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Sample records for controlled gene expression

  1. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  2. Control of gene expression in trypanosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, L; Pays, E

    1995-01-01

    Trypanosomes are protozoan agents of major parasitic diseases such as Chagas' disease in South America and sleeping sickness of humans and nagana disease of cattle in Africa. They are transmitted to mammalian hosts by specific insect vectors. Their life cycle consists of a succession of differentiation and growth phases requiring regulated gene expression to adapt to the changing extracellular environment. Typical of such stage-specific expression is that of the major surface antigens of Trypanosoma brucei, procyclin in the procyclic (insect) form and the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) in the bloodstream (mammalian) form. In trypanosomes, the regulation of gene expression is effected mainly at posttranscriptional levels, since primary transcription of most of the genes occurs in long polycistronic units and is constitutive. The transcripts are processed by transsplicing and polyadenylation under the influence of intergenic polypyrimidine tracts. These events show some developmental regulation. Untranslated sequences of the mRNAs seem to play a prominent role in the stage-specific control of individual gene expression, through a modulation of mRNA abundance. The VSG and procyclin transcription units exhibit particular features that are probably related to the need for a high level of expression. The promoters and RNA polymerase driving the expression of these units resemble those of the ribosomal genes. Their mutually exclusive expression is ensured by controls operating at several levels, including RNA elongation. Antigenic variation in the bloodstream is achieved through DNA rearrangements or alternative activation of the telomeric VSG gene expression sites. Recent discoveries, such as the existence of a novel nucleotide in telomeric DNA and the generation of point mutations in VSG genes, have shed new light on the mechanisms and consequences of antigenic variation. PMID:7603410

  3. Control of gene expression by proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Pahl, H L; Baeuerle, P A

    1996-06-01

    The proteasome and the small protein ubiquitin are key elements in the intracellular pathway of general protein degradation. Recent evidence shows that the proteasome and other less well defined cytoplasmic proteases can participate in specific events which control inducible gene expression. A number of eukaryotic transcriptional regulators, including NF-kappa B/l kappa B, p53, c-Jun, Notch, sterol regulated element binding proteins and MAT2 alpha, have recently been shown to be regulated by proteolytic events, a regulation which results in the activation or inactivation of gene expression.

  4. Transgenic control of perforin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenheld, M.G.; Podack, E.R.; Levy, R.B.

    1995-03-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming effector molecule of CTL and NK cells. To characterize perforin gene expression and its transcriptional control mechanisms in vivo, expression of a cell surface tag, i.e., human CD4, was driven by 5.1 kb of the murin perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region in transgenic mice. Six out of seven transgenic lines expressed the perforin-tag hybrid gene at low to intermediate levels, depending on the integration site. Transgene expression occurred in all cells that physiologically are able to express perforin. At the whole organ level, significant amounts of transgenic mRNA and endogenous perforin mRNA were co-expressed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the lung, the ileum, the oviduct/uterus, and the bone marrow. At the single cell level, the perforin tag was present on NK cells and on CD8{sup +}, as well as on CD4{sup +} cells. Also targeted were Thy-1.2{sup +} {gamma}{delta} T cells, but not Thy-1.2{sup -} {gamma}{delta} T cells, B cells, nor monocytes. During thymic T cell development, transgene expression occurred in double negative (CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}) thymocytes and was detected at all subsequent stages, but exceeded the expression levels of the endogenous gene in the thymus. In conclusion, the analyzed perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region contains important cis-acting sequences that restrict perforin expression to T cells and NK cells, and therefore provides a unique tool for manipulating T cell and/or Nk cell-mediated immune responses in transgenic mice. On the other hand, the normal control of perforin gene expression involves at least one additional negative control mechanism that was not mediated by the transgenic promoter and upstream region. This control restricts perforin gene expression in thymically developing T cells and in most resting peripheral T cells, but can be released upon T cell activation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Posttranscriptional Control of Gene Expression in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John E. G.

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have greatly advanced our understanding of the posttranscriptional steps of eukaryotic gene expression. Given the wide range of experimental tools applicable to S. cerevisiae and the recent determination of its complete genomic sequence, many of the key challenges of the posttranscriptional control field can be tackled particularly effectively by using this organism. This article reviews the current knowledge of the cellular components and mechanisms related to translation and mRNA decay, with the emphasis on the molecular basis for rate control and gene regulation. Recent progress in characterizing translation factors and their protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions has been rapid. Against the background of a growing body of structural information, the review discusses the thermodynamic and kinetic principles that govern the translation process. As in prokaryotic systems, translational initiation is a key point of control. Modulation of the activities of translational initiation factors imposes global regulation in the cell, while structural features of particular 5′ untranslated regions, such as upstream open reading frames and effector binding sites, allow for gene-specific regulation. Recent data have revealed many new details of the molecular mechanisms involved while providing insight into the functional overlaps and molecular networking that are apparently a key feature of evolving cellular systems. An overall picture of the mechanisms governing mRNA decay has only very recently begun to develop. The latest work has revealed new information about the mRNA decay pathways, the components of the mRNA degradation machinery, and the way in which these might relate to the translation apparatus. Overall, major challenges still to be addressed include the task of relating principles of posttranscriptional control to cellular compartmentalization and polysome structure and the role of molecular channelling

  6. Resource Sharing Controls Gene Expression Bursting.

    PubMed

    Caveney, Patrick M; Norred, S Elizabeth; Chin, Charles W; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Razooky, Brandon S; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, C Patrick; Simpson, Michael L

    2017-02-17

    Episodic gene expression, with periods of high expression separated by periods of no expression, is a pervasive biological phenomenon. This bursty pattern of expression draws from a finite reservoir of expression machinery in a highly time variant way, i.e., requiring no resources most of the time but drawing heavily on them during short intense bursts, that intimately links expression bursting and resource sharing. Yet, most recent investigations have focused on specific molecular mechanisms intrinsic to the bursty behavior of individual genes, while little is known about the interplay between resource sharing and global expression bursting behavior. Here, we confine Escherichia coli cell extract in both cell-sized microfluidic chambers and lipid-based vesicles to explore how resource sharing influences expression bursting. Interestingly, expression burst size, but not burst frequency, is highly sensitive to the size of the shared transcription and translation resource pools. The intriguing implication of these results is that expression bursts are more readily amplified than initiated, suggesting that burst formation occurs through positive feedback or cooperativity. When extrapolated to prokaryotic cells, these results suggest that large translational bursts may be correlated with large transcriptional bursts. This correlation is supported by recently reported transcription and translation bursting studies in E. coli. The results reported here demonstrate a strong intimate link between global expression burst patterns and resource sharing, and they suggest that bursting plays an important role in optimizing the use of limited, shared expression resources.

  7. Noise in gene expression: origins, consequences, and control.

    PubMed

    Raser, Jonathan M; O'Shea, Erin K

    2005-09-23

    Genetically identical cells and organisms exhibit remarkable diversity even when they have identical histories of environmental exposure. Noise, or variation, in the process of gene expression may contribute to this phenotypic variability. Recent studies suggest that this noise has multiple sources, including the stochastic or inherently random nature of the biochemical reactions of gene expression. In this review, we summarize noise terminology and comment on recent investigations into the sources, consequences, and control of noise in gene expression.

  8. Control of alphavirus-based gene expression using engineered riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christie L; Yu, Dong; Smolke, Christina D; Geall, Andrew J; Beard, Clayton W; Mason, Peter W

    2015-09-01

    Alphavirus-based replicons are a promising nucleic acid vaccine platform characterized by robust gene expression and immune responses. To further explore their use in vaccination, replicons were engineered to allow conditional control over their gene expression. Riboswitches, comprising a ribozyme actuator and RNA aptamer sensor, were engineered into the replicon 3' UTR. Binding of ligand to aptamer modulates ribozyme activity and, therefore, gene expression. Expression from DNA-launched and VRP-packaged replicons containing riboswitches was successfully regulated, achieving a 47-fold change in expression and modulation of the resulting type I interferon response. Moreover, we developed a novel control architecture where riboswitches were integrated into the 3' and 5' UTR of the subgenomic RNA region of the TC-83 virus, leading to an 1160-fold regulation of viral replication. Our studies demonstrate that the use of riboswitches for control of RNA replicon expression and viral replication holds promise for development of novel and safer vaccination strategies.

  9. Evidence for mitochondrial genetic control of autosomal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kassam, Irfahan; Qi, Tuan; Lloyd-Jones, Luke; Holloway, Alexander; Jan Bonder, Marc; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Powell, Joseph E; Franke, Lude; Montgomery, Grant W; Visscher, Peter M; McRae, Allan F

    2016-12-15

    The mitochondrial and nuclear genomes coordinate and co-evolve in eukaryotes in order to adapt to environmental changes. Variation in the mitochondrial genome is capable of affecting expression of genes on the nuclear genome. Sex-specific mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression has been demonstrated in Drosophila melanogaster, where males were found to drive most of the total variation in gene expression. This has potential implications for male-related health and disease resulting from variation in mtDNA solely inherited from the mother. We used a family-based study comprised of 47,323 gene expression probes and 78 mitochondrial SNPs (mtSNPs) from n = 846 individuals to examine the extent of mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in humans. This identified 15 significant probe-mtSNP associations (P<10-8) corresponding to 5 unique genes on the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, with three of these genes corresponding to mitochondrial genetic control of gene expression in the nuclear genome. The associated mtSNPs for three genes (one cis and two trans associations) were replicated (P < 0.05) in an independent dataset of n = 452 unrelated individuals. There was no evidence for sexual dimorphic gene expression in any of these five probes. Sex-specific effects were examined by applying our analysis to males and females separately and testing for differences in effect size. The MEST gene was identified as having the most significantly different effect sizes across the sexes (P≈10-7). MEST was similarly expressed in males and females with the G allele; however, males with the C allele are highly expressed for MEST, while females show no expression of the gene. This study provides evidence for the mitochondrial genetic control of expression of several genes in humans, with little evidence found for sex-specific effects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Cell Cycle Programs of Gene Expression Control Morphogenetic Protein Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Matthew; Yang, Melody C.; Mischke, Michelle; Chant, John

    2000-01-01

    Genomic studies in yeast have revealed that one eighth of genes are cell cycle regulated in their expression. Almost without exception, the significance of cell cycle periodic gene expression has not been tested. Given that many such genes are critical to cellular morphogenesis, we wanted to examine the importance of periodic gene expression to this process. The expression profiles of two genes required for the axial pattern of cell division, BUD3 and BUD10/AXL2/SRO4, are strongly cell cycle regulated. BUD3 is expressed close to the onset of mitosis. BUD10 is expressed in late G1. Through promotor-swap experiments, the expression profile of each gene was altered and the consequences examined. We found that an S/G2 pulse of BUD3 expression controls the timing of Bud3p localization, but that this timing is not critical to Bud3p function. In contrast, a G1 pulse of BUD10 expression plays a direct role in Bud10p localization and function. Bud10p, a membrane protein, relies on the polarized secretory machinery specific to G1 to be delivered to its proper location. Such a secretion-based targeting mechanism for membrane proteins provides cells with flexibility in remodeling their architecture or evolving new forms. PMID:11134078

  11. Multi-chromatic control of mammalian gene expression and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Schulz, Simon; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Weber, Cornelia C.; Ulm, Roman; Timmer, Jens; Zurbriggen, Matias D.; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    The emergence and future of mammalian synthetic biology depends on technologies for orchestrating and custom tailoring complementary gene expression and signaling processes in a predictable manner. Here, we demonstrate for the first time multi-chromatic expression control in mammalian cells by differentially inducing up to three genes in a single cell culture in response to light of different wavelengths. To this end, we developed an ultraviolet B (UVB)-inducible expression system by designing a UVB-responsive split transcription factor based on the Arabidopsis thaliana UVB receptor UVR8 and the WD40 domain of COP1. The system allowed high (up to 800-fold) UVB-induced gene expression in human, monkey, hamster and mouse cells. Based on a quantitative model, we determined critical system parameters. By combining this UVB-responsive system with blue and red light-inducible gene control technology, we demonstrate multi-chromatic multi-gene control by differentially expressing three genes in a single cell culture in mammalian cells, and we apply this system for the multi-chromatic control of angiogenic signaling processes. This portfolio of optogenetic tools enables the design and implementation of synthetic biological networks showing unmatched spatiotemporal precision for future research and biomedical applications. PMID:23625964

  12. Multi-chromatic control of mammalian gene expression and signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Schulz, Simon; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Weber, Cornelia C; Ulm, Roman; Timmer, Jens; Zurbriggen, Matias D; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-07-01

    The emergence and future of mammalian synthetic biology depends on technologies for orchestrating and custom tailoring complementary gene expression and signaling processes in a predictable manner. Here, we demonstrate for the first time multi-chromatic expression control in mammalian cells by differentially inducing up to three genes in a single cell culture in response to light of different wavelengths. To this end, we developed an ultraviolet B (UVB)-inducible expression system by designing a UVB-responsive split transcription factor based on the Arabidopsis thaliana UVB receptor UVR8 and the WD40 domain of COP1. The system allowed high (up to 800-fold) UVB-induced gene expression in human, monkey, hamster and mouse cells. Based on a quantitative model, we determined critical system parameters. By combining this UVB-responsive system with blue and red light-inducible gene control technology, we demonstrate multi-chromatic multi-gene control by differentially expressing three genes in a single cell culture in mammalian cells, and we apply this system for the multi-chromatic control of angiogenic signaling processes. This portfolio of optogenetic tools enables the design and implementation of synthetic biological networks showing unmatched spatiotemporal precision for future research and biomedical applications.

  13. Histone availability as a strategy to control gene expression.

    PubMed

    Prado, Félix; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Reyes, José C

    2017-03-04

    Histone proteins are main structural components of the chromatin and major determinants of gene regulation. Expression of canonical histone genes is strictly controlled during the cell cycle in order to couple DNA replication with histone deposition. Indeed, reductions in the levels of canonical histones or defects in chromatin assembly cause genetic instability. Early data from yeast demonstrated that severe histone depletion also causes strong gene expression changes. We have recently reported that a moderated depletion of canonical histones in human cells leads to an open chromatin configuration, which in turn increases RNA polymerase II elongation rates and causes pre-mRNA splicing defects. Interestingly, some of the observed defects accompany the scheduled histone depletion that is associated with several senescence and aging processes. Thus, our comparison of induced and naturally-occurring histone depletion processes suggests that a programmed reduction of the level of canonical histones might be a strategy to control gene expression during specific physiological processes.

  14. Circadian Control of Global Gene Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Colleen J.; Kay, Steve A.

    2014-01-01

    An internal time-keeping mechanism has been observed in almost every organism studied from archaea to humans. This circadian clock provides a competitive advantage in fitness and survival (18, 30, 95, 129, 137). Researchers have uncovered the molecular composition of this internal clock by combining enzymology, molecular biology, genetics, and modeling approaches. However, understanding the mechanistic link between the clock and output responses has been elusive. In three model organisms, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, and Mus musculus, whole-genome expression arrays have enabled researchers to investigate how maintaining a time-keeping mechanism connects to an adaptive advantage. Here, we review the impacts transcriptomics have had on our understanding of the clock and how this molecular clock connects with system-level circadian responses. We explore the discoveries made possible by high-throughput RNA assays, the network approaches used to investigate these large transcript datasets, and potential future directions. PMID:20809800

  15. Sequential Logic Model Deciphers Dynamic Transcriptional Control of Gene Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Zhen Xuan; Wong, Sum Thai; Arjunan, Satya Nanda Vel; Piras, Vincent; Tomita, Masaru; Selvarajoo, Kumar; Giuliani, Alessandro; Tsuchiya, Masa

    2007-01-01

    Background Cellular signaling involves a sequence of events from ligand binding to membrane receptors through transcription factors activation and the induction of mRNA expression. The transcriptional-regulatory system plays a pivotal role in the control of gene expression. A novel computational approach to the study of gene regulation circuits is presented here. Methodology Based on the concept of finite state machine, which provides a discrete view of gene regulation, a novel sequential logic model (SLM) is developed to decipher control mechanisms of dynamic transcriptional regulation of gene expressions. The SLM technique is also used to systematically analyze the dynamic function of transcriptional inputs, the dependency and cooperativity, such as synergy effect, among the binding sites with respect to when, how much and how fast the gene of interest is expressed. Principal Findings SLM is verified by a set of well studied expression data on endo16 of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (sea urchin) during the embryonic midgut development. A dynamic regulatory mechanism for endo16 expression controlled by three binding sites, UI, R and Otx is identified and demonstrated to be consistent with experimental findings. Furthermore, we show that during transition from specification to differentiation in wild type endo16 expression profile, SLM reveals three binary activities are not sufficient to explain the transcriptional regulation of endo16 expression and additional activities of binding sites are required. Further analyses suggest detailed mechanism of R switch activity where indirect dependency occurs in between UI activity and R switch during specification to differentiation stage. Conclusions/Significance The sequential logic formalism allows for a simplification of regulation network dynamics going from a continuous to a discrete representation of gene activation in time. In effect our SLM is non-parametric and model-independent, yet providing rich biological

  16. Gene expression control by Bacillus anthracis purine riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Marion; Schneider, Sabine

    2017-02-16

    In all kingdoms of life, cellular replication relies on the presence of nucleosides and nucleotides, the building blocks of nucleic acids and the main source of energy. In bacteria, the availability of metabolites sometimes directly regulates the expression of enzymes and proteins involved in purine salvage, biosynthesis and uptake through riboswitches. Riboswitches are located in bacterial mRNAs and can control gene expression by conformational changes in response to ligand binding. We have established an inverse reporter gene system in Bacillus subtilis that allows us to monitor riboswitch-controlled gene expression. We used it to investigate the activity of five potential purine riboswitches from B. anthracis in response to different purines and pyrimidines. Furthermore, in vitro studies on the aptamer domains of the riboswitches reveal their variation in guanine binding affinity ranging from nM to µM. These data do not only provide insight into metabolite sensing but can also aid to engineer artificial cell regulatory systems.

  17. Small Molecule Control of Virulence Gene Expression in Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Charity, James C.; Blalock, LeeAnn T.; Costante-Hamm, Michelle M.; Kasper, Dennis L.; Dove, Simon L.

    2009-01-01

    In Francisella tularensis, the SspA protein family members MglA and SspA form a complex that associates with RNA polymerase (RNAP) to positively control the expression of virulence genes critical for the intramacrophage growth and survival of the organism. Although the association of the MglA-SspA complex with RNAP is evidently central to its role in controlling gene expression, the molecular details of how MglA and SspA exert their effects are not known. Here we show that in the live vaccine strain of F. tularensis (LVS), the MglA-SspA complex works in concert with a putative DNA-binding protein we have called PigR, together with the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), to regulate the expression of target genes. In particular, we present evidence that MglA, SspA, PigR and ppGpp regulate expression of the same set of genes, and show that mglA, sspA, pigR and ppGpp null mutants exhibit similar intramacrophage growth defects and are strongly attenuated for virulence in mice. We show further that PigR interacts directly with the MglA-SspA complex, suggesting that the central role of the MglA and SspA proteins in the control of virulence gene expression is to serve as a target for a transcription activator. Finally, we present evidence that ppGpp exerts its effects by promoting the interaction between PigR and the RNAP-associated MglA-SspA complex. Through its responsiveness to ppGpp, the contact between PigR and the MglA-SspA complex allows the integration of nutritional cues into the regulatory network governing virulence gene expression. PMID:19876386

  18. Riboswitch-mediated control of gene expression in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of metabolite-sensing RNA domains with gene regulatory functions, so-called riboswitches, has greatly expanded our view of the structural and functional complexity of RNA. Hitherto, more than 20 distinct riboswitch classes have been identified, which respond to a variety of small molecules and perform sophisticated gene regulatory tasks. Riboswitches are typically positioned in the 5' untranslated region of bacterial mRNAs, where they control gene expression by transcriptional or translational attenuation. However, the recent investigation of additional riboswitch classes has revealed a more complex repertoire of regulatory mechanisms. This also includes splicing control in filamentous fungi, green algae and higher plants by thiamin pyrophosphate-binding riboswitches, the only class of metabolite-sensing RNAs identified in eukaryotes so far. All eukaryotic riboswitches characterized to date modulate, in a first step, splicing, but the downstream processes under control vary fundamentally among different species further highlighting the versatility of this gene regulatory mechanism.

  19. Genome engineering and gene expression control for bacterial strain development.

    PubMed

    Song, Chan Woo; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of techniques and tools have been developed for genome engineering and gene expression control to achieve desired phenotypes of various bacteria. Here we review and discuss the recent advances in bacterial genome manipulation and gene expression control techniques, and their actual uses with accompanying examples. Genome engineering has been commonly performed based on homologous recombination. During such genome manipulation, the counterselection systems employing SacB or nucleases have mainly been used for the efficient selection of desired engineered strains. The recombineering technology enables simple and more rapid manipulation of the bacterial genome. The group II intron-mediated genome engineering technology is another option for some bacteria that are difficult to be engineered by homologous recombination. Due to the increasing demands on high-throughput screening of bacterial strains having the desired phenotypes, several multiplex genome engineering techniques have recently been developed and validated in some bacteria. Another approach to achieve desired bacterial phenotypes is the repression of target gene expression without the modification of genome sequences. This can be performed by expressing antisense RNA, small regulatory RNA, or CRISPR RNA to repress target gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. All of these techniques allow efficient and rapid development and screening of bacterial strains having desired phenotypes, and more advanced techniques are expected to be seen. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Optogenetic switches for light-controlled gene expression in yeast.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Francisco; Rojas, Vicente; Delgado, Verónica; Agosin, Eduardo; Larrondo, Luis F

    2017-04-01

    Light is increasingly recognized as an efficient means of controlling diverse biological processes with high spatiotemporal resolution. Optogenetic switches are molecular devices for regulating light-controlled gene expression, protein localization, signal transduction and protein-protein interactions. Such molecular components have been mainly developed through the use of photoreceptors, which upon light stimulation undergo conformational changes passing to an active state. The current repertoires of optogenetic switches include red, blue and UV-B light photoreceptors and have been implemented in a broad spectrum of biological platforms. In this review, we revisit different optogenetic switches that have been used in diverse biological platforms, with emphasis on those used for light-controlled gene expression in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The implementation of these switches overcomes the use of traditional chemical inducers, allowing precise control of gene expression at lower costs, without leaving chemical traces, and positively impacting the production of high-value metabolites and heterologous proteins. Additionally, we highlight the potential of utilizing this technology beyond laboratory strains, by optimizing it for use in yeasts tamed for industrial processes. Finally, we discuss how fungal photoreceptors could serve as a source of biological parts for the development of novel optogenetic switches with improved characteristics. Although optogenetic tools have had a strong impact on basic research, their use in applied sciences is still undervalued. Therefore, the invitation for the future is to utilize this technology in biotechnological and industrial settings.

  1. Gene regulatory networks and the role of robustness and stochasticity in the control of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, Lesley T.; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2011-01-01

    In any given cell, thousands of genes are expressed and work in concert to ensure the cell's function, fitness, and survival. Each gene, in turn, must be expressed at the proper time and in the proper amounts to ensure the appropriate functional outcome. The regulation and expression of some genes are highly robust; their expression is controlled by invariable expression programs. For instance, developmental gene expression is extremely similar in a given cell type from one individual to another. The expression of other genes is more variable: Their levels are noisy and are different from cell to cell and from individual to individual. This can be highly beneficial in physiological responses to outside cues and stresses. Recent advances have enabled the analysis of differential gene expression at a systems level. Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) involving interactions between large numbers of genes and their regulators have been mapped onto graphic diagrams that are used to visualize the regulatory relationships. The further characterization of GRNs has already uncovered global principles of gene regulation. Together with synthetic network biology, such studies are starting to provide insights into the transcriptional mechanisms that cause robust versus stochastic gene expression and their relationships to phenotypic robustness and variability. Here, we discuss GRNs and their topological properties in relation to transcriptional and phenotypic outputs in development and organismal physiology. PMID:21324878

  2. Spatiotemporal Control of Embryonic Gene Expression Using Caged Morpholinos

    PubMed Central

    Shestopalov, Ilya A.; Chen, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic development depends on spatial and temporal control of gene function, and deciphering the molecular mechanisms that underlie pattern formation requires methods for perturbing gene expression with similar precision. Emerging chemical technologies can enable such perturbations, as exemplified by the use of caged morpholino (cMO) oligonucleotides to photo-inactivate genes in zebrafish embryos with spatiotemporal control. This chapter describes general principles for cMO design and methods for cMO assembly in three steps from commercially available reagents. Experimental techniques for the microinjection and photoactivation of these reagents are described in detail, as well as the preparation and application of caged fluorescein dextran (cFD) for labeling irradiated cells. Using these protocols, cMOs can be effective tools for functional genomic studies in zebrafish and other model organisms. PMID:21924162

  3. Epigenetic control of gene expression: Potential implications for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Perri, F; Longo, F; Giuliano, M; Sabbatino, F; Favia, G; Ionna, F; Addeo, R; Della Vittoria Scarpati, G; Di Lorenzo, G; Pisconti, S

    2017-03-01

    Epigenetic changes are defined as inherited modifications that are not present in DNA sequence. Gene expression is regulated at various levels and not only in response to DNA modifications. Examples of epigenetic control are DNA methylation, histone deacetylation and mi-RNA expression. Methylation of several tumor suppressor gene promoters is responsible for their silencing and thus potentially sustain cancerogenesis. Similarly, histone deacetylation can lead to oncogene activation. mi-RNA are small (18-20 nucleotides) non-coding RNA fragments capable of inhibiting other m-RNA, ultimately altering the balance in oncogene and tumor suppressor gene expression. It has been shown that growth of several tumor types can be stimulated by epigenetic changes in various phases of cancerogenesis, and drugs able to interfere with these mechanisms can have a positive impact on tumor progression. As matter of fact, epigenetic changes are dynamic and can be reversed by epigenetic inhibitors. Recently, methyltransferase and histone deacetylase inhibitors have attracted the attention of researchers and clinicians as they potentially provide alternative therapeutic options in some cancers. Drugs that inhibit DNA methylation or histone deacetylation have been studied for the reactivation of tumor suppressor genes and repression of cancer cell growth. Epigenetic inhibitors work alone or in combination with other therapeutic agents. To date, a number of epigenetic inhibitors have been approved for cancer treatment. The main challenge in the field of epigenetic inhibitors is their lack of specificity. In this review article we describe their mechanisms of action and potential in cancer treatment.

