no evidence of any rebound effect from trimipramine. Side effects from trimipramine were only marginal. This first double-blind placebo-controlled study with trimipramine suggests its efficacy in the treatment of primary insomnia. However, due to the large intra- and interindividual variance in the parameters of interest before and during treatment a larger sample size would have been necessary to strengthen the validity of our findings.

  2. Delayed Diagnosis, Range of Severity, and Multiple Sleep Comorbidities: A Clinical and Polysomnographic Analysis of 100 Patients of the Innsbruck Narcolepsy Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Frauscher, Birgit; Ehrmann, Laura; Mitterling, Thomas; Gabelia, David; Gschliesser, Viola; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy is reported to affect 26-56/100,000 in the general population. We aimed to describe clinical and polysomnographic features of a large narcolepsy cohort in order to comprehensively characterize the narcoleptic spectrum. Methods: We performed a chart- and polysomnographybased review of all narcolepsy patients of the Innsbruck narcolepsy cohort. Results: A total of 100 consecutive narcolepsy patients (87 with cataplexy [NC], 13 without cataplexy [N]) were included in the analysis. All subjects had either excessive daytime sleepiness or cataplexy as their initial presenting clinical feature. Age at symptom onset was 20 (6-69) years. Diagnostic delay was 6.5 (0-39) years. The complete narcolepsy tetrad was present in 36/100 patients; 28/100 patients had three cardinal symptoms; 29/100 had two; and 7/100 had only excessive daytime sleepiness. Severity varied broadly with respect to excessive daytime sleepiness (median Epworth Sleepiness Scale score: 18, range 10-24), cataplexy (8-point Likert scale: median 4.5, range 1-8), hypnagogic hallucinations (median 4.5, range 1-7), and sleep paralysis (median 3, range 1-7). Sleep comorbidity was highly prevalent and ranged from sleeprelated movement disorders (n = 55/100), parasomnias (n = 34/100), and sleeprelated breathing disorders (n = 24/100), to insomnia (n = 28/100). REM sleep without atonia or a periodic limb movement in sleep index > 5/h were present in most patients (90/100 and 75/100). A high percentage of narcoleptic patients in the present study had high frequency leg movements (35%) and excessive fragmentary myoclonus (22%). Of the narcolepsy patients with clinical features of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), 76.5% had EMG evidence for RBD on the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), based on a standard cutoff of a minimum of 18% of 3-sec miniepochs. Conclusion: This study is one of the largest monocentric polysomnographic studies to date of patients with narcolepsy and confirms the

  3. Evaluation of Automated and Semi-Automated Scoring of Polysomnographic Recordings from a Clinical Trial Using Zolpidem in the Treatment of Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Svetnik, Vladimir; Ma, Junshui; Soper, Keith A.; Doran, Scott; Renger, John J.; Deacon, Steve; Koblan, Ken S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of 2 automated systems, Morpheus and Somnolyzer24X7, with various levels of human review/editing, in scoring polysomnographic (PSG) recordings from a clinical trial using zolpidem in a model of transient insomnia. Methods: 164 all-night PSG recordings from 82 subjects collected during 2 nights of sleep, one under placebo and one under zolpidem (10 mg) treatment were used. For each recording, 6 different methods were used to provide sleep stage scores based on Rechtschaffen & Kales criteria: 1) full manual scoring, 2) automated scoring by Morpheus 3) automated scoring by Somnolyzer24X7, 4) automated scoring by Morpheus with full manual review, 5) automated scoring by Morpheus with partial manual review, 6) automated scoring by Somnolyzer24X7 with partial manual review. Ten traditional clinical efficacy measures of sleep initiation, maintenance, and architecture were calculated. Results: Pair-wise epoch-by-epoch agreements between fully automated and manual scores were in the range of intersite manual scoring agreements reported in the literature (70%-72%). Pair-wise epoch-by-epoch agreements between automated scores manually reviewed were higher (73%-76%). The direction and statistical significance of treatment effect sizes using traditional efficacy endpoints were essentially the same whichever method was used. As the degree of manual review increased, the magnitude of the effect size approached those estimated with fully manual scoring. Conclusion: Automated or semi-automated sleep PSG scoring offers valuable alternatives to costly, time consuming, and intrasite and intersite variable manual scoring, especially in large multicenter clinical trials. Reduction in scoring variability may also reduce the sample size of a clinical trial. Citation: Svetnik V; Ma J; Soper KA; Doran S; Renger JJ; Deacon S; Koblan KS. Evaluation of automated and semi-automated scoring of polysomnographic recordings from a clinical trial using zolpidem

  4. Polysomnographic characteristics in nonmalignant chronic pain populations: a review of controlled studies

    PubMed Central

    Bjurstrom, Martin F.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Sleep and pain are critical homeostatic systems that interact in a bidirectional manner. Complaints of sleep disturbance are ubiquitous among patients with chronic pain disorders, and conversely, patients with persistent insomnia symptoms commonly report suffering from chronic pain. Sleep deprivation paradigms demonstrate that partial or complete sleep loss induce hyperalgesia, possibly due to shared mechanistic pathways including neuroanatomic and molecular substrates. Further, chronic pain conditions and sleep disturbances are intertwined through comorbidities, which together cause detrimental psychological and physical consequences. This critical review examines 29 polysomnography studies to evaluate whether nonmalignant chronic pain patients, as compared to controls, show differences in objective measures of sleep continuity and sleep architecture. Whereas these controlled studies did not reveal a consistent pattern of objective sleep disturbances, alterations of sleep continuity were commonly reported. Alterations of sleep architecture such as increases in light sleep or decreases in slow-wave sleep were less commonly reported and findings were mixed and also inconsistent. Methodological flaws were identified, which complicated interpretation and limited conclusions; hence, recommendations for future research are suggested. Knowledge of abnormalities in the sleep process has implications for understanding the pathophysiology of chronic pain conditions, which might also direct the development of novel intervention strategies. PMID:26140866

  5. Evaluation of automated and semi-automated scoring of polysomnographic recordings from a clinical trial using zolpidem in the treatment of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Svetnik, Vladimir; Ma, Junshui; Soper, Keith A; Doran, Scott; Renger, John J; Deacon, Steve; Koblan, Ken S

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate the performance of 2 automated systems, Morpheus and Somnolyzer24X7, with various levels of human review/editing, in scoring polysomnographic (PSG) recordings from a clinical trial using zolpidem in a model of transient insomnia. 164 all-night PSG recordings from 82 subjects collected during 2 nights of sleep, one under placebo and one under zolpidem (10 mg) treatment were used. For each recording, 6 different methods were used to provide sleep stage scores based on Rechtschaffen & Kales criteria: 1) full manual scoring, 2) automated scoring by Morpheus 3) automated scoring by Somnolyzer24X7, 4) automated scoring by Morpheus with full manual review, 5) automated scoring by Morpheus with partial manual review, 6) automated scoring by Somnolyzer24X7 with partial manual review. Ten traditional clinical efficacy measures of sleep initiation, maintenance, and architecture were calculated. Pair-wise epoch-by-epoch agreements between fully automated and manual scores were in the range of intersite manual scoring agreements reported in the literature (70%-72%). Pair-wise epoch-by-epoch agreements between automated scores manually reviewed were higher (73%-76%). The direction and statistical significance of treatment effect sizes using traditional efficacy endpoints were essentially the same whichever method was used. As the degree of manual review increased, the magnitude of the effect size approached those estimated with fully manual scoring. Automated or semi-automated sleep PSG scoring offers valuable alternatives to costly, time consuming, and intrasite and intersite variable manual scoring, especially in large multicenter clinical trials. Reduction in scoring variability may also reduce the sample size of a clinical trial.

  6. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Single-Dose, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter, Polysomnographic Study of Gabapentin in Transient Insomnia Induced by Sleep Phase Advance

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Russell P.; Hull, Steven G.; Lankford, D. Alan; Mayleben, David W.; Seiden, David J.; Furey, Sandy A.; Jayawardena, Shyamalie; Roth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the effects of single doses of gabapentin 250 and 500 mg on polysomnographic (PSG) and participant-reported sleep measures in a 5-h phase advance insomnia model. Methods: Adults reporting occasional disturbed sleep received gabapentin 500 mg (n = 125), 250 mg (n = 125), or placebo (n = 127) 30 min prior to bedtime and were in bed from 17:00 to 01:00, ∼5 h before their habitual bedtime. Sleep was assessed by PSG, post-sleep questionnaire, and the Karolinska Sleep Diary (KSD). Next-day residual effects (Digit Symbol Substitution Test [DSST] and Stanford Sleepiness Scale [SSS]) and tolerability were assessed. Results: Demographics were comparable among groups. Among PSG endpoints, wake after sleep onset (primary endpoint) (135.7 [placebo], 100.7 [250 mg], and 73.2 [500 mg] min) was significantly lower and total sleep time (TST) (311.4, 356.5, and 378.7 min) significantly greater in both gabapentin groups versus placebo. Latency to persistent sleep was not significantly different among groups. Percent slow wave sleep (12.6%, 15.4%, and 17.0%, respectively) was significantly greater and percent stage 1 (15.1%, 11.8%, and 10.8%, respectively) significantly lower relative to placebo. Gabapentin was associated with significantly higher values of KSD Sleep Quality Index and reported TST versus placebo; no other reported outcomes were significant. Neither gabapentin dose produced evidence of next-day residual effects as measured by DSST and SSS. Adverse events were infrequent (< 5%). Conclusion: Participants with occasional disturbed sleep treated with gabapentin showed significantly longer sleep duration and greater depth (versus placebo) in response to a phase advance manipulation known to disrupt sleep maintenance. Citation: Rosenberg RP, Hull SG, Lankford DA, Mayleben DW, Seiden DJ, Furey SA, Jayawardena S, Roth T. A randomized, double-blind, single-dose, placebo-controlled, multicenter, polysomnographic study of gabapentin in transient

  7. Polysomnographic assessment of spells in sleep: nocturnal seizures versus parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Dyken, M E; Yamada, T; Lin-Dyken, D C

    2001-12-01

    A dilemma can arise when attempting to distinguish a nocturnal seizure from a parasomnia because both phenomena can be characterized by a general increase in motor and autonomic activity with a transient reduction in the level of consciousness. An additional problem is that an accurate clinical diagnosis generally relies heavily on a detailed history. As sleep related disorders occur at a time when the patient is not fully cognizant, polysomnographic analysis can on occasion supplement for the intrinsic paucity of detailed history. Simultaneously, correlating the clinical and polysomnographic analysis immediately prior to, during, and following an event of interest, can be helpful in differentiating nocturnal seizures from parasomnias.

  8. Sleep disorders in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease): a controlled polysomnographic and self-reported questionnaires study.

    PubMed

    Romigi, Andrea; Liguori, Claudio; Placidi, Fabio; Albanese, Maria; Izzi, Francesca; Uasone, Elisabetta; Terracciano, Chiara; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Ludovisi, Raffaella; Massa, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    No data are available regarding the occurrence of sleep disorders in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). We investigated the sleep-wake cycle in SBMA patients compared with healthy subjects. Nine SBMA outpatients and nine age-matched and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated. Subjective quality of sleep was assessed by means of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The Epworth Sleepiness Scale was used in order to evaluate excessive daytime sleepiness. All participants underwent a 48-h polysomnography followed by the multiple sleep latency test. Time in bed, total sleep time and sleep efficiency were significantly lower in SBMA than controls. Furthermore, the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was significantly higher in SBMA than controls. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA: AHI >5/h) was evident in 6/9 patients (66.6 %). REM sleep without atonia was evident in three patients also affected by OSA and higher AHI in REM; 2/9 (22.2 %) SBMA patients showed periodic limb movements in sleep. The global PSQI score was higher in SBMA versus controls. Sleep quality in SBMA is poorer than in controls. OSA is the most common sleep disorder in SBMA. The sleep impairment could be induced both by OSA or/and the neurodegenerative processes involving crucial areas regulating the sleep-wake cycle.

  9. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter, 28-Day, Polysomnographic Study of Gabapentin in Transient Insomnia Induced by Sleep Phase Advance

    PubMed Central

    Furey, Sandy A.; Hull, Steven G.; Leibowitz, Mark T.; Jayawardena, Shyamalie; Roth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: To evaluate multiple doses of gabapentin 250 mg on polysomnography (PSG) and participant-reported sleep assessments in a 5-h phase advance insomnia model. Methods: Adults reporting occasional disturbed sleep received gabapentin 250 mg (n = 128) or placebo (n = 128). On Days 1 and 28, participants received medication 30 min before bedtime and were in bed from 17:00 to 01:00, ∼5 h before their habitual bedtime. Sleep was assessed by PSG, a post sleep questionnaire, and the Karolinska Sleep Diary. Next-day residual effects and tolerability were evaluated. On Days 2-27, participants took medication at home 30 min before their habitual bedtime. Results: Treatment-group demographics were comparable. Gabapentin resulted in significantly less PSG wake after sleep onset (WASO) compared with placebo on Day 1 (primary endpoint, mean: 107.0 versus 149.1 min, p ≤ 0.001) and Day 28 (113.6 versus 152.3 min, p = 0.002), and significantly greater total sleep time (TST; Day 1: 347.6 versus 283.9 min; Day 28: 335.3 versus 289.1 min) (p ≤ 0.001). Participant-reported WASO and TST also showed significant treatment effects on both days. Gabapentin was associated with less %stage1 on Day 1, and greater %REM on Day 28, versus placebo. During home use, gabapentin resulted in significantly less participant-reported WASO and higher ratings of sleep quality. Gabapentin was well tolerated (most common adverse events: headache, somnolence) with no evidence of next-day impairment. Conclusion: Gabapentin 250 mg resulted in greater PSG and participant-reported sleep duration following a 5-h phase advance on Day 1 and Day 28 of use without evidence of next-day impairment, and greater sleep duration during at-home use. Citation: Furey SA, Hull SG, Leibowitz MT, Jayawardena S, Roth T. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, 28-day, polysomnographic study of gabapentin in transient insomnia induced by sleep phase advance. J Clin Sleep Med 2014

  10. Polysomnographic analysis of bruxism.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Marilene de Oliveira; Rodriguez, Antonio Gomez

    2014-01-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) defines sleep bruxism as a stereotyped movement disorder characterized by clenching and grinding of the teeth during sleep. Bruxism is found in 14%-20% of children, 8% of adults <60 years old, and 3% of adults >60 years old. The mandibular movements of bruxism can be confused with rhythmic mandibular movements associated with other sleep disorders, such as arousals/microarousals, limb movement disorder, and obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. Polysomnography (PSG) is the study of sleep disorders based on the recording of physiological events throughout an entire night of sleep. This system involves electroencephalography, electrooculography, and electromyography of the submental/suprahyoid, tibialis anterior, mentalis, masseter, and temporal muscles, through which signs of sleep bruxism can be identified. The aim of the present study was to identify bruxism during a night of sleep in a laboratory. Thirty patients were analyzed clinically and underwent PSG. The descriptive analysis correlated apnea, arousals, and limb movements in the 12 patients who exhibited signs and symptoms of sleep bruxism. Of these patients, 4 were confirmed through PSG to have bruxism. In a comparison between the 4 patients with confirmed bruxism (PSGB group) and the 8 patients confirmed not to have bruxism (NPSGB group), the respiratory event index was lower in the PSGB group (13.17 and 17.95, respectively). The mean leg movement index was higher in the PSGB group than the NPSGB group in total sleep time (21.36 and 8.42, respectively) and in rapid eye movement sleep time (34.54 and 10.30, respectively).

  11. A randomized clinical trial of valerian fails to improve self-reported, polysomnographic, and actigraphic sleep in older women with insomnia.

    PubMed

    Taibi, Diana M; Vitiello, Michael V; Barsness, Suzanne; Elmer, Gary W; Anderson, Gail D; Landis, Carol A

    2009-03-01

    To test the effects of nightly valerian (Valeriana officinalis) extract to improve sleep of older women with insomnia. Participants in this phase 2 randomized, double-blind, crossover controlled trial were 16 older women (mean age=69.4+/-8.1 years) with insomnia. Participants took 300 mg of concentrated valerian extract or placebo 30 min before bedtime for 2 weeks. Sleep was assessed in the laboratory by self-report and polysomnography (PSG) at baseline and again at the beginning and end of each treatment phase (total of nine nights in the laboratory) and at home by daily sleep logs and actigraphy. There were no statistically significant differences between valerian and placebo after a single dose or after 2 weeks of nightly dosing on any measure of sleep latency, wake after sleep onset (WASO), sleep efficiency, and self-rated sleep quality. In comparing each treatment to baseline in separate comparisons, WASO significantly increased (+17.7+/-25.6 min, p=.02) after 2 weeks of nightly valerian, but not after placebo (+6.8+/-26.4 min, NS). Side effects were minor and did not differ significantly between valerian and placebo. Valerian did not improve sleep in this sample of older women with insomnia. Findings from this study add to the scientific evidence that does not support use of valerian in the clinical management of insomnia.

  12. A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL OF VALERIAN FAILS TO IMPROVE SELF-REPORT, POLYSOMNOGRAPHIC, AND ACTIGRAPHIC SLEEP IN OLDER WOMEN WITH INSOMNIA

    PubMed Central

    Taibi, Diana M.; Vitiello, Michael V.; Barsness, Suzanne; Elmer, Gary W.; Anderson, Gail D.; Landis, Carol A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the effects of nightly valerian (Valeriana officinalis) extract to improve sleep of older women with insomnia. Methods Participants in this phase 2 randomized, double-blind, cross-over controlled trial were 16 older women (mean age = 69.4 ± 8.1 years) with insomnia. Participants took 300 mg of concentrated valerian extract or placebo 30 minutes before bedtime for two weeks. Sleep was assessed in the laboratory by self-report and polysomnography (PSG) at baseline and again at the beginning and end of each treatment phase (total of 9 nights in the laboratory) and at home by daily sleep logs and actigraphy. Results There were no statistically significant differences between valerian and placebo after a single dose or after two weeks of nightly dosing on any measure of sleep latency, wake after sleep onset (WASO), sleep efficiency, and self-rated sleep quality. In comparing each treatment to baseline in separate comparisons, WASO significantly increased (+17.7 ± 25.6 min, p=.02) after two weeks of nightly valerian, but not after placebo (+6.8 ± 26.4 min, NS). Side effects were minor and did not differ significantly between valerian and placebo. Conclusion Valerian did not improve sleep in this sample of older women with insomnia. Findings from this study add to the scientific evidence that does not support use of valerian in the clinical management of insomnia. PMID:18482867

  13. Exploratory Polysomnographic Evaluation of Pregabalin on Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, Sanne; Otte, Andreas; de Weerd, Al; van Erp, Gerard; Cohen, Adam; van Gerven, Joop

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effects of adjunctive pregabalin 300 mg/day versus placebo on polysomnographic (PSG) variables in patients with well controlled partial seizures and subjectively reported sleep disturbance. Methods: An exploratory, 4-week, double-blind, randomized study in patients with well controlled partial seizures on AED monotherapy and subjective sleep disturbance over the previous 6 months. Mean changes from baseline to endpoint in PSG and subjective sleep variables (MOS Sleep Scale, Groningen Sleep Questionnaire) in patients on adjunctive pregabalin 300 mg/day (n=8) were compared with patients on placebo (n=7). Results: Baseline PSGs showed sleep fragmentation. Mean sleep efficiency improved significantly in both treatment groups in the mean baseline to endpoint change; there was no significant between-group difference. Pregabalin treatment was associated with a significant reduction in number of awakenings (p = 0.02), and improvement in wake time after sleep onset approached significance (p = 0.055), suggesting improvement in sleep continuity that was not observed in the placebo group. Pregabalin was also associated with significant improvements in the MOS sleep disturbance and sleep quantity subscales compared with placebo (p ≤0.03). There were no changes in self-reported seizure control. Conclusions: This exploratory pilot study suggests that pregabalin may improve sleep continuity in patients with clinically relevant sleep disturbance. The effect on disturbed sleep appears independent of seizure control. The effects of pregabalin on disturbed sleep and seizures and their interrelationships warrant further study. Citation: de Haas S; Otte A; de Weerd A; van Erp G; Cohen A; van Gerven J. Exploratory polysomnographic evaluation of pregabalin on sleep disturbance in patients with epilepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(5):473-478. PMID:17803010

  14. Polysomnographic and Subjective Sleep Markers of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hita-Yañez, Eva; Atienza, Mercedes; Cantero, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Growing evidence suggests that sleep disturbances precede by years the clinical onset of Alzheimer disease (AD). The goal of the current study is to determine whether changes in polysomnographic (PSG) sleep patterns accompany subjective sleep complaints in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We further examine whether meaningful changes in objective sleep physiology are predicted by self-reported sleep measures in MCI patients, and whether incipient neurodegeneration contributes to exacerbate sleep misperception. Design, Setting, and Participants: Overnight PSG recordings and self-reported sleep measures were obtained from 25 healthy elderly (HE) subjects and 25 patients with MCI at the sleep laboratory. Results: Both PSG and self-reported sleep measures confirmed that sleep is altered in patients with MCI. Whereas subjective sleep responses predicted fragmentation of slow wave sleep (SWS) in HE individuals, this relationship was not evident in MCI patients. Furthermore, patients with MCI showed significant discrepancies in the estimation of sleep onset latency when compared with HE subjects. Conclusions: Sleep is significantly impaired in patients with mild cognitive impairment at both the objective and subjective level, which may be used as a surrogate marker of preclinical Alzheimer disease. Taken together, these findings aid in the development of novel therapeutic strategies devoted to improve sleep in the elderly population at risk of developing Alzheimer disease. Citation: Hita-Yañez E; Atienza M; Cantero JL. Polysomnographic and subjective sleep markers of mild cognitive impairment. SLEEP 2013;36(9):1327-1334. PMID:23997365

  15. Polysomnographic record and successful management of augmentation in restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Michelangelo; Fulda, Stephany; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Zucconi, Marco; Marelli, Sara; Staedler, Claudio; Bassetti, Claudio L; Manconi, Mauro

    2014-05-01

    Dopamine agonists (DAs) represent the first-line treatment in restless legs syndrome (RLS); however, in the long term, a substantial proportion of patients will develop augmentation, which is a severe drug-related exacerbation of symptoms and the main reason for late DA withdrawal. Polysomnographic features and mechanisms underlining augmentation are unknown. No practice guidelines for management of augmentation are available. A clinical case series of 24 consecutive outpatients affected by RLS with clinically significant augmentation during treatment with immediate-release DA was performed. All patients underwent a full-night polysomnographic recording during augmentation. A switchover from immediate-release DAs (l-dopa, pramipexole, ropinirole, rotigotine) to the long-acting, extended-release formula of pramipexole was performed. Fifty percent of patients presented more than 15 periodic limb movements per hour of sleep during augmentation, showing longer sleep latency and shorter total sleep time than subjects without periodic limb movements. In all patients, resolution of augmentation was observed within two to four weeks during which immediate-release dopamine agonists could be completely withdrawn. Treatment efficacy of extended-release pramipexole has persisted, thus far, over a mean follow-up interval of 13 months. Pramipexole extended release could be an easy, safe, and fast pharmacological option to treat augmentation in patients with restless legs syndrome. As such it warrants further prospective and controlled investigations. This observation supports the hypothesis that the duration of action of the drug plays a key role in the mechanism of augmentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. PSGMiner: A modular software for polysomnographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Umut, İlhan

    2016-06-01

    Sleep disorders affect a great percentage of the population. The diagnosis of these disorders is usually made by polysomnography. This paper details the development of new software to carry out feature extraction in order to perform robust analysis and classification of sleep events using polysomnographic data. The software, called PSGMiner, is a tool, which visualizes, processes and classifies bioelectrical data. The purpose of this program is to provide researchers with a platform with which to test new hypotheses by creating tests to check for correlations that are not available in commercially available software. The software is freely available under the GPL3 License. PSGMiner is composed of a number of diverse modules such as feature extraction, annotation, and machine learning modules, all of which are accessible from the main module. Using the software, it is possible to extract features of polysomnography using digital signal processing and statistical methods and to perform different analyses. The features can be classified through the use of five classification algorithms. PSGMiner offers an architecture designed for integrating new methods. Automatic scoring, which is available in almost all commercial PSG software, is not inherently available in this program, though it can be implemented by two different methodologies (machine learning and algorithms). While similar software focuses on a certain signal or event composed of a small number of modules with no expansion possibility, the software introduced here can handle all polysomnographic signals and events. The software simplifies the processing of polysomnographic signals for researchers and physicians that are not experts in computer programming. It can find correlations between different events which could help predict an oncoming event such as sleep apnea. The software could also be used for educational purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Polysomnographic Investigation of Sleep and Respiratory Parameters in Women with Temporomandibular Pain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovsky, Boris; Raphael, Karen G.; Lavigne, Gilles J.; Janal, Malvin N.; Sirois, David A.; Wigren, Pia E.; Nemelivsky, Lena V.; Klausner, Jack J.; Krieger, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Temporomandibular pain disorders (TMD) and myofascial pain were linked to increased prevalence of insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on clinical grounds. However, the literature lacks an accurate polysomnographic (PSG) characterization of sleep abnormalities associated with TMD, given that prior studies included small or uncontrolled samples of TMD patients. The present investigation aims to objectively evaluate measures of sleep and respiratory disturbance in a large representative sample of TMD cases in comparison with matched controls. Methods: Sleep, respiration, and limb movements were measured using a 2-night attended PSG protocol in 170 women—124 TMD cases with myofascial pain and 46 demographically matched controls. The second night data were compared between the groups using ANCOVAs. In TMD cases, the relationship between pain ratings and sleep parameters was analyzed using multiple regressions. Results: In comparison to healthy controls, TMD cased evidenced a significant increase in stage N1 sleep (12.2% ± 7.6% vs. 9.2% ± 5.0%, p = 0.03), which was only mild relative to normative values. TMD cases also demonstrated mild but significant elevations in arousals associated with all types of respiratory events (6.0/h ± 6.1 vs. 3.5/h ± 3.3 p = 0.02) and in respiratory effort related arousals (RERAs, 4.3/h ± 4.3 vs. 2.6/h ± 2.7, p = 0.02). Myofascial pain predicted a lower sleep efficiency (p = 0.01), more frequent awakenings (p = 0.04), and higher RERA index (p = 0.04) among TMD cases. Conclusions: Myofascial pain in TMD is associated with mild elevation in sleep fragmentation and increased frequency of RERA events. Further research is required to evaluate the clinical significance of these findings. Citation: Dubrovsky B; Raphael KG; Lavigne GJ; Janal MN; Sirois DA; Wigren PE; Nemelivsky LV; Klausner JJ; Krieger AC. Polysomnographic investigation of sleep and respiratory parameters in women with temporomandibular pain

  18. Sleep changes in the disorder of insomnia: a meta-analysis of polysomnographic studies.

    PubMed

    Baglioni, Chiara; Regen, Wolfram; Teghen, Armand; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Feige, Bernd; Nissen, Christoph; Riemann, Dieter

    2014-06-01

    Insomnia is a highly prevalent health problem worldwide. Primary insomnia (PI), i.e., insomnia not due to another disorder or substance use, represents a model to elucidate the pathophysiology of sleep. However, prior research in patients with PI has failed to demonstrate consistent abnormalities in the state-of-the-art assessment of sleep (polysomnography). The aim of this meta-analysis was to clarify whether there are identifiable polysomnographic sleep changes that correspond to the subjective complaints of patients with PI. Medline and PsycInfo databases were searched from 1994 to 2012. Effects were calculated as standardized mean differences. Studies were pooled with the random-effects metaanalytic model. Twenty-three studies met inclusion criteria. In total, 582 patients with PI and 485 good sleeper controls (GSC) were evaluated. The results showed that patients with PI present a disruption of sleep continuity and a significant reduction of slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep compared to GSC. The observed changes in sleep architecture, i.e., reductions in SWS and REM sleep, hitherto did not count among the typical polysomnographic findings in patients with PI. An advanced knowledge of the polysomnographic changes in PI may add to foster the understanding of the pathophysiology of sleep and its bi-directional relationships with somatic and mental disorders.

  19. Effects of Botulinum Toxin on Jaw Motor Events during Sleep in Sleep Bruxism Patients: A Polysomnographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Young Joo; Lee, Moon Kyu; Kato, Takafumi; Park, Hyung Uk; Heo, Kyoung; Kim, Seong Taek

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection on jaw motor episodes during sleep in patients with or without orofacial pain who did not respond to oral splint treatment. Methods: Twenty subjects with a clinical diagnosis of SB completed this study. Ten subjects received bilateral BoNT-A injections (25 U per muscle) into the masseter muscles only (group A), and the other 10 received the injections into both the masseter and temporalis muscles (group B). Video-polysomnographic (vPSG) recordings were made before and at 4 weeks after injection. Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) and orofacial activity (OFA) were scored and analyzed for several parameters (e.g., frequency of episodes, bursts per episode, episode duration). The peak amplitude of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the two muscles was also measured. Results: BoNT-A injection did not reduce the frequency, number of bursts, or duration for RMMA episodes in the two groups. The injection decreased the peak amplitude of EMG burst of RMMA episodes in the injected muscles (p < 0.001, repeated measure ANOVA) in both groups. At 4 weeks after injection, 9 subjects self-reported reduction of tooth grinding and 18 subjects self-reported reduction of morning jaw stiffness. Conclusions: A single BoNT-A injection is an effective strategy for controlling SB for at least a month. It reduces the intensity rather than the generation of the contraction in jaw-closing muscles. Future investigations on the efficacy and safety in larger samples over a longer follow-up period are needed before establishing management strategies for SB with BoNT-A. Citation: Shim YJ; Lee MK; Kato T; Park HU; Heo K; Kim ST. Effects of botulinum toxin on jaw motor events during sleep in sleep bruxism patients: a polysomnographic evaluation. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(3):291-298. PMID:24634627

  20. Envelope Analysis of the Airflow Signal To Improve Polysomnographic Assessment of Sleep Disordered Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Javier A.; Arancibia, José M.; Bassi, Alejandro; Vivaldi, Ennio A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Given the detailed respiratory waveform signal provided by the nasal cannula in polysomnographic (PSG) studies, to quantify sleep breathing disturbances by extracting a continuous variable based on the coefficient of variation of the envelope of that signal. Design: Application of an algorithm for envelope analysis to standard nasal cannula signal from actual polysomnographic studies. Setting: PSG recordings from a sleep disorders center were analyzed by an algorithm developed on the Igor scientific data analysis software. Patients or Participants: Recordings representative of different degrees of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) severity or illustrative of the covariation between breathing and particularly relevant factors and variables. Interventions: The method calculated the coefficient of variation of the envelope for each 30-second epoch. The normalized version of that coefficient was defined as the respiratory disturbance variable (RDV). The method outcome was the all-night set of RDV values represented as a time series. Measurements and Results: RDV quantitatively reflected departure from normal sinusoidal breathing at each epoch, providing an intensity scale for disordered breathing. RDV dynamics configured itself in recognizable patterns for the airflow limitation (e.g., in UARS) and the apnea/hypopnea regimes. RDV reliably highlighted clinically meaningful associations with staging, body position, oximetry, or CPAP titration. Conclusions: Respiratory disturbance variable can assess sleep breathing disturbances as a gradual phenomenon while providing a comprehensible and detailed representation of its dynamics. It may thus improve clinical diagnosis and provide a revealing descriptive tool for mechanistic sleep disordered breathing modeling. Respiratory disturbance variable may contribute to attaining simplified screening methodologies, novel diagnostic criteria, and insightful research tools. Citation: Díaz JA; Arancibia JM; Bassi A

  1. A simple and robust method for the automatic scoring of EEG arousals in polysomnographic recordings.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Varela, Isaac; Alvarez-Estevez, Diego; Hernández-Pereira, Elena; Moret-Bonillo, Vicente

    2017-08-01

    Clinical diagnosis of sleep disorders relies on the polysomnographic test to examine the neurophysiological markers of the sleep process. In this test, the recording of the electroencephalographic activity and the submental electromyogram is the source of the analysis for the detection of electroencephalographic arousals. The identification of these events is important for the evaluation of the sleep continuity because they cause the fragmentation of the normal sleep process. This work proposes a new technique for the automatic detection of arousals in polysomnographic recordings, presenting a non-computationally complex method with the idea of providing an easy integration with other algorithms. The proposed algorithm combines different well-known signal analysis solutions to identify relevant arousal patterns with special emphasis on robustness and artifacts tolerance. It is a multistage method that after obtaining an initial set of events, improves the detection finding common EEG arousal patterns. Finally, false positives are discarded after examining each candidate within the context of clinical definitions. 22 polysomnographic recordings from real patients were used to validate the method. The results obtained were encouraging, achieving a precision value of 0.86 and a F1 score value of 0.79. When compared with the gold standard, the method achieves a substantial agreement (Kappa coefficient of 0.78), with an almost perfect agreement with ten recordings. The algorithm designed achieved encouraging results and shows robust behavior in presence of signal artifacts. Its low-coupled design allows its implementation on different development platforms, and an easy combination with other methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sensitivity and Specificity of Polysomnographic Criteria for Defining Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Jack D.; Ulmer, Christi S.; Means, Melanie K.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: In recent years, polysomnography-based eligibility criteria have been increasingly used to identify candidates for insomnia research, and this has been particularly true of studies evaluating pharmacologic therapy for primary insomnia. However, the sensitivity and specificity of PSG for identifying individuals with insomnia is unknown, and there is no consensus on the criteria sets which should be used for participant selection. In the current study, an archival data set was used to test the sensitivity and specificity of PSG measures for identifying individuals with primary insomnia in both home and lab settings. We then evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the eligibility criteria employed in a number of recent insomnia trials for identifying primary insomnia sufferers in our sample. Design: Archival data analysis. Settings: Study participants' homes and a clinical sleep laboratory. Participants: Adults: 76 with primary insomnia and 78 non-complaining normal sleepers. Measurements and Results: ROC and cross-tabs analyses were used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of PSG-derived total sleep time, latency to persistent sleep, wake after sleep onset, and sleep efficiency for discriminating adults with primary insomnia from normal sleepers. None of the individual criteria accurately discriminated PI from normal sleepers, and none of the criteria sets used in recent trials demonstrated acceptable sensitivity and specificity for identifying primary insomnia. Conclusions: The use of quantitative PSG-based selection criteria in insomnia research may exclude many who meet current diagnostic criteria for an insomnia disorder. Citation: Edinger JD; Ulmer CS; Means MK. Sensitivity and specificity of polysomnographic criteria for defining insomnia. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(5):481-491. PMID:23674940

  3. Motor events during healthy sleep: a quantitative polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Frauscher, Birgit; Gabelia, David; Mitterling, Thomas; Biermayr, Marlene; Bregler, Deborah; Ehrmann, Laura; Ulmer, Hanno; Högl, Birgit

    2014-04-01

    Many sleep disorders are characterized by increased motor activity during sleep. In contrast, studies on motor activity during physiological sleep are largely lacking. We quantitatively investigated a large range of motor phenomena during polysomnography in physiological sleep. Prospective polysomnographic investigation. Academic referral sleep laboratory. One hundred healthy sleepers age 19-77 y were strictly selected from a representative population sample by a two-step screening procedure. N/A. Polysomnography according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) standards was performed, and quantitative normative values were established for periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS), high frequency leg movements (HFLM), fragmentary myoclonus (FM), neck myoclonus (NM), and rapid eye movement (REM)-related electromyographic (EMG) activity. Thirty-six subjects had a PLMS index > 5/h, 18 had a PLMS index > 15/h (90th percentile: 24.8/h). Thirty-three subjects had HFLM (90th percentile: four sequences/night). All subjects had FM (90th percentile 143.7/h sleep). Nine subjects fulfilled AASM criteria for excessive FM. Thirty-five subjects had NM (90th percentile: 8.8/h REM sleep). For REM sleep, different EMG activity measures for the mentalis and flexor digitorum superficialis muscles were calculated: the 90th percentile for phasic mentalis EMG activity for 30-sec epochs according to AASM recommendation was 15.6%, and for tonic mentalis EMG activity 2.6%. Twenty-five subjects exceeded the recently proposed phasic mentalis cutoff of 11%. None of the subjects exceeded the tonic mentalis cutoff of 9.6%. Quantification of motor phenomena is a basic prerequisite to develop normative values, and is a first step toward a more precise description of the various motor phenomena present during sleep. Because rates of motor events were unexpectedly high even in physiological sleep, the future use of normative values for both research and clinical routine is essential.

  4. Association of body rolling, leg rolling, and rhythmic feet movements in a young adult: A video-polysomnographic study performed before and after one night of clonazepam.

    PubMed

    Merlino, Giovanni; Serafini, Anna; Dolso, Pierluigi; Canesin, Roberto; Valente, Mariarosaria; Gigli, Gian Luigi

    2008-03-15

    We report clinical and polysomnographic data of a young adult affected by several forms of rhythmic movement disorder (RMD), present in the same night, including a new kind of it, known as rhythmic feet movements. The patient was monitored by means of three consecutive video-polysomnographic recordings, the first two performed to confirm the presence of the sleep disorder and the last one to observe the acute effectiveness of clonazepam on rhythmic movements. We discuss the characteristics of the RMD and the response to the first administration of pharmacological treatment, observed in our patient. (c) 2007 Movement Disorder Society.

  5. Analysis of video-polysomnographic sleep findings in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Terzaghi, Michele; Arnaldi, Dario; Rizzetti, Maria Cristina; Minafra, Brigida; Cremascoli, Riccardo; Rustioni, Valter; Zangaglia, Roberta; Pasotti, Chiara; Sinforiani, Elena; Pacchetti, Claudio; Manni, Raffaele

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of sleep architecture and disorders of nocturnal sleep in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is limited by a lack of systematic video-polysomnographic (video-PSG) investigations. We describe video-PSG findings in 29 consecutive subjects diagnosed with DLB. All the patients underwent a clinical interview and overnight video-PSG monitoring. Twenty-nine nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) matched for age and sex with the DLB cases were selected for comparison. The DLB subjects showed less 1NREM sleep (P = .000) and more 2NREM sleep (P = .000) than the PD subjects. Sleep apnea (30.7% vs. 34.8%) and periodic limb movements (60.9% versus 50.0%) were frequent in both groups. Disruptive motor behavioral manifestations were more frequent in subjects with DLB (69.6% vs. 26.9%, P = .008) and consisted of not only REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) but also confusional events (30.3% vs. 3.8%, P = .020) and arousal-related episodes mimicking RBD. Subjects with DLB in whom a sleep disturbance had been the presenting symptom performed better than those with other onset symptoms on both the Mini-Mental State Examination (22.2 ± 4.1 vs. 18.1 ± 4.6, P = .019) and the Frontal Assessment Battery (15.8 vs. 10.3, P = .010). Polysomnographic findings in DLB show a complex mix of overlapping sleep alterations: impaired sleep structure, sleep comorbidities, and various motor-behavioral events (not restricted to RBD). Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of misleading symptoms and of the risk of overlooking sleep comorbidities, and consider performing polysomnographic sleep investigations in selected cases. We found evidence that a sleep disturbance as the presenting symptom might indicate a different phenotype of the disease, characterized by milder cognitive impairment.

  6. Polysomnographic and long-term video electroencephalographic evaluation of cases presenting with parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Yiş, Uluç; Kurul, Semra Hiz; Öztura, Ibrahim; Ecevit, Mustafa Cenk; Dirik, Eray

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical, electroencephalographic and polysomnographic features of patients presenting with parasomnias. Cases who were admitted for differentiating parasomnias from epilepsy were included in the study. Clinical features of cases were recorded and routine sleep electroencephalography was obtained from all cases. Cases whose symptoms strongly suggested nocturnal seizure underwent all night video electroencephalography monitoring. Polysomnography was obtained to evaluate the quality of breathing from patients whose symptoms suggested obstructive sleep apnea. Twenty-three patients with no neurological disorder were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 11.7 ± 2.8 [7-17] years. Twelve patients (52 %) presented with sleep terrors and 11 patients (48 %) presented with sleep walking. All of the patients underwent a routine sleep electroencephalographic study and 15 patients (65 %) whose symptoms strongly suggested nocturnal epilepsy underwent long-term video electroencephalographic evaluation. Ten patients (43 %) underwent polysomnographic study. Three patients (20 %) who underwent long-term video electroencephalographic evaluation were diagnosed to have nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy and two patients (20 %) who underwent polysomnography had pathological sleep apnea. Eleven patients (48 %) had a psychiatric disorder like major depression, anxiety disorder, hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Childhood cases presenting with parasomnias should be searched for nocturnal epileptic disorders, sleep disordered breathing and psychiatric disorders.

  7. Polysomnographic findings are associated with cephalometric measurements in mouth-breathing children.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Maria Ligia; Machado, Marco Antonio Cardoso; de Carvalho, Luciane Bizari Coin; Zancanella, Edilson; Santos, Gianni Mara Silva; do Prado, Lucila Bizari Fernandes; do Prado, Gilmar Fernandes

    2009-12-15

    Children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy and those with an abnormal craniofacial morphology are predisposed to having sleep disordered breathing; many of these children are mouth breathers. The aim of this study was to determine whether an association exists between polysomnographic findings and cephalometric measures in mouth-breathing children. Twenty-seven children (15 mouth-breathing children and 12 nose-breathing children [control subjects]), aged 7 to 14 years, took part in the study. Polysomnographic variables included sleep efficiency, sleep latency, apnea-hypopnea index, oxygen saturation, arousal index, number of periodic limb movements in sleep, and snoring. Cephalometric measures included maxilla and mandible position, occlusal and mandibular plane inclination, incisor position, pharyngeal airway space width, and hyoid bone position. As compared with nose-breathing children, mouth breathers were more likely to snore (p < 0.001) and to have an apnea-hypopnea index greater than 1 (p = 0.02). Mouth-breathing children were also more likely to have a retruded mandible, more inclined occlusal and mandibular planes, a smaller airway space, and a smaller superior pharyngeal airway space (p < 0.01). The apnea-hypopnea index increased as the posterior airway space decreased (p = 0.05). Our study showed an association between polysomnographic data and cephalometric measures in mouth-breathing children. Snoring was the most important variable associated with abnormal craniofacial morphology. Orthodontists should send any mouth-breathing child for an evaluation of sleep if they find that the child has a small superior pharyngeal airway space or an increased ANB (the relationship between the maxilla and mandible), NS.PIO (occlusal plane inclination in relationship to the skull base), or NS.GoGn (the mandibular plane inclination in relation to the skull base), indicating that the child has a steeper mandibular plane.

  8. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Improves Polysomnographic and Subjective Sleep Profiles in Antidepressant Users with Sleep Complaints

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Willoughby B.; Haynes, Patricia L.; Fridel, Keith W.; Bootzin, Richard R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many antidepressant medications (ADM) are associated with disruptions in sleep continuity that can compromise medication adherence and impede successful treatment. The present study investigated whether mindfulness meditation training could improve self-reported and objectively-measured polysomnographic sleep profiles in depressed individuals who had achieved at least partial remission with ADM, but still had residual sleep complaints. Methods Twenty-three ADM users with sleep complaints were randomized into an 8-week Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) course or a waitlist control condition. Pre-post measurements included polysomnographic sleep studies and subjectively reported sleep and residual depression symptoms. Results Compared to controls, the MBCT participants improved on both polysomnographic and subjective measures of sleep. They showed a pattern of decreased wake time and increased sleep efficiency. Sleep depth, as measured by stage 1 and SWS, did not change as a result of mindfulness training. Conclusions Mindfulness meditation is associated with increases in both objectively and subjectively-measured sleep continuity in ADM users. MM training may serve as more desirable and cost-effective alternative to discontinuation or supplementation with hypnotics, and may contribute to a more sustainable recovery from depression. PMID:22832540

  9. Polysomnographic predictors of persistent continuous positive airway pressure adherence in patients with moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Fu; Hang, Liang-Wen; Huang, Chun-Sen; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Chung, Wei-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Extensive use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has positive clinical benefits for most patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, patient adherence is a major limiting factor to the effectiveness of CPAP treatment. This study determined the potential and quantifiable factors affecting the willingness of patients with OSA to undertake CPAP treatment by comparing the polysomnographic parameters recorded during diagnosis and titration. Patients with moderate and severe OSA who attended diagnostic polysomnography (PSG) and CPAP titration at the sleep center of China Medical University Hospital (CMUH) were included in the study. A total of 312 patients were divided into persistent users and nonusers of CPAP according to their use of in-home CPAP following titration and a 7-day CPAP trial. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to define the potential polysomnographic predictors of persistent CPAP adherence, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Most patients were men older than 50 years who were overweight or obese. Among the patients, 146 (46.8%) became persistent CPAP users. A 10% improvement of oxygen desaturation index (ODI) and a 10% increment in deep sleep percentage increased the chance of persistent CPAP use 1.18-fold and 1.07-fold, respectively. In addition, the improved ODI and deep sleep during CPAP titration increased the chance of persistent CPAP user. The polysomnographic parameters obtained from diagnosis and during titration can facilitate the prediction of persistent CPAP use. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  10. Prevalence and Polysomnographic Correlates of Insomnia Comorbid with Medical Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Roth, Thomas; Hudgel, David W.; Budhiraja, Pooja; Drake, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the prevalence and polysomnographic correlates of insomnia in subjects with self-reported medical disorders. Design: Prospective cross-sectional study. Participants: Community-based sample of 3282 men and women aged 18 to 65 years old, with a subset who underwent polysomnography. Measurements: Self-reported measures of sleep habits and current health, and polysomnographic sleep variables. Results: The prevalence of insomnia was 21.4%. The adjusted odds of insomnia were 2.2 times as high in persons with any medical disorders as in those without medical disorders. Specifically, odds of insomnia were higher in people with heart disease (OR = 1.6 [95% CI: 1.2-23], P = 0.004), hypertension (1.5 [12-18], P < 0.001), diabetes (1.4 [105-20], P = 0.04), stomach ulcers (2.1 [1.6-2.7], P < 0.001), arthritis (1.8 [1.5-2.2], P < 0.001), migraine (1.8 [1.5-2.1], P < 0.001), asthma (1.6 [1.3-2.0], P = 0.04), COPD (1.9 [1.5-2.5], P < 0.001), neurological problems (2.0 [1.5-2.7], P < 0.001), and menstrual problems (1.7 [1.3-2.1], P < 0.001) than in people without these disorders. Prevalence of insomnia increased with increasing number of medical disorders. However, polysomnographic sleep was not significantly different in persons with or without medical disorders for most disorders assessed. Conclusion: This large population-based study suggests that insomnia is highly prevalent in diverse chronic medical disorders. However, polysomnographic evidence of disturbed sleep is present in only a subset of comorbid insomnia populations. Citation: Budhiraja R; Roth T; Hudgel DW; Budhiraja P; Drake CL. Prevalence and polysomnographic correlates of insomnia comorbid with medical disorders. SLEEP 2011;34(7):859-867. PMID:21731135

  11. Polysomnographically determined sleep and body mass index in patients with insomnia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lili; Zhou, Junying; Sun, Yuanfeng; Li, Zhe; Lei, Fei; Zhou, Guangyao; Tang, Xiangdong

    2013-10-30

    We assessed associations between polysomnographically determined sleep, especially the amount of slow-wave sleep (SWS), and body mass index (BMI) in patients with insomnia. One hundred and forty-one insomniacs and 55 healthy volunteers completed overnight polysomnographic recordings, and we measured height and body weight. No significant correlations were obtained between total sleep time and BMI among insomniacs. Compared with normal volunteers, insomnia patients exhibited longer sleep latency and shorter total sleep duration. While the two groups had no significant differences in BMI, insomniacs presented with more N1 but less time spend in SWS and rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Based on their SWS time, we divided insomnia patients into three groups: short (26.99±13.88), intermediate (59.24±8.12), and long (102.21±26.17) SWS groups. The short-SWS group had significantly greater BMI than the long-SWS group. Further analyses with multiple linear regression showed a significant negative correlation between the amount of SWS and BMI scores in insomniacs, whereas no such correlation was found in healthy volunteers after controlling for potential confounds (e.g., age, sex and AHI). Our study suggests that low amounts of SWS may be associated with higher BMI in patients with insomnia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Polysomnographic Findings in a Cohort of Chronic Insomnia Patients with Benzodiazepine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Marianna; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Marano, Giuseppe; Di Nicola, Marco; Dittoni, Serena; Gnoni, Valentina; Di Blasi, Chiara; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Bria, Pietro; Janiri, Luigi; Mazza, Salvatore; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate sleep modifications induced by chronic benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse. Methods: Cohort study, comparison of sleep measures between BDZs abusers and controls. Drug Addiction Unit (Institute of Psychiatry) and Unit of Sleep Disorders (Institute of Neurology) of the Catholic University in Rome. Six outpatients affected by chronic BDZ abuse were enrolled, (4 men, 2 women, mean age 53.3 ± 14.8, range: 34-70 years); 55 healthy controls were also enrolled (23 men, 32 women, mean age 54.2 ± 13.0, range: 27-76 years). All patients underwent clinical evaluation, psychometric measures, ambulatory polysomnography, scoring of sleep macrostructure and microstructure (power spectral fast-frequency EEG arousal, cyclic alternating pattern [CAP]), and heart rate variability. Results: BDZ abusers had relevant modification of sleep macrostructure and a marked reduction of fast-frequency EEG arousal in NREM (patients: 6.6 ± 3.7 events/h, controls 13.7 ± 4.9 events/h, U-test: 294, p = 0.002) and REM (patients: 8.4 ± 2.4 events/h, controls 13.3 ± 5.1 events/h, U-test: 264, p = 0.016), and of CAP rate (patients: 15.0 ± 8.6%, controls: 51.2% ± 12.1%, U-test: 325, p < 0.001). Discussion: BDZ abusers have reduction of arousals associated with increased number of nocturnal awakenings and severe impairment of sleep architecture. The effect of chronic BDZ abuse on sleep may be described as a severe impairment of arousal dynamics; the result is the inability to modulate levels of vigilance. Citation: Mazza M; Losurdo A; Testani E; Marano G; Di Nicola M; Dittoni S; Gnoni V; Di Blasi C; Giannantoni NM; Lapenta L; Brunetti V; Bria P; Janiri L; Mazza S; Della Marca G. Polysomnographic findings in a cohort of chronic insomnia patients with benzodiazepine abuse. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(1):35-42. PMID:24426818

  13. Polysomnographic Characteristics of Sleep in Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baglioni, Chiara; Nissen, Christoph; Schweinoch, Adrian; Riemann, Dieter; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Berger, Mathias; Weiller, Cornelius; Sterr, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Background Research on sleep after stroke has focused mainly on sleep disordered breathing. However, the extend to which sleep physiology is altered in stroke survivors, how these alterations compare to healthy volunteers, and how sleep changes might affect recovery as well as physical and mental health has yet to be fully researched. Motivated by the view that a deeper understanding of sleep in stroke is needed to account for its role in health and well-being as well as its relevance for recovery and rehabilitation, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of polysomnographic studies comparing stroke to control populations. Method Medline and PsycInfo databases were searched using "stroke" and words capturing polysomnographic parameters as search terms. This yielded 1692 abstracts for screening, with 15 meeting the criteria for systematic review and 9 for meta-analysis. Prisma best practice guidelines were followed for the systematic review; the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software was used for random effects modelling. Results The meta-analysis revealed that patients with stroke have poorer sleep than controls. Patients had lower sleep efficiency (mean 75% vs 84%), shorter total-sleep-time (309.4 vs 340.3 min) and more wake-after-sleep-onset (97.2 vs 53.8 min). Patients also spend more time in stage 1 (13% vs 10%) and less time in stage 2 sleep (36% vs 45%) and slow-wave-sleep (10% vs 12%). No group differences were identified for REM sleep. The systematic review revealed a strong bias towards studies in the early recovery phase of stroke, with no study reporting specifically on patients in the chronic state. Moreover, participants in the control groups included community samples as well as other patients groups. Conclusions These results indicate poorer sleep in patients with stroke than controls. While strongly suggestive in nature, the evidence base is limited and methodologically diverse, and hands a clear mandate for further research. A particular

  14. Polysomnographic Characteristics of a Referred Sample of Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Valerie E.; Lewin, Daniel S.; Winnie, Glenna B.; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To describe polysomnographic parameters and their clinical correlates in a referred sample of children with sickle cell disease (SCD). Methods: This was a retrospective medical record review of 55 consecutive children aged 2-18 years with SCD (hemoglobin [Hb] SS and Hb SC genotypes) undergoing polysomnography for evaluation of sleep disordered breathing. Polysomnography values were compared between SCD genotypes, 4 age groups, and adenotonsillectomy status using descriptive and nonparametric statistics. Results: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) was diagnosed in 38/55 (69%) children. Polysomnographic parameters differed significantly between Hb SS and Hb SC genotypes only on arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2; 95.2 ± 3.8 vs. 98.0 ± 0.8, respectively, p < 0.01) and percent of sleep time below SpO2 90% (T90; 8.0 ± 22.0 vs. 0.01 ± 0.02, respectively, p < 0.05). Increasing age was associated with decreasing SpO2 (rho = −0.282, p < 0.05), obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI; rho = −0.364, p < 0.01), total arousal index (rho = −0.272, p < 0.05) and respiratory arousal index (rho = −0.349, p < 0.01). Periodic limb movements in sleep (PLM) averaged 4.7 ± 8.8/h, with a PLM index > 5/h in 5/17 children without OSA. Post- adenotonsillectomy, 8/10 children had OSA, but compared to untreated OSA-positive children they had a lower mean OAHI (4.4 ± 5.5 vs. 8.9 ± 12.5) and a lower T90 (1.6 ± 4.2 vs. 9.2 ± 24.9). Conclusions: Both OSA and PLMs were common in children with SCD. Children with Hb SS experienced more severe nocturnal oxygen desaturation than did those with Hb SC. Post-adenotonsillectomy, most children had OSA, although they experienced fewer obstructive respiratory events and less severe nocturnal oxygen desaturation than did untreated OSA-positive children. Citation: Rogers VE; Lewin DS; Winnie GB; Geiger-Brown J. Polysomnographic characteristics of a referred sample of children with sickle cell disease. J Clin Sleep Med 2010

  15. Relationships between polysomnographic variables, parameters of glucose metabolism, and serum androgens in obese adolescents with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Gideon; Schlüter, Bernhard; Menke, Thomas; Trowitzsch, Eckardt; Andler, Werner; Reinehr, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare polysomnographic variables of obese adolescents with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) to those of healthy controls and to analyse whether polysomnographic variables correlate to parameters of body weight/body composition, to serum androgens and to parameters of glucose metabolism. Thirty-one obese adolescents with PCOS (15.0 years ± 1.0, body mass index 32.7 kg per m(2) ± 6.2) and 19 healthy obese adolescents without PCOS (15.2 years ± 1.1, body mass index 32.4 kg per m(2) ± 4.0) underwent polysomnography to compare apnoea index, hypopnoea index, apnoea-hypopnoea index, the absolute number of obstructive apnoeas, percentage sleep Stages 1, 2, 3 and 4 of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, percentage of REM sleep, TIB, total sleep time (TST), sleep-onset latency, total wake time (TWT), wakefulness after sleep onset (WASO) and sleep efficiency. Furthermore, we correlated polysomnographic variables to parameters of body weight/body composition, to serum androgens and to parameters of glucose metabolism. We found no differences between the two groups concerning the respiratory indices, percentage sleep Stages 2, 3 and 4 of NREM sleep, TIB and sleep-onset latency. The girls with PCOS differed significantly from the controls regarding TST, WASO, TWT, sleep efficiency, percentage Stage 1 of NREM sleep and percentage of REM sleep. We found a weak significant correlation between insulin resistance and apnoea index and between insulin resistance and apnoea-hypopnoea index. Concerning the respiratory variables, adolescents with PCOS do not seem to differ from healthy controls; however, there seem to be differences concerning sleep architecture.

  16. Birth Control in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J.; Beyer, B. K.; Chadwick, K.; De Schaepdrijver, L.; Desai, M.; Enright, B.; Foster, W.; Hui, J. Y.; Moffat, G. J.; Tornesi, B.; Van Malderen, K.; Wiesner, L.; Chen, C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee sponsored a pharmaceutical industry survey on current industry practices for contraception use during clinical trials. The objectives of the survey were to improve our understanding of the current industry practices for contraception requirements in clinical trials, the governance processes set up to promote consistency and/or compliance with contraception requirements, and the effectiveness of current contraception practices in preventing pregnancies during clinical trials. Opportunities for improvements in current practices were also considered. The survey results from 12 pharmaceutical companies identified significant variability among companies with regard to contraception practices and governance during clinical trials. This variability was due primarily to differences in definitions, areas of scientific uncertainty or misunderstanding, and differences in company approaches to enrollment in clinical trials. The survey also revealed that few companies collected data in a manner that would allow a retrospective understanding of the reasons for failure of birth control during clinical trials. In this article, suggestions are made for topics where regulatory guidance or scientific publications could facilitate best practice. These include provisions for a pragmatic definition of women of childbearing potential, guidance on how animal data can influence the requirements for male and female birth control, evidence-based guidance on birth control and pregnancy testing regimes suitable for low- and high-risk situations, plus practical methods to ascertain the risk of drug-drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives. PMID:27042398

  17. Evidence of Subthalamic PGO-like Waves During REM Sleep in Humans: A Deep Brain Polysomnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Mendoza, Julio; Lozano, Beatriz; Seijo, Fernando; Santamarta-Liébana, Elena; Ramos-Platón, Maria José; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Fernández-González, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine whether the subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a role in the transmission of PGO-like waves during REM sleep in humans. Design: Simultaneous recordings from deep brain electrodes to record local field potentials (LFPs), and standard polysomnography to ascertain sleep/wake states. Setting: Main Hospital, department of clinical neurophysiology sleep laboratory. Participants: 12 individuals with Parkinson's disease, with electrodes implanted in the STN; and, as a control for localization purposes, 4 cluster headache patients with electrodes implanted in the posterior hypothalamus. Interventions: All subjects underwent functional neurosurgery for implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes. Results: Sharp, polarity-reversed LFPs were recorded within the STN during REM sleep in humans. These subthalamic PGO-like waves (2–3 Hz, 80–200 μV, and 300–500 msec) appeared during REM epochs as singlets or in clusters of 3–13 waves. During the pre-REM period, subthalamic PGO-like waves were temporally related to drops in the submental electromyogram and/or onset of muscular atonia. Clusters of PGO-like waves occurred typically before and during the bursts of rapid eye movements and were associated with an enhancement in fast (15–35 Hz) subthalamic oscillatory activity. Conclusion: Subthalamic PGO-like waves can be recorded during pre-REM and REM sleep in humans. Our data suggest that the STN may play an active role in an ascending activating network implicated in the transmission of PGO waves during REM sleep in humans. Citation: Fernández-Mendoza J; Lozano B; Seijo F; Santamarta-Liébana E; Ramos-Platón MJ; Vela-Bueno A; Fernández-González F. Evidence of subthalamic PGO-like waves during REM sleep in humans: a deep brain polysomnographic study. SLEEP 2009;32(9):1117-1126. PMID:19750916

  18. Towards a Wireless Smart Polysomnograph Using Symbolic Fusion.

    PubMed

    Ugon, Adrien; Seroussi, Brigitte; Philippe, Carole; Ganascia, Jean-Gabriel; Garda, Patrick; Sedki, Karima; Bouaud, Jacques; Pinna, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Polysomnography is the gold standard test for sleep disorders among which the Sleep Apnea Syndrome (SAS) is considered a public health issue because of the increase of the cardio-and cerebro-vascular risk it is associated with. However, the reliability of this test is questioned since sleep scoring is a time-consuming task performed by medical experts with a high inter- and intra-scorers variability, and because data are collected from 15 sensors distributed over a patient's body surface area, using a wired connection which may be a source of artefacts for the patient's sleep. We have used symbolic fusion to support the automated diagnosis of SAS on the basis of the international guidelines of the AASM for the scoring of sleep events. On a sample of 70 patients, and for the Apnea-Hypopnea Index, symbolic fusion performed at the level of sleep experts (97.1% of agreement). The next step is to confirm these preliminary results and move forward to a smart wireless polysomnograph.

  19. Oral Appliance Treatment Response and Polysomnographic Phenotypes of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Kate; Takaya, Hisashi; Qian, Jin; Petocz, Peter; Ng, Andrew T.; Cistulli, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Mandibular advancement splints (MAS) are an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); however, therapeutic response is variable. Younger age, female gender, less obesity, and milder and supine-dependent OSA have variably been associated with treatment success in relatively small samples. Our objective was to utilize a large cohort of MAS treated patients (1) to compare efficacy across patients with different phenotypes of OSA and (2) to assess demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnography variables as treatment response predictors. Methods: Retrospective analysis of MAS-treated patients participating in clinical trials in sleep centers in Sydney, Australia between years 2000–2013. All studies used equivalent customized two-piece MAS devices and treatment protocols. Treatment response was defined as (1) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) < 5/h, (2) AHI < 10/h and ≥ 50% reduction, and (3) ≥ 50% AHI reduction. Results: A total of 425 patients (109 female) were included (age 51.2 ± 10.9 years, BMI 29.2 ± 5.0 kg/m2). MAS reduced AHI by 50.3% ± 50.7% across the group. Supine-predominant OSA patients had lower treatment response rates than non-positional OSA (e.g., 36% vs. 59% for AHI < 10/h). REM-predominant OSA showed a lower response rate than either NREM or non-stage dependent OSA. In prediction modelling, age, baseline AHI, and anthropometric variables were predictive of MAS treatment outcome but not OSA phenotype. Gender was not associated with treatment outcome. Conclusions: Lower MAS treatment response rates were observed in supine and REM sleep. In a large sample, we confirm that demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic data only weakly inform about MAS efficacy, supporting the need for alternative objective prediction methods to reliably select patients for MAS treatment. Citation: Sutherland K, Takaya H, Qian J, Petocz P, Ng AT, Cistulli PA. Oral appliance treatment response and polysomnographic phenotypes of

  20. Respiratory and Polysomnographic Values in 3- to 5-Year-Old Normal Children at Higher Altitude

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Casey J.; Montgomery-Downs, Hawley E.; Mettler, Pamela; Gozal, David; Halbower, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine polysomnographic parameter differences in children living at higher altitude to children living near sea level. Design and Setting: Prospective study of non-snoring, normal children recruited from various communities around Denver, CO. In-lab, overnight polysomnograms were performed at a tertiary care children's hospital. All children required residence for greater than one year at an elevation around 1,600 meters. Participants: 45 children (62% female), aged 3-5 years, 88.9% non-Hispanic white with average BMI percentile for age of 47.8% ± 30.7%. Measurements and Results: Standard sleep indices were obtained and compared to previously published normative values in a similar population living near sea level (SLG). In the altitude group (AG), the apnea-hypopnea index was 1.8 ± 1.2 and the central apnea-hypopnea index was 1.7 ± 1.1, as compared to 0.9 ± 0.8 and 0.8 ± 0.7, respectively, (P ≤ 0.005) in SLG. Mean end-tidal CO2 level in AG was 42.3 ± 3.0 mm Hg and 40.6 ± 4.6 mm Hg in SLG (P = 0.049). The ≥ 4% desaturation index was 3.9 ± 2.0 in AG compared to 0.3 ± 0.4 in SLG (P < 0.001). Mean periodic limb movement in series index was 10.1 ± 12.3 in AG and 3.6 ± 5.4 in SLG (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Comparison of altitude and sea level sleep studies in healthy children reveals significant differences in central apnea, apneahypopnea, desaturation, and periodic limb movement in series indices. Clinical providers should be aware of these differences when interpreting sleep studies and incorporate altitude-adjusted normative values in therapeutic-decision making algorithms. Citation: Burg CJ; Montgomery-Downs HE; Mettler P; Gozal D; Halbower AC. Respiratory and polysomnographic values in 3- to 5-year-old normal children at higher altitude. SLEEP 2013;36(11):1707-1714. PMID:24179305

  1. Vibration from freight trains fragments sleep: A polysomnographic study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael G.; Croy, Ilona; Hammar, Oscar; Persson Waye, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    As the number of freight trains on railway networks increases, so does the potential for vibration exposure in dwellings nearby to freight railway lines. Nocturnal trains in particular are of particular importance since night-time exposure may interfere with sleep. The present work investigates the impact of vibration and noise from night-time freight trains on human sleep. In an experimental polysomnographic laboratory study, 24 young healthy volunteers with normal hearing were exposed to simulated freight pass-bys with vibration amplitudes of 0.7 and 1.4 mm/s either 20 or 36 times during the night. Stronger vibrations were associated with higher probabilities of event-related arousals and awakenings (p < 0.001), and sleep stage changes (p < 0.05). Sleep macrostructure was most affected in high vibration nights with 36 events, with increased wakefulness (p < 0.05), reduced continual slow wave sleep (p < 0.05), earlier awakenings (p < 0.05) and an overall increase in sleep stage changes (p < 0.05). Subjects reported sleep disturbance due to vibration (F(4,92) = 25.9, p < 0.001) and noise (F(4,92) = 25.9, p < 0.001), with the number of trains having an effect only for the 0.7 mm/s condition (p < 0.05). The findings show that combined vibration and noise from railway freight affects the natural rhythm of sleep, but extrapolation of significance for health outcomes should be approached with caution. PMID:27090401

  2. Polysomnographic Study of Sleep in Survivors of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reinsel, Ruth A.; Starr, Tatiana D.; O'Sullivan, Barbara; Passik, Steven D.; Kavey, Neil B.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Insomnia is a frequent complaint in breast cancer patients during and after treatment. Breast cancer survivors, 1–10 years posttreatment, underwent in-lab polysomnography (PSG) to objectively define the insomnia in those patients with such a complaint. Methods: Twenty-six breast cancer survivors (aged 39–80, mean 54.0 months posttreatment) spent 2 nights in the sleep laboratory. Sleep on Night 2 was scored for sleep stages, sleep onset latency, REM sleep onset latency, wake time, apneas and hypopneas, periodic limb movements and arousals. Subjects were allocated into 2 groups by their scores on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI): no/ mild sleep disturbance (PSQI score ≤ 9, n = 15) or moderate/ severe sleep disturbance (PSQI ≥ 10, n = 11). Results: Standard PSG/EEG parameters failed to differentiate insomniacs from non-insomniacs. The single variable that distinguished the insomnia group was periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS). PLMS were significantly correlated (r ≅ 0.7, p < 0.02) with subjective report of insomnia on PSQI and insomnia severity index. Log[Number of PLMS] was higher in the moderate/severe insomnia group (p = 0.008). Five of 11 patients in the moderate/severe insomnia group had a PLMS index ≥ 15, compared to only one of 15 patients in the none/mild insomnia group (p = 0.02). Menopausal symptoms and use of caffeine, hypnotics, and antidepressants were unrelated to insomnia severity or PLMS. Conclusions: PLMS was the sole PSG variable that separated breast cancer survivors with moderate/severe insomnia from those with no/mild sleep disturbance. Further study of the incidence and significance of PLMS in breast cancer survivors with the complaint of insomnia is merited. Citation: Reinsel RA, Starr TD, O'Sullivan B, Passik SD, Kavey NB. Polysomnographic study of sleep in survivors of breast cancer. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(12):1361–1370. PMID:26194735

  3. Vibration from freight trains fragments sleep: A polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael G; Croy, Ilona; Hammar, Oscar; Persson Waye, Kerstin

    2016-04-19

    As the number of freight trains on railway networks increases, so does the potential for vibration exposure in dwellings nearby to freight railway lines. Nocturnal trains in particular are of particular importance since night-time exposure may interfere with sleep. The present work investigates the impact of vibration and noise from night-time freight trains on human sleep. In an experimental polysomnographic laboratory study, 24 young healthy volunteers with normal hearing were exposed to simulated freight pass-bys with vibration amplitudes of 0.7 and 1.4 mm/s either 20 or 36 times during the night. Stronger vibrations were associated with higher probabilities of event-related arousals and awakenings (p < 0.001), and sleep stage changes (p < 0.05). Sleep macrostructure was most affected in high vibration nights with 36 events, with increased wakefulness (p < 0.05), reduced continual slow wave sleep (p < 0.05), earlier awakenings (p < 0.05) and an overall increase in sleep stage changes (p < 0.05). Subjects reported sleep disturbance due to vibration (F(4,92) = 25.9, p < 0.001) and noise (F(4,92) = 25.9, p < 0.001), with the number of trains having an effect only for the 0.7 mm/s condition (p < 0.05). The findings show that combined vibration and noise from railway freight affects the natural rhythm of sleep, but extrapolation of significance for health outcomes should be approached with caution.