  4. Temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Manjul; Dhekney, Sadanand A; Soriano, Leonardo; Kandel, Raju; Grosser, Jude W

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology provides plant breeders an additional tool to improve various traits desired by growers and consumers of horticultural crops. It also provides genetic solutions to major problems affecting horticultural crops and can be a means for rapid improvement of a cultivar. With the availability of a number of horticultural genome sequences, it has become relatively easier to utilize these resources to identify DNA sequences for both basic and applied research. Promoters play a key role in plant gene expression and the regulation of gene expression. In recent years, rapid progress has been made on the isolation and evaluation of plant-derived promoters and their use in horticultural crops, as more and more species become amenable to genetic transformation. Our understanding of the tools and techniques of horticultural plant biotechnology has now evolved from a discovery phase to an implementation phase. The availability of a large number of promoters derived from horticultural plants opens up the field for utilization of native sequences and improving crops using precision breeding. In this review, we look at the temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops and the usage of a variety of promoters either isolated from horticultural crops or used in horticultural crop improvement. PMID:26504550

  5. Molecular mechanisms controlling CFTR gene expression in the airway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaolin; Ott, Christopher J; Lewandowska, Marzena A; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The low levels of CFTR gene expression and paucity of CFTR protein in human airway epithelial cells are not easily reconciled with the pivotal role of the lung in cystic fibrosis pathology. Previous data suggested that the regulatory mechanisms controlling CFTR gene expression might be different in airway epithelium in comparison to intestinal epithelium where CFTR mRNA and protein is much more abundant. Here we examine chromatin structure and modification across the CFTR locus in primary human tracheal (HTE) and bronchial (NHBE) epithelial cells and airway cell lines including 16HBE14o- and Calu3. We identify regions of open chromatin that appear selective for primary airway epithelial cells and show that several of these are enriched for a histone modification (H3K4me1) that is characteristic of enhancers. Consistent with these observations, three of these sites encompass elements that have cooperative enhancer function in reporter gene assays in 16HBE14o- cells. Finally, we use chromosome conformation capture (3C) to examine the three-dimensional structure of nearly 800 kb of chromosome 7 encompassing CFTR and observe long-range interactions between the CFTR promoter and regions far outside the locus in cell types that express high levels of CFTR. PMID:21895967

  6. RNA decay modulates gene expression and controls its fidelity

    PubMed Central

    GHOSH, SHUBHENDU; JACOBSON, ALLAN

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance of cellular function relies on the expression of genetic information with high fidelity, a process in which RNA molecules form an important link. mRNAs are intermediates that define the proteome, rRNAs and tRNAs are effector molecules that act together to decode mRNA sequence information, and small noncoding RNAs can regulate mRNA half-life and translatability. The steady-state levels of these RNAs occur through transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, of which RNA decay pathways are integral components. RNA decay can initiate from the ends of a transcript or through endonucleolytic cleavage, and numerous factors that catalyze or promote these reactions have been identified and characterized. The rate at which decay occurs depends on RNA sequence or structural elements and usually requires the RNA to be modified in a way that allows recruitment of the decay machinery to the transcript through the binding of accessory factors or small RNAs. The major RNA decay pathways also play important roles in the quality control of gene expression. Acting in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, multiple quality control factors monitor newly synthesized transcripts, or mRNAs undergoing translation, for properties essential to function, including structural integrity or the presence of complete open reading frames. Transcripts targeted by these surveillance mechanisms are rapidly shunted into conventional decay pathways where they are degraded rapidly to ensure that they do not interfere with the normal course of gene expression. Collectively, degradative mechanisms are important determinants of the extent of gene expression and play key roles in maintaining its accuracy. PMID:21132108

  7. Validation of endogenous control reference genes for normalizing gene expression studies in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ayakannu, Thangesweran; Taylor, Anthony H; Willets, Jonathon M; Brown, Laurence; Lambert, David G; McDonald, John; Davies, Quentin; Moss, Esther L; Konje, Justin C

    2015-09-01

    Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique used for the relative quantification of target genes, using reference (housekeeping) genes for normalization to ensure the generation of accurate and robust data. A systematic examination of the suitability of endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in endometrial cancer tissues is absent. The aims of this study were therefore to identify and evaluate from the thirty-two possible reference genes from a TaqMan(®) array panel their suitability as an internal control gene. The mathematical software packages geNorm qBasePLUS identified Pumilio homolog 1 (Drosophila) (PUM1), ubiquitin C (UBC), phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1), mitochondrial ribosomal protein L19 (MRPL19) and peptidylpropyl isomerase A (cyclophilin A) (PPIA) as the best reference gene combination, whilst NormFinder identified MRPL19 as the best single reference gene, with importin 8 (IPO8) and PPIA being the best combination of two reference genes. BestKeeper ranked MRPL19 as the most stably expressed gene. In addition, the study was validated by examining the relative expression of a test gene, which encodes the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). A significant difference in CB1 mRNA expression between malignant and normal endometrium using MRPL19, PPIA, and IP08 in combination was observed. The use of MRPL19, IPO8 and PPIA was identified as the best reference gene combination for the normalization of gene expression levels in endometrial carcinoma. This study demonstrates that the arbitrary selection of endogenous control reference genes for normalization in qRT-PCR studies of endometrial carcinoma, without validation, risks the production of inaccurate data and should therefore be discouraged.

  8. An internal regulatory element controls troponin I gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Yutzey, K.E.; Kline, R.L.; Konieczmy, S.F. . Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1989-04-01

    During skeletal myogenesis, approximately 20 contractile proteins and related gene products temporally accumulate as the cells fuse to form multinucleated muscle fibers. In most instances, the contractile protein genes are regulated transcriptionally, which suggests that a common molecular mechanism may coordinate the expression of this diverse and evolutionarily unrelated gene set. Recent studies have examined the muscle-specific cis-acting elements associated with numerous contractile protein genes. All of the identified regulatory elements are positioned in the 5'-flanking regions, usually within 1,500 base pairs of the transcription start site. Surprisingly, a DNA consensus sequence that is common to each contractile protein gene has not been identified. In contrast to the results of these earlier studies, the authors have found that the 5'-flanking region of the quail troponin I (TnI) gene is not sufficient to permit the normal myofiber transcriptional activation of the gene. Instead, the TnI gene utilizes a unique internal regulatory element that is responsible for the correct myofiber-specific expression pattern associated with the TnI gene. This is the first example in which a contractile protein gene has been shown to rely primarily on an internal regulatory element to elicit transcriptional activation during myogenesis. The diversity of regulatory elements associated with the contractile protein genes suggests that the temporal expression of the genes may involve individual cis-trans regulatory components specific for each gene.

  9. Stress, epigenetic control of gene expression and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Trollope, Alexandra F; Gutièrrez-Mecinas, María; Mifsud, Karen R; Collins, Andrew; Saunderson, Emily A; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2012-01-01

    Making memories of a stressful life event is essential for an organism's survival as it allows it to adapt and respond in a more appropriate manner should the situation occur again. However, it may be envisaged that extremely stressful events can lead to formation of traumatic memories that are detrimental to the organism and lead to psychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The neurotransmitter glutamate and the ERK MAPK signaling pathway play a principal role in learning and memory. Glucocorticoid hormones acting via the glucocorticoid receptor have been shown to strengthen the consolidation of memories of stressful events. The ERK MAPK signaling pathway and glucocorticoid receptor-mediated actions have recently been shown to drive epigenetic modifications and conformational changes in the chromatin, stimulating the expression of neuroplasticity-related genes involved in stress-related learning and memory processes. The main epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are histone modifications and DNA (de-)methylation. Recently, studies have demonstrated that these processes are acting together in concert to regulate gene expression required for memory consolidation. This review explores the role of stress in learning and memory paradigms and the participating signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms and the enzymes that control these modifications during the consolidation process of memory formation.

  10. Controlling gene expression by DNA mechanics: emerging insights and challenges.

    PubMed

    Levens, David; Baranello, Laura; Kouzine, Fedor

    2016-09-01

    Transcription initiation is a major control point for the precise regulation of gene expression. Our knowledge of this process has been mainly derived from protein-centric studies wherein cis-regulatory DNA sequences play a passive role, mainly in arranging the protein machinery to coalesce at the transcription start sites of genes in a spatial and temporal-specific manner. However, this is a highly dynamic process in which molecular motors such as RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), helicases, and other transcription factors, alter the level of mechanical force in DNA, rather than simply a set of static DNA-protein interactions. The double helix is a fiber that responds to flexural and torsional stress, which if accumulated, can affect promoter output as well as change DNA and chromatin structure. The relationship between DNA mechanics and the control of early transcription initiation events has been under-investigated. Genomic techniques to display topological stress and conformational variation in DNA across the mammalian genome provide an exciting new insight on the role of DNA mechanics in the early stages of the transcription cycle. Without understanding how torsional and flexural stresses are generated, transmitted, and dissipated, no model of transcription will be complete and accurate.

  11. Controlling gene expression by DNA mechanics: emerging insights and challenges.

    PubMed

    Levens, David; Baranello, Laura; Kouzine, Fedor

    2016-11-01

    Transcription initiation is a major control point for the precise regulation of gene expression. Our knowledge of this process has been mainly derived from protein-centric studies wherein cis-regulatory DNA sequences play a passive role, mainly in arranging the protein machinery to coalesce at the transcription start sites of genes in a spatial and temporal-specific manner. However, this is a highly dynamic process in which molecular motors such as RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), helicases, and other transcription factors, alter the level of mechanical force in DNA, rather than simply a set of static DNA-protein interactions. The double helix is a fiber that responds to flexural and torsional stress, which if accumulated, can affect promoter output as well as change DNA and chromatin structure. The relationship between DNA mechanics and the control of early transcription initiation events has been under-investigated. Genomic techniques to display topological stress and conformational variation in DNA across the mammalian genome provide an exciting new insight on the role of DNA mechanics in the early stages of the transcription cycle. Without understanding how torsional and flexural stresses are generated, transmitted, and dissipated, no model of transcription will be complete and accurate.

  12. Post-Transcriptional Control of Chloroplast Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Eva M.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplasts contain their own genome, organized as operons, which are generally transcribed as polycistronic transcriptional units. These primary transcripts are processed into smaller RNAs, which are further modified to produce functional RNAs. The RNA processing mechanisms remain largely unknown and represent an important step in the control of chloroplast gene expression. Such mechanisms include RNA cleavage of pre-existing RNAs, RNA stabilization, intron splicing, and RNA editing. Recently, several nuclear-encoded proteins that participate in diverse plastid RNA processing events have been characterised. Many of them seem to belong to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family that is implicated in many crucial functions including organelle biogenesis and plant development. This review will provide an overview of current knowledge of the post-transcriptional processing in chloroplasts. PMID:19838333

  13. Multichromatic control of gene expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Jeffrey J.; Levskaya, Anselm; Voigt, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Light is a powerful tool for manipulating living cells because it can be applied with high resolution across space and over time. We previously constructed a red-light sensitive E. coli transcription system based on a chimera between the red/far red switchable cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 and the E. coli EnvZ/OmpR two-component signaling pathways. Here we report the development of a green light inducible transcription system in E. coli based on a recently discovered green/red photoswitchable two-component system from cyanobacteria. We demonstrate that transcriptional output is proportional to the intensity of green light applied and that the green sensor is orthogonal to the red sensor at intensities of 532nm light less than 0.01W/m2. Expression of both sensors in a single cell allows two-color optical control of transcription in both batch culture and in patterns across a lawn of engineered cells. Because each sensor functions as a photoreversible switch, this system should allow the spatial and temporal control of the expression of multiple genes though different combinations of light wavelengths. This feature should aid precision single cell and population-level studies in systems and synthetic biology. PMID:21035461

  14. act Operon Control of Developmental Gene Expression in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Gronewold, Thomas M. A.; Kaiser, Dale

    2002-01-01

    Cell-bound C-signal guides the building of a fruiting body and triggers the differentiation of myxospores. Earlier work has shown that transcription of the csgA gene, which encodes the C-signal, is directed by four genes of the act operon. To see how expression of the genes encoding components of the aggregation and sporulation processes depends on C-signaling, mutants with loss-of-function mutations in each of the act genes were investigated. These mutations were found to have no effect on genes that are normally expressed up to 3 h into development and are C-signal independent. Neither the time of first expression nor the rate of expression increase was changed in actA, actB, actC, or actD mutant strains. Also, there was no effect on A-signal production, which normally starts before 3 h. By contrast, the null act mutants have striking defects in C-signal production. These mutations changed the expression of four gene reporters that are related to aggregation and sporulation and are expressed at 6 h or later in development. The actA and actB null mutations substantially decreased the expression of all these reporters. The other act null mutations caused either premature expression to wild-type levels (actC) or delayed expression (actD), which ultimately rose to wild-type levels. The pattern of effects on these reporters shows how the C-signal differentially regulates the steps that together build a fruiting body and differentiate spores within it. PMID:11807078

  15. The Use of EST Expression Matrixes for the Quality Control of Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Milnthorpe, Andrew T.; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    EST expression profiling provides an attractive tool for studying differential gene expression, but cDNA libraries' origins and EST data quality are not always known or reported. Libraries may originate from pooled or mixed tissues; EST clustering, EST counts, library annotations and analysis algorithms may contain errors. Traditional data analysis methods, including research into tissue-specific gene expression, assume EST counts to be correct and libraries to be correctly annotated, which is not always the case. Therefore, a method capable of assessing the quality of expression data based on that data alone would be invaluable for assessing the quality of EST data and determining their suitability for mRNA expression analysis. Here we report an approach to the selection of a small generic subset of 244 UniGene clusters suitable for identification of the tissue of origin for EST libraries and quality control of the expression data using EST expression information alone. We created a small expression matrix of UniGene IDs using two rounds of selection followed by two rounds of optimisation. Our selection procedures differ from traditional approaches to finding “tissue-specific” genes and our matrix yields consistency high positive correlation values for libraries with confirmed tissues of origin and can be applied for tissue typing and quality control of libraries as small as just a few hundred total ESTs. Furthermore, we can pick up tissue correlations between related tissues e.g. brain and peripheral nervous tissue, heart and muscle tissues and identify tissue origins for a few libraries of uncharacterised tissue identity. It was possible to confirm tissue identity for some libraries which have been derived from cancer tissues or have been normalised. Tissue matching is affected strongly by cancer progression or library normalisation and our approach may potentially be applied for elucidating the stage of normalisation in normalised libraries or for cancer

  16. Epigenetic control of gene expression in the alcoholic brain.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure causes widespread changes in brain gene expression in humans and animal models. Many of these contribute to cellular adaptations that ultimately lead to behavioral tolerance and alcohol dependence. There is an emerging appreciation for the role of epigenetic processes in alcohol-induced changes in brain gene expression and behavior. For example, chronic alcohol exposure produces changes in DNA and histone methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA expression that affect expression of multiple genes in various types of brain cells (i.e., neurons and glia) and contribute to brain pathology and brain plasticity associated with alcohol abuse and dependence. Drugs targeting the epigenetic "master regulators" are emerging as potential therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders and drug addiction.

  17. Control of gene expression by CRISPR-Cas systems.

    PubMed

    Bikard, David; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2013-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci and their associated cas (CRISPR-associated) genes provide adaptive immunity against viruses (phages) and other mobile genetic elements in bacteria and archaea. While most of the early work has largely been dominated by examples of CRISPR-Cas systems directing the cleavage of phage or plasmid DNA, recent studies have revealed a more complex landscape where CRISPR-Cas loci might be involved in gene regulation. In this review, we summarize the role of these loci in the regulation of gene expression as well as the recent development of synthetic gene regulation using engineered CRISPR-Cas systems.

  18. Control of gene expression by CRISPR-Cas systems

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) loci and their associated cas (CRISPR-associated) genes provide adaptive immunity against viruses (phages) and other mobile genetic elements in bacteria and archaea. While most of the early work has largely been dominated by examples of CRISPR-Cas systems directing the cleavage of phage or plasmid DNA, recent studies have revealed a more complex landscape where CRISPR-Cas loci might be involved in gene regulation. In this review, we summarize the role of these loci in the regulation of gene expression as well as the recent development of synthetic gene regulation using engineered CRISPR-Cas systems. PMID:24273648

  19. Controlling for Gene Expression Changes in Transcription Factor Protein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Charles A. S.; Lee, Zachary T.; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D.; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L.; Seidel, Chris W.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein–protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions. PMID:24722732

  20. VSG gene expression site control in insect form Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Rudenko, G; Blundell, P A; Taylor, M C; Kieft, R; Borst, P

    1994-11-15

    When the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is taken up from mammals by a tse-tse fly, it replaces its variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat by a procyclin coat. Transcription of VSG genes stops in the fly, but transcription of sequences derived from the promoter area of the VSG expression site(s) remains high. Whether this is due to continuing high activity of one promoter or to low activity of many promoters was unclear. We have used the small differences between the sequences of different expression sites to show that multiple expression site promoters are active in insect form trypanosomes. This is confirmed by the low expression of single copy marker genes introduced into the transcribed area. However, if the expression site promoter is removed from the genomic location of the expression site and inserted in the non-transcribed spacer of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA), it is derepressed. Derepression of transcription can also be accomplished by replacing the promoter of an expression site by an rDNA promoter. We conclude that the down-regulation of VSG gene expression site promoters in insect form trypanosomes is affected by both the DNA sequence of the promoter and the genomic context in which it resides.

  1. Synthetic RNA-based switches for mammalian gene expression control.

    PubMed

    Ausländer, Simon; Fussenegger, Martin

    2017-04-04

    Synthetic ribonucleic acid (RNA)-based gene switches control RNA functions in a ligand-responsive manner. Key building blocks are aptamers that specifically bind to small molecules or protein ligands. Engineering approaches often combine rational design and high-throughput screening to identify optimal connection sites or sequences. In this report, we discuss basic principles and emerging design strategies for the engineering of RNA-based gene switches in mammalian cells. Their small size compared with those of transcriptional gene switches, together with advancements in design strategies and performance, may bring RNA-based switches to the forefront of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  2. Tet1 controls meiosis by regulating meiotic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Hong, Kwonho; Liu, Rui; Shen, Li; Inoue, Azusa; Diep, Dinh; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yi

    2012-12-20

    Meiosis is a germ-cell-specific cell division process through which haploid gametes are produced for sexual reproduction. Before the initiation of meiosis, mouse primordial germ cells undergo a series of epigenetic reprogramming steps, including the global erasure of DNA methylation at the 5-position of cytosine (5mC) in CpG-rich DNA. Although several epigenetic regulators, such as Dnmt3l and the histone methyltransferases G9a and Prdm9, have been reported to be crucial for meiosis, little is known about how the expression of meiotic genes is regulated and how their expression contributes to normal meiosis. Using a loss-of-function approach in mice, here we show that the 5mC-specific dioxygenase Tet1 has an important role in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes. Tet1 deficiency significantly reduces female germ-cell numbers and fertility. Univalent chromosomes and unresolved DNA double-strand breaks are also observed in Tet1-deficient oocytes. Tet1 deficiency does not greatly affect the genome-wide demethylation that takes place in primordial germ cells, but leads to defective DNA demethylation and decreased expression of a subset of meiotic genes. Our study thus establishes a function for Tet1 in meiosis and meiotic gene activation in female germ cells.

  3. Tet1 controls meiosis by regulating meiotic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Shinpei; Hong, Kwonho; Liu, Rui; Shen, Li; Inoue, Azusa; Diep, Dinh; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Meiosis is a germ cell-specific cell division process through which haploid gametes are produced for sexual reproduction1. Prior to initiation of meiosis, mouse primordial germ cells (PGCs) undergo a series of epigenetic reprogramming steps2,3, including global erasure of DNA methylation on the 5-position of cytosine (5mC) at CpG4,5. Although several epigenetic regulators, such as Dnmt3l, histone methyltransferases G9a and Prdm9, have been reported to be critical for meiosis6, little is known about how the expression of meiotic genes is regulated and how their expression contributes to normal meiosis. Using a loss of function approach, here we demonstrate that the 5mC-specific dioxygenase Tet1 plays an important role in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes. Tet1 deficiency significantly reduces female germ cell numbers and fertility. Univalent chromosomes and unresolved DNA double strand breaks are also observed in Tet1-deficient oocytes. Tet1 deficiency does not greatly affect the genome-wide demethylation that takes place in PGCs but leads to defective DNA demethylation and decreased expression of a subset of meiotic genes. Our study thus establishes a function for Tet1 in meiosis and meiotic gene activation in female germ cells. PMID:23151479

  4. The formulation of the control of an expression pattern in a gene network by propositional calculus.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hideki; Tanaka, Hiroto; Ushio, Toshimitsu

    2006-06-07

    In this study we model a gene network as a continuous-time switching network. In this model, each gene has a binary state which indicates if the gene expresses or not. We propose a method to control a sequence of expression patterns in the gene network model by adding another continuous-time switching network. By using propositional calculus, we will show that the control problem can be formulated as a mixed-integer linear programming problem with linear constraints.

  5. DNA hydroxymethylation controls cardiomyocyte gene expression in development and hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Carolina M.; Kunderfranco, Paolo; Rubino, Marcello; Larcher, Veronica; Carullo, Pierluigi; Anselmo, Achille; Kurz, Kerstin; Carell, Thomas; Angius, Andrea; Latronico, Michael V. G.; Papait, Roberto; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Methylation at 5-cytosine (5-mC) is a fundamental epigenetic DNA modification associated recently with cardiac disease. In contrast, the role of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC)—5-mC's oxidation product—in cardiac biology and disease is unknown. Here we assess the hydroxymethylome in embryonic, neonatal, adult and hypertrophic mouse cardiomyocytes, showing that dynamic modulation of hydroxymethylated DNA is associated with specific transcriptional networks during heart development and failure. DNA hydroxymethylation marks the body of highly expressed genes as well as distal regulatory regions with enhanced activity. Moreover, pathological hypertrophy is characterized by a shift towards a neonatal 5-hmC distribution pattern. We also show that the ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) enzyme regulates the expression of key cardiac genes, such as Myh7, through 5-hmC deposition on the gene body and at enhancers. Thus, we provide a genome-wide analysis of 5-hmC in the cardiomyocyte and suggest a role for this epigenetic modification in heart development and disease. PMID:27489048

  6. Relationship of eukaryotic DNA replication to committed gene expression: general theory for gene control.

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, L P

    1991-01-01

    The historic arguments for the participation of eukaryotic DNA replication in the control of gene expression are reconsidered along with more recent evidence. An earlier view in which gene commitment was achieved with stable chromatin structures which required DNA replication to reset expression potential (D. D. Brown, Cell 37:359-365, 1984) is further considered. The participation of nonspecific stable repressor of gene activity (histones and other chromatin proteins), as previously proposed, is reexamined. The possible function of positive trans-acting factors is now further developed by considering evidence from DNA virus models. It is proposed that these positive factors act to control the initiation of replicon-specific DNA synthesis in the S phase (early or late replication timing). Stable chromatin assembles during replication into potentially active (early S) or inactive (late S) states with prevailing trans-acting factors (early) or repressing factors (late) and may asymmetrically commit daughter templates. This suggests logical schemes for programming differentiation based on replicons and trans-acting initiators. This proposal requires that DNA replication precede major changes in gene commitment. Prior evidence against a role for DNA replication during terminal differentiation is reexamined along with other results from terminal differentiation of lower eukaryotes. This leads to a proposal that DNA replication may yet underlie terminal gene commitment, but that for it to do so there must exist two distinct modes of replication control. In one mode (mitotic replication) replicon initiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle, whereas the other mode (terminal replication) initiation is not cell cycle restricted, is replicon specific, and can lead to a terminally differentiated state. Aberrant control of mitotic and terminal modes of DNA replication may underlie the transformed state. Implications of a replicon basis for chromatin structure-function and

  7. Inducible control of gene expression with destabilized Cre

    PubMed Central

    Sando, Richard; Baumgaertel, Karsten; Pieraut, Simon; Torabi-Rander, Nina; Wandless, Thomas J.; Mayford, Mark; Maximov, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Acute manipulation of gene and protein function in the brain is essential for understanding the mechanisms of nervous system development, plasticity and information processing. Here we describe a technique based on a destabilized Cre recombinase (DD-Cre) whose activity is controlled by the antibiotic, TMP. We show that DD-Cre triggers rapid TMP-dependent recombination of “floxed” alleles in mouse neurons in vivo, and validate the use of this system for neurobehavioral research. PMID:24056874

  8. With Reference to Reference Genes: A Systematic Review of Endogenous Controls in Gene Expression Studies.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Joanne R; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The choice of reference genes that are stably expressed amongst treatment groups is a crucial step in real-time quantitative PCR gene expression studies. Recent guidelines have specified that a minimum of two validated reference genes should be used for normalisation. However, a quantitative review of the literature showed that the average number of reference genes used across all studies was 1.2. Thus, the vast majority of studies continue to use a single gene, with β-actin (ACTB) and/or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) being commonly selected in studies of vertebrate gene expression. Few studies (15%) tested a panel of potential reference genes for stability of expression before using them to normalise data. Amongst studies specifically testing reference gene stability, few found ACTB or GAPDH to be optimal, whereby these genes were significantly less likely to be chosen when larger panels of potential reference genes were screened. Fewer reference genes were tested for stability in non-model organisms, presumably owing to a dearth of available primers in less well characterised species. Furthermore, the experimental conditions under which real-time quantitative PCR analyses were conducted had a large influence on the choice of reference genes, whereby different studies of rat brain tissue showed different reference genes to be the most stable. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies.

  9. With Reference to Reference Genes: A Systematic Review of Endogenous Controls in Gene Expression Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Joanne R.; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The choice of reference genes that are stably expressed amongst treatment groups is a crucial step in real-time quantitative PCR gene expression studies. Recent guidelines have specified that a minimum of two validated reference genes should be used for normalisation. However, a quantitative review of the literature showed that the average number of reference genes used across all studies was 1.2. Thus, the vast majority of studies continue to use a single gene, with β-actin (ACTB) and/or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) being commonly selected in studies of vertebrate gene expression. Few studies (15%) tested a panel of potential reference genes for stability of expression before using them to normalise data. Amongst studies specifically testing reference gene stability, few found ACTB or GAPDH to be optimal, whereby these genes were significantly less likely to be chosen when larger panels of potential reference genes were screened. Fewer reference genes were tested for stability in non-model organisms, presumably owing to a dearth of available primers in less well characterised species. Furthermore, the experimental conditions under which real-time quantitative PCR analyses were conducted had a large influence on the choice of reference genes, whereby different studies of rat brain tissue showed different reference genes to be the most stable. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies. PMID:26555275

  10. Control Genes and Variability: Absence of Ubiquitous Reference Transcripts in Diverse Mammalian Expression Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Peter D.; Sladek, Robert; Greenwood, Celia M.T.; Hudson, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Control genes, commonly defined as genes that are ubiquitously expressed at stable levels in different biological contexts, have been used to standardize quantitative expression studies for more than 25 yr. We analyzed a group of large mammalian microarray datasets including the NCI60 cancer cell line panel, a leukemia tumor panel, and a phorbol ester induction time course as well as human and mouse tissue panels. Twelve housekeeping genes commonly used as controls in classical expression studies (including GAPD, ACTB, B2M, TUBA, G6PD, LDHA, and HPRT) show considerable variability of expression both within and across microarray datasets. Although we can identify genes with lower variability within individual datasets by heuristic filtering, such genes invariably show different expression levels when compared across other microarray datasets. We confirm these results with an analysis of variance in a controlled mouse dataset, showing the extent of variability in gene expression across tissues. The results show the problems inherent in the classical use of control genes in estimating gene expression levels in different mammalian cell contexts, and highlight the importance of controlled study design in the construction of microarray experiments. [Supplemental material available online at http://genome.mcgill.ca/∼pdlee/control_genes and and http://www.genome.org.] PMID:11827948

  11. Epigenetic Control of Gene Expression in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics is traditionally defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequence. There are three main classes of epigenetic marks—DNA methylation, modifications of histone tails, and noncoding RNAs—each of which may be influenced by the environment, diet, diseases, and ageing. Importantly, epigenetic marks have been shown to influence immune cell maturation and are associated with the risk of developing various forms of cancer, including lung cancer. Moreover, there is emerging evidence that these epigenetic marks affect gene expression in the lung and are associated with benign lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and interstitial lung disease. Technological advances have made it feasible to study epigenetic marks in the lung, and it is anticipated that this knowledge will enhance our understanding of the dynamic biology in the lung and lead to the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for our patients with lung disease. PMID:21596832

  12. A Modified Consumer Inkjet for Spatiotemporal Control of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Daniel J.; Morfino, Roberto C.; Maharbiz, Michel M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost inkjet dosing system capable of continuous, two-dimensional spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression via delivery of diffusible regulators to a custom-mounted gel culture of E. coli. A consumer-grade, inkjet printer was adapted for chemical printing; E. coli cultures were grown on 750 µm thick agar embedded in micro-wells machined into commercial compact discs. Spatio-temporal regulation of the lac operon was demonstrated via the printing of patterns of lactose and glucose directly into the cultures; X-Gal blue patterns were used for visual feedback. We demonstrate how the bistable nature of the lac operon's feedback, when perturbed by patterning lactose (inducer) and glucose (inhibitor), can lead to coordination of cell expression patterns across a field in ways that mimic motifs seen in developmental biology. Examples of this include sharp boundaries and the generation of traveling waves of mRNA expression. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of reaction-diffusion effects in the well-studied lac operon. A finite element reaction-diffusion model of the lac operon is also presented which predicts pattern formation with good fidelity. PMID:19763256

  13. [Identification of endogenous control genes for gene expression studies in peripheral blood of patients with coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Fong, S W; Suhairi, I; Mohamed, M S; Few, L L; Too, W C S; Khoo, B Y; Yussof, Z; Rahman, A R A; Yvonne-Tee, G B

    2013-01-01

    The selection of stable endogenous control genes is critical for normalization of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) data. In this study, we aimed to identify a suitable set of control genes to be used as endogenous references for gene expression evaluation in human peripheral blood samples among coronary artery disease patients. The expression levels of 12 endogenous control genes procured from TATAA Biocenter (Goteborg, Sweden) were measured in five acute coronary syndrome patients and five chronic stable angina patients. Gene expression stability was analyzed using two different software applications i.e geNorm and NormFinder. Results suggested that beta-glucuronidase is the most stable endogenous control, followed by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The NormFinder analysis further confirmed that beta-glucuronidase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase were on the first rank order with the most stable expression among endogenous control genes analyzed and 60S acidic ribosomal protein P0. Besides this, the expression levels of 18S rRNA were revealed to be highly variable between coronary heart disease patients. We thus recommend the use of beta-glucuronidase and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase as reference genes for accurate normalization of relative quantities of gene expression levels in coronary artery disease patients using qPCR. Also the use of 18S rRNA as a control gene should be avoided.

  14. Aging related methylation influences the gene expression of key control genes in colorectal cancer and adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Patai, Árpád V; Leiszter, Katalin; Péterfia, Bálint; Wichmann, Barnabás; Valcz, Gábor; Veres, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-01-01

    with significantly increased SFRP1 mRNA levels in children compared to normal adult samples (P < 0.05). In CRC tissue the mRNA expression of 117 age-related genes were changed, while in adenoma samples 102 genes showed differential expression compared with normal colonic tissue (P < 0.05, logFC > 0.5). The change of expression for several genes including SYNE1, CLEC3B, LTBP3 and SFRP1, followed the same pattern in aging and carcinogenesis, though not for all genes (e.g., MGP). CONCLUSION Several age-related DNA methylation alterations can be observed during CRC development and progression affecting the mRNA expression of certain CRC- and adenoma-related key control genes. PMID:28058013

  15. Aging related methylation influences the gene expression of key control genes in colorectal cancer and adenoma.

    PubMed

    Galamb, Orsolya; Kalmár, Alexandra; Barták, Barbara Kinga; Patai, Árpád V; Leiszter, Katalin; Péterfia, Bálint; Wichmann, Barnabás; Valcz, Gábor; Veres, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-12-21

    increased SFRP1 mRNA levels in children compared to normal adult samples (P < 0.05). In CRC tissue the mRNA expression of 117 age-related genes were changed, while in adenoma samples 102 genes showed differential expression compared with normal colonic tissue (P < 0.05, logFC > 0.5). The change of expression for several genes including SYNE1, CLEC3B, LTBP3 and SFRP1, followed the same pattern in aging and carcinogenesis, though not for all genes (e.g., MGP). Several age-related DNA methylation alterations can be observed during CRC development and progression affecting the mRNA expression of certain CRC- and adenoma-related key control genes.

  16. Control of mammalian gene expression by amino acids, especially glutamine.

    PubMed

    Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Lavoinne, Alain; Husson, Annie

    2009-04-01

    Molecular data rapidly accumulating on the regulation of gene expression by amino acids in mammalian cells highlight the large variety of mechanisms that are involved. Transcription factors, such as the basic-leucine zipper factors, activating transcription factors and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein, as well as specific regulatory sequences, such as amino acid response element and nutrient-sensing response element, have been shown to mediate the inhibitory effect of some amino acids. Moreover, amino acids exert a wide range of effects via the activation of different signalling pathways and various transcription factors, and a number of cis elements distinct from amino acid response element/nutrient-sensing response element sequences were shown to respond to changes in amino acid concentration. Particular attention has been paid to the effects of glutamine, the most abundant amino acid, which at appropriate concentrations enhances a great number of cell functions via the activation of various transcription factors. The glutamine-responsive genes and the transcription factors involved correspond tightly to the specific effects of the amino acid in the inflammatory response, cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, and metabolic functions. Indeed, in addition to the major role played by nuclear factor-kappaB in the anti-inflammatory action of glutamine, the stimulatory role of activating protein-1 and the inhibitory role of C/EBP homology binding protein in growth-promotion, and the role of c-myc in cell survival, many other transcription factors are also involved in the action of glutamine to regulate apoptosis and intermediary metabolism in different cell types and tissues. The signalling pathways leading to the activation of transcription factors suggest that several kinases are involved, particularly mitogen-activated protein kinases. In most cases, however, the precise pathways from the entrance of the amino acid into the cell to the activation of gene

  17. AlgU controls expression of virulence genes in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant pathogenic bacteria are able to integrate information about their environment and adjust gene expression to provide adaptive functions. AlgU, an ECF sigma factor encoded by Pseudomonas syringae, controls expression of genes for alginate biosynthesis and is active while the bacteria are associa...

  18. Light Controlled Modulation of Gene Expression by Chemical Optoepigenetic Probes

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Surya A.; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J. Adam; Szantai-Kis, D. Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N.; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatio-temporal control. Here, we present a novel and generalizable approach, referred to as ‘Chemo-Optical Modulation of Epigenetically-regulated Transcription’ (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may translate into novel therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required. PMID:26974814

  19. Posttranscriptional control of bacteriophage lambda gene expression from a site distal to the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Guarneros, G; Montañez, C; Hernandez, T; Court, D

    1982-01-01

    The bacteriophage lambda int gene product, integrase, recombines the phage DNA with the host DNA at specific sites on each to accomplish lysogeny. The int gene is transcribed from two promoters, PL and PI, each regulated positively by lambda proteins. The expression of integrase is also controlled from a site, sib, in the b region of the phage genome. This is a unique regulatory site because it is located distal to the structural gene in relation to the promoters. The expression of int from the PL promoter is inhibited when sib is present. This effect appears to be specific for PL because sib does not cause inhibition of PI-dependent int synthesis. lambda mutants that contain alterations in the site have been isolated. Sequence analyses of the mutations reveal single base changes, spanning 37 base pairs (bp) in the b region, some 240 bp beyond the int gene. Another mutant, hef13, which has a phenotype similar to that of sib, introduces a nucleotide change within the same 37-bp region. The sib and hef mutations cluster within a region of dyad symmetry. Regulation of int synthesis by sib occurs after transcription of the int gene. There is no difference in the rate of PL-promoted int mRNA synthesis in either sib+ or sib- phage infections, yet int mRNA is less stable in the sib+ infection. Because RNase III host mutants are defective in sib regulation, processing of the PL mRNA at sib by this endoribonuclease may cause int mRNA decay and decrease int synthesis. PMID:6281759

  20. Indirect and suboptimal control of gene expression is widespread in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Price, Morgan N; Deutschbauer, Adam M; Skerker, Jeffrey M; Wetmore, Kelly M; Ruths, Troy; Mar, Jordan S; Kuehl, Jennifer V; Shao, Wenjun; Arkin, Adam P

    2013-01-01

    Gene regulation in bacteria is usually described as an adaptive response to an environmental change so that genes are expressed when they are required. We instead propose that most genes are under indirect control: their expression responds to signal(s) that are not directly related to the genes' function. Indirect control should perform poorly in artificial conditions, and we show that gene regulation is often maladaptive in the laboratory. In Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, 24% of genes are detrimental to fitness in some conditions, and detrimental genes tend to be highly expressed instead of being repressed when not needed. In diverse bacteria, there is little correlation between when genes are important for optimal growth or fitness and when those genes are upregulated. Two common types of indirect control are constitutive expression and regulation by growth rate; these occur for genes with diverse functions and often seem to be suboptimal. Because genes that have closely related functions can have dissimilar expression patterns, regulation may be suboptimal in the wild as well as in the laboratory. PMID:23591776

  1. SOURCES OF VARIATION IN BASELINE GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS FROM TOXICOGENOMIC STUDY CONTROL ANIMALS ACROSS MULTIPLE LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in study design are typical for toxicogenomic studies, but their impact on gene expression in control animals has not been well characterized. A dataset of control animal microarray expression data was assembled by a working group of the Health and Environmental Scienc...

  2. SOURCES OF VARIATION IN BASELINE GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS FROM TOXICOGENOMIC STUDY CONTROL ANIMALS ACROSS MULTIPLE LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in study design are typical for toxicogenomic studies, but their impact on gene expression in control animals has not been well characterized. A dataset of control animal microarray expression data was assembled by a working group of the Health and Environmental Scienc...

  3. Structural insights into ligand binding and gene expression control by an adenosylcobalamin riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Peselis, Alla; Serganov, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Coenzyme B(12) has a key role in various enzymatic reactions and controls expression of bacterial genes through riboswitches. Here we report the crystal structure of the Symbiobacterium thermophilum B(12) riboswitch bound to its ligand adenosylcobalamin. The riboswitch forms a unique junctional structure with a large ligand-binding pocket tailored for specific recognition of the adenosyl moiety and flanked by structural elements that stabilize the regulatory region and enable control of gene expression.

  4. Modelling Robust Feedback Control Mechanisms That Ensure Reliable Coordination of Histone Gene Expression with DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Corrigall, Holly; Ebenhöh, Oliver; Müller, Berndt

    2016-01-01

    Histone proteins are key elements in the packing of eukaryotic DNA into chromosomes. A little understood control system ensures that histone gene expression is balanced with DNA replication so that histone proteins are produced in appropriate amounts. Disturbing or disrupting this system affects genome stability and gene expression, and has detrimental consequences for human development and health. It has been proposed that feedback control involving histone proteins contributes to this regulation and there is evidence implicating cell cycle checkpoint molecules activated when DNA synthesis is impaired in this control. We have developed mathematical models that incorporate these control modes in the form of inhibitory feedback of histone gene expression from free histone proteins, and alternatively a direct link that couples histone RNA synthesis to DNA synthesis. Using our experimental evidence and related published data we provide a simplified description of histone protein synthesis during S phase. Both models reproduce the coordination of histone gene expression with DNA replication during S phase and the down-regulation of histone RNA when DNA synthesis is interrupted, but only the model incorporating histone protein feedback control was able to effectively simulate the coordinate expression of a simplified histone gene family. Our combined theoretical and experimental approach supports the hypothesis that the regulation of histone gene expression involves feedback control. PMID:27798685

  5. Role of feedback and network architecture in controlling virulence gene expression in Bordetella.

    PubMed

    Prajapat, Mahendra Kumar; Saini, Supreet

    2013-11-01

    Bordetella is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for causing whooping cough in a broad range of host organisms. For successful infection, Bordetella controls expression of four distinct classes of genes (referred to as class 1, 2, 3, and 4 genes) at distinct times in the infection cycle. This control is executed by a single two-component system, BvgAS. Interestingly, the transmembrane component of the two-component system, BvgS, consists of three phospho-transfer domains leading to phosphorylation of the response regulator, BvgA. Phosphorylated BvgA then controls expression of virulence genes and also controls bvgAS transcription. In this work, we perform simulations to characterize the role of the network architecture in governing gene expression in Bordetella. Our results show that the wild-type network is locally optimal for controlling the timing of expression of the different classes of genes involved in infection. In addition, the interplay between environmental signals and positive feedback aids the bacterium identify precise conditions for and control expression of virulence genes.

  6. Differentially correlated genes in co-expression networks control phenotype transitions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lina D; Vyshenska, Dariia; Shulzhenko, Natalia; Yambartsev, Anatoly; Morgun, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Co-expression networks are a tool widely used for analysis of "Big Data" in biology that can range from transcriptomes to proteomes, metabolomes and more recently even microbiomes. Several methods were proposed to answer biological questions interrogating these networks. Differential co-expression analysis is a recent approach that measures how gene interactions change when a biological system transitions from one state to another. Although the importance of differentially co-expressed genes to identify dysregulated pathways has been noted, their role in gene regulation is not well studied. Herein we investigated differentially co-expressed genes in a relatively simple mono-causal process (B lymphocyte deficiency) and in a complex multi-causal system (cervical cancer). Co-expression networks of B cell deficiency (Control and BcKO) were reconstructed using Pearson correlation coefficient for two mus musculus datasets: B10.A strain (12 normal, 12 BcKO) and BALB/c strain (10 normal, 10 BcKO). Co-expression networks of cervical cancer (normal and cancer) were reconstructed using local partial correlation method for five datasets (total of 64 normal, 148 cancer). Differentially correlated pairs were identified along with the location of their genes in BcKO and in cancer networks. Minimum Shortest Path and Bi-partite Betweenness Centrality where statistically evaluated for differentially co-expressed genes in corresponding networks.    Results: We show that in B cell deficiency the differentially co-expressed genes are highly enriched with immunoglobulin genes (causal genes). In cancer we found that differentially co-expressed genes act as "bottlenecks" rather than causal drivers with most flows that come from the key driver genes to the peripheral genes passing through differentially co-expressed genes. Using in vitro knockdown experiments for two out of 14 differentially co-expressed genes found in cervical cancer (FGFR2 and CACYBP), we showed that they play

  7. Differentially correlated genes in co-expression networks control phenotype transitions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Lina D.; Vyshenska, Dariia; Shulzhenko, Natalia; Yambartsev, Anatoly; Morgun, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    Background: Co-expression networks are a tool widely used for analysis of “Big Data” in biology that can range from transcriptomes to proteomes, metabolomes and more recently even microbiomes. Several methods were proposed to answer biological questions interrogating these networks. Differential co-expression analysis is a recent approach that measures how gene interactions change when a biological system transitions from one state to another. Although the importance of differentially co-expressed genes to identify dysregulated pathways has been noted, their role in gene regulation is not well studied. Herein we investigated differentially co-expressed genes in a relatively simple mono-causal process (B lymphocyte deficiency) and in a complex multi-causal system (cervical cancer). Methods: Co-expression networks of B cell deficiency (Control and BcKO) were reconstructed using Pearson correlation coefficient for two mus musculus datasets: B10.A strain (12 normal, 12 BcKO) and BALB/c strain (10 normal, 10 BcKO). Co-expression networks of cervical cancer (normal and cancer) were reconstructed using local partial correlation method for five datasets (total of 64 normal, 148 cancer). Differentially correlated pairs were identified along with the location of their genes in BcKO and in cancer networks. Minimum Shortest Path and Bi-partite Betweenness Centrality where statistically evaluated for differentially co-expressed genes in corresponding networks.    Results: We show that in B cell deficiency the differentially co-expressed genes are highly enriched with immunoglobulin genes (causal genes). In cancer we found that differentially co-expressed genes act as “bottlenecks” rather than causal drivers with most flows that come from the key driver genes to the peripheral genes passing through differentially co-expressed genes. Using in vitro knockdown experiments for two out of 14 differentially co-expressed genes found in cervical cancer (FGFR2 and CACYBP), we

  8. tCRISPRi: tunable and reversible, one-step control of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-tian; Jun, Yonggun; Erickstad, Michael J.; Brown, Steven D.; Parks, Adam; Court, Donald L.; Jun, Suckjoon

    2016-01-01

    The ability to control the level of gene expression is a major quest in biology. A widely used approach employs deletion of a nonessential gene of interest (knockout), or multi-step recombineering to move a gene of interest under a repressible promoter (knockdown). However, these genetic methods are laborious, and limited for quantitative study. Here, we report a tunable CRISPR-cas system, “tCRISPRi”, for precise and continuous titration of gene expression by more than 30-fold. Our tCRISPRi system employs various previous advancements into a single strain: (1) We constructed a new strain containing a tunable arabinose operon promoter PBAD to quantitatively control the expression of CRISPR-(d)Cas protein over two orders of magnitude in a plasmid-free system. (2) tCRISPRi is reversible, and gene expression is repressed under knockdown conditions. (3) tCRISPRi shows significantly less than 10% leaky expression. (4) Most important from a practical perspective, construction of tCRISPRi to target a new gene requires only one-step of oligo recombineering. Our results show that tCRISPRi, in combination with recombineering, provides a simple and easy-to-implement tool for gene expression control, and is ideally suited for construction of both individual strains and high-throughput tunable knockdown libraries. PMID:27996021

  9. tCRISPRi: tunable and reversible, one-step control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Tian; Jun, Yonggun; Erickstad, Michael J.; Brown, Steven D.; Parks, Adam; Court, Donald L.; Jun, Suckjoon

    2016-12-01

    The ability to control the level of gene expression is a major quest in biology. A widely used approach employs deletion of a nonessential gene of interest (knockout), or multi-step recombineering to move a gene of interest under a repressible promoter (knockdown). However, these genetic methods are laborious, and limited for quantitative study. Here, we report a tunable CRISPR-cas system, “tCRISPRi”, for precise and continuous titration of gene expression by more than 30-fold. Our tCRISPRi system employs various previous advancements into a single strain: (1) We constructed a new strain containing a tunable arabinose operon promoter PBAD to quantitatively control the expression of CRISPR-(d)Cas protein over two orders of magnitude in a plasmid-free system. (2) tCRISPRi is reversible, and gene expression is repressed under knockdown conditions. (3) tCRISPRi shows significantly less than 10% leaky expression. (4) Most important from a practical perspective, construction of tCRISPRi to target a new gene requires only one-step of oligo recombineering. Our results show that tCRISPRi, in combination with recombineering, provides a simple and easy-to-implement tool for gene expression control, and is ideally suited for construction of both individual strains and high-throughput tunable knockdown libraries.

  10. Control of the expression of anchored genes using micron scale heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivashankar, G. V.; Liu, S.; Libchaber, A.

    2000-06-01

    We control in vitro gene expression, using DNA (gene) sequences immobilized on miniaturized heaters. For this, electronically addressable indium-tin-oxide heating pads, 100 μm2 in size, are fabricated on a glass substrate to locally define temperatures and thus control transcription and translation of DNA gene sequences attached to the pad. Wheat germ cell extract is the reaction medium. We use luciferase gene and monitor its temperature-controlled expression by luminescence. Various constructs are tested yielding either luciferase free or bound to the coding DNA. Control of protein production at precise sites and rates, using temperature, opens the possibility to engineer various protein networks with different time scales. Working with constructs where the protein stays bound, gene product micro-arrays can be realized.

  11. Control of mammalian gene expression by selective mRNA export.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, Vihandha O; Laskey, Ronald A

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear export of mRNAs is a crucial step in the regulation of gene expression, linking transcription in the nucleus to translation in the cytoplasm. Although important components of the mRNA export machinery are well characterized, such as transcription-export complexes TREX and TREX-2, recent work has shown that, in some instances, mammalian mRNA export can be selective and can regulate crucial biological processes such as DNA repair, gene expression, maintenance of pluripotency, haematopoiesis, proliferation and cell survival. Such findings show that mRNA export is an unexpected, yet potentially important, mechanism for the control of gene expression and of the mammalian transcriptome.

  12. Controlling expression of genes in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with a vitamin-repressible riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Ramundo, Silvia; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes of land plants and algae contain generally between 100 and 150 genes. These genes are involved in plastid gene expression and photosynthesis and in various other tasks. The function of some chloroplast genes is still unknown and some of them appear to be essential for growth and survival. Repressible and reversible expression systems are highly desirable for functional and biochemical characterization of these genes. We have developed a genetic tool that allows one to regulate the expression of any coding sequence in the chloroplast genome of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our system is based on vitamin-regulated expression of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast Nac2 protein, which is specifically required for the expression of any plastid gene fused to the psbD 5'UTR. With this approach, expression of the Nac2 gene in the nucleus and, in turn, that of the chosen chloroplast gene artificially driven by the psbD 5'UTR, is controlled by the MetE promoter and Thi4 riboswitch, which can be inactivated in a reversible way by supplying vitamin B12 and thiamine to the growth medium, respectively. This system opens interesting possibilities for studying the assembly and turnover of chloroplast multiprotein complexes such as the photosystems, the ribosome, and the RNA polymerase. It also provides a way to overcome the toxicity often associated with the expression of proteins of biotechnological interest in the chloroplast.

  13. Growth and gene expression are predominantly controlled by distinct regions of the human IL-4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J J; McReynolds, L J; Keegan, A; Wang, L H; Garfein, E; Rothman, P; Nelms, K; Paul, W E

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 causes hematopoietic cells to proliferate and express a series of genes, including CD23. We examined whether IL-4-mediated growth, as measured by 4PS phosphorylation, and gene induction were similarly controlled. Studies of M12.4.1 cells expressing human IL-4R truncation mutants indicated that the region between amino acids 557-657 is necessary for full gene expression, which correlated with Stat6 DNA binding activity. This region was not required for 4PS phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutations in the interval between amino acids 557-657 revealed that as long as one tyrosine remained unmutated, CD23 was fully induced. When all three tyrosines were mutated, the receptor was unable to induce CD23. The results indicate that growth regulation and gene expression are principally controlled by distinct regions of IL-4R.

  14. Identification of suitable internal control genes for expression studies in Coffea arabica under different experimental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Barsalobres-Cavallari, Carla F; Severino, Fábio E; Maluf, Mirian P; Maia, Ivan G

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantitative data from gene expression experiments are often normalized by transcription levels of reference or housekeeping genes. An inherent assumption for their use is that the expression of these genes is highly uniform in living organisms during various phases of development, in different cell types and under diverse environmental conditions. To date, the validation of reference genes in plants has received very little attention and suitable reference genes have not been defined for a great number of crop species including Coffea arabica. The aim of the research reported herein was to compare the relative expression of a set of potential reference genes across different types of tissue/organ samples of coffee. We also validated the expression profiles of the selected reference genes at various stages of development and under a specific biotic stress. Results The expression levels of five frequently used housekeeping genes (reference genes), namely alcohol dehydrogenase (adh), 14-3-3, polyubiquitin (poly), β-actin (actin) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapdh) was assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR over a set of five tissue/organ samples (root, stem, leaf, flower, and fruits) of Coffea arabica plants. In addition to these commonly used internal controls, three other genes encoding a cysteine proteinase (cys), a caffeine synthase (ccs) and the 60S ribosomal protein L7 (rpl7) were also tested. Their stability and suitability as reference genes were validated by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper programs. The obtained results revealed significantly variable expression levels of all reference genes analyzed, with the exception of gapdh, which showed no significant changes in expression among the investigated experimental conditions. Conclusion Our data suggests that the expression of housekeeping genes is not completely stable in coffee. Based on our results, gapdh, followed by 14-3-3 and rpl7 were found to be homogeneously

  15. Optogenetics in Plants: Red/Far-Red Light Control of Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Fernandez, Rocio; Samodelov, Sophia L; Brandl, Simon M; Wehinger, Elke; Müller, Konrad; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic tools to control gene expression have many advantages over the classical chemically inducible systems, overcoming intrinsic limitations of chemical inducers such as solubility, diffusion, and cell toxicity. They offer an unmatched spatiotemporal resolution and permit quantitative and noninvasive control of the gene expression. Here we describe a protocol of a synthetic light-inducible system for the targeted control of gene expression in plants based on the plant photoreceptor phytochrome B and one of its interacting factors (PIF6). The synthetic toggle switch system is in the ON state when plant protoplasts are illuminated with red light (660 nm) and can be returned to the OFF state by subsequent illumination with far-red light (760 nm). In this protocol, the implementation of a red light-inducible expression system in plants using Light-Emitting Diode (LED) illumination boxes is described, including the isolation and transient transformation of plant protoplasts from Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum.