  4. Sleep/Wake Modulation of Polysomnographic Patterns has Prognostic Value in Pediatric Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Molteni, Erika; Avantaggiato, Paolo; Formica, Francesca; Pastore, Valentina; Colombo, Katia; Galbiati, Sara; Arrigoni, Filippo; Strazzer, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Sleep patterns of pediatric patients in unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) have been poorly investigated, and the prognostic potential of polysomnography (PSG) in these subjects is still uncertain. The goal of the study was to identify quantitative PSG indices to be applied as possible prognostic markers in pediatric UWS. Methods: We performed PSG in 27 children and adolescents with UWS due to acquired brain damage in the subacute phase. Patients underwent neurological examination and clinical assessment with standardized scales. Outcome was assessed after 36 mo. PSG tracks were scored for sleep stages and digitally filtered. The spectral difference between sleep and wake was computed, as the percent difference at specific spectral frequencies. We computed (1) the ratio between percent power in the delta and alpha frequency bands, (2) the ratio between alpha and theta frequency bands, and (3) the power ratio index, during wake and sleep, as proposed in previous literature. The predictive role of several clinical and PSG measures was tested by logistic regression. Results: Correlation was found between the differential measures of electroencephalographic activity during sleep and wake in several frequency bands and the clinical scales (Glasgow Outcome Score, Level of Cognitive Functioning Assessment Scale, and Disability Rating Scale) at follow-up; the Sleep Patterns for Pediatric Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (SPPUWS) scores correlated with the differential measures, and allowed outcome prediction with 96.3% of accuracy. Conclusions: The differential measure of electroencephalographic activity during sleep and wake in the beta band and, more incisively, SPPUWS can help in determining the capability to recover from pediatric UWS well before the confirmation provided by suitable clinical scales. Citation: Molteni E, Avantaggiato P, Formica F, Pastore V, Colombo K, Galbiati S, Arrigoni F, Strazzer S. Sleep/wake modulation of polysomnographic

  5. Controlled clinical studies of homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    Observations about controlled clinical trials expressed by Max Haidvogl in the book Ultra High Dilution (1994) have been appraised from a perspective two decades later. The present commentary briefly examines changes in homeopathy research evidence since 1994 as regards: the published number of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), the use of individualised homeopathic intervention, the 'proven efficacy of homeopathy', and the quality of the evidence. The commentary reflects the details of RCTs that are available in a recently published literature review and by scrutiny of systematic reviews of RCTs in homeopathy. The homeopathy RCT literature grew by 309 records in the 18 years that immediately followed Haidvogl's article, with more than a doubling of the proportion that investigated individualised homeopathy. Discounting one prior publication, the entire systematic review literature on homeopathy RCTs post-dates 1994. A total of 36 condition-specific systematic reviews have been identified in the peer-reviewed literature: 16 of them reported positive, or tentatively positive, conclusions about homeopathy's clinical effectiveness; the other 20 were negative or non-conclusive. Reviews typically have been restricted in the strength of their conclusions by the low quality of the original RCT evidence. Three comprehensive systematic reviews concluded, cautiously, that homeopathy may differ from placebo; a fourth such review reached negative conclusions. A recent high-quality meta-analysis concluded that medicines prescribed in individualised homeopathic treatment may have small, specific, effects. Despite important growth in research activity since 1994, concerns about study quality limit the interpretation of available RCT data. The question whether homeopathic intervention differs from placebo awaits decisive answer. Copyright © 2015 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impulse control disorder and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bayard, Sophie; Dauvilliers, Yves; Yu, Huan; Croisier-Langenier, Muriel; Rossignol, Alexia; Charif, Mahmoud; Geny, Christian; Carlander, Bertrand; Cochen De Cock, Valérie

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between ICD and RBD is still not yet understood and the results from the current literature are contradictory in PD. We aimed to explore the association between rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and impulse control disorder in Parkinson's disease. Ninety-eight non-demented patients with Parkinson's disease underwent one night of video-polysomnography recording. The diagnosis of RBD was established according to clinical and polysomnographic criteria. Impulse control disorders were determined by a gold standard, semi-structured diagnostic interview. Half of the patients (n = 49) reported clinical history of RBD while polysomnographic diagnosis of RBD was confirmed in 31.6% of the patients (n = 31). At least one impulse control disorder was identified in 21.4% of patients, 22.6% with RBD and 20.9% without. Logistic regression controlling for potential confounders indicated that both clinical RBD (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.07-1.48, P = 0.15) and polysomnographic confirmed RBD diagnoses (OR = 0.1.28, 95% CI = 0.31-5.33, P = 0.34) were not associated with impulse control disorder. In Parkinson's disease, REM Sleep Behavior Disorder is not associated with impulse control disorder. The results of our study do not support the notion that PSG-confirmed RBD and ICD share a common pathophysiology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Impact of Sleep-Related Attentional Bias on Polysomnographically Measured Sleep in Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Spiegelhalder, Kai; Kyle, Simon D.; Feige, Bernd; Prem, Martin; Nissen, Christoph; Espie, Colin A.; Riemann, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Although sleep-related attentional bias has been shown to be evident in primary insomnia, the association with objectively measured sleep has not been investigated. In the present study, we used polysomnography (PSG) to fill this void. Design: Patients with primary insomnia and healthy controls were studied using a visual dot probe task (VDP) and an emotional Stroop task (EST). Additionally, polysomnography was carried out in a sub-sample (n = 22) of patients in the subsequent night. Setting: Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the University of Freiburg Medical Center. Participants: Thirty patients with primary insomnia and 30 matched healthy controls. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Patients with primary insomnia demonstrated a significant sleep-related attentional bias compared to controls in the EST but no significant group effects were found for the VDP. VDP attentional bias scores were positively correlated with measures of sleep pressure, including total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and the amount of slow wave sleep. EST attentional bias scores were not correlated with subsequent PSG parameters, and we did not observe a correlation between attentional bias scores on the two tasks. Conclusions: The unexpected relationship between increased attentional bias, in the VDP task, and improved markers of sleep duration and continuity, may be indicative of a homeostatic craving for sleep in those with high attentional bias. This awaits further testing in multiple night studies, to shed light on the mechanisms and implications of sleep-related attentional bias. Citation: Spiegelhalder K; Kyle SD; Feige B; Prem M; Nissen C; Espie CA; Riemann D. The impact of sleep-related attentional bias on polysomnographically measured sleep in primary insomnia. SLEEP 2010;33(1):107-112. PMID:20120627

  8. Hypnic jerks are an underestimated sleep motor phenomenon in patients with parkinsonism. A video-polysomnographic and neurophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Chiaro, Giacomo; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Sambati, Luisa; Cecere, Annagrazia; Ferri, Caterina; Caletti, Maria Turchese; Cortelli, Pietro; Provini, Federica

    2016-10-01

    Hypnic jerks (HJs) are sudden contractions of one or more body segments occurring mostly at sleep onset. They are highly sporadic and affect all ages and both sexes with prevalence between 60% and 70% in the general population. This study describes the frequency and the neurophysiological characteristics of HJs in a population of patients with parkinsonism by means of nocturnal video-polysomnographic recordings. This is a prospective cohort study and is reported following the STROBE guidelines. We analyzed the clinical and video-polysomnographic data of the first 66 consecutive patients recruited in the ongoing prospective study "Bologna motor and non-motor Prospective study on Parkinsonism at onset" (BoProPark). Each patient underwent a full neurological workup including a whole-night video- polysomnography. Neurophysiological characteristics including the propagation patterns of the HJs were studied with an extended muscle montage polysomnography. We recorded a total of 62 HJs in 16 patients out of 66 (24%). Sleep parameters were not statistically different between patients with and without HJs. All HJs were spontaneous and occurred randomly throughout the night. Electromyographic analysis showed that muscle activity arose from different muscles with no prevalence of one over the other and without any ordered propagation. No recurring motor pattern of the jerks was detected. Our findings demonstrated that HJs are a frequent, underestimated, sleep-related motor phenomenon in patients with parkinsonism. As they may represent a further cause of sleep disruption and insomnia, HJs should be actively examined. Neurophysiological analysis suggests a subcortical origin of HJs as shown previously for a healthy subject. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Subjective sleep complaints indicate objective sleep problems in psychosomatic patients: a prospective polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Linden, Michael; Dietz, Marie; Veauthier, Christian; Fietze, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between subjective complaints and polysomnographical parameters in psychosomatic patients. A convenience sample of patients from a psychosomatic inpatient unit were classified according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) as very poor sleepers (PSQI >10, n=80) and good sleepers (PSQI <6, n=19). They then underwent a polysomnography and in the morning rated their previous night's sleep using a published protocol (Deutschen Gesellschaft für Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin morning protocol [MP]). In the polysomnography, significant differences were found between very poor and good sleepers according to the PSQI with respect to sleep efficiency and time awake after sleep onset. When comparing objective PSG and subjective MP, the polysomnographical sleep onset latency was significantly positively correlated with the corresponding parameters of the MP: the subjective sleep onset latency in minutes and the subjective evaluation of sleep onset latency (very short, short, normal, long, very long) were positively correlated with the sleep latency measured by polysomnography. The polysomnographical time awake after sleep onset (in minutes) was positively correlated with the subjective time awake after sleep onset (in minutes), evaluation of time awake after sleep onset (seldom, normal often), and subjective restfulness. The polysomnographical total sleep time (TST) was positively correlated with the subjective TST. Conversely, the polysomnographical TST was negatively correlated with the evaluation of TST (high polysomnographical TST was correlated with the subjective evaluation of having slept short or normal and vice versa). The polysomnographical sleep efficiency was positively correlated with subjective feeling of current well-being in the morning and subjective TST and negatively with subjective restfulness, subjective sleep onset latency, subjective evaluation of sleep onset latency, and evaluation of time awake after sleep

  10. Subjective sleep complaints indicate objective sleep problems in psychosomatic patients: a prospective polysomnographic study

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Michael; Dietz, Marie; Veauthier, Christian; Fietze, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the relationship between subjective complaints and polysomnographical parameters in psychosomatic patients. Method A convenience sample of patients from a psychosomatic inpatient unit were classified according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) as very poor sleepers (PSQI >10, n=80) and good sleepers (PSQI <6, n=19). They then underwent a polysomnography and in the morning rated their previous night’s sleep using a published protocol (Deutschen Gesellschaft für Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin morning protocol [MP]). Results In the polysomnography, significant differences were found between very poor and good sleepers according to the PSQI with respect to sleep efficiency and time awake after sleep onset. When comparing objective PSG and subjective MP, the polysomnographical sleep onset latency was significantly positively correlated with the corresponding parameters of the MP: the subjective sleep onset latency in minutes and the subjective evaluation of sleep onset latency (very short, short, normal, long, very long) were positively correlated with the sleep latency measured by polysomnography. The polysomnographical time awake after sleep onset (in minutes) was positively correlated with the subjective time awake after sleep onset (in minutes), evaluation of time awake after sleep onset (seldom, normal often), and subjective restfulness. The polysomnographical total sleep time (TST) was positively correlated with the subjective TST. Conversely, the polysomnographical TST was negatively correlated with the evaluation of TST (high polysomnographical TST was correlated with the subjective evaluation of having slept short or normal and vice versa). The polysomnographical sleep efficiency was positively correlated with subjective feeling of current well-being in the morning and subjective TST and negatively with subjective restfulness, subjective sleep onset latency, subjective evaluation of sleep onset latency, and evaluation of

  11. Can an inert sleeping pill affect sleep? Effects on polysomnographic, behavioral and subjective measures.

    PubMed

    Fratello, Fabiana; Curcio, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Michele; Marzano, Cristina; Couyoumdjian, Alessandro; Petrillo, Giovanna; Bertini, Mario; De Gennaro, Luigi

    2005-10-01

    Since two recent meta-analyses on sleep changes associated with placebo in clinical trials suggested a beneficial effect of placebo treatments, pointing to a dissociation between subjective and objective measures of sleep, the current experiment was directly aimed to assess the effects of an inert compound, administered with the suggestion that it was a hypnotic substance in subjects with mild sleep complaints. The aim of this study was to compare subjective, behavioral, polysomnographic (PSG), and quantitative electroencephalographic (EEG) changes during a night preceded or not by the intake of two 50-mg lactose capsules. Ten female students, selected by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, slept for three consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory, with the experimental (EXP) night defined by the administration of two 50-mg lactose pills. Self-ratings of sleep quality and performance were assessed upon morning awakening of baseline (BSL) and EXP nights. The EXP nights were self-rated as more restful and characterized by a decreased number of nocturnal awakenings than the BSL nights. PSG measures showed that wakefulness after sleep onset significantly decreased during the EXP night as compared to the BSL night. The EXP nights also showed an increase of 0.5-4.0 Hz power during nonrapid eye movement sleep and a decrease of EEG activity in the beta frequency range during rapid eye movement sleep only at central brain sites. A specific improvement of behavioral measures was also found upon morning awakening after the EXP night compared to the BSL night. The administration of an inert pill improves both the subjective and objective quality of sleep. The reduced sleep fragmentation and the effects on some quantitative EEG markers of sleep homeostasis suggest that the experimental manipulation induced coherent changes in the subsequent sleep, resembling an enhancement of sleep pressure. The regional differences of EEG activity suggest the involvement of a specific

  12. Polysomnographic values in children undergoing puberty: pediatric vs. adult respiratory rules in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Ignacio E; Karamessinis, Laurie; Bandla, Preetam; Huang, Jingtao; Kelly, Andrea; Pepe, Michelle; Schultz, Brian; Gallagher, Paul; Brooks, Lee J; Marcus, Carole L

    2008-12-01

    Polysomnographic respiratory events in children should be scored using pediatric respiratory rules. However, due to a lack of data on adolescents, recently revised rules allow children aged 13-18 years to be scored by adult or pediatric criteria. To clarify which criteria to use, we describe the evolution of respiratory events with Tanner stage, and we compare events in children aged 13-18 years with the new American Academy of Sleep Medicine adult and pediatric respiratory rules. Cross-sectional Academic hospital Healthy subjects aged 8-18 years recruited for research purposes. Physical examination to determine Tanner stage, overnight polysomnogram, and determination of sex hormones. Sixty-eight subjects (Tanner 1-5) were studied, mean age [SD] = 13 +/- 3 years, median apnea hypopnea index (AHI)= 0.1 (range: 0-1.2)/h. The median percentages of total sleep time (TST) with SpO2 < 92% were 0.1 (0-4.2)%, and with end-tidal CO2 > 50 torr was 0.1 (0-88.6)%. Thirty-two subjects were aged 13-18 years, (Tanner 3-5). The difference between AHI scored by pediatric (median = 0 [0-0.9]/h) and adult (median = 0 [0 - 0.5]/h) criteria was statistically significant (P = 0.043), but not clinically relevant. Respiratory events in normal children aged 8-18 years are rare and unrelated to Tanner stage. Adult or pediatric respiratory rules can be used for scoring polysomnograms in asymptomatic subjects approaching adulthood. Further studies are needed in symptomatic children within this age group.

  13. Sleep and mental disorders: A meta-analysis of polysomnographic research.

    PubMed

    Baglioni, Chiara; Nanovska, Svetoslava; Regen, Wolfram; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Feige, Bernd; Nissen, Christoph; Reynolds, Charles F; Riemann, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    Investigating sleep in mental disorders has the potential to reveal both disorder-specific and transdiagnostic psychophysiological mechanisms. This meta-analysis aimed at determining the polysomnographic (PSG) characteristics of several mental disorders. Relevant studies were searched through standard strategies. Controlled PSG studies evaluating sleep in affective, anxiety, eating, pervasive developmental, borderline and antisocial personality disorders, attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and schizophrenia were included. PSG variables of sleep continuity, depth, and architecture, as well as rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep were considered. Calculations were performed with the "Comprehensive Meta-Analysis" and "R" software. Using random effects modeling, for each disorder and each variable, a separate meta-analysis was conducted if at least 3 studies were available for calculation of effect sizes as standardized means (Hedges' g). Sources of variability, that is, sex, age, and mental disorders comorbidity, were evaluated in subgroup analyses. Sleep alterations were evidenced in all disorders, with the exception of ADHD and seasonal affective disorders. Sleep continuity problems were observed in most mental disorders. Sleep depth and REM pressure alterations were associated with affective, anxiety, autism and schizophrenia disorders. Comorbidity was associated with enhanced REM sleep pressure and more inhibition of sleep depth. No sleep parameter was exclusively altered in 1 condition; however, no 2 conditions shared the same PSG profile. Sleep continuity disturbances imply a transdiagnostic imbalance in the arousal system likely representing a basic dimension of mental health. Sleep depth and REM variables might play a key role in psychiatric comorbidity processes. Constellations of sleep alterations may define distinct disorders better than alterations in 1 single variable. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. SLEEP AND MENTAL DISORDERS: A META-ANALYSIS OF POLYSOMNOGRAPHIC RESEARCH

    PubMed Central

    Baglioni, Chiara; Nanovska, Svetoslava; Regen, Wolfram; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Feige, Bernd; Nissen, Christoph; Reynolds, Charles F.; Riemann, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Investigating sleep in mental disorders has the potential to reveal both disorder-specific and transdiagnostic psychophysiological mechanisms. This meta-analysis aimed at determining the polysomnographic (PSG) characteristics of several mental disorders. Relevant studies were searched through standard strategies. Controlled PSG studies evaluating sleep in affective, anxiety, eating, pervasive developmental, borderline and antisocial personality disorders, ADHD, and schizophrenia were included. PSG variables of sleep continuity, depth, and architecture, as well as rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep were considered. Calculations were performed with the “Comprehensive Meta-Analysis” and “R” softwares. Using random effects modeling, for each disorder and each variable, a separate meta-analysis was conducted if at least 3 studies were available for calculation of effect sizes as standardized means (Hedges’g). Sources of variability, i.e., sex, age, and mental disorders comorbidity, were evaluated in subgroup analyses. Sleep alterations were evidenced in all disorders, with the exception of ADHD and seasonal affective disorders. Sleep continuity problems were observed in most mental disorders. Sleep depth and REM pressure alterations were associated with affective, anxiety, autism and schizophrenia disorders. Comorbidity was associated with enhanced REM sleep pressure and more inhibition of sleep depth. No sleep parameter was exclusively altered in one condition; however, no two conditions shared the same PSG profile. Sleep continuity disturbances imply a transdiagnostic imbalance in the arousal system likely representing a basic dimension of mental health. Sleep depth and REM variables might play a key role in psychiatric comorbidity processes. Constellations of sleep alterations may define distinct disorders better than alterations in one single variable. PMID:27416139

  15. Comparison of polysomnographic data in age-, sex- and Axis I psychiatric diagnosis matched HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative insomnia patients.

    PubMed

    Low, Yinghui; Goforth, Harold W; Omonuwa, Toma; Preud'homme, Xavier; Edinger, Jack; Krystal, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    There is a high prevalence of insomnia in HIV-seropositive patients. Insomnia is associated with poorer disease outcomes, cognitive impairment and HIV-associated dementia. However there is limited data characterizing the type of sleep disturbances, and the cause. Previous studies report conflicting results, and observed changes in the distribution of REM and SWS were hypothesized to result from co-morbid mood disorders, although this is not established. We carried out this study to determine if there are differences in polysomnographic (PSG) sleep data in age-, sex- and Axis I diagnoses- matched HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative patients. Eighteen HIV-seropositive insomniacs were matched to HIV-seronegative insomniacs based on age, sex and Axis I diagnoses. Participants spent 2 consecutive nights in a sleep lab recording of PSG data. Multivariate analysis revealed an overall significant match-by-variable interaction (p=0.0126). Follow-up analysis show that compared to HIV-seronegative insomnia controls, HIV-seropositive insomniacs have significantly longer SOL, 8% decreased sleep efficiency, and 8-10% decreased time spent in REM sleep (p's<0.05). This study provides preliminary evidence that even after accounting for differences in age, sex and psychiatric diagnoses, HIV-seropositive patients with insomnia have significantly worse sleep than HIV-seronegative patients with insomnia. Unlike what previous authors have proposed, our results do not support the view that comorbid psychiatric disorders like depression are responsible for the observed differences in PSG findings and the greater incidence of insomnia, in HIV-seropositive patients when compared with other groups of insomnia patients. This suggests the presence of other etiologies including neuronal damage, psychosocial stressors, or comorbid medical conditions. Further studies are needed to determine the extent to which these play a role in insomnia in the HIV-seropositive population. Copyright © 2012

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Insomnia Therapy for Those With Insomnia and Depression: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Carney, Colleen E; Edinger, Jack D; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Lachowski, Angela M; Bogouslavsky, Olya; Krystal, Andrew D; Shapiro, Colin M

    2017-04-01

    To compare cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) + antidepressant medication (AD) against treatments that target solely depression or solely insomnia. A blinded, randomized split-plot experimental study. Two urban academic clinical centers. 107 participants (68% female, mean age 42 ± 11) with major depressive disorder and insomnia. Randomization was to one of three groups: antidepressant (AD; escitalopram) + CBT-I (4 sessions), CBT-I + placebo pill, or AD + 4-session sleep hygiene control (SH). Subjective sleep was assessed via 2 weeks of daily sleep diaries (use of medication was covaried in all analyses); although there were no statistically significant group differences detected, all groups improved from baseline to posttreatment on subjective sleep efficiency (SE) and total wake time (TWT) and the effect sizes were large. Objective sleep was assessed via overnight polysomnographic monitoring at baseline and posttreatment; analyses revealed both CBT groups improved on TWT (p = .03), but the AD + SH group worsened. There was no statistically significant effect for PSG SE (p = .07). There was a between groups medium effect observed for the AD + SH and CBT + placebo group differences on diary TWT and both PSG variables. All groups improved significantly from baseline to posttreatment on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17); the groups did not differ. Although all groups self-reported sleeping better after treatment, only the CBT-I groups improved on objective sleep, and AD + SH's sleep worsened. This suggests that we should be treating sleep in those with depression with an effective insomnia treatment and relying on self-report obscures sleep worsening effects. All groups improved on depression, even a group with absolutely no depression-focused treatment component (CBT-I + placebo). The depression effect in CBT-I only group has been reported in other studies, suggesting that we should further investigate the antidepressant properties of

  17. Polysomnographic sleep effects of fluoxetine and nefazodone on a seasonal affective disorder patient.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jianhua; Shapiro, Colin

    2002-11-01

    This reported person met DSM-III-R criteria for seasonal affective disorder. In successive years she had two treatments with fluoxetine and one with nefazodone. Every year regular polysomnographic monitoring was carried out during the critical initial 8 weeks of treatment. The results indicate that on both occasions fluoxetine decreased the patient's sleep quality. Nefazodone had no sleep disturbing effects and on withdrawal no relapse has been seen for 3 years.

  18. Diagnostic value of spontaneous afternoon sleep in epilepsy: polysomnographic study of 96 epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Tartara, A; Manni, R

    1986-01-01

    An early afternoon polysomnographic recording was performed in 112 epileptic patients in order to better define their epileptic disease. 96 subjects (85.7%) slept spontaneously and sleep EEG tracing resulted in diagnostically useful data in 47.8% of cases, a significantly higher percentage than that obtained from tests performed in basal conditions. EEG activation, mostly linked to light NREM sleep stages, was greater in infanto-juvenile subjects than in adults.

  19. Sleep Disturbances in Essential Tremor and Parkinson Disease: A Polysomnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Banu Ozen; Tascilar, Nida; Varo, Armagan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Sleep problems are a common non-motor complication of Parkinson disease (PD), and patients with essential tremor (ET) share a number of motor and non-motor features of PD. To clarify the relationship between these disorders, we evaluated the sleep problems in patients with ET and PD using assessment scales and objective polysomnographic (PSG) testing. Method: Twenty-one consecutive patients with PD, 16 with ET, and 14 healthy subjects participated in this study and were compared in terms of sleep related complaints, final sleep related diagnosis, and polysomnographic features. Results: The results of our study have shown that patients with PD were more likely than were those with ET to have a history of REM sleep behavior disorders (RBD) (p = 0.001) and excessive daytime sleepiness (p ≤ 0.05). Additionally, PSG data revealed that ET patients had lower mean SpO2 values (p ≤ 0.05) and REM without atonia (RWA) (p = 0.032) than did patients with PD. Conclusion: This is the first study to use PSG to evaluate sleep problems both in ET and PD patients. The results point out different sleep problems in these two common movement disorders which should be investigated in further studies. Citation: Barut BO, Tascilar N, Varo A. Sleep disturbances in essential tremor and Parkinson disease: a polysomnographic study. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(6):655–662. PMID:25700875

  20. Alterations in Polysomnographic (PSG) profile in drug-naïve Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Sanju P.; Sinha, Sanjib; Pal, Pramod Kumar; Panda, Samhita; Philip, Mariamma; Taly, Arun B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We studied the changes in Polysomnographic (PSG) profile in drug-naïve patients of Parkinson's disease (PD) who underwent evaluation with sleep overnight PSG. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 30 with newly diagnosed levodopa-naïve patients with PD, fulfilling the UK-PD society brain bank clinical diagnostic criteria (M:F = 25:5; age: 57.2 ± 10.7 years). The disease severity scales and sleep related questionnaires were administered, and then patients were subjected to overnight PSG. Results: The mean duration of illness was 9.7 ± 9.5 months. The mean Hoehn and Yahr stage was 1.8 ± 0.4. The mean Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score improved from 27.7 ± 9.2 to 17.5 ± 8.9 with sustained usage of levodopa. Nocturnal sleep as assessed by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was impaired in 10 (33.3%) patients (mean PSQI score: 5.1 ± 3.1). Excessive day time somnolence was recorded in three patients with Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score ≥ 10 (mean ESS score: 4.0 ± 3.4). PSG analysis revealed that poor sleep efficiency of <85% was present in 86.7% of patients (mean: 68.3 ± 21.3%). The latencies to sleep onset (mean: 49.8 ± 67.0 minutes) and stage 2 sleep (36.5 ± 13.1%) were prolonged while slow wave sleep was shortened. Respiration during sleep was significantly impaired in which 43.3% had impaired apnoea hyperpnoea index (AHI) ≥5, mean AHI: 8.3 ± 12.1). Apnoeic episodes were predominantly obstructive (obstructive sleep apnea, OSA index = 2.2 ± 5.1). These patients had periodic leg movement (PLM) disorder (56.7% had PLM index of 5 or more, mean PLMI: 27.53 ± 4 9.05) that resulted in excessive daytime somnolence. Conclusions: To conclude, sleep macro-architecture is altered in frequently and variably in levodopa-naïve patients of PD and the alterations are possibly due to disease process per se. PMID:25221397

  1. Polysomnographic Measurement of Sleep Duration and Bodily Pain Perception in the Sleep Heart Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Weingarten, Jeremy A.; Dubrovsky, Boris; Basner, Robert C.; Redline, Susan; George, Liziamma; Lederer, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine whether total sleep time (TST) and specific sleep stage duration are associated with bodily pain perception and whether sex, age, or subjective sleepiness modifies this relationship. Methods: Data from adults ages 39–90 y (n = 5,199) who took part in the Sleep Heart Health Study Exam 1 were analyzed. TST, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep time, and slow wave sleep (SWS) time were measured by unattended, in-home nocturnal polysomnography. Bodily pain perception was measured via the Short Form-36 questionnaire bodily pain component. We used logistic regression to examine associations between total and individual sleep stage durations and bodily pain perception controlling for age, sex, race, body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index, antidepressant use, and important cardiovascular conditions (smoking [pack-years], history of diabetes, and history of percutaneous coronary intervention and/or coronary artery bypass graft). Results: In the fully adjusted model, REM sleep time and SWS time were not associated with “moderate to severe pain,” whereas TST was: Each 1-h decrement in TST was associated with a 7% increased odds of “moderate to severe pain” (odds ratio 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.002, 1.14). Due to modification of the association between SWS time and “moderate to severe pain” by sex (P for interaction = 0.01), we performed analyses stratified by sex: Each 1-h decrement in SWS time was associated with a 20% higher odds of “moderate to severe pain” among men (odds ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.03–1.42) whereas an association was not observed among women. Conclusions: Shorter TST among all subjects and shorter SWS time in men was associated with “moderate to severe pain.” REM sleep time was not associated with bodily pain perception in this cohort. Citation: Weingarten JA, Dubrovsky B, Basner RC, Redline S, George L, Lederer DJ. Polysomnographic measurement of sleep duration and bodily pain perception in

  2. A Prospective Video-Polysomnographic Analysis of Movements during Physiological Sleep in 100 Healthy Sleepers

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Ambra; Gabelia, David; Mitterling, Thomas; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    and shorter than NREM movements, indicating different influences on motor control during both sleep states. Citation: Stefani A, Gabelia D, Mitterling T, Poewe W, Högl B, Frauscher B. A prospective video-polysomnographic analysis of movements during physiological sleep in 100 healthy sleepers. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1479–1487. PMID:25669176

  3. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy improves polysomnographic and subjective sleep profiles in antidepressant users with sleep complaints.

    PubMed

    Britton, Willoughby B; Haynes, Patricia L; Fridel, Keith W; Bootzin, Richard R

    2012-01-01

    Many antidepressant medications (ADM) are associated with disruptions in sleep continuity that can compromise medication adherence and impede successful treatment. The present study investigated whether mindfulness meditation (MM) training could improve self-reported and objectively measured polysomnographic (PSG) sleep profiles in depressed individuals who had achieved at least partial remission with ADM, but still had residual sleep complaints. Twenty-three ADM users with sleep complaints were randomized into an 8-week Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) course or a waitlist control condition. Pre-post measurements included PSG sleep studies and subjectively reported sleep, residual depression symptoms. Compared to controls, the MBCT participants improved on both PSG and subjective measures of sleep. They showed a pattern of decreased wake time and increased sleep efficiency. Sleep depth, as measured by stage 1 and slow-wave sleep, did not change as a result of mindfulness training. MM is associated with increases in both objectively and subjectively measured sleep continuity in ADM users. MM training may serve as more desirable and cost-effective alternative to discontinuation or supplementation with hypnotics, and may contribute to a more sustainable recovery from depression. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. QT Interval Variability Index and QT Interval Duration in Different Sleep Stages: Analysis of Polysomnographic Recordings in Nonapneic Male Patients.

    PubMed

    Viigimae, Moonika; Karai, Deniss; Pirn, Peeter; Pilt, Kristjan; Meigas, Kalju; Kaik, Jyri

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether different sleep stages, especially REM sleep, affect QT interval duration and variability in male patients without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Polysomnographic recordings of 30 patients were analyzed. Beat-to-beat QT interval variability was calculated using QTV index (QTVI) formula. For QTc interval calculation, in addition to Bazett's formula, linear and parabolic heart rate correction formulas with two separate α values were used. QTVI and QTc values were calculated as means of 2 awake, 3 NREM, and 3 REM sleep episodes; the duration of each episode was 300 sec. Mean QTVI values were not statistically different between sleep stages. Therefore, elevated QTVI values found in patients with OSA cannot be interpreted as physiological sympathetic impact during REM sleep and should be considered as a risk factor for potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The absence of difference of the mean QTc interval values between NREM and REM stages seems to confirm our conclusion that sympathetic surges during REM stage do not induce repolarization variability. In patients without notable structural and electrical remodeling of myocardium, physiological elevation in sympathetic activity during REM sleep remains subthreshold concerning clinically significant increase of myocardial electrical instability.

  5. QT Interval Variability Index and QT Interval Duration in Different Sleep Stages: Analysis of Polysomnographic Recordings in Nonapneic Male Patients

    PubMed Central

    Viigimae, Moonika; Karai, Deniss; Pirn, Peeter; Pilt, Kristjan; Meigas, Kalju; Kaik, Jyri

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether different sleep stages, especially REM sleep, affect QT interval duration and variability in male patients without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Polysomnographic recordings of 30 patients were analyzed. Beat-to-beat QT interval variability was calculated using QTV index (QTVI) formula. For QTc interval calculation, in addition to Bazett's formula, linear and parabolic heart rate correction formulas with two separate α values were used. QTVI and QTc values were calculated as means of 2 awake, 3 NREM, and 3 REM sleep episodes; the duration of each episode was 300 sec. Mean QTVI values were not statistically different between sleep stages. Therefore, elevated QTVI values found in patients with OSA cannot be interpreted as physiological sympathetic impact during REM sleep and should be considered as a risk factor for potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The absence of difference of the mean QTc interval values between NREM and REM stages seems to confirm our conclusion that sympathetic surges during REM stage do not induce repolarization variability. In patients without notable structural and electrical remodeling of myocardium, physiological elevation in sympathetic activity during REM sleep remains subthreshold concerning clinically significant increase of myocardial electrical instability. PMID:26693490

  6. Atypical Headbanging Presentation of Idiopathic Sleep Related Rhythmic Movement Disorder: Three Cases with Video-Polysomnographic Documentation

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Shih-Bin; Schenck, Carlos H.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To describe three cases of sleep related, idiopathic rhythmic movement disorder (RMD) with atypical headbanging, consisting of head punching and head slapping. Methods: Three consecutive patients (2 males [11 and 13 years old) and one female [22 years old]) presented with atypical headbanging of 6 years, 7 years, and 17 years duration. In 2 cases, typical rhythmic headbanging (with use of the head) shifted after 3-4 years to atypical headbanging, with frontal head punching that was quasi-rhythmic. In one case, atypical headbanging (head-slapping) was the initial and only RMD. There was no injury from the headbanging. Prenatal, perinatal, developmental, behavioral-psychological, medical-neurological, and family histories were negative. Clinical evaluations and nocturnal video-polysomnography with seizure montage were performed on all patients. Results: Atypical headbanging was documented in all 3 cases; episodes always emerged late in the sleep cycle: from N2 sleep in 11 episodes, from REM sleep in 4 episodes, and from N1 sleep in 1 episode. Epileptiform activity was not detected. Clonazepam therapy was substantially effective in 1 case but not effective in 2 cases. Conclusions: These 3 cases of idiopathic atypical headbanging expand the literature on this RMD variant, as to our knowledge only one previously documented case has been reported. Citation: Yeh SB; Schenck CH. Atypical headbanging presentation of idiopathic sleep related rhythmic movement disorder: three cases with video-polysomnographic documentation. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(4):403-411. PMID:22893771

  7. A Polysomnographic Study of Parkinson's Disease Sleep Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; De Jesus, Sol; Walz, Roger; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin; Peng-Chen, Zhongxing; Okun, Michael S.; Alatriste-Booth, Vanessa; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common nonmotor phenomenon in Parkinson's disease (PD) affecting patient's quality of life. In this study, we examined the association between clinical characteristics with sleep disorders and sleep architecture patterns in a PD cohort. Patients underwent a standardized polysomnography study (PSG) in their “on medication” state. We observed that male gender and disease duration were independently associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Only lower levodopa equivalent dose (LED) was associated with periodic limb movement disorders (PLMD). REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) was more common among older patients, with higher MDS-UPDRS III scores, and LED. None of the investigated variables were associated with the awakenings/arousals (A/A). Sleep efficiency was predicted by amantadine usage and age, while sleep stage 1 was predicted by dopamine agonists and Hoehn & Yahr severity. The use of MAO-B inhibitors and MDS-UPDRS part III were predictors of sleep stages 2 and 3. Age was the only predictor of REM sleep stage and gender for total sleep time. We conclude that sleep disorders and architecture are poorly predictable by clinical PD characteristics and other disease related factors must also be contributing to these sleep disturbances. PMID:26504612

  8. Clinical and Physiological Correlates of Caffeine and Caffeine Metabolites in Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Youngberg, Mark R.; Karpov, Irina O.; Begley, Amy; Pollock, Bruce G.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the relationship between plasma concentrations of caffeine and subjective and polysomnographic measures of sleep in both good sleeper controls (GSC) and individuals with primary insomnia (PI), following the consumption of low-moderate quantities of caffeine in the home environment. Methods: 65 PI and 29 GSC, each consuming < 4 four coffee cup equivalents of caffeine daily, were recruited. Subjects completed a diary detailing sleep habits and caffeine consumption, one night of polysomnography, and a blood sample for measurement of plasma caffeine and its metabolites at bedtime. Plasma concentrations of caffeine, its primary metabolite, paraxanthine, and other metabolites were determined for each subject and correlated with self-report and polysomnographic measures. Results: No statistically significant differences were found between GSC and PI with respect to number of caffeinated beverages consumed (p = 0.91), estimated absolute caffeine ingestion (p = 0.48), time of caffeine consumption (p = 0.22), or plasma concentrations of caffeine (p = 0.92) or paraxanthine (p = 0.88). Significant correlations were found between plasma concentrations of caffeine/paraxanthine and endorsed caffeine intake (r = 0.58, p < 0.05) and estimated absolute caffeine ingestion (r = 0.57, p < 0.05). Plasma caffeine/paraxanthine was significantly correlated with percent stage 1 sleep (r = 0.32, p < 0.05). However, plasma concentrations of caffeine/paraxanthine were not significantly correlated with other subjective or polysomnographic measures of sleep disturbance in either GSC or PI. Conclusions: These data suggest that low-moderate amounts of caffeine consumed in the home environment, and mostly during morning hours, have little effect on subjective or polysomnographic measures of sleep in GSC or PI. Citation: Youngberg MR; Karpov IO; Begley A; Pollock BG; Buysse DJ. Clinical and physiological correlates of caffeine and caffeine metabolites in primary insomnia. J

  9. Swiss regulations for controlling clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Zanini, G M

    1998-04-01

    Switzerland has recently issued regulations designed to control all trials with drugs in human subjects, namely the 'Regolamento dell'Ufficio Intercantonale per il controllo dei medicamenti in fase di studio clinico' (Intercantonal Regulations Controlling Drugs used in Clinical Trials), which have been operating since 1st January 1995. These new regulations are generally consistent with other international regulations and have introduced the concept of good clinical practice (GCP) into Switzerland. There are other regulations in Switzerland, such as Federal regulations on immunobiological products, special rules governing the administration of radiolabelled drugs to humans, drugs of abuse and medical devices. Any gap in the central regulations must be filled by cantonal regulations, where they exist. This is a comprehensive review of the regulations governing clinical trials in Switzerland, with special attention being devoted to trials with therapeutic compounds and to compatibility between Swiss and international procedures.

  10. Sensitivity and specificity of polysomnographic criteria for defining insomnia.

    PubMed

    Edinger, Jack D; Ulmer, Christi S; Means, Melanie K

    2013-05-15

    In recent years, polysomnography-based eligibility criteria have been increasingly used to identify candidates for insomnia research, and this has been particularly true of studies evaluating pharmacologic therapy for primary insomnia. However, the sensitivity and specificity of PSG for identifying individuals with insomnia is unknown, and there is no consensus on the criteria sets which should be used for participant selection. In the current study, an archival data set was used to test the sensitivity and specificity of PSG measures for identifying individuals with primary insomnia in both home and lab settings. We then evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the eligibility criteria employed in a number of recent insomnia trials for identifying primary insomnia sufferers in our sample. Archival data analysis. Study participants' homes and a clinical sleep laboratory. 76 with primary insomnia and 78 non-complaining normal sleepers. ROC and cross-tabs analyses were used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of PSG-derived total sleep time, latency to persistent sleep, wake after sleep onset, and sleep efficiency for discriminating adults with primary insomnia from normal sleepers. None of the individual criteria accurately discriminated PI from normal sleepers, and none of the criteria sets used in recent trials demonstrated acceptable sensitivity and specificity for identifying primary insomnia. The use of quantitative PSG-based selection criteria in insomnia research may exclude many who meet current diagnostic criteria for an insomnia disorder.

  11. Control of OSA during automatic positive airway pressure titration in a clinical case series: predictors and accuracy of device download data.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsin-Chia Carol; Hillman, David R; McArdle, Nigel

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the factors associated with physiologic control of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) during automatic positive airway pressure (APAP) titration in a clinical series. To also assess the usefulness of apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) data downloaded from the APAP device (Dev AHI). Retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients with OSA who underwent APAP titration (Autoset Spirit, ResMed, Bella Vista, New South Wales, Australia ) with simultaneous polysomnographic (PSG) monitoring in the sleep laboratory. Tertiary sleep clinic. There were 190 consecutive patients with OSA referred for APAP titration. There were 58% of patients who achieved optimal or good control of OSA (titration PSG AHI < 10, or at least 50% reduction in AHI if diagnostic AHI < 15/hr) during APAP titration. The independent predictors of titration PSG AHI were a history of cardiac disease and elevated central apnea and arousal indices during the diagnostic study. Although the median and interquartile range (IQR) AHI from the device (7.0, 3.9-11.6 events/hr) was only slightly less than the PSG AHI (7.8, 3.9-14.4 events/hr, P = 0.04) during titration, case-by-case agreement between the two measures was poor (chi-square < 0.001). In a clinical sample control of OSA during APAP titration is often poor, and close clinical follow-up is particularly needed in patients with a history of cardiac disease or with high arousal or central apnea indices on the diagnostic study. Device AHI does not reliably assess control during APAP titration, and PSG assessment may be required if clinical response to treatment is poor. The findings relate to the ResMed AutoSet device and may not apply to other devices.

  12. Multivariate analysis of full-term neonatal polysomnographic data.

    PubMed

    Gerla, V; Paul, K; Lhotska, L; Krajca, V

    2009-01-01

    Polysomnography (PSG) is one of the most important noninvasive methods for studying maturation of the child brain. Sleep in infants is significantly different from sleep in adults. This paper addresses the problem of computer analysis of neonatal polygraphic signals. We applied methods designed for differentiating three important neonatal behavioral states: quiet sleep, active sleep, and wakefulness. The proportion of these states is a significant indicator of the maturity of the newborn brain in clinical practice. In this study, we used data provided by the Institute for Care of Mother and Child, Prague (12 newborn infants of similar postconceptional age). The data were scored by an experienced physician to four states (wake, quiet sleep, active sleep, movement artifact). For accurate classification, it was necessary to determine the most informative features. We used a method based on power spectral density (PSD) applied to each EEG channel. We also used features derived from electrooculogram (EOG), electromyogram (EMG), ECG, and respiration [pneumogram (PNG)] signals. The most informative feature was the measure of regularity of respiration from the PNG signal. We designed an algorithm for interpreting these characteristics. This algorithm was based on Markov models. The results of automatic detection of sleep states were compared to the "sleep profiles" determined visually. We evaluated both the success rate and the true positive rate of the classification, and statistically significant agreement of the two scorings was found. Two variants, for learning and for testing, were applied, namely learning from the data of all 12 newborns and tenfold cross-validation, and learning from the data of 11 newborns and testing on the data from the 12th newborn. We utilized information obtained from several biological signals (EEG, ECG, PNG, EMG, EOG) for our final classification. We reached the final success rate of 82.5%. The true positive rate was 81.8% and the false

  13. Cognitive, psychomotor and polysomnographic effects of trazodone in primary insomniacs.

    PubMed

    Roth, Alicia J; McCall, W Vaughn; Liguori, Anthony

    2011-12-01

    Trazodone is prescribed widely as a sleep aid, although it is indicated for depression, not insomnia. Its daytime cognitive and psychomotor effects have not been investigated systematically in insomniacs. The primary goal of this study was to quantify, in primary insomniacs, the hypnotic efficacy of trazodone and subsequent daytime impairments. Sixteen primary insomniacs (mean age 44 years) participated, with insomnia confirmed by overnight polysomnography (sleep efficiency ≤ 85%). Trazodone 50 mg was administered to participants 30 min before bedtime for 7 days in a 3-week, within-subjects, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. Subjective effects, equilibrium (anterior/posterior body sway), short-term memory, verbal learning, simulated driving and muscle endurance were assessed the morning after days 1 and 7 of drug administration. Sleep was evaluated with overnight polysomnography and modified Multiple Sleep Latency Tests (MSLT) on days 1 and 7. Trazodone produced small but significant impairments of short-term memory, verbal learning, equilibrium and arm muscle endurance across time-points. Relative to placebo across test days, trazodone was associated with fewer night-time awakenings, minutes of Stage 1 sleep and self-reports of difficulty sleeping. On day 7 only, slow wave sleep was greater and objective measures of daytime sleepiness lower with trazodone than with placebo. Although trazodone is efficacious for sleep maintenance difficulties, its associated cognitive and motor impairments may provide a modest caveat to health-care providers.

  14. Cognitive, Psychomotor, and Polysomnographic Effects of Trazodone in Primary Insomniacs

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Alicia J.; McCall, W. Vaughn; Liguori, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Summary Trazodone is widely prescribed as a sleep aid, although it is indicated for depression, not insomnia. Its daytime cognitive and psychomotor effects have not been systematically investigated in insomniacs. The primary goal of this study was to quantify, in primary insomniacs, the hypnotic efficacy of trazodone and subsequent daytime impairments. Sixteen primary insomniacs (mean age 44 years) participated, with insomnia confirmed by overnight polysomnography (sleep efficiency ≤ 85%). Trazodone 50 mg was administered to participants 30 minutes before bedtime for seven days, in a three-week, within-subjects, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. Subjective effects, equilibrium (anterior/posterior body sway), short-term memory, verbal learning, simulated driving, and muscle endurance were assessed the morning after Days 1 and 7 of drug administration. Sleep was evaluated with overnight polysomnography and modified Multiple Sleep Latency Tests (MSLT) on Days 1 and 7. Trazodone produced small but significant impairments of short-term memory, verbal learning, equilibrium, and arm muscle endurance across time points. Relative to placebo across test days, trazodone was associated with fewer nighttime awakenings, minutes of Stage 1 sleep, and self-reports of difficulty sleeping. On Day 7 only, slow wave sleep was greater and objective measures of daytime sleepiness lower with trazodone than with placebo. Although trazodone is efficacious for sleep maintenance difficulties, its associated cognitive and motor impairments may provide a modest caveat to healthcare providers. PMID:21623982

  15. Alexithymia and polysomnographic measures of sleep in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Bazydlo, R; Lumley, M A; Roehrs, T

    2001-01-01

    This study examined associations between alexithymia and objective characteristics of sleep (latencies, stages, and amount and patterning of REM sleep) that may contribute to subjective reports of poor sleep quality and impaired dream recall among alexithymic people. Fifty healthy, normally sleeping adults from the community completed the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale and slept uninterrupted for one night in the laboratory while polysomnography was conducted. Various measures of sleep latency, sleep stages, and REM sleep-related variables were obtained, and analyses correlated these sleep measures with alexithymia, controlling for age, sex, and level of depressed affect. Higher alexithymia scores were significantly related to increased stage 1 (light) sleep and decreased stage 3/4 (deep) sleep. Alexithymia was unrelated to overall sleep efficiency or percentage of stage 2 sleep. Alexithymia was related to more frequent REM episodes and more stage 1 sleep during and immediately after REM episodes but was unrelated to the absolute amount of REM sleep. Alexithymia was also related to an earlier onset of the first REM episode. Alexithymia is associated with more light sleep and less deep sleep, which may contribute to subjective reports of poor sleep and increased sleepiness, fatigue, and somatic symptoms. Although alexithymia is not associated with an overall reduction of REM sleep, the increased frequency of episodes of REM that are interrupted and followed by light sleep rather than complete awakenings may contribute to limited dream recall.

  16. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Toxicology Test Systems § 862.3280 Clinical toxicology control material. (a) Identification. A clinical toxicology...

  17. Comparing the Effects of Reflexology and Footbath on Sleep Quality in the Elderly: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Leila; Seyyedrasooli, Alehe; Zamanazadeh, Vahid; Nasiri, Khadijeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are common mental disorders reported among the elderly in all countries, and with nonpharmacological interventions, they could be helped to improve their sleep quality. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two interventions, foot reflexology and foot bath, on sleep quality in elderly people. Patients and Methods: This three-group randomized clinical trial (two experimental groups and a control group) was conducted on 69 elderly men. The two experimental groups had reflexology (n = 23) and foot bath (n = 23) interventions for 6 weeks. The reflexology intervention was done in the mornings, once a week for ten minutes on each foot. The participants in the foot bath group were asked to soak their feet in 41°C to 42°C water one hour before sleeping. The pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) was completed before and after the intervention through an interview process. Results: The results showed that the PSQI scores after intervention compared to before it in the reflexology and foot bath groups were statistically significant (P = 0.01 , P = 0.001); however, in the control group did not show a statistically significant difference (P = 0.14). In addition, the total score changes among the three groups were statistically significant (P = 0.01). Comparing the score changes of quality of sleep between the reflexology and foot bath groups showed that there was no significant difference in none of the components and the total score (P = 0.09). The two interventions had the same impact on the quality of sleep. Conclusions: It is suggested that the training of nonpharmacological methods to improve sleep quality such as reflexology and foot bath be included in the elderly health programs. In addition, it is recommended that the impact of these interventions on subjective sleep quality using polysomnographic recordings be explored in future research. PMID:26734475

  18. The relationship between the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and polysomnographic parameters in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Ju; Kang, Hyun Woo; Lee, Lae Hyung

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the subjective Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and objective polysomnographic parameters that was compared in dichotomized groups of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with and without excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). A retrospective review of the 96 consecutive snoring patients suspected of OSA due to upper airway problems was performed. ESS score was assessed and EDS was considered present when the ESS score was >10. Polysomnography was performed for each patient. Comparisons of polysomnographic parameters between both groups of patients were performed using Mann-Whitney U-tests. The Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated. EDS patients showed significantly greater body mass index (BMI), AHI and ODI, higher percentage of snoring time, a longer time length of SpO(2) < 90% and lower minimum SpO(2) compared to no EDS patients. There was no statistical difference in other sleep parameters. A positive correlation between the ESS score and BMI, percentage of snoring time, minimum SpO(2) and time length of SpO(2) < 90% was identified. Despite many controversies, our conclusion is that apnea/hypoxemia has considerable coherence to account for the EDS measured by ESS in OSA patients.

  19. Quality Control in Clinical Laboratory Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Oct 2013 – Jan 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quality Control in Clinical Laboratory Samples 5a. CONTRACT...Bioeffects Branch, Bioeffects Division, Human Effectiveness Directorate, 711 HPW/RHDJ, Air Force Research Laboratory , Wright Patterson AFB, OH 45433, USA...Force Research Laboratory Wright-Patterson AFB OH 45433-5707 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 711 HPW/RHDJ 11. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY REPORT

  20. Effects of moderate-intensity exercise on polysomnographic and subjective sleep quality in older adults with mild to moderate sleep complaints.

    PubMed

    King, Abby C; Pruitt, Leslie A; Woo, Sandra; Castro, Cynthia M; Ahn, David K; Vitiello, Michael V; Woodward, Steven H; Bliwise, Donald L

    2008-09-01

    This study sought to determine the 12-month effects of exercise increases on objective and subjective sleep quality in initially inactive older persons with mild to moderate sleep complaints. A nonclinical sample of underactive adults 55 years old or older (n=66) with mild to moderate chronic sleep complaints were randomly assigned to a 12-month program of primarily moderate-intensity endurance exercise (n=36) or a health education control program (n=30). The main outcome measure was polysomnographic sleep recordings, with additional measures of subjective sleep quality, physical activity, and physical fitness. Directional hypotheses were tested. Using intent-to-treat methods, at 12 months exercisers, relative to controls, spent significantly less time in polysomnographically measured Stage 1 sleep (between-arm difference=2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7-4.0; p=003), spent more time in Stage 2 sleep (between-arm difference=3.2, 95% CI, 0.6-5.7; p=.04), and had fewer awakenings during the first third of the sleep period (between-arm difference=1.0, 95% CI, 0.39-1.55; p=.03). Exercisers also reported greater 12-month improvements relative to controls in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) sleep disturbance subscale score (p=.009), sleep diary-based minutes to fall asleep (p=.01), and feeling more rested in the morning (p=.02). Compared with general health education, a 12-month moderate-intensity exercise program that met current physical activity recommendations for older adults improved some objective and subjective dimensions of sleep to a modest degree. The results suggest additional areas for investigation in this understudied area.

  1. Contact Lens Methods for Clinical Myopia Control.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Philip Raey Kidd; Munro, Oliver James; Phillips, John Robert

    2016-09-01

    A number of optical methods for slowing myopia progression have been tested and are now available. However, data on real-world use in clinical use is scarce. Here, we present a review of the clinical outcomes for patients attending a specialist myopia control clinic at The University of Auckland Optometry School, NZ. We report a comparative case series of 110 patients (aged 4-33 years, mean: 12.13 ± 4.58 years, 62% female) who attended the clinic between 2010 and 2014. Fifty-six were prescribed orthokeratology, 32 dual focus soft contact lenses, and 22 received advice only. Initial myopia, vitreous and axial eye length, previous myopia progression, age, number of myopic parents, and gender were not significantly different between orthokeratology and dual focus soft contact lens groups. Mean follow-up time for the orthokeratology and dual focus lens groups was the same (orthokeratology: 1.30 ± 0.88 years; dual focus lens: 1.33 ± 0.80 years (p = 0.989)). There was a significant reduction in the annualized myopia progression in both groups (orthokeratology: -1.17 ± 0.55 to -0.09 ± 017 D/yr, p < 0.001; dual focus soft contact lens: -1.15 ± 0.46 to -0.10 ± 0.23 D/yr, p < 0.001). There was no difference between orthokeratology and dual focus lens treatment efficacy (p = 0.763), nor in axial or vitreous chamber length changes after treatment (p = 0.184). One adverse event was reported over the 4-year period. Both orthokeratology and dual focus soft contact lenses are effective strategies for targeting myopia progression in the clinic. We saw no significant difference in the efficacy of the two methods in this regard, and so we believe there are very few barriers for any contact lens practitioner to be actively promoting myopia control treatment to at-risk patients.

  2. ADULTS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Krupa N.; Majeed, Zahraa; Yoruk, Yilmaz B.; Yang, Hongmei; Hilton, Tiffany N.; McMahon, James M.; Hall, William J.; Walck, Donna; Luque, Amneris E.; Ryan, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected older adults (HOA) are at risk of functional decline. Interventions promoting physical activity that can attenuate functional decline and are easily translated into the HOA community are of high priority. We conducted a randomized, controlled clinical trial to evaluate whether a physical activity counseling intervention based on self-determination theory (SDT) improves physical function, autonomous motivation, depression and the quality of life (QOL) in HOA. Methods A total of 67 community-dwelling HOA with mild-to-moderate functional limitations were randomized to one of two groups: a physical activity counseling group or the usual care control group. We used SDT to guide the development of the experimental intervention. Outcome measures that were collected at baseline and final study visits included a battery of physical function tests, levels of physical activity, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL. Results The study participants were similar in their demographic and clinical characteristics in both the treatment and control groups. Overall physical performance, gait speed, measures of endurance and strength, and levels of physical activity improved in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Measures of autonomous regulation such as identified regulation, and measures of depression and QOL improved significantly in the treatment group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Across the groups, improvement in intrinsic regulation and QOL correlated with an improvement in physical function (p<0.05). Conclusion Our findings suggest that a physical activity counseling program grounded in SDT can improve physical function, autonomous motivation, depression, and QOL in HOA with functional limitations. PMID:26867045

  3. The feasibility of home polysomnographic recordings prescribed for sleep-related neurological disorders: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, N; Jonas, J; Schaff, J-L; Koessler, L; Maillard, L; Vespignani, H

    2014-09-01

    Home polysomnography is being increasingly developed for sleep studies, with various grades of quality. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of affordable, high quality home polysomnographic recordings prescribed for suspected sleep-related neurological disorders. We prospectively screened all patients referred to the specialist sleep disorders clinic in Nancy University Hospital between May 2011 and August 2011. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they required polysomnography for the diagnosis of a sleep-related neurological disorder. One-night, polysomnography was performed in each patient's home by a trained sleep technician. Financial cost was determined prior to inclusion. A recording was considered as satisfactory if all the following criteria were present: at least, one EEG channel with continuous signal allowing determination of sleep stages and wake during more than 66% of sleep time; at least, one usable respiratory channel (airflow or either band) during more than 66% of sleep time; and usable oximetry during more than 66% of sleep time. Forty-eight of the 139 screened patients were included. Among the 48 home polysomnography recordings, 35 (72.9%) were satisfactory. Thirteen (27.1%) tracings displayed an unsatisfactory loss of EEG data, including seven (14.6%) tracings with an unsatisfactory loss of respiratory data. Home polysomnography prescribed for suspected sleep-related neurological disorders is feasible, with affordable costs, whilst maintaining high quality recording. Further studies are needed to measure the real medico-economic impact of promoting outpatient domiciliary explorations for sleep-related neurological disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. The Effect of Psychosocial Stress on Sleep: A Review of Polysomnographic Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eui-Joong; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review examines the effect of diverse psychosocial stressors on polysomnographic measures of sleep. Sixty-three articles were located and categorized in terms of the types of stressors imposed. Experimental stress resulted in fairly consistent changes: decreases in slow wave sleep, REM sleep, and sleep efficiency (SE), as well as increases in awakenings. Data were limited in terms of response to non-experimental stressors, except for the case of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on sleep, where a number of reports suggest that PTSD patients have increased awakenings and decreased SE. Future research needs to define stress more precisely in terms of duration and severity and to measure its impacts on sleep in populations that differ in terms of age, comorbid illness, gender, and so forth. Without such fine-grained analyses, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions about this important area. PMID:17937582

  5. What is "success" following surgery for obstructive sleep apnea? The effect of different polysomnographic scoring systems.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Jonathan C; Robinson, Sam; Antic, Nick A; McEvoy, R Doug; Windler, Samantha; Mackay, Stuart; Carney, A Simon

    2012-08-01

    To illustrate that the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is dependent on the polysomnographic scoring criteria used, and the success rates of treatments for OSA are dependent on the defined outcome measures. Retrospective case series with prospective reanalysis of polysomnographic data. Consecutively treated adult patients (N = 40) with moderate to severe OSA having multilevel pharyngeal surgery in 2007 were studied. All patients underwent submucosal lingualplasty and concurrent or previous uvulopalatopharyngoplasty ± palatal advancement. Full polysomnography (PSG) was performed preoperatively and at a mean of 145 days postoperatively. Pre- and postoperative PSG data were analyzed by two different but widely used scoring systems for the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) 1999 Chicago criteria and the AASM 2007 recommended criteria. Follow-up PSG data were available in 31 of 40 patients. Successful surgery was defined as a reduction in AHI(Rec) <20 with a 50% reduction from the patient's baseline, and in this group the surgical intervention was associated with a 72.2% success rate. If, however, differing AHI metrics are used or the absolute or percent reduction used to define a successful outcome is changed, then the rate of surgical success is shown to range from 39% to 92%. Different criteria for measuring AHI and defining success following OSA surgery can produce widely conflicting outcome data. Reported results following OSA surgery should be interpreted with this in mind. Using acceptable criteria, multilevel sleep surgery can be demonstrated to be of benefit to the majority of carefully selected patients. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Polysomnographic evaluation of sleep quality and quantitative variables in women as a function of mood, reproductive status, and age.

    PubMed

    Orff, Henry J; Meliska, Charles J; Lopez, Ana; Martinez, Fernando; Sorenson, Diane; Parry, Barbara L

    2012-12-01

    This archival cross-sectional investigation examined the impact of mood, reproductive status (RS), and age on polysomnographic (PSG) measures in women. PSG was performed on 73 normal controls (NC) and 64 depressed patients (DP), in the course of studies in menstruating, pregnant, postpartum, and peri- and postmenopausal women. A two-factor, between-subjects multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to test the main effects of reproductive status (RS: menstrual vs pregnant vs postpartum vs menopausal) and diagnosis (NC vs DP), and their interaction, on PSG measures. To further refine the analyses, a two-factor, between subjects MANOVA was used to test the main effects of age (19 to 27 vs 28 to 36 vs 37 to 45 vs 46+ years) and diagnosis on the PSG data. Analyses revealed that in DP women, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep percentage was significantly elevated relative to NC across both RS and age. Significant differences in sleep efficiency, Stage 1%, and REM density were associated with RS; differences in total sleep time, Stage 2 percentage, and Stage 4 percentage were associated with differences in age. Both RS and age were related to differences in sleep latency, Stage 3 percentage, and Delta percentage. Finally, wake after sleep onset time, REM percentage, and REM latency did not vary with respect to RS or age. Overall, this investigation examined three major variables (mood, RS, and age) that are known to impact sleep in women. Of the variables, age appeared to have the greatest impact on PSG sleep measures, reflecting changes occurring across the lifespan.

  7. Controlled outcome studies of child clinical hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Adinolfi, Barbara; Gava, Nicoletta

    2013-09-01

    Background Hypnosis is defined as "as an interaction in which the hypnotist uses suggested scenarios ("suggestions") to encourage a person's focus of attention to shift towards inner experiences". Aim of the work The focus of this review is to summarize the findings of controlled outcome studies investigating the potential of clinical hypnosis in pediatric populations. We will examine the following themes: anesthesia, acute and chronic pain, chemotherapy-related distress, along with other specific medical issues. Results Hypnosis is an effective method to reduce pain and anxiety before, during and after the administration of anesthetics, during local dental treatments, invasive medical procedures and in burn children. Hypnosis can be successfully used to manage recurrent headaches, abdominal pain, irritable bowel syndrome and chemotherapy-related distress. Hypnosis has an important role in managing symptoms and improving the quality of life of children suffering from asthma and cystic fibrosis and in facilitating the treatment of insomnia in school-age children. Finally, hypnosis can be effectively used for the treatment of some habitual disorders such as nocturnal enuresis and dermatologic conditions, including atopic dermatitis and chronic eczema Conclusions Clinical hypnosis seems to be a useful, cheap and side-effects free tool to manage fear, pain and several kinds of stressful experiences in pediatric populations. Children who receive self-hypnosis trainings achieve significantly greater improvements in their physical health, quality of life, and self-esteem.

  8. 21 CFR 862.3280 - Clinical toxicology control material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clinical toxicology control material. 862.3280... Systems § 862.3280 Clinical toxicology control material. (a) Identification. A clinical toxicology control... detect and monitor systematic deviations from accuracy resulting from reagent or instrument defects....

  9. [Oral candidiasis: clinical features and control].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2010-10-01

    Candidiasis is the most commonly encountered fungal infection, and oral candidiasis is often observed as a local opportunistic infection. Oral candidiasis is clinically divided into three types: acute forms, chronic forms, and Candida-associated lesions. Candida adhesion and multiplication are largely regulated by the local and systemic factors of the host. The local factors include impairment of the oral mucosal integrity, which is usually impaired by hyposalivation, anticancer drugs/radiation for head and neck cancers, denture wearing, a decrease in the oral bacterial population, and poor oral hygiene. Among Candida species, oral candidiasis is mostly caused by Candida albicans (C. albicans), C. glabrata, or C. tropicalis. Oral Candida induces a variety of symptoms, such as oral mucosal inflammation manifesting as an uncomfortable feeling, pain, erythema, erosion, taste abnormalities, and hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. Candida overgrowth in the oral cavity may disseminate to distant organs. Therefore, in order to avoid the sequelae of systemic candidiasis, oral candidiasis should be rapidly controlled. Oral candidiasis is usually treated by the local application of antifungal drugs. However, oral candidiasis occasionally escapes the control of such local treatment due to the development of multi-drug resistant Candida strains and species or due to the suppression of salivation or cellular immune activity. When drug-resistant strains are suspected as the pathogens and when the host is generally compromised, the oral administration of combinations of antifungal drugs, enhancement of cellular immune activity, and improvement of the nutritional condition are recommended.

  10. Control of OSA During Automatic Positive Airway Pressure Titration in a Clinical Case Series: Predictors and Accuracy of Device Download Data

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hsin-Chia Carol; Hillman, David R.; McArdle, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the factors associated with physiologic control of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) during automatic positive airway pressure (APAP) titration in a clinical series. To also assess the usefulness of apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) data downloaded from the APAP device (Dev AHI). Design: Retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients with OSA who underwent APAP titration (Autoset Spirit, ResMed, Bella Vista, New South Wales, Australia ) with simultaneous polysomnographic (PSG) monitoring in the sleep laboratory. Setting: Tertiary sleep clinic. Participants: There were 190 consecutive patients with OSA referred for APAP titration. Measurements and Results: There were 58% of patients who achieved optimal or good control of OSA (titration PSG AHI < 10, or at least 50% reduction in AHI if diagnostic AHI < 15/hr) during APAP titration. The independent predictors of titration PSG AHI were a history of cardiac disease and elevated central apnea and arousal indices during the diagnostic study. Although the median and interquartile range (IQR) AHI from the device (7.0, 3.9-11.6 events/hr) was only slightly less than the PSG AHI (7.8, 3.9-14.4 events/hr, P = 0.04) during titration, case-by-case agreement between the two measures was poor (chi-square < 0.001). Conclusion: In a clinical sample control of OSA during APAP titration is often poor, and close clinical follow-up is particularly needed in patients with a history of cardiac disease or with high arousal or central apnea indices on the diagnostic study. Device AHI does not reliably assess control during APAP titration, and PSG assessment may be required if clinical response to treatment is poor. The findings relate to the ResMed AutoSet device and may not apply to other devices. Citation: Huang HCC; Hillman DR; McArdle N. Control of OSA during automatic positive airway pressure titration in a clinical case series: predictors and accuracy of device download data. SLEEP 2012;35(9):1277

  11. Aircraft noise effects on sleep: application of the results of a large polysomnographic field study.

    PubMed

    Basner, Mathias; Samel, Alexander; Isermann, Ullrich

    2006-05-01

    The Institute of Aerospace Medicine at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) investigated the influence of nocturnal aircraft noise on sleep in polysomnographic laboratory and field studies between 1999 and 2004. The results of the field studies were used by the Regional Council of Leipzig (Germany) for the establishment of a noise protection plan in the official approval process for the expansion of Leipzig/Halle airport. Methods and results of the DLR field study are described in detail. Special attention is given to the dose-response relationship between the maximum sound pressure level of an aircraft noise event and the probability to wake up, which was used to establish noise protection zones directly related to the effects of noise on sleep. These protection zones differ qualitatively and quantitatively from zones that are solely based on acoustical criteria. The noise protection plan for Leipzig/Halle airport is presented and substantiated: (1) on average, there should be less than one additional awakening induced by aircraft noise, (2) awakenings recalled in the morning should be avoided as much as possible, and (3) aircraft noise should interfere as little as possible with the process of falling asleep again. Issues concerned with the representativeness of the study sample are discussed.

  12. Sleep in the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi): A semi-restrictive, non-invasive, polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Aguilar, Manuel Alejandro; Ayala-Guerrero, Fructuoso; Jiménez-Anguiano, Anabel; Santillán-Doherty, Ana María; García-Orduña, Francisco; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2015-02-01

    The normal sleep patterns of the spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) have not been described yet. The objective of this study was to characterize the electrophysiological patterns, sleeping postures, and sleep-wake cycle in semi-restricted spider monkeys. Continuous 24-hr polysomnographic (PSG) recordings, involving simultaneous recording of non-invasive electroencephalographic (EEG), electro-oculographic (EOG), and electromyographic (EMG) activities, were carried out in captive monkeys living in outdoor rainforest enclosures. Electrode placement was done according to the human international 10-20 system. Specific behaviors displayed by monkeys during the sleep-wake cycles were correlated with the PSG recordings. The nycthemeral distribution of the sleep-wake cycle was also calculated. The results show that electrophysiological N-REM sleep patterns in spider monkeys are similar to those observed in other primates, including human beings. Furthermore, a vertical semi-fetal posture was observed during N-REM and REM sleep phases. The amount of nocturnal sleep was significantly higher than that of the diurnal period, showing that the spider monkey is a diurnal primate. An outstanding finding was the absence of muscular atonia during the spider monkey's REM sleep, which suggests that arboreal primates have developed a neuromuscular mechanism specialized for sleeping in a vertical posture.

  13. Manual vs. automated analysis of polysomnographic recordings in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Stege, Gerben; Vos, Petra J E; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Hilkens, Pieter H E; van de Ven, Marjo J T; Heijdra, Yvonne F; van den Elshout, Frank J J

    2013-05-01

    The sleep quality, as assessed by polysomnography (PSG), of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be severely disturbed. The manual analysis of PSGs is time-consuming, and computer systems have been developed to automatically analyze PSGs. Studies on the reliability of automated analyses in healthy subjects show varying results, and the purpose of this study was to assess whether automated analysis of PSG by one certain automatic system in patients with COPD provide accurate outcomes when compared to manual analysis. In a retrospective study, the full-night polysomnographic recordings of patients with and without COPD were analyzed automatically by Matrix Sleep Analysis software and manually. The outcomes of manual and automated analyses in both groups were compared using Bland-Altman plots and Students' paired t tests. Fifty PSGs from patients with COPD and 57 PSGs from patients without COPD were included. In both study groups, agreement between manual and automated analysis was poor in nearly all sleep and respiratory parameters, like total sleep time, sleep efficiency, sleep latency, amount of rapid eye movement sleep and other sleep stages, number of arousals, apnea-hypopnea index, and desaturation index. Automated analysis of PSGs by the studied automated system in patients with COPD has poor agreement with manual analysis when looking at sleep and respiratory parameters and should, therefore, not replace the manual analysis of PSG recordings in patients with COPD.

  14. Detection of Periodic Leg Movements by Machine Learning Methods Using Polysomnographic Parameters Other Than Leg Electromyography.

    PubMed

    Umut, İlhan; Çentik, Güven

    2016-01-01

    The number of channels used for polysomnographic recording frequently causes difficulties for patients because of the many cables connected. Also, it increases the risk of having troubles during recording process and increases the storage volume. In this study, it is intended to detect periodic leg movement (PLM) in sleep with the use of the channels except leg electromyography (EMG) by analysing polysomnography (PSG) data with digital signal processing (DSP) and machine learning methods. PSG records of 153 patients of different ages and genders with PLM disorder diagnosis were examined retrospectively. A novel software was developed for the analysis of PSG records. The software utilizes the machine learning algorithms, statistical methods, and DSP methods. In order to classify PLM, popular machine learning methods (multilayer perceptron, K-nearest neighbour, and random forests) and logistic regression were used. Comparison of classified results showed that while K-nearest neighbour classification algorithm had higher average classification rate (91.87%) and lower average classification error value (RMSE = 0.2850), multilayer perceptron algorithm had the lowest average classification rate (83.29%) and the highest average classification error value (RMSE = 0.3705). Results showed that PLM can be classified with high accuracy (91.87%) without leg EMG record being present.

  15. Do periodic arm movements during sleep exist in healthy subjects? A polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Gabelia, David; Mitterling, Thomas; Högl, Birgit; Wenning, Gregor K; Frauscher, Birgit

    2014-09-01

    Despite several polysomnographic studies on periodic leg movements (PLM) in healthy sleep, data on the prevalence and characteristics of periodic arm movements (PAM) in normal subjects are lacking. We aimed to investigate PAM and their association with PLM during wakefulness and sleep in healthy subjects. Ninety-one participants underwent video-polysomnography according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine 2007 criteria. In addition to standard electromyographic registration, data for both flexor digitorum superficialis muscles were recorded. Sixty-two subjects (68.1%) had a PAM index during wakefulness >5/h (median PAM index during wakefulness, 8.8/h; range, 0-77). Seven subjects (7.7%) had a PAM index >5/h during sleep (median PAM index during sleep, 0.7/h; range, 0-47.4). In 14% of cases, PAM during wakefulness were coincident with PLM during wakefulness. During sleep, this coincidence was not evident. The correlation between PAM and PLM was weak to moderate (during wakefulness: Spearman's ρ = 0.576, P < 0.001; during sleep: Spearman's ρ = 0.222, P = 0.036). In healthy subjects, PAM occur predominantly during wakefulness with no apparent true periodicity. In contrast to classical PLM, some PAM may not present a true periodic phenomenon, but rather random voluntary movements meeting the wide range of periodicity criteria for PLM. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sexual behaviors during sleep associated with polysomnographically confirmed parasomnia overlap disorder.

    PubMed

    Cicolin, Alessandro; Tribolo, Antonella; Giordano, Alessandra; Chiarot, Elisabetta; Peila, Elena; Terreni, Anna; Bucca, Caterina; Mutani, Roberto

    2011-05-01

    Parasomnia overlap disorder (POD) refers to a sleep disorder characterized by the association of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) with NREM sleep parasomnia in the same patient. Sexual behaviors during sleep (SBS) can include most wakeful sexual activities and are classified in the ICSD-2 as a variant of confusional arousals and sleepwalking, both NREM parasomnias. A case of SBS associated with sleepwalking and possible RBD has been previously described, but it was not confirmed by polysomnography (PSG). We report two patients with SBS associated with POD documented by PSG. In one patient (60-year-old female) SBS was video-polysomnographically demonstrated: a few minute episode of masturbation occurring during slow-wave sleep (SWS) and preceded by hypersynchronous delta pattern. During the episode, the EEG pattern showed the persistence of delta rhythms with increasing alpha activity. When awoken by technicians, the patient was not aware of her sexual behavior and did not report any dream. The other patient, a 41-year-old male with a history of sleepwalking and RBD, was legally charged with repeatedly sexually fondling a young girl during the night. The POD was documented by PSG. The parasomnia defense, including sleepsex, was accepted by the Court and the patient was acquitted. This is an unprecedented report of SBS in patients with PSG-confirmed POD and of SBS documented during video-PSG. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A comparison of the effects of packing or transseptal suture on polysomnographic parameters in septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Murat; Bostancı, Aslı; Akdag, Mehmet; Dinc, Oktay

    2013-03-01

    Our objective is to examine the effects of using nasal packing or transseptal suture in septoplasty in young patients, specifically on the polysomnographic parameters in the post-operative period. A total of 43 patients who had undergone septoplasty surgery after a diagnosis of septum deviation were included in the study. Packing was inserted in 23 patients, and transseptal suture was performed in the other 20 patients. A polysomnography test was performed on the patients on the first day after surgery and during the post-operative period. A post-operative increase was found in the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) within both the packing and suture groups. The AHI increase in the packing group was statistically significant (p < 0.05). In the post-operative period, the fall in average oxygen desaturation in the packing group was significantly higher compared to suture group (p < 0.001). In addition, the arousal index was significantly higher in the packing group (p < 0.05). The use of nasal packing in young patients after septoplasty surgery reduced the quality of life after surgery and had negative effects on respiration during sleep. The finding that nasal packing caused obstructive sleep apnea syndrome even in young patients leads us to hypothesise that the effect of the packing on comorbid patients' respiratory function during sleep would be even more severe.

  18. [Practice and thought for quality control of drug clinical trial institution for clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Wu, Ping; Li, Yong; Lian, Feng-mei; Liu, Ping; Qiao, Jie

    2014-12-01

    The quality control of new drug cilnical trial is the effective guaranty for the pharmaceutical safety and effective after available on market. Enhancing the inspection and quality control of new drug clinical trials provide the crucial importance to achieve a persistent profitable standard. This paper mainly discussed the problems of current clinical trials based on annual check of drug clinical trial institution.

  19. Selecting control interventions for clinical outcome studies.

    PubMed

    Barkauskas, Violet H; Lusk, Sally L; Eakin, Brenda L

    2005-04-01

    In the current research environment the design and management of control groups is becoming more complex. The selection of a control group design is dependent on study goals, presence and quality of existing interventions, urgency of the problem or issue being addressed by the intervention, and factors related to the study site. The purpose of the presentation is to identify various approaches to the design of control groups in experimental studies and to identify their strengths, limitations, and applications. A case study exemplifies the issues associated with control group selection and design.

  20. Sleep Irregularity in the Previous Week Influences the First-Night Effect in Polysomnographic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Da-Hye; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Han, Changsu; Bok, Ki-Nam; Moon, Jung Ho; Lee, Eunil; Kim, Leen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The first-night effect is a well-known phenomenon resulting from an individual's maladaptation to the unfamiliar environment of a sleep laboratory. However, there have been no direct reports of the effect of previous sleep patterns on the first-night effect. We aimed to investigate the effect the previous week's sleep pattern on the first-night effect. Methods Twenty-four young, healthy, male participants completed the study procedure. During one week prior to study, the participants kept sleep diaries and wore actigraphs to identify sleep-wake pattern. Two consecutive nights of polysomnography were conducted after that. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were applied to compare sleep variables of the two nights. Variance (standard deviation) of sleep onset time during the previous week was used as an index of irregularity. A Kendall's ranked correlation analysis and a linear regression test were applied to detect correlation between sleep irregularity and the first-night effect measured by polysomnography. Results There were significant differences in the values of sleep efficiency (p=0.011) and wake after sleep onset (WASO) (p=0.006) between the two nights. Sleep efficiency was lower and WASO was higher on the first night as compared to the second night. Sleep irregularity in the previous week was negatively correlated with sleep efficiency (p<0.001) of the first night, but was not significantly correlated with any other sleep parameters. Conclusion We replicated the existence of the first-night effect commonly observed in sleep studies. Sleep irregularity in the previous week may influence the first-night effect in polysomnographic studies. PMID:27081381

  1. Neurophysiological Two-Channel Polysomnographic Device in the Diagnosis of Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, Álex; Sampol, Gabriel; Jurado, Maria José; Cambrodi, Roser; Lloberes, Patricia; Romero, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: Our objective was to evaluate a portable device (Somté, Compumedics, Australia), which incorporates 2 neurophysiological channels (electroencephalography and electrooculography) with cardiorespiratory monitoring for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Method: Full polysomnography (PSG) and Somté recordings were simultaneously performed in 68 patients with suspected OSA. Data were analyzed blindly by 2 scorers. Results: A good agreement between methods in sleep efficiency was observed (68.8% [18.4] with PSG vs 68% [19.1] with Somté [p: n.s.] for scorer 1, and 67.5% [19.1] vs 68.4% [18.5; p: n.s.] for scorer 2). The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) obtained with Somté was lower than with PSG: 19 (17.8) vs 21.7 (19) (p < 0.001) for scorer 1, and 16.6 (16.7) vs 20 (18.8) (p < 0.001) for scorer 2. The sensitivity of Somté for a PSG-AHI > 5 was 91% for scorer 1 and 90% for scorer 2, while specificity was 77% and 90%, respectively. The areas under the receiver operating curve for different PSG-AHI cutoff points (≥ 5, ≥ 15, and ≥ 30) were 0.81, 0.90, and 0.86, respectively, for scorer 1, and 0.90, 0.88, and 0.83 for scorer 2. Conclusions: These data suggest that Somté is an effective device to identify sleep and respiratory variables in patients with suspected OSA. Citation: Ferré Á; Sampol G; Jurado MJ; Cambrodi R; Lloberes P; Romero O. Neurophysiological two-channel polysomnographic device in the diagnosis of sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(2):163-168. PMID:22505861

  2. Concordance of Polysomnographic and Actigraphic Measurement of Sleep and Wake in Older Women with Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Taibi, Diana M.; Landis, Carol A.; Vitiello, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: The objective of this secondary analysis was to evaluate concurrent validity of actigraphy and polysomnography (PSG) in older women with insomnia. Methods: Concurrent validity of actigraphy and PSG was examined through (1) comparison of sleep outcomes from each recording method; (2) calculation of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and predictive values from epoch-by-epoch data; and (3) statistical and graphical exploration of the relationship between sleep disturbance severity and concordance of actigraphy and PSG. Subjects were 16 community-dwelling older women (mean age 69.4 ± 8.1) with insomnia who underwent 8 nights of concurrent actigraphy and PSG. Results: Sleep efficiency reflected much greater sleep disturbance on PSG (66.9%) than actigraphy (84.4%). Based on generalized linear models, the parameter estimates for agreement between actigraphy and PSG were statistically significant (p < 0.05) for total sleep time and sleep latency, verged on significance for WASO (p = 0.052), but was not significant for sleep efficiency (p = 0.20). Epoch-by-epoch analysis showed high sensitivity (96.1%), low specificity (36.4%), and modest values on agreement (75.4%) and predictive values of sleep (74.7%) and wake (80.2%). Generalized linear models showed that overall accuracy of actigraphy declined as sleep efficiency declined (unstandardized Beta = 0.741, p < 0.001). Based on this model, sleep efficiency of 73% was the point at which accuracy declined below an acceptable accuracy value of 80%. Conclusions: Actigraphy offers a relatively inexpensive and unobtrusive method for measuring sleep, but it appears to underestimate sleep disturbance, particularly at sleep efficiency levels below 73%, in older women with insomnia. Citation: Taibi DM; Landis CA; Vitiello MV. Concordance of polysomnographic and actigraphic measurement of sleep and wake in older women with insomnia. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(3):217-225. PMID:23493815

  3. Direct comparison of two actigraphy devices with polysomnographically recorded naps in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Nicola; Buman, Matthew P; McDevitt, Elizabeth A; Ricker, Ashley A; Mednick, Sara C

    2013-06-01

    The last 20 yrs have seen a marked increase in studies utilizing actigraphy in free-living environments. The aim of the present study is to directly compare two commercially available actigraph devices with concurrent polysomnography (PSG) during a daytime nap in healthy young adults. Thirty healthy young adults, ages 18-31 (mean 20.77 yrs, SD 3.14 yrs) simultaneously wore AW-64 and GT3X+ devices during a polysomnographically recorded nap. Mann-Whitney U (M-U) test, intraclass correlation coefficients, and Bland-Altman statistic were used to compare total sleep time (TST), sleep onset latency (SOL), wake after sleep onset (WASO), and sleep efficiency (SE) between the two actigraphs and PSG. Epoch-by-epoch (EBE) agreement was calculated to determine accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, predictive values for sleep (PVS) and wake (PVW), and kappa and prevalence- and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) coefficients. All frequency settings provided by the devices were examined. For both actigraphs, EBE analysis found accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PVS, and PVW comparable to previous reports of other similar devices. Kappa and PABAK coefficients showed moderate to high agreement with PSG depending on device settings. The GT3X+ overestimated TST and SE, and underestimated SOL and WASO, whereas no significant difference was found between AW-64 and PSG. However, GT3X+ showed overall better EBE agreements to PSG than AW-64. We conclude that both actigraphs are valid and reliable devices for detecting sleep/wake diurnal patterns. The choice between devices should be based on several parameters as reliability, cost of the device, scoring algorithm, target population, experimental condition, and aims of the study (e.g., sleep and/or physical activity).

  4. [Placebo control and clinical trial of Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing

    2010-10-01

    World Health Organization aims to develop safe, effective and practical traditional medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and other complementary and alternative medicine are being recognized in the whole world nowadays. However, the definite effect of Chinese medicine is still in need of scientific research proof. Placebo control is of equal importance to active control and blank control in clinical trial of TCM. This article briefly reviewed the importance of placebo control and commented on its present situation in clinical trial of TCM. This article also brought up the preliminary proposals of placebo application in TCM clinical trial. We should emphasize scientific placebo preparation and good design of placebo-controlled trial, which are directed by International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. A good clinical trial project will avoid unnecessary wastes and provide safe and effective treatment for people.

  5. Bed bugs: clinical relevance and control options.

    PubMed

    Doggett, Stephen L; Dwyer, Dominic E; Peñas, Pablo F; Russell, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, bed bugs of the species Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus have undergone a worldwide resurgence. These bed bugs are blood-sucking insects that readily bite humans. Cutaneous reactions may occur and can start out as small macular lesions that can develop into distinctive wheals of around 5 cm in diameter, which are accompanied by intense itching. Occasionally, bullous eruptions may result. If bed bugs are numerous, the patient can present with widespread urticaria or eythematous rashes. Often, bites occur in lines along the limbs. Over 40 pathogens have been detected in bed bugs, but there is no definitive evidence that they transmit any disease-causing organisms to humans. Anemia may result when bed bugs are numerous, and their allergens can trigger asthmatic reactions. The misuse of chemicals and other technologies for controlling bed bugs has the potential to have a deleterious impact on human health, while the insect itself can be the cause of significant psychological trauma. The control of bed bugs is challenging and should encompass a multidisciplinary approach utilizing nonchemical means of control and the judicious use of insecticides. For accommodation providers, risk management procedures should be implemented to reduce the potential of bed bug infestations.

  6. Bed Bugs: Clinical Relevance and Control Options

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Dominic E.; Peñas, Pablo F.; Russell, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Since the late 1990s, bed bugs of the species Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus have undergone a worldwide resurgence. These bed bugs are blood-sucking insects that readily bite humans. Cutaneous reactions may occur and can start out as small macular lesions that can develop into distinctive wheals of around 5 cm in diameter, which are accompanied by intense itching. Occasionally, bullous eruptions may result. If bed bugs are numerous, the patient can present with widespread urticaria or eythematous rashes. Often, bites occur in lines along the limbs. Over 40 pathogens have been detected in bed bugs, but there is no definitive evidence that they transmit any disease-causing organisms to humans. Anemia may result when bed bugs are numerous, and their allergens can trigger asthmatic reactions. The misuse of chemicals and other technologies for controlling bed bugs has the potential to have a deleterious impact on human health, while the insect itself can be the cause of significant psychological trauma. The control of bed bugs is challenging and should encompass a multidisciplinary approach utilizing nonchemical means of control and the judicious use of insecticides. For accommodation providers, risk management procedures should be implemented to reduce the potential of bed bug infestations. PMID:22232375

  7. Polysomnographic measures of sleep in cocaine dependence and alcohol dependence: Implications for age‐related loss of slow wave, stage 3 sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bjurstrom, Martin F.; Olmstead, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and aims Sleep disturbance is a prominent complaint in cocaine and alcohol dependence. This controlled study evaluated differences of polysomnographic (PSG) sleep in cocaine‐ and alcohol‐dependent subjects, and examined whether substance dependence interacts with age to alter slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Design Cross‐sectional comparison. Setting Los Angeles and San Diego, CA, USA. Participants Abstinent cocaine‐dependent subjects (n = 32), abstinent alcohol‐dependent subjects (n = 73) and controls (n = 108); mean age 40.3 years recruited 2005–12. Measurements PSG measures of sleep continuity and sleep architecture primary outcomes of Stage 3 sleep and REM sleep. Covariates included age, ethnicity, education, smoking, body mass index and depressive symptoms. Findings Compared with controls, both groups of substance dependent subjects showed loss of Stage 3 sleep (P < 0.001). A substance dependence × age interaction was found in which both cocaine‐ and alcohol‐dependent groups showed loss of Stage 3 sleep at an earlier age than controls (P < 0.05 for all), and cocaine‐dependent subjects showed loss of Stage 3 sleep at an earlier age than alcoholics (P < 0.05). Compared with controls, REM sleep was increased in both substance‐dependent groups (P < 0.001), and cocaine and alcohol dependence were associated with earlier age‐related increase in REM sleep (P < 0.05 for all). Conclusions Cocaine and alcohol dependence appear to be associated with marked disturbances of sleep architecture, including increased rapid eye movement sleep and accelerated age‐related loss of slow wave, Stage 3 sleep. PMID:26749502

  8. Polysomnographic outcomes following lingual tonsillectomy for persistent obstructive sleep apnea in down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prosser, J Drew; Shott, Sally R; Rodriguez, Oscar; Simakajornboon, Narong; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Ishman, Stacey L

    2017-02-01

    Lingual tonsil hypertrophy is a common cause of persistent airway obstruction in patients with Down syndrome (DS) following adenotonsillectomy (T&A); however, little is known about the effect of lingual tonsillectomy (LT) on polysomnographic outcomes in these patients. Our objective was to describe changes in sleep-related respiratory outcomes following LT in children with DS and persistent obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) following T&A. Retrospective case series. We included all children with DS who underwent polysomnography before and after LT at a tertiary care center from 2003 to 2013. Nonparametric analysis of variables was performed. Forty patients with DS underwent LT; 21 met inclusion criteria. The mean age at surgery was 9.3 ± 4.3 years and 47.6% were female. The median apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 9.1 events/hour (range, 3.8 to 43.8 events/hour) before surgery and 3.7 events/hour (range, 0.5 to 24.4 events/hour) after surgery. The median improvement in overall AHI and the obstructive AHI (oAHI) were 5.1 events/hour (range, -2.9 to 41) and 5.3 events/hour (range, -2.9 to 41), respectively (P <.0001). The mean oxygen saturation nadir improved from 84% to 89% (P =.004). The mean time with CO2 > 50 mm Hg, central index, and percentage of rapid eye movement sleep were not significantly different. After surgery, the oAHI was <5 events/hour in 61.9% and ≤1 in 19% of patients. In children with DS, persistent OSA after T&A and lingual tonsil hypertrophy, LT significantly improved AHI, oAHI, and O2 saturation nadir. We recommend that children with DS should be evaluated for lingual tonsil hypertrophy if found to have persistent OSA following T&A. 4 Laryngoscope, 2016 127:520-524, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Assessment Of Noise-induced Sleep Fragility In Two Age Ranges By Means Of Polysomnographic Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzano, M. G.; Parrino, L.; Spaggiari, M. C.; Buccino, G. P.; Fioriti, G.; Depoortere, H.

    1993-04-01

    The microstructure of sleep, which translates the short-lived fluctuations of the arousal level, is a commonly neglected feature in polysomnographic studies. Specifically arranged microstructural EEG events may provide important information on the dynamic characteristics of the sleep process. CAP (cyclic alternating pattern) and non-CAP are complementary modalities in which arousal-related "phasic" EEG phenomena are organized in non-REM sleep, and they correspond to opposite conditions of unstable and stable sleep depth, respectively. Thus, arousal instability can be measured by the CAP rate, the percentage ratio of total CAP time to total non-REM sleep time. The CAP rate, an age-related physiological variable that increases in several pathological conditions, is highly sensitive to acoustic perturbation. In the present study, two groups of healthy subjects without complaints about sleep, belonging to different age ranges (six young adults, three males and three females, between 20 and 30 years, and six middle-aged individuals, three males and three females, between 40 and 55 years) slept, after adaptation to the sleep laboratory, in a random sequence for two non-consecutive nights either under silent baseline (27·3 dB(A) Lcq) or noise-disturbed (continuous 55 dB(A) white noise) conditions. Age-related and noise-related effects on traditional sleep parameters and on the CAP rate were statistically evaluated by a split-plot test. Compared to young adults, the middle-aged individuals showed a significant reduction of total sleep time, stage 2 and REM sleep and significantly higher values of nocturnal awakenings and the CAP rate. The noisy nights were characterized by similar alterations. The disruptive effects of acoustic perturbation were greater on the more fragile sleep architecture of the older group. The increased fragility of sleep associated with aging probably reflects the decreased capacity of the sleeping brain to maintain steady states of vigilance. Total

  10. Measuring asthma control. Clinic questionnaire or daily diary?

    PubMed

    Juniper, E F; O'Byrne, P M; Ferrie, P J; King, D R; Roberts, J N

    2000-10-01

    Daily symptom, peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), and medication diaries are often used in clinical trials of treatments for asthma on the assumption that they provide a better estimate of clinical status than does a questionnaire completed in the clinic. We conducted a study with the aim of comparing the measurement properties of the clinic-completed Asthma Control Questionnaire with those of the Asthma Control Diary. The diary is composed of questions and response options almost identical to those of the questionnaire, but uses PEFR instead of FEV(1) as the measure of airway caliber. In an observational study, 50 adults with symptomatic asthma attended a McMaster University asthma clinic at 0, 1, 5, and 9 wk to complete the Asthma Control Questionnaire and other measures of asthma status. For 1 wk before each follow-up visit, patients completed the Asthma Control Diary every morning and evening. Concordance between the questionnaire and diary was high (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.87). Both reliability (ICC: questionnaire = 0.90; diary = 0.86) and responsiveness (responsiveness index: questionnaire = 1.06; diary = 0.90; p = 0.005) were better with the questionnaire than with the diary. Correlations between the two instruments and other measures of clinical asthma status were similar and close to a priori predictions. Both the Asthma Control Questionnaire and the Asthma Control Diary are valid instruments for measuring asthma control, but the questionnaire has slightly better discriminative and evaluative measurement properties than does the diary.

  11. Clinical governance and infection control in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Masterson, R G; Teare, E L

    2001-01-01

    The recent organizational changes in the NHS have at their core the concept of clinical governance. Although initially poorly defined and understood this term has now taken on a clear identity, placing quality alongside fiscal probity and corporate governance at the top of NHS priorities. Integral to clinical governance are the basic elements of clear national standards for services and treatments that are to be locally delivered through assured, monitored, high quality healthcare. It is within this framework that workers in infection control must develop their own methods of applying clinical governance. This review explores the implications that the strategy of clinical governance holds for the speciality of infection control, emphasizing the benefits its active adoption can bring and highlighting the key relevance of clinical risk management in this setting. It illustrates clinical governance as a tool to engage colleagues on a multi-disciplinary front, most particularly the crucial link to senior Trust management.

  12. Alteration of serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and polysomnographic indices after uvulopalatal flap surgery in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Murad; Vuralkan, Erkan; Akin, Istemihan; Firat, Hikmet; Ardic, Sadik; Akaydin, Sevgi; Miser, Ece

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare the changes in polysomnographic indices and serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), cystatin C, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who were treated surgically via a uvulopalatal flap (UPF) technique. Twenty-five patients (14 men, 11 women), average age 46.2 ± 9.3 years, who underwent UPF surgery were included in this study. Serum biochemical analyses and polysomnographic examinations were performed before and 6 months after the surgery. Pre- and postoperative values of apnea hypopnea index (AHI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI), and minimum oxygen concentrations, as well as serum levels of CRP, cystatin C, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 were compared. Comparison of variables before and after UPF surgery demonstrated that AHI (p = 0.001), ODI (p < 0.001) and oxygen saturation (p < 0.001) were significantly improved. In addition, serum levels of CRP (p = 0.036), cystatin C (p = 0.005), TNF-α (p < 0.001), and ICAM-1 (p < 0.001) were significantly reduced 6 months after surgery. Our results suggest that UPF is an effective surgical method that alleviates the severity of OSA. Moreover, it may have the potential to prevent the development of atherosclerosis by attenuating the inflammatory process induced by activation of inflammatory mediators such as CRP, TNF-α, ICAM-1, and cystatin C.

  13. Clinical translation of controlled protein delivery systems for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Kara L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Strategies that utilize controlled release of drugs and proteins for tissue engineering have enormous potential to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The multiple advantages of controlled release strategies merit overcoming the significant challenges to translation, including high costs and long, difficult regulatory pathways. This review highlights the potential of controlled release of proteins for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. We specifically discuss treatment modalities that have reached preclinical and clinical trials, with emphasis on controlled release systems for bone tissue engineering, the most advanced application with several products already in clinic. Possible strategies to address translational and regulatory concerns are also discussed. PMID:25787736

  14. Clinical translation of controlled protein delivery systems for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Kara L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-04-01

    Strategies that utilize controlled release of drugs and proteins for tissue engineering have enormous potential to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The multiple advantages of controlled release strategies merit overcoming the significant challenges to translation, including high costs and long, difficult regulatory pathways. This review highlights the potential of controlled release of proteins for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. We specifically discuss treatment modalities that have reached preclinical and clinical trials, with emphasis on controlled release systems for bone tissue engineering, the most advanced application with several products already in clinic. Possible strategies to address translational and regulatory concerns are also discussed.

  15. Mapping clinically useful terminology to a controlled medical vocabulary.

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, R. C.; Cimino, J. J.; Clayton, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    We have mapped clinically used diagnostic terms from a legacy ambulatory care system to the separate controlled vocabulary of our central clinical information system. The methodology combines elements of lexical and morphologic text matching techniques, followed by manual physician review. Results of the automated matching algorithm before and after partial manual review are presented. The results of this effort will permit the migration of coded clinical data from one system to another. Output from the system after the term review process will be fed back to the target vocabulary via automated and semi-automated means to improve its clinical utility. PMID:7949922

  16. Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Gene Expression Patterns and Metabolic Parameters in Habitually Snoring and Non-Snoring Children with Normal Polysomnographic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Gharib, Sina A.; Kim, Jinkwan; Capdevila, Oscar Sans; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Bhattacharjee, Rakesh; Hegazi, Mohamed; Gozal, David

    2011-01-01

    Background: Children who snore but do not have gas exchange abnormalities or alterations of sleep architecture have primary snoring (PS). Since increasing evidence suggest that PS may be associated with morbidity, we hypothesized that assessing genome-wide gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) will identify a distinct signature in PS children. Methods: Children (aged 4–9 years) with and without habitual snoring and a normal PSG were designated as either PS or controls. Whole genome expression profiles of PBL and metabolic parameters in 30 children with PS and 30 age-, gender-, ethnicity-, and BMI-matched controls were compared. Pathway-focused gene network analysis of the PBL transcriptome was performed. Metabolic parameters were measured in an independent follow-up cohort of 98 children (64 PS and 34 controls) to evaluate the computationally derived findings. Results: PS was not associated with a distinct transcriptional signature in PBL. Exploratory functional network analysis of enriched gene sets identified a number of putative pathways—including those mapping to insulin signaling, adipocyte differentiation, and obesity—with significant alterations in glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity emerging in the follow-up cohort of children with PS, but no differences in lipid profiles. Conclusions: PS children do not exhibit global perturbations in their PBL transcriptional response, suggesting that current normative PSG criteria are overall valid. However, subtle differences in functionally coherent pathways involved in glycemic homeostasis were detected and confirmed in a larger independent pediatric cohort indicating that PS may carry increased risk for end-organ morbidity in susceptible children. Citation: Khalyfa A; Gharib SA; Kim J; Capdevila OS; Kheirandish-Gozal L; Bhattacharjee R; Hegazi M; Gozal D. Peripheral blood leukocyte gene expression patterns and metabolic parameters in habitually snoring and non-snoring children with normal

  17. [Clinical application of extracts of Echinacea purpurea or Echinacea pallida. Critical evaluation of controlled clinical studies].

    PubMed

    Dorsch, W

    1996-04-01

    The phytotherapy should be understood as being integrated into the rational pharmacotherapy. The modern phytotherapy tries hard to proof effects with pharmacological and clinical studies. The task force E of the federal bureau of health of Germany has made a statement regarding this problem. This article reviews only controlled clinical trials about the application of extracts of echinacea purpura or echinacea pallida.

  18. Sleep and Respiration in 100 Healthy Caucasian Sleepers—A Polysomnographic Study According to American Academy of Sleep Medicine Standards

    PubMed Central

    Mitterling, Thomas; Högl, Birgit; Schönwald, Suzana Veiga; Hackner, Heinz; Gabelia, David; Biermayr, Marlene; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Despite differences between American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and Rechtschaffen and Kales scoring criteria, normative values following the current AASM criteria are lacking. We investigated sleep and respiratory variables in healthy adults over the lifespan, and established polysomnographic normative values according to current standards. Design: Prospective polysomnographic investigation. Setting: Academic referral hospital sleep laboratory. Participants: One hundred healthy sleepers aged 19–77 y were selected from a representative population sample by a two-step screening. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: All subjects underwent one full-night polysomnography. Sleep and arousals were scored according to AASM standards. Respiration was scored according to AASM 2007 and 2012 criteria in order to compare both methods. Percentile curves showed age-related differences in sleep architecture: a decrease was found for sleep efficiency [≤ 30 y: 87.0 (71.9–94.1)% versus > 60 y: 79.7 (44.5–90.9)%], total sleep time [≤ 30 y: 413.5 (345.6–451.9) min versus > 60 y: 378.3 (216.0–440.0) min], the percentages of N3 [≤ 30 y 20.7 (15.2–37.5)% versus > 60 y: 14.9 (2.4–35.6)%] and rapid eye movement sleep [≤ 30 y 15.5 (7.5–23.6)% versus. > 60 y: 10.3 (1.9–21.9)%], whereas the percentage of wake time after sleep onset increased with age [≤ 30 y 6.0 (1.9–22.8)% versus > 60 y: 15.2 (6.3–48.7)%]. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was higher when applying the AASM 2012 criteria [AHI AASM 2007 0.7 (0.0–21.5)/h versus 2012: 1.7 (0.0–25)/h; P < 0.001]. Eight percent of subjects had an AHI > 15/h. Conclusions: This study provides normative data on sleep macrostructure, microstructure, and respiration in adults following AASM standards. Furthermore, we demonstrated that respiration scoring according to AASM 2012 results in higher AHIs, and challenge the use of age-independent respiratory cutoff values. Citation: Mitterling

  19. Polysomnographic findings in a cohort of chronic insomnia patients with benzodiazepine abuse.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Marianna; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Marano, Giuseppe; Di Nicola, Marco; Dittoni, Serena; Gnoni, Valentina; Di Blasi, Chiara; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Bria, Pietro; Janiri, Luigi; Mazza, Salvatore; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-01-15

    To evaluate sleep modifications induced by chronic benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse. Cohort study, comparison of sleep measures between BDZs abusers and controls. Drug Addiction Unit (Institute of Psychiatry) and Unit of Sleep Disorders (Institute of Neurology) of the Catholic University in Rome. Six outpatients affected by chronic BDZ abuse were enrolled, (4 men, 2 women, mean age 53.3 ± 14.8, range: 34-70 years); 55 healthy controls were also enrolled (23 men, 32 women, mean age 54.2 ± 13.0, range: 27-76 years). All patients underwent clinical evaluation, psychometric measures, ambulatory polysomnography, scoring of sleep macrostructure and microstructure (power spectral fast-frequency EEG arousal, cyclic alternating pattern [CAP]), and heart rate variability. BDZ abusers had relevant modification of sleep macrostructure and a marked reduction of fast-frequency EEG arousal in NREM (patients: 6.6 ± 3.7 events/h, controls 13.7 ± 4.9 events/h, U-test: 294, p = 0.002) and REM (patients: 8.4 ± 2.4 events/h, controls 13.3 ± 5.1 events/h, U-test: 264, p = 0.016), and of CAP rate (patients: 15.0 ± 8.6%, controls: 51.2% ± 12.1%, U-test: 325, p < 0.001). BDZ abusers have reduction of arousals associated with increased number of nocturnal awakenings and severe impairment of sleep architecture. The effect of chronic BDZ abuse on sleep may be described as a severe impairment of arousal dynamics; the result is the inability to modulate levels of vigilance.

  20. A clinical data repository enhances hospital infection control.

    PubMed Central

    Samore, M.; Lichtenberg, D.; Saubermann, L.; Kawachi, C.; Carmeli, Y.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the benefits of a relational database of hospital clinical data (Clinical Data Repository; CDR) for an infection control program. The CDR consists of > 40 Sybase tables, and is directly accessible for ad hoc queries by members of the infection control unit who have been granted privileges for access by the Information Systems Department. The data elements and functional requirements most useful for surveillance of nosocomial infections, antibiotic use, and resistant organisms are characterized. Specific applications of the CDR are presented, including the use of automated definitions of nosocomial infection, graphical monitoring of resistant organisms with quality control limits, and prospective detection of inappropriate antibiotic use. Hospital surveillance and quality improvement activities are significantly benefited by the availability of a querable set of tables containing diverse clinical data. PMID:9357588

  1. Unhealthy weight control practices: culprits and clinical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Zachary Michael; Patterson, Sean; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Preoccupation with weight status and a desire to lose weight appears common. Many individuals seek "magic bullet" approaches to weight loss and waive the risks of using these products. In this paper, we review the challenges of weight maintenance, highlight some unhealthy weight control practices, and discuss the futility and potential danger of unregulated weight control agents. Novel clinical strategies are discussed that health care providers may use to triage patients with obesity in an attempt to make ethical and personalized treatment decisions.

  2. Control of clinical paratuberculosis in New Zealand pastoral livestock.

    PubMed

    Gautam, M; Ridler, A; Wilson, P R; Heuer, C

    2017-09-17

    This review summarises current control measures for clinical paratuberculosis (Johne's disease; JD) in New Zealand pastoral livestock. Most New Zealand sheep, deer, beef and dairy cattle herds and flocks are infected by Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (Map). Dairy cattle and deer are mostly infected with bovine (Type II), and sheep and beef cattle with ovine (Type I) strains. Control in all industries is voluntary. While control in sheep and beef cattle is ad hoc, the dairy and deer industries have developed resources to assist development of farm-specific programmes. The primary target for all livestock is reduction of the incidence rate of clinical disease rather than bacterial eradication per se. For dairy farms, a nationally instituted JD-specific programme provides guidelines for risk management, monitoring and testing clinically suspect animals. While there is no formal programme for sheep farms, for those with annual prevalences of clinical disease >2%, especially fine wool breeds, vaccination may be a cost effective control option. The deer industry proactively monitors infection by a national abattoir surveillance programme and farmers with an apparent high disease incidence are encouraged to engage with a national network of trained consultants for management and control advice. Evaluation of the biological and economic effectiveness of control in all industries remains to be undertaken. Nevertheless, opportunities exist for farmers who perceive significant JD problems in their herds/flocks to participate in systematic best-practice activities that are likely to reduce the number of clinical infections with Map on their farms and therefore the overall prevalence of JD in New Zealand's farming industries.

  3. Veterinary clinical research database for homeopathy: placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Clausen, J; Albrecht, H; Mathie, R T

    2013-04-01

    Veterinary homeopathy has led a somewhat shadowy existence since its first introduction. Only in the last three decades has the number of clinical trials increased considerably. This literature is generally not well perceived, which may be partly a consequence of the diffuse and somewhat inaccessible nature of some of the relevant research publications. The Veterinary Clinical Research Database for Homeopathy (VetCR) was launched in 2006 to provide information on existing clinical research in veterinary homeopathy and to facilitate the preparation of systematic reviews. The aim of the present report is to provide an overview of this first database on clinical research in veterinary homeopathy, with a special focus on its content of placebo controlled clinical trials and summarising what is known about placebo effects in animals. In April 2012, the VetCR database contained 302 data records. Among these, 203 controlled trials were identified: 146 randomised and 57 non-randomised. In 97 of those 203 trials, the homeopathic medical intervention was compared to placebo. A program of formal systematic reviews of peer-reviewed randomised controlled trials in veterinary homeopathy is now underway; detailed findings from the program's data extraction and appraisal approach, including the assessment of trial quality (risk of bias), will be reported in due course. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Franklin, Lavoisier, and Mesmer: origin of the controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Herr, Harry W

    2005-01-01

    In 1784, a Royal Commission headed by Benjamin Franklin and Antoine Lavoisier designed a series of ingenious experiments to debunk France's greatest medical rogue, Anton Mesmer, and his bizarre healing of illnesses based on his bogus theory of animal magnetism. Using intentional subject ignorance and sham interventions to investigate mesmerism, Franklin's commission provided a model for the controlled clinical trial.

  5. Clinical applications of biomedical microdevices for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gurman, Pablo; Miranda, Oscar R; Clayton, Kevin; Rosen, Yitzhak; Elman, Noel M

    2015-01-01

    Miniaturization of devices to micrometer and nanometer scales, combined with the use of biocompatible and functional materials, has created new opportunities for the implementation of drug delivery systems. Advances in biomedical microdevices for controlled drug delivery platforms promise a new generation of capabilities for the treatment of acute conditions and chronic illnesses, which require high adherence to treatment, in which temporal control over the pharmacokinetic profiles is critical. In addition, clinical conditions that require a combination of drugs with specific pharmacodynamic profiles and local delivery will benefit from drug delivery microdevices. This review provides a summary of various clinical applications for state-of-the-art controlled drug delivery microdevices, including cancer, endocrine and ocular disorders, and acute conditions such as hemorrhagic shock. Regulatory considerations for clinical translation of drug delivery microdevices are also discussed. Drug delivery microdevices promise a remarkable gain in clinical outcomes and a substantial social impact. A review of articles covering the field of microdevices for drug delivery was performed between January 1, 1990, and January 1, 2014, using PubMed as a search engine.

  6. [The limits of controlled clinical studies: the case of rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Portioli, I

    2000-01-01

    The double blind, placebo controlled, randomized clinical trial is the best tool for gathering evidence concerning the efficacy and safety of a drug. However, in some clinical situations--rheumatology is one--these trials have an intrinsic difficulty in representing the clinical reality: e.g., indicating how a drug influences course of a disease over the long-term. Beginning with the distinction between the "activity" of a drug as confirmed by randomized clinical trials, and its "efficacy" over time, as desired by the patient, we attempt to question why this difficulty arises. Several differentiating elements are involved. The objective of the randomized clinical trial design, that is, activity on acute parameters, may not coincide with the interests of the patient, i.e., efficacy in controlling disability or chronic pain. The duration of a randomized clinical trial is sufficient to measure drug activity but not to provide an indication of its effects on the course of the disease. In the randomized clinical trial, the size of the sample, generally from 10(2)-10(3) patients can, at the most, lead to the conclusion that a drug is "active" while the measurement of efficacy is based on a much greater number of observations. With regard to recruitment criteria, clinical trial patients are chosen on the basis of defined disease severity and activity, while in clinical practice, it is known that this often waxes and wanes. The presence of co-morbidity often leads to the exclusion of patients, yet it is known that up to 17% of rheumatoid arthritis patients are depressed. While concomitant therapy is not permitted during randomized clinical trials, it is generally almost always implemented in normal clinical practice. Drug dosage in a clinical trial is not variable, while in practice it is. The greatest difference is found in the measurement of efficacy, where the randomized clinical trial emphasizes the number of tender and swollen joints, acute phase reactants, disease

  7. Comparison Study of Polysomnographic Features in Multiple System Atrophy-cerebellar Types Combined with and without Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Behavior Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yan; Hu, Yue-Qing; Zhan, Shu-Qin; Li, Cun-Jiang; Wang, Hong-Xing; Wang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: The brain stem is found to be impaired in multiple system atrophy-cerebellar types (MSA-C). Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is reported as a marker of progressive brain stem dysfunction. Few systematic studies about the sleep disturbances in MSA-C patients combined with or without RBD were reported. This study aimed to explore the polysomnographic (PSG) features of sleep disturbances between MSA-C patients with and without RBD. Methods: Totally, 46 MSA-C patients (23 with RBD, and 23 without RBD) were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent a structured interview for their demographic data, history of sleep pattern, and movement disorders; and then, overnight video-PSG was performed in each patient. All the records were evaluated by specialists at the Sleep Medicine Clinic for RBD and the Movement Disorder Clinic for MSA-C. The Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test for continuous variables, and the Chi-square test for categorical variables were used in this study. Results: MSA-C patients with RBD had younger visiting age (52.6 ± 7.4 vs. 56.7 ± 6.0 years, P = 0.046) and shorter duration of the disease (12.0 [12.0, 24.0] vs. 24.0 [14.0, 36.0] months, P = 0.009) than MSA-C patients without RBD. MSA-C with RBD had shorter REM sleep latency (111.7 ± 48.2 vs. 157.0 ± 68.8 min, P = 0.042), higher percentage of REM sleep (14.9% ±4.0% vs. 10.0% ± 3.2%, P = 0.019), and lower Stage I (9.5% ±7.2% vs. 15.9% ±8.0%, P = 0.027) than MSA-C without RBD. Moreover, MSA-C patients with RBD had more decreased sleep efficiency (52.4% ±12.6% vs. 65.8% ±15.9%, P = 0.029) than that without RBD. Conclusions: In addition to the RBD, MSA-C patients with RBD had other more severe sleep disturbances than those without RBD. The sleep disorders of MSA patients might be associated with the progress of the disease. PMID:27625088

  8. Subjective sleep complaints in pediatric depression: a controlled study and comparison with EEG measures of sleep and waking.

    PubMed

    Bertocci, Michele A; Dahl, Ronald E; Williamson, Douglas E; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Ryan, Neal D

    2005-11-01

    Children with major depressive disorder (MDD) often complain of sleep disturbances; however, polysomnographic studies have failed to find objective evidence of these disturbances. This article examines subjective sleep reports of children with MDD and healthy controls focusing on comparing subjective and objective sleep measures. Fifty-one subjects with MDD and 42 healthy subjects, 8-17 years old, participated in a comprehensive psychobiologic study including three nights of EEG sleep recording. Each morning, subjects completed a post-sleep form subjectively rating their sleep, which was then compared with their polysomnographic studies. Depressed subjects reported significantly worse sleep on four scales: subjective sleep quality, perceived number of awakenings, estimated minutes awake, and perceived ease of waking. In contrast to these subjective complaints, objective EEG measures indicated no evidence of disturbed sleep in the depressed sample compared to controls. Furthermore, exploratory analyses focusing on the subset of depressed subjects with the greatest subjective sleep disturbance showed, paradoxically, significantly better sleep in terms of the number of EEG awakenings and objective disturbances. Despite clinical evidence of subjective sleep complaints in depressed children, our EEG measures showed little evidence to indicate an objective basis for these perceptions. These findings raise provocative questions regarding the nature of sleep complaints associated with early-onset depression.

  9. Sleep-stage transitions during polysomnographic recordings as diagnostic features of type 1 narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Carrillo, Oscar; Leary, Eileen B; Peppard, Paul E; Young, Terry; Sorensen, Helge Bjarrup Dissing; Jennum, Poul; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep fragmentation, and cataplexy. Short rapid eye movement (REM) latency (≤15 min) during nocturnal polysomnography (PSG) or during naps of the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) defines a sleep-onset REM sleep period (SOREMP), a diagnostic hallmark. We hypothesized that abnormal sleep transitions other than SOREMPs can be identified in type 1 narcolepsy. Sleep-stage transitions (one to 10 epochs to one to five epochs of any other stage) and bout length features (one to 10 epochs) were extracted from PSGs. The first 15 min of sleep were excluded when a nocturnal SOREMP was recorded. F(0.1) measures and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to identify specific (≥98%) features. A data set of 136 patients and 510 sex- and age-matched controls was used for the training. A data set of 19 cases and 708 sleep-clinic patients was used for the validation. (1) ≥5 transitions from ≥5 epochs of stage N1 or W to ≥2 epochs of REM sleep, (2) ≥22 transitions from ≥3 epochs of stage N2 or N3 to ≥2 epochs of N1 or W, and (3) ≥16 bouts of ≥6 epochs of N1 or W were found to be highly specific (≥98%). Sensitivity ranged from 16% to 30%, and it did not vary substantially with and without medication or a nocturnal SOREMP. In patients taking antidepressants, nocturnal SOREMPs occurred much less frequently (16% vs. 36%, p < 0.001). Increased sleep-stage transitions notably from ≥2.5 min of W/N1 into REM are specifically diagnostic for narcolepsy independent of a nocturnal SOREMP. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Sleep and Respiration in 100 Healthy Caucasian Sleepers--A Polysomnographic Study According to American Academy of Sleep Medicine Standards.

    PubMed

    Mitterling, Thomas; Högl, Birgit; Schönwald, Suzana Veiga; Hackner, Heinz; Gabelia, David; Biermayr, Marlene; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-06-01

    Despite differences between American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and Rechtschaffen and Kales scoring criteria, normative values following the current AASM criteria are lacking. We investigated sleep and respiratory variables in healthy adults over the lifespan, and established polysomnographic normative values according to current standards. Prospective polysomnographic investigation. Academic referral hospital sleep laboratory. One hundred healthy sleepers aged 19-77 y were selected from a representative population sample by a two-step screening. N/A. All subjects underwent one full-night polysomnography. Sleep and arousals were scored according to AASM standards. Respiration was scored according to AASM 2007 and 2012 criteria in order to compare both methods. Percentile curves showed age-related differences in sleep architecture: a decrease was found for sleep efficiency [≤ 30 y: 87.0 (71.9-94.1)% versus > 60 y: 79.7 (44.5-90.9)%], total sleep time [≤ 30 y: 413.5 (345.6-451.9) min versus > 60 y: 378.3 (216.0-440.0) min], the percentages of N3 [≤ 30 y 20.7 (15.2-37.5)% versus > 60 y: 14.9 (2.4-35.6)%] and rapid eye movement sleep [≤ 30 y 15.5 (7.5-23.6)% versus. > 60 y: 10.3 (1.9-21.9)%], whereas the percentage of wake time after sleep onset increased with age [≤ 30 y 6.0 (1.9-22.8)% versus > 60 y: 15.2 (6.3-48.7)%]. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was higher when applying the AASM 2012 criteria [AHI AASM 2007 0.7 (0.0-21.5)/h versus 2012: 1.7 (0.0-25)/h; P < 0.001]. Eight percent of subjects had an AHI > 15/h. This study provides normative data on sleep macrostructure, microstructure, and respiration in adults following AASM standards. Furthermore, we demonstrated that respiration scoring according to AASM 2012 results in higher AHIs, and challenge the use of age-independent respiratory cutoff values. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Development of a current-controlled defibrillator for clinical tests.

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Schönegg, M; Schöchlin, J; Bolz, A

    2002-01-01

    The work presented here is only a part of the development for a new current-controlled defibrillator. In the diploma thesis "Development and construction of a current-controlled defibrillator for clinical tests" the most important part was the control and safety of the defibrillator. To ensure a safe circuit design, a risk-analysis and a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) were necessary. Another major part was the programming of a microcontroller in embedded C and a programmable logic device in Very High Speed Integrated Circuit Description Language (VHDL). The circuit had to be constructed, and the defibrillator was optically decoupled from the laptop for safety reasons. The waveform-data can be transmitted to the microcontroller from the laptop, and the logged data is then transmitted back.

  12. Unfavorable polysomnographic sleep patterns predict poor sleep and poor psychological functioning 3 years later in patients with restless legs syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brand, Serge; Beck, Johannes; Hatzinger, Martin; Savic, Mirjana; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Amongst the variety of disorders affecting sleep, restless legs syndrome (RLS) merits particular attention. Little is known about long-term outcomes for sleep or psychological functioning following a diagnosis of RLS. The aim of the present study was thus to evaluate sleep and psychological functioning at a 3-year follow-up and based on polysomnographic measurements. Thirty-eight patients (18 female and 20 male patients; mean age: 56.06, SD = 12.07) with RLS and sleep electroencephalographic recordings were followed-up 33 months later. Participants completed a series of self-rating questionnaires related to sleep and psychological functioning. Additionally, they completed a sleep log for 7 consecutive days. Age, male gender, increased light sleep (S1, S2) and sleep onset latency, along with low sleep efficiency, predicted psychological functioning and sleep 33 months later. Specifically, sleep fragmentation predicted poor psychological functioning, and both sleep fragmentation and light sleep predicted poor sleep. In patients with RLS, irrespective of medication or duration of treatment, poor objective sleep patterns at diagnosis predicted both poor psychological functioning and poor sleep about 3 years after diagnosis. The pattern of results suggests the need for more thorough medical and psychotherapeutic treatment and monitoring of patients with RLS. © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Polysomnographic and actigraphic characteristics of patients with H1N1-vaccine-related and sporadic narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Alakuijala, Anniina; Sarkanen, Tomi; Partinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    After the pandemic H1N1 influenza ASO3-adjuvanted vaccine, Pandemrix©, was used in late 2009 and early 2010, the incidence of narcolepsy increased in many European countries. This incidence mainly increased in children and adolescents and, to a lesser degree, in adults. 125 unmedicated patients, aged 4 to 61 years, were included in this case-series study. Of these, 69 were diagnosed to have an H1N1-vaccine-related narcolepsy and 57 had sporadic narcolepsy. Most of these patients had: an actigraphy recording of 1-2 weeks, polysomnography, a Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT), and cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 concentration analysis. Patients with H1N1-vaccine-related narcolepsy had shorter diagnostic delays, lower periodic leg movement index during sleep, earlier sleep-wake rhythm, and were younger in age at diagnosis, compared with sporadic cases. They also had shorter sleep latency and more sleep onset REM periods in MSLT, but these results were strongly age-dependent. Actigraphy showed quantitatively less sleep and more sleep fragmentation than polysomnography. Regarding polysomnographic and actigraphic characteristics, there were no dramatic deviations between H1N1-vaccine-related and sporadic narcolepsy. Circadian rhythms indicated some interesting new findings with respect to the H1N1-vaccine-related disease. An actigraphy recording of 1-2 weeks is useful when studying the nocturnal aspects of narcolepsy and sleep-wake rhythms of narcoleptic patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical and microbiological effects of commercially available dentifrice containing amine fluoride: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A R; Agarwal, Esha; Bajaj, Pavan; Naik, Savitha B; Kumari, Minal; Guruprasad, C N

    2012-07-01

    The inability of the normal adult population to perform adequate tooth brushing has led to the search for chemotherapeutic agents in order to improve plaque control. This 6 month, single center, randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted to assess the clinical and microbiological effects of a dentifrice containing only amine fluoride (AF) as the active ingredient on gingivitis. NINETY SUBJECTS DIAGNOSED WITH CHRONIC GENERALIZED GINGIVITIS WERE SELECTED AND RANDOMLY DIVIDED IN THREE GROUPS: Group 1 - placebo toothpaste, Group 2 - AF containing toothpaste, and Group 3 - triclosan containing toothpaste with polymer and fluoride. Clinical evaluation was undertaken using the gingival index of Loe and Silness and the plaque index and microbiological counts were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks. A subjective evaluation was also undertaken by a questionnaire. AF containing toothpaste showed significant improvement in gingival and plaque index scores as well as microbiologic counts compared with placebo dentifrice. These improvements were comparable to triclosan containing toothpaste. AF containing toothpaste may be a useful formulation for chemical plaque control agent and improvement in plaque and gingival status and add to the list of various therapeutic agents used for maintenance of gingival health.

  15. Clinical and microbiological effects of commercially available dentifrice containing amine fluoride: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pradeep, A. R.; Agarwal, Esha; Bajaj, Pavan; Naik, Savitha B.; Kumari, Minal; Guruprasad, C. N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The inability of the normal adult population to perform adequate tooth brushing has led to the search for chemotherapeutic agents in order to improve plaque control. This 6 month, single center, randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted to assess the clinical and microbiological effects of a dentifrice containing only amine fluoride (AF) as the active ingredient on gingivitis. Materials and Methods: Ninety subjects diagnosed with chronic generalized gingivitis were selected and randomly divided in three groups: Group 1 – placebo toothpaste, Group 2 – AF containing toothpaste, and Group 3 – triclosan containing toothpaste with polymer and fluoride. Clinical evaluation was undertaken using the gingival index of Loe and Silness and the plaque index and microbiological counts were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks. A subjective evaluation was also undertaken by a questionnaire. Results: AF containing toothpaste showed significant improvement in gingival and plaque index scores as well as microbiologic counts compared with placebo dentifrice. These improvements were comparable to triclosan containing toothpaste. Conclusions: AF containing toothpaste may be a useful formulation for chemical plaque control agent and improvement in plaque and gingival status and add to the list of various therapeutic agents used for maintenance of gingival health. PMID:23293479

  16. Clinical trials: active control vs placebo--what is ethical?

    PubMed

    Spławiński, Jacek; Kuźniar, Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    The quest for effective medicines is very old. In modern times two important tools have been developed to evaluate efficacy of drugs, superiority and non-inferiority types of clinical trials. The former tests the null hypothesis of micro (the difference between a tested drug and comparator) < or = 0 against micro > 0; the latter tests the null hypothesis of micro < or = - delta against, micro > - delta, where delta is the clinical difference from the comparator. In a superiority trial, a new drug is tested against a placebo; in a non-inferiority trial, a new drug is tested against active treatment. In this paper, arguments are presented to show that a superiority trial against a placebo is scientifically sound but ethically unacceptable, whereas a non-inferiority trial against active treatment is ethically sound but scientifically not reliable. Switching from a superiority type of trial with placebo to a non-inferiority trial with an active-control--following the latest revision of Declaration of Helsinki--is in practice switching from the violation of the uncertainty principle to uncertainty of results. Given human and financial resources, it appears an academic question as to which is more unethical: to violate patients' rights or to produce results without scientific value. All presented considerations lead to the conclusion that the use of a superiority trial of design with an active control instead of placebo will satisfy scientific needs, expectation of patients, and the ancient quest for effective medicines. In the era of Good (Clinical, Laboratory, Manufacture) Practice, the attention of those performing clinical trials is focused on the procedure, not always on its essence. However even the excellent performance of a trial which is not worth doing is fruitless.

  17. Clinical randomized controlled trial of chemomechanical caries removal (Carisolv).

    PubMed

    Lozano-Chourio, M A; Zambrano, O; González, H; Quero, M

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the chemomechanical caries-removal system (Carisolv) with high-speed excavation in cavitated occlusal caries of primary molars. Design and setting. The study was a randomized controlled, clinical trial in which the two techniques were compared in each subject. Participants were chosen from public schools, in Maracaibo County, Zulia State, Venezuela. The sample consisted of 80 primary molars selected from 40 children (mean age 7.7+/-0.7 years). Each patient had at least two contralateral primary molars with cavitated occlusal caries and approximately equal-size access to lesions. The outcome variables were: clinically complete caries removal, size of the opening of the cavity, volume of carious tissue removed, pain during caries removal, anaesthesia requested by the patient, caries-removal time, and behaviour and preference of patients. All treated molars were clinically caries free whichever caries-removal procedure was used. When Carisolv' was used the final cavity entrance sizes were smaller (P<0.001) and the estimated volume of tissue removed was less (P<0.001). The time taken for caries removal was three times longer (7.51+/-1.83 min, P<0.001). Some pain was reported by seven (17.5%) participants when Carisolv was used, compared with 16 (40%) when high-speed excavation was used (P<0.05). Using the Carisolv method there was a higher proportion of patients with positive behaviour (P<0.01), and 71.0% (P<0.05) preferred this treatment. Carisolv is an effective clinical alternative treatment for the removal of occlusal dentinal caries in cavitated primary molars; it is more conservative of dental tissue and appeared to be more comfortable for most patients, although the clinical time spent is longer than when using high-speed excavation.

  18. Controlled clinical comparison of three commercial blood culture systems.

    PubMed

    Frank, U; Malkotsis, D; Mlangeni, D; Daschner, F D

    1999-04-01

    In a controlled clinical comparison, three commercial blood culture systems--the standard aerobic BacT/Alert bottle (STD), the aerobic BacT/Alert FAN bottle (FAN) and the Isolator system (ISO; Wampole Laboratories, USA) were compared for their ability to detect aerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms. A total of 945 BacT/Alert (STD and FAN) blood culture sets were compared. Of these, 110 blood culture sets (11.6%) yielded growth of 116 clinically significant bacterial and fungal isolates. Microorganisms were recovered from 10.7% (101/945) of the FAN bottles compared to 8.9% (84/945) of the STD bottles. Of the significant isolates, 78 (67.2%) were recovered by both bottles, 29 (25%) by the FAN bottle only and nine (7.8%) by the STD bottle only (P<0.01). Along with 56.1% (530/945) of BacT/Alert blood culture sets, a concomitant ISO tube was obtained. Of the triple (STD + FAN + ISO) blood culture sets, 54 (10.2%) yielded growth of 59 clinically relevant isolates. Microorganisms were detected in 9.1% (48/530) of the FAN bottles, 8.3% (44/530) of the STD bottles and 4% (21/530) of the ISO tubes (P<0.001). Overall, the BacT/Alert system detected more clinically significant microorganisms than the ISO tube; the STD and the FAN bottle each recovered significantly more staphylococci (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively) and gram-negative rods (P<0.01, both). In conclusion, the BacT/Alert FAN bottle performed better than the BacT/Alert STD bottle; both BacT/Alert bottles, however, were superior to the ISO tube in terms of recovery of clinically significant microorganisms, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

  19. RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIALS IN ORTHOPEDICS: DIFFICULTIES AND LIMITATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Imamura, Marta; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) are considered to be the gold standard for evidence-based medicine nowadays, and are important for directing medical practice through consistent scientific observations. Steps such as patient selection, randomization and blinding are fundamental for conducting a RCT, but some additional difficulties are presented in trials that involve surgical procedures, as is common in orthopedics. The aim of this article was to highlight and discuss some difficulties and possible limitations on RCTs within the field of surgery. PMID:27027037

  20. A dose-ranging study of pramipexole for the symptomatic treatment of restless legs syndrome: polysomnographic evaluation of periodic leg movements and sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Jama, Leni; Hirvonen, Kari; Partinen, Markku; Alakuijala, Anniina; Hublin, Christer; Tamminen, Ilkka; Koester, Juergen; Reess, Juergen

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate, both polysomnographically and by subjective scales, the efficacy and safety profile of pramipexole for restless legs syndrome (RLS) via a 3-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, dose-ranging study. At baseline and after 3 weeks, periodic limb movements (PLM) and sleep parameters were assessed by polysomnography, and patients self-assessed their sleep disturbance and overall RLS severity using the international RLS study group rating scale (IRLS). Four pramipexole doses were evaluated: 0.125, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75mg/d. Data from 107 patients were included in the intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis. For pramipexole recipients, the primary outcome measure, PLM per hour in bed asleep or awake (the PLM index, or PLMI), decreased by a median of -26.55 to -52.70 depending on dosage group, vs. -3.00 for placebo (p<0.01 or 0.001 for each group vs. placebo; Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test). Improvements in the secondary endpoints of PLM while asleep and while awake were also significantly superior for pramipexole. At 3 weeks, all pramipexole doses reduced the median for PLM while asleep to levels considered normal (<5PLM/h). Except for delta-sleep time and awakenings/arousals, sleep parameters remained unchanged or favored pramipexole. Median sleep latency was reduced by -5.00 to -11.75min in the pramipexole groups, vs. -2.00 for placebo (p<0.05 for all groups except 0.25mg/d). Median total sleep time increased by 25.75-66.75min, vs. 25.50 (p<0.05 for 0.50mg/d), and median time in stages 2-4/rapid eye movement (REM) sleep increased by 37.00-68.00min, vs. 26.75 (p<0.05 for 0.50mg/d). By subjective IRLS ratings, all pramipexole doses were significantly superior to placebo. Safety analysis demonstrated no dose-dependent increase in adverse events, and no drug-related increase in daytime somnolence was observed. Pramipexole is effective and well tolerated in RLS, most notably among objective measures, for reducing PLM and decreasing sleep latency. Although

  1. Confounding Effect in Clinical Research of Otolaryngology and Its Control.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong-qiang; Huang, Dong-yan; Armijo Olivo, Susan; Yang, Huai-an; Bambanini, Yagesh; Sonnenberg, Lyn; Clark, Brenda; Constantinescu, Gabriela; Qian Yu, Jason; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Confounding effect is a critical issue in clinical research of otolaryngology because it can distort the research's conclusion. In this review, we introduce the definition of confounding effect, the methods of verifying and controlling the effect. Confounding effect can be prevented by research's design, and adjusted by data analysis. Clinicians would be aware and cautious about confounding effect in their research. They would be able to set up a research's design in which appropriate methods have been applied to prevent this effect.They would know how to adjust confounding effect after data collection. It is important to remember that sometimes it is impossible to eliminate confounding effect completely, and statistical method is not a master key. Solid research knowledge and critical thinking of our brain are the most important in controlling confounding effect.

  2. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: clinical characteristics and implications

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Robert F; Potenza, Marc N

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Impulse control disorders (ICDs), specifically those related to excessive gambling, eating, sex and shopping, have been observed in a subset of people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Although some initial case reports claimed that dopamine replacement therapies, particularly dopamine agonists, cause ICDs, more recent, larger and better controlled studies indicate a more complicated picture. While dopamine replacement therapy use is related to ICDs, other vulnerabilities, some related to PD and/or its treatment directly and others seemingly unrelated to PD, have also been associated with ICDs in PD. This suggests a complex etiology with multiple contributing factors. As ICDs occur in a sizable minority of PD patients and can be associated with significant distress and impairment, further investigation is needed to identify factors that can predict who may be more likely to develop ICDs. Clinical implications are discussed and topics for future research are offered. PMID:21709778

  3. Quantitative sleep EEG and polysomnographic predictors of driving simulator performance in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Vakulin, Andrew; D'Rozario, Angela; Kim, Jong-Won; Watson, Brooke; Cross, Nathan; Wang, David; Coeytaux, Alessandra; Bartlett, Delwyn; Wong, Keith; Grunstein, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    To improve identification of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients at risk of driving impairment, this study explored predictors of driving performance impairment in untreated OSA patients using clinical PSG metrics, sleepiness questionnaires and quantitative EEG markers from routine sleep studies. Seventy-six OSA patients completed sleepiness questionnaires and driving simulator tests in the evening of their diagnostic sleep study. All sleep EEGs were subjected to quantitative power spectral analysis. Correlation and multivariate linear regression were used to identify the strongest predictors of driving simulator performance. Absolute EEG spectral power across all frequencies (0.5-32 Hz) throughout the entire sleep period and separately in REM and NREM sleep, (r range 0.239-0.473, all p<0.05), as well as sleep onset latency (r=0.273, p<0.017) positively correlated with driving simulator steering deviation. Regression models revealed that amongst clinical and qEEG variables, the significant predictors of worse steering deviation were greater total EEG power during NREM and REM sleep, greater beta EEG power in NREM and greater delta EEG power in REM (range of variance explained 5-17%, t range 2.29-4.0, all p<0.05) and sleep onset latency (range of variance explained 4-9%, t range 2.15-2.5, all p<0.05). In OSA patients, increased EEG power, especially in the faster frequency (beta) range during NREM sleep and slower frequency (delta) range in REM sleep were associated with worse driving performance, while no relationships were observed with clinical metrics e.g. apnea, arousal or oxygen indices. Quantitative EEG analysis in OSA may provide useful markers of driving impairment risk. Future studies are necessary to confirm these findings and assess the clinical significance of quantitative EEG as predictors of driving impairment in OSA. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neglected tropical diseases: diagnosis, clinical management, treatment and control.