  16. Epididymal Region-Specific miRNA Expression and DNA Methylation and Their Roles in Controlling Gene Expression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shuanggang; Zhang, Jinsong; Xie, Shengsong; Ma, Wubin; Ni, Minjie; Tang, Chunhua; Zhou, Lu; Zhou, Yuchuan; Liu, Mofang; Li, Yixue; Zhang, Yonglian

    2015-01-01

    Region-specific gene expression is an intriguing feature of the mammalian epididymis. This unique property is essential for sperm maturation and storage, and it also implicates stringent and multi-level regulations of gene expression. Over the past decade, the androgen-driven activation of epididymal gene transcription has been extensively studied. However, it still remains largely unexplored whether and how other regulatory mechanisms, such as miRNAs and DNA methylation, are involved in controlling regional gene expression in the epididymis. Using microarray-based approaches, we studied the regional miRNA expression and DNA methylation profiles in 4 distinct epididymal regions (initial segment, caput, corpus and cauda) of rats. We found that the miR-200 family members were more expressed in caput, compared with cauda. By GSEA analysis, the differential expression of miR-200 family between caput and cauda was shown to be negatively correlated with their predicted target genes, among which 4 bona fide targets were verified by luciferase reporter assay. Predicted target genes of miR-200 family have enriched functions in anti-apoptosis, cell transportation and development, implying the regional diversity in epididymal functions. On the other hand, we revealed epididymal DNA methylation of 2002 CpG islands and 2771 gene promoters (-3.88-0.97kb), among which 1350 (67.43%) CpG islands and 2095 (75.60%) promoters contained region-specific DNA methylation. We observed significant and distinct functional enrichment in genes with specifically methylated promoters in each epididymal regions, but these DNA methylations did not show significant correlation with repressed gene transcription in the mature epididymis. Conclusively, we investigated the regional miRNA expression and DNA methylation in the rat epididymis and revealed a potential role of miR-200 family in gene expression regulation between caput and cauda. This may contribute to the distinct physiological function in

  17. Optimization of radiation controlled gene expression by adenoviral vectors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Anton, Martina; Gomaa, Iman E O; von Lukowicz, Tobias; Molls, Michael; Gansbacher, Bernd; Würschmidt, Florian

    2005-07-01

    The radiation-inducible EGR-1-promoter has been used in different gene therapy approaches in order to enhance and locally restrict therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this study was to reduce nonspecific gene expression in the absence of irradiation (IR) in an adenoviral vector. Rat rhabdomyosarcoma R1H tumor cells were infected with adenoviral vectors expressing either EGFP or HSV-TK under control of the murine EGR-1 promoter/enhancer. Cells were irradiated at 0-6 Gy. Gene expression was determined by FACS-analysis (EGFP), or crystal violet staining (HSV-TK). The bovine growth hormone polyadenylation signal (BGH pA) was used as insulating sequence and was introduced upstream or upstream and downstream of the expression cassette. Infected R1H cells displayed IR dose-dependent EGFP expression. Cells treated with IR, AdEGR.TK and ganciclovir displayed a survival of 17.3% (6 Gy). However, significant gene expression was observed in the absence of IR with EGR.TK and EGR.EGFP constructs. Introduction of BGHpA upstream or upstream and downstream of expression cassette resulted in decreased nonspecific cytotoxicity by a factor of 1.6-2.3 with minor influence on the induced level of cytotoxicity. Introduction of insulating sequences in adenoviral vectors might allow tighter temporospatial control of gene expression by the radiation-inducible EGR-1 promoter.

  18. Lentiviral vector system for coordinated constitutive and drug controlled tetracycline-regulated gene co-expression.

    PubMed

    Stahlhut, Maike; Schwarzer, Adrian; Eder, Matthias; Yang, Min; Li, Zhixiong; Morgan, Michael; Schambach, Axel; Kustikova, Olga S

    2015-09-01

    Constitutive co-expression of cooperating transgenes using retroviral integrating vectors is frequently used for genetic modification of different cell types to establish therapeutic or cancer models. However, such approaches are unable to dissect the influence of dose, order and reversibility of transgene expression on the fate of newly developed therapeutic/malignant phenotypes. We present a modular lentiviral vector system, which provides expression of constitutive and inducible components. To demonstrate its functionality, we constitutively expressed the well-described transcription factor Meis1 followed by inducible co-expression of collaborating partner Hoxa9 under the control of tetracycline responsive promoters in murine fibroblasts and primary hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Fluorescent markers to track transgene co-expression revealed tightly controlled, efficiently inducible and reversible but cell type dependent gene transfer over time. We demonstrated dose-dependent blockade of myeloid differentiation when both Meis1/Hoxa9 were concomitantly overexpressed in primary HPCs in vitro, but the absence of the transformed phenotype in non-induced samples or when Hoxa9 expression was down-regulated. This system combines the advantages of lentiviral gene transfer and the opportunity for drug-controlled co-expression of multiple transgenes to dissect, among others, gene networks governing complex cell behavior, such as proto-oncogene dose-dependent leukemogenic pathways or collaborating mechanisms of genes enhancing competitive fitness of hematopoietic cells.

  19. The putative protein methyltransferase LAE1 controls cellulase gene expression in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Seiboth, Bernhard; Karimi, Razieh Aghcheh; Phatale, Pallavi A; Linke, Rita; Hartl, Lukas; Sauer, Dominik G; Smith, Kristina M; Baker, Scott E; Freitag, Michael; Kubicek, Christian P

    2012-06-01

    Trichoderma reesei is an industrial producer of enzymes that degrade lignocellulosic polysaccharides to soluble monomers, which can be fermented to biofuels. Here we show that the expression of genes for lignocellulose degradation are controlled by the orthologous T. reesei protein methyltransferase LAE1. In a lae1 deletion mutant we observed a complete loss of expression of all seven cellulases, auxiliary factors for cellulose degradation, β-glucosidases and xylanases were no longer expressed. Conversely, enhanced expression of lae1 resulted in significantly increased cellulase gene transcription. Lae1-modulated cellulase gene expression was dependent on the function of the general cellulase regulator XYR1, but also xyr1 expression was LAE1-dependent. LAE1 was also essential for conidiation of T. reesei. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing ('ChIP-seq') showed that lae1 expression was not obviously correlated with H3K4 di- or trimethylation (indicative of active transcription) or H3K9 trimethylation (typical for heterochromatin regions) in CAZyme coding regions, suggesting that LAE1 does not affect CAZyme gene expression by directly modulating H3K4 or H3K9 methylation. Our data demonstrate that the putative protein methyltransferase LAE1 is essential for cellulase gene expression in T. reesei through mechanisms that remain to be identified.

  20. The putative protein methyltransferase LAE1 controls cellulase gene expression in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Seiboth, Bernhard; Karimi, Razieh Aghcheh; Phatale, Pallavi A; Linke, Rita; Hartl, Lukas; Sauer, Dominik G; Smith, Kristina M; Baker, Scott E; Freitag, Michael; Kubicek, Christian P

    2012-01-01

    Summary Trichoderma reesei is an industrial producer of enzymes that degrade lignocellulosic polysaccharides to soluble monomers, which can be fermented to biofuels. Here we show that the expression of genes for lignocellulose degradation are controlled by the orthologous T. reesei protein methyltransferase LAE1. In a lae1 deletion mutant we observed a complete loss of expression of all seven cellulases, auxiliary factors for cellulose degradation, β-glucosidases and xylanases were no longer expressed. Conversely, enhanced expression of lae1 resulted in significantly increased cellulase gene transcription. Lae1-modulated cellulase gene expression was dependent on the function of the general cellulase regulator XYR1, but also xyr1 expression was LAE1-dependent. LAE1 was also essential for conidiation of T. reesei. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (‘ChIP-seq’) showed that lae1 expression was not obviously correlated with H3K4 di- or trimethylation (indicative of active transcription) or H3K9 trimethylation (typical for heterochromatin regions) in CAZyme coding regions, suggesting that LAE1 does not affect CAZyme gene expression by directly modulating H3K4 or H3K9 methylation. Our data demonstrate that the putative protein methyltransferase LAE1 is essential for cellulase gene expression in T. reesei through mechanisms that remain to be identified. PMID:22554051

  1. Automated annotation of Drosophila gene expression patterns using a controlled vocabulary.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shuiwang; Sun, Liang; Jin, Rong; Kumar, Sudhir; Ye, Jieping

    2008-09-01

    Regulation of gene expression in space and time directs its localization to a specific subset of cells during development. Systematic determination of the spatiotemporal dynamics of gene expression plays an important role in understanding the regulatory networks driving development. An atlas for the gene expression patterns of fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been created by whole-mount in situ hybridization, and it documents the dynamic changes of gene expression pattern during Drosophila embryogenesis. The spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression are integrated by anatomical terms from a controlled vocabulary linking together intermediate tissues developed from one another. Currently, the terms are assigned to patterns manually. However, the number of patterns generated by high-throughput in situ hybridization is rapidly increasing. It is, therefore, tempting to approach this problem by employing computational methods. In this article, we present a novel computational framework for annotating gene expression patterns using a controlled vocabulary. In the currently available high-throughput data, annotation terms are assigned to groups of patterns rather than to individual images. We propose to extract invariant features from images, and construct pyramid match kernels to measure the similarity between sets of patterns. To exploit the complementary information conveyed by different features and incorporate the correlation among patterns sharing common structures, we propose efficient convex formulations to integrate the kernels derived from various features. The proposed framework is evaluated by comparing its annotation with that of human curators, and promising performance in terms of F1 score has been reported.

  2. Differential modulation of gene expression in the NMDA postsynaptic density of schizophrenic and control smokers.

    PubMed

    Mexal, S; Frank, M; Berger, R; Adams, C E; Ross, R G; Freedman, R; Leonard, S

    2005-10-03

    Nicotine is known to induce the release of multiple neurotransmitters, including glutamate and dopamine, through activation of nicotinic receptors. Gene expression in the N-methyl-d-aspartate postsynaptic density (NMDA-PSD), as well as other functional groups, was compared in postmortem hippocampus of schizophrenic and nonmentally ill smokers and nonsmokers utilizing a microarray and quantitative RT-PCR approach. The expression of 277 genes was significantly changed between all smokers and nonsmokers. Specific gene groups, most notably genes expressed in the NMDA-PSD, were prevalent among these transcripts. Analysis of the interaction between smoking and schizophrenia identified several genes in the NMDA-PSD that were differentially affected by smoking in patients. The present findings suggest that smoking may differentially modulate glutamatergic function in schizophrenic patients and control subjects. The biological mechanisms underlying chronic tobacco use are likely to differ substantially between these two groups.

  3. A Novel Regulatory Gene, Tri10, Controls Trichothecene Toxin Production and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tag, Andrew G.; Garifullina, Gulnara F.; Peplow, Andrew W.; Ake, Charles; Phillips, T. D.; Hohn, Thomas M.; Beremand, Marian N.

    2001-01-01

    We report here the characterization of Tri10, a novel regulatory gene within the trichothecene gene cluster. Comparison of Tri10 genomic and mRNA sequences revealed that removal of a single 77-bp intron provided a 1,260-bp open reading frame, encoding a 420-amino-acid protein. Disruption of Tri10 in Fusarium sporotrichioides abolished T-2 toxin production and dramatically decreased the transcript accumulation for four trichothecene genes (Tri4, Tri5, Tri6, and Tri101) and an apparent farnesyl pyrophosphate synthetase (Fpps) gene. Conversely, homologous integration of a disruption vector by a single upstream crossover event significantly increased T-2 toxin production and elevated the transcript accumulation of the trichothecene genes and Fpps. Further analysis revealed that disruption of Tri10, and to a greater extent the disruption of Tri6, increased sensitivity to T-2 toxin under certain growth conditions. Although Tri10 is conserved in Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium sambucinum and clearly plays a central role in regulating trichothecene gene expression, it does not show any significant matches to proteins of known or predicted function or to motifs except a single transmembrane domain. We suggest a model in which Tri10 acts upstream of the cluster-encoded transcription factor TRI6 and is necessary for full expression of both the other trichothecene genes and the genes for the primary metabolic pathway that precedes the trichothecene biosynthetic pathway, as well as for wild-type levels of trichothecene self-protection. We further suggest the presence of a regulatory loop where Tri6 is not required for the transcription of Tri10 but is required to limit the expression of Tri10. PMID:11679358

  4. PhotoMorphs™: A Novel Light-Activated Reagent for Controlling Gene Expression in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tomasini, Amber J.; Schuler, Aaron D.; Zebala, John A.; Mayer, Alan N.

    2009-01-01

    Manipulating gene expression in zebrafish is critical for exploiting the full potential of this vertebrate model organism. Morpholino oligos are the most commonly employed antisense technology for knocking down gene expression. However, morpholinos suffer from a lack of control over the timing and location of knockdown. In this report, we describe a novel light-activatable knockdown reagent called PhotoMorph™. PhotoMorphs can be generated from existing morpholinos by hybridization with a complementary caging strand containing a photocleavable linkage. The caging strand neutralizes the morpholino activity until irradiation of the PhotoMorph with UV light releases the morpholino. We generated PhotoMorphs to target genes encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), No tail, and E-cadherin to illustrate the utility of this approach. Temporal control of gene expression with PhotoMorphs permitted us to circumvent the early lethal phenotype of E-cadherin knockdown. A splice-blocking PhotoMorph directed to the rheb gene showed light-dependent gene knockdown up to 72 hpf. PhotoMorphs thus offer a new class of laboratory reagents suitable for the spatiotemporal control of gene expression in the zebrafish. PMID:19644983

  5. Combinatorial control of temporal gene expression in the Drosophila wing by enhancers and core promoters

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The transformation of a developing epithelium into an adult structure is a complex process, which often involves coordinated changes in cell proliferation, metabolism, adhesion, and shape. To identify genetic mechanisms that control epithelial differentiation, we analyzed the temporal patterns of gene expression during metamorphosis of the Drosophila wing. Results We found that a striking number of genes, approximately 50% of the Drosophila transcriptome, exhibited changes in expression during a time course of wing development. While cis-acting enhancer sequences clearly correlated with these changes, a stronger correlation was discovered between core-promoter types and the dynamic patterns of gene expression within this differentiating tissue. In support of the hypothesis that core-promoter type influences the dynamics of expression, expression levels of several TATA-box binding protein associated factors (TAFs) and other core promoter-associated components changed during this developmental time course, and a testes-specific TAF (tTAF) played a critical role in timing cellular differentiation within the wing. Conclusions Our results suggest that the combinatorial control of gene expression via cis-acting enhancer sequences and core-promoter types, determine the complex changes in gene expression that drive morphogenesis and terminal differentiation of the Drosophila wing epithelium. PMID:22992320

  6. Genetic control of eosinophilia in mice: gene(s) expressed in bone marrow-derived cells control high responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Vadas, M.A.

    1982-02-01

    A heterogeneity in the capacity of strains of mice to mount eosinophilia is described. BALB/c and C3H are eosinophil high responder strains (EO-HR) and CBA and A/J are eosinophil low responder strains (EO-LR), judged by the response of blood eosinophils to Ascaris suum, and the response of blood, bone marrow, and spleen eosinophils to keyhole limpet hemocyanin given 2 days after 150 mg/kg cyclophosphamide. Some of the gene(s) for high responsiveness appear to be dominant because (EO-HR x EO-LR)F/sub 1/ mice were intermediate to high responders. This gene is expressed in bone marrow-derived cells because radiation chimeras of the type EO-HR..-->..F/sub 1/ were high responders and EO-LR..-->..F/sub 1/ were low responders. This description of a genetic control of eosinophilia in mice may be useful in understanding the role of this cell in parasite immunity and allergy.

  7. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Pentland, Ieisha; Parish, Joanna L

    2015-07-06

    All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions.

  8. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pentland, Ieisha; Parish, Joanna L.

    2015-01-01

    All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions. PMID:26154016

  9. A Bistable Switch and Anatomical Site Control Vibrio cholerae Virulence Gene Expression in the Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Alex T.; Dolganov, Nadia A.; Rasmussen, Thomas; Otto, Glen; Miller, Michael C.; Felt, Stephen A.; Torreilles, Stéphanie; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental, but unanswered question in host-pathogen interactions is the timing, localization and population distribution of virulence gene expression during infection. Here, microarray and in situ single cell expression methods were used to study Vibrio cholerae growth and virulence gene expression during infection of the rabbit ligated ileal loop model of cholera. Genes encoding the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT) were powerfully expressed early in the infectious process in bacteria adjacent to epithelial surfaces. Increased growth was found to co-localize with virulence gene expression. Significant heterogeneity in the expression of tcpA, the repeating subunit of TCP, was observed late in the infectious process. The expression of tcpA, studied in single cells in a homogeneous medium, demonstrated unimodal induction of tcpA after addition of bicarbonate, a chemical inducer of virulence gene expression. Striking bifurcation of the population occurred during entry into stationary phase: one subpopulation continued to express tcpA, whereas the expression declined in the other subpopulation. ctxA, encoding the A subunit of CT, and toxT, encoding the proximal master regulator of virulence gene expression also exhibited the bifurcation phenotype. The bifurcation phenotype was found to be reversible, epigenetic and to persist after removal of bicarbonate, features consistent with bistable switches. The bistable switch requires the positive-feedback circuit controlling ToxT expression and formation of the CRP-cAMP complex during entry into stationary phase. Key features of this bistable switch also were demonstrated in vivo, where striking heterogeneity in tcpA expression was observed in luminal fluid in later stages of the infection. When this fluid was diluted into artificial seawater, bacterial aggregates continued to express tcpA for prolonged periods of time. The bistable control of virulence gene expression points to a mechanism that could

  10. Electrotransfer parameters as a tool for controlled and targeted gene expression in skin

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Spela; Blagus, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Lampreht Tratar, Ursa; Stimac, Monika; Prosen, Lara; Dolinsek, Tanja; Kamensek, Urska; Kranjc, Simona; Steinstraesser, Lars; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Préat, Véronique; Sersa, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Skin is an attractive target for gene electrotransfer. It consists of different cell types that can be transfected, leading to various responses to gene electrotransfer. We demonstrate that these responses could be controlled by selecting the appropriate electrotransfer parameters. Specifically, the application of low or high electric pulses, applied by multi-electrode array, provided the possibility to control the depth of the transfection in the skin, the duration and the level of gene expression, as well as the local or systemic distribution of the transgene. The influence of electric pulse type was first studied using a plasmid encoding a reporter gene (DsRed). Then, plasmids encoding therapeutic genes (IL-12, shRNA against endoglin, shRNA against melanoma cell adhesion molecule) were used, and their effects on wound healing and cutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors were investigated. The high-voltage pulses resulted in gene expression that was restricted to superficial skin layers and induced a local response. In contrast, the low-voltage electric pulses promoted transfection into the deeper skin layers, resulting in prolonged gene expression and higher transgene production, possibly with systemic distribution. Therefore, in the translation into the clinics, it will be of the utmost importance to adjust the electrotransfer parameters for different therapeutic approaches and specific mode of action of the therapeutic gene. PMID:27574782

  11. Conditional control of suicide gene expression in tumor cells with theophylline-responsive ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Wang, J; Cheng, H; Sun, Y; Liu, M; Wu, Z; Pei, R

    2017-02-01

    Numerous synthetic RNA-based controls for integrating sensing switches with function devices have been demonstrated in a variety of organisms for gene regulation. Although potential advantages of RNA-based genetic control strategies have been shown in clinical applications, successfully extending these engineered systems into medical applications has seldom been reported. Here, a synthetic RNA-based ribozyme system and its application in advancing rationally designed cellular therapy were described. The theophylline-responsive, ribozyme-based device provided a powerful platform for suicide gene expression regulation in tumor cells. Moreover, we demonstrate the ability of our synthetic controller to modulate effectively the viability of the cells in response to drug input. Our RNA-based regulatory system could dose-dependently fine-tune transgene expression in mammalian cells and address urgent limitations in existing genetic control strategies for gene- and cell-based therapies in the future.

  12. Signal-dependent dynamics of transcription factor translocation controls gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Nan; O'Shea, Erin K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Information about environmental stimuli is often transmitted using common signalling molecules, but the mechanisms that ensure signalling specificity are not entirely known. Here we show that the identities and intensities of different stresses are transmitted by modulation of the amplitude, duration or frequency of nuclear translocation of the budding yeast general stress responsive transcription factor Msn2. Through artificial control of the dynamics of Msn2 translocation, we reveal how distinct dynamical schemes differentially affect reporter gene expression. Using a simple model, we predict stress-induced reporter gene expression from single-cell translocation dynamics. We then demonstrate that the response of natural target genes to dynamical modulation of Msn2 translocation is influenced by differences in the kinetics of promoter transitions and transcription factor binding properties. Thus, multiple environmental signals can trigger qualitatively different dynamics of a single transcription factor, and influence gene expression patterns. PMID:22179789

  13. Regulatable arabinose-inducible gene expression system with consistent control in all cells of a culture.

    PubMed

    Khlebnikov, A; Risa, O; Skaug, T; Carrier, T A; Keasling, J D

    2000-12-01

    The arabinose-inducible promoter P(BAD) is subject to all-or-none induction, in which intermediate concentrations of arabinose give rise to subpopulations of cells that are fully induced and uninduced. To construct a host-vector expression system with regulatable control in a homogeneous population of cells, the araE gene of Escherichia coli was cloned into an RSF1010-derived plasmid under control of the isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside-inducible P(tac) and P(taclac) promoters. This gene encodes the low-affinity, high-capacity arabinose transport protein and is controlled natively by an arabinose-inducible promoter. To detect the effect of arabinose-independent araE expression on population homogeneity and cell-specific expression, the gfpuv gene was placed under control of the arabinose-inducible araBAD promoter (P(BAD)) on the pMB1-derived plasmid pBAD24. The transporter and reporter plasmids were transformed into E. coli strains with native arabinose transport systems and strains deficient in one or both of the arabinose transport systems (araE and/or araFGH). The effects of the arabinose concentration and arabinose-independent transport control on population homogeneity were investigated in these strains using flow cytometry. The araE, and araE araFGH mutant strains harboring the transporter and reporter plasmids were uniformly induced across the population at all inducer concentrations, and the level of gene expression in individual cells varied with arabinose concentration. In contrast, the parent strain, which expressed the native araE and araFGH genes and harbored the transporter and reporter plasmids, exhibited all-or-none behavior. This work demonstrates the importance of including a transport gene that is controlled independently of the inducer to achieve regulatable and consistent induction in all cells of the culture.

  14. Regulatable Arabinose-Inducible Gene Expression System with Consistent Control in All Cells of a Culture

    PubMed Central

    Khlebnikov, Artem; Risa, Øystein; Skaug, Tove; Carrier, Trent A.; Keasling, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The arabinose-inducible promoter PBAD is subject to all-or-none induction, in which intermediate concentrations of arabinose give rise to subpopulations of cells that are fully induced and uninduced. To construct a host-vector expression system with regulatable control in a homogeneous population of cells, the araE gene of Escherichia coli was cloned into an RSF1010-derived plasmid under control of the isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside-inducible Ptac and Ptaclac promoters. This gene encodes the low-affinity, high-capacity arabinose transport protein and is controlled natively by an arabinose-inducible promoter. To detect the effect of arabinose-independent araE expression on population homogeneity and cell-specific expression, the gfpuv gene was placed under control of the arabinose-inducible araBAD promoter (PBAD) on the pMB1-derived plasmid pBAD24. The transporter and reporter plasmids were transformed into E. coli strains with native arabinose transport systems and strains deficient in one or both of the arabinose transport systems (araE and/or araFGH). The effects of the arabinose concentration and arabinose-independent transport control on population homogeneity were investigated in these strains using flow cytometry. The araE, and araE araFGH mutant strains harboring the transporter and reporter plasmids were uniformly induced across the population at all inducer concentrations, and the level of gene expression in individual cells varied with arabinose concentration. In contrast, the parent strain, which expressed the native araE and araFGH genes and harbored the transporter and reporter plasmids, exhibited all-or-none behavior. This work demonstrates the importance of including a transport gene that is controlled independently of the inducer to achieve regulatable and consistent induction in all cells of the culture. PMID:11092865

  15. Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri: Control of Symbiosis-Related Gene Expression System in a Marine Bacterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-04

    The pool of mutagenized plasmids was used to transform E . coli cells containing pHIK555 a plasmid compatible with pHK724 which possesses functional...inclusion bodies form upon overexpression of a foreign protein in E . coli . WORK PLAN (Year 2): The mutations described define two regions in the terminal...RR04106 411d019 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) U. Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri : Control of a Symbiosis-Related Gene Expression

  16. Dissecting Daily and Circadian Expression Rhythms of Clock-Controlled Genes in Human Blood.

    PubMed

    Lech, Karolina; Ackermann, Katrin; Revell, Victoria L; Lao, Oscar; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2016-02-01

    The identification and investigation of novel clock-controlled genes (CCGs) has been conducted thus far mainly in model organisms such as nocturnal rodents, with limited information in humans. Here, we aimed to characterize daily and circadian expression rhythms of CCGs in human peripheral blood during a sleep/sleep deprivation (S/SD) study and a constant routine (CR) study. Blood expression levels of 9 candidate CCGs (SREBF1, TRIB1, USF1, THRA1, SIRT1, STAT3, CAPRIN1, MKNK2, and ROCK2), were measured across 48 h in 12 participants in the S/SD study and across 33 h in 12 participants in the CR study. Statistically significant rhythms in expression were observed for STAT3, SREBF1, TRIB1, and THRA1 in samples from both the S/SD and the CR studies, indicating that their rhythmicity is driven by the endogenous clock. The MKNK2 gene was significantly rhythmic in the S/SD but not the CR study, which implies its exogenously driven rhythmic expression. In addition, we confirmed the circadian expression of PER1, PER3, and REV-ERBα in the CR study samples, while BMAL1 and HSPA1B were not significantly rhythmic in the CR samples; all 5 genes previously showed significant expression in the S/SD study samples. Overall, our results demonstrate that rhythmic expression patterns of clock and selected clock-controlled genes in human blood cells are in part determined by exogenous factors (sleep and fasting state) and in part by the endogenous circadian timing system. Knowledge of the exogenous and endogenous regulation of gene expression rhythms is needed prior to the selection of potential candidate marker genes for future applications in medical and forensic settings. © 2015 The Author(s).

  17. Controlled expression and structural organization of a Lactococcus lactis bacteriophage lysin encoded by two overlapping genes.