    PubMed

    Utzinger, Jürg; Becker, Sören L; Knopp, Stefanie; Blum, Johannes; Neumayr, Andreas L; Keiser, Jennifer; Hatz, Christoph F

    2012-11-22

    Branded in 2005, "neglected tropical diseases" have gained traction in terms of advocacy, interest for research, enhanced funding and political will for their control and eventual elimination. Starting with an initial set of 13 neglected tropical diseases--seven helminth, three bacterial and three protozoal infections--the list considerably expanded to more than 40 diseases that now also includes viral, fungal and ectoparasitic infections. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the neglected tropical diseases, their causative agents and the current geographical distribution, including their importance for the general practitioners seeing returning travellers and migrants in Switzerland. We characterise the most important of the neglected tropical diseases in terms of at-risk population, estimated number of infections, annual mortality rates and global burden, including current knowledge gaps. With an emphasis on neglected tropical diseases due to helminths, protozoa and ectoparasites, we review common diagnostic methods and current recommendations for treatment at the population level and the individual patient, thereby juxtaposing the situation in highly endemic countries on one side, with Switzerland on the other. We highlight the clinical presentation and management of the neglected tropical diseases in general and then elaborate on two examples, strongyloidiasis and leptospirosis. Our review provides a global perspective of neglected tropical diseases and we hope that it will prove useful for the general practitioner and clinician in Switzerland and elsewhere to enhance their suspicion index, differential diagnosis, clinical management and treatment, including referral to specialised clinics and laboratories when need be.

  5. Clinical efficacy of frovatriptan: placebo-controlled studies.

    PubMed

    Ryan, R; Géraud, G; Goldstein, J; Cady, R; Keywood, C

    2002-04-01

    To confirm the clinical efficacy of frovatriptan 2.5 mg. Frovatriptan is a new 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(1B/1D) receptor agonist being developed for the acute treatment of migraine with or without aura. Results from preclinical and clinical pharmacology studies showed frovatriptan to be a potent 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist with a long terminal elimination half-life (26 hours) and a broad therapeutic index. Three randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group trials, in a total of 2676 patients, were performed to confirm the clinical efficacy of frovatriptan 2.5 mg for the acute treatment of migraine. In all three studies, headache response 2 hours after frovatriptan dosing was significantly greater than that seen with placebo (P < or = .001) with approximately a two-fold measure of effect over placebo for headache response at 2 and 4 hours postdosing. Time to headache response occurred within 1.5 hours in a substantial proportion of patients. The incidence of 24-hour headache recurrence with frovatriptan was low (10% to 25%). Frovatriptan therapy also was associated with a high degree of patient satisfaction. Frovatriptan represents a consistently effective acute treatment for migraine and accompanying symptoms.

  6. Tiagabine in clinical practice: effects on seizure control and behavior.

    PubMed

    Vossler, David G; Morris, George L; Harden, Cynthia L; Montouris, Georgia; Faught, Edward; Kanner, Andres M; Fix, Aaron; French, Jacqueline A

    2013-08-01

    Preapproval randomized controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs provide data in limited patient groups. We assessed the side effect and seizure reduction profile of tiagabine (TGB) in typical clinical practice. Investigators recorded adverse effect (AE), seizure, and assessment-of-benefit data prospectively in sequential patients treated open label with TGB. Two hundred ninety-two patients (39 children) were enrolled to be treated long term with TGB. Seizure types were focal-onset (86%), generalized-onset (12%), both focal- and generalized-onset (0.3%), and multiple associated with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome (2%). Two hundred thirty-one received at least one dose of TGB (median = 28 mg/day) and had follow-up seizure or AE data reported. Common AEs were fatigue, dizziness, psychomotor slowing, ataxia, gastrointestinal upset, weight change, insomnia, and "others" (mostly behavioral). Serious AEs occurred in 19 patients: behavioral effects (n = 12), status epilepticus (n = 3), others (n = 3), and sudden unexplained death (n = 1). No patients experienced suicidal ideation/behavior, rash, nephrolithiasis, or organ failure. Seizure outcomes were seizure freedom (5%), ≥75% reduction (12%), ≥50% reduction (23%), and increased number of seizures (17%), or new seizure type (1%). Behavioral AEs occurred in a larger proportion of patients compared to those reported in TGB preapproval randomized controlled trials. A moderate percentage of patients had a meaningful reduction in seizure frequency. In clinical practice, TGB remains a useful antiepileptic drug. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical and microbiologic effects of commercially available dentifrice containing aloe vera: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A R; Agarwal, Esha; Naik, Savitha B

    2012-06-01

    Certain plants used in folk medicine serve as a source of therapeutic agents that have antimicrobial and other multipotential effects. This prospective, randomized, placebo, and positively controlled clinical trial was designed to evaluate the clinical and microbiologic effects of a commercially available dentifrice containing aloe vera on the reduction of plaque and gingival inflammation in patients with gingivitis. Ninety patients diagnosed with chronic generalized gingivitis were selected and randomly divided into three groups: group 1, placebo toothpaste; group 2, toothpaste containing aloe vera; and group 3, toothpaste with polymer and fluoride containing triclosan. Clinical evaluation was undertaken using a gingival index, plaque was assessed using a modification of the Quigley-Hein index, and microbiologic counts were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks. A subjective evaluation was also undertaken by questionnaire. Toothpaste containing aloe vera showed significant improvement in gingival and plaque index scores as well as microbiologic counts compared with placebo dentifrice. These improvements were comparable to those achieved with toothpaste containing triclosan. Toothpaste containing aloe vera may be a useful herbal formulation for chemical plaque control agents and improvement in plaque and gingival status.

  8. 77 FR 75670 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services,Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Fisher Clinical Services... FR 60143, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown, Pennsylvania 18106, made... listed substances for analytical research and clinical trials. No comments or objections have...

  9. Effects of homeopathic medicines on polysomnographic sleep of young adults with histories of coffee-related insomnia.

    PubMed

    Bell, Iris R; Howerter, Amy; Jackson, Nicholas; Aickin, Mikel; Baldwin, Carol M; Bootzin, Richard R

    2011-05-01

    Homeopathy, a common form of alternative medicine worldwide, relies on subjective patient reports for diagnosis and treatment. Polysomnography offers a modern methodology for evaluating the objective effects of taking homeopathic remedies that clinicians claim exert effects on sleep quality in susceptible individuals. Animal studies have previously shown changes in non rapid eye movement sleep with certain homeopathic remedies. Young adults of both sexes (ages 18-31) with above-average scores on standardized personality scales for either cynical hostility or anxiety sensitivity (but not both) and a history of coffee-induced insomnia participated in the month-long study. At-home polysomnographic recordings were obtained on successive pairs of nights once per week for a total of eight recordings (nights 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23). Subjects (N=54) received placebo pellets on night 8 (single-blind) and verum pellets on night 22 (double-blind) in 30c doses of one of two homeopathic remedies, Nux Vomica or Coffea Cruda. Subjects completed daily morning sleep diaries and weekly Pittsburgh sleep quality index scales, as well as profile of mood states scales at bedtime on polysomnography nights. Verum remedies significantly increased PSG total sleep time and NREM, as well as awakenings and stage changes. Changes in actigraphic and self-rated scale effects were not significant. The study demonstrated the feasibility of using in-home, all-night sleep recordings to study homeopathic remedy effects. Findings are similar though not identical to those reported in animals with the same remedies. Possible mechanisms include initial disruption of the nonlinear dynamics of sleep patterns by the verum remedies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Homeopathic Medicines on Polysomnographic Sleep of Young Adults with Histories of Coffee-Related Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Iris R.; Howerter, Amy; Jackson, Nicholas; Aickin, Mikel; Baldwin, Carol M.; Bootzin, Richard R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Homeopathy, a common form of alternative medicine worldwide, relies on subjective patient reports for diagnosis and treatment. Polysomnography offers a modern methodology for evaluating the objective effects of taking homeopathic remedies that clinicians claim exert effects on sleep quality in susceptible individuals. Animal studies have previously shown changes in non rapid eye movement sleep with certain homeopathic remedies. Methods Young adults of both sexes (ages 18–31) with above-average scores on standardized personality scales for either cynical hostility or anxiety sensitivity (but not both), and a history of coffee-induced insomnia, participated in the month-long study. At-home polysomnographic recordings were obtained on successive pairs of nights once per week for a total of eight recordings (nights 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23). Subjects (N=54) received placebo pellets on night 8 (single-blind) and verum pellets on night 22 (double-blind) in 30c doses of one of two homeopathic remedies, Nux Vomica or Coffea Cruda. Subjects completed daily morning sleep diaries and weekly Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scales, as well as Profile of Mood States Scales at bedtime on polysomnography nights. Results Verum remedies significantly increased PSG total sleep time and NREM, as well as awakenings and stage changes. Changes in actigraphic and self-rated scale effects were not significant. Conclusions The study demonstrated the feasibility of using in-home all-night sleep recordings to study homeopathic remedy effects. Findings are similar though not identical to those reported in animals with the same remedies. Possible mechanisms include initial disruption of the nonlinear dynamics of sleep patterns by the verum remedies. PMID:20673648

  11. Headache secondary to sleep-related bruxism: A case with polysomnographic findings

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sourav; Gupta, Ravi; Dhyani, Mohan; Goel, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Sleep-related bruxism may present with headache. However, in clinical practice it may be difficult to differentiate from other causes of headache, especially in subjects with substance abuse. We are presenting a case of sleep-related bruxism that presented with headache and sleep-related symptoms in the presence of substance abuse. Polysomnography was used to ascertain cause of headache. How the other possible causes of headache ruled out is also discussed in report. In short, Sleep-related bruxism can cause headache that is worse in the morning. It is associated with poor quality sleep. PMID:25883492

  12. Morvan chorea and agrypnia excitata: when video-polysomnographic recording guides the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Provini, Federica; Marconi, Sara; Amadori, Marcello; Guaraldi, Pietro; Pierangeli, Giulia; Cortelli, Pietro; Lugaresi, Elio; Montagna, Pasquale; Tinuper, Paolo

    2011-12-01

    Morvan chorea is an antibody-mediated limbic encephalopathy characterized by severe insomnia, mental confusion, hallucinations, enacted dreams, hyperhidrosis, and neuromyotonia. In a 78 years old man presenting with progressive insomnia apathy and depression, a video-polysomnogram documented enacted dreams mimicking daily life activity (oneiric stupor). This finding led us to perform a search for serum antibodies to voltage-gated K+ channels, which was positive. A diagnosis of Morvan chorea was done. The patient underwent plasma exchange with complete resolution of the clinical picture. Oneiric stupor may represent a useful precocious diagnostic marker in Morvan chorea. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Comorbid insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea in military personnel: correlation with polysomnographic variables.

    PubMed

    Mysliwiec, Vincent; Matsangas, Panagiotis; Baxter, Tristin; McGraw, Leigh; Bothwell, Nici E; Roth, Bernard J

    2014-03-01

    Military personnel undergoing polysomnography are typically diagnosed only with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Comorbid insomnia with OSA is a well-established, underappreciated diagnosis. We sought to determine if military personnel with mild OSA met clinical criteria for insomnia and if there was a pattern of polysomnogram (PSG) variables that identified insomnia in these patients. Retrospective chart review of military personnel with mild OSA; cluster analysis to describe PSG variables. 206 personnel assessed, predominately male (96.6%), mean age 36.5 ± 8.14 years, body mass index 30.2 ± 3.66 kg/m(2) and apnea hypopnea index of 8.44 ± 2.92 per hour; 167 (81.1%) met criteria for insomnia. Cluster analysis identified a group of patients (N = 52) with PSG variables of increased wakefulness after sleep onset 77.3 minutes (27.7) (p < 0.001) and decreased sleep efficiency 82.6% (5.82) (p < 0.001) consistent with insomnia. Patients in this group were more likely to meet criteria for insomnia with an odds ratio 5.27 (1.20, 23.1), (p = 0.009). The majority of military personnel with mild OSA meet criteria for insomnia. Roughly one-third of these patients can be identified by a pattern of PSG variables. Recognizing and treating both comorbid insomnia and OSA could improve clinical outcomes. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. Polysomnographic sleep disturbances in nicotine, caffeine, alcohol, cocaine, opioid, and cannabis use: A focused review.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alexandra N; Salloum, Ihsan M

    2015-10-01

    In the United States, approximately 60 million Americans suffer from sleep disorders and about 22 million Americans report substance dependence or use disorders annually. Sleep disturbances are common consequences of substance use disorders and are likely found in primary care as well as in specialty practices. The aim of this review was to evaluate the effects of the most frequently used substances-nicotine, alcohol, opioids, cocaine, caffeine, and cannabis-have on sleep parameters measured by polysomnography (PSG) and related clinical manifestations. We used electronic databases such as PubMED and PsycINFO to search for relevant articles. We only included studies that assessed sleep disturbances using polysomnography and reviewed the effects of these substances on six clinically relevant sleep parameters: Total sleep time, sleep onset latency, rapid-eye movement, REM latency, wake after sleep onset, and slow wave sleep. Our review indicates that these substances have significant impact on sleep and that their effects differ during intoxication, withdrawal, and chronic use. Many of the substance-induced sleep disturbances overlap with those encountered in sleep disorders, medical, and psychiatric conditions. Sleep difficulties also increase the likelihood of substance use disorder relapse, further emphasizing the need for optimizing treatment interventions in these patients. Our review highlights the importance of systematically screening for substance use in patients with sleep disturbances and highlights the need for further research to understand mechanisms underlying substances-induced sleep disturbances and on effective interventions addressing these conditions. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  15. Acupressure therapy for morning sickness. A controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Hyde, E

    1989-01-01

    A prospective, controlled clinical trial examined the efficacy of acupressure therapy for morning sickness, using a two group, random assignment, crossover design. Subjects in Group 1 (N = 8) used acupressure wristbands for five days, followed by five days without therapy. Subjects in Group 2 (N = 8) had no therapy for five days, followed by five days use of wristbands. The Multiple Affect Adjective Checklist and Sickness Impact Profile were used, and extent of nausea was assessed at baseline, day five, and day ten. Use of acupressure wristbands relieved morning sickness for 12 of 16 subjects (chi 2 = 5.31 with Yates' correction factor, df = 1, p less than .025). Acupressure therapy resulted in statistically significant (p less than .05) reductions in anxiety, depression, behavioral dysfunction, and nausea. Limitations of the study and suggestions for future research are presented.

  16. [Textile intolerance in atopic eczema--a controlled clinical study].

    PubMed

    Diepgen, T L; Stäbler, A; Hornstein, O P

    1990-10-01

    In patients suffering from atopic dermatitis (AD), we often find intolerance reactions against wool, whereas irritation by synthetic fibers is still a matter of discussion. In a randomized clinical study on 55 patients with AD and 31 healthy controls, we investigated the irritative capacity of poncho-like shirts made of 4 different materials (A: cotton; B, C, D: synthetics of different fiber structure). The intensity of itching or discomfort due to repeated wearing of these shirts was evaluated by means of a point system (max.comfort = 10 points, max. discomfort = 1 point). Our study clearly showed that the irritative capacity of synthetic shirts is significantly higher in patients with AD, while cotton shirts were best tolerated. We also observed significant difference regarding the surface structure and diameter of the synthetic fibers under investigation.

  17. Quality assurance and quality control in clinical cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Fady M; Watson, Michael S

    2014-07-14

    The goal of any clinical laboratory should be to provide patients with the most accurate test results possible. This is accomplished through various overlapping programs that continuously monitor and optimize all aspects of a test, including decisions by the laboratory to offer a test, the decision of providers to request the test, the testing itself, and the reporting of results to the referral source and patient. The levels at which test performance and accuracy can be optimized are encompassed under quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA). The monitoring of QC and QA problems allows for the integration of these parameters into a total quality management program. This unit reviews QC and QA guidelines, in addition to discussing how to establish a quality assurance program.

  18. Nutrient menu planning for clinical research centers. Control by computer.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, M L; Wheeler, L A

    1975-10-01

    A computer program has been developed for the dietetic service of the Clinical Research Center at the University of Florida. Presently, it is used in menu planning and nutrient analysis for selective, controlled-nutrient diets and for constant diets. The program is able to compute food weights for a patient-selected daily menu which would satisfy up to twenty-three nutrient constraints and which may be optimized with respect to one or more of these. The principal benefit of the program is a saving in the dietetian's time in calculating the nutrient content of the diet and in planning diets with several constrained nutrients. It is also being used as a teaching resource for dietetic interns and dietetic trainees.

  19. Fundamental and clinical studies on tumor control by TBI

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Kiyohiko; Myojin, Miyako

    1996-12-31

    Total body irradiation (TBI) has been considered to bring about immunosuppressive effects on organisms. The conclusion is derived from data obtained by sublethal doses of TBI, but there are no data on how low doses of TBI act on organisms. On the other hand, it is known that low doses of TBI are effective on some malignant lymphoma or chronic myelogenous leukemia. However, the effect of low doses of TBI is rarely investigated radiobiologically. For 15 yr, the authors have studied the effects of low doses of TBI on normal or tumor-bearing mice and its immunological background. In this paper, they show the results of fundamental and clinical studies on tumor control by low doses of TBI.

  20. PTSD elderly war veterans: a clinical controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gamito, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Rosa, Pedro; Morais, Diogo; Duarte, Nuno; Oliveira, Susana; Saraiva, Tomaz

    2010-02-01

    Around 25,000 war veterans in Portugal suffer posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This clinically controlled study evaluates virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) as an alternative procedure to reduce PTSD symptoms. Ten patients were assigned to three groups: VRET, exposure in imagination (EI), and waiting list (WL). The patients were Portuguese veterans from a series of wars fought in former African colonies more than 30 years ago. While the EI group participated in traditional imagination therapy, the VRET group was exposed to a virtual reality (VR) war scenario. Cues such as ambush, mortar blasting, and waiting for rescue were used in the VR. Patients enrolled in the VRET group showed statistical reduction of PTSD-associated disorders like depression and anxiety. Far from being conclusive, this pilot study nonetheless presents some promising data on the use of VRET on old war veteran populations.

  1. Myopia Control with Bifocal Contact Lenses: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Aller, Thomas A; Liu, Maria; Wildsoet, Christine F

    2016-04-01

    Most studies have reported only minimal reductions in myopia progression with bifocal or progressive multifocal spectacles, although somewhat larger, although mostly still clinically insignificant, effects have been reported in children with nearpoint esophoria and/or accommodative dysfunctions. The CONTROL study was a 1-year, prospective, randomized, clinical trial of bifocal contact lenses for control of myopia in children with eso fixation disparities at near. Eighty-six myopic subjects, aged 8 to 18 years, were enrolled in the study after passing the screening examination. Of these, 79 completed lens assignment and 78 completed the study. The mean refractive error of these 79 subjects was -2.69 ± 1.40D (SD), and all had progressed by -0.50D or more since their last examination. All subjects also had eso fixation disparity at near. Subjects were randomly assigned to wear either Vistakon Acuvue 2 (single-vision soft contact lenses [SVSCLs]) or Vistakon Acuvue Bifocal (bifocal soft contact lenses [BFSCLs]). Bifocal adds were selected to neutralize the associated phoria. Treatment outcomes included cycloplegic autorefraction and axial length, assessed in terms of changes after 6 and 12 months of treatment from pretreatment baseline values. The BFSCLs significantly slowed myopia progression, with statistically significant differences between the treatment groups after 6 months. After 12 months of treatment, the SVSCL group had progressed by -0.79 ± 0.43D compared with -0.22 ± 0.34D for the BFSCL group (cycloplegic objective spherical equivalent, average of two eyes). Corresponding axial length changes were 0.24 ± 0.17 mm and 0.05 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. All of these differences were found to be statistically significant (unpaired t-tests, p < 0.001). The distance center bifocal contact lenses tested in this study achieved greater control over myopia progression and axial elongation (>70%) compared with most published results with multifocal spectacles. Further

  2. Active Video Game Exercise Training Improves the Clinical Control of Asthma in Children: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Carvalho, Celso R. F.; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Teixeira-Carvalho, Etiene Farah; Mendonça, Juliana Fernandes Barreto; Stirbulov, Roberto; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether aerobic exercise involving an active video game system improved asthma control, airway inflammation and exercise capacity in children with moderate to severe asthma. Design A randomized, controlled, single-blinded clinical trial was carried out. Thirty-six children with moderate to severe asthma were randomly allocated to either a video game group (VGG; N = 20) or a treadmill group (TG; n = 16). Both groups completed an eight-week supervised program with two weekly 40-minute sessions. Pre-training and post-training evaluations involved the Asthma Control Questionnaire, exhaled nitric oxide levels (FeNO), maximum exercise testing (Bruce protocol) and lung function. Results No differences between the VGG and TG were found at the baseline. Improvements occurred in both groups with regard to asthma control and exercise capacity. Moreover, a significant reduction in FeNO was found in the VGG (p < 0.05). Although the mean energy expenditure at rest and during exercise training was similar for both groups, the maximum energy expenditure was higher in the VGG. Conclusion The present findings strongly suggest that aerobic training promoted by an active video game had a positive impact on children with asthma in terms of clinical control, improvementin their exercise capacity and a reductionin pulmonary inflammation. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01438294 PMID:26301706

  3. Random allocation in controlled clinical trials: a review.

    PubMed

    Egbewale, Bolaji Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    An allocation strategy that allows for chance placement of participants to study groups is crucial to the experimental nature of randomised controlled trials. Following decades of the discovery of randomisation considerable erroneous opinion and misrepresentations of its concept both in principle and practice still exists. In some circles, opinions are also divided on the strength and weaknesses of each of the random allocation strategies. This review provides an update on various random allocation techniques so as to correct existing misconceptions on this all important procedure. This is a review of literatures published in the Pubmed database on concepts of common allocation techniques used in controlled clinical trials. Allocation methods that use; case record number, date of birth, date of presentation, haphazard or alternating assignment are non-random allocation techniques and should not be confused as random methods. Four main random allocation techniques were identified. Minimisation procedure though not fully a random technique, however, proffers solution to the limitations of stratification at balancing for multiple prognostic factors, as the procedure makes treatment groups similar in several important features even in small sample trials. Even though generation of allocation sequence by simple randomisation procedure is easily facilitated, a major drawback of the technique is that treatment groups can by chance end up being dissimilar both in size and composition of prognostic factors. More complex allocation techniques that yield more comparable treatment groups also have certain drawbacks. However, it is important that whichever allocation technique is employed, unpredictability of random assignment should not be compromised.

  4. A placebo-controlled clinical evaluation of Kharjurapaka in Mamsakshaya

    PubMed Central

    Dhoke, Sujata P.; Dwivedi, Rambabu; Vyas, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The world is facing most of the health problems due to nutritional imbalance, and Mamsakshaya (wasting) is one of them. Mamsakshaya explained in Kiyantahshirasiya Adhyaya can be considered as a separate entity, and it can be correlated with Karshya vyadhi. Mamsakshaya occurs due to diminished Prithvi and Jala Mahabhuta in the body and also due to improper diet and environmental factors. Kharjurapaka (KP) is having Prithvi and Jala Mahabhuta dominance and Guru (heavy), Shita (cold), Snigdha (unctuous) Guna (property) which are similar to conjugation of Mamsa Dhatu. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate Brimhana (nourishment) effect of KP on having signs and symptoms of Mamsakshaya patients. Materials and Methods: The study was therapeutic, interventional, randomized placebo controlled clinical trial carried out on 34 patients of Mamsakshaya. Patients were divided into two Groups. In Group A (trial group), KP (20 g) once in a day with normal water was administered for 30 days, and in Group B (control group), placebo tablet (500 mg) of roasted wheat flour for 30 days duration was administered. Effect of therapy was assessed on subjective and objective parameters, anthropometrical parameters such as body mass index (BMI), weight, and chest circumference. Results: It was found that Group A showed significant results in BMI and sign and symptom of Mamsakshaya in comparison to Group B. Conclusion: KP showed better efficacy in comparison with placebo group. PMID:27833368

  5. Clinical Use of Cannabinoids for Symptom Control in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Notcutt, William G

    2015-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system was discovered in 1988 but has received little attention for its potential therapeutic possibilities. That has started to change, and since 2000, a significant number of clinical trials of cannabinoids, principally for the control of spasticity in multiple sclerosis, have been undertaken. These studies have been difficult because of the nature of the disease and have involved patients for whom other therapies have failed or proved inadequate. This paper outlines the background to the use of cannabinoids available and discusses the principles of practice associated with their safe use. The focus has been on nabiximols, being the most studied and the only cannabinoid that has been both adequately researched for use in multiple sclerosis and granted a license by the regulators. However, what has emerged is that the effect for many patients can be much wider than just control of spasticity. Within and outside of neurology there seems to be an expanding range of possibilities for the therapeutic use of cannabinoids.

  6. Monitoring sleep depth: analysis of bispectral index (BIS) based on polysomnographic recordings and sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Sandra; Romero, Sergio; Alonso, Joan Francesc; Mañanas, Miguel Ángel; Pujol, Anna; Baxarias, Pilar; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria

    2017-02-01

    The assessment and management of sleep are increasingly recommended in the clinical practice. Polysomnography (PSG) is considered the gold standard test to monitor sleep objectively, but some practical and technical constraints exist due to environmental and patient considerations. Bispectral index (BIS) monitoring is commonly used in clinical practice for guiding anesthetic administration and provides an index based on relationships between EEG components. Due to similarities in EEG synchronization between anesthesia and sleep, several studies have assessed BIS as a sleep monitor with contradictory results. The aim of this study was to evaluate objectively both the feasibility and reliability of BIS for sleep monitoring through a robust methodology, which included full PSG recordings at a baseline situation and after 40 h of sleep deprivation. Results confirmed that the BIS index was highly correlated with the hypnogram (0.89 ± 0.02), showing a progressive decrease as sleep deepened, and an increase during REM sleep (awake: 91.77 ± 8.42; stage N1: 83.95 ± 11.05; stage N2: 71.71 ± 11.99; stage N3: 42.41 ± 9.14; REM: 80.11 ± 8.73). Mean and median BIS values were lower in the post-deprivation night than in the baseline night, showing statistical differences for the slow wave sleep (baseline: 42.41 ± 9.14 vs. post-deprivation: 39.49 ± 10.27; p = 0.02). BIS scores were able to discriminate properly between deep (N3) and light (N1, N2) sleep. BIS values during REM overlapped those of other sleep stages, although EMG activity provided by the BIS monitor could help to identify REM sleep if needed. In conclusion, BIS monitors could provide a useful measure of sleep depth in especially particular situations such as intensive care units, and they could be used as an alternative for sleep monitoring in order to reduce PSG-derived costs and to increase capacity in ambulatory care.

  7. Clinical efficacy of a bleaching enzyme-based toothpaste. A double-blind controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Llena, Carmen; Oteo, Carlos; Oteo, Jesús; Amengual, José; Forner, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of a bleaching enzyme-based toothpaste. A randomized clinical trial was carried out, comprising 48 participants with teeth exhibiting color A3 or higher according to the Vita Classical guide. One-half of the sample received the bleaching enzyme-based toothpaste (White Kin(®)), while the other received placebo toothpaste. Both products were supplied in identical containers and had the same composition except for the active components. The teeth color was measured with a spectrophotometer. The patients were instructed to brush their teeth three times a day during 3 min with the assigned product, during 12 weeks. The color measurements were repeated after 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks of treatment. Color variation was based on the CIE L*a*b* coordinates, ΔE and the EW index. The relationship of these variables at different observation times were performed using a generalized estimating equations model, which evaluated the effect of treatment, time and interaction. The patients using the bleaching enzyme-based toothpaste showed an increase in lightness (80.14 -treatment- versus 79.25 -control group-) and a reduction in component b*. ΔE was found higher in the treatment group (p=0.064), close to statistical significance. The bleaching enzyme-based toothpaste could be potentially efficient in the modification in tooth color progressing from the third to ninth week of treatment, tending to stabilize after the ninth week. A very low carbamide peroxide concentration, with the incorporation of lactoperoxidase, tooth paste, tends to offer clinically satisfactory results, in terms of modifications in tooth color, nevertheless no significant differences were founded when compared to the control group, with an oral hygiene controlled along the study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Evaluation of polysomnographic diagnostic criteria for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Xu, Z F; Wu, Y X; Feng, G S; Zhang, Y M; Ni, X

    2016-11-07

    Objective: To determine the appropriate criteria of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children. Method: Children with snoring and healthy children were recruited from October 2014 to September 2015. Subjects were divided into four groups based on polysomnography(PSG). Group 1: children with obstructive apnea hypopnea index(OAHI)≥1 (the OSAS criteria of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, ICSD) but their AHI≤5 or OAI ≤1 (under the OSAS criteria of AHI>5 or OAI>1 by the American Thoracic Society, ATS); Group 2: children with OAHI<1 (the primary snoring criteria of the ICSD); Group 3: children with AHI>5 or OAI>1; and Group 4: normal children as controls. Sleep disorder scales and polysomnography parameters were compared among the four groups. Results: A total of 1 115 children were included.There were 143, 345, 529 and 98 children in each group. After adjust for age, gender and body mass index(BMI), children in group 1 had higher total sleep disorder scale score (P<0.01), as well as sub-scores for severe snoring (P<0.01), daytime behavior problem (P<0.01) and sleep related nighttime abnormality (P<0.05) compared with normal controls, and they had longer mean and longest duration of obstructive apnea and hypopnea and lower minimum oxygen saturation compared with children with obstructive AHI<1 (all P<0.05 or <0.01). Conclusion: OAHI>1 should be defined as the criteria of OSAS in children.

  9. Prevalence and correlates of sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease: a polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Alatriste-Booth, Vanessa; Rodríguez-Violante, Mayela; Camacho-Ordoñez, Azyadeh; Cervantes-Arriaga, Amin

    2015-03-01

    Sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease are very common. Polysomnography (PSG) is considered the gold standard for diagnosis. The aim of the present study is to assess the prevalence of nocturnal sleep disorders diagnosed by polysomnography and to determine the associated clinical factors. A total of 120 patients with Parkinson's disease were included. All patients underwent a standardized overnight, single night polysomnography. Ninety-four (78.3%) patients had an abnormal PSG. Half of the patients fulfilled criteria for sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS); rapid eye movement behavior disorder (RBD) was present in 37.5%. Characteristics associated with SAHS were age (p = 0.049) and body mass index (p = 0.016). Regarding RBD, age (p < 0.001), left motor onset (p = 0.047) and levodopa equivalent dose (p = 0.002) were the main predictors. SAHS and RBD were the most frequent sleep disorders. Higher levodopa equivalent dose and body mass index appear to be risk factors for RBD and SAHS, respectively.

  10. Migraine, arousal and sleep deprivation: comment on: "sleep quality, arousal and pain thresholds in migraineurs: a blinded controlled polysomnographic study".

    PubMed

    Vollono, Catello; Testani, Elisa; Losurdo, Anna; Mazza, Salvatore; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-06-10

    We discuss the hypothesis proposed by Engstrom and coworkers that Migraineurs have a relative sleep deprivation, which lowers the pain threshold and predispose to attacks. Previous data indicate that Migraineurs have a reduction of Cyclic Alternating Pattern (CAP), an essential mechanism of NREM sleep regulation which allows to dump the effect of incoming disruptive stimuli, and to protect sleep. The modifications of CAP observed in Migraineurs are similar to those observed in patients with impaired arousal (narcolepsy) and after sleep deprivation. The impairment of this mechanism makes Migraineurs more vulnerable to stimuli triggering attacks during sleep, and represents part of a more general vulnerability to incoming stimuli.

  11. Are fluoride releasing dental materials clinically effective on caries control?

    PubMed

    Cury, Jaime Aparecido; de Oliveira, Branca Heloisa; dos Santos, Ana Paula Pires; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló

    2016-03-01

    (1) To describe caries lesions development and the role of fluoride in controlling disease progression; (2) to evaluate whether the use of fluoride-releasing pit and fissure sealants, bonding orthodontic agents and restorative materials, in comparison to a non-fluoride releasing material, reduces caries incidence in children or adults, and (3) to discuss how the anti-caries properties of these materials have been evaluated in vitro and in situ. The search was performed on the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and on Medline via Pubmed. Caries is a biofilm-sugar dependent disease and as such it provokes progressive destruction of mineral structure of any dental surface - intact, sealed or restored - where biofilm remains accumulated and is regularly exposed to sugar. The mechanism of action of fluoride released from dental materials on caries is similar to that of fluoride found in dentifrices or other vehicles of fluoride delivery. Fluoride-releasing materials are unable to interfere with the formation of biofilm on dental surfaces adjacent to them or to inhibit acid production by dental biofilms. However, the fluoride released slows down the progression of caries lesions in tooth surfaces adjacent to dental materials. This effect has been clearly shown by in vitro and in situ studies but not in randomized clinical trials. The anti-caries effect of fluoride releasing materials is still not based on clinical evidence, and, in addition, it can be overwhelmed by fluoride delivered from dentifrices. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sleep and dreaming in patients with borderline personality disorder: a polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Schredl, Michael; Paul, Franc; Reinhard, Iris; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich Walter; Schmahl, Christian; Bohus, Martin

    2012-12-30

    Previous research has demonstrated disturbances in sleep continuity in subjects with borderline personality disorders (BPD). Moreover, depression-like sleep abnormalities like reduced REM latency have been found in BPD subjects, even without comorbid major depression disorder. Yet it is still unknown what the effect is of co-morbid posttraumatic stress disorder on sleep continuity and dream content in BPD patients group. The present study compared 27 unmedicated female BPD subjects and healthy controls. The patients exhibited increased sleep fragmentation, increased REM density, and reduced REM latency. The findings were independent from co-morbid posttraumatic stress response (PTSD), which was present in 33% of the patient sample. Negatively toned dreams obtained by REM awakenings and nightmares were also reported more often by the patients-also irrespective of co-morbid PTSD-whereas dreams of specific BPD behavior, like self-mutilation, were rare. Taking these finding into account, one might productively investigate whether the sleep abnormalities improve during successful treatment of BPD and whether efficient methods for treating nightmares can be beneficial for this patient group.

  13. Polysomnographic study of nocturnal sleep in idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Ferri, Raffaele; Poli, Francesca; Vandi, Stefano; Cosentino, Filomena I I; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    We investigated nocturnal sleep abnormalities in 19 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time (IH) in comparison with two age- and sex- matched control groups of 13 normal subjects (C) and of 17 patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC), the latter considered as the extreme of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Sleep macro- and micro- (i.e. cyclic alternating pattern, CAP) structure as well as quantitative analysis of EEG, of periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS), and of muscle tone during REM sleep were compared across groups. IH and NC patients slept more than C subjects, but IH showed the highest levels of sleep fragmentation (e.g. awakenings), associated with a CAP rate higher than NC during lighter sleep stages and lower than C during slow wave sleep respectively, and with the highest relative amount of A3 and the lowest of A1 subtypes. IH showed a delta power in between C and NC groups, whereas muscle tone and PLMS had normal characteristics. A peculiar profile of microstructural sleep abnormalities may contribute to sleep fragmentation and, possibly, EDS in IH.

  14. In utero Repair of Myelomeningocele: Rationale, Initial Clinical Experience and a Randomized Controlled Prospective Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Enrico; Flake, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    Myelomeningocele (MMC), one of the most common congenital malformations, can result in severe lifelong disabilities, including paraplegia, hydrocephalus, Arnold-Chiari II malformation, incontinence, sexual dysfunction, skeletal deformations, and mental impairment. MMC was the first nonlethal anomaly to be treated by fetal surgery. Studies in animals provide compelling evidence that the primary cause of the neurological deficit associated with MMC is not simply incomplete neurulation but rather chronic mechanical injury and amniotic-fluid-induced chemical trauma that progressively damage the exposed neural tissue during gestation. Initial results suggest that the surgical repair of MMC before 25 weeks of gestation may preserve neurological function, reverse the hindbrain herniation of the Arnold-Chiari II malformation, and obviate the need for postnatal placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. As it is currently unknown whether fetal surgery for MMC is truly beneficial compared to standard postnatal care, a randomized, controlled clinical trial has been initiated within the United States. PMID:22479081

  15. Degree of pineal calcification (DOC) is associated with polysomnographic sleep measures in primary insomnia patients.

    PubMed

    Mahlberg, Richard; Kienast, Thorsten; Hädel, Sven; Heidenreich, Jens Olaf; Schmitz, Stephan; Kunz, Dieter

    2009-04-01

    Melatonin plays a key role in the proper functioning of the circadian timing system (CTS), and exogenous melatonin has been shown to be beneficial in cases of CTS and sleep disturbances. Nevertheless, the concept of "melatonin deficit" has yet to be defined. The aim of our study was, therefore, to determine the relationship between the degree of pineal calcification (DOC) and a range of sleep parameters measured objectively using polysomnography (PSG). A total of 31 outpatients (17 women, 14 men, mean age 45.9 years; SD 14.4) with primary insomnia were included in our study. Following an adaptation night, a PSG recording night was performed in the sleep laboratory. Urine samples were collected at predefined intervals over a 32-h period that included both PSG nights. The measurement of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) levels was determined using ELISA. DOC and volume of calcified pineal tissue (CPT) and uncalcified pineal tissue (UPT) were estimated by means of cranial computed tomography. UPT was positively associated with 24-h aMT6s excretion (r=0.569; P=0.002), but CPT was not. After controlling for age, aMT6s parameters, CPT, and UPT did not correlate with any of the PSG parameters evaluated. In contrast, DOC was negatively associated with REM sleep percentage (r=-0.567, P=0.001), total sleep time (r=-0.463, P=0.010), and sleep efficiency (r=-0.422, P=0.020). DOC appears to be a superior indicator of melatonin deficit compared to the absolute amount of melatonin in the circulation. High DOC values indicate changes predominantly in the PSG parameters governed by the circadian timing system. DOC may thus serve as a marker of CTS instability.

  16. Polysomnographic Measurement of Sleep Duration and Bodily Pain Perception in the Sleep Heart Health Study.

    PubMed

    Weingarten, Jeremy A; Dubrovsky, Boris; Basner, Robert C; Redline, Susan; George, Liziamma; Lederer, David J

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether total sleep time (TST) and specific sleep stage duration are associated with bodily pain perception and whether sex, age, or subjective sleepiness modifies this relationship. Data from adults ages 39-90 y (n = 5,199) who took part in the Sleep Heart Health Study Exam 1 were analyzed. TST, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep time, and slow wave sleep (SWS) time were measured by unattended, in-home nocturnal polysomnography. Bodily pain perception was measured via the Short Form-36 questionnaire bodily pain component. We used logistic regression to examine associations between total and individual sleep stage durations and bodily pain perception controlling for age, sex, race, body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index, antidepressant use, and important cardiovascular conditions (smoking [pack-years], history of diabetes, and history of percutaneous coronary intervention and/or coronary artery bypass graft). In the fully adjusted model, REM sleep time and SWS time were not associated with "moderate to severe pain," whereas TST was: Each 1-h decrement in TST was associated with a 7% increased odds of "moderate to severe pain" (odds ratio 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.002, 1.14). Due to modification of the association between SWS time and "moderate to severe pain" by sex (P for interaction = 0.01), we performed analyses stratified by sex: Each 1-h decrement in SWS time was associated with a 20% higher odds of "moderate to severe pain" among men (odds ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.42) whereas an association was not observed among women. Shorter TST among all subjects and shorter SWS time in men was associated with "moderate to severe pain." REM sleep time was not associated with bodily pain perception in this cohort. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  17. Clinical decision support to improve blood pressure control in hemodialysis patients: a nonrandomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stephanie; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Wiebe, Natasha; Majumdar, Sumit; Klarenbach, Scott; Jindal, Kailash; Manns, Braden; Mortis, Garth; Campbell, Patricia; Tonelli, Marcello

    2012-01-01

    Computer-based clinical decision support aims to improve the quality of patient care. The utility of decision support for improving blood pressure control in hemodialysis patients is unknown. This was a nonrandomized controlled trial of adult patients receiving chronic in-center hemodialysis during the period of April 1, 2005, to September 30, 2006, in 1 of the 2 major university-based renal programs in Alberta, Canada. Physicians in the intervention center were provided with twice-monthly audits and printed management suggestions based on guideline-recommended blood pressure targets. The same data were available to physicians in the control group but without audit and feedback decision support. Eight hundred and thirty hemodialysis patients were receiving dialysis treatment at the time the study was initiated. Preintervention and postintervention blood pressure data were available for 361 patients. The primary outcome, the proportion of postdialysis systolic blood pressures at target over 12 months, did not differ between the intervention and the control programs (unadjusted odds ratio 0.59; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.34-1.02, p = 0.06; adjusted odds ratio 0.62; 95% CI, 0.35-1.11, p = 0.11). There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in other measures of blood pressure such as the mean change in postdialysis systolic blood pressures (unadjusted mean difference 4 mm Hg, 95% CI, -1 to 9, p = 0.36; adjusted mean difference 2 mm Hg, 95% CI, -1 to 5, p = 0.19). In this population of chronic hemodialysis patients, a computer-based clinical decision support system was not associated with improved blood pressure control.

  18. Control of subretinal fluid: experimental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Marmor, M F

    1990-01-01

    Experimental work shows that subretinal fluid is removed both by active transport across the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and by passive hydrostatic and oncotic forces that work most effectively when the RPE barrier has been damaged. The retina will stay attached whether or not the RPE is intact--but retinal function requires the RPE barrier and thus active transport is the primary mechanism of subretinal fluid control. RPE fluid transport is normally limited by the retina (which resists water flow from the vitreous) but can be quite powerful when a reservoir of subretinal fluid is present. Clinical serous detachments are unlikely to form solely as a result of small RPE defects or leaks, since the active and passive transport systems for removing subretinal fluid are both so strong. It is suggested that the primary pathology in most serous retinopathy is a diffuse metabolic or vascular abnormality of RPE fluid transport, and that RPE defects or leaks are necessary but only secondary components of the disease. Several hypotheses for removing subretinal fluid therapeutically are considered in terms of their physiology. The subretinal space between the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the remnant of the embryonic optic vesicle. In the developed eye the subretinal space is of minimal size, but no tissue junctions form across it and it can re-open under pathological conditions of retinal detachment. In a sense, the title of this paper is misleading since normally there should be no subretinal fluid to control. However, ocular mechanisms are necessary to prevent an accumulation of fluid, and to remove it under conditions of stress or disease.

  19. Childhood headache at school entry: a controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Aromaa, M; Sillanpää, M L; Rautava, P; Helenius, H

    1998-06-01

    Our objective was to study the prevalence of different headache types, characterizations, and triggers of headache in Finnish children starting school. Questionnaires were sent to 1,132 families with 6-year-old children. Children with headache disturbing their daily activities (n=96) and an asymptomatic control group of children (n=96) participated in a clinical interview and examination. Children with headache had significantly more bruxism (odds ratio [OR], 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.4), tenderness in the occipital muscle insertion areas (OR, 4.8; 95% CI, 1.8 to 12.7), and tenderness in the temporomandibular joint areas (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.3 to 6.0). They also had more travel sickness (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.7 to 6.7) than control children. Eating ice cream (OR, 5.3; 95% CI, 1.4 to 20.3), fear (OR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.2 to 11.2), and anxiety (OR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.0 to 10.8) triggered headache more often in migraineurs than in children with tension-type headache. Children with migraine also reported more frequently abdominal (OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.7 to 18.1) and other (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.2 to 9.8) pain concurrently with headache, and they used medication for pain relief more often (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.0 to 9.5). Headache classification in children may be improved by palpation of occipital muscle insertions and temporomandibular joint areas, and by discerning a history of triggering events and concurrent symptoms.

  20. A Systematic Assessment of the Association of Polysomnographic Indices with Blood Pressure: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Dennis A.; Wang, Rui; Jacobs, David R.; Duprez, Daniel; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Shea, Steven; Watson, Karol; Redline, Susan

    2015-01-01

    , Shea S, Watson K, Redline S. A Systematic assessment of the association of polysomnographic indices with blood pressure: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). SLEEP 2015;38(4):587–596. PMID:25348124

  1. A Prospective Video-Polysomnographic Analysis of Movements during Physiological Sleep in 100 Healthy Sleepers.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Ambra; Gabelia, David; Mitterling, Thomas; Poewe, Werner; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-09-01

    Video-polysomnography (v-PSG) is the gold standard for the diagnosis of sleep disorders. Quantitative assessment of type and distribution of physiological movements during sleep for the differentiation between physiological and pathological motor activity is lacking. We performed a systematic and detailed analysis of movements during physiological sleep using v-PSG technology. Prospective v-PSG investigation. Academic referral center sleep laboratory. One hundred healthy sleepers aged 19-77 years recruited from a representative population sample after a two-step screening. N/A. All subjects underwent v-PSG. In all cases where electromyographic activity > 100 msec duration was visible during sleep in the mentalis, submentalis, flexor digitorum superficialis, or anterior tibialis muscles, the time-synchronized video was analyzed. Visible movements were classified according to movement type and topography, and movement rates were computed for the different sleep stages. A total of 9,790 movements (median 10.2/h, IQR 4.6-16.2) were analyzed: 99.7% were elementary, 0.3% complex. Movement indices were higher in men than women (men: median 13/h, interquartile range 7.1-29.3, women: median 7.9/h, interquartile range 3.4-14.5; P = 0.006). The majority of movements involved the extremities (87.9%) and were classified as focal (53.3%), distal (79.6%), and unilateral (71.5%); 15.3% of movements were associated with arousals. REM-related movements (median 0.8 sec, IQR 0.5-1.2) were shorter than NREM-related movements (median 1.1 sec, IQR 0.8-1.6; P = 0.001). Moreover, REM-related movements were predominantly myocloniform (86.6%), whereas NREM-related movements were more often non-myocloniform (59.1%, P < 0.001). Minor movements are frequent during physiological sleep, and are associated with low arousal rates. REM-related movements were predominantly myocloniform and shorter than NREM movements, indicating different influences on motor control during both sleep states. © 2015

  2. Clinical spectrum of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Daniel; David, Anthony S; Evans, Andrew H; Grant, Jon E; Stacy, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs), including compulsive gambling, buying, sexual behavior, and eating, are a serious and increasingly recognized psychiatric complication in Parkinson's disease (PD). Other impulsive-compulsive behaviors (ICBs) have been described in PD, including punding (stereotyped, repetitive, purposeless behaviors) and dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS; compulsive PD medication overuse). ICDs have been most closely related to the use of dopamine agonists (DAs), perhaps more so at higher doses; in contrast, DDS is primarily associated with shorter-acting, higher-potency dopaminergic medications, such as apomorphine and levodopa. Possible risk factors for ICDs include male sex, younger age and younger age at PD onset, a pre-PD history of ICDs, and a personal or family history of substance abuse, bipolar disorder, or gambling problems. Given the paucity of treatment options and potentially serious consequences, it is critical for PD patients to be monitored closely for development of ICDs as part of routine clinical care. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  3. [Review of controled clinical trials of behavioral treatment for obesity].

    PubMed

    Márquez-Ibáñez, B; Armendáriz-Anguiano, A L; Bacardí-Gascón, M; Jiménez-Cruz, A

    2008-01-01

    The increased prevalence of obesity has been associated to an increment in chronic-degenerative diseases. The behavioral conduct therapies (BCT) have been used to help subjects develop a series of skills to reach a healthy weight. We conducted a review of the literature of BCT from controlled clinical trials registered at PubMed from January 2000 to november 2006. We found five long-term (> or = 12 months) studies and analyzed each study. The percent of weight loss at the end of follow up ranged from 3% to 9% of the initial weight; the percent of retention fluctuated from 92% at three months to 55% at 24 months. There were no similar reported studies conducted in Latino or Hispanic population. These results suggest that the change in loss of weight with BCT are modest at the end of the follow up period and that most of the studies report low adherence to treatment. It is recommended that public and private funds are needed to implement effective and safe multicentric long term randomized studies on different cultural populations, including most Latin-American countries.

  4. Sleep episodes and daytime somnolence as result of individual susceptibility to different dopaminergic drugs in a PD patient: a polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Romigi, A; Brusa, L; Marciani, M G; Pierantozzi, M; Placidi, F; Izzi, F; Sperli, F; Testa, F; Stanzione, P

    2005-01-15

    The association between excessive daytime somnolence (EDS) and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is often reported but still debated. The possible role of antiparkinsonian therapy or primarily of PD on excessive diurnal sleepiness is controversial. We describe the case of a 61-year-old patient affected by PD who experienced sleep episodes (SE) occurring during pramipexole plus L-Dopa therapy. Polysomnographic sleep studies and subjective evaluations of daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale) were carried out under administration of pramipexole plus L-Dopa, L-Dopa monotherapy and cabergoline plus L-Dopa. The polysomnography revealed two sleep events during pramipexole plus L-Dopa. Moreover, the polysomnographic data showed an increase of both diurnal and nocturnal sleep under pramipexole plus L-Dopa compared with cabergoline plus L-Dopa and L-Dopa as monotherapy. In addition, while Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) Score showed a mild sleepiness under pramipexole (ESS score=11), ESS scores were normal under both L-Dopa and cabergoline plus L-Dopa. Sleep episodes also disappeared under both L-Dopa and cabergoline plus L-Dopa (2- and 12-month follow-up). We hypothesize that an individual susceptibility to specific antiparkinsonian drug may play a significant role in the genesis of sleepiness in our PD patient.

  5. Polysomnographic Assessment of Sleep Comorbidities in Drug-Naïve Narcolepsy-Spectrum Disorders—A Japanese Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This is a large cross-sectional study which aimed to investigate comorbidity rate, degree of sleep-related breathing disorder, polysomnigraphically diagnosible rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder/rapid eye movement sleep without atonia and periodic limb movements during sleep in Japanese drug-naïve patients with narcolepsy-spectrum disorders. A total of 158 consecutive drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, 295 patients with narcolepsy without cataplexy and 395 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time were enrolled. From retrospectively analyzed data of nocturnal polysomnography and multiple sleep latency test, higher rates of periodic limb movements during sleep (> = 15 h-1) (10.2%) and polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (1.9%) were found in patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy. They had more severe periodic limb movements during sleep especially during rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentages of rapid eye movement sleep without atonia than the other two patient groups. In the present large sample study, Japanese drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy showed the highest comorbidity rates of periodic limb movements during sleep, polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia among those with the other narcolepsy-spectrum disorders; the rates were lower than those for Western patients. PMID:26322978

  6. Polysomnographic Assessment of Sleep Comorbidities in Drug-Naïve Narcolepsy-Spectrum Disorders--A Japanese Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Sasai-Sakuma, Taeko; Kinoshita, Akihiko; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    This is a large cross-sectional study which aimed to investigate comorbidity rate, degree of sleep-related breathing disorder, polysomnigraphically diagnosible rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder/rapid eye movement sleep without atonia and periodic limb movements during sleep in Japanese drug-naïve patients with narcolepsy-spectrum disorders. A total of 158 consecutive drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, 295 patients with narcolepsy without cataplexy and 395 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time were enrolled. From retrospectively analyzed data of nocturnal polysomnography and multiple sleep latency test, higher rates of periodic limb movements during sleep (> = 15 h(-1)) (10.2%) and polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (1.9%) were found in patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy. They had more severe periodic limb movements during sleep especially during rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentages of rapid eye movement sleep without atonia than the other two patient groups. In the present large sample study, Japanese drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy showed the highest comorbidity rates of periodic limb movements during sleep, polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia among those with the other narcolepsy-spectrum disorders; the rates were lower than those for Western patients.

  7. Controlled release metoprolol for aortic regurgitation: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Broch, Kaspar; Urheim, Stig; Lønnebakken, Mai Tone; Stueflotten, Wenche; Massey, Richard; Fosså, Kristian; Hopp, Einar; Aakhus, Svend; Gullestad, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Chronic aortic regurgitation (AR) creates a volume load on the left ventricle, which induces adaptive responses. With time, excessive left ventricular (LV) dilatation may precipitate heart failure. β-adrenergic receptor antagonists (β-blockers) are beneficial in patients with heart failure, but their effect in AR is unclear. This trial was designed to evaluate the effect of controlled release metoprolol on LV remodelling in patients with AR. In this double blind trial, 75 asymptomatic patients aged 44±14 years, 89% males, fulfilling at least two echocardiographic criteria for moderate or severe chronic AR, were randomised to receive metoprolol CR/XL up-titrated to 200 mg/day, or matching placebo. The primary endpoint was LV end diastolic volume, measured by MRI after 6 months of treatment. After 6 months, the difference in the baseline-adjusted LV end diastolic volume between patients allocated to metoprolol and those allocated to placebo was 8 (95% CI -8 to 25) mL (p=0.32). The adjusted LV ejection fraction was 2.7 (95% CI 0.1 to 5.3) percentage points higher in the metoprolol group than in the placebo group (p=0.04). The exercise capacity and peak oxygen consumption did not differ between treatment arms. Serum concentrations of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide were 138 (95% CI 71 to 205) pg/mL higher in the metoprolol group (p<0.001). There were no serious adverse events in either treatment arm. Treatment with metoprolol of adults with chronic, moderate to severe AR had no effect on LV volumes. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01157572-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. 77 FR 72409 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services..., 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, Allentown, Pennsylvania 18106, made application to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for registration as an importer of levorphanol...

  9. 77 FR 67396 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application, Fisher Clinical Services..., 2012, Fisher Clinical Services, Inc., 7554 Schantz Road, ] Allentown, Pennsylvania 18106, made application to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for registration as an importer of Tapentadol...

  10. Effectiveness of the clinical teaching associate model to improve clinical learning outcomes: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Parchebafieh, Samaneh; Gholizadeh, Leila; Lakdizaji, Sima; Ghiasvandiyan, Shahrzad; Davoodi, Arefeh

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the clinical teaching associate (CTA) model to improve clinical learning outcomes in nursing students. Students were randomly allocated to either the CTA (n = 28) or traditional training group (n = 32), and their clinical knowledge, skills, and satisfaction with the learning experience were assessed and compared. The results showed that the CTA model was equally effective in improving clinical knowledge, skills, and satisfaction of nursing students.

  11. The Complex Sleep Apnea Resolution Study: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Versus Adaptive Servoventilation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Morgenthaler, Timothy I.; Kuzniar, Tomasz J.; Wolfe, Lisa F.; Willes, Leslee; McLain, William C.; Goldberg, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Prior studies show that adaptive servoventilation (ASV) is initially more effective than continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for patients with complex sleep apnea syndrome (CompSAS), but choosing therapies has been controversial because residual central breathing events may resolve over time in many patients receiving chronic CPAP therapy. We conducted a multicenter, randomized, prospective trial comparing clinical and polysomnographic outcomes over prolonged treatment of patients with CompSAS, with CPAP versus ASV. Methods: Qualifying participants meeting criteria for CompSAS were randomized to optimized CPAP or ASV treatment. Clinical and polysomnographic data were obtained at baseline and after 90 days of therapy. Results: We randomized 66 participants (33 to each treatment). At baseline, the diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 37.7 ± 27.8 (central apnea index [CAI] = 3.2 ± 5.8) and best CPAP AHI was 37.0 ± 24.9 (CAI 29.7 ± 25.0). After second-night treatment titration, the AHI was 4.7 ± 8.1 (CAI = 1.1 ± 3.7) on ASV and 14.1 ± 20.7 (CAI = 8.8 ± 16.3) on CPAP (P ≤ 0.0003). At 90 days, the ASV versus CPAP AHI was 4.4 ± 9.6 versus 9.9 ± 11.1 (P = 0.0024) and CAI was 0.7 ± 3.4 versus 4.8 ± 6.4 (P < 0.0001), respectively. In the intention-to-treat analysis, success (AHI < 10) at 90 days of therapy was achieved in 89.7% versus 64.5% of participants treated with ASV and CPAP, respectively (P = 0.0214). Compliance and changes in Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index were not significantly different between treatment groups. Conclusion: Adaptive servoventilation (ASV) was more reliably effective than CPAP in relieving complex sleep apnea syndrome. While two thirds of participants experienced success with CPAP, approximately 90% experienced success with ASV. Because both methods produced similar symptomatic changes, it is unclear if this polysomnographic effectiveness may translate into other desired

  12. Empathy in Boys with Gender Identity Disorder: A Comparison to Externalizing Clinical Control Boys and Community Control Boys and Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen-Anderson, Allison F. H.; Jenkins, Jennifer M.; Bradley, Susan J.; Zucker, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The construct of empathy was examined in 20 boys with gender identity disorder (GID), 20 clinical control boys with externalizing disorders (ECC), 20 community control boys (NCB), and 20 community control girls (NCG). The mean age of the children was 6.86 years (range = 4-8 years). It was hypothesized that boys with GID would show…

  13. Remotely Controlled Mandibular Protrusion during Sleep Predicts Therapeutic Success with Oral Appliances in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Remmers, John; Charkhandeh, Shouresh; Grosse, Joshua; Topor, Zbigniew; Brant, Rollin; Santosham, Peter; Bruehlmann, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: The present study addresses the need for a validated tool that prospectively identifies favorable candidates for oral appliance therapy in treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. The objective of the study was to evaluate the ability of a mandibular titration study, performed with a remotely controlled mandibular positioner (RCMP), to predict treatment outcome with a mandibular repositioning appliance (MRA) and to predict an effective target protrusive position (ETPP). Design: A prospective, blinded, outcome study. Setting: Standard clinical care with tests performed in the polysomnographic laboratory. Participants: Consecutive patients (n = 67) recruited from a sleep center or a dental practice using broad inclusion criteria (age 21-80 years; AHI > 10/h; BMI < 40 kg/m2). Interventions: Therapeutic outcome with a mandibular protruding oral appliance was predicted following a mandibular protrusive titration study in the polysomnographic laboratory using a remotely controlled positioner and prospectively established predictive rules. An ETPP was also prospectively determined for participants predicted to be therapeutically successful with MRA therapy. All participants were blindly treated with a MRA, at either the predicted ETPP or a sham position, and therapeutic outcome was compared against prediction. Measurements and Results: At the final protrusive position, standard predictive parameters (sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values) showed statistically significant predictive accuracy (P < 0.05) in the range of 83% to 94%. The predicted ETPP provided an efficacious protrusive position in 87% of participants predicted to be therapeutically successful with MRA therapy (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Using prospectively established rules for interpreting the polysomnographic data, the mandibular titration study predicted mandibular repositioning appliance therapeutic outcome with significant accuracy, particularly with regard to

  14. Clinical characteristics of sleep disorders in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhi-Juan; Liu, Chan-Chan; Ji, Su-Qiong; Yang, Qing-Mei; Ye, Hong-Xiang; Han, Hai-Yan; Xue, Zheng

    2017-02-01

    In order to investigate the sleep quality and influencing factors in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 201 PD patients were enrolled and underwent extensive clinical evaluations. Subjective sleep evaluation was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). It was found that poor sleep quality (77.11%) and excessive daytime sleepiness (32.34%) were commonly seen in PD patients and positively correlated with disease severity. Then 70 out of the 201 PD patients and 70 age- and sex-matched controls underwent a polysomnographic recording. The parameters were compared between PD group and control group and the influencing factors of sleep in PD patients were analyzed. The results showed that sleep efficiency (SE) was significantly decreased (P<0.01), and sleep latency (SL) and the arousal index (AI) were increased (P<0.05) in the PD group as compared with those in the control group. SE and total sleep time (TST) were positively correlated with the Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) stage. There was significant difference in the extent of hypopnea and hypoxemia between the PD group and the control group (P<0.05). Our results indicate that PD patients have an overall poor sleep quality and a high prevalence of sleep disorder, which may be correlated with the disease severity. Respiratory function and oxygen supply are also affected to a certain degree in PD patients.

  15. Oncolytic Virus: Regulatory Aspects from Quality Control to Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Teruhide; Uchida, Eriko

    2017-02-22

    Oncolytic viruses, which include both naturally occurring wild-type viruses/attenuated viruses and genetically modified viruses, have recently been developed for use in innovative cancer therapies. Genetically modified oncolytic viruses possess the unique ability to replicate conditionally as a unique gene therapy product. Since oncolytic viruses exhibit prolonged persistence in patients, viral shedding and transmission to third parties should be major concerns for clinical trials, along with the clinical safety and efficacy. Accordingly, studies are now underway to establish the safety and efficacy of oncolytic viruses.

  16. Impulse control disorders: clinical characteristics and pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Potenza, Marc N

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge of the clinical characteristics and pharmacological management of pathological gambling, kleptomania, and compulsive buying. Specifically, the article summarizes the phenomenology and associated psychopathology of these disorders and presents study results of the various pharmacological agents used to treat these disorders--serotonin reuptake inhibitors, opioid antagonists, mood stabilizers, and atypical antipsychotics.

  17. Clinical Characteristics of Impaired Trunk Control in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyrman, Lieve; Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; Verheyden, Geert; Klingels, Katrijn; Monbaliu, Elegast; Feys, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify clinical characteristics of impaired trunk control in hundred children with spastic CP (mean age 11.4 [plus or minus] 2.1 years, range 8-15 years). Assessment of trunk control was performed with the Trunk Control Measurement Scale (TCMS). Trunk control was clearly impaired, indicated by a median total TCMS score of…

  18. Clinical Characteristics of Impaired Trunk Control in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyrman, Lieve; Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; Verheyden, Geert; Klingels, Katrijn; Monbaliu, Elegast; Feys, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify clinical characteristics of impaired trunk control in hundred children with spastic CP (mean age 11.4 [plus or minus] 2.1 years, range 8-15 years). Assessment of trunk control was performed with the Trunk Control Measurement Scale (TCMS). Trunk control was clearly impaired, indicated by a median total TCMS score of…

  19. Development of a clinical data warehouse for hospital infection control.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Mary F; Kieszkowski, Piotr; Zagorski, Brandon M; Trick, William E; Sommers, Michael; Weinstein, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    Existing data stored in a hospital's transactional servers have enormous potential to improve performance measurement and health care quality. Accessing, organizing, and using these data to support research and quality improvement projects are evolving challenges for hospital systems. The authors report development of a clinical data warehouse that they created by importing data from the information systems of three affiliated public hospitals. They describe their methodology; difficulties encountered; responses from administrators, computer specialists, and clinicians; and the steps taken to capture and store patient-level data. The authors provide examples of their use of the clinical data warehouse to monitor antimicrobial resistance, to measure antimicrobial use, to detect hospital-acquired bloodstream infections, to measure the cost of infections, and to detect antimicrobial prescribing errors. In addition, they estimate the amount of time and money saved and the increased precision achieved through the practical application of the data warehouse.

  20. Development of a Clinical Data Warehouse for Hospital Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Mary F.; Kieszkowski, Piotr; Zagorski, Brandon M.; Trick, William E.; Sommers, Michael; Weinstein, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Existing data stored in a hospital's transactional servers have enormous potential to improve performance measurement and health care quality. Accessing, organizing, and using these data to support research and quality improvement projects are evolving challenges for hospital systems. The authors report development of a clinical data warehouse that they created by importing data from the information systems of three affiliated public hospitals. They describe their methodology; difficulties encountered; responses from administrators, computer specialists, and clinicians; and the steps taken to capture and store patient-level data. The authors provide examples of their use of the clinical data warehouse to monitor antimicrobial resistance, to measure antimicrobial use, to detect hospital-acquired bloodstream infections, to measure the cost of infections, and to detect antimicrobial prescribing errors. In addition, they estimate the amount of time and money saved and the increased precision achieved through the practical application of the data warehouse. PMID:12807807

  1. Latex condom breakage and slippage in a controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, M J; Waugh, M S

    1997-07-01

    Although millions of couples rely on male latex condoms to protect against unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, their use is limited in part by questions about their performance. Rates of condom breakage and slippage, two measures of performance, vary broadly across studies. This variation in part reflects study variability and limitations, including sample size, reliance on subjects' memory, user populations, and products evaluated. In an effort to define condom performance in a group of monogamous couples typical of those using condoms for contraception, we conducted a clinical trial of a single brand of lubricated condoms (Durex Ramses). A total of 4637 attempts to use the condom were evaluated. Six breaks occurred before intercourse (nonclinical breaks), and 10 condoms broke during intercourse or were only noted to have broken upon withdrawal (clinical breaks), resulting in a nonclinical breakage rate of 0.13% (95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.28%), clinical breakage rate of 0.28% (0.15-0.48%), and a total breakage rate of 0.41% (0.25-0.64%). The rate of complete slippage was 0.63% (0.42-0.90%), and total failure (clinical breaks plus complete slips) was 1.04% (0.76-1.37%). These rates are lower than those in other studies with the exception of one, a prospective investigation in a population of female prostitutes. Results indicate that condoms can, in experienced, motivated populations, provide excellent performance and suggest that their efficacy at preventing pregnancy may equal that of the most reliable forms of contraception. Because this study involved a single condom brand, these results may not be generalizable to other brands.

  2. Clinical requirements for closed-loop control systems.

    PubMed

    Clarke, William L; Renard, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Closed-loop (CL) therapy systems should be safe, efficacious, and easily manageable for type 1 diabetes mellitus patient use. For the first two clinical requirements, noninferiority and superiority criteria must be determined based on current conventional and intensive therapy outcomes. Current frequencies of hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis are reviewed and safety expectations for CL therapy systems are proposed. Glycosylated hemoglobin levels lower than current American Diabetes Association recommendations for different age groups are proposed as superiority criteria. Measures of glycemic variability are described and the recording of blood glucose levels as percentages within, above, and below a target range are suggested as reasonable alternatives to sophisticated statistical analyses. It is also suggested that Diabetes Quality of Life and Fear of Hypoglycemia surveys should be used to track psychobehavioral outcomes. Manageability requirements for safe and effective clinical management of CL systems are worth being underscored. The weakest part of the infusion system remains the catheter, which is exposed to variable and under-delivery incidents. Detection methods are needed to warn both the system and the patient about altered insulin delivery, including internal pressure and flow alarms. Glucose monitor sensor accuracy is another requirement; it includes the definition of conditions that lead to capillary glucose measurement, eventually followed by sensor recalibration or replacement. The crucial clinical requirement will be a thorough definition of the situations when the patient needs to move from CL to manual management of insulin delivery, or inversely can switch back to CL after a requested interruption. Instructions about these actions will constitute a major part of the education process of the patients before using CL systems and contribute to the manageability of these systems. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  3. Control and monitoring system for clinically employed pneumatic blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Normann, N A; Henrichsen, D W; Cooper, T G; King, R E; Noon, G P; DeBakey, M E

    1977-01-01

    Instantaneous position of the flexing member in pneumatic blood pumps is monitored on-line by measuring the electrical capacitance across the gas space within the pump. Monitor output is utilized in closed-loop pump control and for automatic pump shutdown in response to operational abnormalities. Thus, safety and efficacy are enhanced through operational optimization, automatic safety features, and facilitated evaluation.

  4. Acromegalic axial arthropathy: a clinical case-control study.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Raffaele; De Brasi, Davide; Pivonello, Rosario; Marzullo, Paolo; Manguso, Francesco; Sodano, Antonio; Oriente, Pasquale; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2004-02-01

    Arthropathy is the major cause of morbidity in acromegaly. To feature the spinal involvement, 54 patients with active acromegaly (27 men, 27 women; age range, 21-69 yr) and 54 sex-, age-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this observational analytical prospective case-control study. A questionnaire to describe onset, duration, and severity of articular symptoms; rheumatological examination, including vertebral and chest mobility, Schober test, thorax expansion, and axial radiological study; and IGF-I, GH, insulin, and glucose level measurement (baseline and after an oral glucose tolerance test) was used to investigate the prevalence of arthropathy and correlate these findings with hormonal parameters. Axial arthropathy was found in 28 patients (52%) and 12 controls (22%; chi(2) = 8.9; P = 0.003). In detail, spinal mobility was reduced in 30 patients (56%) and 10 controls (18%; chi(2) = 14.3; P < 0.0001), thoracic cage was involved in six patients (11%), alterations of spinal profile were observed in 37 patients (68%) and 15 controls (28%; chi(2) = 16.3; P < 0.0001), and increased L2 vertebra diameters were observed in 34 patients (63%) and none of the controls (chi(2) = 46.7; P < 0.0001). Narrowing and widening of L2-L3 disk space were found in 20 (37%) and seven (13%) patients, respectively. Features of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) were found in 11 patients (20%) and none of the controls (chi(2) = 10.1; P < 0.001). Disease duration was correlated with vertebral body height (P = 0.001) or intervertebral space height (P = 0.02), and lumbar mobility with thorax expansion (P = 0.004); DISH severity was correlated with basal (P = 0.04) and peak (P = 0.01) glucose levels after glucose load. In conclusion, chronic GH and IGF-I excess typically affects the axial skeleton with development of severe alterations of spine morphology and function until features of DISH occur. An early diagnosis of acromegaly is mandatory to reduce

  5. Clinical Effects of Subgingivally Delivered Spirulina Gel in Chronic Periodontitis Cases: A Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahendra, Jaideep; Mahendra, Little; Muthu, Jananni; John, Libby; Romanos, Georgios E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical effects of Spirulina in-situ gel as an adjunct to Scaling And Root Planning (SRP) in the treatment of chronic periodontitis subjects. Material and Methods: 64 sites were selected with probing pocket depth of ≥5mm and they were divided into 2 groups; 33 sites were treated with SRP along with spirulina gel (Group A) and 31 sites were treated with SRP alone (Group B). Clinical parameters were recorded at baseline before SRP and at 120th day after the treatment therapy. The parameters included Probing Pocket Depth (PPD) and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL). Results: Both the groups showed significant improvement in the parameters. However, Group A (SRP along with spirulina) showed statistically significant decrease in mean probing pocket depth and gain in the clinical attachment level after 120 days as compared to Group B SRP alone. Conclusion: Locally delivered spirulina gel, along with scaling and root planning, has been shown to cause a beneficial impact. The efficacy of the product as a local drug delivery system in the non-surgical treatment of periodontitis without any side effects has been proved. Spirulina appears to be promising. It exerts strong anti-inflammatory effects which are closely connected with its antioxidative activity. This study can have a significant impact on the treatment procedures of periodontitis, with the use of blue green algae in the future. PMID:24298522

  6. 77 FR 14805 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the... Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and...

  7. Maternal Control and Adolescent Depression: Ethnic Differences among Clinically Referred Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Jo-Ann S.; Donenberg, Geri R.; Martinovich, Zoran

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relationship between perceived maternal control and depression for 11 urban adolescent girls seeking psychological services at an outpatient clinic. No relation between control and depression was found for Caucasian and Latina girls, but high control was linked to less depression among African American girls. Findings highlight the…

  8. Evidence of subthalamic PGO-like waves during REM sleep in humans: a deep brain polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Mendoza, Julio; Lozano, Beatriz; Seijo, Fernando; Santamarta-Liébana, Elena; Ramos-Platón, Maria José; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Fernández-González, Fernando

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether the subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a role in the transmission of PGO-like waves during REM sleep in humans. Simultaneous recordings from deep brain electrodes to record local field potentials (LFPs), and standard polysomnography to ascertain sleep/wake states. Main Hospital, department of clinical neurophysiology sleep laboratory. 12 individuals with Parkinson's disease, with electrodes implanted in the STN; and, as a control for localization purposes, 4 cluster headache patients with electrodes implanted in the posterior hypothalamus. All subjects underwent functional neurosurgery for implantation of deep brain stimulation electrodes. Sharp, polarity-reversed LFPs were recorded within the STN during REM sleep in humans. These subthalamic PGO-like waves (2-3 Hz, 80-200 pV, and 300-500 msec) appeared during REM epochs as singlets or in clusters of 3-13 waves. During the pre-REM period, subthalamic PGO-like waves were temporally related to drops in the submental electromyogram and/or onset of muscular atonia. Clusters of PGO-like waves occurred typically before and during the bursts of rapid eye movements and were associated with an enhancement in fast (15-35 Hz) subthalamic oscillatory activity. Subthalamic PGO-like waves can be recorded during pre-REM and REM sleep in humans. Our data suggest that the STN may play an active role in an ascending activating network implicated in the transmission of PGO waves during REM sleep in humans.

  9. [Clinical research XI. From the clinical judgment to the case and controls design].

    PubMed

    Talavera, Juan O; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    The case-control design like the historical cohort carries a number of potential biases as a consequence of the reconstruction of events once the outcome has occurred, and as a consequence of the bias generated by the selection of the control group. This design is characterized by a number of cases (cases), for which we identify a comparison group (controls). It begins at the outcome in direction to the probable cause; therefore, it requires reconstructing events in the opposite direction as it occurs in the phenomenon of causality. However, we must always keep in mind the architectural design, and consider in each section--baseline, maneuver and outcome--characteristics that allow us to demonstrate the effect of the maneuver, avoiding improper assembly, susceptibility, performance and detection bias. The transfer bias can only be controlled with the provision of a defined population, whether it is a population based case-control study or a case-control study nested in a cohort. When a defined population is not possible, this design is only recommended in rare diseases.

  10. Involving clinical librarians at the point of care: results of a controlled intervention.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Elizabeth M; Powelson, Susan E; Reaume, Renée D; Ghali, William A

    2011-12-01

    To measure the effect of including a clinical librarian in the health care team on medical residents and clinical clerks. In 2009, medical residents and clinical clerks were preassigned to one of two patient care teams (intervention and control). Each team had a month-long rotation on the general medicine teaching unit. The clinical librarian joined the intervention team for morning intake, clinical rounding, or an afternoon patient list review, providing immediate literature searches, formal group instruction, informal bedside teaching, and/or individual mentoring for use of preappraised resources and evidence-based medicine search techniques. Both intervention and control teams completed pre and post surveys comparing their confidence levels and awareness of resources as well as their self-reported use of evidence for making patient care decisions. The nonintervention team was surveyed as the control group. The clinical librarian intervention had a significant positive effect on medical trainees' self-reported ability to independently locate and evaluate evidence resources to support patient care decisions. Notably, 30 of 34 (88%) reported having changed a treatment plan based on skills taught by the clinical librarian, and 27 of 34 (79%) changed a treatment plan based on the librarian's mediated search support. Clinical librarians on the care team led to positive effects on self-reported provider attitudes, provider information retrieval tendencies, and, notably, clinical decision making. Future research should evaluate economic effects of widespread implementation of on-site clinical librarians.

  11. Attitudes toward Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials of Patients with Schizophrenia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Norio; Ishioka, Masamichi; Tsuchimine, Shoko; Tsuruga, Koji; Sato, Yasushi; Furukori, Hanako; Kudo, Shuhei; Tomita, Tetsu; Nakagami, Taku; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the use of placebo in clinical trials of schizophrenia patients is controversial because of medical and ethical concerns, placebo-controlled clinical trials are commonly used in the licensing of new drugs. Aims The objective of this study was to assess the attitudes toward placebo-controlled clinical trials among patients with schizophrenia in Japan. Method Using a cross-sectional design, we recruited patients (n = 251) aged 47.7±13.2 (mean±SD) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were admitted to six psychiatric hospitals from December 2013 to March 2014. We employed a 14-item questionnaire specifically developed to survey patients' attitudes toward placebo-controlled clinical trials. Results The results indicated that 33% of the patients would be willing to participate in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Expectations for improvement of disease, a guarantee of hospital treatment continuation, and encouragement by family or friends were associated with the willingness to participate in such trials, whereas a belief of additional time required for medical examinations was associated with non-participation. Conclusions Fewer than half of the respondents stated that they would be willing to participate in placebo-controlled clinical trials. Therefore, interpreting the results from placebo-controlled clinical trials could be negatively affected by selection bias. PMID:26600382

  12. Creation and implementation of a historical controls database from randomized clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Jigar R; Bowen, Edward A; Danielson, Mark M; Allam, Rajasekhar R; Cantor, Michael N

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethical concerns about randomly assigning patients to suboptimal or placebo arms and the paucity of willing participants for randomization into control and experimental groups have renewed focus on the use of historical controls in clinical trials. Although databases of historical controls have been advocated, no published reports have described the technical and informatics issues involved in their creation. Objective To create a historical controls database by leveraging internal clinical trial data at Pfizer, focusing on patients who received only placebo in randomized controlled trials. Methods We transformed disparate clinical data sources by indexing, developing, and integrating clinical data within internal databases and archives. We focused primarily on trials mapped into a consistent standard and trials in the pain therapeutic area as a pilot. Results Of the more than 20 000 internal Pfizer clinical trials, 2404 completed placebo controlled studies with a parallel design were identified. Due to challenges with informed consent and data standards used in older clinical trials, studies completed before 2000 were excluded, yielding 1134 studies from which placebo subjects and associated clinical data were extracted. Conclusions It is technically feasible to pool portions of placebo populations through a stratification and segmentation approach for a historical placebo group database. A sufficiently large placebo controls database would enable previous distribution calculations on representative populations to supplement, not eliminate, the placebo arm of future clinical trials. Creation of an industry-wide placebo controls database, utilizing a universal standard, beyond the borders of Pfizer would add significant efficiencies to the clinical trial and drug development process. PMID:23449762

  13. Reducing falls among geriatric rehabilitation patients: a controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Berean, Colleen; Paches, Debra; Caveny, Penny; Yuen, Doris; Ballash, Lauralee; Freund-Heritage, Rosalie

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention programme to reduce falls among geriatric rehabilitation patients. Pre/post-test design with independent pre-test and matched post-test samples. Inpatient geriatric wards in a rehabilitation hospital. Seventy-six matched pairs (n = 152) of geriatric rehabilitation patients from one control and one intervention ward participated in the study, and 36 nursing staff surveys were completed. The intervention programme was developed based on interviews and systematic reviews. Educational materials were distributed to patients and families, and preventive measures were implemented. The rates of falls before and after the intervention both within and between the wards were compared, and surveys were completed. The matched patients presented no significant differences on age, gender or medical conditions. The falls rates, proportion of fallers and length of stay was higher among those in the control ward (P< 0.043). The percentage of fallers and the rate of falls/1000 patient days were lower on the intervention ward after implementation: odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = -2.9 (-6.6, -1.2) and -1.8 (-6.0, 0.5). Thirty of 36 respondents considered the tool to be helpful and beneficial for use on other wards. The intervention programme was effective in reducing falls among geriatric rehabilitation patients.

  14. Effects of doxycycline on clinical, microbiological and immunological parameters in well-controlled diabetes type-2 patients with periodontal disease: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Tsalikis, Lazaros; Sakellari, Dimitra; Dagalis, Panagiotis; Boura, Panagiota; Konstantinidis, Antonios

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical, microbiological and immunological effects of systemic doxycycline as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) in chronic periodontitis patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes. Sixty-six patients compliant to oral hygiene (Hygiene Index <20%) allocated to either a test (systemic doxycycline for 21 days) or a control (placebo) group participated in the present randomized controlled trial (RCT). Clinical assessments were recorded at baseline, 3 and 6 months after therapy and included clinical attachment level (CAL), set as the primary outcome of the study, probing pocket depth (PPD), recession (RE) and bleeding on probing (BOP). At the same time points, counts of 15 subgingival species were evaluated by "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization, gingival crevicular fluid samples were analysed for matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8) by ELISA and HbA1c levels were determined. Comparisons between and within groups were performed by non-parametric tests (Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon signed-ranks and z-test for proportions with Bonferroni corrections) at the 0.05 level. No major differences were noticed in clinical and microbiological parameters of periodontal disease or levels of MMP-8 between the two groups. Adjunctive systemic doxycycline does not seem to significantly enhance the effects of SRP in well-controlled diabetes type 2 patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Subjective Sleep Complaints in Pediatric Depression: A Controlled Study and Comparison with EEG Measures of Sleep and Waking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertocci, Michele A.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Williamson, Douglas E.; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Ryan, Neal D.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Children with major depressive disorder (MDD) often complain of sleep disturbances; however, polysomnographic studies have failed to find objective evidence of these disturbances. This article examines subjective sleep reports of children with MDD and healthy controls focusing on comparing subjective and objective sleep measures.…

  16. Phytothermotherapy in osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Bellisai, Barbara; Iacoponi, Francesca; Manica, Patrizia; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of adding a cycle of phytothermotherapy (a traditional treatment with fermenting grass used in Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy) to the usual drug treatment, in patients with primary symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, hip, or lumbar spine. In this randomized, single-blind, controlled trial, 218 outpatients were enrolled; 109 patients were treated with a cycle of phytothermotherapy at the thermal resort of Garniga Terme (Trento, Italy) for 10 days; the other 109 patients continued regular outpatient care. Patients were assessed at baseline, after 2 weeks, and after 3 months from the beginning of the study and were evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) for spontaneous pain, a Health Assessment Questionnaire, the Lequesne index for hip and knee osteoarthritis, and the Rolland Morris Questionnaire for lumbar spine OA and symptomatic drug consumption. In patients treated with phytothermotherapy, a significant improvement of VAS and a reduction of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug consumption at the end of treatment and 3 months later were observed. In the control group, no significant differences were noted. The analyses performed separately for each subgroup for OA localization showed that the best results were evident in lumbar spine OA. Concerning tolerability, in the group treated with phytothermotherapy 10% of patients presented side-effects due to treatment, but these were of low intensity and did not interrupt the therapy. In conclusion, the results show beneficial effects of a cycle of phytothermotherapy in patients with OA of the hip, knee, or lumbar spine. Phytothermotherapy may therefore be a useful aid alongside the usual pharmacologic and physiokinesic therapies, or may be used as a valid alternative for patients who do not tolerate pharmacologic treatments.

  17. Participants’ perception of pharmaceutical clinical research: a cross-sectional controlled study

    PubMed Central

    González-Saldivar, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Viramontes-Madrid, José Luis; Salcido-Montenegro, Alejandro; Carlos-Reyna, Kevin Erick Gabriel; Treviño-Alvarez, Andrés Marcelo; Álvarez-Villalobos, Neri Alejandro; González-González, José Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background There is scarce scientific information assessing participants’ perception of pharmaceutical research in developed and developing countries concerning the risks, safety, and purpose of clinical trials. Methods To assess the perception that 604 trial participants (cases) and 604 nonparticipants (controls) of pharmaceutical clinical trials have about pharmaceutical clinical research, we surveyed participants with one of four chronic diseases from 12 research sites throughout Mexico. Results Participation in clinical trials positively influences the perception of pharmaceutical clinical research. More cases (65.4%) than controls (50.7%) perceived that the main purpose of pharmaceutical research is to cure more diseases and to do so more effectively. In addition, more cases considered that there are significant benefits when participating in a research study, such as excellent medical care and extra free services, with this being the most important motivation to participate for both groups (cases 52%, controls 54.5%). We also found a sense of trust in their physicians to deal with adverse events, and the perception that clinical research is a benefit to their health, rather than a risk. More controls believed that clinical trial participants’ health is put at risk (57% vs 33.3%). More cases (99.2%) than controls (77.5%) would recommend participating in a clinical trial, and 90% of cases would enroll in a clinical trial again. Conclusion Participation in clinical trials positively influences the perception that participants have about pharmaceutical clinical research when compared to nonparticipants. This information needs to be conveyed to clinicians, public health authorities, and general population to overcome misconceptions. PMID:27199549

  18. 77 FR 60143 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services... renewal to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for registration as an importer of...

  19. 78 FR 54913 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Clinical Supplies Management, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Clinical Supplies... application by renewal to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as an importer...

  20. Model-based control of mechanical ventilation: design and clinical validation.

    PubMed

    Martinoni, E P; Pfister, Ch A; Stadler, K S; Schumacher, P M; Leibundgut, D; Bouillon, T; Böhlen, T; Zbinden, A M

    2004-06-01

    We developed a model-based control system using end-tidal carbon dioxide fraction (FE'(CO(2))) to adjust a ventilator during clinical anaesthesia. We studied 16 ASA I-II patients (mean age 38 (range 20-59) yr; weight 67 (54-87) kg) during i.v. anaesthesia for elective surgery. After periods of normal ventilation the patients were either hyper- or hypoventilated to assess precision and dynamic behaviour of the control system. These data were compared with a previous group where a fuzzy-logic controller had been used. Responses to different clinical events (invalid carbon dioxide measurement, limb tourniquet release, tube cuff leak, exhaustion of carbon dioxide absorbent, simulation of pulmonary embolism) were also noted. The model-based controller correctly maintained the setpoint. No significant difference was found for the static performance between the two controllers. The dynamic response of the model-based controller was more rapid (P<0.05). The mean rise time after a setpoint increase of 1 vol% was 313 (sd 90) s and 142 (17) s for fuzzy-logic and model-based control, respectively, and after a 1 vol% decrease was 355 (127) s and 177 (36) s, respectively. The new model-based controller had a consistent response to clinical artefacts. A model-based FE'(CO(2)) controller can be used in a clinical setting. It reacts appropriately to artefacts, and has a better dynamic response to setpoint changes than a previously described fuzzy-logic controller.

  1. 78 FR 23594 - Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-19

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances, Notice of Application, Almac Clinical Services... 5, 2013, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton, Pennsylvania 18964, made application by renewal to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as an importer of...

  2. 77 FR 24984 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Clinical Supplies Management, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Clinical Supplies.... Therefore, in accordance with 21 CFR 1301.34(a), this is notice that on November 13, 2011, Clinical Supplies Management, Inc., 342 42nd Street South, Fargo, North Dakota 58103, made application by renewal to the...

  3. 77 FR 24985 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Almac Clinical Services.... Therefore, in accordance with 21 CFR 1301.34(a), this is notice that on March 5, 2012, Almac Clinical Services, Inc., (ACSI), 25 Fretz Road, Souderton, Pennsylvania 18964, made application by renewal to...

  4. 77 FR 47109 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Clinical Supplies Management Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... Enforcement Administration Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Clinical Supplies..., 2012, Clinical Supplies ] Management Inc., 342 42nd Street South, Fargo, North Dakota 58103, made application by renewal to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for registration as an importer of...

  5. Controlling Rater Stringency Error in Clinical Performance Rating: Further Validation of a Performance Rating Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cason, Gerald J.; And Others

    Prior research in a single clinical training setting has shown Cason and Cason's (1981) simplified model of their performance rating theory can improve rating reliability and validity through statistical control of rater stringency error. Here, the model was applied to clinical performance ratings of 14 cohorts (about 250 students and 200 raters)…

  6. Defining a clinically meaningful effect for the design and interpretation of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Richard S E; Kraemer, Helena C; Epstein, Robert S; Frank, Ellen; Haynes, Ginger; Laughren, Thomas P; McNulty, James; Reed, Shelby D; Sanchez, Juan; Leon, Andrew C

    2013-05-01

    This article captures the proceedings of a meeting aimed at defining clinically meaningful effects for use in randomized controlled trials for psychopharmacological agents. Experts from a variety of disciplines defined clinically meaningful effects from their perspectives along with viewpoints about how to design and interpret randomized controlled trials. The article offers relevant, practical, and sometimes anecdotal information about clinically meaningful effects and how to interpret them. The concept for this session was the work of co-chairs Richard Keefe and the late Andy Leon. Faculty included Richard Keefe, PhD; James McNulty, AbScB; Robert S. Epstein, MD, MS; Shelby D. Reed, PhD; Juan Sanchez, MD; Ginger Haynes, PhD; Andrew C. Leon, PhD; Helena Chmura Kraemer, PhD; Ellen Frank, PhD, and Kenneth L. Davis, MD. The term clinically meaningful effect is an important aspect of designing and interpreting randomized controlled trials but can be particularly difficult in the setting of psychopharmacology where effect size may be modest, particularly over the short term, because of a strong response to placebo. Payers, regulators, patients, and clinicians have different concerns about clinically meaningful effects and may describe these terms differently. The use of moderators in success rate differences may help better delineate clinically meaningful effects. There is no clear consensus on a single definition for clinically meaningful differences in randomized controlled trials, and investigators must be sensitive to specific concerns of stakeholders in psychopharmacology in order to design and execute appropriate clinical trials.

  7. Controlling the vector of distraction osteogenesis in the management of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Shilo, Dekel; Emodi, Omri; Aizenbud, Dror; Rachmiel, Adi

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in individuals with craniofacial anomalies can compromise airway and is a serious life-threatening condition. In many cases, tracheostomy is carried out as the treatment of choice. Distraction osteogenesis of the mandible as a treatment modality for OSA is very useful and may spare the need for tracheostomy or allow decannulation, yet controlling the vector of distraction is still a major challenge. We present a method for controlling the vector of distraction. Eight patients with severe respiratory distress secondary to a micrognathic mandible were treated by mandibular distraction osteogenesis using either external or internal devices. Temporary anchorage devices (TADs) and orthodontic elastics were used to control the vector of distraction. Cephalometric X-rays, computed tomography, and polysomnographic sleep studies were used to analyze the results. A mean distraction of 22 mm using the internal devices and a mean of 30 mm using the external devices were achieved. Increase in the pharyngeal airway and hyoid bone advancement was also observed. Anterior-posterior advancement of the mandible was noted with no clockwise rotation. Most importantly, clinical improvement in symptoms of OSA, respiratory distress, and feeding was noted. We describe a method for controlling the vector of distraction used as a treatment for OSA. In these cases, TADs were used as an anchorage unit to control the vector of distraction. Our results show excellent clinical and radiographical results. TADs are a simple and nonexpensive method to control the vector of distraction.

  8. Controlling the vector of distraction osteogenesis in the management of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Shilo, Dekel; Emodi, Omri; Aizenbud, Dror; Rachmiel, Adi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in individuals with craniofacial anomalies can compromise airway and is a serious life-threatening condition. In many cases, tracheostomy is carried out as the treatment of choice. Distraction osteogenesis of the mandible as a treatment modality for OSA is very useful and may spare the need for tracheostomy or allow decannulation, yet controlling the vector of distraction is still a major challenge. We present a method for controlling the vector of distraction. Materials and Methods: Eight patients with severe respiratory distress secondary to a micrognathic mandible were treated by mandibular distraction osteogenesis using either external or internal devices. Temporary anchorage devices (TADs) and orthodontic elastics were used to control the vector of distraction. Cephalometric X-rays, computed tomography, and polysomnographic sleep studies were used to analyze the results. Results: A mean distraction of 22 mm using the internal devices and a mean of 30 mm using the external devices were achieved. Increase in the pharyngeal airway and hyoid bone advancement was also observed. Anterior-posterior advancement of the mandible was noted with no clockwise rotation. Most importantly, clinical improvement in symptoms of OSA, respiratory distress, and feeding was noted. Conclusions: We describe a method for controlling the vector of distraction used as a treatment for OSA. In these cases, TADs were used as an anchorage unit to control the vector of distraction. Our results show excellent clinical and radiographical results. TADs are a simple and nonexpensive method to control the vector of distraction. PMID:28299260

  9. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: asthma control and exacerbations: standardizing endpoints for clinical asthma trials and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Reddel, Helen K; Taylor, D Robin; Bateman, Eric D; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Boushey, Homer A; Busse, William W; Casale, Thomas B; Chanez, Pascal; Enright, Paul L; Gibson, Peter G; de Jongste, Johan C; Kerstjens, Huib A M; Lazarus, Stephen C; Levy, Mark L; O'Byrne, Paul M; Partridge, Martyn R; Pavord, Ian D; Sears, Malcolm R; Sterk, Peter J; Stoloff, Stuart W; Sullivan, Sean D; Szefler, Stanley J; Thomas, Mike D; Wenzel, Sally E

    2009-07-01

    The assessment of asthma control is pivotal to the evaluation of treatment response in individuals and in clinical trials. Previously, asthma control, severity, and exacerbations were defined and assessed in many different ways. The Task Force was established to provide recommendations about standardization of outcomes relating to asthma control, severity, and exacerbations in clinical trials and clinical practice, for adults and children aged 6 years or older. A narrative literature review was conducted to evaluate the measurement properties and strengths/weaknesses of outcome measures relevant to asthma control and exacerbations. The review focused on diary variables, physiologic measurements, composite scores, biomarkers, quality of life questionnaires, and indirect measures. The Task Force developed new definitions for asthma control, severity, and exacerbations, based on current treatment principles and clinical and research relevance. In view of current knowledge about the multiple domains of asthma and asthma control, no single outcome measure can adequately assess asthma control. Its assessment in clinical trials and in clinical practice should include components relevant to both of the goals of asthma treatment, namely achievement of best possible clinical control and reduction of future risk of adverse outcomes. Recommendations are provided for the assessment of asthma control in clinical trials and clinical practice, both at baseline and in the assessment of treatment response. The Task Force recommendations provide a basis for a multicomponent assessment of asthma by clinicians, researchers, and other relevant groups in the design, conduct, and evaluation of clinical trials, and in clinical practice.

  10. Contribution of family social support to the metabolic control of people with diabetes mellitus: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Lilian Cristiane; Coelho, Anna Claudia Martins; Gomides, Danielle Dos Santos; Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina; Foss, Milton César; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-08-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial aimed to evaluate the contribution of family social support to the clinical/metabolic control of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that requires continuous care in order for individuals to reach glycemic control, the primordial goal of treatment. Family social support is essential to the development of care skills and their maintenance. However, there are few studies that investigate the contribution of family social support to diabetes control. The study was developed between June 2011 and May 2013, and included 164 people who were randomized using simple randomization. The intervention group differed from the control group in that it included a family caregiver, who was recognized by the patient as a source of social support. The educational interventions received by people with diabetes mellitus were used as the basis of the education provided through telephone calls to patients' family members and caregivers, and their purpose was to encourage dialogue between the patients and their relatives about the topics related to diabetes. Regarding the clinical impact, the results showed that there was a greater reduction in blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin in the intervention group than in the control group, showing a positive effect on the control of the disease. Families should be incorporated into the care of people with diabetes mellitus and especially in health care programs, in particular those that can promote different forms of social support to strengthen the bond between family members. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nutritional screening; control of clinical undernutrition with analytical parameters.

    PubMed

    de Ulíbarri Pérez, José Ignacio; Fernández, Guillermo; Rodríguez Salvanés, Francisco; Díaz López, Ana María

    2014-01-13

    Objetivo: Actualizar el cribado nutricional. La alta prevalencia del desequilibrio nutricional que genera la Desnutrición Clínica (DC), especialmente en hospitales y residencias asistidas, obliga al uso de herramientas de cribado y a controlar su evolución para combatirla sobre la marcha. La DC deriva menos de la carencia nutricional que de los efectos de la enfermedad y sus tratamientos, pero los actuales sistemas de cribado buscan más la desnutrición ya establecida que el riesgo nutricional existente. Las alteraciones metabólicas del equilibrio nutricional que constituyen la trofopatía se pueden captar en el plasma sin demoras, automáticamente, permitiendo rectificar actitudes terapéuticas demasiado agresivas o complementarlas con el adecuado soporte nutricional. Con los sistemas manuales de cribado, solo pasados días o semanas se evidenciarán, tardíamente, los cambios somáticos expresivos de esa desnutrición. La concentración de la albúmina plasmática es un parámetro muy valioso en el control nutricional. Su disminución, cualquiera que sea la causa, expresa un posible déficit pero también el riesgo nutricional a que se ve sometida la célula, antes de que la desnutrición se manifieste somáticamente. La precocidad de la detección del riesgo nutricional, anticipándose a la desnutrición y su gran capacidad pronóstica hacen de las herramientas basadas en parámetros analíticos, el procedimiento más útil, ergonómico, seguro y eficiente para el cribado y pronóstico nutricional en el entorno clínico. Conclusión: es hora de actualizar conceptos, deshacer mitos y optar por sistemas modernos de cribado eficientes, única manera de alcanzar el sueño de controlar la DC en nuestras poblaciones enfermas y frágiles.

  12. A Pragmatic Guide on How Physicians Can Take Over Financial Control of Their Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Control of clinical cost is becoming increasingly important in health care worldwide. Physicians should accept the limitation of resources and take responsibility to improve their clinical cost-reimbursement ratio. To achieve this, they will need basic education in clinic management to control and adjust costs and reimbursement, without impacting professional quality of care. Rational use of diagnostics and therapy should be implemented and frequently verified. Physicians are the only professionals that are able to integrate economics with health care. This is in the best interest of patients and will improve a physician's position, influence, and professional freedom levels within our hospitals. PMID:23484576

  13. A pragmatic guide on how physicians can take over financial control of their clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Volker R; Fischer, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Control of clinical cost is becoming increasingly important in health care worldwide. Physicians should accept the limitation of resources and take responsibility to improve their clinical cost-reimbursement ratio. To achieve this, they will need basic education in clinic management to control and adjust costs and reimbursement, without impacting professional quality of care. Rational use of diagnostics and therapy should be implemented and frequently verified. Physicians are the only professionals that are able to integrate economics with health care. This is in the best interest of patients and will improve a physician's position, influence, and professional freedom levels within our hospitals.

  14. Advances in clinical NK cell studies: Donor selection, manufacturing and quality control.

    PubMed

    Koehl, U; Kalberer, C; Spanholtz, J; Lee, D A; Miller, J S; Cooley, S; Lowdell, M; Uharek, L; Klingemann, H; Curti, A; Leung, W; Alici, E

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly used in clinical studies in order to treat patients with various malignancies. The following review summarizes platform lectures and 2013-2015 consortium meetings on manufacturing and clinical use of NK cells in Europe and United States. A broad overview of recent pre-clinical and clinical results in NK cell therapies is provided based on unstimulated, cytokine-activated, as well as genetically engineered NK cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). Differences in donor selection, manufacturing and quality control of NK cells for cancer immunotherapies are described and basic recommendations are outlined for harmonization in future NK cell studies.

  15. Advances in clinical NK cell studies: Donor selection, manufacturing and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, U.; Kalberer, C.; Spanholtz, J.; Lee, D. A.; Miller, J. S.; Cooley, S.; Lowdell, M.; Uharek, L.; Klingemann, H.; Curti, A.; Leung, W.; Alici, E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly used in clinical studies in order to treat patients with various malignancies. The following review summarizes platform lectures and 2013–2015 consortium meetings on manufacturing and clinical use of NK cells in Europe and United States. A broad overview of recent pre-clinical and clinical results in NK cell therapies is provided based on unstimulated, cytokine-activated, as well as genetically engineered NK cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CAR). Differences in donor selection, manufacturing and quality control of NK cells for cancer immunotherapies are described and basic recommendations are outlined for harmonization in future NK cell studies. PMID:27141397

  16. Are Randomized Controlled Trials the (G)old Standard? From Clinical Intelligence to Prescriptive Analytics.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Thomeer, Michiel; Heath, John; Vukicevic, Milan

    2016-07-06

    Despite the accelerating pace of scientific discovery, the current clinical research enterprise does not sufficiently address pressing clinical questions. Given the constraints on clinical trials, for a majority of clinical questions, the only relevant data available to aid in decision making are based on observation and experience. Our purpose here is 3-fold. First, we describe the classic context of medical research guided by Poppers' scientific epistemology of "falsificationism." Second, we discuss challenges and shortcomings of randomized controlled trials and present the potential of observational studies based on big data. Third, we cover several obstacles related to the use of observational (retrospective) data in clinical studies. We conclude that randomized controlled trials are not at risk for extinction, but innovations in statistics, machine learning, and big data analytics may generate a completely new ecosystem for exploration and validation.

  17. Are Randomized Controlled Trials the (G)old Standard? From Clinical Intelligence to Prescriptive Analytics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the accelerating pace of scientific discovery, the current clinical research enterprise does not sufficiently address pressing clinical questions. Given the constraints on clinical trials, for a majority of clinical questions, the only relevant data available to aid in decision making are based on observation and experience. Our purpose here is 3-fold. First, we describe the classic context of medical research guided by Poppers’ scientific epistemology of “falsificationism.” Second, we discuss challenges and shortcomings of randomized controlled trials and present the potential of observational studies based on big data. Third, we cover several obstacles related to the use of observational (retrospective) data in clinical studies. We conclude that randomized controlled trials are not at risk for extinction, but innovations in statistics, machine learning, and big data analytics may generate a completely new ecosystem for exploration and validation. PMID:27383622

  18. Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia: Associations With Clinical and Cognitive Insight Controlling for Levels of Psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Popolo, Raffaele; Dimaggio, Giancarlo; Luther, Lauren; Vinci, Giancarlo; Salvatore, Giampaolo; Lysaker, Paul H

    2016-03-01

    Poor insight in schizophrenia is a risk factor for both poor outcomes and treatment adherence. Accordingly, interest in identifying causes of poor insight has increased. This study explored whether theory of mind (ToM) impairments are linked to poor clinical and cognitive insight independent of psychopathology. Participants with schizophrenia (n = 37) and control subjects (n = 40) completed assessments of ToM with the Hinting Task and the Brüne Picture Sequencing Task, clinical insight and psychopathology with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and cognitive insight with the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale. Results indicated that the schizophrenia group had greater impairments in ToM relative to control subjects. In the schizophrenia group, the Hinting Task performance was related to both cognitive and clinical insight, with only the relationship with cognitive insight persisting after controlling for psychopathology. Picture Sequencing Task performance was related to cognitive insight only. Future research directions and clinical implications are discussed.

  19. Family Physician Clinical Inertia in Glycemic Control among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Valerija Bralić; Marković, Biserka Bergman; Kranjčević, Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients with diabetes do not achieve target values. One of the reasons for this is clinical inertia. The correct explanation of clinical inertia requires a conjunction of patient with physician and health care system factors. Our aim was to determine the rate of clinical inertia in treating diabetes in primary care and association of patient, physician, and health care setting factors with clinical inertia. Material/Methods This was a national, multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study in primary care in Croatia. Each family physician (FP) provided professional data and collected clinical data on 15–25 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Clinical inertia was defined as a consultation in which treatment change based on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was indicated but did not occur. Results A total of 449 FPs (response rate 89.8%) collected data on 10275 patients. Mean clinical inertia per FP was 55.6% (SD ±26.17) of consultations. All of the FPs were clinically inert with some patients, and 9% of the FPs were clinically inert with all patients. The main factors associated with clinical inertia were: higher percentage of HbA1c, oral anti-diabetic drug initiated by diabetologist, increased postprandial glycemia and total cholesterol, physical inactivity of patient, and administration of drugs other than oral antidiabetics. Conclusions Clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM is a serious problem. Patients with worse glycemic control and those whose therapy was initiated by a diabetologist experience more clinical inertia. More research on causes of clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM should be conducted to help achieve more effective diabetes control. PMID:25652941

  20. Family physician clinical inertia in glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bralić Lang, Valerija; Bergman Marković, Biserka; Kranjčević, Ksenija

    2015-02-05

    Many patients with diabetes do not achieve target values. One of the reasons for this is clinical inertia. The correct explanation of clinical inertia requires a conjunction of patient with physician and health care system factors. Our aim was to determine the rate of clinical inertia in treating diabetes in primary care and association of patient, physician, and health care setting factors with clinical inertia. This was a national, multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study in primary care in Croatia. Each family physician (FP) provided professional data and collected clinical data on 15-25 type 2 diabetes (T2DM) patients. Clinical inertia was defined as a consultation in which treatment change based on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels was indicated but did not occur. A total of 449 FPs (response rate 89.8%) collected data on 10275 patients. Mean clinical inertia per FP was 55.6% (SD ±26.17) of consultations. All of the FPs were clinically inert with some patients, and 9% of the FPs were clinically inert with all patients. The main factors associated with clinical inertia were: higher percentage of HbA1c, oral anti-diabetic drug initiated by diabetologist, increased postprandial glycemia and total cholesterol, physical inactivity of patient, and administration of drugs other than oral antidiabetics. Clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM is a serious problem. Patients with worse glycemic control and those whose therapy was initiated by a diabetologist experience more clinical inertia. More research on causes of clinical inertia in treating patients with T2DM should be conducted to help achieve more effective diabetes control.

  1. Inhibitory motor control in apneic and insomniac patients: a stop task study.

    PubMed

    Sagaspe, Patricia; Philip, Pierre; Schwartz, Sophie

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess with a stop task the inhibitory motor control efficiency--a major component of executive control functions--in patients suffering from sleep disorders. Twenty-two patients with untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) (mean age 46 +/- 9 years; mean apnea-hypopnea index, AHI = 30 +/- 20) and 13 patients with psychophysiological insomnia (mean age 47 +/- 12 years) were compared with individually matched healthy controls. Sleep disturbances in the patient populations were clinically and polysomnographically diagnosed. The stop task has a frequent visual 'Go' stimulus to set up a response tendency and a less frequent auditory 'Stop' signal to withhold the planned or prepotent response. The stop signal reaction time (SSRT) reflects the time to internally suppress the ongoing response. SSRT was slower for the apneic patients than for their respective controls (248 +/- 107 versus 171 +/- 115 ms, anova, P < 0.05) but not for the insomniac patients compared with their controls (235 +/- 112 versus 194 +/- 109 ms, NS). Moreover, in apneic patients, slower SSRT was associated with lower nocturnal oxygen saturation (r = -0.477, P < 0.05). By contrast, neither apneics nor insomniacs differed from their matched controls for reaction times on Go trials. To conclude, unlike insomniacs, OSAS patients present an impaired inhibitory motor control, an executive function which is required in many common everyday life situations. Inhibitory motor control relies on the integrity of the inferior prefrontal cortex, which could be affected by nocturnal oxyhemoglobin desaturation in apneic patients.

  2. Disciplined Decision Making in an Interdisciplinary Environment: Some Implications for Clinical Applications of Statistical Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical applications of statistical process control (SPC) in human service organizations are considered. SPC is seen as providing a standard set of criteria that serves as a common interface for data-based decision making, which may bring decision making under the control of established contingencies rather than the immediate contingencies of…

  3. A Controlled Trial of Teaching Clinical Biochemistry by the Keller Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Peter L.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty medical students at the University of Otago were randomly chosen to learn clinical biochemistry by the Keller Plan. The rest of the class acted as controls. The randomly selected Keller group scored significantly higher than the control group on a practice/review test and the final examination. (Author/MLW)

  4. Non-participation in a randomized controlled trial: the effect on clinical and non-clinical variables.

    PubMed

    Vermaire, J H; van Loveren, C; Poorterman, J H G; Hoogstraten, J

    2011-01-01

    Studies reporting clinical and non-clinical parameters of participants and non-participants of clinical trials are scarce. In the available studies non-participants were likely to show less favourable outcomes than participants on both socioeconomic parameters as well as on caries experience. However, the impact of non-participation on the total sample of the research population is not established. In the present study, as part of baseline data collection for a randomized controlled trial on caries-preventive strategies, 346 parents of children 6.0 years (± 3 months) of age were approached to let their child participate. Sixty parents refused, but 56 of them were willing to fill out the same set of questionnaires and to allow their child to be clinically examined once. Parents from participating children had higher socioeconomic status, were more often of autochthonous origin and scored better on knowledge questions than parents of non-participating children. Furthermore, parents of participating children reported a higher willingness to invest, were more likely to hold on to regular meals and their child had lower levels of plaque compared to non-participating children. Surprisingly, the participating children had higher dmfs scores than the non-participating children. Their care index (fs/ds + fs) was higher than that of non-participating children. Based on the findings of this study, the presumption that non-participating children will show less favourable clinical outcomes cannot be supported. Although participants differed from non-participants, they did not differ from the total population. It is suggested that the external validity of a randomized controlled trial on caries-preventive strategies is not necessarily affected by non-participation bias. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Evening and morning peroxiredoxin-2 redox/oligomeric state changes in obstructive sleep apnea red blood cells: Correlation with polysomnographic and metabolic parameters.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Amélia; Vaz, Fátima; Torres, Vukosava M; Valentim-Coelho, Cristina; Silva, Rita; Prosinecki, Vesna; Alexandre, Bruno M; Carvalho, Ana S; Matthiesen, Rune; Malhotra, Atul; Pinto, Paula; Bárbara, Cristina; Penque, Deborah

    2017-02-01

    We have examined the effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) on red blood cell (RBC) proteome variation at evening/morning day time to uncover new insights into OSA-induced RBC dysfunction that may lead to OSA manifestations. Dysregulated proteins mainly fall in the group of catalytic enzymes, stress response and redox regulators such as peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2). Validation assays confirmed that at morning the monomeric/dimeric forms of PRDX2 were more overoxidized in OSA RBC compared to evening samples. Six month of positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment decreased this overoxidation and generated multimeric overoxidized forms associated with chaperone/transduction signaling activity of PRDX2. Morning levels of overoxidized PRDX2 correlated with polysomnographic (PSG)-arousal index and metabolic parameters whereas the evening level of disulfide-linked dimer (associated with peroxidase activity of PRDX2) correlated with PSG parameters. After treatment, morning overoxidized multimer of PRDX2 negatively correlated with fasting glucose and dopamine levels. Overall, these data point toward severe oxidative stress and altered antioxidant homeostasis in OSA RBC occurring mainly at morning time but with consequences till evening. The beneficial effect of PAP involves modulation of the redox/oligomeric state of PRDX2, whose mechanism and associated chaperone/transduction signaling functions deserves further investigation. RBC PRDX2 is a promising candidate biomarker for OSA severity and treatment monitoring, warranting further investigation and validation.

  6. Individualized Quality Control Plan (IQCP): Is It Value-Added for Clinical Microbiology?

    PubMed

    Sharp, Susan E; Miller, Melissa B; Hindler, Janet

    2015-12-01

    The Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) recently published their Individualized Quality Control Plan (IQCP [https://www.cms.gov/regulations-and-guidance/legislation/CLIA/Individualized_Quality_Control_Plan_IQCP.html]), which will be the only option for quality control (QC) starting in January 2016 if laboratories choose not to perform Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA) [U.S. Statutes at Large 81(1967):533] default QC. Laboratories will no longer be able to use "equivalent QC" (EQC) or the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) standards alone for quality control of their microbiology systems. The implementation of IQCP in clinical microbiology laboratories will most certainly be an added burden, the benefits of which are currently unknown. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Clinical significance of sleep bruxism on several occlusal and functional parameters.

    PubMed

    Ommerborn, Michelle A; Giraki, Maria; Schneider, Christine; Fuck, Lars Michael; Zimmer, Stefan; Franz, Matthias; Raab, Wolfgang Hans-michael; Schaefer, Ralf

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between various functional and occlusal parameters and sleep bruxism. Thirty-nine (39) sleep bruxism patients and 30 controls participated in this investigation. The assessment of sleep bruxism was performed using the Bruxcore Bruxism-Monitoring Device (BBMD) combined with a new computer-based analyzing method. Sixteen functional and/or occlusal parameters were recorded. With a mean slide of 0.95 mm in the sleep bruxism group and a mean slide of 0.42 mm in the control group (Mann Whitney U test; p<0.003), results solely demonstrated a significant group difference regarding the length of a slide from centric occlusion to maximum intercuspation. The results suggest that the slightly pronounced slide could be of clinical importance in the development of increased wear facets in patients with current sleep bruxism activity. Following further evaluation including polysomnographic recordings, the BBMD combined with this new analyzing technique seems to be a clinically feasible instrument that allows the practitioner to quantify abrasion over a short period.

  8. Poor glycemic control in younger women attending Malaysian public primary care clinics: findings from adults diabetes control and management registry.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Ai Theng; Lee, Ping Yein; Sazlina, Shariff-Ghazali; Mohamad Adam, Bujang; Chew, Boon How; Mastura, Ismail; Jamaiyah, Haniff; Syed Alwi, Syed-Abdul-Rahman; Sri Wahyu, Taher; Nafiza, Mat-Nasir

    2013-12-10

    Women of reproductive age are a group of particular concern as diabetes may affect their pregnancy outcome as well as long-term morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to compare the clinical profiles and glycemic control of reproductive and non-reproductive age women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in primary care settings, and to determine the associated factors of poor glycemic control in the reproductive age group women. This was a cross-sectional study using cases reported by public primary care clinics to the Adult Diabetes Control and Management registry from 1st January to 31st December 2009. All Malaysian women aged 18 years old and above and diagnosed with T2D for at least 1 year were included in the analysis. The target for glycemic control (HbA1c < 6.5%) is in accordance to the recommended national guidelines. Both univariate and multivariate approaches of logistic regression were applied to determine whether reproductive age women have an association with poor glycemic control. Data from a total of 30,427 women were analyzed and 21.8% (6,622) were of reproductive age. There were 12.5% of reproductive age women and 18.0% of non-reproductive age women that achieved glycemic control. Reproductive age group women were associated with poorer glycemic control (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2-1.8). The risk factors associated with poor glycemic control in the reproductive age women were being of Malay and Indian race, longer duration of diabetes, patients on anti-diabetic agents, and those who had not achieved the target total cholesterol and triglycerides. Women with T2D have poor glycemic control, but being of reproductive age was associated with even poorer control. Health care providers need to pay more attention to this group of patients especially for those with risk factors. More aggressive therapeutic strategies to improve their cardiometabolic control and pregnancy outcome are warranted.

  9. The Declaration of Helsinki and clinical trials: a focus on placebo-controlled trials in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, William T; Appelbaum, Paul S; Levine, Robert J

    2003-02-01

    The authors' goal was to consider ethical approaches to placebo-controlled clinical trials in the light of the evolving Declaration of Helsinki, with special attention to applications to research on schizophrenia. They review the Helsinki position on placebos, including the 2002 Clarification, exploring the potential negative effects of banning placebos in studies involving conditions for which at least partially effective treatments exist. The Clarification is examined as an approach to this issue that, in contrast to earlier formulations, better acknowledges the complexity of clinical research and the need for protocol-specific determinations. Placebo controls in schizophrenia studies are used to illustrate issues relevant to all clinical research on therapeutic interventions. The Helsinki Clarification provides a basis for operationalizing criteria for review of placebo use in clinical trials. Six criteria are proposed for judging the ethical acceptability of placebo controls, including the likelihood that the intervention being tested will have clinically significant advantages over existing treatments, the presence of compelling reasons for placebo use, subject selection that minimizes the possibility of serious adverse consequences, and a risk-versus-benefit analysis that favors the advantages from placebo use over the risks to subjects. The Helsinki Clarification constitutes an important advance in international approaches to placebo use, requiring protocol-by-protocol judgments on complex issues of clinical research ethics. When operationalized, it provides review boards with a useful methodology for reaching determinations on the appropriateness of placebo controls in particular studies.

  10. Should we reconsider the routine use of placebo controls in clinical research?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern clinical-research practice favors placebo controls over usual-care controls whenever a credible placebo exists. An unrecognized consequence of this preference is that clinicians are more limited in their ability to provide the benefits of the non-specific healing effects of placebos in clinical practice. Methods We examined the issues in choosing between placebo and usual-care controls. We considered why placebo controls place constraints on clinicians and the trade-offs involved in the choice of control groups. Results We find that, for certain studies, investigators should consider usual-care controls, even if an adequate placebo is available. Employing usual-care controls would be of greatest value for pragmatic trials evaluating treatments to improve clinical care and for which threats to internal validity can be adequately managed without a placebo-control condition. Conclusions Intentionally choosing usual-care controls, even when a satisfactory placebo exists, would allow clinicians to capture the value of non-specific therapeutic benefits that are common to all interventions. The result could be more effective, patient-centered care that makes the best use of both specific and non-specific benefits of medical interventions. PMID:22540350

  11. Clinical nurse preceptor teaching competencies: relationship to locus of control and self-directed learning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Lin; Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2012-06-01

    An effective preceptor is a vital component of a strong learning experience for learners. Many clinical preceptors provide on-site supervision and clinical teaching but lack the skills necessary to be effective teachers. Few studies have examined the factors related to teaching competence among clinical nurse preceptors. This article is a report of a study that examined (a) the differences in teaching competence by preceptor background, (b) the influence of locus of control on self-evaluated teaching competence, (c) the association between self-directed learning and self-evaluated teaching competence, and (d) the predictors of self-evaluated teaching competence among clinical nurse preceptors. This descriptive and correlational study used a cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of 243 clinical nurse preceptors from a medical center in northern Taiwan. Of these, 242 completed questionnaires for an effective response rate of 99.6%. The self-evaluated Teaching Competencies Scale, Internal-External Scale, and Self-Directed Learning Instrument were used to assess teaching competencies and related factors among clinical nurse preceptors. Descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney test, and multivariate linear regression were used to analyze data. Clinical nurse preceptors averaged 4.03 in teaching competence, indicating a moderately above average score. Higher teaching competence was associated with older age, being married, >10-year work experience, not assigned by unit manager, and good internal locus of control. Self-directed learning significantly correlated with teaching competence (r = .62). Internal locus of control and self-directed learning were significant independent predictors of teaching competence after adjusting for age, marital status, total years as a clinical nurse preceptor, and willingness to be a clinical nurse preceptor. Together, these accounted for 33.6% of teaching competence variance. Nurse managers should recognize all factors

  12. Low sperm counts in genitourinary medicine clinic attendees: results from a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Carne, Christopher A; Chilcott, Sian; Palmer, Christopher; Green, Oliver; Bridge, Simeon; Walsh, Richard; Gramy-Mason, Anna; O'Donovan, Maria

    2012-10-01

    To conduct a case-control study of abnormalities in the semen of genitourinary (GU) medicine clinic attendees compared with general practice (GP) controls and in patients with asymptomatic and symptomatic non-specific urethritis (NSU) before and after the urethritis resolves. Rates of semen abnormalities were compared between the different groups (19 with symptomatic and 27 with asymptomatic NSU, seven with symptomatic non-NSU and 64 clinic controls) and between clinic attendees and 417 patients attending GP for the first investigation of possible infertility. Those with symptomatic or asymptomatic NSU gave repeat semen samples on resolution of the NSU. The study included 117 clinic volunteers. They were shown to have statistically significantly worse total sperm counts (p=0.002), volume of semen (p<0.001) and percentage of abnormal forms (p<0.04) compared with 417 GP controls. Compared with the rest of the clinic volunteers, asymptomatic NSU patients had statistically significantly lower total sperm counts (p<0.02). Asymptomatic NSU patients had statistically significantly lower total sperm counts compared with symptomatic NSU patients (p<0.02). Compared with GP controls, clinic controls had statistically significantly inferior total sperm counts (p=0.009) and semen volume (p<0.001). GU clinic attendees are more likely to have abnormalities of semen than patients attending GP for the first check for possible infertility. A high rate of abnormal semen findings are found in patients with and without NSU but the highest rate occurred in those with asymptomatic NSU. Is asymptomatic NSU therefore pathogenic and does it require treatment like symptomatic NSU?

  13. Clinical effects of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite paste in the treatment of intrabony periodontal defects: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Bernd; Kasaj, Adrian; Teich, Marie; Jepsen, Søren

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the present randomized controlled clinical study was to compare the clinical outcomes of papilla preservation flap surgery with or without the application of a novel nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) bone graft substitute. Fourteen patients with paired intrabony periodontal defects of ≥ 4 mm participated in this split-mouth design study. The defects in each subject were randomly selected to receive nano-HA paste in conjunction with papilla preservation flaps or papilla preservation flaps alone. Probing bone levels (PBL) from a customized acrylic stent and probing pocket depths (PPD) were measured at baseline and again 6 months following surgery. No differences in any of the investigated parameters were observed at baseline between the two groups. Healing was uneventful in all patients. Both treatments resulted in significant improvements between baseline and 6 months (p < 0.05). At 6 months after therapy, the sites treated with nano-HA paste showed a reduction in mean PPD from 8.3 ± 1.2 to 4.0 ± 1.1 mm and a gain in PBL of 4.3 ± 1.4 mm, whereas in the control group, the mean PPD changed from 7.9 ± 1.2 mm to 5.0 ± 1.2 mm and PBL gain was 2.6 ± 1.4 mm. Results demonstrated statistically greater PPD reduction and PBL gain (p < 0.05) in the test group as compared with the control group. In conclusion, after 6 months, the treatment of intrabony periodontal defects with a nano-HA paste leads to significantly improved clinical outcomes when compared with papilla preservation flap surgery alone.

  14. Defining a Clinically Meaningful Effect for the Design and Interpretation of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Helena C.; Epstein, Robert S.; Frank, Ellen; Haynes, Ginger; Laughren, Thomas P.; Mcnulty, James; Reed, Shelby D.; Sanchez, Juan; Leon, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This article captures the proceedings of a meeting aimed at defining clinically meaningful effects for use in randomized controlled trials for psychopharmacological agents. Design: Experts from a variety of disciplines defined clinically meaningful effects from their perspectives along with viewpoints about how to design and interpret randomized controlled trials. Setting: The article offers relevant, practical, and sometimes anecdotal information about clinically meaningful effects and how to interpret them. Participants: The concept for this session was the work of co-chairs Richard Keefe and the late Andy Leon. Faculty included Richard Keefe, PhD; James McNulty, AbScB; Robert S. Epstein, MD, MS; Shelby D. Reed, PhD; Juan Sanchez, MD; Ginger Haynes, PhD; Andrew C. Leon, PhD; Helena Chmura Kraemer, PhD; Ellen Frank, PhD, and Kenneth L. Davis, MD. Results: The term clinically meaningful effect is an important aspect of designing and interpreting randomized controlled trials but can be particularly difficult in the setting of psychopharmacology where effect size may be modest, particularly over the short term, because of a strong response to placebo. Payers, regulators, patients, and clinicians have different concerns about clinically meaningful effects and may describe these terms differently. The use of moderators in success rate differences may help better delineate clinically meaningful effects. Conclusion: There is no clear consensus on a single definition for clinically meaningful differences in randomized controlled trials, and investigators must be sensitive to specific concerns of stakeholders in psychopharmacology in order to design and execute appropriate clinical trials. PMID:23882433

  15. An artificial neural network estimation of gait balance control in the elderly using clinical evaluations.

    PubMed

    Lugade, Vipul; Lin, Victor; Farley, Arthur; Chou, Li-Shan

    2014-01-01

    The use of motion analysis to assess balance is essential for determining the underlying mechanisms of falls during dynamic activities. Clinicians evaluate patients using clinical examinations of static balance control, gait performance, cognition, and neuromuscular ability. Mapping these data to measures of dynamic balance control, and the subsequent categorization and identification of community dwelling elderly fallers at risk of falls in a quick and inexpensive manner is needed. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that given clinical measures, an artificial neural network (ANN) could determine dynamic balance control, as defined by the interaction of the center of mass (CoM) with the base of support (BoS), during gait. Fifty-six elderly adults were included in this study. Using a feed-forward neural network with back propagation, combinations of five functional domains, the number of hidden layers and error goals were evaluated to determine the best parameters to assess dynamic balance control. Functional domain input parameters included subject characteristics, clinical examinations, cognitive performance, muscle strength, and clinical balance performance. The use of these functional domains demonstrated the ability to quickly converge to a solution, with the network learning the mapping within 5 epochs, when using up to 30 hidden nodes and an error goal of 0.001. The ability to correctly identify the interaction of the CoM with BoS demonstrated correlation values up to 0.89 (P<.001). On average, using all clinical measures, the ANN was able to estimate the dynamic CoM to BoS distance to within 1 cm and BoS area to within 75 cm2. Our results demonstrated that an ANN could be trained to map clinical variables to biomechanical measures of gait balance control. A neural network could provide physicians and patients with a cost effective means to identify dynamic balance issues and possible risk of falls from routinely collected clinical examinations.

  16. [The importance of test control for the post-graduate education in clinical rhinology].

    PubMed

    Nosulia, E V; Kim, I A; Kosiakov, S Ia; Piskunov, G Z; Vinnikov, A K

    2014-01-01

    This publication deals with the problems pertaining to the improvement of the system of the post-graduate education in otorhinolaryngology with special reference to one of its topical fields, clinical rhinology. The authors emphasize the importance of one of the principal components of the post-graduate education under the present-day conditions, namely organization of control and self-control of learning the new material, self-monitoring and individual correction of the level of knowledge. Special attention is given to the training tests that can be used to adequately simulate the decision-making process with respect to a concrete clinical situation. It is concluded that the systematic application of test control is one of the most important prerequisites for the enhancement of the effectiveness of the post-graduate education in clinical otorhinolaryngology.

  17. "Virtual" clinical trials: case control experiments utilizing a health services research workstation.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, M. G.; Hillman, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    We created an interface to a growing repository of clinical and administrative information to facilitate the design and execution of case-control experiments. The system enables knowledgeable users to generate and test hypotheses regarding associations among diseases and outcomes. The intuitive interface allows the user to specify criteria for selecting cases and defining putative risks. The repository contains comprehensive administrative and selected clinical information on all ambulatory and emergency department visits as well as hospital admissions since 1994. We tested the workstation's ability to determine relationships between outpatient diagnoses including hypertension, osteoarthritis and hypercholesterolemia with the occurrence of admissions for stroke and myocardial infarction and achieved results consistent with published studies. Successful implementation of this Health Services Research Workstation will allow "virtual" clinical trials to validate the results of formal clinical trials on a local population and may provide meaningful analyses of data when formal clinical trials are not feasible. PMID:9929230

  18. Birth Control in Clinical Trials: Industry Survey of Current Use Practices, Governance, and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Breslin, W J; Beyer, B K; Chadwick, K; De Schaepdrijver, L; Desai, M; Enright, B; Foster, W; Hui, J Y; Moffat, G J; Tornesi, B; Van Malderen, K; Wiesner, L; Chen, C L

    2016-03-01

    The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee sponsored a pharmaceutical industry survey on current industry practices for contraception use during clinical trials. The objectives of the survey were to improve our understanding of the current industry practices for contraception requirements in clinical trials, the governance processes set up to promote consistency and/or compliance with contraception requirements, and the effectiveness of current contraception practices in preventing pregnancies during clinical trials. Opportunities for improvements in current practices were also considered. The survey results from 12 pharmaceutical companies identified significant variability among companies with regard to contraception practices and governance during clinical trials. This variability was due primarily to differences in definitions, areas of scientific uncertainty or misunderstanding, and differences in company approaches to enrollment in clinical trials. The survey also revealed that few companies collected data in a manner that would allow a retrospective understanding of the reasons for failure of birth control during clinical trials. In this article, suggestions are made for topics where regulatory guidance or scientific publications could facilitate best practice. These include provisions for a pragmatic definition of women of childbearing potential, guidance on how animal data can influence the requirements for male and female birth control, evidence-based guidance on birth control and pregnancy testing regimes suitable for low- and high-risk situations, plus practical methods to ascertain the risk of drug-drug interactions with hormonal contraceptives.

  19. Antibiotics and the social history of the controlled clinical trial, 1950-1970.

    PubMed

    Podolsky, Scott H

    2010-07-01

    The histories of antibiotics, controlled clinical trials, and attempts by academics to inculcate an explicitly rational therapeutics among clinicians in the United States were linked during a formative period from 1950 to 1970. Maxwell Finland and Harry Dowling would serve at the epicenter of such efforts in the context of first the broad-spectrum antibiotics, and then, and still more critically, the since-forgotten influx of "fixed-dose combination" antibiotics. With their attention focused less upon individual clinicians than upon pharmaceutical marketers, clinical investigators, the American Medical Association, and the federal government, Finland, Dowling and their supporters would wield the "controlled clinical trial" against the pharmaceutical "testimonial" as a means of ensuring a rational therapeutics. In doing so, they would play an important role in the direction the subsequent Kefauver hearings (1959-1962) would take toward mandating proof of drug efficacy via controlled clinical trials prior to new drug approval. Understanding such a trajectory allows us to better appreciate not only the social history of the controlled clinical trial and the priorities of leaders in infectious disease in the United States during this time, but the consequences of their efforts as well.

  20. Clinical effectiveness of basic root canal treatment after 24 months: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Rainer A; Holzner, Anna L; Markovic, Ljubisa; Brueckner, Inga; Zimmer, Stefan

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of basic root canal treatment (BRT) with tactile working length determination in terms of radiographic and clinical outcome parameters compared with endodontic treatment with standard radiographic working length control. This was a clinical, multicenter, controlled, open-label trial to evaluate BRT effectiveness after 24 months. The primary end point was the apical extension score of the radiographic quality parameter of root canal fillings. The secondary radiographic end point was the periapical index, and the secondary clinical end point was tooth tender to percussion. The safety end point was tooth loss as a consequence of endodontic failure. Statistical analyses of binary and categoric data were calculated using cross tables and the chi-square test. BRT with tactile working length determination compared with standard radiographic working length control did not significantly differ in terms of radiographic and clinical outcomes after 24 months. The apical extension of the root canal fillings and the periapical anatomic structures showed no significant differences according to radiographic analyses (P = .5). Corresponding results were found in clinical aspects of tooth tender to percussion (P = .6) and tooth loss (P = .7). Tactile working length determination in BRT resulted in comparable treatment outcomes compared with standard endodontic treatment with radiographic working length control and turned out to be an accurate method in BRT. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Wireless remote control clinical image workflow: utilizing a PDA for offsite distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Brent J.; Documet, Luis; Documet, Jorge; Huang, H. K.; Muldoon, Jean

    2004-04-01

    Last year we presented in RSNA an application to perform wireless remote control of PACS image distribution utilizing a handheld device such as a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA). This paper describes the clinical experiences including workflow scenarios of implementing the PDA application to route exams from the clinical PACS archive server to various locations for offsite distribution of clinical PACS exams. By utilizing this remote control application, radiologists can manage image workflow distribution with a single wireless handheld device without impacting their clinical workflow on diagnostic PACS workstations. A PDA application was designed and developed to perform DICOM Query and C-Move requests by a physician from a clinical PACS Archive to a CD-burning device for automatic burning of PACS data for the distribution to offsite. In addition, it was also used for convenient routing of historical PACS exams to the local web server, local workstations, and teleradiology systems. The application was evaluated by radiologists as well as other clinical staff who need to distribute PACS exams to offsite referring physician"s offices and offsite radiologists. An application for image workflow management utilizing wireless technology was implemented in a clinical environment and evaluated. A PDA application was successfully utilized to perform DICOM Query and C-Move requests from the clinical PACS archive to various offsite exam distribution devices. Clinical staff can utilize the PDA to manage image workflow and PACS exam distribution conveniently for offsite consultations by referring physicians and radiologists. This solution allows the radiologist to expand their effectiveness in health care delivery both within the radiology department as well as offisite by improving their clinical workflow.

  2. A Virtual Reality Game for Chronic Pain Management: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Jin, Weina; Choo, Amber; Gromala, Diane; Shaw, Chris; Squire, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Although Virtual Reality (VR) applications have been shown to reduce many forms of acute pain, such research of VR applications and their effects on chronic pain is still at its infancy. In this study, we designed a VR game Cryoslide, and examined its analgesic effect on chronic pain patients, its end users, in a clinical setting. In this randomized, controlled crossover clinical study of 20 chronic pain patients, Cryoslide significantly reduced perceived pain compared to the baseline and the control group. The results demonstrate that Cryoslide can be effectively used as an analgesic intervention for chronic pain management to lessen pain intensity during short-term symptom spikes.

  3. Efficacy of Eight Months of Nightly Zolpidem: A Prospective Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Surilla; Roehrs, Timothy A.; Roth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the long-term (8 months) efficacy of zolpidem in adults with chronic primary insomnia using polysomnography. Design: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting: Sleep disorders and research center. Participants: Healthy participants (n = 91), ages 23-70, meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for primary insomnia. Interventions: Nightly zolpidem, 10 mg (5 mg for patients > 60 yrs) or placebo 30 minutes before bedtime for 8 months. Measurements and Results: Polysomnographic sleep parameters and morning subject assessments of sleep on 2 nights in months 1 and 8. Relative to placebo, zolpidem significantly increased overall total sleep time and sleep efficiency, reduced sleep latency and wake after sleep onset when assessed at months 1 and 8. Overall, subjective evaluations of efficacy were not shown among treatment groups. Conclusions: In adults with primary insomnia, nightly zolpidem administration remained efficacious across 8 months of nightly use. Clinical Trial Information: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01006525; Trial Name: Safety and Efficacy of Chronic Hypnotic Use; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01006525. Citation: Randall S; Roehrs TA; Roth T. Efficacy of eight months of nightly zolpidem: a prospective placebo-controlled study. SLEEP 2012;35(11):1551-1557. PMID:23115404

  4. First clinical experience with the air purge control and electrical remote-controlled tubing clamp in mini bypass.

    PubMed

    Huybregts, Rien M A J M; Veerman, Derk P; Vonk, Alexander B A; Nesselaar, Alfred F; Paulus, Reggie C E; Thone-Passchier, Deirdre H; Smith, Annette L; de Vroege, Roel

    2006-09-01

    Most mini bypass systems do not contain a venous and cardiotomy reservoir in the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit and lack the capability to remove venous air. In conjunction with the manufacturer the air purge control system, a system which automatically removes air that is captured in a venous bubble trap, has been developed. This system is combined with an electrical remote clamp, which automatically clamps the arterial line in case air leaves the bubble trap. Twenty consecutive patients undergoing surgery with CPB were included in this clinical validation. Venous air was removed by the air purge control during bypass. The electrical remote clamp was never activated by the system, confirming that the air purge control adequately removed venous air during these cases. The air purge control, in conjunction with the electrical remote clamp, is a valuable safety feature in mini bypass, enhancing patient safety and user friendliness while providing a level of safety equivalent to those of conventional bypass systems.

  5. [Study on clinical effectiveness of acupuncture and moxibustion on acute Bell's facial paralysis: randomized controlled clinical observation].