    PubMed Central

    Shearman, C A; Jury, K L; Gasson, M J

    1994-01-01

    The phi vML3 bacteriophage lysin is specific for lactococci and could be used to promote enzyme release during cheese manufacture. The level of lysin expression from the cloned gene using its own upstream sequences is very low. Expression in Escherichia coli by using a synthetic hybrid lysin gene and a series of BAL 31 deletions of the original cloned DNA fragment suggested that the start of the gene had previously been incorrectly assigned. Reevaluation of homology between the lysin and Bacillus subtilis PZA protein 15 led to the identification of a new potential ribosome binding site (RBS). A 0.72-kb PCR-generated fragment including this RBS and the complete lysin gene was expressed and inducibly controlled. The translational start of the lysin gene was identified as an isoleucine codon, and this may lead to a low translation rate. During the analysis of the BAL 31 deletion fragments, two proteins of 20 and 8 kDa were shown to be expressed from the originally defined lysin gene. The DNA sequence has a second open reading frame with a good RBS and two potential start methionines. The smaller lysin protein was isolated, and the N terminus was sequenced, confirming that one methionine codon acted as the start of a second gene. The larger lysin protein has homology with lysozymes. The smaller lysin protein has some features resembling those of a holin. The possible roles of these two proteins in lysis of lactococci are discussed. Images PMID:7944354

  18. TAF6δ Controls Apoptosis and Gene Expression in the Absence of p53

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Emmanuelle; Pellay, François-Xavier; Benecke, Arndt; Bell, Brendan

    2008-01-01

    Background Life and death decisions of metazoan cells hinge on the balance between the expression of pro- versus anti-apoptotic gene products. The general RNA polymerase II transcription factor, TFIID, plays a central role in the regulation of gene expression through its core promoter recognition and co-activator functions. The core TFIID subunit TAF6 acts in vitro as an essential co-activator of transcription for the p53 tumor suppressor protein. We previously identified a splice variant of TAF6, termed TAF6δ that can be induced during apoptosis. Methodology/Principal Findings To elucidate the impact of TAF6δ on cell death and gene expression, we have employed modified antisense oligonucleotides to enforce expression of endogenous TAF6δ. The induction of endogenous TAF6δ triggered apoptosis in tumor cell lines, including cells devoid of p53. Microarray experiments revealed that TAF6δ activates gene expression independently of cellular p53 status. Conclusions Our data define TAF6δ as a pivotal node in a signaling pathway that controls gene expression programs and apoptosis in the absence of p53. PMID:18628956

  19. Novel regulatory cascades controlling expression of nitrogen-fixation genes in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R

    2010-11-01

    Geobacter species often play an important role in bioremediation of environments contaminated with metals or organics and show promise for harvesting electricity from waste organic matter in microbial fuel cells. The ability of Geobacter species to fix atmospheric nitrogen is an important metabolic feature for these applications. We identified novel regulatory cascades controlling nitrogen-fixation gene expression in Geobacter sulfurreducens. Unlike the regulatory mechanisms known in other nitrogen-fixing microorganisms, nitrogen-fixation gene regulation in G. sulfurreducens is controlled by two two-component His-Asp phosphorelay systems. One of these systems appears to be the master regulatory system that activates transcription of the majority of nitrogen-fixation genes and represses a gene encoding glutamate dehydrogenase during nitrogen fixation. The other system whose expression is directly activated by the master regulatory system appears to control by antitermination the expression of a subset of the nitrogen-fixation genes whose transcription is activated by the master regulatory system and whose promoter contains transcription termination signals. This study provides a new paradigm for nitrogen-fixation gene regulation.

  20. Novel regulatory cascades controlling expression of nitrogen-fixation genes in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01

    Geobacter species often play an important role in bioremediation of environments contaminated with metals or organics and show promise for harvesting electricity from waste organic matter in microbial fuel cells. The ability of Geobacter species to fix atmospheric nitrogen is an important metabolic feature for these applications. We identified novel regulatory cascades controlling nitrogen-fixation gene expression in Geobacter sulfurreducens. Unlike the regulatory mechanisms known in other nitrogen-fixing microorganisms, nitrogen-fixation gene regulation in G. sulfurreducens is controlled by two two-component His–Asp phosphorelay systems. One of these systems appears to be the master regulatory system that activates transcription of the majority of nitrogen-fixation genes and represses a gene encoding glutamate dehydrogenase during nitrogen fixation. The other system whose expression is directly activated by the master regulatory system appears to control by antitermination the expression of a subset of the nitrogen-fixation genes whose transcription is activated by the master regulatory system and whose promoter contains transcription termination signals. This study provides a new paradigm for nitrogen-fixation gene regulation. PMID:20660485

  1. Effect of TPA and HTLV-1 Tax on BRCA1 and ERE controlled genes expression.

    PubMed

    Jabareen, Azhar; Abu-Jaafar, Aya; Abou-Kandil, Ammar; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2017-07-18

    Interference with the expression and/or functions of the multifunctional tumor suppressor BRCA1 leads to a high risk of breast and ovarian cancers. BRCA1 expression is usually activated by the estrogen (E2) liganded ERα receptor. Activated ERα is considered as a potent transcription factor which activates various genes expression by 2 pathways. A classical pathway, ERα binds directly to E2-responsive elements (EREs) in the promoters of the responsive genes and a non-classical pathway where ERα indirectly binds with the appropriate gene promoter. In our previous study, HTLV-1Tax was found to strongly inhibit ERα induced BRCA1 expression while stimulating ERα induced ERE dependent genes. TPA is a strong PKC activator which found to induce the expression of HTLV-1. Here we examined the effect of TPA on the expression of BRCA1 and genes controlled by ERE region in MCF-7 cells and on Tax activity on these genes. Our results showed strong stimulatory effect of TPA on both BRCA1 and ERE expression without treatment with E2. Tax did not show any significant effect on these TPA activities. It seems that TPA activation of BRCA1 and ERE expression is dependent on PKC activity but not through the NFκB pathway. However, 53BP1 may be involved in this TPA activity because its overexpression significantly reduced the TPA stimulatory effect on BRCA1 and ERE expression. Additionally, our Chip assay results probably exclude possible involvement of ERα pathway in this TPA activity because TPA did not interfere with the binding of ERα to both BRCA1 promoter and ERE region.

  2. Serum albumin alters the expression of iron-controlled genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kruczek, Cassandra; Wachtel, Mitchell; Alabady, Magdy S.; Payton, Paxton R.; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which causes serious infections in immunocompromised patients, produces numerous virulence factors, including exotoxin A and the siderophore pyoverdine. As production of these virulence factors is influenced by the host environment, we examined the effect serum has on global transcription within P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 at different phases of growth in an iron-deficient medium. At early exponential phase, serum significantly enhanced expression of 138 genes, most of which are repressed by iron, including pvdS, regA and the pyoverdine synthesis genes. However, serum did not interfere with the repression of these genes by iron. Serum enhanced regA expression in a fur mutant of PAO1 but not in a pvdS mutant. The serum iron-binding protein apotransferrin, but not ferritin, enhanced regA and pvdS expression. However, in PAO1 grown in a chemically defined medium that contains no iron, serum but not apotransferrin enhanced pvdS and regA expression. While complement inactivation failed to eliminate this effect, albumin absorption reduced the effect of serum on pvdS and regA expression in the iron-deficient medium chelexed tryptic soy broth dialysate. Additionally, albumin absorption eliminated the effect of serum on pvdS and regA expression in the chemically defined medium. These results suggest that serum enhances the expression of P. aeruginosa iron-controlled genes by two mechanisms: one through apotransferrin and another one through albumin. PMID:22053004

  3. Long-Range Control of Gene Expression: Emerging Mechanisms and Disruption in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kleinjan, Dirk A.; van Heyningen, Veronica

    2005-01-01

    Transcriptional control is a major mechanism for regulating gene expression. The complex machinery required to effect this control is still emerging from functional and evolutionary analysis of genomic architecture. In addition to the promoter, many other regulatory elements are required for spatiotemporally and quantitatively correct gene expression. Enhancer and repressor elements may reside in introns or up- and downstream of the transcription unit. For some genes with highly complex expression patterns—often those that function as key developmental control genes—the cis-regulatory domain can extend long distances outside the transcription unit. Some of the earliest hints of this came from disease-associated chromosomal breaks positioned well outside the relevant gene. With the availability of wide-ranging genome sequence comparisons, strong conservation of many noncoding regions became obvious. Functional studies have shown many of these conserved sites to be transcriptional regulatory elements that sometimes reside inside unrelated neighboring genes. Such sequence-conserved elements generally harbor sites for tissue-specific DNA-binding proteins. Developmentally variable chromatin conformation can control protein access to these sites and can regulate transcription. Disruption of these finely tuned mechanisms can cause disease. Some regulatory element mutations will be associated with phenotypes distinct from any identified for coding-region mutations. PMID:15549674

  4. Seasonal Changes in Patterns of Gene Expression in Avian Song Control Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Replogle, Kirstin; Drnevich, Jenny; Lent, Karin L.; Wissman, Anne Marie; Farin, Federico M.; Bammler, Theo K.; Beyer, Richard P.; Clayton, David F.; Perkel, David J.; Brenowitz, Eliot A.

    2012-01-01

    Photoperiod and hormonal cues drive dramatic seasonal changes in structure and function of the avian song control system. Little is known, however, about the patterns of gene expression associated with seasonal changes. Here we address this issue by altering the hormonal and photoperiodic conditions in seasonally-breeding Gambel's white-crowned sparrows and extracting RNA from the telencephalic song control nuclei HVC and RA across multiple time points that capture different stages of growth and regression. We chose HVC and RA because while both nuclei change in volume across seasons, the cellular mechanisms underlying these changes differ. We thus hypothesized that different genes would be expressed between HVC and RA. We tested this by using the extracted RNA to perform a cDNA microarray hybridization developed by the SoNG initiative. We then validated these results using qRT-PCR. We found that 363 genes varied by more than 1.5 fold (>log2 0.585) in expression in HVC and/or RA. Supporting our hypothesis, only 59 of these 363 genes were found to vary in both nuclei, while 132 gene expression changes were HVC specific and 172 were RA specific. We then assigned many of these genes to functional categories relevant to the different mechanisms underlying seasonal change in HVC and RA, including neurogenesis, apoptosis, cell growth, dendrite arborization and axonal growth, angiogenesis, endocrinology, growth factors, and electrophysiology. This revealed categorical differences in the kinds of genes regulated in HVC and RA. These results show that different molecular programs underlie seasonal changes in HVC and RA, and that gene expression is time specific across different reproductive conditions. Our results provide insights into the complex molecular pathways that underlie adult neural plasticity. PMID:22529977

  5. Gene expression in plant mitochondria: transcriptional and post-transcriptional control.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Stefan; Brennicke, Axel

    2003-01-01

    The informational content of the mitochondrial genome in plants is, although small, essential for each cell. Gene expression in these organelles involves a number of distinct transcriptional and post-transcriptional steps. The complex post-transcriptional processes of plant mitochondria such as 5' and 3' RNA processing, intron splicing, RNA editing and controlled RNA stability extensively modify individual steady-state RNA levels and influence the mRNA quantities available for translation. In this overview of the processes in mitochondrial gene expression, we focus on confirmed and potential sites of regulatory interference and discuss the evolutionary origins of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes. PMID:12594926

  6. Metaboloepigenetics: Interrelationships between energy metabolism and epigenetic control of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Dallas R.; Bultman, Scott J.

    2012-01-01

    Diet and energy metabolism affect gene expression, which influences human health and disease. Here, we discuss the role of epigenetics as a mechanistic link between energy metabolism and control of gene expression. A number of key energy metabolites including SAM, acetyl-CoA, NAD+, and ATP serve as essential co-factors for many, perhaps most, epigenetic enzymes that regulate DNA methylation, posttranslational histone modifications, and nucleosome position. The relative abundance of these energy metabolites allows a cell to sense its energetic state. And as co-factors, energy metabolites act as rheostats to modulate the activity of epigenetic enzymes and upregulate/downregulate transcription as appropriate to maintain homeostasis. PMID:22261928

  7. Evaluation of endogenous control gene(s) for gene expression studies in human blood exposed to 60Co γ-rays ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Vaiphei, S Thangminlal; Keppen, Joshua; Nongrum, Saibadaiahun; Chaubey, R C; Kma, L; Sharan, R N

    2015-01-01

    In gene expression studies, it is critical to normalize data using a stably expressed endogenous control gene in order to obtain accurate and reliable results. However, we currently do not have a universally applied endogenous control gene for normalization of data for gene expression studies, particularly those involving (60)Co γ-ray-exposed human blood samples. In this study, a comparative assessment of the gene expression of six widely used housekeeping endogenous control genes, namely 18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, MT-ATP6 and CDKN1A, was undertaken for a range of (60)Co γ-ray doses (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 Gy) at 8.4 Gy min(-1) at 0 and 24 h post-irradiation time intervals. Using the NormFinder algorithm, real-time PCR data obtained from six individuals (three males and three females) were analyzed with respect to the threshold cycle (Ct) value and abundance, ΔCt pair-wise comparison, intra- and inter-group variability assessments, etc. GAPDH, either alone or in combination with 18S, was found to be the most suitable endogenous control gene and should be used in gene expression studies, especially those involving qPCR of γ-ray-exposed human blood samples.

  8. Photosynthetic control of electron transport and the regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Foyer, Christine H; Neukermans, Jenny; Queval, Guillaume; Noctor, Graham; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2012-02-01

    The term 'photosynthetic control' describes the short- and long-term mechanisms that regulate reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport (PET) chain so that the rate of production of ATP and NADPH is coordinated with the rate of their utilization in metabolism. At low irradiances these mechanisms serve to optimize light use efficiency, while at high irradiances they operate to dissipate excess excitation energy as heat. Similarly, the production of ATP and NADPH in ratios tailored to meet demand is finely tuned by a sophisticated series of controls that prevents the accumulation of high NAD(P)H/NAD(P) ratios and ATP/ADP ratios that would lead to potentially harmful over-reduction and inactivation of PET chain components. In recent years, photosynthetic control has also been extrapolated to the regulation of gene expression because mechanisms that are identical or similar to those that serve to regulate electron flow through the PET chain also coordinate the regulated expression of genes encoding photosynthetic proteins. This requires coordinated gene expression in the chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nuclei, involving complex networks of forward and retrograde signalling pathways. Photosynthetic control operates to control photosynthetic gene expression in response to environmental and metabolic changes. Mining literature data on transcriptome profiles of C(3) and C(4) leaves from plants grown under high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) levels compared with those grown with ambient CO(2) reveals that the transition to higher photorespiratory conditions in C(3) plants enhances the expression of genes associated with cyclic electron flow pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana, consistent with the higher ATP requirement (relative to NADPH) of photorespiration.

  9. Gene Expression Profiling in Blood Provides Reproducible Molecular Insights into Asthma Control.

    PubMed

    Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Qiu, Weiliang; Martinez, Fernando D; Strunk, Robert C; Lemanske, Robert F; Liu, Andrew H; Gilliland, Frank D; Millstein, Joshua; Gauderman, W James; Ober, Carole; Krishnan, Jerry A; White, Steven R; Naureckas, Edward T; Nicolae, Dan L; Barnes, Kathleen C; London, Stephanie J; Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; Carey, Vincent J; Weiss, Scott T; Raby, Benjamin A

    2017-01-15

    Maintaining optimal symptom control remains the primary objective of asthma treatment. Better understanding of the biologic underpinnings of asthma control may lead to the development of improved clinical and pharmaceutical approaches. To identify molecular pathways and interrelated genes whose differential expression was associated with asthma control. We performed gene set enrichment analyses of asthma control in 1,170 adults with asthma, each with gene expression data derived from either whole blood (WB) or unstimulated CD4(+) T lymphocytes (CD4), and a self-reported asthma control score representing either the preceding 6 months (chronic) or 7 days (acute). Our study comprised a discovery WB cohort (n = 245, chronic) and three independent, nonoverlapping replication cohorts: a second WB set (n = 448, acute) and two CD4 sets (n = 300, chronic; n = 77, acute). In the WB discovery cohort, we found significant overrepresentation of genes associated with asthma control in 1,106 gene sets from the Molecular Signatures Database (false discovery rate, <5%). Of these, 583 (53%) replicated in at least one replication cohort (false discovery rate, <25%). Suboptimal control was associated with signatures of eosinophilic and granulocytic inflammatory signals, whereas optimal control signatures were enriched for immature lymphocytic patterns. These signatures included two related biologic processes related to activation by TREM-1 (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1) and lipopolysaccharide. Together, these results demonstrate the existence of specific, reproducible transcriptomic components in blood that vary with degree of asthma control and implicate a novel biologic target (TREM-1).

  10. Precise integration of inducible transcriptional elements (PrIITE) enables absolute control of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rita; Hansen, Lars; Hintze, John; Almeida, Raquel; Larsen, Sylvester; Coskun, Mehmet; Davidsen, Johanne; Mitchelmore, Cathy; David, Leonor; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Tetracycline-based inducible systems provide powerful methods for functional studies where gene expression can be controlled. However, the lack of tight control of the inducible system, leading to leakiness and adverse effects caused by undesirable tetracycline dosage requirements, has proven to be a limitation. Here, we report that the combined use of genome editing tools and last generation Tet-On systems can resolve these issues. Our principle is based on precise integration of inducible transcriptional elements (coined PrIITE) targeted to: (i) exons of an endogenous gene of interest (GOI) and (ii) a safe harbor locus. Using PrIITE cells harboring a GFP reporter or CDX2 transcription factor, we demonstrate discrete inducibility of gene expression with complete abrogation of leakiness. CDX2 PrIITE cells generated by this approach uncovered novel CDX2 downstream effector genes. Our results provide a strategy for characterization of dose-dependent effector functions of essential genes that require absence of endogenous gene expression. PMID:28472465

  11. MicroRNA in Control of Gene Expression: An Overview of Nuclear Functions

    PubMed Central

    Catalanotto, Caterina; Cogoni, Carlo; Zardo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The finding that small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are able to control gene expression in a sequence specific manner has had a massive impact on biology. Recent improvements in high throughput sequencing and computational prediction methods have allowed the discovery and classification of several types of ncRNAs. Based on their precursor structures, biogenesis pathways and modes of action, ncRNAs are classified as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs or esiRNAs), promoter associate RNAs (pRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and sno-derived RNAs. Among these, miRNAs appear as important cytoplasmic regulators of gene expression. miRNAs act as post-transcriptional regulators of their messenger RNA (mRNA) targets via mRNA degradation and/or translational repression. However, it is becoming evident that miRNAs also have specific nuclear functions. Among these, the most studied and debated activity is the miRNA-guided transcriptional control of gene expression. Although available data detail quite precisely the effectors of this activity, the mechanisms by which miRNAs identify their gene targets to control transcription are still a matter of debate. Here, we focus on nuclear functions of miRNAs and on alternative mechanisms of target recognition, at the promoter lavel, by miRNAs in carrying out transcriptional gene silencing. PMID:27754357

  12. Ultrasound-induced hyperthermia for the spatio-temporal control of gene expression in bone repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher; Padilla, Frédéric; Zhang, Man; Vilaboa, Nuria; Kripfgans, Oliver; Fowlkes, Brian; Franceschi, Renny

    2012-10-01

    Spatial and temporal control over the expression of growth/differentiation factors is of great interest for regeneration of bone, but technologies capable of providing tight and active control over gene expression remain elusive. We propose the use of focused ultrasound for the targeted activation of heat shock-sensitive expression systems in engineered bone. We report in vitro results with cells that express firefly luciferase (fLuc) under the control of a heat shock protein promoter. Cells were embedded in fibrin scaffolds and exposed to focused ultrasound, using a custom 3.3MHz transducer (focal length 4", f-number 1.33", focal dimension 1.2mm lateral FWHM) in CW mode for 2-20 minutes at intensities ISPTA=120-440 W/cm2. The kinetics of ultrasound-mediated activation of the cells was compared with that of strictly thermal activation. Bioluminescence imaging revealed fLuc expression in an area ≥2.5mm in diameter at the position of the ultrasound focus, and the diameter and intensity of the signal increased with the amplitude of the acoustic energy. We also found that ultrasound activated fLuc expression with substantially shorter exposures than thermal activation. Our results demonstrate the potential for focused ultrasound to selectively activate the expression of a gene of interest in an engineered tissue and suggest that focused ultrasound activates the heat shock pathway by a combination of thermal and non-thermal mechanisms.

  13. Automated annotation of Drosophila gene expression patterns using a controlled vocabulary

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Shuiwang; Sun, Liang; Jin, Rong; Kumar, Sudhir; Ye, Jieping

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Regulation of gene expression in space and time directs its localization to a specific subset of cells during development. Systematic determination of the spatiotemporal dynamics of gene expression plays an important role in understanding the regulatory networks driving development. An atlas for the gene expression patterns of fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been created by whole-mount in situ hybridization, and it documents the dynamic changes of gene expression pattern during Drosophila embryogenesis. The spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression are integrated by anatomical terms from a controlled vocabulary linking together intermediate tissues developed from one another. Currently, the terms are assigned to patterns manually. However, the number of patterns generated by high-throughput in situ hybridization is rapidly increasing. It is, therefore, tempting to approach this problem by employing computational methods. Results: In this article, we present a novel computational framework for annotating gene expression patterns using a controlled vocabulary. In the currently available high-throughput data, annotation terms are assigned to groups of patterns rather than to individual images. We propose to extract invariant features from images, and construct pyramid match kernels to measure the similarity between sets of patterns. To exploit the complementary information conveyed by different features and incorporate the correlation among patterns sharing common structures, we propose efficient convex formulations to integrate the kernels derived from various features. The proposed framework is evaluated by comparing its annotation with that of human curators, and promising performance in terms of F1 score has been reported. Contact: jieping.ye@asu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18632750

  14. [Study on the analytical error factors and evaluation of an internal control gene for leukemia gene expression analysis].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yumiko; Yokota, Hiromitsu; Takai, Daiya; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2012-08-01

    Quantitative analysis of the leukemia fusion gene by real-time PCR is a sensitive method to monitor minimal residual disease; the data obtained are very useful to evaluate the disease stage and prognosis, contributing to the clinical practice of hematology. However, there is no standard laboratory procedure for leukemia genetic testing. Therefore, this genetic testing has some problems related to precision management. To minimize analytical error factors, normalization by an internal control gene is necessary. Additionally, it is important to choose a gene suitable for leukemia gene expression analysis because the expression of an internal standard gene changes due to various factors. In this study, we examined analytical error factors (RNA extraction efficiency, reverse transcription reaction efficiency) and evaluated an internal control gene. As a result, in RNA extraction, the extraction efficiency of the acid-guanidium-phenol-chloroform (AGPC) method was high compared to the silica method. The reverse transcription reaction efficiency was significantly different with each reaction reagent. Furthermore, since three kinds of gene (18s rRNA, GUS, beta-actin) had few differences between samples, they were considered to be suitable as internal standards.

  15. Anx7 is required for nutritional control of gene expression in mouse pancreatic islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Meera; Eidelman, Ofer; Leighton, Ximena; Glasman, Mirta; Goping, Gertrude; Pollard, Harvey B.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene expression in islets of Langerhans is profoundly sensitive to glucose and other nutrients. Islets of Langerhans in the Anx7(+/-) knockout mouse exhibit a profound reduction in ITPR3 protein expression, defective intracellular calcium signaling, and defective insulin secretion. Additional data presented here also show that mRNA for ITPR3 is virtually undetectable in isolated Anx7(+/-) islets. IP3Receptor type 3 (ITPR3) expression in islets of Langerhans is closely regulated by secretory stimuli, and it has been suggested that the level of the ITPR3 expression controls the ability of the islets to respond to nutritional signals. We report that although control islets respond to glucose in vitro by a transient increment in ITPR3 mRNA, the islets from the Anx7(+/-) mouse remain low. We therefore hypothesized that the Anx7/IP3 Receptor(3)/Ca(2+) signaling pathway plays a role in beta cell responses to glucose, and that in the absence of the Anx7/ITPR3 signaling system, the islets would be unable to discriminate between fed or fasted states in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To test this hypothesis, we subjected Anx7(+/-) and control mice to either food and water ad libidum or to an overnight fast with access to water only. We then isolated the respective islets and compared nutrient-dependent changes in global gene expression under the four conditions using genome-based microarray technology. RESULTS: Anx7 protein expression in these islets is only about 50% of control levels in normal littermate controls, and IPTR3 message and protein are virtually zero. cDNA microarray analyses show that in control animals gene expression is significantly affected by the fasting state. Many of the affected genes have historical relevance to development and differentiation of islets. These include preproglucagon, APOJ, cadherin2, phosphoglucoisomerase, oncostatin M, PAX6, HGF, and cytokeratin 18. However, there are also many other nutritionally sensitive genes in control

  16. The Circadian Clock That Controls Gene Expression in Arabidopsis Is Tissue Specific1

    PubMed Central

    Thain, Simon C.; Murtas, Giovanni; Lynn, James R.; McGrath, Robert. B.; Millar, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    The expression of CHALCONE SYNTHASE (CHS) expression is an important control step in the biosynthesis of flavonoids, which are major photoprotectants in plants. CHS transcription is regulated by endogenous programs and in response to environmental signals. Luciferase reporter gene fusions showed that the CHS promoter is controlled by the circadian clock both in roots and in aerial organs of transgenic Arabidopsis plants. The period of rhythmic CHS expression differs from the previously described rhythm of chlorophyll a/b-binding protein (CAB) gene expression, indicating that CHS is controlled by a distinct circadian clock. The difference in period is maintained in the wild-type Arabidopsis accessions tested and in the de-etiolated 1 and timing of CAB expression 1 mutants. These clock-affecting mutations alter the rhythms of both CAB and CHS markers, indicating that a similar (if not identical) circadian clock mechanism controls these rhythms. The distinct tissue distribution of CAB and CHS expression suggests that the properties of the circadian clock differ among plant tissues. Several animal organs also exhibit heterogeneous circadian properties in culture but are believed to be synchronized in vivo. The fact that differing periods are manifest in intact plants supports our proposal that spatially separated copies of the plant circadian clock are at most weakly coupled, if not functionally independent. This autonomy has apparently permitted tissue-specific specialization of circadian timing. PMID:12226490

  17. Large-scale screen for genes controlling mammalian embryogenesis, using high-throughput gene expression analysis in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Neidhardt, L; Gasca, S; Wertz, K; Obermayr, F; Worpenberg, S; Lehrach, H; Herrmann, B G

    2000-11-01

    We have adapted the whole-mount in situ hybridization technique to perform high-throughput gene expression analysis in mouse embryos. A large-scale screen for genes showing specific expression patterns in the mid-gestation embryo was carried out, and a large number of genes controlling development were isolated. From 35760 clones of a 9.5 d.p.c. cDNA library, a total of 5348 cDNAs, enriched for rare transcripts, were selected and analyzed by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Four hundred and twenty-eight clones revealed specific expression patterns in the 9.5 d.p.c. embryo. Of 361 tag-sequenced clones, 198 (55%) represent 154 known mouse genes. Thirty-nine (25%) of the known genes are involved in transcriptional regulation and 33 (21%) in inter- or intracellular signaling. A large number of these genes have been shown to play an important role in embryogenesis. Furthermore, 24 (16%) of the known genes are implicated in human disorders and three others altered in classical mouse mutations. Similar proportions of regulators of embryonic development and candidates for human disorders or mouse mutations are expected among the 163 new mouse genes isolated. Thus, high-throughput gene expression analysis is suitable for isolating regulators of embryonic development on a large-scale, and in the long term, for determining the molecular anatomy of the mouse embryo. This knowledge will provide a basis for the systematic investigation of pattern formation, tissue differentiation and organogenesis in mammals.