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Li, Ning; Liu, Yi; Huang, Chang-qiong; Zhang, Yong-ling

    2006-03-01

    To investigate the adverse effects of acupuncture on the prognosis, and effectiveness of acupuncture combined with far infrared ray in the patient of acute Bell's facial paralysis within 48 h. Clinically randomized controlled trial was used, and the patients were divided into 3 groups: group A (early acupuncture group), group B (acupuncture combined with far infrared ray) and group C (acupuncture after 7 days). The facial nerve functional classification at the attack, 7 days after the attack and after treatment, the clinically cured rate of following-up of 6 months, and the average cured time, the cured time of complete facial paralysis were observed in the 3 groups. There were no significant differences among the 3 groups in the facial nerve functional classification 7 days after the attack, the clinically cured rate of following-up of 6 months and the average cured time (P > 0.05), but the cured time of complete facial paralysis in the group A and the group B were shorter than that in the group C (P < 0.05). The patient of acute Bell's facial paralysis can be treated with acupuncture and moxibustion, and traditional moxibustion can be replaced by far infrared way.

  6. Glia as the “bad guys”: Implications for improving clinical pain control and the clinical utility of opioids

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Linda R.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Ledeboer, Annemarie; Wieseler-Frank, Julie; Milligan, Erin D.; Maier, Steven F.

    2007-01-01

    Within the past decade, there has been increasing recognition that glia are far more than simply “housekeepers” for neurons. This review explores two recently recognized roles of glia (microglia and astrocytes) in: (a) creating and maintaining enhanced pain states such as neuropathic pain, and (b) compromising the efficacy of morphine and other opioids for pain control. While glia have little-to-no role in pain under basal conditions, pain is amplified when glia become activated, inducing the release of proinflammatory products, especially proinflammatory cytokines. How glia are triggered to become activated is a key issue, and appears to involve a number of neuron-to-glia signals including neuronal chemokines, neurotransmitters, and substances released by damaged, dying and dead neurons. In addition, glia become increasingly activated in response to repeated administration of opioids. Products of activated glia increase neuronal excitability via numerous mechanisms, including direct receptor-mediated actions, upregulation of excitatory amino acid receptor function, downregulation of GABA receptor function, and so on. These downstream effects of glial activation amplify pain, suppress acute opioid analgesia, contribute to the apparent loss of opioid analgesia upon repeated opioid administration (tolerance), and contribute to the development of opioid dependence. The potential implications of such glial regulation of pain and opioid actions are vast, suggestive that targeting glia and their proinflammatory products may provide a novel and effective therapy for controlling clinical pain syndromes and increasing the clinical utility of analgesic drugs. PMID:17175134

  7. Effects of RYGB on energy expenditure, appetite and glycaemic control: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J B; Pedersen, S D; Gregersen, N T; Vestergaard, L; Nielsen, M S; Ritz, C; Madsbad, S; Worm, D; Hansen, D L; Clausen, T R; Rehfeld, J F; Astrup, A; Holst, J J; Sjödin, A

    2016-02-01

    Increased energy expenditure (EE) has been proposed as an important mechanism for weight loss following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). However, this has never been investigated in a controlled setting independent of changes in energy balance. Similarly, only few studies have investigated the effect of RYGB on glycaemic control per se. Here, we investigated the effect of RYGB on EE, appetite, glycaemic control and specific signalling molecules compared with a control group in comparable negative energy balance. Obese normal glucose-tolerant participants were randomized to receive RYGB after 8 (n=14) or 12 weeks (n=14). The protocol included a visit at week 0 and three visits (weeks 7, 11 and 78) where 24-h EE, appetite and blood parameters were assessed. Participants followed a low-calorie diet from weeks 0-11, with those operated at week 12 serving as a control group for those operated at week 8. Compared with controls, RYGB-operated participants had lower body composition-adjusted 24-h EE and basal EE 3 weeks postoperatively (both P<0.05) but EE parameters at week 78 were not different from preoperative values (week 7). Surgery changed the postprandial response of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY3-36 (PYY), ghrelin, cholecystokinin, fibroblast growth factor-19 and bile acids (all P<0.05). Particularly, increases in GLP-1, PYY and decreases in ghrelin were associated with decreased appetite. None of HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance), Matsuda index, the insulinogenic index, the disposition index and fasting hepatic insulin clearance were different between the groups, but RYGB operated had lower fasting glucose (P<0.05) and the postprandial glucose profile was shifted to the left (P<0.01). Our data do not support that EE is increased after RYGB. More likely, RYGB promotes weight loss by reducing appetite, partly mediated by changes in gastrointestinal hormone secretion. Furthermore, we found that the early changes in

  8. Design Control for Clinical Translation of 3D Printed Modular Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Scott J.; Flanagan, Colleen L.; Zopf, David A.; Morrison, Robert J.; Nasser, Hassan; Patel, Janki J.; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia N.; Wheeler, Matthew B.; Green, Glenn E.

    2015-01-01

    The primary thrust of tissue engineering is the clinical translation of scaffolds and/or biologics to reconstruct tissue defects. Despite this thrust, clinical translation of tissue engineering therapies from academic research has been minimal in the 27 year history of tissue engineering. Academic research by its nature focuses on, and rewards, initial discovery of new phenomena and technologies in the basic research model, with a view towards generality. Translation, however, by its nature must be directed at specific clinical targets, also denoted as indications, with associated regulatory requirements. These regulatory requirements, especially design control, require that the clinical indication be precisely defined a priori, unlike most academic basic tissue engineering research where the research target is typically open-ended, and furthermore requires that the tissue engineering therapy be constructed according to design inputs that ensure it treats or mitigates the clinical indication. Finally, regulatory approval dictates that the constructed system be verified, i.e., proven that it meets the design inputs, and validated, i.e., that by meeting the design inputs the therapy will address the clinical indication. Satisfying design control requires (1) a system of integrated technologies (scaffolds, materials, biologics), ideally based on a fundamental platform, as compared to focus on a single technology, (2) testing of design hypotheses to validate system performance as opposed to mechanistic hypotheses of natural phenomena, and (3) sequential testing using in vitro, in vivo, large preclinical and eventually clinical tests against competing therapies, as compared to single experiments to test new technologies or test mechanistic hypotheses. Our goal in this paper is to illustrate how design control may be implemented in academic translation of scaffold based tissue engineering therapies. Specifically, we propose to (1) demonstrate a modular platform approach

  9. Design control for clinical translation of 3D printed modular scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hollister, Scott J; Flanagan, Colleen L; Zopf, David A; Morrison, Robert J; Nasser, Hassan; Patel, Janki J; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia N; Wheeler, Matthew B; Green, Glenn E

    2015-03-01

    The primary thrust of tissue engineering is the clinical translation of scaffolds and/or biologics to reconstruct tissue defects. Despite this thrust, clinical translation of tissue engineering therapies from academic research has been minimal in the 27 year history of tissue engineering. Academic research by its nature focuses on, and rewards, initial discovery of new phenomena and technologies in the basic research model, with a view towards generality. Translation, however, by its nature must be directed at specific clinical targets, also denoted as indications, with associated regulatory requirements. These regulatory requirements, especially design control, require that the clinical indication be precisely defined a priori, unlike most academic basic tissue engineering research where the research target is typically open-ended, and furthermore requires that the tissue engineering therapy be constructed according to design inputs that ensure it treats or mitigates the clinical indication. Finally, regulatory approval dictates that the constructed system be verified, i.e., proven that it meets the design inputs, and validated, i.e., that by meeting the design inputs the therapy will address the clinical indication. Satisfying design control requires (1) a system of integrated technologies (scaffolds, materials, biologics), ideally based on a fundamental platform, as compared to focus on a single technology, (2) testing of design hypotheses to validate system performance as opposed to mechanistic hypotheses of natural phenomena, and (3) sequential testing using in vitro, in vivo, large preclinical and eventually clinical tests against competing therapies, as compared to single experiments to test new technologies or test mechanistic hypotheses. Our goal in this paper is to illustrate how design control may be implemented in academic translation of scaffold based tissue engineering therapies. Specifically, we propose to (1) demonstrate a modular platform approach

  10. Randomized controlled trial of a nurse-led rheumatology clinic for monitoring biological therapy.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ingrid; Fridlund, Bengt; Arvidsson, Barbro; Teleman, Annika; Bergman, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the treatment outcomes of a nurse-led rheumatology clinic and a rheumatologist-led clinic in patients with low disease activity or in remission who are undergoing biological therapy. Patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis treated with biological therapy are usually monitored by rheumatologists. Nurse-led rheumatology clinics have been proposed in patients with low disease activity or in remission. Randomized controlled trial. A 12-month follow-up trial was conducted between October 2009 and August 2011, where 107 patients were randomized into two groups with a 6-month follow-up to a nurse-led rheumatology clinic based on person-centred care (intervention group; n = 53) or to a rheumatologist-led clinic (control group; n = 54). The hypothesis was that the nurse-led clinic outcomes would not be inferior to those obtained from a rheumatologist-led clinic at the 12-month follow-up. The primary outcome was disease activity measured by Disease Activity Score 28. A total of 47 patients in the intervention group and 50 in the control group completed the 12-month trial. The trial revealed no statistically significant differences between groups in mean change of Disease Activity Score 28, Visual Analogue Scales for pain, the Health Assessment Questionnaire, satisfaction with or confidence in obtaining rheumatology care. Patients with stable chronic inflammatory arthritis undergoing biological therapy could be monitored by a nurse-led rheumatology clinic without difference in outcome as measured by the Disease Activity Score 28. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Clinically relevant quality measures for risk factor control in primary care: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Stefan; Gemperli, Armin; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Bauer, Douglas C; Zimmerli, Lukas; Cornuz, Jacques; Battegay, Edouard; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Kerr, Eve A; Aujesky, Drahomir; Rodondi, Nicolas

    2014-07-15

    Assessment of the proportion of patients with well controlled cardiovascular risk factors underestimates the proportion of patients receiving high quality of care. Evaluating whether physicians respond appropriately to poor risk factor control gives a different picture of quality of care. We assessed physician response to control cardiovascular risk factors, as well as markers of potential overtreatment in Switzerland, a country with universal healthcare coverage but without systematic quality monitoring, annual report cards on quality of care or financial incentives to improve quality. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 1002 randomly selected patients aged 50-80 years from four university primary care settings in Switzerland. For hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus, we first measured proportions in control, then assessed therapy modifications among those in poor control. "Appropriate clinical action" was defined as a therapy modification or return to control without therapy modification within 12 months among patients with baseline poor control. Potential overtreatment of these conditions was defined as intensive treatment among low-risk patients with optimal target values. 20% of patients with hypertension, 41% with dyslipidemia and 36% with diabetes mellitus were in control at baseline. When appropriate clinical action in response to poor control was integrated into measuring quality of care, 52 to 55% had appropriate quality of care. Over 12 months, therapy of 61% of patients with baseline poor control was modified for hypertension, 33% for dyslipidemia, and 85% for diabetes mellitus. Increases in number of drug classes (28-51%) and in drug doses (10-61%) were the most common therapy modifications. Patients with target organ damage and higher baseline values were more likely to have appropriate clinical action. We found low rates of potential overtreatment with 2% for hypertension, 3% for diabetes mellitus and 3-6% for dyslipidemia. In

  12. Clinical hypnosis in the treatment of postmenopausal hot flashes: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary R; Fisher, William I; Johnson, Aimee K; Carpenter, Janet S; Keith, Timothy Z

    2013-03-01

    The use of estrogen and progesterone to manage vasomotor symptoms (ie, hot flashes and night sweats) has declined because of concerns about their risks, and there is an increased interest in alternate, effective, and low-risk treatments. This study reports the results of a randomized controlled trial of clinical hypnosis for treating vasomotor symptoms among postmenopausal women. This is a randomized, single-blind, controlled, clinical trial involving 187 postmenopausal women reporting a minimum of seven hot flashes per day (or at least 50 hot flashes a week) at baseline between December 2008 and April 2012. Eligible participants received five weekly sessions of either clinical hypnosis or structured-attention control. Primary outcomes were hot flash frequency (subjectively and physiologically recorded) and hot flash score assessed by daily diaries on weeks 2 to 6 and week 12. Secondary outcomes included measures of hot flash-related daily interference, sleep quality, and treatment satisfaction. In a modified intent-to-treat analysis that included all randomized participants who provided data, reported subjective hot flash frequency from baseline to week 12 showed a mean reduction of 55.82 (74.16%) hot flashes for the clinical hypnosis intervention versus a mean reduction of 12.89 (17.13%) hot flashes for controls (P < 0.001; 95% CI, 36.15-49.67). The mean reduction in hot flash score was 18.83 (80.32%) for the clinical hypnosis intervention as compared with 3.53 (15.38%) for controls (P < 0.001; 95% CI, 12.60-17.54). At 12-week follow-up, the mean reduction in physiologically monitored hot flashes was 5.92 (56.86%) for clinical hypnosis and 0.88 (9.94%) for controls (P < 0.001; 95% CI, 2.00-5.46). Secondary outcomes were significantly improved compared with controls at 12-week follow-up: hot flash-related interference (P < 0.001; 95% CI, 2.74-4.02), sleep quality (P < 0.001; 95% CI, 3.65-5.84), and treatment satisfaction (P < 0.001; 95% CI, 7.79-8.59). Compared

  13. The STOP-Bang Equivalent Model and Prediction of Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Relation to Polysomnographic Measurements of the Apnea/Hypopnea Index

    PubMed Central

    Farney, Robert J.; Walker, Brandon S.; Farney, Robert M.; Snow, Gregory L.; Walker, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Various models and questionnaires have been developed for screening specific populations for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as defined by the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI); however, almost every method is based upon dichotomizing a population, and none function ideally. We evaluated the possibility of using the STOP-Bang model (SBM) to classify severity of OSA into 4 categories ranging from none to severe. Methods: Anthropomorphic data and the presence of snoring, tiredness/sleepiness, observed apneas, and hypertension were collected from 1426 patients who underwent diagnostic polysomnography. Questionnaire data for each patient was converted to the STOP-Bang equivalent with an ordinal rating of 0 to 8. Proportional odds logistic regression analysis was conducted to predict severity of sleep apnea based upon the AHI: none (AHI < 5/h), mild (AHI ≥ 5 to < 15/h), moderate (≥ 15 to < 30/h), and severe (AHI ≥ 30/h). Results: Linear, curvilinear, and weighted models (R2 = 0.245, 0.251, and 0.269, respectively) were developed that predicted AHI severity. The linear model showed a progressive increase in the probability of severe (4.4% to 81.9%) and progressive decrease in the probability of none (52.5% to 1.1%). The probability of mild or moderate OSA initially increased from 32.9% and 10.3% respectively (SBM score 0) to 39.3% (SBM score 2) and 31.8% (SBM score 4), after which there was a progressive decrease in probabilities as more patients fell into the severe category. Conclusions: The STOP-Bang model may be useful to categorize OSA severity, triage patients for diagnostic evaluation or exclude from harm. Citation: Farney RJ; Walker BS; Farney RM; Snow GL; Walker JM. The STOP-Bang equivalent model and prediction of severity of obstructive sleep apnea: relation to polysomnographic measurements of the apnea/hypopnea index. J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(5):459-465. PMID:22003340

  14. Association of statin therapy with blood pressure control in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic outpatients in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Morgado, Manuel; Rolo, Sandra; Macedo, Ana Filipa; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Background: Some clinical evidence revealed that statins, apart from lowering cholesterol levels, also have an antihypertensive effect. Our aim was to evaluate the existence of a possible association of statin therapy with blood pressure (BP) control in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: Patients attending a hypertension/dyslipidemia clinic were prospectively evaluated. Those patients with a diagnosis of stage 1 hypertension and hypercholesterolemia who consented to participate were included in the study, either in the statin group (when taking a statin) or in the control group (when not taking a statin). Exclusion criteria included dementia, pregnancy, or breastfeeding, and history or evidence of stage 2 hypertension. Detailed clinical information was prospectively obtained from medical records. A total of 110 hypertensive patients were assigned to the study (82 in the statin group and 28 in the control group). Results: Although there were no significant differences (P > 0.05) in both groups concerning gender, body mass index, antihypertensive pharmacotherapy, and serum levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, a higher BP control was observed in the statin group (P = 0.002). Significantly lower systolic BP (–6.7 mmHg, P = 0.020) and diastolic BP (–6.4 mmHg, P = 0.002) levels were reported in the statin group. Serum levels of low-density lipoprotein were also significantly lower in the statin group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This observational study detected an association of statin therapy with BP control in hypertensive hypercholesterolemic patients in clinical practice. These findings raise the possibility that statin therapy may be useful for BP control in the studied population. PMID:21716752

  15. Development of Automatic Controller of Brain Temperature Based on the Conditions of Clinical Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsuki, Tomohiko; Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi

    A new automatic controller of brain temperature was developed based on the inevitable conditions of its clinical use from the viewpoint of various kinds of feasibility, in particular, electric power consumption of less than 1,500W in ICU. The adaptive algorithm was employed to cope with individual time-varying characteristic change of patients. The controller under water-surface cooling hypothermia requires much power for the frequent regulation of the water temperature of cooling blankets. Thus, in this study, the power consumption of the controller was checked by several kinds of examinations involving the control simulation of brain temperature using a mannequin with thermal characteristics similar to that of adult patients. The required accuracy of therapeutic brain hypothermia, i.e. control deviation within ±0.1C was experimentally confirmed using “root mean square of the control error”, despite the present controller consumes less energy comparing with the one in the case of our conventional controller, where it can still keeps remaining power margin more than 300W even in the full operation. Thereby, the clinically required water temperature was also confirmed within the limit of power supply, thus its practical application is highly expected with less physical burden of medical staff inclusive of more usability and more medical cost performance.

  16. 77 FR 50162 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Clinical Supplies Management, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Clinical Supplies Management, Inc. Correction In notice document 2012-19197 appearing on pages 47109-47110 in the issue...

  17. Second-generation antidepressants in social anxiety disorder: meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, Gabriela Bezerra; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire; Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Vigne, Paula; Figueira, Ivan; Versiani, Márcio

    2011-05-01

    A growing number of controlled clinical trials suggest that different second-generation antidepressants (SGA) may be effective in the treatment of social anxiety disorder (SAD). The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of SGA in SAD and to investigate possible differences in their efficacy. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trials involving second-generation antidepressants in adult patients with SAD published on PubMed/MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Current Controlled Trials databases until July 2009. Our analyses were based on changes in Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), Clinical Global Impression (CGI), and standardized mean difference (SMD). Twenty-seven controlled clinical trials, comprising ten different SGA, were selected. When comparing the reduction of LSAS scores, the group receiving active drugs showed a significantly greater reduction compared to those observed in the placebo group [pooled weighted mean -11.9 (IC 95% -14.5 to -9.4)]. The combined relative risk (RR) for the different drugs revealed a 62% increase in treatment response (final CGI ≤2) for those using SGAs, compared to those receiving placebo [RR 1.62 (95% CI 1.44-1.81)]. The combined SMD for the SGAs was -0.43 (IC 95% -0.49 to -0.37). Second-generation antidepressants are efficacious treatment for patients with SAD. However, our results do not suggest differences of efficacy among different drugs.

  18. 78 FR 59064 - Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug Enforcement Administration Importer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Fisher Clinical Services... application by renewal to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for registration as an importer of...

  19. Prenatal Pregnancy Complications and Psychiatric Symptoms: Children with ASD versus Clinic Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudor, Megan E.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the association between prenatal pregnancy complications (PPC) and childhood psychiatric symptoms in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and non-ASD children who were referred to a psychiatric clinic (Controls). Parents completed a "DSM-IV"-referenced rating scale and developmental history questionnaire.…

  20. Clinically Referred ODD Children with or without CD and Healthy Controls: Comparisons across Contextual Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolko, David J.; Dorn, Lorah D.; Bukstein, Oscar; Burke, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    This study compares 6-11-year-old, clinically referred boys and girls diagnosed with Oppositional Defiant Disorder, either with (ODD + CD, n = 40) or without Conduct Disorder (ODD only; n = 136), to a matched sample of healthy control children (HC; n = 69). Multiple informants completed intake diagnostic interviews and self-reports to evaluate…

  1. Clinically Referred ODD Children with or without CD and Healthy Controls: Comparisons across Contextual Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolko, David J.; Dorn, Lorah D.; Bukstein, Oscar; Burke, Jeffrey D.

    2008-01-01

    This study compares 6-11-year-old, clinically referred boys and girls diagnosed with Oppositional Defiant Disorder, either with (ODD + CD, n = 40) or without Conduct Disorder (ODD only; n = 136), to a matched sample of healthy control children (HC; n = 69). Multiple informants completed intake diagnostic interviews and self-reports to evaluate…

  2. Prenatal Pregnancy Complications and Psychiatric Symptoms: Children with ASD versus Clinic Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudor, Megan E.; DeVincent, Carla J.; Gadow, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the association between prenatal pregnancy complications (PPC) and childhood psychiatric symptoms in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and non-ASD children who were referred to a psychiatric clinic (Controls). Parents completed a "DSM-IV"-referenced rating scale and developmental history questionnaire.…

  3. Likely country of origin in publications on randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials during the last 60 years

    PubMed Central

    Gluud, Christian; Nikolova, Dimitrinka

    2007-01-01

    Background The number of publications on clinical trials is unknown as well as the countries publishing most trial reports. To try to examine these questions we performed an ecological study. Methods We searched the 454,449 records on publications in The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2005 (CD-ROM version) for possible country of origin. We inspected a random sample of 906 records for information on country and type of trial. Results There was an exponential growth of publications on randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials since 1946, but the growth seems to have seized since 2000. We identified the possible country of origin of 210,974 publications (46.4%). The USA is leading with about 46,789 publications followed by UK, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Canada, and France. Sweden becomes the leader with 891 publications per million inhabitants during the last 60 years followed by Denmark (n = 864), New Zealand (n = 791), Finland (n = 781), the Netherlands (n = 570), Switzerland (n = 547), and Norway (n = 543). In depth assessment of the random sample backed these findings. Conclusion Many records lacked country of origin, even after the additional scrutiny. The number of publications on clinical trials increased exponentially until the turn of the century. Rather small, democratic, and wealthy countries take the lead when the number of publications on clinical trials is calculated based on million inhabitants. If all countries produced the same number of trials as these countries, this could mean thousands of new effective treatments during the next 60 years. PMID:17326823

  4. Evaluation of the clinical and cost effectiveness of intermediate care clinics for diabetes (ICCD): a multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew; O'Hare, Joseph Paul; Hardy, Ainsley; Raymond, Neil; Szczepura, Ala; Crossman, Ric; Baines, Darrin; Khunti, Kamlesh; Kumar, Sudhesh; Saravanan, Ponnusamy

    2014-01-01

    Configuring high quality care for the rapidly increasing number of people with type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a major challenge worldwide for both providers and commissioners. In the UK, about two thirds of people with T2D are managed entirely in primary care, with wide variation in management strategies and achievement of targets. Pay for performance, introduced in 2004, initially resulted in improvements but disparities exist in ethnic minorities and the improvements are levelling off. Community based, intermediate care clinics for diabetes (ICCDs) were considered one solution and are functioning across the UK. However, there is no randomised trial evidence for the effectiveness of such clinics. This is a cluster-randomised trial, involving 3 primary care trusts, with 49 general practices randomised to usual care (n=25) or intervention (ICCDs; n=24). All eligible adult patients with T2D were invited; 1997 were recruited and 1280 followed-up after 18-months intervention. achievement of all three of the NICE targets [(HbA1c ≤ 7.0%/53 mmol/mol; Blood Pressure <140/80 mmHg; cholesterol <154 mg/dl (4 mmol/l)]. PRIMARY OUTCOME was achieved in 14.3% in the intervention arm vs. 9.3% in the control arm (p=0.059 after adjustment for covariates). The odds ratio (95% CI) for achieving primary outcome in the intervention group was 1.56 (0.98, 2.49). Primary care and community clinic costs were significantly higher in the intervention group, but there were no significant differences in hospital costs or overall healthcare costs. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of +£7,778 per QALY gained, indicated ICCD was marginally more expensive at producing health gain. Intermediate care clinics can contribute to improving target achievement in patients with diabetes. Further work is needed to investigate the optimal scale and organisational structure of ICCD services and whether, over time, their role may change as skill levels in primary care increase. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  5. The stimulation effect of auricular magnetic press pellets on older female adults with sleep disturbance undergoing polysomnographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chyi; Liao, Wen-Chun; Liaw, Jen-Jiuan; Hang, Liang-Wen; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives. To examine the stimulation effect of auricular magnetic press pellet therapy on older female adults with sleep disturbance as determined by polysomnography (PSG). Design. Randomized, single-blind, experimental-controlled, parallel-group. Setting. Community. Participants. Twenty-seven older female adults with sleep disturbance according to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) >5 for at least 3 months were recruited. Participants were screened by both the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), as well as polysomnography prior to randomization. Interventions. All eligible participants were randomly allocated into the experimental or control group. Both groups were taped with magnetic press pellet on auricular points for 3 weeks. The experimental group was treated by applying pressure on the magnetic press pellets 3 times per day while no stimulation was applied on the control group. Measurements and Results. Both groups were measured by PSG and PSQI at the beginning of the study and 3 weeks after the study. Both groups showed improvements on PSQI scores compared to the baseline. One-way analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline scores showed that significant improvements of PSG-derived sleep parameters, such as sleep efficiency, were found in the experimental group. However, no significant differences between groups were observed in the proportion of sleep stages with the exception of Stage 2. Conclusions. Auricular therapy using magnetic pellets and stimulation by pressing was more effective in improving the sleep quality compared to auricular therapy without any stimulation.

  6. Effectiveness of dementia follow-up care by memory clinics or general practitioners: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Melis, René J F; Van Der Aa, Geert C H M; Golüke-Willemse, Gertie A M; De Leest, Benoit J M; Van Raak, Frank H J M; Schölzel-Dorenbos, Carla J M; Verheijen, Desiree C M; Verhey, Frans R J; Visser, Marieke C; Wolfs, Claire A; Adang, Eddy M M; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of post-diagnosis dementia treatment and coordination of care by memory clinics compared with general practitioners. Design Multicentre randomised controlled trial. Setting Nine memory clinics and 159 general practitioners in the Netherlands. Participants 175 patients with a new diagnosis of mild to moderate dementia living in the community and their informal caregivers. Interventions Usual care provided by memory clinic or general practitioner. Main outcome measures Caregiver rated quality of life of the patient measured with the quality of life in Alzheimer’s disease instrument and self perceived burden of the informal caregiver measured with the sense of competence questionnaire (intention to treat analysis). Results The quality of life of the patients in the memory clinic group was 0.5 (95% confidence interval −0.7 to 1.6) points higher than in the general practitioner group. Caregivers’ burden was 2.4 (−5.8 to 1.0) points lower in the memory clinic group than in the general practitioner group. Conclusion No evidence was found that memory clinics were more effective than general practitioners with regard to post-diagnosis treatment and coordination care for patients with dementia. Without further evidence on the effectiveness of these modalities, other arguments, such as cost minimisation, patients’ preferences, or regional health service planning, can determine which type of dementia care is offered. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00554047. PMID:22589500

  7. Translating Research on Myoelectric Control into Clinics-Are the Performance Assessment Methods Adequate?

    PubMed

    Vujaklija, Ivan; Roche, Aidan D; Hasenoehrl, Timothy; Sturma, Agnes; Amsuess, Sebastian; Farina, Dario; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2017-01-01

    Missing an upper limb dramatically impairs daily-life activities. Efforts in overcoming the issues arising from this disability have been made in both academia and industry, although their clinical outcome is still limited. Translation of prosthetic research into clinics has been challenging because of the difficulties in meeting the necessary requirements of the market. In this perspective article, we suggest that one relevant factor determining the relatively small clinical impact of myocontrol algorithms for upper limb prostheses is the limit of commonly used laboratory performance metrics. The laboratory conditions, in which the majority of the solutions are being evaluated, fail to sufficiently replicate real-life challenges. We qualitatively support this argument with representative data from seven transradial amputees. Their ability to control a myoelectric prosthesis was tested by measuring the accuracy of offline EMG signal classification, as a typical laboratory performance metrics, as well as by clinical scores when performing standard tests of daily living. Despite all subjects reaching relatively high classification accuracy offline, their clinical scores varied greatly and were not strongly predicted by classification accuracy. We therefore support the suggestion to test myocontrol systems using clinical tests on amputees, fully fitted with sockets and prostheses highly resembling the systems they would use in daily living, as evaluation benchmark. Agreement on this level of testing for systems developed in research laboratories would facilitate clinically relevant progresses in this field.

  8. Neuromuscular control of trunk stability: clinical implications for sports injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Zazulak, Bohdanna; Cholewicki, Jacek; Reeves, N Peter

    2008-09-01

    Recent prospective evidence supports the hypothesis that impaired trunk control is a contributing factor to sports injuries of the spine as well as to segments of the kinetic chain. The current concepts regarding neuromuscular control of trunk stability are best described from a systems engineering perspective. In the analysis of current neuromuscular training protocols for sports injury prevention, these principles are applied to identify components that optimize neuromuscular control of trunk stability. Current perspectives of neuromuscular learning can be applied clinically to aid in the formulation of injury prevention strategies.

  9. First clinical evaluation of the navigated controlled drill at the lateral skull base.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Dittrich, E; Scholl, C; Neumuth, T; Strauss, M; Dietz, A; Lüth, T; Strauss, G

    2008-01-01

    Surgery on the lateral skull base puts delicate structures at risk. To support the surgeon in identifying and protecting the risk structures the principle of Navigated Control (NC) can be used for preventing iatrogenic injuries. In this paper the application of Navigated Control for surgery on the lateral skull base was investigated for the first time in clinical use. There was no risk structure damage with NC. Navigated Control in lateral skull base surgery seems to have a great potential for safe risk structure protection, a morbidity reduction and in a relief of strain for the surgeon.

  10. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of the Assayed Quality Control Material for Clinical Microbiology Assays. Final order.

    PubMed

    2017-07-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA, Agency, or we) is classifying the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the assayed quality control material for clinical microbiology assays' classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  11. Covariate-adjusted borrowing of historical control data in randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Han, Baoguang; Zhan, Jia; John Zhong, Z; Liu, Dawei; Lindborg, Stacy

    2017-07-01

    The borrowing of historical control data can be an efficient way to improve the treatment effect estimate of the current control group in a randomized clinical trial. When the historical and current control data are consistent, the borrowing of historical data can increase power and reduce Type I error rate. However, when these 2 sources of data are inconsistent, it may result in a combination of biased estimates, reduced power, and inflation of Type I error rate. In some situations, inconsistency between historical and current control data may be caused by a systematic variation in the measured baseline prognostic factors, which can be appropriately addressed through statistical modeling. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian hierarchical model that can incorporate patient-level baseline covariates to enhance the appropriateness of the exchangeability assumption between current and historical control data. The performance of the proposed method is shown through simulation studies, and its application to a clinical trial design for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is described. The proposed method is developed for scenarios involving multiple imbalanced prognostic factors and thus has meaningful implications for clinical trials evaluating new treatments for heterogeneous diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The Individualized Quality Control Plan - Coming Soon to Clinical Microbiology Laboratories Everywhere!

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nancy

    2015-11-15

    As of January 1, 2016, microbiology laboratories can choose to adopt a new quality control option, the Individualized Quality Control Plan (IQCP), under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA). This voluntary approach increases flexibility for meeting regulatory requirements and provides laboratories the opportunity to customize QC for their testing in their unique environments and by their testing personnel. IQCP is an all-inclusive approach to quality based on risk management to address potential errors in the total testing process. It includes three main steps, (1) performing a risk assessment, (2) developing a QC plan, and (3) monitoring the plan through quality assessment. Resources are available from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Society for Microbiology, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and accrediting organizations, such as the College of American Pathologists and Joint Commission, to assist microbiology laboratories implementing IQCP.

  13. Computerized Management of Patient Care in a Complex, Controlled Clinical Trial in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F.

    1987-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) is often not responsive to conventional supportive therapy and the mortality rate may exceed 90%. A new form of supportive care, Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal (ECCO2R), has shown a dramatic increase in survival (48%). A controlled clinical trial of the new ECCO2R therapy versus conventional Continuous Positive Pressure Ventilation (CPPV) is being initiated. Detailed care protocols have been developed by “expert” critical care physicians for the management of patients. Using a blackboard control architecture, the protocols have been implemented on an existing hospital information system and will direct patient care and help manage the controlled clinical trial. Therapeutic instructions are automatically generated by the computer from data input by physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and the laboratory. Preliminary results show that the computerized protocol system can direct therapy for acutely ill patients.

  14. Role of technology in supporting quality control and treatment fidelity in a family caregiver clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Farran, Carol J; Etkin, Caryn D; McCann, Judith J; Paun, Olimpia; Eisenstein, Amy R; Wilbur, Joellen

    2011-11-01

    This article describes how a family caregiver lifestyle physical activity clinical trial uses research technology to enhance quality control and treatment fidelity. This trial uses a range of Internet, Blaise(®) Windows-based software and Echo Server technologies to support quality control issues, such as data collection, data entry, and study management advocated by the clinical trials literature, and to ensure treatment fidelity concerning intervention implementation (i.e., design, training, delivery, receipt, and enactment) as proposed by the National Institutes of Health Behavior Change Consortium. All research staff are trained to use these technologies. Strengths of this technological approach to support quality control and treatment fidelity include the comprehensive plan, involvement of all staff, and ability to maintain accurate and timely data. Limitations include the upfront time and costs for developing and testing these technological methods, and having support staff readily available to address technological issues if they occur.

  15. The Individualized Quality Control Plan – Coming Soon to Clinical Microbiology Laboratories Everywhere!

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    As of January 1, 2016, microbiology laboratories can choose to adopt a new quality control option, the Individualized Quality Control Plan (IQCP), under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA). This voluntary approach increases flexibility for meeting regulatory requirements and provides laboratories the opportunity to customize QC for their testing in their unique environments and by their testing personnel. IQCP is an all-inclusive approach to quality based on risk management to address potential errors in the total testing process. It includes three main steps, (1) performing a risk assessment, (2) developing a QC plan, and (3) monitoring the plan through quality assessment. Resources are available from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Society for Microbiology, Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and accrediting organizations, such as the College of American Pathologists and Joint Commission, to assist microbiology laboratories implementing IQCP. PMID:26997689

  16. Effectiveness of treadmill training on balance control in elderly people: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pirouzi, Soraya; Motealleh, Ali Reza; Fallahzadeh, Fatemeh; Fallahzadeh, Mohammad Amin

    2014-11-01

    Physical exercise would improve postural stability, which is an essential factor in preventing accidental fall among the elderly population. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of treadmill walking on balance improvement among the elderly people. A total of 30 community dwelling older adults with a Berg Balance Scale score of 36-48 and the ability to walk without aid were considered and divided into control (n=15) and experimental (n=15) groups. Individuals in the experimental group participated in 30 minutes of forward and backward treadmill training based on three times a week interval for a period of four weeks. Individuals in the control group were instructed to continue with their daily routine activity. Before and after training, gait speed was measured by six-minute walk test and balance ability was evaluated by Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale (FABS) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) tests. Postural sway items such as the Center of Pressure (COP), average displacement and velocity were evaluated by using a force platform system. Data were collected in quiet standing, tandem position and standing on foam pads before and after intervention. After intervention, balance variables in the experimental group indicated a significant improvement in quiet standing on firm and foam surfaces, but no considerable improvement was shown in tandem position. A between-group comparison showed a significant reduction in COP velocity in the sagittal plane (P=0.030) during quiet standing and in the frontal plane (P=0.001) during standing on foam, whereas no significant reduction in COP parameters during tandem position was found. It is recommended that twelve sessions of forward and backward treadmill walk are effective in balance improvement in elderly people. IRCT201209199440N2.

  17. Informed conditioning on clinical covariates increases power in case-control association studies.

    PubMed

    Zaitlen, Noah; Lindström, Sara; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Cornelis, Marilyn; Genovese, Giulio; Pollack, Samuela; Barton, Anne; Bickeböller, Heike; Bowden, Donald W; Eyre, Steve; Freedman, Barry I; Friedman, David J; Field, John K; Groop, Leif; Haugen, Aage; Heinrich, Joachim; Henderson, Brian E; Hicks, Pamela J; Hocking, Lynne J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Landi, Maria Teresa; Langefeld, Carl D; Le Marchand, Loic; Meister, Michael; Morgan, Ann W; Raji, Olaide Y; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Scherf, David; Steer, Sophia; Walshaw, Martin; Waters, Kevin M; Wilson, Anthony G; Wordsworth, Paul; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Tchetgen, Eric Tchetgen; Haiman, Christopher; Hunter, David J; Plenge, Robert M; Worthington, Jane; Christiani, David C; Schaumberg, Debra A; Chasman, Daniel I; Altshuler, David; Voight, Benjamin; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L

    2012-01-01

    Genetic case-control association studies often include data on clinical covariates, such as body mass index (BMI), smoking status, or age, that may modify the underlying genetic risk of case or control samples. For example, in type 2 diabetes, odds ratios for established variants estimated from low-BMI cases are larger than those estimated from high-BMI cases. An unanswered question is how to use this information to maximize statistical power in case-control studies that ascertain individuals on the basis of phenotype (case-control ascertainment) or phenotype and clinical covariates (case-control-covariate ascertainment). While current approaches improve power in studies with random ascertainment, they often lose power under case-control ascertainment and fail to capture available power increases under case-control-covariate ascertainment. We show that an informed conditioning approach, based on the liability threshold model with parameters informed by external epidemiological information, fully accounts for disease prevalence and non-random ascertainment of phenotype as well as covariates and provides a substantial increase in power while maintaining a properly controlled false-positive rate. Our method outperforms standard case-control association tests with or without covariates, tests of gene x covariate interaction, and previously proposed tests for dealing with covariates in ascertained data, with especially large improvements in the case of case-control-covariate ascertainment. We investigate empirical case-control studies of type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and end-stage kidney disease over a total of 89,726 samples. In these datasets, informed conditioning outperforms logistic regression for 115 of the 157 known associated variants investigated (P-value = 1 × 10(-9)). The improvement varied across diseases with a 16% median increase in χ(2) test statistics and a

  18. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factors of Extensive Macular Atrophy with Pseudodrusen: The EMAP Case-Control National Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Douillard, Aymeric; Picot, Marie-Christine; Delcourt, Cécile; Lacroux, Annie; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Puech, Bernard; Defoort-Dhelemmes, Sabine; Drumare, Isabelle; Jozefowicz, Elsa; Bocquet, Béatrice; Baudoin, Corinne; Al-Dain Marzouka, Nour; Perez-Roustit, Sarah; Arsène, Sophie; Gissot, Valérie; Devin, François; Arndt, Carl; Wolff, Benjamin; Mauget-Faÿsse, Martine; Quaranta, Maddalena; Mura, Thibault; Deplanque, Dominique; Oubraham, Hassiba; Cohen, Salomon Yves; Gastaud, Pierre; Zambrowsky, Olivia; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Mohand Saïd, Saddek; Blanco Garavito, Rocio; Souied, Eric; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Hamel, Christian; Meunier, Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    To assess the association of clinical and biological factors with extensive macular atrophy with pseudodrusen (EMAP) characterized by bilateral macular atrophy occurring in patients aged 50 to 60 years and a rapid progression to legal blindness within 5 to 10 years. A national matched case-control study. Participants were recruited in 10 French Departments of Ophthalmology and their associated clinical investigation centers. All 115 patients with EMAP had symptoms before the age of 55 years due to bilateral extensive macular atrophy with a larger vertical axis and diffuse pseudodrusen. Three controls without age-related macular degeneration (AMD) or retinal disease at fundus examination were matched for each patient with EMAP by gender, age, and geographic area (in total 415). Subjects and controls underwent an eye examination including color, red-free autofluorescent fundus photographs and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with macular analysis. The interviews collected demographic, lifestyle, family and personal medical history, medications, and biological data. Associations of risk factors were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Extensive macular atrophy with pseudodrusen status (cases vs. controls). Extensive macular atrophy with pseudodrusen most frequently affected women (70 women, 45 men). After multivariate adjustment, family history of glaucoma or AMD was strongly associated with EMAP (odds ratio [OR], 2.3, P = 0.008 and OR, 1.5, P = 0.01, respectively). No association was found with cardiac diseases or their risk factors. Mild and moderate kidney disease and higher neutrophil rate were associated with a reduced risk of EMAP (OR, 0.58, P = 0.04; OR, 0.34, P = 0.01; and OR, 0.59, P = 0.003, respectively). On the contrary, eosinophilia (OR, 1.6; P = 0.0002), lymphocytosis (OR, 1.84; P = 0.0002), increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (OR, 6.5; P = 0.0005), decreased CH50 (P = 0.001), and high plasma C3 level (P = 0

  19. Clinical and radiographic analysis of cervical disc arthroplasty compared with allograft fusion: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mummaneni, Praveen V; Burkus, J Kenneth; Haid, Regis W; Traynelis, Vincent C; Zdeblick, Thomas A

    2007-03-01

    The authors report the results of a prospective randomized multicenter study in which the results of cervical disc arthroplasty were compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in patients treated for symptomatic single-level cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). Five hundred forty-one patients with single-level cervical DDD and radiculopathy were enrolled at 32 sites and randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: 276 patients in the investigational group underwent anterior cervical discectomy and decompression and arthroplasty with the PRESTIGE ST Cervical Disc System (Medtronic Sofamor Danek); 265 patients in the control group underwent decompressive ACDF. Eighty percent of the arthroplasty-treated patients (223 of 276) and 75% of the control patients (198 of 265) completed clinical and radiographic follow-up examinations at routine intervals for 2 years after surgery. Analysis of all currently available postoperative 12- and 24-month data indicated a two-point greater improvement in the neck disability index score in the investigational group than the control group. The arthroplasty group also had a statistically significant higher rate of neurological success (p = 0.005) as well as a lower rate of secondary revision surgeries (p = 0.0277) and supplemental fixation (p = 0.0031). The mean improvement in the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Component Summary scores was greater in the investigational group at 12 and 24 months, as was relief of neck pain. The patients in the investigational group returned to work 16 days sooner than those in the control group, and the rate of adjacent-segment reoperation was significantly lower in the investigational group as well (p = 0.0492, log-rank test). The cervical disc implant maintained segmental sagittal angular motion averaging more than 7 degrees. In the investigational group, there were no cases of implant failure or migration. The PRESTIGE ST Cervical Disc System maintained

  20. Clinical evaluation of a novel herbal dental cream in plaque formation: a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Amrutesh, Sunita; Malini, J; Tandur, Prakash S; Patki, Pralhad S

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of herbal dental cream in comparison to fluoride dental cream. Objectives Clinical evaluation of a novel herbal dental cream in plaque formation: a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial. Methods One hundred and two patients with established dental plaque were randomly assigned to either herbal dental group or fluoride dental group for six weeks in a double-blind design. Improvement in plaque index, oral hygiene status, bleeding index, and gingival index was evaluated in these patients along with microbiological study. Results Results indicated a significant reduction in plaque index, gingival index, oral hygiene index, and microbial growth in both groups. Difference between the groups was not significant. There was no significant change in bleeding index. No adverse events were reported and both the dental creams were well tolerated. Conclusion The finding of this preliminary study indicates that herbal dental cream is as safe and effective as fluoride dental cream, but not superior to it. PMID:27186096

  1. [Construction and implementation of quality control index for clinical safety of Chinese medicine injection].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-jie; Xie, Yan-ming

    2015-12-01

    In order to ensure the authenticity and accuracy of traditional Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring data, Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring quality control indicators, including the monitoring center, monitoring personnel, hardware conditions, monitoring progress and the number of patients into the group, original documents and archives management, electronic data, adverse events, quality management were constructed. Its application in the creation of major new drugs technology major projects, 10 kinds of traditional Chinese medicine injections clinical safety monitoring quality control work, found the missing case surveillance, not reported adverse events, only reported adverse reactions, electronic data reporting lag, lack of level of efforts to control the problem, and corrected, the traditional Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring of quality control and quality assurance, and subsequent Chinese medicine safety monitoring quality control to provide the reference.

  2. Core outcome domains for controlled trials and clinical recordkeeping in eczema: international multiperspective Delphi consensus process.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jochen; Langan, Sinéad; Stamm, Tanja; Williams, Hywel C

    2011-03-01

    There is wide variation in the use of outcome measures for eczema. We performed a three-stage web-based international Delphi exercise to develop consensus-based sets of core outcome domains for eczema for "controlled trials" and "clinical recordkeeping". A total of 57 individuals from four stakeholder groups (consumers, clinical experts, regulatory agency representatives, and journal editors) representing 13 countries were asked to rate the importance of 19 outcome domains for eczema and to choose which domains should be included in two core sets of outcomes. Forty-six individuals (81%) participated. Participants received standardized feedback, including the group median, interquartile range, and previous responses, and the assessment was repeated in two subsequent rounds. We defined consensus a priori if at least 60% of the members of at least three stakeholder groups, including consumers, recommended domain inclusion in the core set. Consensus was achieved for inclusion of symptoms, physician-assessed clinical signs, and a measurement for long-term control of flares in the core set of outcome domains for eczema trials. We recommend including these three core outcomes in future eczema trials in order to enhance clinical interpretability and to enable meta-analyses across different studies. For recordkeeping, consensus was reached to regularly monitor eczema symptoms in clinical practice. Future work is needed to select which existing or new scales should be used to measure the domains identified as relevant for the core set.

  3. Atypical headbanging presentation of idiopathic sleep related rhythmic movement disorder: three cases with video-polysomnographic documentation.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Shih-Bin; Schenck, Carlos H

    2012-08-15

    To describe three cases of sleep related, idiopathic rhythmic movement disorder (RMD) with atypical headbanging, consisting of head punching and head slapping. Three consecutive patients (2 males [11 and 13 years old) and one female [22 years old]) presented with atypical headbanging of 6 years, 7 years, and 17 years duration. In 2 cases, typical rhythmic headbanging (with use of the head) shifted after 3-4 years to atypical headbanging, with frontal head punching that was quasi-rhythmic. In one case, atypical headbanging (head-slapping) was the initial and only RMD. There was no injury from the headbanging. Prenatal, perinatal, developmental, behavioral-psychological, medical-neurological, and family histories were negative. Clinical evaluations and nocturnal video-polysomnography with seizure montage were performed on all patients. Atypical headbanging was documented in all 3 cases; episodes always emerged late in the sleep cycle: from N2 sleep in 11 episodes, from REM sleep in 4 episodes, and from N1 sleep in 1 episode. Epileptiform activity was not detected. Clonazepam therapy was substantially effective in 1 case but not effective in 2 cases. These 3 cases of idiopathic atypical headbanging expand the literature on this RMD variant, as to our knowledge only one previously documented case has been reported.

  4. Tight budgetary control: a study of clinical department managers' perceptions in Swedish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nylinder, Pia

    2009-04-01

    The composition of clinical department managers in Swedish hospitals is changing; more non-doctors and women are entering managerial positions. In parallel, most hospitals face increased pressure to contain costs. This article presents a study of managers' perceptions of tightness of budgetary control and how their views vary systematically with personal characteristics and organizational conditions. Data were collected through a postal survey in 2005 to 173 clinical department managers (response rate of 70%). Statistical analysis was performed by factor analysis and logistic regression. The data suggest that clinical department managers' perceptions of tight budgetary control were related to how long they had been in their current position, their profession (whether they were doctors or non-doctors) and their sex. Further, their perceptions could be explained by how close the managers' departments were to their budget targets. Perception of tight budgetary control by managers depends on both their personal characteristics and the financial situation of their departments. Differences between men and women, and doctors and non-doctors call for additional research about the possible impact of changes in the composition of clinical department managers on how budgetary responsibility is exercised.

  5. Performance assessment questionnaire regarding TB control for use in primary health care clinics in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena; Ruffino-Netto, Antônio

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to provide access to and disseminate a questionnaire used as an instrument to assess the organizational elements and the performance of primary health care clinics regarding TB control in Brazil, comparing selected organizational dimensions by health care clinic, by municipality and by actor (patients, health care workers and managers). The results show that municipalities where the coverage of supervised treatment was more extensive presented more favorable indicators regarding access to TB treatment. The organizational format of the health care clinics involved in TB treatment-family health programs and referral centers with specialized teams in TB Control Programs (TCPs)-was not a factor that expanded access to diagnosis. The TCPs involving a smaller number of patients presented better performance regarding health care professional-patient relationship. The majority of the patients faced economic and social difficulties, and most managers were unaware of the amount of resources allocated to TB control activities. The instrument proved to be viable and to have the potential to adequately assess the performance of health care clinics in the urban areas studied.

  6. Temperature-Controlled Delivery of Radiofrequency Energy in Fecal Incontinence: A Randomized Sham-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Arjan P; Lam, Tze J; Meurs-Szojda, Maria M; Felt-Bersma, Richelle J F

    2017-08-01

    Controlled delivery of radiofrequency energy has been suggested as treatment for fecal incontinence. The aim of this study was to determine whether the clinical response to the radiofrequency energy procedure is superior to sham in patients with fecal incontinence. This was a randomized sham-controlled clinical trial from 2008 to 2015. This study was conducted in an outpatient clinic. Forty patients with fecal incontinence in whom maximal conservative management had failed were randomly assigned to receiving either radiofrequency energy or sham procedure. Fecal incontinence was measured using the Vaizey incontinence score (range, 0-24). The impact of fecal incontinence on quality of life was measured by using the fecal incontinence quality-of-life score (range, 1-4). Measurements were performed at baseline and at 6 months. Anorectal function was evaluated using anal manometry and anorectal endosonography at baseline and at 3 months. At baseline, Vaizey incontinence score was 16.8 (SD 2.9). At t = 6 months, the radiofrequency energy group improved by 2.5 points on the Vaizey incontinence score compared with the sham group (13.2 (SD 3.1), 15.6 (SD 3.3), p = 0.02). The fecal incontinence quality-of-life score at t = 6 months was not statistically different. Anorectal function did not show any alteration. Patients with severe fecal incontinence were included in the study, thus making it difficult to generalize the results. Both radiofrequency energy and sham procedure improved the fecal incontinence score, the radiofrequency energy procedure more than sham. Although statistically significant, the clinical impact for most of the patients was negligible. Therefore, the radiofrequency energy procedure should not be recommended for patients with fecal incontinence until patient-related factors associated with treatment success are known. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A373.

  7. Assessment of Inhalation Technique in Clinical and Functional Control of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Maricoto, Tiago; Rodrigues, Luís Vaz; Teixeira, Gilberto; Valente, Carla; Andrade, Lília; Saraiva, Alcina

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma affect almost 300 million individuals. Inhaled therapy is often associated with technical errors reducing efficacy and compliance. To evaluate the inhalation technique and its relation with clinical and functional control in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Analytical cross-sectional study including patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease treated with any type of inhaler device. Demographic data and inquiry about previous teaching of inhalation technique were collected in all participants. Inhalation technique was evaluated in: Step 1 - device activation; Step 2 - previous expiration; Step 3 - inspiration; Step 4 - end inspiratory pause. Clinical control was assessed from the questionnaires Asthma Control Test, Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test, modified Medical Research Council and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Assessment Test. Spirometric evaluation was performed in all participants. From a total of 62 subjects, 74.19% made at least one error, mainly during step 2 (53.2%). Previous education on inhalation technique was associated with lower number of errors (p = 0.014). There was no association between number of errors and age (p = 0.321), years of diagnosis (p = 0.119) or spirometric evaluation (p > 0.05). In asthma an association was found between number of errors and Asthma Control Test (p = 0.032) and Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test (p = 0.008). Teaching inhalation technique has a positive impact on its future performance. Most patients make mistakes, affecting clinical control in asthma, although in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease no relation was found. This is an ongoing work that aims to reevaluate inhalation technique after patients' education and its further impact.

  8. [Quality control of capillary blood measurements in clinical services: follow up by the biologist].

    PubMed

    Desjobert, H; Durand, G; Chérubin, N; Le Moël, G

    2001-04-01

    In Bichat-Claude Bernard Hospital, the study of capillary glucose analyzers in the aim of uniformizing the selection of glucose meters, has shown the relevance of a standardized handling in order to obtain clinically interpretable results. It has been necessary to implement a quality follow up by the biologist. In the first stage, the biochemistry laboratory, with the clinical service supervisor and the supplier, has assured the training of the medical staff habilitated to use the meters and to carry out a quality control. In the second stage, the biologist implemented a monthly control on a total blood control sample, the stability of which has been checked after the necessary addition of glucose. Dosing of that sample, which is used as an external control, is carried out in parallel by the QID Precision glucose analyzer (Abbott) and by the portable Hemocue B Glucose (Vermed), which is selected as a comparison standard. This allows a monthly control of the accuracy of the meter. The condition of the equipment, as well as the weekly control follow up, validated by the nurse, is registered on a sheet prepared by the biologist. In partnership with Vermed, we have developed a processing software of the data stored in the Hemocue, allowing the automatic issue of a report summarizing the equipment condition and the data of weekly and monthly controls follow up. This report, signed by the biologist, is sent to every Service Manager and Supervising Nurse. On the basis of our one year experience, this practice has generated an efficient collaboration between the clinical services and the biochemistry laboratory, allowing to keep the quality of the capillary glucose measurements performed in inpatients.

  9. Cognitive control level of action for analyzing verbal reports in educative clinical simulation situations.

    PubMed

    Morineau, Thierry; Meineri, Sebastien; Chapelain, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    Several methods and theoretical frameworks have been proposed for efficient debriefing after clinical simulation sessions. In these studies, however, the cognitive processes underlying the debriefing stage are not directly addressed. Cognitive control constitutes a conceptual link between behavior and reflection on behavior to apprehend debriefing cognitively. Our goal was to analyze cognitive control from verbal reports using the Skill-Rule-Knowledge model. This model considers different cognitive control levels from skill-based to rule-based and knowledge-based control. An experiment was conducted with teams of nursing students who were confronted with emergency scenarios during high-fidelity simulation sessions. Participants' descriptions of their actions were asked in the course of the simulation scenarios or during the debriefing stage. 52 nursing students working in 26 pairs participated in this study. Participants were divided into two groups: an "in situ" group in which they had to describe their actions at different moments of a deteriorating patient scenario, and a "debriefing" group, in which, at the same moments, they had to describe their actions displayed on a video recording. In addition to a cognitive analysis, the teams' clinical performance was measured. The cognitive control level in the debriefing group was generally higher than in the in situ group. Good team performance was associated with a high level of cognitive control after a patient's significant state deterioration. These findings are in conformity with the "Skill-Rule-Knowledge" model. The debriefing stage allows a deeper reflection on action compared with the in situ condition. If an abnormal event occurs as an adverse event, then participants' mental processes tend to migrate towards knowledge-based control. This migration particularly concerns students with the best clinical performance. Thus, this cognitive framework can help to strengthen the analysis of verbal reports. Copyright

  10. Compliance with infection control practices in an university hospital dental clinic

    PubMed Central

    Mutters, Nico T.; Hägele, Ulrike; Hagenfeld, Daniel; Hellwig, Elmar; Frank, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Compliance with infection control practices is the key to quality care and excellence in dentistry. Infection control remains one of the most cost-beneficial interventions available. However, implementing control procedures requires full compliance of the whole dental team. The aim of our study was to measure the compliance in daily clinical practice. Methods: The compliance with infection control practices in dentistry by dental health care personnel (DHCP) in a German university dental clinic was observed during clinical work. In addition, a survey was conducted to assess the individual knowledge about infection control procedures. Contamination of the workplace during invasive dental procedures was tested, as well. Results: A total of 58 invasive dental treatments implying close contacts between HCWs and patients were scrutinized. All HCWs (100%) wore gloves during dental work, but in some cases (female dentists: 14.3%; dental assistants: 28.6%) gloves were neither changed nor hands were disinfected between different activities or patient contacts (female dentists: 68.6%; male dentists: 60.9%; dental assistants: 93%). Only 31.4% of female and 39.1% of male dentists carried out adequate hygienic hand disinfection after removing gloves. Male dentists wore significantly more often (100%) protective eyewear compared to 77.1% of female dentists (p<0.05). In addition, most of female dentists (62.9%) and dental assistants (80.7%) wore jewelry during dental procedures. Conclusion: Despite the knowledge of distinct hygiene procedures only a small percentage of dental staff performs hygiene practices according to recommended guidelines. Strict audit is clearly needed in the dental setting to ensure compliance with infection control guidelines to prevent transmission of pathogens. Our results provide insights for the development of a targeted education and training strategy to enhance compliance of dental staff especially of dental assistants with infection control

  11. The ethical use of placebo controls in clinical research: the Declaration of Helsinki.

    PubMed

    La Vaque, T J; Rossiter, T

    2001-03-01

    Medical ethicists have questioned the use of no-treatment (placebo and sham procedure) controlled studies of new therapies when safe and effective standard therapies are available for use as an active or "equivalence" control. Current ethical principles of conduct for biomedical research specifically prohibit designs that withhold or deny "the best proven diagnostic and therapeutic" treatment to any participant in a clinical study, including those individuals who consent to randomization into a control group. Studies of psychophysiological therapies are often criticized on the grounds they lack a placebo or sham treatment control group. This paper briefly reviews the history of the problem and discusses the ethical standards that govern human research as derived from the Nuremberg Code and the Declaration of Helsinki. An examination of the problem with regard to research involving EEG biofeedback therapy for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Traumatic Brain Injury, and depression serves to highlight the issues. It is concluded that the active treatment control (treatment equivalence) design is most appropriate for those clinical studies examining disorders for which there is a known, effective treatment. Sham- or placebo-controlled studies are ethically acceptable for those disorders for which no effective treatment is available.

  12. Randomized controlled clinical trial of Blood Glucose Awareness Training (BGAT III) in Switzerland and Germany.

    PubMed

    Schachinger, Hartmut; Hegar, Karin; Hermanns, Norbert; Straumann, Madeleine; Keller, Ulrich; Fehm-Wolfsdorf, Gabriele; Berger, Willi; Cox, Daniel

    2005-12-01

    Although both diabetes and the efficacy of medical management are international issues, psycho-educational interventions might be culturally bound. Blood Glucose Awareness Training (BGAT) is a psycho-educational program for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. It is focused on improving recognition and management of extreme blood glucose levels, and is the best documented American psycho-educational program for this purpose. A randomized controlled clinical trial of BGAT's long-term benefits in a non-American setting has been lacking. One hundred and eleven adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus from Switzerland and Germany participated. After a 6 months baseline assessment, subjects were randomly assigned to receive either 2 months of BGAT (n = 56) or a physician-guided self-help control intervention (n = 55). BGAT improved recognition of low (p = 0.008), high (p = .03), and overall blood glucose (p = 0.001), and reduced frequency of severe hypoglycemia (p = 0.04), without compromising metabolic control. BGAT reduced both the external locus of control (p < 0.02) and fear of hypoglycemia (p < 0.02). BGAT was efficacious in reducing adverse clinical events and achieving clinically desirable goals in a European, as well as American setting.

  13. Application of indices Cp and Cpk to improve quality control capability in clinical biochemistry laboratories.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming-Shu; Wu, Ming-Hsun; Lin, Chih-Ming

    2014-04-30

    The traditional criteria for acceptability of analytic quality may not be objective in clinical laboratories. To establish quality control procedures intended to enhance Westgard multi-rules for improving the quality of clinical biochemistry tests, we applied the Cp and Cpk quality-control indices to monitor tolerance fitting and systematic variation of clinical biochemistry test results. Daily quality-control data of a large Taiwanese hospital in 2009 were analyzed. The test items were selected based on an Olympus biochemistry machine and included serum albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, cholesterol, glucose and potassium levels. Cp and Cpk values were calculated for normal and abnormal levels, respectively. The tolerance range was estimated with data from 50 laboratories using the same instruments and reagents. The results showed a monthly trend of variation for the five items under investigation. The index values of glucose were lower than those of the other items, and their values were usually <2. In contrast to the Cp value for cholesterol, Cpk of cholesterol was lower than 2, indicating a systematic error that should be further investigated. This finding suggests a degree of variation or failure to meet specifications that should be corrected. The study indicated that Cp and Cpk could be applied not only for monitoring variations in quality control, but also for revealing inter-laboratory qualitycontrol capability differences.

  14. Mistletoe Preparation Iscador: Are there Methodological Concerns with Respect to Controlled Clinical Trials?*

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In Europe many cancer patients use complementary therapies, particularly mistletoe. Only a few controlled clinical trials have been performed with the mistletoe preparation Iscador as a complementary treatment for cancer, many of them with medium to low quality due to methodological shortcomings. Reasons for some quality concerns, particularly discontinuation of treatment and/or participation and premature termination are analyzed. Analysis is based on controlled clinical trials dealing with Iscador. Data stem from the archive of published and ongoing research of the «Verein für Krebsforschung» (Society for Cancer Research) in Arlesheim, Switzerland. Controlled clinical studies with cancer patients that were started after 01.01.1990 or were not completed by then have been evaluated. Fifty-six controlled studies are documented, 24 of them randomized and 32 non-randomized. Nine of the randomized studies were done by matched-pair design, the others by conventional parallel group design; six of the last were terminated prematurely primarily for slow recruitment due to patient preferences and compliance of physicians. Patient and physician preference seem to be important factors limiting recruitment for randomized trials and hence implementation. This adds to the overall unwillingness of participation by patients with serious diseases. A well-balanced mix of designs using different research methods and outcomes is suggested combined with analyses, in countries where mistletoe therapy in general or Iscador in particular is unknown or not available. PMID:18955241

  15. Mistletoe Preparation Iscador: Are there Methodological Concerns with Respect to Controlled Clinical Trials?

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Renatus

    2009-03-01

    In Europe many cancer patients use complementary therapies, particularly mistletoe. Only a few controlled clinical trials have been performed with the mistletoe preparation Iscador as a complementary treatment for cancer, many of them with medium to low quality due to methodological shortcomings. Reasons for some quality concerns, particularly discontinuation of treatment and/or participation and premature termination are analyzed. Analysis is based on controlled clinical trials dealing with Iscador. Data stem from the archive of published and ongoing research of the (Society for Cancer Research) in Arlesheim, Switzerland. Controlled clinical studies with cancer patients that were started after 01.01.1990 or were not completed by then have been evaluated. Fifty-six controlled studies are documented, 24 of them randomized and 32 non-randomized. Nine of the randomized studies were done by matched-pair design, the others by conventional parallel group design; six of the last were terminated prematurely primarily for slow recruitment due to patient preferences and compliance of physicians. Patient and physician preference seem to be important factors limiting recruitment for randomized trials and hence implementation. This adds to the overall unwillingness of participation by patients with serious diseases. A well-balanced mix of designs using different research methods and outcomes is suggested combined with analyses, in countries where mistletoe therapy in general or Iscador in particular is unknown or not available.

  16. Reintroduction of gluten following flour transamidation in adult celiac patients: a randomized, controlled clinical study.

    PubMed

    Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Salvati, Virginia M; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Stefanile, Rosita; Capobianco, Federica; Luongo, Diomira; Bergamo, Paolo; Maurano, Francesco; Giardullo, Nicola; Malamisura, Basilio; Rossi, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    A lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD) is mandatory for celiac disease (CD) but has poor compliance, justifying novel strategies. We found that wheat flour transamidation inhibited IFN-γ secretion by intestinal T cells from CD patients. Herein, the primary endpoint was to evaluate the ability of transamidated gluten to maintain GFD CD patients in clinical remission. Secondary endpoints were efficacy in prevention of the inflammatory response and safety at the kidney level, where reaction products are metabolized. In a randomized single blinded, controlled 90-day trial, 47 GFD CD patients received 3.7 g/day of gluten from nontransamidated (12) or transamidated (35) flour. On day 15, 75% and 37% of patients in the control and experimental groups, respectively, showed clinical relapse (P = 0.04) whereas intestinal permeability was mainly altered in the control group (50% versus 20%, P = 0.06). On day 90, 0 controls and 14 patients in the experimental group completed the challenge with no variation of antitransglutaminase IgA (P = 0.63), Marsh-Oberhuber grading (P = 0.08), or intestinal IFN-γ mRNA (P > 0.05). Creatinine clearance did not vary after 90 days of treatment (P = 0.46). In conclusion, transamidated gluten reduced the number of clinical relapses in challenged patients with no changes of baseline values for serological/mucosal CD markers and an unaltered kidney function.

  17. Reintroduction of Gluten Following Flour Transamidation in Adult Celiac Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Salvati, Virginia M.; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Stefanile, Rosita; Capobianco, Federica; Luongo, Diomira; Bergamo, Paolo; Maurano, Francesco; Giardullo, Nicola; Malamisura, Basilio; Rossi, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    A lifelong gluten-free diet (GFD) is mandatory for celiac disease (CD) but has poor compliance, justifying novel strategies. We found that wheat flour transamidation inhibited IFN-γ secretion by intestinal T cells from CD patients. Herein, the primary endpoint was to evaluate the ability of transamidated gluten to maintain GFD CD patients in clinical remission. Secondary endpoints were efficacy in prevention of the inflammatory response and safety at the kidney level, where reaction products are metabolized. In a randomized single blinded, controlled 90-day trial, 47 GFD CD patients received 3.7 g/day of gluten from nontransamidated (12) or transamidated (35) flour. On day 15, 75% and 37% of patients in the control and experimental groups, respectively, showed clinical relapse (P = 0.04) whereas intestinal permeability was mainly altered in the control group (50% versus 20%, P = 0.06). On day 90, 0 controls and 14 patients in the experimental group completed the challenge with no variation of antitransglutaminase IgA (P = 0.63), Marsh-Oberhuber grading (P = 0.08), or intestinal IFN-γ mRNA (P > 0.05). Creatinine clearance did not vary after 90 days of treatment (P = 0.46). In conclusion, transamidated gluten reduced the number of clinical relapses in challenged patients with no changes of baseline values for serological/mucosal CD markers and an unaltered kidney function. PMID:22899947

  18. Sleep misperception, EEG characteristics and autonomic nervous system activity in primary insomnia: a retrospective study on polysomnographic data.

    PubMed

    Maes, J; Verbraecken, J; Willemen, M; De Volder, I; van Gastel, A; Michiels, N; Verbeek, I; Vandekerckhove, M; Wuyts, J; Haex, B; Willemen, T; Exadaktylos, V; Bulckaert, A; Cluydts, R

    2014-03-01

    Misperception of Sleep Onset Latency, often found in Primary Insomnia, has been cited to be influenced by hyperarousal, reflected in EEG- and ECG-related indices. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the association between Central Nervous System (i.e. EEG) and Autonomic Nervous System activity in the Sleep Onset Period and the first NREM sleep cycle in Primary Insomnia (n=17) and healthy controls (n=11). Furthermore, the study examined the influence of elevated EEG and Autonomic Nervous System activity on Stage2 sleep-protective mechanisms (K-complexes and sleep spindles). Confirming previous findings, the Primary Insomnia-group overestimated Sleep Onset Latency and this overestimation was correlated with elevated EEG activity. A higher amount of beta EEG activity during the Sleep Onset Period was correlated with the appearance of K-complexes immediately followed by a sleep spindle in the Primary Insomnia-group. This can be interpreted as an extra attempt to protect sleep continuity or as a failure of the sleep-protective role of the K-complex by fast EEG frequencies following within one second. The strong association found between K-alpha (K-complex within one second followed by 8-12 Hz EEG activity) in Stage2 sleep and a lower parasympathetic Autonomic Nervous System dominance (less high frequency HR) in Slow-wave sleep, further assumes a state of hyperarousal continuing through sleep in Primary Insomnia.

  19. How to improve accrual to clinical trials of symptom control 1: recruitment strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Inadequate patient accrual remains the primary problem for clinical trials of integrative therapies for symptom control. Many difficulties can be predicted and avoided if a careful, evidence-based approach to trial design is taken: trialists should attempt to get as much data as possible on the study population by querying institutional databases, examining case notes, following in-patient rounds and conducting “dry runs” by asking doctors for referrals. Trials require aggressive recruitment strategies, including advertising, writing to patients at home, scanning clinic lists and identifying critical points during clinical care at which patients can be approached. The information given to patients during any initial contact should be as simple and general as possible: presenting too much information too soon can be overwhelming and off-putting. PMID:17309812

  20. [Actual aspects of state control of dietary, clinical and prophylactic nutrition in health care organizations].

    PubMed

    Sukhanov, B P; Kerimova, M G; Elizarova, E V

    2014-01-01

    A review is aimed to help professionals, who provide state sanitary control of dietary (clinical and prophylactic) nutrition in health care organizations. Taking into account the new modern legislative framework and the scientific and practical publications, the basic requirements for standardization, harmonization and individualization (personalization) of nutritional therapy and monitoring of their implementation in health care organizations by state sanitary authorities has been set out. The attention is focused on the optimization of clinical nutrition, as well as the methods of assessment of balance and nutritive value of the standard diets, their proper correction with dry protein composite blends and other specialized products of dietary clinical and prophylactic nutrition, including foods fortified with dietary and biologically active substances and food supplements (nutraceuticals). The paper describes ways to improve the organization of state sanitary and dietary nutritional care in health care organizations, outlines priority issues to be addressed to improve the nutritional care.

  1. Parenting clinically anxious versus healthy control children aged 4-12 years.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, C M; van Steensel, F J A; Bögels, S M

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated whether parenting behaviors differed between parents of 68 clinically anxious children and 106 healthy control children aged 4-12 years. The effects of parent gender, child gender and child age on parenting were explored. Mothers and fathers completed a questionnaire to assess parenting behaviors in for children hypothetically anxious situations. Results showed that parents of clinically anxious children reported more anxiety-enhancing parenting (reinforcement of dependency and punishment) as well as more positive parenting (positive reinforcement). For the clinical sample, fathers reported using more modeling/reassurance than mothers, and parents reported using more force with their 4-7-year-olds than with their 8-12-year-olds. No interaction effects were found for child gender with child anxiety status on parenting. Results indicate that for intervention, it is important to measure parenting behaviors, and to take into account father and mother differences and the age of the child.

  2. Crest Tartar Control benefits assessed by Quanticalc: clinical method and three-month results.

    PubMed

    Dijkman, A G; Arends, J; Ruben, J R; White, D J; Cox, E R; Bollmer, B W

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, a method is described for applying the Quanticalc (QC) dental scaler to the clinical assessment of tartar control dentifrice effects on supragingival calculus formation and therapist efforts required in subsequent calculus debridement. In a 3-month, randomized cross-over study, subjects using Crest Tartar Control were observed to form 25% less calculus than they formed in a similar period using Crest Regular non-tartar control dentifrice as placebo. QC measurements likewise revealed 25% savings in the developed force used to scale the anterior lingual surfaces, coupled with a 27% reduction in the number of strokes required to clean these surfaces free of supragingival calculus in subjects using tartar control dentifrice. The quantitative savings in professional effort amounted to 3 kg (developed forces saved) per subject using tartar control dentifrice. White subjects using placebo dentifrice for 3 months developed less calculus than shown at baseline (29% less calculus), this was not complemented by decreases in total force and strokes used in cleaning. This supports the hypothesis that the surface area coverage of calculus (e.g., the planimetric "area" of supragingival calculus on the tooth) does not contribute alone to the amount of effort as forces and strokes required in subsequent debridement. These results demonstrate that: 1) the QC dental scaler can be effectively used in the clinical assessment of scaling forces/efforts associated with supragingival calculus debridement; and 2) a tartar control dentifrice containing soluble pyrophosphate is clinically effective in reducing both the surface coverage of calculus and the therapist effort required in subsequent calculus debridement.

  3. Effective Information Extraction Framework for Heterogeneous Clinical Reports Using Online Machine Learning and Controlled Vocabularies

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shuai; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Hayek, Salim S; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2017-01-01

    Background Extracting structured data from narrated medical reports is challenged by the complexity of heterogeneous structures and vocabularies and often requires significant manual effort. Traditional machine-based approaches lack the capability to take user feedbacks for improving the extraction algorithm in real time. Objective Our goal was to provide a generic information extraction framework that can support diverse clinical reports and enables a dynamic interaction between a human and a machine that produces highly accurate results. Methods A clinical information extraction system IDEAL-X has been built on top of online machine learning. It processes one document at a time, and user interactions are recorded as feedbacks to update the learning model in real time. The updated model is used to predict values for extraction in subsequent documents. Once prediction accuracy reaches a user-acceptable threshold, the remaining documents may be batch processed. A customizable controlled vocabulary may be used to support extraction. Results Three datasets were used for experiments based on report styles: 100 cardiac catheterization procedure reports, 100 coronary angiographic reports, and 100 integrated reports—each combines history and physical report, discharge summary, outpatient clinic notes, outpatient clinic letter, and inpatient discharge medication report. Data extraction was performed by 3 methods: online machine learning, controlled vocabularies, and a combination of these. The system delivers results with F1 scores greater than 95%. Conclusions IDEAL-X adopts a unique online machine learning–based approach combined with controlled vocabularies to support data extraction for clinical reports. The system can quickly learn and improve, thus it is highly adaptable. PMID:28487265

  4. Effective Information Extraction Framework for Heterogeneous Clinical Reports Using Online Machine Learning and Controlled Vocabularies.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuai; Lu, James J; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Hayek, Salim S; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Wang, Fusheng

    2017-05-09

    Extracting structured data from narrated medical reports is challenged by the complexity of heterogeneous structures and vocabularies and often requires significant manual effort. Traditional machine-based approaches lack the capability to take user feedbacks for improving the extraction algorithm in real time. Our goal was to provide a generic information extraction framework that can support diverse clinical reports and enables a dynamic interaction between a human and a machine that produces highly accurate results. A clinical information extraction system IDEAL-X has been built on top of online machine learning. It processes one document at a time, and user interactions are recorded as feedbacks to update the learning model in real time. The updated model is used to predict values for extraction in subsequent documents. Once prediction accuracy reaches a user-acceptable threshold, the remaining documents may be batch processed. A customizable controlled vocabulary may be used to support extraction. Three datasets were used for experiments based on report styles: 100 cardiac catheterization procedure reports, 100 coronary angiographic reports, and 100 integrated reports-each combines history and physical report, discharge summary, outpatient clinic notes, outpatient clinic letter, and inpatient discharge medication report. Data extraction was performed by 3 methods: online machine learning, controlled vocabularies, and a combination of these. The system delivers results with F1 scores greater than 95%. IDEAL-X adopts a unique online machine learning-based approach combined with controlled vocabularies to support data extraction for clinical reports. The system can quickly learn and improve, thus it is highly adaptable.

  5. Advocating for both Environmental and Clinical Approaches to Control Human Strongyloidiasis.

    PubMed

    Beknazarova, Meruyert; Whiley, Harriet; Ross, Kirstin

    2016-09-30

    Strongyloidiasis is an underestimated disease caused by the soil-transmitted parasite of the genus Strongyloides. It is prevalent in socioeconomically disadvantaged communities and it is estimated that global infection could be as high as 370 million people. This paper explores current methods of strongyloidiasis treatment, which rely on administration of anthelminthic drugs. However these drugs cannot prevent reinfection and drug resistance has already been observed in veterinary models. This highlights the need for a combined approach for controlling Strongyloides that includes both clinical treatment and environmental control methods. Currently, nematicides are widely used to control plant parasites. The review suggests that due to the species' similarity and similar modes of action, these nematicides could also be used to control animal and human parasitic nematodes in the environment.

  6. Advocating for both Environmental and Clinical Approaches to Control Human Strongyloidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Beknazarova, Meruyert; Whiley, Harriet; Ross, Kirstin

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is an underestimated disease caused by the soil-transmitted parasite of the genus Strongyloides. It is prevalent in socioeconomically disadvantaged communities and it is estimated that global infection could be as high as 370 million people. This paper explores current methods of strongyloidiasis treatment, which rely on administration of anthelminthic drugs. However these drugs cannot prevent reinfection and drug resistance has already been observed in veterinary models. This highlights the need for a combined approach for controlling Strongyloides that includes both clinical treatment and environmental control methods. Currently, nematicides are widely used to control plant parasites. The review suggests that due to the species’ similarity and similar modes of action, these nematicides could also be used to control animal and human parasitic nematodes in the environment. PMID:27706031

  7. Clinical outcomes after posterolateral lumbar fusion in workers' compensation patients: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Leah Y; Glassman, Steven D; Kantamneni, Neha R; Mugavin, Mark O; Djurasovic, Mladen

    2010-09-01

    Case-control propensity matched. To compare clinical outcomes after lumbar fusion in patients receiving workers' compensation with a case-matched control group who are not on workers' compensation. Previous studies have demonstrated poor outcomes in patients receiving workers' compensation after lumbar fusion. However, a case-control study where patients are matched for covariates known to affect outcomes after lumbar fusion, including baseline clinical outcome measures, has not been done. From 783 patients who underwent posterolateral fusion with complete preoperative and 2-year postoperative outcome measures, 60 patients who were receiving workers' compensation were identified. Outcome measures included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), and back and leg pain numerical rating scales. Propensity scoring technique was used to match these patients with a control group not receiving workers' compensation using sex, age, smoking status, body mass index, diagnosis, number of levels fused, preoperative ODI, SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS), SF-36 Mental Component Summary, and back and leg pain scores, producing 58 matched pairs. There were no significant differences between the demographics, job classification, and preoperative outcome scores in the two groups. At 2 years after operation, patients not receiving workers' compensation had a significantly greater improvement in ODI (P=0.009) and SF-36 PCS (P=0.007) compared with those receiving workers' compensation. Although patients not receiving workers' compensation had greater improvements in back and leg pain compared with those receiving workers' compensation, this did not reach statistical significance (P=0.079). The mean 2-year ODI, SF-36 PCS, and back pain raw scores of patients receiving workers' compensation were significantly lower than those not receiving workers' compensation. Only 19% of workers' compensation patients achieved minimum clinically important difference in terms

  8. The Relations Between Temperament, Character, and Executive Functions in Children With ADHD and Clinical Controls.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, Renate; Zulauf Logoz, Marina; Walitza, Susanne; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph

    2015-04-28

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the overlap between executive functions and temperament as measured by two questionnaires and to examine characteristic profiles in children with ADHD and clinical controls. Parents of 111 clinically referred children, half of whom were diagnosed with ADHD and half with other or no diagnoses, completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) and the Cloninger Junior Temperament and Character Inventory (JTCI). Factor analysis of both instruments resulted in three common factors representing aspects of (1) cognitive regulation, (2) behavioral regulation, and (3) anxious/rigid tendencies. Factor (4) represented strengths and positive resources and loaded on JTCI scales only. Both instruments discriminated significantly between ADHD and non-ADHD children. Conduct disorder/oppositional defiant disorder (CD/ODD) but not ADHD accounted for problems in BRIEF Emotional Control and Self-Monitor and JTCI low Cooperativeness. The two instruments only partially overlap and may complement each other. © 2015 SAGE Publications.

  9. The relationship between clinical outcomes and medication adherence in difficult-to-control asthma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Anna C; Proeschal, Amandine; Brightling, Christopher E; Wardlaw, Andrew J; Pavord, Ian; Bradding, Peter; Green, Ruth H

    2012-08-01

    Medication non-adherence and the clinical implications in difficult-to-control asthma were audited. Prescription issue data from 115 patients identified sub-optimal adherence (<80%) in 65% of patients on inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) or combined ICS/long-acting β2 agonist (LABA). In those using separate ICS and LABA, adherence to LABA (50%) was significantly better than to ICS (14.3%). Patients with sub-optimal ICS adherence had reduced FEV(1) and higher sputum eosinophil counts. Adherence ratio was an independent predictor of previous ventilation for acute severe asthma (p=0.008). The majority of patients with difficult-to-control asthma are non-adherent with their asthma medication. Non-adherence is correlated with poor clinical outcomes.

  10. Do Contemporary Randomized Controlled Trials Meet ESMO Thresholds for Meaningful Clinical Benefit?

    PubMed

    Del Paggio, J C; Azariah, B; Sullivan, R; Hopman, W M; James, F V; Roshni, S; Tannock, I F; Booth, C M

    2017-01-01

    The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) recently released a magnitude of clinical benefit scale (ESMO-MCBS) for systemic therapies for solid cancers. Here, we evaluate contemporary randomized controlled trials (RCTs) against the proposed ESMO thresholds for meaningful clinical benefit. RCTs evaluating systemic therapy for breast cancer, nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and pancreatic cancer published 2011-2015 were reviewed. Data were abstracted regarding trial characteristics and outcomes, and these were applied to the ESMO-MCBS. We also determined whether RCTs were designed to detect an effect that would meet clinical benefit as defined by the ESMO-MCBS. About 277 eligible RCTs were included (40% breast, 31% NSCLC, 22% CRC, 6% pancreas). Median sample size was 532 and 83% were funded by industry. Among all 277 RCTs, the experimental therapy was statistically superior to the control arm in 138 (50%) trials: results of only 31% (43/138) of these trials met the ESMO-MCBS clinical benefit threshold. RCTs with curative intent were more likely to meet clinically meaningful thresholds than those with palliative intent [61% (19/31) versus 22% (24/107), P < 0.001]. Among the 226 RCTs for which the ESMO-MCBS could be applied, 31% (70/226) were designed to detect an effect size that could meet ESMO-MCBS thresholds. Less than one-third of contemporary RCTs with statistically significant results meet ESMO thresholds for meaningful clinical benefit, and this represents only 15% of all published trials. Investigators, funding agencies, regulatory agencies, and industry should adopt more stringent thresholds for meaningful benefit in the design of future RCTs.

  11. Clinical evaluation of Nigella sativa seeds for the treatment of hyperlipidemia: a randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Dianatkhah, Mehrnoush; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Asgary, Sedigheh; Ghannadi, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    Natural products are proved to play a good role as an alternative to synthetic chemicals in many clinical conditions. Hypercholesterolemia is the most important risk factor for atherosclerosis. Previous studies showed that Nigella sativa L. has both antioxidant and lipid lowering potentials. To evaluate the efficacy of the seeds of Nigella sativa on the treatment of hyperlipidemia. In this randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial which was conducted in Isfahan city (Iran), 88 subjects aged > or =18 years with a total cholesterol concentration >200 mg/dl were included. According to the patients" profiles number, they were randomized to receive either N. sativa capsules or the matching placebo. Each N sativa capsule contained 500 +/- 10 mg N. sativa crushed seeds, and patients had to take 2 g N. sativa per day for 4 weeks. Fasting baseline laboratory values (fasting blood sugar, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein and triglyceride) were obtained for all parameters on each subject prior to the start of the study and at the end of 4 weeks. In our study a significant decrease was observed in the concentration of total cholesterol (4.78%), Low density lipoprotein (7.6%) and Triglyceride (16.65%), and this decrease was more significant for TG concentration. N. sativa had not any beneficial effects on Fasting blood sugar and High density lipoprotein. According to the results of our present study it seems that N. sativa may have some beneficial therapeutic effects in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. However, further investigations with a larger sample size are necessary.

  12. Hypertension control and its correlates among adults attending a hypertension clinic in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Maginga, John; Guerrero, Mariana; Koh, Eileen; Hansen, Christian Holm; Shedafa, Rehema; Kalokola, Fredrick; Smart, Luke R.; Peck, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension control rates are low in sub-Saharan Africa. Population-specific determinants of blood pressure (BP) control have not been adequately described. We measured BP and conducted interviews to determine factors associated with BP control among adults attending a hypertension clinic in Tanzania. Three hundred adults were enrolled. BP was controlled in 47.7% at the study visit but only 28.3% over 3 consecutive visits. Demographic and socioeconomic factors were not associated with control. Obesity and higher medication cost were associated with decreased control. Their effect was mediated through adherence. Good knowledge of (OR=2.5, 95%CI=1.0–6.1, p=0.047), attitudes towards (OR=2.7, 95%CI=1.0–7.1, p=0.04) and practices concerning (OR=5.4, 95%CI=2.3–13.0, p<0.001) hypertension were independently associated with increased control, even after adjusting for mediation through adherence. Good adherence had the strongest association with control (OR=14.6,95% CI=5.8–37.0, p<0.001). Strategies to reduce hypertension-related morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa should target these factors. Interventional studies of such strategies are needed. PMID:26279168

  13. Polysomnographic findings after adenotonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnoea in obese and non-obese children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, C-H; Hsu, W-C; Chang, W-H; Lin, M-T; Kang, K-T

    2016-10-01

    Use of polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard of diagnosis and measurement of treatment effectiveness for paediatric obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Although adenotonsillectomy (T&A) is effective in diminishing the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), a meta-analysis of postoperative changes for all other PSG parameters and outcome comparisons between obese and non-obese children following T&A have never been conducted. To comprehensively review polysomnographic findings after surgery for obese and non-obese children with OSA. Study protocol was registered on PROSPERO (CRD42013004737). Two authors independently searched databases including PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Review from January 1997 to July 2014. The keywords used included the following: sleep apnea, OSA, sleep apnea syndromes, tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy, infant, child, adolescent, and Humans. A comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis for literature for OSA children treated by T&A with polysomnography data. Random-effects model was applied to determine postoperative sleep parameter changes and the surgical success rate between obese and non-obese groups. The quality of studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. In total, 51 studies with 3413 subjects were enrolled. After surgery, sleep architecture was altered by a significant decrease in sleep stage 1, and an increase in slow-wave sleep and the rapid eye movement stage, and enhanced sleep efficiency. The mean difference between pre- and postoperative was a significant reduction of 12.4 event/h in AHI, along with a reduction of obstructive index, hypopnoea index, central index and arousal index. Mean and minimum oxygen saturation increased significantly after surgery. The overall success rate was 51% for postoperative AHI <1 (obese versus non-obese versus combined, 34% versus 49% versus 56%), and 81% for AHI <5 (obese versus non-obese versus combined, 61% versus 87% versus 84%). Meta-regression analyses demonstrate that

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea related to rapid-eye-movement or non-rapid-eye-movement sleep: comparison of demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic features

    PubMed Central

    Sunnetcioglu, Aysel; Sertogullarından, Bunyamin; Ozbay, Bulent; Gunbatar, Hulya; Ekin, Selami

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To determine whether there are significant differences between rapid-eye-movement (REM)-related obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and non-REM (NREM)-related OSA, in terms of the demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic characteristics of the subjects. Methods : This was a retrospective study of 110 patients (75 males) with either REM-related OSA (n = 58) or NREM-related OSA (n = 52). To define REM-related and NREM-related OSA, we used a previously established criterion, based on the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI): AHI-REM/AHI-NREM ratio > 2 and ≤ 2, respectively. Results : The mean age of the patients with REM-related OSA was 49.5 ± 11.9 years, whereas that of the patients with NREM-related OSA was 49.2 ± 12.6 years. The overall mean AHI (all sleep stages combined) was significantly higher in the NREM-related OSA group than in the REM-related OSA group (38.6 ± 28.2 vs. 14.8 ± 9.2; p < 0.05). The mean AHI in the supine position (s-AHI) was also significantly higher in the NREM-related OSA group than in the REM-related OSA group (49.0 ± 34.3 vs. 18.8 ± 14.9; p < 0.0001). In the NREM-related OSA group, the s-AHI was higher among the men. In both groups, oxygen desaturation was more severe among the women. We found that REM-related OSA was more common among the patients with mild-to-moderate OSA, whereas NREM-related OSA was more common among those with severe OSA. Conclusions : We found that the severity of NREM-related OSA was associated mainly with s-AHI. Our findings suggest that the s-AHI has a more significant effect on the severity of OSA than does the AHI-REM. When interpreting OSA severity and choosing among treatment modalities, physicians should take into consideration the sleep stage and the sleep posture. PMID:26982041

  15. Patient-derived determinants for participation in placebo-controlled clinical trials for fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Holman, Andrew J; Neradilek, Moni Blazej; Dryland, David D; Neiman, Richard A; Brown, Paul B; Ettlinger, Robert E

    2010-12-01

    Perspectives of patients with fibromyalgia influence their likelihood of participating in randomized placebo-controlled trials and potentially clash with current, well-established methodology of randomized controlled trial design. Mandates to use only acetaminophen for breakthrough pain and that require discontinuation of concomitant medications, especially in studies lacking an active comparator arm, could bias a trial cohort to thereby reduce the generalizability of study findings and conclusions. This study evaluates factors affecting willingness to participate in such clinical trials, including the impact of altruism, payment, study duration, forced discontinuation of specific medications, and subject demographics for patients seen by rheumatologists proficient and avidly interested in treating fibromyalgia.

  16. Computed tomography radiation dose optimization: scanning protocols and clinical applications of automatic exposure control.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Mannudeep K; Naz, Nausheen; Rizzo, Stefania M R; Blake, Michael A

    2005-01-01

    As multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) technology evolves, manifold applications of CT scanning have been adopted in clinical practice and optimization of scanning protocols to comply with an "as low as reasonably achievable" radiation dose have become more complex. Automatic exposure control techniques, which have been recently introduced on most state-of-the-art CT equipment, aid in radiation dose optimization at a selected image quality. The present article reviews the fundamentals of automatic exposure control techniques in CT, along with the scanning protocols and associated radiation dose reduction.

  17. Heart rate control with adrenergic blockade: Clinical outcomes in cardiovascular medicine

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, David; Elton, Terry S; Menachemi, Doron M; Wexler, Randy K

    2010-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is involved in regulating various cardiovascular parameters including heart rate (HR) and HR variability. Aberrant sympathetic nervous system expression may result in elevated HR or decreased HR variability, and both are independent risk factors for development of cardiovascular disease, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. Epidemiologic studies have established that impaired HR control is linked to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. One successful way of decreasing HR and cardiovascular mortality has been by utilizing β-blockers, because their ability to alter cell signaling at the receptor level has been shown to mitigate the pathogenic effects of sympathetic nervous system hyperactivation. Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated that β-blocker-mediated HR control improvements are associated with decreased mortality in postinfarct and heart failure patients. Although improved HR control benefits have yet to be established in hypertension, both traditional and vasodilating β-blockers exert positive HR control effects in this patient population. However, differences exist between traditional and vasodilating β-blockers; the latter reduce peripheral vascular resistance and exert neutral or positive effects on important metabolic parameters. Clinical evidence suggests that attainment of HR control is an important treatment objective for patients with cardiovascular conditions, and vasodilating β-blocker efficacy may aid in accomplishing improved outcomes. PMID:20539841

  18. Randomized controlled clinical trial of long-term chemo-mechanical caries removal using Papacarie™ gel.

    PubMed

    Motta, Lara Jansiski; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Campanelli, Ana Paula; Silva, André Luis da; Alfaya, Thays Almeida; Godoy, Camila Haddad Leal de; Navarro, Maria Fidela de Lima

    2014-01-01

    Compare the effectiveness of Papacarie™ gel for the chemo-mechanical removal of carious lesions on primary teeth to conventional caries removal with a low-speed bur with regard to execution time, clinical aspects and radiographic findings. A randomized controlled clinical trial with a split-mouth design was carried out. The sample was composed of 20 children aged four to seven years, in whom 40 deciduous teeth were randomly divided into two groups: chemo-mechanical caries removal with Papacarie™ and removal of carious dentin with a low-speed bur. Each child underwent both procedures and served as his/her own control. Restorations were performed with glass ionomer cement. The time required to perform the procedure was also analyzed. The patients underwent longitudinal clinical and radiographic follow-up of the restorations. No statistically significant difference between groups was found regarding the time required to perform the procedures and the radiographic follow up. Statistically significant differences between groups were found in the clinical evaluation at 6 and 18 months after treatment. Papacarie™ is as effective as the traditional method for the removal of carious dentin on deciduous teeth, but offers the advantages of the preservation of sound dental tissue as well as the avoidance of sharp rotary instruments and local anesthesia.

  19. Clinical manifestations of Kawasaki disease shock syndrome: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Shin; Chi, Hsin; Huang, Fu-Yuan; Peng, Chun-Chih; Chen, Ming-Ren; Chiu, Nan-Chang

    2015-02-01

    Kawasaki disease shock syndrome (KDSS) is a severe condition related to Kawasaki disease (KD), and sometimes it is difficult to diagnose. This is a case-control study to ascertain the clinical presentations, risk factors, and clinical outcomes of children who had KDSS. Children who were hospitalized during 2001-2011 with the diagnosis of KD combined with hypotension, sepsis, or shock were retrospectively reviewed and were defined as case patients. For each case patient, three season-matched patients diagnosed as having KD with normal blood pressure were identified to serve as control patients. Demographic characteristics, clinical presentations, laboratory features, therapies, and outcomes were analyzed. Nine KDSS patients and 27 control patients were identified. The average age of patients with KDSS was 3.2 ± 3.2 years. Compared with controls, KDSS patients were less likely to have a diagnosis of KD at admission (22.2% vs. 66.7%) and had a higher risk of coronary artery dilatation (77.8% vs. 11.1%). Risk factors for KDSS included higher neutrophil counts and proportions of bands, higher C-reactive protein (CRP), and lower platelet counts. All case patients received aspirin therapy; eight patients received intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, with two receiving more than one course. Seven KDSS patients required fluid resuscitation, and eight patients required vasoactive infusions. Patients with KDSS may have uneven clinical course and may be misdiagnosed in the beginning. They may have more prominent inflammatory markers in the early phase and higher risk of coronary artery dilatation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Correlation between clinical assessment and force plate measurement of postural control after stroke.

    PubMed

    Frykberg, Gunilla Elmgren; Lindmark, Birgitta; Lanshammar, Håkan; Borg, Jörgen

    2007-07-01

    To explore the correlation between clinical assessment and force plate measurement of postural control after stroke when selected balance tasks are performed under similar spatial and temporal conditions, and to examine the inter-rater agreement of assessment of weight distribution during quiet stance in subjects with stroke. A descriptive and correlational study. Clinical assessment of postural control using Berg Balance Scale, video recording for rating of weight distribution, and force plate measurement with the Vifor-system, were performed in 20 subjects with stroke. Mean velocity of displacement of the centre of pressure in the anterior-posterior direction correlated moderately with scores from the Berg Balance Scale items "maintaining a position" in the whole sample (rs = -0.50, p < 0.05). Moderate correlation was found between ratings of each of 3 physiotherapists and centre of pressure's mean position in the frontal plane on the force plate, while the inter-rater agreement was poor. Clinical assessment of postural control and weight distribution showed moderate correlation with force plate measurement when the assessments were performed under similar conditions. The data suggest that the reliability of observational postural analysis needs to be improved.

  1. Text Message Reminders Increase Appointment Adherence in a Pediatric Clinic: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Nila; Boneh, Jordana; Li, Hong; Lazebnik, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Background. High no-show rates can burden clinic productivity and affect patient care. Although multiple studies have shown that text messages improve appointment adherence, very little research has focused on low-income and predominantly African American populations in resident clinic settings. Objectives. To determine whether incorporating a text message reminder reduces the no-show rate at an urban, pediatric resident clinic. Methods. A randomized controlled trial was conducted at a tertiary level ambulatory pediatric practice between August 2014 and February 2015. Following a demographic survey, 170 patients were enrolled. Patients were randomized into control or intervention groups. All patients received the standard voice message appointment reminder, but the intervention group additionally received a text message reminder. The primary outcome was no-show rate. Results. 95.3% of the participants were African American, and the overall no-show rate was 30.8%. No-show rate was significantly lower in the intervention group (23.5%) than the control group (38.1%) representing a difference of 14.6% (p = 0.04). No demographic factors were found to alter the association between no-show rate and text message intervention. Conclusions. Text message reminders effectively improve show rates at a resident pediatric practice with high no-show rates, representing a promising approach to improving appointment adherence. PMID:28127311

  2. Clinical importance of achieving biochemical control with medical therapy in adult patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    In acromegaly, achieving biochemical control (growth hormone [GH] level <1.0 ng/mL and age- and sex-normalized levels of insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1]) through timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment provides an opportunity to improve patient outcomes. Diagnosis of acromegaly is challenging because it is rooted in observing subtle clinical manifestations, and it is typical for acromegaly to evolve for up to 10 years before it is recognized. This results in chronic exposure to elevated levels of GH and IGF-1 and delay in patients receiving appropriate treatment, which consequently increases mortality risk. In this review, the clinical impact of elevated GH and IGF-1 levels, the effectiveness of current therapies, and the potential role of novel treatments for acromegaly will be discussed. Clinical burden of acromegaly and benefits associated with management of GH and IGF-1 levels will be reviewed. Major treatment paradigms in acromegaly include surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. With medical therapies, such as somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists, and GH receptor antagonists, a substantial proportion of patients achieve reduced GH and normalized IGF-1 levels. In addition, signs and symptoms, quality of life, and comorbidities have also been reported to improve to varying degrees in patients who achieve biochemical control. Currently, there are several innovative therapies in development to improve patient outcomes, patient use, and access. Timely biochemical control of acromegaly ensures that the patient can ultimately improve morbidity and mortality from this disease and its extensive consequences. PMID:27471378

  3. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy and strict plaque control on preterm/low birth weight: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Patricia; Moreira, Carlos Heitor C; Fiorini, Tiago; Musskopf, Marta L; da Rocha, José M; Oppermann, Maria Lucia R; Aass, Anne M; Gjermo, Per; Susin, Cristiano; Rösing, Cassiano K; Oppermann, Rui V

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out to assess the effect of comprehensive nonsurgical periodontal treatment and strict plaque control performed during pregnancy on the reduction of preterm and/or low birth weight rates (PTLBW). Three hundred and three women were randomly allocated to receive periodontal treatment either during pregnancy (n = 147, test group) or after delivery (n = 156, control group). During pregnancy, the control group received only one session of supragingival scaling and oral hygiene instruction. In contrast, the test group received comprehensive periodontal treatment including multiple sessions of scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instructions, and frequent maintenance visits. At baseline, periodontal inflammation was observed in approximately 50% of sites and attachment loss affected <15% of sites. Compared to controls, women in the test group had significant reductions in the percentage of sites with plaque (48.5% vs. 10.3%, p < 0.001), gingival bleeding (23.3% vs. 2.5%, p < 0.001), calculus (21.3% vs. 4.1%, p < 0.001), bleeding on probing (38.1% vs. 2.6%, p < 0.001) and probing depth ≥3 mm (19.97% vs. −2.45%, p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed between the groups in the occurrence of PT (11.7% vs. 9.1%, p = 0.57), LBW (5.6 % vs. 4.1%, p = 0.59), and PTLBW (4.15% vs. 2.60%, p = 0.53). Comprehensive periodontal treatment and strict plaque control significantly improved periodontal health; however, no reduction of PTLBW rates was observed. Thus, remaining periodontal inflammation posttreatment cannot explain the lack of effect of periodontal treatment on PTLBW. Clinical relevance This study demonstrated that periodontal diseases may be successfully treated during pregnancy. Our results do not support a potential beneficial effect of periodontal treatment on PTLBW.

  4. Clinical assessment of reactive postural control among physiotherapists in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Sibley, K M; Inness, E L; Straus, S E; Salbach, N M; Jaglal, S B

    2013-09-01

    Reactive postural control, the ability to recover from an external perturbation to stability, ultimately determines whether an individual will fall following a loss of balance and should be routinely incorporated in balance assessment. The purpose of this study was to identify (1) methods used to assess reactive postural control in clinical practice and (2) factors associated with regular assessment of reactive postural control. A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Three hundred and fifty-seven physiotherapists in Ontario, Canada who treated adults with balance impairments answered questions about the components of balance they assess and how they assess reactive control in their practice. Of the 273 respondents who assessed reactive postural control at least some of the time, 15.4% used a standardized measure, 79.1% used a non-standardized approach, and 5.5% used both. Forty-five methods of assessing reactive control were reported. The most common methods used were non-standardized perturbations (43.5%; 104/239 respondents) and movement observation (18.8%; 45/239). The remaining 43 methods were each used by less than 8% of respondents. Practice area had the strongest association with regular assessment of reactive postural control (>60% of the time), and respondents working with neurological disorders were more likely to regularly evaluate reactive control than those working with people with orthopedic conditions. Despite the availability of valid standardized measures to evaluate reactive postural control, respondents relied primarily on non-standardized approaches and observational assessment. Future work should examine the factors influencing choice of reactive control assessment tools and awareness of standardized measures for reactive postural control.

  5. Improving completeness of electronic problem lists through clinical decision support: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Justine; Feblowitz, Joshua C; Maloney, Francine L; Wilcox, Allison R; McLoughlin, Karen Sax; Ramelson, Harley; Schneider, Louise; Bates, David W

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate clinical problem lists are critical for patient care, clinical decision support, population reporting, quality improvement, and research. However, problem lists are often incomplete or out of date. Objective To determine whether a clinical alerting system, which uses inference rules to notify providers of undocumented problems, improves problem list documentation. Study Design and Methods Inference rules for 17 conditions were constructed and an electronic health record-based intervention was evaluated to improve problem documentation. A cluster randomized trial was conducted of 11 participating clinics affiliated with a large academic medical center, totaling 28 primary care clinical areas, with 14 receiving the intervention and 14 as controls. The intervention was a clinical alert directed to the provider that suggested adding a problem to the electronic problem list based on inference rules. The primary outcome measure was acceptance of the alert. The number of study problems added in each arm as a pre-specified secondary outcome was also assessed. Data were collected during 6-month pre-intervention (11/2009–5/2010) and intervention (5/2010–11/2010) periods. Results 17 043 alerts were presented, of which 41.1% were accepted. In the intervention arm, providers documented significantly more study problems (adjusted OR=3.4, p<0.001), with an absolute difference of 6277 additional problems. In the intervention group, 70.4% of all study problems were added via the problem list alerts. Significant increases in problem notation were observed for 13 of 17 conditions. Conclusion Problem inference alerts significantly increase notation of important patient problems in primary care, which in turn has the potential to facilitate quality improvement. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01105923. PMID:22215056

  6. Effect of systemic antibiotics on clinical and patient-reported outcomes of implant therapy - a multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wah Ching; Ong, Marianne; Han, Jie; Mattheos, Nikos; Pjetursson, Bjarni E; Tsai, Alex Yi-Min; Sanz, Ignacio; Wong, May C M; Lang, Niklaus P

    2014-02-01

    To determine the effect of various systemic antibiotic prophylaxis regimes on patient-reported outcomes and postsurgical complications in patients undergoing conventional implant installation. Three hundred and twenty-nine healthy adults in need of conventional implant installation were randomly assigned to one of four groups: (i) preoperatively 2 g of amoxycillin 1 h before surgery (positive control, PC), (ii) postoperatively 2 g of amoxycillin immediately following surgery (test 1, T1), (iii) preoperatively 2 g of amoxycillin 1 h before and 500 mg thrice daily on days 2 and 3 after surgery (test 2, T2), (iv) preoperatively 2 g of placebo 1 h before surgery (negative control, NC). Subjects were examined clinically by blinded examiners over 8 weeks after implant installation. In addition, Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) for pain, swelling, bruising and bleeding were obtained over 14 days. ANOVA was performed for the VAS. Chi-square tests were applied for postsurgical complications. All VAS scores were low for all groups and decreased over time (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences for the VAS scores between the various groups at any time point (P > 0.05). There was only a significant difference in flap closure at week 4, where NC had 5% of the subjects not achieving complete wound closure compared to 0% for the three other groups (P = 0.01), with no other significant differences for any postsurgical complications (P > 0.05). For standard single implant placement, prophylactic systemic antibiotics either before or after, or before and after the surgical procedure do not improve patient-reported outcomes or prevalence of postsurgical complications. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Use of historical control data for assessing treatment effects in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Viele, Kert; Berry, Scott; Neuenschwander, Beat; Amzal, Billy; Chen, Fang; Enas, Nathan; Hobbs, Brian; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Kinnersley, Nelson; Lindborg, Stacy; Micallef, Sandrine; Roychoudhury, Satrajit; Thompson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials rarely, if ever, occur in a vacuum. Generally, large amounts of clinical data are available prior to the start of a study, particularly on the current study's control arm. There is obvious appeal in using (i.e., 'borrowing') this information. With historical data providing information on the control arm, more trial resources can be devoted to the novel treatment while retaining accurate estimates of the current control arm parameters. This can result in more accurate point estimates, increased power, and reduced type I error in clinical trials, provided the historical information is sufficiently similar to the current control data. If this assumption of similarity is not satisfied, however, one can acquire increased mean square error of point estimates due to bias and either reduced power or increased type I error depending on the direction of the bias. In this manuscript, we review several methods for historical borrowing, illustrating how key parameters in each method affect borrowing behavior, and then, we compare these methods on the basis of mean square error, power and type I error. We emphasize two main themes. First, we discuss the idea of 'dynamic' (versus 'static') borrowing. Second, we emphasize the decision process involved in determining whether or not to include historical borrowing in terms of the perceived likelihood that the current control arm is sufficiently similar to the historical data. Our goal is to provide a clear review of the key issues involved in historical borrowing and provide a comparison of several methods useful for practitioners. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Placebo Devices as Effective Control Methods in Acupuncture Clinical Trials: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Claire Shuiqing; Tan, Hsiewe Ying; Zhang, George Shengxi; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Xue, Charlie Changli; Xie, Yi Min

    2015-01-01

    While the use of acupuncture has been recognised by the World Health Organisation, its efficacy for many of the common clinical conditions is still undergoing validation through randomised controlled trials (RCTs). A credible placebo control for such RCTs to enable meaningful evaluation of its efficacy is to be established. While several non-penetrating acupuncture placebo devices, namely the Streitberger, the Park and the Takakura Devices, have been developed and used in RCTs, their suitability as inert placebo controls needs to be rigorously determined. This article systematically reviews these devices as placebo interventions. Electronic searches were conducted on four English and two Chinese databases from their inceptions to July 2014; hand searches of relevant references were also conducted. RCTs, in English or Chinese language, comparing acupuncture with one of the aforementioned devices as the control intervention on human participants with any clinical condition and evaluating clinically related outcomes were included. Thirty-six studies were included for qualitative analysis while 14 were in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis does not support the notion of either the Streitberger or the Park Device being inert control interventions while none of the studies involving the Takakura Device was included in the meta-analysis. Sixteen studies reported the occurrence of adverse events, with no significant difference between verum and placebo acupuncture. Author-reported blinding credibility showed that participant blinding was successful in most cases; however, when blinding index was calculated, only one study, which utilised the Park Device, seemed to have an ideal blinding scenario. Although the blinding index could not be calculated for the Takakura Device, it was the only device reported to enable practitioner blinding. There are limitations with each of the placebo devices and more rigorous studies are needed to further evaluate their effects and

  9. Use of historical control data for assessing treatment effects in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Viele, Kert; Berry, Scott; Neuenschwander, Beat; Amzal, Billy; Chen, Fang; Enas, Nathan; Hobbs, Brian; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Kinnersley, Nelson; Lindborg, Stacy; Micallef, Sandrine; Roychoudhury, Satrajit; Thompson, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials rarely, if ever, occur in a vacuum. Generally, large amounts of clinical data are available prior to the start of a study, particularly on the current study’s control arm. There is obvious appeal in using (i.e., ‘borrowing’) this information. With historical data providing information on the control arm, more trial resources can be devoted to the novel treatment while retaining accurate estimates of the current control arm parameters. This can result in more accurate point estimates, increased power, and reduced type I error in clinical trials, provided the historical information is sufficiently similar to the current control data. If this assumption of similarity is not satisfied, however, one can acquire increased mean square error of point estimates due to bias and either reduced power or increased type I error depending on the direction of the bias. In this manuscript, we review several methods for historical borrowing, illustrating how key parameters in each method affect borrowing behavior, and then, we compare these methods on the basis of mean square error, power and type I error. We emphasize two main themes. First, we discuss the idea of ‘dynamic’ (versus ‘static’) borrowing. Second, we emphasize the decision process involved in determining whether or not to include historical borrowing in terms of the perceived likelihood that the current control arm is sufficiently similar to the historical data. Our goal is to provide a clear review of the key issues involved in historical borrowing and provide a comparison of several methods useful for practitioners. PMID:23913901

  10. Ankylosing spondylitis confers substantially increased risk of clinical spine fractures: a nationwide case-control study.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Alhambra, D; Muñoz-Ortego, J; De Vries, F; Vosse, D; Arden, N K; Bowness, P; Cooper, C; Diez-Perez, A; Vestergaard, P

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) leads to osteopenia/osteoporosis and spine rigidity. We conducted a case-control study and found that AS-affected patients have a 5-fold and 50% increased risk of clinical spine and all clinical fractures, respectively. Excess risk of both is highest in the first years and warrants an early bone health assessment after diagnosis. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is related to spine rigidity and reduced bone mass, but data on its impact on fracture risk are scarce. We aimed to study the association between AS and clinical fractures using a case-control design. From the Danish Health Registries, we identified all subjects who sustained a fracture in the year 2000 (cases) and matched up to three controls by year of birth, gender and region. Clinically diagnosed AS was identified using International Classification of Diseases, 8th revision (ICD-8; 71249), and International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10; M45) codes. We also studied the impact of AS duration. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for non-traumatic fractures (any site, clinical spine and non-vertebral) according to AS status and time since AS diagnosis. Multivariate models were adjusted for fracture history, socio-economic status, previous medical consultations, alcoholism and use of oral glucocorticoids. We identified 139/124,655 (0.11%) AS fracture cases, compared to 271/373,962 (0.07%) AS controls. Unadjusted (age- and gender-matched) odds ratio (OR) were 1.54 [95% confidence interval (95%CI) 1.26-1.89] for any fracture, 5.42 [2.50-11.70] for spine and 1.39 [1.12-1.73] for non-vertebral fracture. The risk peaked in the first 2.5 years following AS diagnosis: OR 2.69 [1.84-3.92] for any fracture. Patients with AS have a 5-fold higher risk of clinical spine fracture and a 35% increased risk of non-vertebral fracture. This excess risk peaks early, in the first 2.5 years of AS disease. Patients should be assessed

  11. Removal of extrinsic stain using a tartar control whitening dentifrice: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, R W; White, D J

    2001-01-01

    A nine-week, double blind clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel tartar control whitening dentifrice with a silica-based abrasive system on induced dental stain. The study model involved three weeks of stain induction followed by six weeks of unsupervised brushing to assess efficacy. To induce stain, 222 healthy adult volunteers received a dental prophylaxis, and then began a limited brushing regimen supplemented by three-times daily rinsing with tea and once daily rinsing with 15 ml of 0.12% chlorhexidine. This regimen was suspended, and 187 subjects with tooth stain were entered into a six-week clinical trial where they were randomized to either a silica-based tartar control whitening dentifrice or a marketed regular dentifrice control, balancing for stain levels and smoking status. At baseline, three and six weeks, stain area and stain intensity were measured on the 8 anterior teeth using the Lobene Index. After six weeks' use, composite Lobene means were 35% lower for the whitening dentifrice compared to the regular control. In addition to the overall reductions, there were statistically significant reductions in stain area (p < 0.015) and stain intensity (p < 0.01) at both three and six weeks. The tartar control whitening dentifrice was effective in removing stain on the gingival margins and elsewhere on the body of the tooth. Safety profiles for the two test dentifrices were generally similar. After three and six weeks' use, the tartar control whitening dentifrice reduced chlorhexidine and tea stain compared to the marketed control.

  12. Clinical characteristics of impaired trunk control in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Heyrman, Lieve; Desloovere, Kaat; Molenaers, Guy; Verheyden, Geert; Klingels, Katrijn; Monbaliu, Elegast; Feys, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify clinical characteristics of impaired trunk control in hundred children with spastic CP (mean age 11.4 ± 2.1 years, range 8-15 years). Assessment of trunk control was performed with the Trunk Control Measurement Scale (TCMS). Trunk control was clearly impaired, indicated by a median total TCMS score of 38.5 out of 58 (66%). Median subscale scores were 18 out of 20 (90%) for the subscale static sitting balance, 16 out of 28 (57%) for the subscale selective movement control and 6 out of 10 (60%) for the subscale dynamic reaching. Total TCMS and subscale scores differed significantly between topographies and severity of motor impairment according to the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). Children with hemiplegia obtained the highest scores, followed by children with diplegia and children with quadriplegia obtained the lowest scores. TCMS scores significantly decreased with increasing GMFCS level. In conclusion, trunk control is impaired in children with CP to a various extent, depending on the topography and severity of the motor impairment. The findings of this study also provide specific clues for treatment interventions targeting trunk control to improve their functional abilities.

  13. A controlled clinical trial of a clinically-tuned powered ankle prosthesis in people with transtibial amputation.

    PubMed

    Gardinier, Emily S; Kelly, Brian M; Wensman, Jeffrey; Gates, Deanna H

    2017-07-01

    To determine whether there are changes in level walking performance for people using a powered ankle prosthesis that was tuned by an independent, manufacturer-certified prosthetist in accordance with device recommendations. Intervention study with cross-over design. Laboratory. Convenience sample of 10 individuals with unilateral, transtibial amputation, and 10 age- and gender-matched control participants. Powered ankle prosthesis (BiOM T2 Ankle System). Main outcome metrics: Metabolic costs of walking, preferred walking speed. There were no significant differences in oxygen consumption (2.9% difference; P = 0.606, d = 0.26), cost of transport (~1% difference; P = 0.652, d = 0.23), or preferred walking speed (~1% difference; P = 0.147, d = 0.76) when using the powered ankle compared to unpowered prostheses. Secondary analyses of user characteristics revealed that participants who were classified as having the highest function (K4 on Medicare's 5-point scale from K0 to K4) were significantly more likely to exhibit energy cost savings than those classified as having lower function (K3; P = 0.014, d = 2.36). Participants did not demonstrate significant improvements in energetics or preferred speed when wearing a clinically tuned powered ankle prosthesis compared to their non-powered prostheses. Prescribers of powered devices should understand that not all users will show an immediate reduction in energy expenditure.

  14. Statistical process control for referrals by general practitioner at Health Insurance Organization clinics in Alexandria.

    PubMed

    Abdel Wahab, Moataza M; Nofal, Laila M; Guirguis, Wafaa W; Mahdy, Nehad H

    2004-01-01

    Quality control is the application of statistical techniques to a process in an effort to identify and minimize both random and non-random sources of variation. The present study aimed at the application of Statistical Process Control (SPC) to analyze the referrals by General Practitioners (GP) at Health Insurance Organization (HIO) clinics in Alexandria. Retrospective analysis of records and cross sectional interview to 180 GPs were done. Using the control charts (p chart), the present study confirmed the presence of substantial variation in referral rates from GPs to specialists; more than 60% of variation was of the special cause, which revealed that the process of referral in Alexandria (HIO) was completely out of statistical control. Control charts for referrals by GPs classified by different GP characteristics or organizational factors revealed much variation, which suggested that the variation was at the level of individual GPs. Furthermore, the p chart for each GP separately; which yielded a fewer number of points out of control (outliers), with an average of 4 points. For 26 GPs, there was no points out of control, those GPs were slightly older than those having points out of control. Otherwise, there was no significant difference between them. The revised p chart for those 26 GPs together yielded a centerline of 9.7%, upper control limit of 12.0% and lower control limit of 7.4%. Those limits were in good agreement with the limits specified by HIO; they can be suggested to be the new specification limits after some training programs.

  15. Clinical and physiological correlates of caffeine and caffeine metabolites in primary insomnia.

    PubMed

    Youngberg, Mark R; Karpov, Irina O; Begley, Amy; Pollock, Bruce G; Buysse, Daniel J

    2011-04-15

    To explore the relationship between plasma concentrations of caffeine and subjective and polysomnographic measures of sleep in both good sleeper controls (GSC) and individuals with primary insomnia (PI), following the consumption of low-moderate quantities of caffeine in the home environment. 65 PI and 29 GSC, each consuming < 4 four coffee cup equivalents of caffeine daily, were recruited. Subjects completed a diary detailing sleep habits and caffeine consumption, one night of polysomnography, and a blood sample for measurement of plasma caffeine and its metabolites at bedtime. Plasma concentrations of caffeine, its primary metabolite, paraxanthine, and other metabolites were determined for each subject and correlated with self-report and polysomnographic measures. No statistically significant differences were found between GSC and PI with respect to number of caffeinated beverages consumed (p = 0.91), estimated absolute caffeine ingestion (p = 0.48), time of caffeine consumption (p = 0.22), or plasma concentrations of caffeine (p = 0.92) or paraxanthine (p = 0.88). Significant correlations were found between plasma concentrations of caffeine/paraxanthine and endorsed caffeine intake (r = 0.58, p < 0.05) and estimated absolute caffeine ingestion (r = 0.57, p < 0.05). Plasma caffeine/paraxanthine was significantly correlated with percent stage 1 sleep (r = 0.32, p < 0.05). However, plasma concentrations of caffeine/paraxanthine were not significantly correlated with other subjective or polysomnographic measures of sleep disturbance in either GSC or PI. These data suggest that low-moderate amounts of caffeine consumed in the home environment, and mostly during morning hours, have little effect on subjective or polysomnographic measures of sleep in GSC or PI.

  16. Acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials and prospective clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Dae; Heo, In; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Crawford, Cindy; Kang, Hyung-Won; Lim, Jung-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the current evidence for effectiveness of acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the form of a systematic review, a systematic literature search was conducted in 23 electronic databases. Grey literature was also searched. The key search terms were "acupuncture" and "PTSD." No language restrictions were imposed. We included all randomized or prospective clinical trials that evaluated acupuncture and its variants against a waitlist, sham acupuncture, conventional therapy control for PTSD, or without control. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 2 uncontrolled clinical trials (UCTs) out of 136 articles in total were systematically reviewed. One high-quality RCT reported that acupuncture was superior to waitlist control and therapeutic effects of acupuncture and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) were similar based on the effect sizes. One RCT showed no statistical difference between acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). One RCT reported a favorable effect of acupoint stimulation plus CBT against CBT alone. A meta-analysis of acupuncture plus moxibustion versus SSRI favored acupuncture plus moxibustion in three outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the evidence of effectiveness of acupuncture for PTSD is encouraging but not cogent. Further qualified trials are needed to confirm whether acupuncture is effective for PTSD.

  17. Group sequential control of overall toxicity incidents in clinical trials - non-Bayesian and Bayesian approaches.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jihnhee; Hutson, Alan D; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Kedron, Mary A

    2016-02-01

    In some small clinical trials, toxicity is not a primary endpoint; however, it often has dire effects on patients' quality of life and is even life-threatening. For such clinical trials, rigorous control of the overall incidence of adverse events is desirable, while simultaneously collecting safety information. In this article, we propose group sequential toxicity monitoring strategies to control overall toxicity incidents below a certain level as opposed to performing hypothesis testing, which can be incorporated into an existing study design based on the primary endpoint. We consider two sequential methods: a non-Bayesian approach in which stopping rules are obtained based on the 'future' probability of an excessive toxicity rate; and a Bayesian adaptation modifying the proposed non-Bayesian approach, which can use the information obtained at interim analyses. Through an extensive Monte Carlo study, we show that the Bayesian approach often provides better control of the overall toxicity rate than the non-Bayesian approach. We also investigate adequate toxicity estimation after the studies. We demonstrate the applicability of our proposed methods in controlling the symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage rate for treating acute ischemic stroke patients. © The Author(s) 2012.

  18. Klapp method effect on idiopathic scoliosis in adolescents: blind randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Diego De Sousa; De Assis, Sanderson José Costa; Baroni, Marina Pegoraro; Lopes, Johnnatas Mikael; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Cacho, Roberta De Oliveira; Pereira, Silvana Alves

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To estimate the effect of Klapp method on idiopathic scoliosis in school students. [Subjects and Methods] A single-blind randomized clinical trial with 22 students randomly divided into intervention group (n=12) and inactive control group (n=10). Exercise protocol consisted of Klapp method, 20 sessions, three times a week for intervention group, and inactivity for control group. Dorsal muscle strength was measured by dynamometer; body asymmetries and gibbosity angles were measured by biophotogrammetry. Data were obtained by Generalized Estimated Equation, with 5% significance level. Clinical impact for dependent variables was estimated by "d" Cohen. [Results] There was no change in intragroup analysis and intergroup for all postural symmetry variables. However, it was detected intergroup difference in extensor muscle strength and intergroup difference with marginal significance of gibbosity angles. Regarding extensor muscle strength, intervention group produced average improvement of 7.0 kgf compared to control group. Gibbosity angles progressed less in intervention group, with 5.71° average delay compared to control group. [Conclusion] Klapp method was effective for gibbosity stabilization and it improves spine extensor muscle strength.

  19. Klapp method effect on idiopathic scoliosis in adolescents: blind randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Diego De Sousa; De Assis, Sanderson José Costa; Baroni, Marina Pegoraro; Lopes, Johnnatas Mikael; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Cacho, Roberta De Oliveira; Pereira, Silvana Alves

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To estimate the effect of Klapp method on idiopathic scoliosis in school students. [Subjects and Methods] A single-blind randomized clinical trial with 22 students randomly divided into intervention group (n=12) and inactive control group (n=10). Exercise protocol consisted of Klapp method, 20 sessions, three times a week for intervention group, and inactivity for control group. Dorsal muscle strength was measured by dynamometer; body asymmetries and gibbosity angles were measured by biophotogrammetry. Data were obtained by Generalized Estimated Equation, with 5% significance level. Clinical impact for dependent variables was estimated by “d” Cohen. [Results] There was no change in intragroup analysis and intergroup for all postural symmetry variables. However, it was detected intergroup difference in extensor muscle strength and intergroup difference with marginal significance of gibbosity angles. Regarding extensor muscle strength, intervention group produced average improvement of 7.0 kgf compared to control group. Gibbosity angles progressed less in intervention group, with 5.71° average delay compared to control group. [Conclusion] Klapp method was effective for gibbosity stabilization and it improves spine extensor muscle strength. PMID:28210027

  20. Informed Conditioning on Clinical Covariates Increases Power in Case-Control Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zaitlen, Noah; Lindström, Sara; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Cornelis, Marilyn; Genovese, Giulio; Pollack, Samuela; Barton, Anne; Bickeböller, Heike; Bowden, Donald W.; Eyre, Steve; Freedman, Barry I.; Friedman, David J.; Field, John K.; Groop, Leif; Haugen, Aage; Heinrich, Joachim; Henderson, Brian E.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Langefeld, Carl D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Meister, Michael; Morgan, Ann W.; Raji, Olaide Y.; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Scherf, David; Steer, Sophia; Walshaw, Martin; Waters, Kevin M.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Wordsworth, Paul; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Tchetgen, Eric Tchetgen; Haiman, Christopher; Hunter, David J.; Plenge, Robert M.; Worthington, Jane; Christiani, David C.; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Altshuler, David; Voight, Benjamin; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic case-control association studies often include data on clinical covariates, such as body mass index (BMI), smoking status, or age, that may modify the underlying genetic risk of case or control samples. For example, in type 2 diabetes, odds ratios for established variants estimated from low–BMI cases are larger than those estimated from high–BMI cases. An unanswered question is how to use this information to maximize statistical power in case-control studies that ascertain individuals on the basis of phenotype (case-control ascertainment) or phenotype and clinical covariates (case-control-covariate ascertainment). While current approaches improve power in studies with random ascertainment, they often lose power under case-control ascertainment and fail to capture available power increases under case-control-covariate ascertainment. We show that an informed conditioning approach, based on the liability threshold model with parameters informed by external epidemiological information, fully accounts for disease prevalence and non-random ascertainment of phenotype as well as covariates and provides a substantial increase in power while maintaining a properly controlled false-positive rate. Our method outperforms standard case-control association tests with or without covariates, tests of gene x covariate interaction, and previously proposed tests for dealing with covariates in ascertained data, with especially large improvements in the case of case-control-covariate ascertainment. We investigate empirical case-control studies of type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and end-stage kidney disease over a total of 89,726 samples. In these datasets, informed conditioning outperforms logistic regression for 115 of the 157 known associated variants investigated (P-value = 1×10−9). The improvement varied across diseases with a 16% median increase in χ2 test statistics and a

  1. Suspected collagen disorders in the bleeding disorder clinic: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S C; Odiaman, L; Card, R T; van der Bom, J G; Poon, M-C

    2013-03-01

    Disorders of collagen are associated with a mild bleeding tendency because of the potential abnormal interaction of collagen, von Willebrand factor (VWF) and platelets required during primary haemostasis and due to generalized soft tissue fragility. Abnormal collagen may contribute to bleeding in existing mucocutaneous bleeding disorders, but the prevalence in this setting is unknown. Generalized symptomatic joint hypermobility (SJH) is common in collagen disorders and may be objectively measured. To assess the association between symptomatic joint hypermobility and mucocutaneous bleeding disorders, we performed a case-control study in which case subjects were 55 consecutive individuals who had visited our bleeding disorder clinic with a diagnosis of von Willebrand disease, low von Willebrand factor levels, mild platelet function disorder or undefined bleeding disorder. Controls were 50 subjects without a bleeding disorder, and were age and gender matched to the cases. All subjects were assessed with: (i) Beighton score for joint hypermobility, (ii) revised Brighton criteria, (iii) Condensed MCMDM1-VWD bleeding questionnaire, and (iv) haemostasis laboratory studies. The prevalence of SJH/suspected collagen disorder in the bleeding disorder clinic was 24% (13/55) compared with 2% (1/50) in the control population (OR 15, 95% CI 2-121). Seventy-seven per cent of bleeding disorder clinic SJH subjects (10/13) had a prior personal or family history of Ehlers-Danlos, Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome or Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). Symptomatic joint hypermobility was associated with increased odds of an underlying mucocutaneous bleeding disorder. These findings suggest that a collagen disorder is common and often unrecognized in the bleeding disorder clinic as a potential contributor to the bleeding symptoms.

  2. Clinical nurse specialists lead teams to impact glycemic control after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Klinkner, Gwen; Murray, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this evidence-based practice improvement project was to improve patients' blood glucose control after cardiac surgery, specifically aiming to keep blood glucose levels less than 200 mg/dL. Glycemic control is essential for wound healing and infection prevention. Multiple factors including the use of corticosteroids and the stress of critical illness put cardiac surgery patients at greater risk for elevated blood glucose levels postoperatively. A Surgical Care Improvement Project measure related to infection prevention calls for the morning blood glucose level (closest to 6:00 AM) to be less than 200 mg/dL on postoperative days 0 to 2. Patients on our cardiothoracic surgery unit were experiencing blood glucose levels greater than benchmark goals. A practice improvement effort was designed to decrease the number of blood glucose results greater than 200 mg/dL after cardiac surgery. The clinical nurse specialists for diabetes and cardiac surgery worked with nursing staff and the interdisciplinary team to implement a 4-pronged approach to improve efficiency in care processes: (1) increase frequency of glucose monitoring, (2) improve accessibility of insulin orders, (3) develop delegation protocol to facilitate nurse-initiated insulin infusion, and (4) implement revised insulin infusion protocol. Hyperglycemia was identified more quickly, and a nurse-initiated protocol prompted more timely use of revised insulin infusion orders and involvement of the diabetes specialty team. Clinically significant improvement in postoperative glycemic control was achieved. Empowering nurses to initiate hyperglycemia treatment and consultation by diabetes specialists may greatly improve efficiency in care processes and clinical outcomes for cardiac surgery patients. Clinical nurse specialists are well positioned to plan and implement interventions that facilitate an evidence-based approach to glycemic management after cardiac surgery.

  3. Clinical effect of a gel containing Lippia sidoides on plaque and gingivitis control

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sérgio Luis da Silva; Praxedes, Yuri Carvalho Machado; Bastos, Thiago Catunda; Alencar, Phillipe Nogueira Barbosa; da Costa, Flávio Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This parallel controlled clinical trial evaluated the effect of a gel containing Lippia sidoides essential oil on plaque and gingivitis control. Methods: Thirty patients (n=30) were randomly selected and allocated into three groups: Lippia sidoides (LS, n=10), chlorhexidine (CLX, n=10) or placebo (control, n=10). Plaque and bleeding index were recorded at baseline and after three months. All volunteers were instructed to brush with the gel three times a day throughout the experiment period. Results: There was a significant reduction on plaque and gingivitis in the test groups (P<.05), but no statistically significant difference was observed between them (P>.05). Conclusion: A gel preparation containing 10% Lippia sidoides essential oil was an efficient herbal antiplaque and antigingivitis agent. PMID:23408652

  4. Perceptions of the importance and control of professional problems in the clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Maupomé, G; Borges-Yáñez, S A; Dáez-de-Bonilla, F J; Pineda-Cruz, A

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the relative importance of culturally relevant professional problems and the degree of control over them, as perceived by dentists and dental students in Mexico City, Mexico. The dentists and students ranked 13 problems according to importance and then according to the perceived degree of control over each one. Novice clinicians were less secure about their ability to cope with the legal, financial, and clinical performance problems, whereas experienced clinicians were more concerned about occupational hazards and the dental market and culture. Both reported similar perceptions of their control of the problems. This preliminary information should support introducing into dental schools relevant practice-management courses, targeting continuing education efforts, and instituting professional counseling measures to meet the challenges posed by these problems.

  5. [Post-marketing reevaluation for potential quality risk and quality control in clinical application of traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-jiao; He, Li-yun; Liu, Bao-yan

    2015-06-01

    The effective quality control in clinical practices is an effective guarantee for the authenticity and scientificity of the findings. The post-marketing reevaluation for traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) focuses on the efficacy, adverse reaction, combined medication and effective dose of drugs in the market by expanded clinical trials, and requires a larger sample size and a wider range of patients. Therefore, this increases the difficulty of quality control in clinical practices. With the experience in quality control in clinical practices for the post-marketing reevaluation for Kangbingdu oral for cold, researchers in this study reviewed the study purpose, project, scheme design and clinical practice process from an overall point of view, analyzed the study characteristics of the post-marketing reevaluation for TCMs and the quality control risks, designed the quality control contents with quality impacting factors, defined key review contents and summarized the precautions in clinical practices, with the aim to improve the efficiency of quality control of clinical practices. This study can provide reference to clinical units and quality control-related personnel in the post-marketing reevaluation for TCMs.

  6. Clinical Effects of a Pharmacist Intervention in Acute Wards - A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Trine R H; Honoré, Per H; Rasmussen, Mette; Andersen, Stig E

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the clinical effect of a clinical pharmacist (CP) intervention upon admission to hospital on inpatient harm and to assess a potential educational bias. Over 16 months, 593 adult patients taking ≥4 medications daily were included from three Danish acute medicine wards. Patients were randomized to either the CP intervention or the usual care (prospective control). To assess a potential educational bias, a retrospective control group was formed by randomization. The CP intervention comprised medication history, medication reconciliation, medication review and entry of proposed prescriptions into the electronic prescribing system. The primary outcome of inpatient harm was identified using triggers from the Institute of Healthcare Improvement Global Trigger Tool. Harms were validated and rated for severity by two independent and blinded outcome panels. Secondary end-points were harms per patient, length of hospital stay, readmissions and 1-year mortality. Harm affected 11% of the patients in the intervention group compared to 17% in the combined control group, odds ratio (OR) 0.57 (CI 0.32-1.02, p = 0.06). The incidence of harm was similar in the intervention and prospective control groups, OR 0.80 (CI 0.40-1.59, p = 0.52) but occurred less frequently in the intervention than in the retrospective control group OR 0.46 (CI 0.25-0.85, p = 0.01). An educational bias from the intervention to the control group might have contributed to this negative outcome. In conclusion, the CP intervention at admission to hospital had no statistically significant effect on inpatient harm. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  7. A controlled study of depression among attendees of an oncology clinic in West Africa.

    PubMed

    Olagunju, Andrew T; Aina, Olatunji F

    2011-01-01

    Depression is commonly encountered among cancer patients and has been linked with grave consequences if not promptly treated. This study was set to determine the prevalence of depression in cancer patients. The samples were recruited using systematic random sampling and made up of 200 cancer patients and 200 age and sex matched controls that consented and met the inclusion criteria. The instruments used included: Socio-demographic and clinical profile questionnaire, Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale Revised (CES-DR), and the Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN). The instruments were administered by the researchers on the subjects and controls, and data obtained were analyzed using SPSS-15. A larger proportion of cancer patients compared to controls had depressive symptomatology (CES-DR score of 16 and above) made up of 98 (49.0%) cancer patients compared to 40 (20.0%) controls, and the difference was statistically significant, p = < 0.001. Seventy-four (18.5%) subjects from the two groups had depressive disorder using SCAN. The prevalence of depression in cancer subjects was 27.5% with 9.5% in controls and the difference was statistically significant with p = < 0.001. A substantial proportion of cancer patients with depression, 36 (65.5%, n = 55), had moderate depression, 15 (27.3%, n = 55) were mildly depressed, and 7.2% (n = 55) had severe depression. A significant proportion of cancer patients had depression compared with the controls with acute medical conditions. Prompt identification and treatment of cancer, mental disorders like depression should be integrated into cancer care in this part of the world.

  8. Randomized, blinded, controlled clinical trial shows no benefit of homeopathic mastitis treatment in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Fanny; Staufenbiel, Rudolf; Simons, Julia; Pieper, Laura

    2017-03-22

    Mastitis is one of the most common diseases in dairy production, and homeopathic remedies have been used increasingly in recent years to treat it. Clinical trials evaluating homeopathy have often been criticized for their inadequate scientific approach. The objective of this triple-blind, randomized controlled trial was to assess the efficacy of homeopathic treatment in bovine clinical mastitis. The study was conducted on a conventionally managed dairy farm between June 2013 and May 2014. Dairy cows with acute mastitis were randomly allocated to homeopathy (n = 70) or placebo (n = 92), for a total of 162 animals. The homeopathic treatment was selected based on clinical symptoms but most commonly consisted of a combination of nosodes with Streptococcinum, Staphylococcinum, Pyrogenium, and Escherichia coli at a potency of 200c. Treatment was administered to cows in the homeopathy group at least once per day for an average of 5 d. The cows in the placebo group were treated similarly, using a placebo preparation instead (lactose globules without active ingredients). If necessary, we also used allopathic drugs (e.g., antibiotics, udder creams, and anti-inflammatory drugs) in both groups. We recorded data relating to the clinical signs of mastitis, treatment, time to recovery, milk yield, somatic cell count at first milk recording after mastitis, and culling. We observed cows for up to 200 d after clinical recovery. Base-level data did not differ between the homeopathy and placebo groups. Mastitis lasted for an average of 6 d in both groups. We observed no significant differences in time to recovery, somatic cell count, risk of clinical cure within 14 d after disease occurrence, mastitis recurrence risk, or culling risk. The results indicated no additional effect of homeopathic treatment compared with placebo. The advantages or disadvantages of homeopathy should be carefully assessed for individual farms.