  18. Variation and genetic control of gene expression in primary immunocytes across inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Sara; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Bogue, Molly A; Hattori, Kimie; Pop, Cristina; Koller, Daphne; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    To determine the breadth and underpinning of changes in immunocyte gene expression due to genetic variation in mice, we performed, as part of the Immunological Genome Project, gene expression profiling for CD4(+) T cells and neutrophils purified from 39 inbred strains of the Mouse Phenome Database. Considering both cell types, a large number of transcripts showed significant variation across the inbred strains, with 22% of the transcriptome varying by 2-fold or more. These included 119 loci with apparent complete loss of function, where the corresponding transcript was not expressed in some of the strains, representing a useful resource of "natural knockouts." We identified 1222 cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) that control some of this variation. Most (60%) cis-eQTLs were shared between T cells and neutrophils, but a significant portion uniquely impacted one of the cell types, suggesting cell type-specific regulatory mechanisms. Using a conditional regression algorithm, we predicted regulatory interactions between transcription factors and potential targets, and we demonstrated that these predictions overlap with regulatory interactions inferred from transcriptional changes during immunocyte differentiation. Finally, comparison of these and parallel data from CD4(+) T cells of healthy humans demonstrated intriguing similarities in variability of a gene's expression: the most variable genes tended to be the same in both species, and there was an overlap in genes subject to strong cis-acting genetic variants. We speculate that this "conservation of variation" reflects a differential constraint on intraspecies variation in expression levels of different genes, either through lower pressure for some genes, or by favoring variability for others. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Tunable riboregulator switches for post-transcriptional control of gene expression

    DOE PAGES

    Krishnamurthy, Malathy; Hennelly, Scott Patrick; Dale, Taraka T.; ...

    2015-07-13

    The most straightforward approach to altering the flux through a particular metabolic step is to increase or decrease the concentration of the enzyme catalyst. Until recently engineering strategies for altering gene expression have focused on transcription control using strong inducible promoters or by using one of several strategies to knock down or knock out a wasteful gene. Recently, synthetic riboregulators have been developed for translational regulation of gene expression. We report a new modular synthetic riboregulator class that has the potential to finely tune protein expression and independently control the concentration of each enzyme in an engineered metabolic pathway. Ourmore » design includes a cis-repressor at the 5’ end of the mRNA that forms a stem-loop helix occluding the ribosome binding site and blocking translation. An activating-RNA, expressed in trans, frees the RBS turning on translation. The overall architecture of the riboregulators is designed using Watson-Crick base-pairing stability followed by directed evolution on a portion of each trans-activator to fine tune translation. We report a cis-repressor that can completely shut off translation of antibiotic resistance reporters and a trans-activator that restores translation. We have shown it is possible to use riboregulators to achieve translational control of gene expression over a wide dynamic range. Using a bioluminescent reporter system, we demonstrated an ON/OFF ratio >300. We have demonstrated that a targeting sequence can be changed to develop riboregulators that can independently regulate translation of many genes with minimal cross-talk. In a SELEX experiment, we demonstrated that by subtly altering the sequence of the trans-activator, it is possible to alter the equilibrium between repressed and activated states and achieve intermediate translational control.« less

  20. Tunable riboregulator switches for post-transcriptional control of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Malathy; Hennelly, Scott Patrick; Dale, Taraka T.; Starkenburg, Shawn Robert; Marti-Arbona, Ricardo; Fox, David Thomas; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Yoshiko; Unkefer, Clifford Jay

    2015-07-13

    The most straightforward approach to altering the flux through a particular metabolic step is to increase or decrease the concentration of the enzyme catalyst. Until recently engineering strategies for altering gene expression have focused on transcription control using strong inducible promoters or by using one of several strategies to knock down or knock out a wasteful gene. Recently, synthetic riboregulators have been developed for translational regulation of gene expression. We report a new modular synthetic riboregulator class that has the potential to finely tune protein expression and independently control the concentration of each enzyme in an engineered metabolic pathway. Our design includes a cis-repressor at the 5’ end of the mRNA that forms a stem-loop helix occluding the ribosome binding site and blocking translation. An activating-RNA, expressed in trans, frees the RBS turning on translation. The overall architecture of the riboregulators is designed using Watson-Crick base-pairing stability followed by directed evolution on a portion of each trans-activator to fine tune translation. We report a cis-repressor that can completely shut off translation of antibiotic resistance reporters and a trans-activator that restores translation. We have shown it is possible to use riboregulators to achieve translational control of gene expression over a wide dynamic range. Using a bioluminescent reporter system, we demonstrated an ON/OFF ratio >300. We have demonstrated that a targeting sequence can be changed to develop riboregulators that can independently regulate translation of many genes with minimal cross-talk. In a SELEX experiment, we demonstrated that by subtly altering the sequence of the trans-activator, it is possible to alter the equilibrium between repressed and activated states and achieve intermediate translational control.

  1. The Sporothrix schenckii Gene Encoding for the Ribosomal Protein L6 Has Constitutive and Stable Expression and Works as an Endogenous Control in Gene Expression Analysis.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; Martínez-Álvarez, José A; Clavijo-Giraldo, Diana M; Hernández, Nahúm V; Flores-Martínez, Alberto; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2017-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is one of the causative agents of sporotrichosis, a worldwide-distributed mycosis that affects humans and other mammals. The interest in basic and clinical features of this organism has significantly increased in the last years, yet little progress in molecular aspects has been reported. Gene expression analysis is a set of powerful tools that helps to assess the cell response to changes in the extracellular environment, the genetic networks controlling metabolic pathways, and the adaptation to different growth conditions. Most of the quantitative methodologies used nowadays require data normalization, and this is achieved measuring the expression of endogenous control genes. Reference genes, whose expression is assumed to suffer minimal changes regardless the cell morphology, the stage of the cell cycle or the presence of harsh extracellular conditions are commonly used as controls in Northern blotting assays, microarrays, and semi-quantitative or quantitative RT-PCR. Since the biology of the organisms is usually species specific, it is difficult to find a reliable group of universal genes that can be used as controls for data normalization in experiments addressing the gene expression, regardless the taxonomic classification of the organism under study. Here, we compared the transcriptional stability of the genes encoding for elongation factor 1A, Tfc1, a protein involved in transcription initiation on Pol III promoters, ribosomal protein L6, histone H2A, β-actin, β-tubulin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, UAF30, the upstream activating factor 30, and the transcription initiation factor TFIID subunit 10, during the fungal growth in different culture media and cell morphologies. Our results indicated that only the gene encoding for the ribosomal protein L6 showed a stable and constant expression. Furthermore, it displayed not transcriptional changes when S. schenckii infected larvae of Galleria mellonella or interacted with immune

  2. Synergistic and Dose-Controlled Regulation of Cellulase Gene Expression in Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghai; Yao, Guangshan; Wu, Ruimei; Gao, Liwei; Kan, Qinbiao; Liu, Meng; Yang, Piao; Liu, Guodong; Qin, Yuqi; Song, Xin; Zhong, Yaohua; Fang, Xu; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum produces diverse lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are regulated by the combinations of many transcription factors. Here, a single-gene disruptant library for 470 transcription factors was constructed and systematically screened for cellulase production. Twenty transcription factors (including ClrB, CreA, XlnR, Ace1, AmyR, and 15 unknown proteins) were identified to play putative roles in the activation or repression of cellulase synthesis. Most of these regulators have not been characterized in any fungi before. We identified the ClrB, CreA, XlnR, and AmyR transcription factors as critical dose-dependent regulators of cellulase expression, the core regulons of which were identified by analyzing several transcriptomes and/or secretomes. Synergistic and additive modes of combinatorial control of each cellulase gene by these regulatory factors were achieved, and cellulase expression was fine-tuned in a proper and controlled manner. With one of these targets, the expression of the major intracellular β-glucosidase Bgl2 was found to be dependent on ClrB. The Bgl2-deficient background resulted in a substantial gene activation by ClrB and proved to be closely correlated with the relief of repression mediated by CreA and AmyR during cellulase induction. Our results also signify that probing the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation mechanisms of cellulolytic regulators and using it for reconstruction of expression regulation network (RERN) may be a promising strategy for cellulolytic fungi to develop enzyme hyper-producers. Based on our data, ClrB was identified as focal point for the synergistic activation regulation of cellulase expression by integrating cellulolytic regulators and their target genes, which refined our understanding of transcriptional-regulatory network as a "seesaw model" in which the coordinated regulation of cellulolytic genes is established by counteracting activators and repressors.

  3. Synergistic and Dose-Controlled Regulation of Cellulase Gene Expression in Penicillium oxalicum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhonghai; Yao, Guangshan; Wu, Ruimei; Gao, Liwei; Kan, Qinbiao; Liu, Meng; Yang, Piao; Liu, Guodong; Qin, Yuqi; Song, Xin; Zhong, Yaohua; Fang, Xu; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum produces diverse lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are regulated by the combinations of many transcription factors. Here, a single-gene disruptant library for 470 transcription factors was constructed and systematically screened for cellulase production. Twenty transcription factors (including ClrB, CreA, XlnR, Ace1, AmyR, and 15 unknown proteins) were identified to play putative roles in the activation or repression of cellulase synthesis. Most of these regulators have not been characterized in any fungi before. We identified the ClrB, CreA, XlnR, and AmyR transcription factors as critical dose-dependent regulators of cellulase expression, the core regulons of which were identified by analyzing several transcriptomes and/or secretomes. Synergistic and additive modes of combinatorial control of each cellulase gene by these regulatory factors were achieved, and cellulase expression was fine-tuned in a proper and controlled manner. With one of these targets, the expression of the major intracellular β-glucosidase Bgl2 was found to be dependent on ClrB. The Bgl2-deficient background resulted in a substantial gene activation by ClrB and proved to be closely correlated with the relief of repression mediated by CreA and AmyR during cellulase induction. Our results also signify that probing the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation mechanisms of cellulolytic regulators and using it for reconstruction of expression regulation network (RERN) may be a promising strategy for cellulolytic fungi to develop enzyme hyper-producers. Based on our data, ClrB was identified as focal point for the synergistic activation regulation of cellulase expression by integrating cellulolytic regulators and their target genes, which refined our understanding of transcriptional-regulatory network as a “seesaw model” in which the coordinated regulation of cellulolytic genes is established by counteracting activators and repressors. PMID:26360497

  4. YmoA negatively controls the expression of insecticidal genes in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Starke, Mandy; Fuchs, Thilo M

    2014-04-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is toxic towards invertebrates due to the presence of the toxin complex (tc) genes that are activated by the thermolabile regulator TcaR2. In the search for further regulatory factors involved in insecticidal gene expression, the modulator of yersinial virulence, YmoA, was identified to silence all tc genes of the Y. enterocolitica strain W22703 (biovar 2, serovar O:9). Using promoter fusions with the luciferase reporter, we found that the deletion of ymoA results in elevated transcription of tcaR1, tcaR2, tcaA, tcaB, tcaC, tccC1 and tccC2 at both 15 °C and 37 °C. Complementation by episomal ymoA significantly reduced tc gene expression, thus validating the inhibitory activity of YmoA on the production of insecticidal proteins. YmoA contributes to the binding properties of H-NS to the tc promoters by forming a complex with this nucleoid-associated protein, and this complex not only binds to the upstream regions of all tc genes, but also to intragenic sites of tcaA and tcaB that play an important role in controlling the expression of both genes. At low temperature, the intracellular amount of thermostable YmoA is not reduced, but the repressor is less functional. These data point to H-NS/YmoA as an antagonist of the inducer TcaR2.

  5. Proteases and oxidant stress control organic dust induction of inflammatory gene expression in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Kartiga; Gottipati, Koteswara R; Berhane, Kiflu; Samten, Buka; Pendurthi, Usha; Boggaram, Vijay

    2016-10-22

    Persistant inflammatory responses to infectious agents and other components in organic dust underlie lung injury and development of respiratory diseases. Organic dust components responsible for eliciting inflammation and the mechanisms by which they cause lung inflammation are not fully understood. We studied the mechanisms by which protease activities in poultry dust extracts and intracellular oxidant stress induce inflammatory gene expression in A549 and Beas2B lung epithelial cells. The effects of dust extracts on inflammatory gene expression were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), enzyme linked immunosorbent (ELISA) and western blot assays. Oxidant stress was probed by dihydroethidium (DHE) labeling, and immunostaining for 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Effects on interleukin-8 (IL-8) promoter regulation were determined by transient transfection assay. Dust extracts contained trypsin and elastase activities, and activated protease activated receptor (PAR)-1 and -2. Serine protease inhibitors and PAR-1 or PAR-2 knockdown suppressed inflammatory gene induction. Dust extract induction of IL-8 gene expression was associated with increased DHE-fluorescence and 4-HNE staining, and antioxidants suppressed inflammatory gene induction. Protease inhibitors and antioxidants suppressed protein kinase C and NF-κB activation and induction of IL-8 promoter activity in cells exposed to dust extract. Our studies demonstrate that proteases and intracellular oxidants control organic dust induction of inflammatory gene expression in lung epithelial cells. Targeting proteases and oxidant stress may serve as novel approaches for the treatment of organic dust induced lung diseases. This is the first report on the involvement of oxidant stress in the induction of inflammatory gene expression by organic dust.

  6. Dynamic Maternal Gradients Control Timing and Shift-Rates for Drosophila Gap Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Verd, Berta; Crombach, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Pattern formation during development is a highly dynamic process. In spite of this, few experimental and modelling approaches take into account the explicit time-dependence of the rules governing regulatory systems. We address this problem by studying dynamic morphogen interpretation by the gap gene network in Drosophila melanogaster. Gap genes are involved in segment determination during early embryogenesis. They are activated by maternal morphogen gradients encoded by bicoid (bcd) and caudal (cad). These gradients decay at the same time-scale as the establishment of the antero-posterior gap gene pattern. We use a reverse-engineering approach, based on data-driven regulatory models called gene circuits, to isolate and characterise the explicitly time-dependent effects of changing morphogen concentrations on gap gene regulation. To achieve this, we simulate the system in the presence and absence of dynamic gradient decay. Comparison between these simulations reveals that maternal morphogen decay controls the timing and limits the rate of gap gene expression. In the anterior of the embyro, it affects peak expression and leads to the establishment of smooth spatial boundaries between gap domains. In the posterior of the embryo, it causes a progressive slow-down in the rate of gap domain shifts, which is necessary to correctly position domain boundaries and to stabilise the spatial gap gene expression pattern. We use a newly developed method for the analysis of transient dynamics in non-autonomous (time-variable) systems to understand the regulatory causes of these effects. By providing a rigorous mechanistic explanation for the role of maternal gradient decay in gap gene regulation, our study demonstrates that such analyses are feasible and reveal important aspects of dynamic gene regulation which would have been missed by a traditional steady-state approach. More generally, it highlights the importance of transient dynamics for understanding complex regulatory

  7. Thyroid hormone and adrenergic signaling interact to control pineal expression of the dopamine receptor D4 gene (Drd4).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-So; Bailey, Michael J; Weller, Joan L; Sugden, David; Rath, Martin F; Møller, Morten; Klein, David C

    2010-01-15

    Dopamine plays diverse and important roles in vertebrate biology, impacting behavior and physiology through actions mediated by specific G-protein-coupled receptors, one of which is the dopamine receptor D4 (Drd4). Here we present studies on the >100-fold daily rhythm in rat pineal Drd4 expression. Our studies indicate that Drd4 is the dominant dopamine receptor gene expressed in the pineal gland. The gene is expressed in pinealocytes at levels which are approximately 100-fold greater than in other tissues, except the retina, in which transcript levels are similar. Pineal Drd4 expression is circadian in nature and under photoneural control. Whereas most rhythmically expressed genes in the pineal are controlled by adrenergic/cAMP signaling, Drd4 expression also requires thyroid hormone. This advance raises the questions of whether Drd4 expression is regulated by this mechanism in other systems and whether thyroid hormone controls expression of other genes in the pineal gland.

  8. Alternate Bearing in Citrus: Changes in the Expression of Flowering Control Genes and in Global Gene Expression in ON- versus OFF-Crop Trees

    PubMed Central

    Shalom, Liron; Samuels, Sivan; Zur, Naftali; Shlizerman, Lyudmila; Zemach, Hanita; Weissberg, Mira; Ophir, Ron; Blumwald, Eduardo; Sadka, Avi

    2012-01-01

    Alternate bearing (AB) is the process in fruit trees by which cycles of heavy yield (ON crop) one year are followed by a light yield (OFF crop) the next. Heavy yield usually reduces flowering intensity the following year. Despite its agricultural importance, how the developing crop influences the following year's return bloom and yield is not fully understood. It might be assumed that an ‘AB signal’ is generated in the fruit, or in another organ that senses fruit presence, and moves into the bud to determine its fate—flowering or vegetative growth. The bud then responds to fruit presence by altering regulatory and metabolic pathways. Determining these pathways, and when they are altered, might indicate the nature of this putative AB signal. We studied bud morphology, the expression of flowering control genes, and global gene expression in ON- and OFF-crop buds. In May, shortly after flowering and fruit set, OFF-crop buds were already significantly longer than ON-crop buds. The number of differentially expressed genes was higher in May than at the other tested time points. Processes differentially expressed between ON- and OFF-crop trees included key metabolic and regulatory pathways, such as photosynthesis and secondary metabolism. The expression of genes of trehalose metabolism and flavonoid metabolism was validated by nCounter technology, and the latter was confirmed by metabolomic analysis. Among genes induced in OFF-crop trees was one homologous to SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING-LIKE (SPL), which controls juvenile-to-adult and annual phase transitions, regulated by miR156. The expression pattern of SPL-like, miR156 and other flowering control genes suggested that fruit load affects bud fate, and therefore development and metabolism, a relatively long time before the flowering induction period. Results shed light on some of the metabolic and regulatory processes that are altered in ON and OFF buds. PMID:23071667

  9. E2F Transcription Factors Control the Roller Coaster Ride of Cell Cycle Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Thurlings, Ingrid; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Initially, the E2F transcription factor was discovered as a factor able to bind the adenovirus E2 promoter and activate viral genes. Afterwards it was shown that E2F also binds to promoters of nonviral genes such as C-MYC and DHFR, which were already known at that time to be important for cell growth and DNA metabolism, respectively. These findings provided the first clues that the E2F transcription factor might be an important regulator of the cell cycle. Since this initial discovery in 1987, several additional E2F family members have been identified, and more than 100 targets genes have been shown to be directly regulated by E2Fs, the majority of these are important for controlling the cell cycle. The progression of a cell through the cell cycle is accompanied with the increased expression of a specific set of genes during one phase of the cell cycle and the decrease of the same set of genes during a later phase of the cell cycle. This roller coaster ride, or oscillation, of gene expression is essential for the proper progression through the cell cycle to allow accurate DNA replication and cell division. The E2F transcription factors have been shown to be critical for the temporal expression of the oscillating cell cycle genes. This review will focus on how the oscillation of E2Fs and their targets is regulated by transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanism in mammals, yeast, flies, and worms. Furthermore, we will discuss the functional impact of E2Fs on the cell cycle progression and outline the consequences when E2F expression is disturbed.

  10. Regulatory elements controlling pituitary-specific expression of the human prolactin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Peers, B; Voz, M L; Monget, P; Mathy-Hartert, M; Berwaer, M; Belayew, A; Martial, J A

    1990-01-01

    We have performed transfection and DNase I footprinting experiments to investigate pituitary-specific expression of the human prolactin (hPRL) gene. When fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene, 5,000 base pairs of the 5'-flanking sequences of the hPRL gene were able to drive high cat gene expression in prolactin-expressing GH3B6 cells specifically. Deletion analysis indicated that this pituitary-specific expression was controlled by three main positive regulatory regions. The first was located just upstream from the TATA box between coordinates -40 and -250 (proximal region). We have previously shown that three motifs of this region bind the pituitary-specific Pit-1 factor. The second positive region was located in the vicinity of coordinates -1300 to -1750 (distal region). DNase I footprinting assays revealed that eight DNA motifs of this distal region bound protein Pit-1 and that two other motifs were recognized by ubiquitous factors, one of which seems to belong to the AP-1 (jun) family. The third positive region was located further upstream, between -3500 and -5000 (superdistal region). This region appears to enhance transcription only in the presence of the distal region. Images PMID:2388622

  11. Regulatory elements controlling pituitary-specific expression of the human prolactin gene.

    PubMed

    Peers, B; Voz, M L; Monget, P; Mathy-Hartert, M; Berwaer, M; Belayew, A; Martial, J A

    1990-09-01

    We have performed transfection and DNase I footprinting experiments to investigate pituitary-specific expression of the human prolactin (hPRL) gene. When fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene, 5,000 base pairs of the 5'-flanking sequences of the hPRL gene were able to drive high cat gene expression in prolactin-expressing GH3B6 cells specifically. Deletion analysis indicated that this pituitary-specific expression was controlled by three main positive regulatory regions. The first was located just upstream from the TATA box between coordinates -40 and -250 (proximal region). We have previously shown that three motifs of this region bind the pituitary-specific Pit-1 factor. The second positive region was located in the vicinity of coordinates -1300 to -1750 (distal region). DNase I footprinting assays revealed that eight DNA motifs of this distal region bound protein Pit-1 and that two other motifs were recognized by ubiquitous factors, one of which seems to belong to the AP-1 (jun) family. The third positive region was located further upstream, between -3500 and -5000 (superdistal region). This region appears to enhance transcription only in the presence of the distal region.

  12. Robust control of the seasonal expression of the Arabidopsis FLC gene in a fluctuating environment.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shinichiro; Kobayashi, Masaki J; Satake, Akiko; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Kudoh, Hiroshi

    2010-06-22

    Plants flower in particular seasons even in natural, fluctuating environments. The molecular basis of temperature-dependent flowering-time regulation has been extensively studied, but little is known about how gene expression is controlled in natural environments. Without a memory of past temperatures, it would be difficult for plants to detect seasons in natural, noisy environments because temperature changes occurring within a few weeks are often inconsistent with seasonal trends. Our 2-y census of the expression of a temperature-dependent flowering-time gene, AhgFLC, in a natural population of perennial Arabidopsis halleri revealed that the regulatory system of this flowering-time gene extracts seasonal cues as if it memorizes temperatures over the past 6 wk. Time-series analysis revealed that as much as 83% of the variation in the AhgFLC expression is explained solely by the temperature for the previous 6 wk, but not by the temperatures over shorter or longer periods. The accuracy of our model in predicting the gene expression pattern under contrasting temperature regimes in the transplant experiments indicates that such modeling incorporating the molecular bases of flowering-time regulation will contribute to predicting plant responses to future climate changes.

  13. Determination of internal controls for quantitative gene expression of Isochrysis zhangjiangensis at nitrogen stress condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuang; Zhou, Jiannan; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song

    2016-02-01

    Isochrysis zhangjiangensis is a potential marine microalga for biodiesel production, which accumulates lipid under nitrogen limitation conditions, but the mechanism on molecular level is veiled. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) provides the possibility to investigate the gene expression levels, and a valid reference for data normalization is an essential prerequisite for firing up the analysis. In this study, five housekeeping genes, actin (ACT), α-tubulin (TUA), ß-tubulin (TUB), ubiquitin (UBI), 18S rRNA (18S) and one target gene, diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), were used for determining the reference. By analyzing the stabilities based on calculation of the stability index and on operating the two types of software, geNorm and bestkeeper, it showed that the reference genes widely used in higher plant and microalgae, such as UBI, TUA and 18S, were not the most stable ones in nitrogen-stressed I. zhangjiangensis, and thus are not suitable for exploring the mRNA expression levels under these experimental conditions. Our results show that ACT together with TUB is the most feasible internal control for investigating gene expression under nitrogen-stressed conditions. Our findings will contribute not only to future qPCR studies of I. zhangjiangensis, but also to verification of comparative transcriptomics studies of the microalgae under similar conditions.

  14. A histone modification identifies a DNA element controlling slo BK channel gene expression in muscle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolei; Ghezzi, Alfredo; Krishnan, Harish R.; Pohl, Jascha B.; Bohm, Arun Y.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2016-01-01

    The slo gene encodes BK type Ca2+-activated K+ channels. In Drosophila, expression of slo is induced by organic solvent sedation (benzyl alcohol and ethanol) and this increase in neural slo expression contributes to the production of functional behavioral tolerance (inducible resistance) to these drugs. Within the slo promoter region, we observed that benzyl alcohol sedation produces a localized spike of histone acetylation over a 65 n conserved DNA element called 55b. Changes in histone acetylation are commonly the consequence of transcription factor activity and previously, a localized histone acetylation spike was used to successfully map a DNA element involved in benzyl alcohol-induced slo expression. To determine whether the 55b element was also involved in benzyl alcohol-induced neural expression of slo we deleted it from the endogenous slo gene by homologous recombination. Flies lacking the 55b element were normal with respect to basal and benzyl alcohol-induced neural slo expression, the capacity to acquire and maintain functional tolerance, their threshold for electrically-induced seizures and most slo-related behaviors. Removal of the 55b element did however increase the level of basal expression from the muscle/tracheal cell-specific slo core promoter and produced a slight increase in overall locomotor activity. We conclude that the 55b element is involved in control of slo expression from the muscle and tracheal-cell promoter but is not involved in the production of functional benzyl alcohol tolerance. PMID:25967280

  15. CplexA: a Mathematica package to study macromolecular-assembly control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Jose M G; Saiz, Leonor

    2010-08-15

    Macromolecular assembly coordinates essential cellular processes, such as gene regulation and signal transduction. A major challenge for conventional computational methods to study these processes is tackling the exponential increase of the number of configurational states with the number of components. CplexA is a Mathematica package that uses functional programming to efficiently compute probabilities and average properties over such exponentially large number of states from the energetics of the interactions. The package is particularly suited to study gene expression at complex promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors. CplexA is freely available together with documentation at http://sourceforge.net/projects/cplexa/.