  9. Laboratory and clinical stain removal evaluations of two tartar control dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Yankell, S L; Emling, R C; Prencipe, M; Rustogi, K; Volpe, A R

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate Colgate original Tartar Control dentifrice (TC) and new Colgate Micro Cleansing Tartar Control (MCTC) dentifrice in a laboratory and clinical study for their ability to remove induced stain. In the laboratory study, polished and etched bovine enamel specimens were stained for 4 days with a coffee, tea, and mucin, Sarcina lutea tartox culture in trypticase soy broth. Sixteen specimens were then brushed for 200 strokes with a sodium carboxymethyl cellulose solution to remove loose stain, and then brushed for 300 strokes with a 1:1 toothpaste slurry. Tooth color was measured by reflectance with the CLE L*a*b* scale. The calculated stain removal, 37% for MCTC and 24% for TC, was significantly different (p<0.01) favoring the MCTC dentifrice. In the clinical study, eight-six subjects were given Peridex (0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate) mouthrinse, a low abrasive dentifrice and a soft toothbrush to use twice a day for 8 weeks. Stain was monitored on the buccal and lingual surfaces of the anterior teeth using the Lobene index. The seventy-seven subjects with sufficient total stain were stratified into two balanced groups, given a new soft toothbrush and were randomly assigned to use one of the dentifrices tested, twice a day for 8 weeks. At 4, 6 and 8 weeks in the study, the MCTC dentifrice product had consistent, significantly (p<0.05-0.001) lower total stain scores than the TC dentifrice. In the laboratory and clinical studies conducted, even though stain induction and evaluation procedures differed, the new Colgate Micro Cleansing Tartar Control dentifrice was significantly more effective at removing stain than the Colgate original Tartar Control dentifrice formula.

  10. Clinical and neurobiological effects of aerobic exercise in dental phobia: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lindenberger, Brigitt L; Plag, Jens; Schumacher, Sarah; Gaudlitz, Katharina; Bischoff, Sophie; Bobbert, Thomas; Dimeo, Fernando; Petzold, Moritz B; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Dudás, Zsuzsa; Ströhle, Andreas

    2017-05-26

    Physical activity has shown to be effective in anxiety disorders. For specific phobia, no studies are available that systematically examined the effects of an aerobic exercise intervention on phobic fear within a randomized-controlled design. Therefore, we investigated the acute effect of a standardized aerobic training on clinical symptoms of dental phobia as well as on stress-related neurobiological markers. Within a crossover design, 30 patients with dental phobia (mean age: 34.1 years; mean score of the Dental Anxiety Scale: 18.8) underwent two minor dental interventions separated by 7 days. Dental treatment was performed after 30 min of physical activity at either 20% VO2 max (control) or 70% VO2 max (intervention), respectively. To control for habituation, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two conditions prior to the first intervention. Moreover, saliva samples were collected at five times in order to determine changes in salivary cortisol (sC) and alpha-amylase (sAA) due to treatment. In comparison to baseline, aerobic exercise within 70% VO2 max significantly reduced clinical anxiety and sC concentrations before, during, and after the dental treatment. In contrast, the control condition led to decreased sAA levels at different time points of measurement. Habituation occurred at the second study day, independent of the order. Our study provides evidence for an effect of moderate-intense exercise on clinical symptoms and sC in patients with dental phobia. Therefore, acute aerobic exercise might be a simple and low-cost intervention to reduce disorder-specific phobic fear. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The challenges of control groups, placebos and blinding in clinical trials of dietary interventions.

    PubMed

    Staudacher, Heidi M; Irving, Peter M; Lomer, Miranda C E; Whelan, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    High-quality placebo-controlled evidence for food, nutrient or dietary advice interventions is vital for verifying the role of diet in optimising health or for the management of disease. This could be argued to be especially important where the benefits of dietary intervention are coupled with potential risks such as compromising nutrient intake, particularly in the case of exclusion diets. The objective of the present paper is to explore the challenges associated with clinical trials in dietary research, review the types of controls used and present the advantages and disadvantages of each, including issues regarding placebos and blinding. Placebo-controlled trials in nutrient interventions are relatively straightforward, as in general placebos can be easily produced. However, the challenges associated with conducting placebo-controlled food interventions and dietary advice interventions are protean, and this has led to a paucity of placebo-controlled food and dietary advice trials compared with drug trials. This review appraises the types of controls used in dietary intervention trials and provides recommendations and nine essential criteria for the design and development of sham diets for use in studies evaluating the effect of dietary advice, along with practical guidance regarding their evaluation. The rationale for these criteria predominantly relate to avoiding altering the outcome of interest in those delivered the sham intervention in these types of studies, while not compromising blinding.

  12. Lavender essential oil in the treatment of migraine headache: a placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Sasannejad, Payam; Saeedi, Morteza; Shoeibi, Ali; Gorji, Ali; Abbasi, Maryam; Foroughipour, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Lavender essential oil has been used as an anxiolytic drug, a mood stabilizer, a sedative, spasmolytic, antihypertensive, antimicrobial, analgesic agent as well as a wound healing accelerator. We have studied for the first time the efficacy of lavender essential oil inhalation for the treatment of migraine in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Forty-seven patients with definite diagnosis of migraine headache were divided into cases and controls. Cases inhaled lavender essential oil for 15 min, whereas the control group used liquid paraffin for the same time period. Patients were asked to record their headache severity and associated symptoms in 30-min intervals for a total of 2 h. We matched the two groups for key confounding factors. The mean reduction of headache severity in cases was 3.6 ± 2.8 based on Visual Analogue Scale score. The reduction was 1.6 ± 1.6 in controls. This difference between the controls and cases was statistically significant with p < 0.0001. From 129 headache attacks in cases, 92 responded entirely or partially to lavender. In the control group, 32 out of 68 recorded headache attacks responded to placebo. The percentage of responders was significantly higher in the lavender group than the placebo group (p = 0.001). The present study suggests that inhalation of lavender essential oil may be an effective and safe treatment modality in acute management of migraine headaches. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Quality Controls in Cellular Immunotherapies: Rapid Assessment of Clinical Grade Dendritic Cells by Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Zhao, Yingdong; Tumaini, Barbara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Ping, Jin; Wang, Ena; Wood, Lauren V; Marincola, Francesco M; Puri, Raj K; Stroncek, David F

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based immunotherapies are among the most promising approaches for developing effective and targeted immune response. However, their clinical usefulness and the evaluation of their efficacy rely heavily on complex quality control assessment. Therefore, rapid systematic methods are urgently needed for the in-depth characterization of relevant factors affecting newly developed cell product consistency and the identification of reliable markers for quality control. Using dendritic cells (DCs) as a model, we present a strategy to comprehensively characterize manufactured cellular products in order to define factors affecting their variability, quality and function. After generating clinical grade human monocyte-derived mature DCs (mDCs), we tested by gene expression profiling the degrees of product consistency related to the manufacturing process and variability due to intra- and interdonor factors, and how each factor affects single gene variation. Then, by calculating for each gene an index of variation we selected candidate markers for identity testing, and defined a set of genes that may be useful comparability and potency markers. Subsequently, we confirmed the observed gene index of variation in a larger clinical data set. In conclusion, using high-throughput technology we developed a method for the characterization of cellular therapies and the discovery of novel candidate quality assurance markers. PMID:23147403

  14. Best supportive care in clinical trials: review of the inconsistency in control arm design.

    PubMed

    Nipp, R D; Currow, D C; Cherny, N I; Strasser, F; Abernethy, A P; Zafar, S Y

    2015-06-30

    Best supportive care (BSC) as a control arm in clinical trials is poorly defined. We conducted a review to evaluate clinical trials' concordance with published, consensus-based framework for BSC delivery in trials. A consensus-based Delphi panel previously identified four key domains of BSC delivery in trials: multidisciplinary care; supportive care documentation; symptom assessment; and symptom management. We reviewed trials including BSC control arms from 2002 to 2014 to assess concordance to BSC standards and to selected items from the CONSORT 2010 guidelines. Of 408 articles retrieved, we retained 18 after applying exclusion criteria. Overall, trials conformed to the CONSORT guidelines better than the BSC standards (28% vs 16%). One-third of articles offered a detailed description of BSC, 61% reported regular symptom assessment, and 44% reported using validated symptom assessment measures. One-third reported symptom assessment at identical intervals in both arms. None documented evidence-based symptom management. No studies reported educating patients about symptom management or goals of therapy. No studies reported offering access to palliative care specialists. Reporting of BSC in trials is incomplete, resulting in uncertain internal and external validity. Such studies risk systematically over-estimating the net clinical effect of the comparator arms.

  15. Best supportive care in clinical trials: review of the inconsistency in control arm design

    PubMed Central

    Nipp, R D; Currow, D C; Cherny, N I; Strasser, F; Abernethy, A P; Zafar, S Y

    2015-01-01

    Background: Best supportive care (BSC) as a control arm in clinical trials is poorly defined. We conducted a review to evaluate clinical trials' concordance with published, consensus-based framework for BSC delivery in trials. Methods: A consensus-based Delphi panel previously identified four key domains of BSC delivery in trials: multidisciplinary care; supportive care documentation; symptom assessment; and symptom management. We reviewed trials including BSC control arms from 2002 to 2014 to assess concordance to BSC standards and to selected items from the CONSORT 2010 guidelines. Results: Of 408 articles retrieved, we retained 18 after applying exclusion criteria. Overall, trials conformed to the CONSORT guidelines better than the BSC standards (28% vs 16%). One-third of articles offered a detailed description of BSC, 61% reported regular symptom assessment, and 44% reported using validated symptom assessment measures. One-third reported symptom assessment at identical intervals in both arms. None documented evidence-based symptom management. No studies reported educating patients about symptom management or goals of therapy. No studies reported offering access to palliative care specialists. Conclusions: Reporting of BSC in trials is incomplete, resulting in uncertain internal and external validity. Such studies risk systematically over-estimating the net clinical effect of the comparator arms. PMID:26068397

  16. Migraine, arousal and sleep deprivation: comment on: “sleep quality, arousal and pain thresholds in migraineurs: a blinded controlled polysomnographic study”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the hypothesis proposed by Engstrom and coworkers that Migraineurs have a relative sleep deprivation, which lowers the pain threshold and predispose to attacks. Previous data indicate that Migraineurs have a reduction of Cyclic Alternating Pattern (CAP), an essential mechanism of NREM sleep regulation which allows to dump the effect of incoming disruptive stimuli, and to protect sleep. The modifications of CAP observed in Migraineurs are similar to those observed in patients with impaired arousal (narcolepsy) and after sleep deprivation. The impairment of this mechanism makes Migraineurs more vulnerable to stimuli triggering attacks during sleep, and represents part of a more general vulnerability to incoming stimuli. PMID:23758606

  17. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter, 28-day, polysomnographic study of gabapentin in transient insomnia induced by sleep phase advance.

    PubMed

    Furey, Sandy A; Hull, Steven G; Leibowitz, Mark T; Jayawardena, Shyamalie; Roth, Thomas

    2014-10-15

    To evaluate multiple doses of gabapentin 250 mg on polysomnography (PSG) and participant-reported sleep assessments in a 5-h phase advance insomnia model. Adults reporting occasional disturbed sleep received gabapentin 250 mg (n = 128) or placebo (n = 128). On Days 1 and 28, participants received medication 30 min before bedtime and were in bed from 17:00 to 01:00, ∼5 h before their habitual bedtime. Sleep was assessed by PSG, a post sleep questionnaire, and the Karolinska Sleep Diary. Next-day residual effects and tolerability were evaluated. On Days 2-27, participants took medication at home 30 min before their habitual bedtime. Treatment-group demographics were comparable. Gabapentin resulted in significantly less PSG wake after sleep onset (WASO) compared with placebo on Day 1 (primary endpoint, mean: 107.0 versus 149.1 min, p ≤ 0.001) and Day 28 (113.6 versus 152.3 min, p = 0.002), and significantly greater total sleep time (TST; Day 1: 347.6 versus 283.9 min; Day 28: 335.3 versus 289.1 min) (p ≤ 0.001). Participant-reported WASO and TST also showed significant treatment effects on both days. Gabapentin was associated with less %stage1 on Day 1, and greater %REM on Day 28, versus placebo. During home use, gabapentin resulted in significantly less participant-reported WASO and higher ratings of sleep quality. Gabapentin was well tolerated (most common adverse events: headache, somnolence) with no evidence of next-day impairment. Gabapentin 250 mg resulted in greater PSG and participant-reported sleep duration following a 5-h phase advance on Day 1 and Day 28 of use without evidence of next-day impairment, and greater sleep duration during at-home use.

  18. The impact of prediabetes on glycemic control and clinical outcomes postburn injury.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Amy; Coffey, Rebecca; Jones, Larry; Murphy, Claire V

    2014-01-01

    Poor glucose control and clinical outcomes have been observed in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients postburn injury. Prediabetes is a precursor to diabetes. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of prediabetes on postinjury glucose control and clinical outcomes. A retrospective review was conducted comparing prediabetics and euglycemic controls. Patients who were admitted for burn care were 18 to 89 years of age and had a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) obtained on admission. Prediabetics were defined by an HbA1c of 5.7 to 6.4% and controls by HbA1c < 5.7%. Inpatient glucose levels were recorded, in addition to clinical outcomes. Two hundred eight patients were included: 54 prediabetics and 154 controls. The prediabetic population was older (50.7 vs 39 years; P < .001) with more hypertensives (44.4 vs 16.9%; P < .001), consisted of more African-Americans (20.4 vs 12%; P = .04), and had larger areas of full-thickness burns (4.5 vs 1.75%; P = .02). Median admission HbA1c was 5.9 (5.7-6.0)% among prediabetics and 5.3 (5-5.45)% among controls (P < .001). Prediabetics had significantly higher time-weighted glucose levels (127.7 [105.5-147.6] vs 108.0 [97.1-122.2] mg/dl; P < .001) and more had an average inpatient glucose >150 mg/dl (20.4 vs 9.1%; P = .028). There was no difference in rates of hypoglycemia (glucose <70 mg/dl) or glycemic variability. Prediabetics had lower survival rates (92.6 vs 98.7%; P = .041), but similar rates of unplanned readmission (1.9 vs 3.9%; P = .68), intensive care unit admission (29.6 vs 23.4%; P = .36), mechanical ventilation (24.1 vs 16.2%; P = .20), length of hospital stay (4 [2-8] vs 3 [2-11]; P = .71), and infection (11.1 vs 11.7%; P = .99). Prediabetic status has a significant impact on glucose control and mortality after burn injury.

  19. Blindness of clinical evaluators, parents, and children in a placebo-controlled trial of fluvoxamine.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Benedetto; Davis, Mark; Greenhill, Laurence L; Pine, Daniel S

    2006-01-01

    Few of the increasing number of pediatric clinical trials of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in children have been evaluated for level of blindness of investigators, children, and parents. The success of the masking procedures used in a double-blind, pediatric trial of fluvoxamine in children was examined. Clinical evaluators, parents, and children were asked to guess individual treatment assignment at the end of an 8-week, placebo-controlled trial of fluvoxamine conducted in 128 outpatients (6-17 years of age) with anxiety disorders. The relationship between treatment attribution and improvement status or presence of adverse events was examined. The rate of correct guesses was significantly greater than chance among clinical evaluators (78%), parents (81%), and children (67%) (for all, p < 0.001). Attribution to fluvoxamine was associated with presence of clinical improvement, and attribution to placebo with lack of improvement (p < 0.001) in both the fluvoxamine and placebo group. There was no association between presence of adverse events and direction of the guess. Accuracy of the guess did not improve with time. The tendency to attribute improvement to active treatment and lack of improvement to placebo was consistent across investigators, parents, and children and was applied regardless of actual treatment received by the patient. Adverse events did not influence treatment attribution.

  20. Exploring the relationship among user satisfaction, compliance, and clinical outcomes of telemedicine services for glucose control.

    PubMed

    Rho, Mi Jung; Kim, Si Ra; Kim, Hun-Sung; Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Mun, Seong K; Choi, In Young

    2014-08-01

    Although research has shown that telemedicine services for blood glucose control can be useful in managing diabetes, the relationships among user satisfaction, compliance, and clinical outcomes have not been well studied. A positive assessment of telemedicine services can improve user satisfaction, which can increase compliance and improve clinical outcomes. These relationships are validated with actual telemedicine projects for diabetes management. The assessment of user satisfaction for telemedicine services is composed of the following six variables: usefulness, ease of use, compatibility, facilitating conditions, accessibility, and intimacy. The relationship between user satisfaction and compliance or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) improvement was analyzed. Data were collected from 81 type 2 diabetic patients who used telemedicine services. We used multiple regression analysis, logistic regression analysis, simple linear regression, and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test to analyze the data. The user assessments of the telemedicine services were very high, ranging from 5.8 to 6 points. Of the six variables, compatibility, ease of use, intimacy, and usefulness had a positive effect on overall satisfaction (p<0.05). Overall satisfaction and compliance were positively correlated with HbA1c improvement. In addition, income level was also an important variable for overall satisfaction. Our results indicate that patient assessments of telemedicine services are important factors for clinical outcome improvement. In addition, higher satisfaction and more frequent self-assessments can improve clinical outcomes.

  1. An analytical review of 24 controlled clinical trials for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS).

    PubMed

    White, K P; Harth, M

    1996-02-01

    We performed a combined manual and computer search of the FMS literature to identify controlled clinical trials in FMS from 1980 to June 1994 inclusive. Our specific objectives were: 1) to determine which outcome measures have been used in clinical trials for FMS, and the methods utilized to measure these outcomes; 2) to identify which outcome measures were most and least sensitive in distinguishing between treatment groups, and 3) to identify weakness in trial design. Our analysis of 24 clinical trials demonstrates the large diversity of outcome measures and measurement instruments that have been used to detect differences between treatment and placebo in the management of FMS. Whereas certain outcomes, such as self-reported pain and sleep quality, were frequently measured, other clinically important outcomes, such as functional and psychological status, were infrequently included in data collection. Finally, we identified several significant potential sources of bias, including potential flaws in subject selection and group allocation, inadequate randomization, incomplete blinding, errors in outcome measurement, and inappropriate analysis of data.

  2. Full-mouth disinfection as a therapeutic protocol for type-2 diabetic subjects with chronic periodontitis: twelve-month clinical outcomes: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vanessa R; Lima, Jadson A; Miranda, Tamires S; Gonçalves, Tiago E D; Figueiredo, Luciene C; Faveri, Marcelo; Duarte, Poliana M

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the clinical effects of chlorhexidine (CHX) application in a full-mouth disinfection (FMD) protocol in poorly controlled type-2 diabetic subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis. Thirty-eight subjects were randomly assigned into FMD group (n=19): full-mouth scaling and root planing (FMSRP) within 24 h + local application of CHX gel + CHX rinses for 60 days or Control group (n = 19): FMSRP within 24 h + local application of placebo gel + placebo rinses for 60 days. Clinical parameters, glycated haemoglobin and fasting plasma glucose were assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months post-therapies. All clinical parameters improved significantly at 3, 6 and 12 months post-therapies for both groups (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between groups for any clinical parameters, and glycemic condition at any time-point (p > 0.05). The treatments did not differ with respect to clinical parameters, including the primary outcome variable (i.e. changes in clinical attachment level in deep pockets), for up to 12 months post-treatments. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Fixed-Dose Triple Combination of Antihypertensive Drugs Improves Blood Pressure Control: From Clinical Trials to Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Alberto; Lenti, Salvatore; Schiavon, Laura; Sacco, Antonella Paola; Dell'Avvocata, Fabio; Rigatelli, Gianluca; Ramazzina, Emilio

    2017-04-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control is the main clinical goal in the management of hypertensive patients; however, BP in most of these patients remains uncontrolled, despite the widespread availability of antihypertensive drugs as free-combination therapy. This study compared the efficacy of a fixed-dose triple combination (FDTC) of antihypertensive drugs with that of a free combination of three antihypertensives in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Ninety-two patients (mean age 60.8 ± 12.1, 58.0% male) with uncontrolled essential hypertension (office systolic BP ≥ 140 or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg) previously treated with a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) inhibitor plus hydrochlorothiazide were switched to once-daily FDTC therapy with perindopril/indapamide/amlodipine (5-10/1.25-2.5/5-10 mg). Patients were age- and sex-matched with a control group of hypertensive patients receiving free-combination therapy with three drugs including a RAAS inhibitor, a diuretic, and a calcium channel blocker. Office BP and 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) were evaluated at baseline and after 1 and 4 months. Significant reductions in ambulatory 24-h, daytime, and nighttime systolic BP, and pulse pressure (PP) were found in the FDTC group relative to reductions seen with free-combination therapy, after the first month only of follow-up. Target BP values (mean 24-h ambulatory systolic/diastolic BP < 130/80 mmHg) were reached by more recipients of FDTC than free-combination therapy (64.8% vs. 46.9%, p < 0.05) at month 4 of follow-up, despite reductions in 24-h ABPM values from baseline being similar in both groups at this time point. FDTC of perindopril/indapamide/amlodipine was effective at reducing SBP and PP in previously treated patients with uncontrolled hypertension, and well tolerated, providing support for clinicians in choosing a fixed-dose triple combination over the free-combination of a RAAS inhibitor, a diuretic, and a calcium antagonist.

  4. Clinical-pharmacist intervention reduces clinically relevant drug-drug interactions in patients with heart failure: A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Roblek, Tina; Deticek, Andreja; Leskovar, Bostjan; Suskovic, Stanislav; Horvat, Matej; Belic, Ales; Mrhar, Ales; Lainscak, Mitja

    2016-01-15

    Incidence of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) increases with complexity of treatment and comorbidities, as in heart failure (HF). This randomized, double-blind study evaluated the intervention of the pharmacist on prevalence of clinically relevant DDIs (NCT01855165). Patients admitted with HF were screened for clinically relevant DDIs, and randomized to control or intervention. All attending physicians received standard advice about pharmacological therapy; those in the intervention group also received alerts about clinically relevant DDIs. Primary endpoint was DDI at discharge and secondary were re-hospitalization or death during follow-up. Of 213 patients, 51 (mean age, 79 ± 6 years; male, 47%) showed 66 clinically relevant DDIs and were randomized. For intervention (n=26) versus control (n=25), the number of patients with and the number of DDIs were significantly lower at discharge: 8 vs. 18 and 10 vs. 31; p=0.003 and 0.0049, respectively. Over a 6 month follow-up period, 11 control and 9 intervention patients were re-hospitalized or died (p>0.2 for all). No significant differences were seen between control and intervention for patients with eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (78%) for re-hospitalization or death (10 vs. 7; p=0.74). Pharmacist intervention significantly reduces the number of patients with clinically relevant DDIs, but not clinical endpoints 6 months from discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A multicenter randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial of pramipexole for Tourette's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurlan, Roger; Crespi, Giovanna; Coffey, Barbara; Mueller-Vahl, Kirsten; Koval, Stephen; Wunderlich, Glen

    2012-05-01

    Dopamine agonists could theoretically normalize the suspected central dopamine hypersensitivity in Tourette's syndrome. There was a multicenter randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial of pramipexole given for 6 weeks in 63 children and adolescents with Tourette's syndrome. There were no significant differences in the adjusted mean change in the Total Tic Score of the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale for patients treated with pramipexole (-7.16) and placebo (-7.17). There were no significant treatment effects on change from baseline in the Global Severity score of the Yale Scale and parent- and investigator-scored Clinical Global Impression of Improvement. In patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, there was improvement in DuPaul ADHD scale scores for patients receiving pramipexole compared with placebo. There was no evidence that pramipexole has efficacy in suppressing tics. Pramipexole may decrease symptoms of associated attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  6. The default network and self-generated thought: component processes, dynamic control, and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R.; Smallwood, Jonathan; Spreng, R. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Though only a decade has elapsed since the default network was first emphasized as being a large-scale brain system, recent years have brought great insight into the network’s adaptive functions. A growing theme highlights the default network as playing a key role in internally-directed—or self-generated—thought. Here, we synthesize recent findings from cognitive science, neuroscience, and clinical psychology to focus attention on two emerging topics as current and future directions surrounding the default network. First, we present evidence that self-generated thought is a multi-faceted construct whose component processes are supported by different subsystems within the network. Second, we highlight the dynamic nature of the default network, emphasizing its interaction with executive control systems when regulating aspects of internal thought. We conclude by discussing clinical implications of disruptions to the integrity of the network, and consider disorders when thought content becomes polarized or network interactions become disrupted or imbalanced. PMID:24502540

  7. Reporting of statistically significant results at ClinicalTrials.gov for completed superiority randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Dechartres, Agnes; Bond, Elizabeth G; Scheer, Jordan; Riveros, Carolina; Atal, Ignacio; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-11-30

    Publication bias and other reporting bias have been well documented for journal articles, but no study has evaluated the nature of results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov. We aimed to assess how many randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov report statistically significant results and whether the proportion of trials with significant results differs when no treatment effect estimate or p-value is posted. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov in June 2015 for all studies with results posted. We included completed RCTs with a superiority hypothesis and considered results for the first primary outcome with results posted. For each trial, we assessed whether a treatment effect estimate and/or p-value was reported at ClinicalTrials.gov and if yes, whether results were statistically significant. If no treatment effect estimate or p-value was reported, we calculated the treatment effect and corresponding p-value using results per arm posted at ClinicalTrials.gov when sufficient data were reported. From the 17,536 studies with results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov, we identified 2823 completed phase 3 or 4 randomized trials with a superiority hypothesis. Of these, 1400 (50%) reported a treatment effect estimate and/or p-value. Results were statistically significant for 844 trials (60%), with a median p-value of 0.01 (Q1-Q3: 0.001-0.26). For the 1423 trials with no treatment effect estimate or p-value posted, we could calculate the treatment effect and corresponding p-value using results reported per arm for 929 (65%). For 494 trials (35%), p-values could not be calculated mainly because of insufficient reporting, censored data, or repeated measurements over time. For the 929 trials we could calculate p-values, we found statistically significant results for 342 (37%), with a median p-value of 0.19 (Q1-Q3: 0.005-0.59). Half of the trials with results posted at ClinicalTrials.gov reported a treatment effect estimate and/or p-value, with significant

  8. Using statistical process control to make data-based clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Pfadt, A; Wheeler, D J

    1995-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis is based on an investigation of variability due to interrelationships among antecedents, behavior, and consequences. This permits testable hypotheses about the causes of behavior as well as for the course of treatment to be evaluated empirically. Such information provides corrective feedback for making data-based clinical decisions. This paper considers how a different approach to the analysis of variability based on the writings of Walter Shewart and W. Edwards Deming in the area of industrial quality control helps to achieve similar objectives. Statistical process control (SPC) was developed to implement a process of continual product improvement while achieving compliance with production standards and other requirements for promoting customer satisfaction. SPC involves the use of simple statistical tools, such as histograms and control charts, as well as problem-solving techniques, such as flow charts, cause-and-effect diagrams, and Pareto charts, to implement Deming's management philosophy. These data-analytic procedures can be incorporated into a human service organization to help to achieve its stated objectives in a manner that leads to continuous improvement in the functioning of the clients who are its customers. Examples are provided to illustrate how SPC procedures can be used to analyze behavioral data. Issues related to the application of these tools for making data-based clinical decisions and for creating an organizational climate that promotes their routine use in applied settings are also considered.

  9. Using statistical process control to make data-based clinical decisions.

    PubMed Central

    Pfadt, A; Wheeler, D J

    1995-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis is based on an investigation of variability due to interrelationships among antecedents, behavior, and consequences. This permits testable hypotheses about the causes of behavior as well as for the course of treatment to be evaluated empirically. Such information provides corrective feedback for making data-based clinical decisions. This paper considers how a different approach to the analysis of variability based on the writings of Walter Shewart and W. Edwards Deming in the area of industrial quality control helps to achieve similar objectives. Statistical process control (SPC) was developed to implement a process of continual product improvement while achieving compliance with production standards and other requirements for promoting customer satisfaction. SPC involves the use of simple statistical tools, such as histograms and control charts, as well as problem-solving techniques, such as flow charts, cause-and-effect diagrams, and Pareto charts, to implement Deming's management philosophy. These data-analytic procedures can be incorporated into a human service organization to help to achieve its stated objectives in a manner that leads to continuous improvement in the functioning of the clients who are its customers. Examples are provided to illustrate how SPC procedures can be used to analyze behavioral data. Issues related to the application of these tools for making data-based clinical decisions and for creating an organizational climate that promotes their routine use in applied settings are also considered. PMID:7592154

  10. Application of traditional clinical pathology quality control techniques to molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shu-Ling; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Hafez, Michael J; Gocke, Christopher D; Murphy, Kathleen M; Sokoll, Lori J; Eshleman, James R

    2008-03-01

    Many molecular diagnostic laboratories have evolved from research laboratories, initially performing low numbers of homebrew assays, but many laboratories now perform more kit-based assays, with ever increasing test volumes. One such assay is assessment of bone marrow transplantation engraftment. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is performed primarily in the treatment of hematological malignancies. Monitoring of engraftment was traditionally evaluated using minisatellites (variable number tandem repeats) and Southern blotting, but most laboratories now use Food and Drug Administration-cleared microsatellite (short tandem repeats) kits to assess the extent of engraftment. With the increase in equipment reliability, the use of kit-based assays, and the desire to provide the highest quality clinical data, we began applying traditional clinical pathology quality control tools to the molecular diagnostics laboratory. In this study, we demonstrate this approach using a microsatellite-based bone marrow engraftment assay. We analyzed control samples (pure and mixed) for two different microsatellites to establish quality control parameters and constructed Levey-Jennings charts to monitor both the precision and accuracy of this assay. By incorporating these tools into an overall quality assurance program, a laboratory can identify systematic errors and perform corrective actions before actual assay failure, thereby improving the quality of patient care.

  11. Dissatisfaction with skin appearance among patients with eating disorders and non-clinical controls.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M A; Gupta, A K

    2001-07-01

    We have recently observed that women with the eating disorders (EDs) anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa report a significantly greater (P = 0.002) dissatisfaction with the appearance of their skin than do non-clinical controls. To examine further the nature of the dissatisfaction with skin appearance in women with EDs. Several psychosocial and body image parameters, including whether or not the subjects were satisfied with a wide range of attributes associated with non-diseased skin, were surveyed in women aged < or = 30 years. Survey data from 32 women with EDs and 34 randomly selected community-based non-clinical controls were examined. Eighty-one per cent of the patients with EDs vs. 56% of the controls reported dissatisfaction with the appearance of their skin (P = 0.03), particularly with respect to its dryness and roughness. Other attributes that were rated more frequently were 'bags' and 'darkness' under the eyes, freckles, fine wrinkles and patchy hyperpigmentation. There is a high prevalence of dissatisfaction with skin appearance among women aged < or = 30 years, which is even higher among patients with EDs.

  12. Clinical and Immunological Changes of Immunotherapy in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Caraballo, Jorge Mario; Cardona Villa, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Immunotherapy has proven to be an useful tool in the management of allergic respiratory diseases; however, little has been studied in atopic dermatitis. Objective. To evaluate the clinical and immunological impact of immunotherapy with mites allergen extracts in atopic dermatitis. Methods. Patients with atopic dermatitis were assigned with computer-generated randomization to either of the following groups: (a) controls received only topical treatment with steroids and/or tacrolimus and (b) actively treated patients received topical treatment plus immunotherapy. Levels of serum total IgE, mites-specific IgE and IgG4 were assessed at study start and after one year of immunotherapy. Results. 31 patients in the active group and 29 in the control group completed the study. Symptoms and medication scores were significantly reduced in the active group after six months. Three patients in the control group showed new sensitizations to mites, while 3 patients in the active group showed neosensitization to shrimp with negative oral food challenge. We observed significant increase of mites-specific IgG4 levels in active group. Conclusion. Specific allergen immunotherapy induced a tolerogenic IgG4 response to mite allergens associated with favorable clinical effects in atopic dermatitis patients. PMID:23724240

  13. The impact of the Virtual Ophthalmology Clinic on medical students' learning: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Succar, T; Zebington, G; Billson, F; Byth, K; Barrie, S; McCluskey, P; Grigg, J

    2013-01-01

    Aim The Virtual Ophthalmology Clinic (VOC) is an interactive web-based teaching module, with special emphasis on history taking and clinical reasoning skills. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of VOC on medical students' learning. Methods A randomised controlled trial (RCT) was conducted with medical students from the University of Sydney (n=188) who were randomly assigned into either an experimental (n=93) or a control group (n=95). A pre- and post-test and student satisfaction questionnaire were administered. Twelve months later a follow-up test was conducted to determine the long-term retention rate of graduates. Results There was a statistically significant (P<0.001) within-subject improvement pre- to post rotation in the number of correctly answered questions for both the control and experimental groups (mean improvement for control 10%, 95% CI 1.3–2.6, and for experimental 17.5%, 95% CI 3.0–4.0). The improvement was significantly greater in the experimental group (mean difference in improvement between groups 7.5%, 95% CI 0.8–2.3, P<0.001). At 12 months follow-up testing, the experimental group scored on average 1.6 (8%) (95%CI 0.4 to 2.7, P=0.007) higher than the controls. Conclusion On the basis of a statistically significant improvement in academic performance and highly positive student feedback, the implementation of VOC may provide a means to address challenges to ophthalmic learning outcomes in an already crowded medical curriculum. PMID:23867718

  14. Controlled clinical evaluations of chlorine dioxide, chlorite and chlorate in man.

    PubMed Central

    Lubbers, J R; Chauan, S; Bianchine, J R

    1982-01-01

    To assess the relative safety of chronically administered chlorine water disinfectants in man, a controlled study was undertaken. The clinical evaluation was conducted in the three phases common to investigational drug studies. Phase I, a rising dose tolerance investigation, examined the acute effects of progressively increasing single doses of chlorine disinfectants to normal healthy adult male volunteers. Phase II considered the impact on normal subjects of daily ingestion of the disinfectants at a concentration of 5 mg/l. for twelve consecutive weeks. Persons with a low level of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase may be expected to be especially susceptible to oxidative stress; therefore, in Phase III, chlorite at a concentration of 5 mg/l. was administered daily for twelve consecutive weeks to a small group of potentially at-risk glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient subjects. Physiological impact was assessed by evaluation of a battery of qualitative and quantitative tests. The three phases of this controlled double-blind clinical evaluation of chlorine dioxide and its potential metabolites in human male volunteer subjects were completed uneventfully. There were no obvious undesirable clinical sequellae noted by any of the participating subjects or by the observing medical team. In several cases, statistically significant trends in certain biochemical or physiological parameters were associated with treatment; however, none of these trends was judged to have physiological consequence. One cannot rule out the possibility that, over a longer treatment period, these trends might indeed achieve proportions of clinical importance. However, by the absence of detrimental physiological responses within the limits of the study, the relative safety of oral ingestion of chlorine dioxide and its metabolites, chlorite and chlorate, was demonstrated. PMID:6961033

  15. Glycaemic control and associated factors among patients with diabetes at public health clinics in Johor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, M I; Daud, Faiz; Ismail, Aniza

    2016-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of glycaemic control and factors associated with poor glycaemic control [glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥6.5%] among patients with type 2 diabetes treated in public health clinics in Johor, Malaysia. Cross-sectional study. A review of all patients aged over 18 years and with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes for >1 year. The National Diabetic Registry was used as the database for attendees at public health clinics in Johor Bahru between January and December 2013. A required sample of 660 was calculated, and a random sampling method was applied to acquire patient information across the 13 public health clinics in Johor Bahru. All relevant information (e.g. HbA1c, type of treatment and other parameters for glycaemic control) were abstracted from the registry. Sixty-eight percent of 706 patients had HbA1c >6.5%, and mean HbA1c was 7.8%. Younger patients (72.3%) had poorer glycaemic control than older patients (63.0%), and most patients with poor glycaemic control were obese (79.2%). Approximately 31.7% of patients did not achieve the target blood pressure <130/80 mmHg, and 58.5% did not achieve the target lipid profile. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that age (<60 years), sex (male), duration of diabetes (>5 years), body mass index (obese), type of treatment (diet therapy vs combination therapy) and abnormal lipid profile were significantly associated with increased odds of HbA1C >6.5%. More than half (68%) of the patients with diabetes had HbA1c >6.5%. This highlights the importance of providing organized care to manage patients with diabetes in the primary care setting, such as weight reduction programmes, proper prescribing treatment, and age- and gender-specific groups to ensure good glycaemic control. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Controlled clinical trials of cell therapy in stroke: Meta-analysis at six months after treatment.

    PubMed

    Detante, Olivier; Moisan, Anaïck; Hommel, Marc; Jaillard, Assia

    2017-10-01

    Background Cell therapy is promising in experimental studies and has been assessed only in a few studies on humans. Aims To evaluate the effect of cell therapy in humans. Methods We included clinical trials with a control group that reported safety and efficacy six months following treatment. Quality was evaluated and clinical scales data were extracted. Quantitative analysis was based on the standardized means difference (SMD). Among 28 trials published from 1995 to 2016, nine studies (194 patients; 191 controls) were eligible. Publication biases were assessed with the funnel plot and pre-specified explanatory variables were tested with a group analysis and a meta-regression. Results The overall quality was moderate. Cell therapy had a positive effect on the outcome (SMD: 0.57, 95% CI: 0.22-0.92; p = 0.002). The sensitivity analysis showed an upper level of effect size of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.34-1.27; p = 0.001) and a lower level of 0.455 (95% CI: 0.04-0.87; p = 0.03). None of the pre-specified explanatory variable was significantly correlated to outcome: age, ratio infarction/hemorrhage, delay from stroke to treatment, route of administration, cell type, randomization, and blinded outcome assessment. The significant heterogeneity (p = 0.03) was not explained by publication biases (p = 0.09) and was more likely due to methodological and quality differences between the trials. Conclusions This result suggests that cell therapy is beneficial in stroke and is expected to help in the designing of stem cells controlled clinical trials (CCT) in large populations.

  17. Bringing explicit insight into cognitive psychology features during clinical reasoning seminars: a prospective, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Nendaz, Mathieu R; Gut, Anne M; Louis-Simonet, Martine; Perrier, Arnaud; Vu, Nu V

    2011-04-01

    Facets of reasoning competence influenced by an explicit insight into cognitive psychology features during clinical reasoning seminars have not been specifically explored. This prospective, controlled study, conducted at the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine, Switzerland, assessed the impact on sixth-year medical students' patient work-up of case-based reasoning seminars, bringing them explicit insight into cognitive aspects of their reasoning. Volunteer students registered for our three-month Internal Medicine elective were assigned to one of two training conditions: standard (control) or modified (intervention) case-based reasoning seminars. These seminars start with the patient's presenting complaint and the students must ask the tutor for additional clinical information to progress through case resolution. For this intervention, the tutors made each step explicit to students and encouraged self-reflection on their reasoning processes. At the end of their elective, students' performances were assessed through encounters with two standardized patients and chart write-ups. Twenty-nine students participated, providing a total of 58 encounters. The overall differences in accuracy of the final diagnosis given to the patient at the end of the encounter (control 63% vs intervention 74%, p = 0.53) and of the final diagnosis mentioned in the patient chart (61% vs 70%, p = 0.58) were not statistically significant. The students in the intervention group significantly more often listed the correct diagnosis among the differential diagnoses in their charts (75% vs 97%, p = 0.02). This case-based clinical reasoning seminar intervention, designed to bring students insight into cognitive features of their reasoning, improved aspects of diagnostic competence.

  18. Clinical Effectiveness of Scapulothoracic Joint Control Training Exercises on Shoulder Joint Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Jing-Jie; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Wang, Ji-Hong; Zhang, Qiu-Yang; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the clinical effectiveness of scapulothoracic joint control training exercises on shoulder joint dysfunction. Forty patients with traumatic shoulder pain and joint dysfunction were randomized into the treatment or control group. Standard rehabilitation interventions included glenohumeral joint mobilization techniques, ultrasound therapy, traditional Chinese medicine, interference current therapy, and other comprehensive interventions. Patients received scapulothoracic joint control training exercises, including active and passive motions of the scapulothoracic joints, peri-joint muscle exercise, and joint stability exercises for 1 month. Patient status was evaluated by Constant-Murley scales before and after the prescribed interventions. The pain conditions, daily activities, range of movement, strength tests and total scores were significantly improved compared to prior treatment. Moreover, improvements in pain, daily activities, scope of activities, and total scores for patients in the treatment group were statistically significant when compared to the control group (P < 0.05). However, there was no inter-group difference in strength testing. The combination of standard rehabilitation interventions and scapulothoracic joint control training exercises are an effective treatment of the shoulder joint dysfunction. Moreover, the pain outcomes, scope of activities, and total scores were better in the treatment group.

  19. [Controlled clinical study on compound Decumbent Corydalis Rhizome and diclofenac in treatment of knee osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chuan; Yin, Geng; Cen, Xiao-Min; Xie, Qi-Bing

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of compound Decumbent Corydalis Rhizome (DCR) in treating patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Totally 79 patients with knee osteoarthritis were selected from out-patient and inpatient departments of West China Hospital and randomly divided into the test group and the control group. The test group (n = 41) was given Compound DCR with the dosage of 1.8 g · d(-1), while the control group (n = 38) was administered with diclofenac sodium with the dosage of 75 mg · d(-1). After 12 weeks of treatment, the total efficacy rates based on patients/physicians evaluation for experimental and control groups were 68.29%, 63.41% and 71.05%, 63.16%, respectively, without significant difference between the two groups. Both of the two groups showed significant improvements in the main efficacy indexes (pain on walking 20 m) and minor indexes (tenderness on palpation, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities OA index (WOMAC) and Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 ), but without significant difference in efficacy between them. The incidence of related adverse events was 24.39% in the test group and 47.37% in the control group, respectively, with significant differences between the two groups (P < 0.05). In the controlled study, compound DCR is as efficient as diclofenac sodium but more tolerable, with a good clinical application prospect.

  20. Frequency of discrepancies in retracted clinical trial reports versus unretracted reports: blinded case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cole, Graham D; Nowbar, Alexandra N; Mielewczik, Michael; Shun-Shin, Matthew J; Francis, Darrel P

    2015-09-20

    To compare the frequency of discrepancies in retracted reports of clinical trials with those in adjacent unretracted reports in the same journal. Blinded case-control study. Journals in PubMed. 50 manuscripts, classified on PubMed as retracted clinical trials, paired with 50 adjacent unretracted manuscripts from the same journals. Reports were randomly selected from PubMed in December 2012, with no restriction on publication date. Controls were the preceding unretracted clinical trial published in the same journal. All traces of retraction were removed. Three scientists, blinded to the retraction status of individual reports, reviewed all 100 trial reports for discrepancies. Discrepancies were pooled and cross checked before being counted into prespecified categories. Only then was the retraction status unblinded for analysis. Total number of discrepancies (defined as mathematically or logically contradictory statements) in each clinical trial report. Of 479 discrepancies found in the 100 trial reports, 348 were in the 50 retracted reports and 131 in the 50 unretracted reports. On average, individual retracted reports had a greater number of discrepancies than unretracted reports (median 4 (interquartile range 2-8.75) v 0 (0-5); P<0.001). Papers with a discrepancy were significantly more likely to be retracted than those without a discrepancy (odds ratio 5.7 (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 14.5); P<0.001). In particular, three types of discrepancy arose significantly more frequently in retracted than unretracted reports: factual discrepancies (P=0.002), arithmetical errors (P=0.01), and missed P values (P=0.02). Results from a retrospective analysis indicated that citations and journal impact factor were unlikely to affect the result. Discrepancies in published trial reports should no longer be assumed to be unimportant. Scientists, blinded to retraction status and with no specialist skill in the field, identify significantly more discrepancies in retracted than

  1. Frequency of discrepancies in retracted clinical trial reports versus unretracted reports: blinded case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Nowbar, Alexandra N; Mielewczik, Michael; Shun-Shin, Matthew J; Francis, Darrel P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare the frequency of discrepancies in retracted reports of clinical trials with those in adjacent unretracted reports in the same journal. Design Blinded case-control study. Setting Journals in PubMed. Population 50 manuscripts, classified on PubMed as retracted clinical trials, paired with 50 adjacent unretracted manuscripts from the same journals. Reports were randomly selected from PubMed in December 2012, with no restriction on publication date. Controls were the preceding unretracted clinical trial published in the same journal. All traces of retraction were removed. Three scientists, blinded to the retraction status of individual reports, reviewed all 100 trial reports for discrepancies. Discrepancies were pooled and cross checked before being counted into prespecified categories. Only then was the retraction status unblinded for analysis. Main outcome measure Total number of discrepancies (defined as mathematically or logically contradictory statements) in each clinical trial report. Results Of 479 discrepancies found in the 100 trial reports, 348 were in the 50 retracted reports and 131 in the 50 unretracted reports. On average, individual retracted reports had a greater number of discrepancies than unretracted reports (median 4 (interquartile range 2-8.75) v 0 (0-5); P<0.001). Papers with a discrepancy were significantly more likely to be retracted than those without a discrepancy (odds ratio 5.7 (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 14.5); P<0.001). In particular, three types of discrepancy arose significantly more frequently in retracted than unretracted reports: factual discrepancies (P=0.002), arithmetical errors (P=0.01), and missed P values (P=0.02). Results from a retrospective analysis indicated that citations and journal impact factor were unlikely to affect the result. Conclusions Discrepancies in published trial reports should no longer be assumed to be unimportant. Scientists, blinded to retraction status and with no specialist

  2. Clinical decision support tools for osteoporosis disease management: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Monika; Straus, Sharon E

    2008-12-01

    Studies indicate a gap between evidence and clinical practice in osteoporosis management. Tools that facilitate clinical decision making at the point of care are promising strategies for closing these practice gaps. To systematically review the literature to identify and describe the effectiveness of tools that support clinical decision making in osteoporosis disease management. Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and EBM Reviews (CDSR, DARE, CCTR, and ACP J Club), and contact with experts in the field. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in any language from 1966 to July 2006 investigating disease management interventions in patients at risk for osteoporosis. Outcomes included fractures and bone mineral density (BMD) testing. Two investigators independently assessed articles for relevance and study quality, and extracted data using standardized forms. Of 1,246 citations that were screened for relevance, 13 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Reported study quality was generally poor. Meta-analysis was not done because of methodological and clinical heterogeneity; 77% of studies included a reminder or education as a component of their intervention. Three studies of reminders plus education targeted to physicians and patients showed increased BMD testing (RR range 1.43 to 8.67) and osteoporosis medication use (RR range 1.60 to 8.67). A physician reminder plus a patient risk assessment strategy found reduced fractures [RR 0.58, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 0.90] and increased osteoporosis therapy (RR 2.44, CI 1.43 to 4.17). Multi-component tools that are targeted to physicians and patients may be effective for supporting clinical decision making in osteoporosis disease management.

  3. Clinical Decision Support Tools for Osteoporosis Disease Management: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Straus, Sharon E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies indicate a gap between evidence and clinical practice in osteoporosis management. Tools that facilitate clinical decision making at the point of care are promising strategies for closing these practice gaps. OBJECTIVE To systematically review the literature to identify and describe the effectiveness of tools that support clinical decision making in osteoporosis disease management. DATA SOURCES Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and EBM Reviews (CDSR, DARE, CCTR, and ACP J Club), and contact with experts in the field. REVIEW METHODS Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in any language from 1966 to July 2006 investigating disease management interventions in patients at risk for osteoporosis. Outcomes included fractures and bone mineral density (BMD) testing. Two investigators independently assessed articles for relevance and study quality, and extracted data using standardized forms. RESULTS Of 1,246 citations that were screened for relevance, 13 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Reported study quality was generally poor. Meta-analysis was not done because of methodological and clinical heterogeneity; 77% of studies included a reminder or education as a component of their intervention. Three studies of reminders plus education targeted to physicians and patients showed increased BMD testing (RR range 1.43 to 8.67) and osteoporosis medication use (RR range 1.60 to 8.67). A physician reminder plus a patient risk assessment strategy found reduced fractures [RR 0.58, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 0.90] and increased osteoporosis therapy (RR 2.44, CI 1.43 to 4.17). CONCLUSION Multi-component tools that are targeted to physicians and patients may be effective for supporting clinical decision making in osteoporosis disease management. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-008-0812-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18836782

  4. Impulse Control Disorders: Updated Review of Clinical Characteristics and Pharmacological Management

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana; Odlaug, Brian L.; Grant, Jon E.

    2011-01-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) are characterized by urges and behaviors that are excessive and/or harmful to oneself or others and cause significant impairment in social and occupational functioning, as well as legal and financial difficulties. ICDs are relatively common psychiatric conditions, yet are poorly understood by the general public, clinicians, and individuals struggling with the disorder. Although ICD treatment research is limited, studies have shown ICDs may respond well to pharmacological treatment. This article presents a brief overview about the clinical characteristics of ICDs and pharmacological treatment options for individuals with ICDs. PMID:21556272

  5. Controlled clinical trial of oral and topical diethylcarbamazine in treatment of onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H R; Greene, B M; Langham, M E

    1980-05-03

    In a double-blind controlled clinical trial comparing the safety and efficacy of oral diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC) with topical DEC for the treatment of onchocerciasis twenty men with moderate skin-snip microfilarial counts received daily therapy for 1 week, then weekly therapy for the rest of 6 months. The number of microfilariae per skin snip dropped quickly to 2% of initial levels and remained at low levels in those receiving oral DEC, and to 20% of initial levels in patients treated with DEC lotion. Side-effects in both groups included lymphadenopathy, fever, pruritus, rash, proteinuria, and chorioretinitis; they were commoner with topical DEC.

  6. Empathy in boys with gender identity disorder: a comparison to externalizing clinical control boys and community control boys and girls.

    PubMed

    Owen-Anderson, Allison F H; Jenkins, Jennifer M; Bradley, Susan J; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2008-03-01

    The construct of empathy was examined in 20 boys with gender identity disorder (GID), 20 clinical control boys with externalizing disorders (ECC), 20 community control boys (NCB), and 20 community control girls (NCG). The mean age of the children was 6.86 years (range = 4-8 years). It was hypothesized that boys with GID would show similar levels of empathy to those shown by NC girls and higher levels of empathy than the NC and ECC boys. Three measures of empathy were administered: a maternal-report questionnaire, a self-report questionnaire, and an in vivo evaluation in which children's reactions to pain simulations to two adult actors (mother, experimenter) were coded for empathy levels. On the maternal report and in-vivo measures, the NC girls had significantly higher empathy levels than the NC boys, but not on the self-report measure. By maternal report, the NC girls were rated as significantly more empathic than were the GID boys, with a "large" effect size. There were no significant differences between the GID boys and the NC girls on the self-report and in-vivo measures and the effect size differences were "small." No significant differences were observed between the GID and NC boys; however, there were "medium" and "small" effect size differences with boys with GID showing more empathy on the in-vivo and self-report measures, respectively. On the maternal-report measure, the GID boys were rated as significantly more empathic than the ECC boys and there was a trend for the GID boys to show greater levels of empathy than the ECC boys on both the self-report and in-vivo measures. The effect size differences on all three empathy measures were "medium" to "large," with GID boys showing more empathy than ECC boys. Empathy as a dispositional characteristic in the genesis and perpetuation of GID in boys is discussed.

  7. Evaluating the Clinical Efficacy of Tooth Powder on Plaque-Induced Gingivitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Khalil

    2017-09-01

    Toothpastes and tooth powders are common oral care products used to control plaque and other deposits from tooth surfaces, thereby reducing gingivitis. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of tooth powder in controlling dental plaque and gingivitis. A double-blind, parallel-arm, randomized controlled trial was conducted on 154 participants, aged 33 to 40 years, having at least 20 teeth with a full-mouth gingival index (GI) score ≥ 1.04 and fulfilling other inclusion/exclusion criteria. The plaque index (PI) and GI scores were used as measures of oral hygiene. Outcome variables of gingivitis and dental plaque were evaluated in test and control groups randomized with 1:1 ratio at 4, 12, and 24 weeks of follow-up. Repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA), t test, and paired t test were used for statistical analysis with a significance level of ≤ 0.050. One hundred and thirty-seven (N = 137) participants completed the study. Demographic and oral clinical parameters showed no statistical difference between the test group and the control group at baseline. A statistically significant difference (P ≤ .033) between the test group and the control group was observed for dental PI and GI scores at follow-up examinations. The repeated measure ANOVA also revealed a significant group interaction (P ≤ .01) for a reduction in outcome variables. From the current study, it may be concluded that tooth powder has been shown to be statistically superior to toothpastes in controlling dental plaque and gingivitis.

  8. Positive state observer for the automatic control of the depth of anesthesia-Clinical results.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Filipa N; Mendonça, T; Rocha, P

    2016-09-13

    The depth of anesthesia (DoA) is a crucial feature in general anesthesia. Nowadays the DoA is usually evaluated by the bispectral index (BIS). According to the surgical procedure, different reference levels for the BIS may be clinically required. This can be achieved by the simultaneous administration of an analgesic (e.g. remifentanil) and an hypnotic (eg propofol). As a contribution to the effort of automating the processes of drug delivery in general anesthesia, in this paper, a positive state observer is designed for the implementation of a control scheme proposed for the automatic administration of propofol and of remifentanil, in order to track a desired level for the BIS. It is proved and illustrated by simulations that the controller-observer scheme has a very good performance. This scheme was implemented, tested and evaluated both by means of simulations and for a set of patients during surgical procedures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Alpha lipoic acid efficacy in burning mouth syndrome. A controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Sánchez, Begoña; Moreno-López, Luis-Alberto; Cerero-Lapiedra, Rocío; Llamas-Martínez, Silvia; Esparza-Gómez, Germán

    2015-07-01

    A double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted in order to evaluate the efficacy of alpha lipoic acid (ALA) and determine the statistical significance of the outcome variables. Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is defined as an oral burning sensation in the absence of clinical signs which could justify the syndrome. Recent studies suggest the existence of neurological factors as a possible cause of the disease. 60 patients with BMS, in two groups: case group with 600 mg/day and placebo as control group; with follow up of 2 months. 64% of ALA patients reported some level of improvement, with a level of maintenance of 68.75% one month after treatment. 27.6% of the placebo group also demonstrated some reduction in BMS symptoms. Long-term evolution and the intensity of symptoms are variables that reduce the probability of improvement with ALA treatment.

  10. First clinical application of a navigation-controlled shaver in paranasal sinus surgery.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Gero; Hofer, Mathias; Fischer, Milos; Koulechov, Kirill; Trantakis, Christos; Manzey, Dittrich; Meixenberger, Juergen; Dietz, Andreas; Lueth, Tim C; Klapper, H U

    2008-01-01

    Conventional, pointer-based navigated Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS) has been shown to have certain limitations: necessity of instrument change for navigation, changes in the surgeon's line-of-sight axis, and limited length of use of the navigation information. These limitations result in negative consequences regarding the surgeon's attentiveness in any given situation, as well as in his cognitive work-load. The principle of Navigated Control offers advantages concerning these problems and limitations of the conventionally navigated FESS. This Chapter analyzes the first clinical deployment of a navigation-controlled shaver in FESS on the basis of the following questions: (1) Is clinical deployment of the navigation-controlled shaver possible with the pre-clinic evaluated set-up? (2) What information relevant to the surgery is relayed in an intraoperative setting by the navigation-controlled shaver? (3) How does deployment of the navigation-controlled shaver affect the ergonomics of the surgery? Ten patients with chronic sinusitis ethmoidalis were included in the study (average age: 48 [22-71], m:w=4:6). The preoperative and intraoperative workflow was documented according to the Innovation Center Computer Assisted Surgery (ICCAS) Workflow protocol. Data regarding the surgical validity of the information and ergonomic characteristics were recorded by means of questionnaires. The average time required for segmentation of the workspace was 14.2 minutes. The shaver switched off through Navigated Control an average 16.5 times during an FESS. From this amount, five shutdowns on average were initiative and six were determined to be provoked. The shutdowns were indicated by the operators to be correct in 199 of 220 (90.5%) events and in agreement with the actual position and planned resection borders. The quality of the relayed navigation information was indicated with an average Level of Quality (LOQ) of 56.4 [50-80]. The most favorable evaluation was

  11. Salmonella enteritidis: clinical epidemiological approaches for prevention and control of S. enteritidis in poultry production.

    PubMed

    Noordhuizen, J P; Frankena, K

    1994-01-01

    Salmonella enteritidis infections in poultry appear to be of major public concern. Prevalence levels in veal calves and pigs are rather low. Because of the complex of socio-psychological, welfare, economic and public health aspects great emphasis should be put on prevention and control. This paper deals with some clinical epidemiological approaches for prevention and control of S. enteritidis. Emphasis is set on multifactorial background of infection occurrence, epidemiological methods and features of monitoring and surveillance for evaluation of measures taken during a follow-up period. Finally, it is stated that the application of Risk Assessment & Analysis principles in this problem area, integrating the concepts previously addressed, might prove to be a valuable perspective.

  12. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy suppresses dental plaque formation in healthy adults: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ichinose-Tsuno, Akiko; Aoki, Akira; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Kirikae, Teruo; Shimbo, Takuro; Lee, Masaichi-Chang-Il; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Maruoka, Yutaka; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Ishikawa, Isao; Izumi, Yuichi

    2014-12-15

    Oral care is important for oral and systemic health, especially for elderly institutionalized individuals and compromised patients. However, conventional mechanical plaque control is often difficult for these patients because of the pain or the risk of aspiration. Although antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT), which is considered an alternative or adjunct to mechanical approaches, has potential application as a less stressful method of daily plaque control, no clinical application of this technique has been reported. We investigated the inhibitory effect of a combination of toluidine blue O (TBO), and a red light-emitting diode (LED) on dental plaque formation in healthy volunteers. The optimal concentration of TBO was determined in preliminary in vitro experiments to evaluate the bactericidal effect of aPDT on Streptococcus oralis and to clarify its safety in fibroblast cells. To survey the mechanism of TBO-mediated aPDT, the quality and quantity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated during aPDT were also examined using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Subsequently, the inhibitory effect of aPDT on dental plaque formation was investigated in eleven subjects as a clinical pilot study. The right or left mandibular premolars were randomly assigned to the treatment (with aPDT) or control (without aPDT) groups. In total, aPDT was applied six times (twice per day) to the teeth in the test group over a period of four days. On the fourth day, the study concluded and the analyses were performed. A combination of 500 or 1000 μg/ml TBO and LED irradiation for 20 s significantly decreased the number of colony forming units of Streptococcus oralis. The cytotoxicity of aPDT was comparable to that of standard antiseptics used in the oral cavity. Hydroxyl radicals were detected by ESR analysis, but singlet oxygen was not. A randomized controlled trial demonstrated that aPDT with 1000 μg/ml TBO and red LED irradiation significantly suppressed dental plaque

  13. Craniosacral therapy for migraine: Protocol development for an exploratory controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Mann, John D; Faurot, Keturah R; Wilkinson, Laurel; Curtis, Peter; Coeytaux, Remy R; Suchindran, Chirayath; Gaylord, Susan A

    2008-01-01

    Background Migraine affects approximately 20% of the population. Conventional care for migraine is suboptimal; overuse of medications for the treatment of episodic migraines is a risk factor for developing chronic daily headache. The study of non-pharmaceutical approaches for prevention of migraine headaches is therefore warranted. Craniosacral therapy (CST) is a popular non-pharmacological approach to the treatment or prevention of migraine headaches for which there is limited evidence of safety and efficacy. In this paper, we describe an ongoing feasibility study to assess the safety and efficacy of CST in the treatment of migraine, using a rigorous and innovative randomized controlled study design involving low-strength static magnets (LSSM) as an attention control intervention. Methods The trial is designed to test the hypothesis that, compared to those receiving usual care plus a treatment with low-strength static magnets (attention-control complementary therapy), subjects receiving usual medical care plus CST will demonstrate significant improvement in: quality-of-life as measured by the Headache Impact Test (HIT-6); reduced frequency of migraine; and a perception of clinical benefit. Criteria for inclusion are either gender, age > 11, English or Spanish speaking, meeting the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) criteria for migraine with or without aura, a headache frequency of 5 to 15 per month over at least two years. After an 8 week baseline phase, eligible subjects are randomized to either CST or an attention control intervention, low strength static magnets (LSSM). To evaluate possible therapist bias, videotaped encounters are analyzed to assess for any systematic group differences in interactions with subjects. Results 169 individuals have been screened for eligibility, of which 109 were eligible for the study. Five did not qualify during the baseline phase because of inadequate headache frequency. Nineteen have withdrawn from the

  14. Clinically apparent internal mammary nodal metastasis in patients with advanced breast cancer: incidence and local control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Jing; Oh, Julia L; Whitman, Gary J; Iyengar, Puneeth; Yu, Tse-Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A; Perkins, George; Buchholz, Thomas A; Strom, Eric A

    2010-07-15

    To investigate the incidence and local control of internal mammary lymph node metastases (IMN+) in patients with clinical N2 or N3 locally advanced breast cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 809 breast cancer patients diagnosed with advanced nodal disease (clinical N2-3) who received radiation treatment at our institution from January 2000 December 2006. Patients were considered IMN+ on the basis of imaging studies. We identified 112 of 809 patients who presented with IMN+ disease (13.8%) detected on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. All 112 patients with IMN+ disease received anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) resulted in a complete response (CR) on imaging studies of IMN disease in 72.1% of patients. Excluding 16 patients with progressive disease, 96 patients received adjuvant radiation to the breast or the chest wall and the regional lymphatics including the IMN chain with a median dose of 60 Gy if the internal mammary lymph nodes normalized after chemotherapy and 66 Gy if they did not. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 41 months (8-118 months). For the 96 patients able to complete curative therapy, the actuarial 5-year IMN control rate, locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 89%, 80%, 76%, and 56%. Over ten percent of patients with advanced nodal disease will have IMN metastases on imaging studies. Multimodality therapy including IMN irradiation achieves excellent rates of control in the IMN region and a DFS of more than 50% after curative treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Clinically Apparent Internal Mammary Nodal Metastasis in Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: Incidence and Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujing; Oh, Julia L.; Whitman, Gary J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and local control of internal mammary lymph node metastases (IMN+) in patients with clinical N2 or N3 locally advanced breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 809 breast cancer patients diagnosed with advanced nodal disease (clinical N2-3) who received radiation treatment at our institution from January 2000 December 2006. Patients were considered IMN+ on the basis of imaging studies. Results: We identified 112 of 809 patients who presented with IMN+ disease (13.8%) detected on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. All 112 patients with IMN+ disease received anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) resulted in a complete response (CR) on imaging studies of IMN disease in 72.1% of patients. Excluding 16 patients with progressive disease, 96 patients received adjuvant radiation to the breast or the chest wall and the regional lymphatics including the IMN chain with a median dose of 60 Gy if the internal mammary lymph nodes normalized after chemotherapy and 66 Gy if they did not. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 41 months (8-118 months). For the 96 patients able to complete curative therapy, the actuarial 5-year IMN control rate, locoregional control, overall survival, and disease-free survival were 89%, 80%, 76%, and 56%. Conclusion: Over ten percent of patients with advanced nodal disease will have IMN metastases on imaging studies. Multimodality therapy including IMN irradiation achieves excellent rates of control in the IMN region and a DFS of more than 50% after curative treatment.

  16. Optimizing clinical trial supply requirements: simulation of computer-controlled supply chain management.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Magnus; Byrom, Bill; Dowlman, Nikki; McEntegart, Damian

    2004-01-01

    Computer-controlled systems are commonly used in clinical trials to control dispensing and manage site inventories of trial supplies. Typically such systems are used with an interactive telephone or web system that provide an interface with the study site. Realizing the maximum savings in medication associated with this approach has, in the past, been problematic as it has been difficult to fully estimate medication requirements due to the complexities of these algorithms and the inherent variation in the clinical trial recruitment process. We describe the traditional and automated methods of supplying sites. We detail a simulation approach that models the automated system. We design a number of simulation experiments using this model to investigate the supply strategy properties that influence medication overage and other strategy performance metrics. The computer-controlled medication system gave superior performance to the traditional method. In one example, a 75% overage of wasted medication in the traditional system was associated with higher supply failure than an automated system strategy with an overage of 47%. In a further example, we demonstrate that the impact of using a country stratified as opposed to site stratified scheme affects the number of deliveries and probability of supply failures more than the amount of drug wasted with respective increases of 20, 2300 and 4%. Medication savings with automated systems are particularly significant in repeat dispensing designs. We show that the number of packs required can fall by as much as 50% if one uses a predictive medication algorithm. We conclude that a computer-controlled supply chain enables medication savings to be realized and that it is possible to quantify the distribution of these savings using a simulation model. The simulation model can be used to optimize the prestudy medication supply strategy and for midstudy monitoring using real-time data contained in the study database.

  17. Effect of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Darsareh, Fatemeh; Taavoni, Simin; Joolaee, Soodabeh; Haghani, Hamid

    2012-09-01

    Menopause is a significant event in most women's lives because it marks the end of a woman's natural reproductive life. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aromatherapy massage on menopausal symptoms. A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted at a menopausal clinic at a gynecology hospital in Tehran. The study population comprised 90 women who were assigned to an aromatherapy massage group, a placebo massage group, or a control group. Each participant in the aromatherapy massage group received 30-minute aromatherapy treatment sessions twice a week for 4 weeks with aroma oil, whereas participants in the placebo massage group received the same treatment with plain oil. No treatment was provided to participants in the control group. The outcome measures in this study were menopausal symptoms, as obtained through the Menopause Rating Scale. The mean baseline level of the menopausal score did not differ among all groups. However, after eight sessions of intervention, the Menopause Rating Scale score differed significantly among the three groups (P < 0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed that women in both the aromatherapy massage group and the placebo massage group had a lower menopausal score than the control group (P < 0.001). When the aromatherapy massage and the placebo massage groups were compared, the menopausal score for the aromatherapy massage group was found to be significantly lower (P < 0.001) than for the placebo group. The results of the study demonstrate that both massage and aromatherapy massage were effective in reducing menopausal symptoms. However, aromatherapy massage was more effective than only massage.

  18. The Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale: psychometric features within a clinical population and a cut-off point to differentiate clinical patients from healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Krabbenborg, Manon A M; Danner, Unna N; Larsen, Junilla K; van der Veer, Nienke; van Elburg, Annemarie A; de Ridder, Denise T D; Evers, Catharine; Stice, Eric; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2012-07-01

    The Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (EDDS) is a brief self-report measure for diagnosing anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Research has provided evidence of the reliability and validity of this scale in non-clinical populations. Our study is the first to examine the psychometric features of the EDDS in a clinical population of eating disordered patients. We identified a cut-off point that differentiates clinical patients from healthy controls. A clinical group of 59 Dutch female eating disordered patients and a control group of 45 Dutch students completed the EDDS, the Eating Disorder Examination Interview, the Body Attitude Test and the Beck Depression Inventory--II. The EDDS showed good test-retest reliability, internal consistency, criterion validity and convergent validity with other scales assessing eating and general pathology. An overall symptom composite cut-off score of 16.5 accurately distinguished clinical patients from healthy controls. The EDDS may be a useful instrument in clinical settings and in ae