  16. Tetracycline-Regulatable System To Tightly Control Gene Expression in the Pathogenic Fungus Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Hironobu; Mio, Toshiyuki; Nagahashi, Shigehisa; Kokado, Michiko; Arisawa, Mikio; Aoki, Yuko

    2000-01-01

    Conventional tools for elucidating gene function are relatively scarce in Candida albicans, the most prevalent human fungal pathogen. To this end, we developed a convenient system to control gene expression in C. albicans by the tetracycline-regulatable (TR) promoters. When the sea pansy Renilla reniformis luciferase gene (RLUC1) was placed under the control of this system, doxycycline (DOX) inhibited the luciferase activity almost completely. In the absence of DOX, the RLUC1 gene was induced to express luciferase at a level 400- to 1,000-fold higher than that in the presence of DOX. The same results were obtained in hypha-forming cells. The replacement of N-myristoyltransferase or translation elongation factor 3 promoters with TR promoters conferred a DOX-dependent growth defect in culture media. Furthermore, all the mice infected with these mutants, which are still virulent, survived following DOX administration. Consistently, we observed that the number of these mutant cells recovered from the mouse kidneys was significantly reduced following DOX administration. Thus, this system is useful for investigating gene functions, since this system is able to function in both in vitro and in vivo settings. PMID:11083786

  17. Shared control of gene expression in bacteria by transcription factors and global physiology of the cell

    PubMed Central

    Berthoumieux, Sara; de Jong, Hidde; Baptist, Guillaume; Pinel, Corinne; Ranquet, Caroline; Ropers, Delphine; Geiselmann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled by the joint effect of (i) the global physiological state of the cell, in particular the activity of the gene expression machinery, and (ii) DNA-binding transcription factors and other specific regulators. We present a model-based approach to distinguish between these two effects using time-resolved measurements of promoter activities. We demonstrate the strength of the approach by analyzing a circuit involved in the regulation of carbon metabolism in E. coli. Our results show that the transcriptional response of the network is controlled by the physiological state of the cell and the signaling metabolite cyclic AMP (cAMP). The absence of a strong regulatory effect of transcription factors suggests that they are not the main coordinators of gene expression changes during growth transitions, but rather that they complement the effect of global physiological control mechanisms. This change of perspective has important consequences for the interpretation of transcriptome data and the design of biological networks in biotechnology and synthetic biology. PMID:23340840

  18. Functional characterization of calliphorid cell death genes and cellularization gene promoters for controlling gene expression and cell viability in early embryos.

    PubMed

    Edman, R M; Linger, R J; Belikoff, E J; Li, F; Sze, S-H; Tarone, A M; Scott, M J

    2015-02-01

    The New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, and the Australian sheep blow fly, Lucilia cuprina, are major pests of livestock. The sterile insect technique was used to eradicate C. hominivorax from North and Central America. This involved area-wide releases of male and female flies that had been sterilized by radiation. Genetic systems have been developed for making 'male-only' strains that would improve the efficiency of genetic control of insect pests. One system involves induction of female lethality in embryos through activation of a pro-apoptotic gene by the tetracycline-dependent transactivator. Sex-specific expression is achieved using an intron from the transformer gene, which we previously isolated from several calliphorids. In the present study, we report the isolation of the promoters from the C. hominivorax slam and Lucilia sericata bnk cellularization genes and show that these promoters can drive expression of a GFP reporter gene in early embryos of transgenic L. cuprina. Additionally, we report the isolation of the L. sericata pro-apoptotic hid and rpr genes, identify conserved motifs in the encoded proteins and determine the relative expression of these genes at different stages of development. We show that widespread expression of the L. sericata pro-apoptotic genes was lethal in Drosophila melanogaster. The isolated gene promoters and pro-apoptotic genes could potentially be used to build transgenic embryonic sexing strains of calliphorid livestock pests.

  19. DNA methylation mediated control of gene expression is critical for development of crown gall tumors.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Jochen; Scholz, Claus-Juergen; Kneitz, Susanne; Weber, Dana; Fuchs, Joerg; Hedrich, Rainer; Deeken, Rosalia

    2013-01-01

    Crown gall tumors develop after integration of the T-DNA of virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains into the plant genome. Expression of the T-DNA-encoded oncogenes triggers proliferation and differentiation of transformed plant cells. Crown gall development is known to be accompanied by global changes in transcription, metabolite levels, and physiological processes. High levels of abscisic acid (ABA) in crown galls regulate expression of drought stress responsive genes and mediate drought stress acclimation, which is essential for wild-type-like tumor growth. An impact of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation on crown gall development has been suggested; however, it has not yet been investigated comprehensively. In this study, the methylation pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana crown galls was analyzed on a genome-wide scale as well as at the single gene level. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the oncogenes Ipt, IaaH, and IaaM were unmethylated in crown galls. Nevertheless, the oncogenes were susceptible to siRNA-mediated methylation, which inhibited their expression and subsequently crown gall growth. Genome arrays, hybridized with methylated DNA obtained by immunoprecipitation, revealed a globally hypermethylated crown gall genome, while promoters were rather hypomethylated. Mutants with reduced non-CG methylation developed larger tumors than the wild-type controls, indicating that hypermethylation inhibits plant tumor growth. The differential methylation pattern of crown galls and the stem tissue from which they originate correlated with transcriptional changes. Genes known to be transcriptionally inhibited by ABA and methylated in crown galls became promoter methylated upon treatment of A. thaliana with ABA. This suggests that the high ABA levels in crown galls may mediate DNA methylation and regulate expression of genes involved in drought stress protection. In summary, our studies provide evidence that epigenetic processes regulate gene

  20. A mRNA-based thermosensor controls expression of rhizobial heat shock genes

    PubMed Central

    Nocker, Andreas; Hausherr, Thomas; Balsiger, Sylvia; Krstulovic, Nila-Pia; Hennecke, Hauke; Narberhaus, Franz

    2001-01-01

    Expression of several heat shock operons, mainly coding for small heat shock proteins, is under the control of ROSE (repression of heat shock gene expression) in various rhizobial species. This negatively cis-acting element confers temperature control by preventing expression at physiological temperatures. We provide evidence that ROSE-mediated regulation occurs at the post-transcriptional level. A detailed mutational analysis of ROSE1–hspA translationally fused to lacZ revealed that its highly conserved 3′-half is required for repression at normal temperatures (30°C). The mRNA in this region is predicted to form an extended secondary structure that looks very similar in all 15 known ROSE elements. Nucleotides involved in base pairing are strongly conserved, whereas nucleotides in loop regions are more divergent. Base substitutions leading to derepression of the lacZ fusion at 30°C exclusively resided in potential stem structures. Optimised base pairing by elimination of a bulged residue and by introduction of complementary nucleotides in internal loops resulted in ROSE elements that were tightly repressed not only at normal but also at heat shock temperatures. We propose a model in which the temperature-regulated secondary structure of ROSE mRNA influences heat shock gene expression by controlling ribosome access to the ribosome-binding site. PMID:11726689

  1. A mRNA-based thermosensor controls expression of rhizobial heat shock genes.

    PubMed

    Nocker, A; Hausherr, T; Balsiger, S; Krstulovic, N P; Hennecke, H; Narberhaus, F

    2001-12-01

    Expression of several heat shock operons, mainly coding for small heat shock proteins, is under the control of ROSE (repression of heat shock gene expression) in various rhizobial species. This negatively cis-acting element confers temperature control by preventing expression at physiological temperatures. We provide evidence that ROSE-mediated regulation occurs at the post-transcriptional level. A detailed mutational analysis of ROSE(1)-hspA translationally fused to lacZ revealed that its highly conserved 3'-half is required for repression at normal temperatures (30 degrees C). The mRNA in this region is predicted to form an extended secondary structure that looks very similar in all 15 known ROSE elements. Nucleotides involved in base pairing are strongly conserved, whereas nucleotides in loop regions are more divergent. Base substitutions leading to derepression of the lacZ fusion at 30 degrees C exclusively resided in potential stem structures. Optimised base pairing by elimination of a bulged residue and by introduction of complementary nucleotides in internal loops resulted in ROSE elements that were tightly repressed not only at normal but also at heat shock temperatures. We propose a model in which the temperature-regulated secondary structure of ROSE mRNA influences heat shock gene expression by controlling ribosome access to the ribosome-binding site.

  2. Gene expression profiling in persons with multiple chemical sensitivity before and after a controlled n-butanol exposure session

    PubMed Central

    Dantoft, Thomas M; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus; Claeson, Anna-Sara; Engkilde, Kaare; Lind, Nina; Nordin, Steven; Hellgren, Lars I

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the pathophysiological pathways leading to symptoms elicitation in multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) by comparing gene expression in MCS participants and healthy controls before and after a chemical exposure optimised to cause symptoms among MCS participants. The first hypothesis was that unexposed and symptom-free MCS participants have similar gene expression patterns to controls and a second hypothesis that MCS participants can be separated from controls based on differential gene expression upon a controlled n-butanol exposure. Design Participants were exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol while seated in a windowed exposure chamber for 60 min. A total of 26 genes involved in biochemical pathways found in the literature have been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of MCS and other functional somatic syndromes were selected. Expression levels were compared between MCS and controls before, within 15 min after being exposed to and 4 hours after the exposure. Settings Participants suffering from MCS and healthy controls were recruited through advertisement at public places and in a local newspaper. Participants 36 participants who considered themselves sensitive were prescreened for eligibility. 18 sensitive persons fulfilling the criteria for MCS were enrolled together with 18 healthy controls. Outcome measures 17 genes showed sufficient transcriptional level for analysis. Group comparisons were conducted for each gene at the 3 times points and for the computed area under the curve (AUC) expression levels. Results MCS participants and controls displayed similar gene expression levels both at baseline and after the exposure and the computed AUC values were likewise comparable between the 2 groups. The intragroup variation in expression levels among MCS participants was noticeably greater than the controls. Conclusions MCS participants and controls have similar gene expression levels at baseline and it was not possible to separate

  3. Live-cell monitoring of periodic gene expression in synchronous human cells identifies Forkhead genes involved in cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Grant, Gavin D; Gamsby, Joshua; Martyanov, Viktor; Brooks, Lionel; George, Lacy K; Mahoney, J Matthew; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C; Whitfield, Michael L

    2012-08-01

    We developed a system to monitor periodic luciferase activity from cell cycle-regulated promoters in synchronous cells. Reporters were driven by a minimal human E2F1 promoter with peak expression in G1/S or a basal promoter with six Forkhead DNA-binding sites with peak expression at G2/M. After cell cycle synchronization, luciferase activity was measured in live cells at 10-min intervals across three to four synchronous cell cycles, allowing unprecedented resolution of cell cycle-regulated gene expression. We used this assay to screen Forkhead transcription factors for control of periodic gene expression. We confirmed a role for FOXM1 and identified two novel cell cycle regulators, FOXJ3 and FOXK1. Knockdown of FOXJ3 and FOXK1 eliminated cell cycle-dependent oscillations and resulted in decreased cell proliferation rates. Analysis of genes regulated by FOXJ3 and FOXK1 showed that FOXJ3 may regulate a network of zinc finger proteins and that FOXK1 binds to the promoter and regulates DHFR, TYMS, GSDMD, and the E2F binding partner TFDP1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing analysis identified 4329 genomic loci bound by FOXK1, 83% of which contained a FOXK1-binding motif. We verified that a subset of these loci are activated by wild-type FOXK1 but not by a FOXK1 (H355A) DNA-binding mutant.

  4. Live-cell monitoring of periodic gene expression in synchronous human cells identifies Forkhead genes involved in cell cycle control

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Gavin D.; Gamsby, Joshua; Martyanov, Viktor; Brooks, Lionel; George, Lacy K.; Mahoney, J. Matthew; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.; Whitfield, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a system to monitor periodic luciferase activity from cell cycle–regulated promoters in synchronous cells. Reporters were driven by a minimal human E2F1 promoter with peak expression in G1/S or a basal promoter with six Forkhead DNA-binding sites with peak expression at G2/M. After cell cycle synchronization, luciferase activity was measured in live cells at 10-min intervals across three to four synchronous cell cycles, allowing unprecedented resolution of cell cycle–regulated gene expression. We used this assay to screen Forkhead transcription factors for control of periodic gene expression. We confirmed a role for FOXM1 and identified two novel cell cycle regulators, FOXJ3 and FOXK1. Knockdown of FOXJ3 and FOXK1 eliminated cell cycle–dependent oscillations and resulted in decreased cell proliferation rates. Analysis of genes regulated by FOXJ3 and FOXK1 showed that FOXJ3 may regulate a network of zinc finger proteins and that FOXK1 binds to the promoter and regulates DHFR, TYMS, GSDMD, and the E2F binding partner TFDP1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing analysis identified 4329 genomic loci bound by FOXK1, 83% of which contained a FOXK1-binding motif. We verified that a subset of these loci are activated by wild-type FOXK1 but not by a FOXK1 (H355A) DNA-binding mutant. PMID:22740631

  5. The wheat HMW-glutenin 1Dy10 gene promoter controls endosperm expression in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Thilmony, Roger; Guttman, Mara E; Lin, Jeanie W; Blechl, Ann E

    2014-01-01

    The grass species Brachypodium distachyon has emerged as a model system for the study of gene structure and function in temperate cereals. As a first demonstration of the utility of Brachypodium to study wheat gene promoter function, we transformed it with a T-DNA that included the uidA reporter gene under control of a wheat High-Molecular-Weight Glutenin Subunit (HMW-GS) gene promoter and transcription terminator. For comparison, the same expression cassette was introduced into wheat by biolistics. Histochemical staining for β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity showed that the wheat promoter was highly expressed in the endosperms of all the seeds of Brachypodium and wheat homozygous plants. It was not active in any other tissue of transgenic wheat, but showed variable and sporadic activity in a minority of styles of the pistils of four homozygous transgenic Brachypodium lines. The ease of obtaining transgenic Brachypodium plants and the overall faithfulness of expression of the wheat HMW-GS promoter in those plants make it likely that this model system can be used for studies of other promoters from cereal crop species that are difficult to transform.

  6. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Complex and the Control of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Beischlag, Timothy V.; Morales, J. Luis; Hollingshead, Brett D.; Perdew, Gary H.

    2008-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that controls the expression of a diverse set of genes. The toxicity of the potent AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is almost exclusively mediated through this receptor. However, the key alterations in gene expression that mediate toxicity are poorly understood. It has been established through characterization of AhR-null mice that the AhR has a required physiological function, yet how endogenous mediators regulate this orphan receptor remains to be established. A picture as to how the AhR/ARNT heterodimer actually mediates gene transcription is starting to emerge. The AhR/ARNT complex can alter transcription both by binding to its cognate response element and through tethering to other transcription factors. In addition, many of the coregulatory proteins necessary for AhR-mediated transcription have been identified. Cross talk between the estrogen receptor and the AhR at the promoter of target genes appears to be an important mode of regulation. Inflammatory signaling pathways and the AhR also appear to be another important site of cross talk at the level of transcription. A major focus of this review is to highlight experimental efforts to characterize nonclassical mechanisms of AhR-mediated modulation of gene transcription. PMID:18540824

  7. The Global Response Regulator RegR Controls Expression of Denitrification Genes in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Maria J.; Argandoña, Montserrat; Vargas, Carmen; Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Mesa, Socorro; Delgado, María J.

    2014-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum RegSR regulatory proteins belong to the family of two-component regulatory systems, and orthologs are present in many Proteobacteria where they globally control gene expression mostly in a redox-responsive manner. In this work, we have performed a transcriptional profiling of wild-type and regR mutant cells grown under anoxic denitrifying conditions. The comparative analyses of wild-type and regR strains revealed that almost 620 genes induced in the wild type under denitrifying conditions were regulated (directly or indirectly) by RegR, pointing out the important role of this protein as a global regulator of denitrification. Genes controlled by RegR included nor and nos structural genes encoding nitric oxide and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, genes encoding electron transport proteins such as cycA (blr7544) or cy2 (bll2388), and genes involved in nitric oxide detoxification (blr2806-09) and copper homeostasis (copCAB), as well as two regulatory genes (bll3466, bll4130). Purified RegR interacted with the promoters of norC (blr3214), nosR (blr0314), a fixK-like gene (bll3466), and bll4130, which encodes a LysR-type regulator. By using fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide extension (FLOE), we were able to identify two transcriptional start sites located at about 35 (P1) and 22 (P2) bp upstream of the putative translational start codon of norC. P1 matched with the previously mapped 5′end of norC mRNA which we demonstrate in this work to be under FixK2 control. P2 is a start site modulated by RegR and specific for anoxic conditions. Moreover, qRT-PCR experiments, expression studies with a norC-lacZ fusion, and heme c-staining analyses revealed that anoxia and nitrate are required for RegR-dependent induction of nor genes, and that this control is independent of the sensor protein RegS. PMID:24949739

  8. The global response regulator RegR controls expression of denitrification genes in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Torres, Maria J; Argandoña, Montserrat; Vargas, Carmen; Bedmar, Eulogio J; Fischer, Hans-Martin; Mesa, Socorro; Delgado, María J

    2014-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum RegSR regulatory proteins belong to the family of two-component regulatory systems, and orthologs are present in many Proteobacteria where they globally control gene expression mostly in a redox-responsive manner. In this work, we have performed a transcriptional profiling of wild-type and regR mutant cells grown under anoxic denitrifying conditions. The comparative analyses of wild-type and regR strains revealed that almost 620 genes induced in the wild type under denitrifying conditions were regulated (directly or indirectly) by RegR, pointing out the important role of this protein as a global regulator of denitrification. Genes controlled by RegR included nor and nos structural genes encoding nitric oxide and nitrous oxide reductase, respectively, genes encoding electron transport proteins such as cycA (blr7544) or cy2 (bll2388), and genes involved in nitric oxide detoxification (blr2806-09) and copper homeostasis (copCAB), as well as two regulatory genes (bll3466, bll4130). Purified RegR interacted with the promoters of norC (blr3214), nosR (blr0314), a fixK-like gene (bll3466), and bll4130, which encodes a LysR-type regulator. By using fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide extension (FLOE), we were able to identify two transcriptional start sites located at about 35 (P1) and 22 (P2) bp upstream of the putative translational start codon of norC. P1 matched with the previously mapped 5'end of norC mRNA which we demonstrate in this work to be under FixK2 control. P2 is a start site modulated by RegR and specific for anoxic conditions. Moreover, qRT-PCR experiments, expression studies with a norC-lacZ fusion, and heme c-staining analyses revealed that anoxia and nitrate are required for RegR-dependent induction of nor genes, and that this control is independent of the sensor protein RegS.

  9. Alterations to the remote control of Shh gene expression cause congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert E; Lettice, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Multi-species conserved non-coding elements occur in the vertebrate genome and are clustered in the vicinity of developmentally regulated genes. Many are known to act as cis-regulators of transcription and may reside at long distances from the genes they regulate. However, the relationship of conserved sequence to encoded regulatory information and indeed, the mechanism by which these contribute to long-range transcriptional regulation is not well understood. The ZRS, a highly conserved cis-regulator, is a paradigm for such long-range gene regulation. The ZRS acts over approximately 1 Mb to control spatio-temporal expression of Shh in the limb bud and mutations within it result in a number of limb abnormalities, including polydactyly, tibial hypoplasia and syndactyly. We describe the activity of this developmental regulator and discuss a number of mechanisms by which regulatory mutations in this enhancer function to cause congenital abnormalities.

  10. Aire controls gene expression in the thymic epithelium with ordered stochasticity

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Matthew; Zemmour, David; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Aire controls immunologic tolerance by inducing the ectopic thymic expression of many tissue-specific genes, acting broadly by removing stops on the transcriptional machinery. To better understand Aire’s specificity, we performed single-cell RNAseq and DNA methylation analysis in Aire-sufficient and -deficient medullary epithelial cells (mTECs). Each of Aire’s target genes was induced in only a minority of mTECs, independently of DNA methylation patterns, as small inter-chromosomal gene clusters activated in concert in a proportion of mTECs. These microclusters differed between individual mice, and thus suggest an organization of the DNA or of the epigenome that results from stochastic determinism, but is bookmarked and stable through mTEC divisions, ensuring more effective presentation of self-antigens, and favoring diversity of self-tolerance between individuals. PMID:26237550

  11. Alterations to the remote control of Shh gene expression cause congenital abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert E.; Lettice, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-species conserved non-coding elements occur in the vertebrate genome and are clustered in the vicinity of developmentally regulated genes. Many are known to act as cis-regulators of transcription and may reside at long distances from the genes they regulate. However, the relationship of conserved sequence to encoded regulatory information and indeed, the mechanism by which these contribute to long-range transcriptional regulation is not well understood. The ZRS, a highly conserved cis-regulator, is a paradigm for such long-range gene regulation. The ZRS acts over approximately 1 Mb to control spatio-temporal expression of Shh in the limb bud and mutations within it result in a number of limb abnormalities, including polydactyly, tibial hypoplasia and syndactyly. We describe the activity of this developmental regulator and discuss a number of mechanisms by which regulatory mutations in this enhancer function to cause congenital abnormalities. PMID:23650631

  12. Artificial riboswitches for gene expression and replication control of DNA and RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Ketzer, Patrick; Kaufmann, Johanna K; Engelhardt, Sarah; Bossow, Sascha; von Kalle, Christof; Hartig, Jörg S; Ungerechts, Guy; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2014-02-04

    Aptazymes are small, ligand-dependent self-cleaving ribozymes that function independently of transcription factors and can be customized for induction by various small molecules. Here, we introduce these artificial riboswitches for regulation of DNA and RNA viruses. We hypothesize that they represent universally applicable tools for studying viral gene functions and for applications as a safety switch for oncolytic and live vaccine viruses. Our study shows that the insertion of artificial aptazymes into the adenoviral immediate early gene E1A enables small-molecule-triggered, dose-dependent inhibition of gene expression. Aptazyme-mediated shutdown of E1A expression translates into inhibition of adenoviral genome replication, infectious particle production, and cytotoxicity/oncolysis. These results provide proof of concept for the aptazyme approach for effective control of biological outcomes in eukaryotic systems, specifically in virus infections. Importantly, we also demonstrate aptazyme-dependent regulation of measles virus fusion protein expression, translating into potent reduction of progeny infectivity and virus spread. This not only establishes functionality of aptazymes in fully cytoplasmic genetic systems, but also implicates general feasibility of this strategy for application in viruses with either DNA or RNA genomes. Our study implies that gene regulation by artificial riboswitches may be an appealing alternative to Tet- and other protein-dependent gene regulation systems, based on their small size, RNA-intrinsic mode of action, and flexibility of the inducing molecule. Future applications range from gene analysis in basic research to medicine, for example as a safety switch for new generations of efficiency-enhanced oncolytic viruses.

  13. Artificial riboswitches for gene expression and replication control of DNA and RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ketzer, Patrick; Kaufmann, Johanna K.; Engelhardt, Sarah; Bossow, Sascha; von Kalle, Christof; Hartig, Jörg S.; Ungerechts, Guy; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.

    2014-01-01

    Aptazymes are small, ligand-dependent self-cleaving ribozymes that function independently of transcription factors and can be customized for induction by various small molecules. Here, we introduce these artificial riboswitches for regulation of DNA and RNA viruses. We hypothesize that they represent universally applicable tools for studying viral gene functions and for applications as a safety switch for oncolytic and live vaccine viruses. Our study shows that the insertion of artificial aptazymes into the adenoviral immediate early gene E1A enables small-molecule–triggered, dose-dependent inhibition of gene expression. Aptazyme-mediated shutdown of E1A expression translates into inhibition of adenoviral genome replication, infectious particle production, and cytotoxicity/oncolysis. These results provide proof of concept for the aptazyme approach for effective control of biological outcomes in eukaryotic systems, specifically in virus infections. Importantly, we also demonstrate aptazyme-dependent regulation of measles virus fusion protein expression, translating into potent reduction of progeny infectivity and virus spread. This not only establishes functionality of aptazymes in fully cytoplasmic genetic systems, but also implicates general feasibility of this strategy for application in viruses with either DNA or RNA genomes. Our study implies that gene regulation by artificial riboswitches may be an appealing alternative to Tet- and other protein-dependent gene regulation systems, based on their small size, RNA-intrinsic mode of action, and flexibility of the inducing molecule. Future applications range from gene analysis in basic research to medicine, for example as a safety switch for new generations of efficiency-enhanced oncolytic viruses. PMID:24449891

  14. Endoribonuclease-Based Two-Component Repressor Systems for Tight Gene Expression Control in Plants

    DOE PAGES

    Liang, Yan; Richardson, Sarah; Yan, Jingwei; ...

    2017-01-17

    © 2017 American Chemical Society. Tight control and multifactorial regulation of gene expression are important challenges in genetic engineering and are critical for the development of regulatory circuits. Meeting these challenges will facilitate transgene expression regulation and support the fine-tuning of metabolic pathways to avoid the accumulation of undesired intermediates. By employing the endoribonuclease Csy4 and its recognition sequence from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and manipulating 5′UTR of mRNA, we developed a two-component expression-repression system to tightly control synthesis of transgene products. We demonstrated that this regulatory device was functional in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plant species, and showed that it can bemore » used to repress transgene expression by > 400-fold and to synchronize transgene repression. In addition to tissue-specific transgene repression, this system offers stimuli-dependent expression control. Using a bioinformatics approach, we identified 54 orthologous systems from various bacteria, and then validated in planta the activity for a few of those systems, demonstrating the potential diversity of such a two-component repressor system.« less

  15. Computational design of a Zn2+ receptor that controls bacterial gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, M. A.; Looger, L. L.; Hellinga, H. W.

    2003-09-01

    The control of cellular physiology and gene expression in response to extracellular signals is a basic property of living systems. We have constructed a synthetic bacterial signal transduction pathway in which gene expression is controlled by extracellular Zn2+. In this system a computationally designed Zn2+-binding periplasmic receptor senses the extracellular solute and triggers a two-component signal transduction pathway via a chimeric transmembrane protein, resulting in transcriptional up-regulation of a -galactosidase reporter gene. The Zn2+-binding site in the designed receptor is based on a four-coordinate, tetrahedral primary coordination sphere consisting of histidines and glutamates. In addition, mutations were introduced in a secondary coordination sphere to satisfy the residual hydrogen-bonding potential of the histidines coordinated to the metal. The importance of the secondary shell interactions is demonstrated by their effect on metal affinity and selectivity, as well as protein stability. Three designed protein sequences, comprising two distinct metal-binding positions, were all shown to bind Zn2+ and to function in the cell-based assay, indicating the generality of the design methodology. These experiments demonstrate that biological systems can be manipulated with computationally designed proteins that have drastically altered ligand-binding specificities, thereby extending the repertoire of genetic control by extracellular signals.

  16. Four Inducible Promoters for Controlled Gene Expression in the Oleaginous Yeast Rhodotorula toruloides

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Alexander M. B.; Love, John; Aves, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Rhodotorula (Rhodosporidium) toruloides is an oleaginous yeast with great biotechnological potential, capable of accumulating lipid up to 70% of its dry biomass, and of carotenoid biosynthesis. However, few molecular genetic tools are available for manipulation of this basidiomycete yeast and its high genomic GC content can make routine cloning difficult. We have developed plasmid vectors for transformation of R. toruloides which include elements for Saccharomyces cerevisiae in-yeast assembly; this method is robust to the assembly of GC-rich DNA and of large plasmids. Using such vectors we screened for controllable promoters, and identified inducible promoters from the genes NAR1, ICL1, CTR3, and MET16. These four promoters have independent induction/repression conditions and exhibit different levels and rates of induction in R. toruloides, making them appropriate for controllable transgene expression in different experimental situations. Nested deletions were used to identify regulatory regions in the four promoters, and to delimit the minimal inducible promoters, which are as small as 200 bp for the NAR1 promoter. The NAR1 promoter shows very tight regulation under repressed conditions as determined both by an EGFP reporter gene and by conditional rescue of a leu2 mutant. These new tools facilitate molecular genetic manipulation and controllable gene expression in R. toruloides. PMID:27818654

  17. Controlling Hox gene expression and activity to build the vertebrate axial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Casaca, Ana; Santos, Ana Cristina; Mallo, Moisés

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that Hox genes are central players in patterning the vertebrate axial skeleton. Extensive genetic studies in the mouse have revealed that the combinatorial activity of Hox genes along the anterior-posterior body axis specifies different vertebral identities. In addition, Hox genes were instrumental for the evolutionary diversification of the vertebrate body plan. In this review, we focus on fundamental questions regarding the intricate mechanisms controlling Hox gene activity. In particular, we discuss the functional relevance of the precise timing of Hox gene activation in the embryo. Moreover, we provide insight into the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms that are likely to control this process and are responsible for the maintenance of spatially restricted Hox expression domains throughout embryonic development. We also analyze how specific features of each Hox protein may contribute to the functional diversity of Hox family. Altogether, the work reviewed here further supports the notion that the Hox program is far more complex than initially assumed. Exciting new findings will surely emerge in the years ahead.

  18. Quality Controls in Cellular Immunotherapies: Rapid Assessment of Clinical Grade Dendritic Cells by Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Zhao, Yingdong; Tumaini, Barbara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Ping, Jin; Wang, Ena; Wood, Lauren V; Marincola, Francesco M; Puri, Raj K; Stroncek, David F

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based immunotherapies are among the most promising approaches for developing effective and targeted immune response. However, their clinical usefulness and the evaluation of their efficacy rely heavily on complex quality control assessment. Therefore, rapid systematic methods are urgently needed for the in-depth characterization of relevant factors affecting newly developed cell product consistency and the identification of reliable markers for quality control. Using dendritic cells (DCs) as a model, we present a strategy to comprehensively characterize manufactured cellular products in order to define factors affecting their variability, quality and function. After generating clinical grade human monocyte-derived mature DCs (mDCs), we tested by gene expression profiling the degrees of product consistency related to the manufacturing process and variability due to intra- and interdonor factors, and how each factor affects single gene variation. Then, by calculating for each gene an index of variation we selected candidate markers for identity testing, and defined a set of genes that may be useful comparability and potency markers. Subsequently, we confirmed the observed gene index of variation in a larger clinical data set. In conclusion, using high-throughput technology we developed a method for the characterization of cellular therapies and the discovery of novel candidate quality assurance markers. PMID:23147403

  19. GABAA receptor subunit gene expression in human prefrontal cortex: comparison of schizophrenics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akbarian, S.; Huntsman, M. M.; Kim, J. J.; Tafazzoli, A.; Potkin, S. G.; Bunney, W. E. Jr; Jones, E. G.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics is hypoactive and displays changes related to inhibitory, GABAergic neurons, and GABAergic synapses. These changes include decreased levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme for GABA synthesis, upregulation of muscimol binding, and downregulation of benzodiazepine binding to GABAA receptors. Studies in the visual cortex of nonhuman primates have demonstrated that gene expression for GAD and for several GABAA receptor subunit polypeptides is under control of neuronal activity, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms in the hypoactive prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics may explain the abnormalities in GAD and in GABAA receptor regulation. In the present study, which is the first of its type on human cerebral cortex, levels of mRNAs for six GABAA receptor subunits (alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 2) and their laminar expression patterns were analyzed in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics and matched controls, using in situ hybridization histochemistry and densitometry. Three types of laminar expression pattern were observed: mRNAs for the alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2 subunits, which are the predominant receptor subunits expressed in the mature cortex, were expressed at comparatively high levels by cells of all six cortical layers, but most intensely by cells in lower layer III and layer IV. mRNAs for the alpha 2, alpha 5, and beta 1 subunits were expressed at lower levels; alpha 2 and beta 1 were expressed predominantly by cells in layers II, III, and IV; alpha 5 was expressed predominantly in layers IV, V, and VI. There were no significant changes in overall mRNA levels for any of the receptor subunits in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics, and the laminar expression pattern of all six receptor subunit mRNAs did not differ between schizophrenics and controls. Because gene expression for GABAA receptor subunits is not consistently altered in the prefrontal cortex of

  20. GABAA receptor subunit gene expression in human prefrontal cortex: comparison of schizophrenics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akbarian, S.; Huntsman, M. M.; Kim, J. J.; Tafazzoli, A.; Potkin, S. G.; Bunney, W. E. Jr; Jones, E. G.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics is hypoactive and displays changes related to inhibitory, GABAergic neurons, and GABAergic synapses. These changes include decreased levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme for GABA synthesis, upregulation of muscimol binding, and downregulation of benzodiazepine binding to GABAA receptors. Studies in the visual cortex of nonhuman primates have demonstrated that gene expression for GAD and for several GABAA receptor subunit polypeptides is under control of neuronal activity, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms in the hypoactive prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics may explain the abnormalities in GAD and in GABAA receptor regulation. In the present study, which is the first of its type on human cerebral cortex, levels of mRNAs for six GABAA receptor subunits (alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 2) and their laminar expression patterns were analyzed in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics and matched controls, using in situ hybridization histochemistry and densitometry. Three types of laminar expression pattern were observed: mRNAs for the alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2 subunits, which are the predominant receptor subunits expressed in the mature cortex, were expressed at comparatively high levels by cells of all six cortical layers, but most intensely by cells in lower layer III and layer IV. mRNAs for the alpha 2, alpha 5, and beta 1 subunits were expressed at lower levels; alpha 2 and beta 1 were expressed predominantly by cells in layers II, III, and IV; alpha 5 was expressed predominantly in layers IV, V, and VI. There were no significant changes in overall mRNA levels for any of the receptor subunits in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics, and the laminar expression pattern of all six receptor subunit mRNAs did not differ between schizophrenics and controls. Because gene expression for GABAA receptor subunits is not consistently altered in the prefrontal cortex of

  1. Transcriptional control of two ribosome-inactivating protein genes expressed in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) embryos.

    PubMed

    Kawade, Kensuke; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2009-05-01

    SoRIP1 and SoRIP2 are ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP: EC 3.2.2.22) genes identified in spinach (Spinacia oleracea). They are differentially expressed in a development-dependent manner during spinach somatic embryogenesis. Here, we isolated genomic clones of SoRIP1 and SoRIP2. These two RIP genes have different genomic organization. Phylogenetic analysis of predicted amino acid sequences of RIPs in Caryophyllales plants revealed that they are divided into two major subfamilies, corresponding to SoRIP1 and SoRIP2. To gain further insight into the transcriptional control of SoRIP1 and SoRIP2, we obtained their 5'-flanking sequences by inverse PCR. Comparison of two 5'-flanking sequences revealed the characteristic cis elements in each region that confer differential transcriptional control. In the 5'-flanking region of SoRIP1, we found several motifs with functions related to embryonic development. The 5'-flanking region of SoRIP2 contains some defense-responsive motifs. Expression of SoRIP1 was detected in various tissues. In particular, SoRIP1 was highly expressed in the early immature fruits, and immunohistochemistry showed that SoRIP1 accumulated in the peripheral region of the immature embryo, with weaker expression in internal cells. During fruit development, the expression of SoRIP2 was low. However, the accumulation of SoRIP2 was conspicuous in the epidermis of the immature embryo. The expression of SoRIP2, but not SoRIP1, in leaves was induced by salicylic acid treatment. This differential transcriptional regulation of SoRIP1 and SoRIP2 suggests that the corresponding proteins may have different functions, one being related to embryonic development and the other to embryo defense.

  2. Designing and using synthetic RNA thermometers for temperature-controlled gene expression in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Juliane; Bock, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Many techniques have been developed for studying inducible gene expression, but all of them are multicomponent systems consisting of cis-acting elements at the DNA or RNA level, trans-acting regulator proteins and/or small molecules as inducers. RNA thermometers are the only known single-component regulators of gene expression. They consist of a temperature-sensitive secondary structure in the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA, which contains the ribosome-binding site. The ribosome-binding site can be masked or unmasked by a simple temperature shift, thereby repressing or inducing translation. Recently, we and others have designed synthetic RNA thermometers that are considerably simpler than naturally occurring thermometers and can be exploited as convenient on/off switches of gene expression. In this protocol, we describe the construction and use of synthetic RNA thermometers. We provide guidelines for the in silico design of thermometer-controlled mRNA leaders and for their experimental testing and optimization; the entire procedure can be completed in 2-3 weeks.

  3. MALT1 Protease Activity Controls the Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Keratinocytes upon Zymosan Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anja; Grondona, Paula; Maier, Tabea; Brändle, Marc; Schönfeld, Caroline; Jäger, Günter; Kosnopfel, Corinna; Eberle, Franziska C; Schittek, Birgit; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Yazdi, Amir S; Hailfinger, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    The protease activity of the paracaspase mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) plays an important role in antigen receptor-mediated lymphocyte activation by controlling the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB and is thus essential for the expression of inflammatory target genes. MALT1 is not only present in cells of the hematopoietic lineage, but is ubiquitously expressed. Here we report that stimulation with zymosan or Staphylococcus aureus induced MALT1 protease activity in human primary keratinocytes. Inhibition of the Src family of kinases or novel protein kinase C isoforms as well as silencing of CARMA2 or BCL10 interfered with activation of MALT1 protease. Silencing or inhibition of MALT1 protease strongly decreased the expression of important inflammatory genes such as TNFα, IL-17C, CXCL8 and HBD-2. MALT1-inhibited cells were unable to mount an antimicrobial response upon zymosan stimulation or phorbolester/ionomycin treatment, demonstrating a central role of MALT1 protease activity in keratinocyte immunity and suggesting MALT1 as a potential target in inflammatory skin diseases.

  4. Conditional control of mammalian gene expression by tetracycline-dependent hammerhead ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Beilstein, Kim; Wittmann, Alexander; Grez, Manuel; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-05-15

    Robust synthetic devices are requisite for the construction of synthetic genetic circuits and important scientific and technological tools to control cellular processes. We developed tetracycline-dependent ribozymes, which can switch on gene expression up to 8.7-fold upon addition of tetracycline. A tetracycline aptamer was grafted onto the hammerhead ribozyme in such a way that ligand binding to the aptamers destroys a loop-loop interaction within the ribozyme thereby inhibiting ribozyme cleavage and allowing gene expression. The advantage of the presented regulatory system is its independence of any regulatory proteins. The stable integration of the ribozyme into the genome of HeLa cells indicates a low background activity in the absence of ligand. Furthermore, the ligand concentration required to robustly flip the switch does not affect cell viability and therefore allows a long-term application of the system. These properties turn the tetracycline-dependent ribozymes into a very promising tool for conditional gene expression in mammalian cells.

  5. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J M; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-07-15

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology.

  6. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J. M.; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology. PMID:27417732

  7. Automated optogenetic feedback control for precise and robust regulation of gene expression and cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Rullan, Marc; Aoki, Stephanie K.; Buchmann, Peter; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic control of gene expression can have far-reaching implications for biotechnological applications and biological discovery. Thanks to the advantages of light, optogenetics has emerged as an ideal technology for this task. Current state-of-the-art methods for optical expression control fail to combine precision with repeatability and cannot withstand changing operating culture conditions. Here, we present a novel fully automatic experimental platform for the robust and precise long-term optogenetic regulation of protein production in liquid Escherichia coli cultures. Using a computer-controlled light-responsive two-component system, we accurately track prescribed dynamic green fluorescent protein expression profiles through the application of feedback control, and show that the system adapts to global perturbations such as nutrient and temperature changes. We demonstrate the efficacy and potential utility of our approach by placing a key metabolic enzyme under optogenetic control, thus enabling dynamic regulation of the culture growth rate with potential applications in bacterial physiology studies and biotechnology. PMID:27562138

  8. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-03-18

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA-asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions.

  9. Control of gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis in the muscular adaptation to endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Anna-Maria; Pilegaard, Henriette; Litvintsev, Anastassia; Leick, Lotte; Hood, David A

    2006-01-01

    Every time a bout of exercise is performed, a change in gene expression occurs within the contracting muscle. Over the course of many repeated bouts of exercise (i.e. training), the cumulative effects of these alterations lead to a change in muscle phenotype. One of the most prominent of these adaptations is an increase in mitochondrial content, which confers a greater resistance to muscle fatigue. This essay reviews current knowledge on the regulation of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis at the molecular level. The major steps involved include, (i) transcriptional regulation of nuclear-encoded genes encoding mitochondrial proteins by the coactivator peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor g coactivator-1, (ii) control of mitochondrial DNA gene expression by the transcription factor Tfam, (iii) mitochondrial fission and fusion mechanisms, and (iv) import of nuclear-derived gene products into the mitochondrion via the protein import machinery. It is now known that exercise can modify the rates of several of these steps, leading to mitochondrial biogenesis. An understanding of how exercise can produce this effect could help us decide whether exercise is beneficial for patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders, as well as a variety of metabolic diseases.

  10. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control -- A multilevel and inter-disciplinary study

    SciTech Connect

    Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1990-09-01

    All projects are working toward a goal for describing the three dimensional nuclear topography in terms of relative spatial relationships among genes (specific DNA sequence). Methods are now being perfected to detect these genes, quantitatively and spatially, to perturb these genes specifically, and to measure the perturbation in order to assure specificity. We are developing methods to assay, after perturbation of the target DNA within living cells, whether or not only the target sequence are attacked while other sequences remain unharmed. We are now at the stage to do chemical gene modification or masking within living cells in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Soon, we will be able to study the function and the physical location of each gene in living cells with exquisite specificity. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling controls basal and oncostatin M-mediated JUNB gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Mellissa J; Hu, Qiuping; Macrae, Erin; DeWille, James

    2015-05-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is aberrantly activated in many human cancers, including breast cancer. Activation of MAPK signaling is associated with the increased expression of a wide range of genes that promote cell survival, proliferation, and migration. This report investigated the influence of MAPK signaling on the regulation and expression of JUNB in human breast cancer cell lines. JUNB has been associated with tumor suppressor and oncogenic functions, with most reports describing JUNB as an oncogene in breast cancer. Our results indicated that JUNB expression is elevated in MCF10A(met), SKBR3, and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines compared to nontransformed MCF10A mammary epithelial cells. Increased RAS/MAPK signaling in MCF10A(met) cells correlates with the increased association of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) phosphorylated on serine 5 (Pol IIser5p) with the JUNB proximal promoter. Pol IIser5p is the "transcription initiating" form of Pol II. Treatment with U0126, a MAPK pathway inhibitor, reduces Pol IIser5p association with the JUNB proximal promoter and reduces JUNB expression. Oncostatin M (OSM) enhances MAPK and STAT3 signaling and significantly induces JUNB expression. U0126 treatment reduces OSM-induced Pol IIser5p binding to the JUNB proximal promoter and JUNB expression, but does not reduce pSTAT3 levels or the association of pSTAT3 with the JUNB proximal promoter. These results demonstrate that the MAPK pathway plays a primary role in the control of JUNB gene expression by promoting the association of Pol IIser5p with the JUNB proximal promoter.

  12. Long-term model predictive control of gene expression at the population and single-cell levels

    PubMed Central

    Uhlendorf, Jannis; Miermont, Agnès; Delaveau, Thierry; Charvin, Gilles; Fages, François; Bottani, Samuel; Batt, Gregory; Hersen, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression plays a central role in the orchestration of cellular processes. The use of inducible promoters to change the expression level of a gene from its physiological level has significantly contributed to the understanding of the functioning of regulatory networks. However, from a quantitative point of view, their use is limited to short-term, population-scale studies to average out cell-to-cell variability and gene expression noise and limit the nonpredictable effects of internal feedback loops that may antagonize the inducer action. Here, we show that, by implementing an external feedback loop, one can tightly control the expression of a gene over many cell generations with quantitative accuracy. To reach this goal, we developed a platform for real-time, closed-loop control of gene expression in yeast that integrates microscopy for monitoring gene expression at the cell level, microfluidics to manipulate the cells’ environment, and original software for automated imaging, quantification, and model predictive control. By using an endogenous osmostress responsive promoter and playing with the osmolarity of the cells environment, we show that long-term control can, indeed, be achieved for both time-constant and time-varying target profiles at the population and even the single-cell levels. Importantly, we provide evidence that real-time control can dynamically limit the effects of gene expression stochasticity. We anticipate that our method will be useful to quantitatively probe the dynamic properties of cellular processes and drive complex, synthetically engineered networks. PMID:22893687

  13. Rational design of aptazyme riboswitches for efficient control of gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guocai; Wang, Haimin; Bailey, Charles C; Gao, Guangping; Farzan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to control mammalian gene expression with ligand-responsive riboswitches have been hindered by lack of a general method for generating efficient switches in mammalian systems. Here we describe a rational-design approach that enables rapid development of efficient cis-acting aptazyme riboswitches. We identified communication-module characteristics associated with aptazyme functionality through analysis of a 32-aptazyme test panel. We then developed a scoring system that predicts an aptazymes’s activity by integrating three characteristics of communication-module bases: hydrogen bonding, base stacking, and distance to the enzymatic core. We validated the power and generality of this approach by designing aptazymes responsive to three distinct ligands, each with markedly wider dynamic ranges than any previously reported. These aptayzmes efficiently regulated adeno-associated virus (AAV)-vectored transgene expression in cultured mammalian cells and mice, highlighting one application of these broadly usable regulatory switches. Our approach enables efficient, protein-independent control of gene expression by a range of small molecules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18858.001 PMID:27805569

  14. Evaluating methods for ranking differentially expressed genes applied to microArray quality control data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Statistical methods for ranking differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from gene expression data should be evaluated with regard to high sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility. In our previous studies, we evaluated eight gene ranking methods applied to only Affymetrix GeneChip data. A more general evaluation that also includes other microarray platforms, such as the Agilent or Illumina systems, is desirable for determining which methods are suitable for each platform and which method has better inter-platform reproducibility. Results We compared the eight gene ranking methods using the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) datasets produced by five manufacturers: Affymetrix, Applied Biosystems, Agilent, GE Healthcare, and Illumina. The area under the curve (AUC) was used as a measure for both sensitivity and specificity. Although the highest AUC values can vary with the definition of "true" DEGs, the best methods were, in most cases, either the weighted average difference (WAD), rank products (RP), or intensity-based moderated t statistic (ibmT). The percentages of overlapping genes (POGs) across different test sites were mainly evaluated as a measure for both intra- and inter-platform reproducibility. The POG values for WAD were the highest overall, irrespective of the choice of microarray platform. The high intra- and inter-platform reproducibility of WAD was also observed at a higher biological function level. Conclusion These results for the five microarray platforms were consistent with our previous ones based on 36 real experimental datasets measured using the Affymetrix platform. Thus, recommendations made using the MAQC benchmark data might be universally applicable. PMID:21639945

  15. Validation of housekeeping genes as an internal control for gene expression studies in Giardia lamblia using quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Fierro, Francisco; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio

    2016-04-25

    The analysis of transcript levels of specific genes is important for understanding transcriptional regulation and for the characterization of gene function. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a powerful tool to quantify gene expression. The objective of this study was to identify reliable housekeeping genes in Giardia lamblia. Twelve genes were selected for this purpose, and their expression was analyzed in the wild type WB strain and in two strains with resistance to nitazoxanide (NTZ) and metronidazole (MTZ), respectively. RefFinder software analysis showed that the expression of the genes is different in the three strains. The integrated data from the four analyses showed that the NADH oxidase (NADH) and aldolase (ALD) genes were the most steadily expressed genes, whereas the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene was the most unstable. Additionally, the relative expression of seven genes were quantified in the NTZ- and MTZ-resistant strains by RT-qPCR, using the aldolase gene as the internal control, and the results showed a consistent differential pattern of expression in both strains. The housekeeping genes found in this work will facilitate the analysis of mRNA expression levels of other genes of interest in G. lamblia.

  16. Different gene expression of skin tissues between mice with weight controlled by either calorie restriction or physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia; Xie, Linglin; Sylvester, Jessica; Wang, Jiasong; Bai, Jianfa; Baybutt, Richard; Wang, Weiqun

    2007-04-01

    Cancer prevention by weight control via dietary calorie restriction (DCR) and/or exercise has been demonstrated in animal models. To understand the underlying mechanisms, we compared phorbol ester (TPA)-induced gene expression profiles in DCR- or exercise-treated mouse skin tissues. SENCAR mice were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: ad libitum-fed sedentary control, ad libitum-fed exercise (AE), exercise but pair-fed at the amount of the control (PE), and 20% DCR. After 10 weeks, both body weight and fat composition significantly decreased in the DCR and PE groups compared with the controls. Weight loss was not observed in the AE group due, at least in part, to increased food intake. Among 39,000 transcripts with 45,101 probe sets measured by Affymetrix microarray, we identified 411, 110, and 67 genes that showed >or=1.5-fold and significant changes by DCR, AE, and PE, respectively. Gene ontology showed a profound impact on gene expression by DCR in 21 biologic process categories. Although PE and AE had a moderate impact on gene expression, the similarity of gene expression pattern altered by PE was relatively closer to DCR, whereas AE was closer to the control. The results of 22 cancer-related gene expression patterns, especially for certain oncogenes, further supported that PE appeared to be a better alternative than AE to DCR-like cancer prevention. The impact on gene expression pattern was associated with the effect on weight loss (i.e., DCR > PE > AE). Overall, this study demonstrated for the first time that weight control via decreasing energy intake or increasing energy expenditure resulted in the different modes of gene expression. DCR showed profound inhibitory impact on the expression of genes relevant to cancer risks. Furthermore, exercise along with limited calorie intake appears to be a better method for reducing weight and cancer risk compared with exercise alone.

  17. Interplay between Fur and HNS in controlling virulence gene expression in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Prajapat, Mahendra Kumar; Saini, Supreet

    2012-11-01

    Salmonella enterica is responsible for a large number of diseases in a wide-range of hosts. Two of the global regulators involved in controlling gene expression during the infection cycle of the bacterium are Fur and HNS. In this paper, we demonstrate computationally that Fur and HNS have disproportionately high density of binding sites in the Pathogenicity Islands on the Salmonella chromosome. Moreover, the frequency of binding sites for the two proteins is correlated throughout the genome of the organism. These results indicate a complex interplay between Fur and HNS in regulating cellular global behavior. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ribosome profiling reveals an important role for translational control in circadian gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Christopher; Lahens, Nicholas F.; Hogenesch, John B.; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Physiological and behavioral circadian rhythms are driven by a conserved transcriptional/translational negative feedback loop in mammals. Although most core clock factors are transcription factors, post-transcriptional control introduces delays that are critical for circadian oscillations. Little work has been done on circadian regulation of translation, so to address this deficit we conducted ribosome profiling experiments in a human cell model for an autonomous clock. We found that most rhythmic gene expression occurs with little delay between transcription and translation, suggesting that the lag in the accumulation of some clock proteins relative to their mRNAs does not arise from regulated translation. Nevertheless, we found that translation occurs in a circadian fashion for many genes, sometimes imposing an additional level of control on rhythmically expressed mRNAs and, in other cases, conferring rhythms on noncycling mRNAs. Most cyclically transcribed RNAs are translated at one of two major times in a 24-h day, while rhythmic translation of most noncyclic RNAs is phased to a single time of day. Unexpectedly, we found that the clock also regulates the formation of cytoplasmic processing (P) bodies, which control the fate of mRNAs, suggesting circadian coordination of mRNA metabolism and translation. PMID:26338483

  19. Transcriptional expression study in the central nervous system of rats: what gene should be used as internal control?

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Ana Carolina; Lazzari, Virgínia Meneghini; Agnes, Grasiela; Almeida, Silvana; Giovenardi, Márcia; da Veiga, Ana Beatriz Gorini

    2014-01-01

    Objective A growing number of published articles report the expression of specific genes with different behavior patterns in rats. The levels of messenger ribonucleic acid transcripts are usually analyzed by reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction and quantified after normalization with an internal control or reference gene (housekeeping gene). Nevertheless, housekeeping genes exhibit different expression in the central nervous system, depending on the physiological conditions and the area of the brain to be studied. The choice of a good internal control gene is essential for obtaining reliable results. This study evaluated the expression of three housekeeping genes (beta-actin, cyclophilin A, and ubiquitin C) in different areas of the central nervous system in rats (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, striatum, and prefrontal cortex). Methods Wistar rats (virgin females, n=6) during the diestrum period were used. Total ribonucleic acid was extracted from each region of the brain; the complementary deoxyribonucleic acid was synthesized by reverse transcription and amplified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction using SYBR™ Green and primers specific for each one of the reference genes. The stability of the expression was determined using NormFinder. Results Beta-actin was the most stable gene in the hippocampus and striatum, while cyclophilin A and ubiquitin C showed greater stability in the prefrontal cortex and the olfactory bulb, respectively. Conclusion Based on our study, further studies of gene expression using rats as animal models should take into consideration these results when choosing a reliable internal control gene. PMID:25295456

  20. Cohesins: chromatin architects in chromosome segregation, control of gene expression and much more.

    PubMed

    Barbero, José L

    2009-07-01

    Cells have evolved to develop molecules and control mechanisms that guarantee correct chromosome segregation and ensure the proper distribution of genetic material to daughter cells. In this sense, the establishment, maintenance, and removal of sister chromatid cohesion is one of the most fascinating and dangerous processes in the life of a cell because errors in the control of these processes frequently lead to cell death or aneuploidy. The main protagonist in this mechanism is a four-protein complex denominated the cohesin complex. In the last 10 years, we have improved our understanding of the key players in the regulation of sister chromatid cohesion during cell division in mitosis and meiosis. The last 2 years have seen an increase in evidence showing that cohesins have important functions in non-dividing cells, revealing new, unexplored roles for these proteins in the control of gene expression, development, and other essential cell functions in mammals.

  1. Post-Transcriptional Control of Cytokine Gene Expression in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control of cytokine gene expression is essential for rapid and transient response to stimuli and external stress. In health, post-transcriptional control is exerted by a number of trans-acting RNA-binding proteins and cis-acting sequence elements. These elements exist largely in the 3′ untranslated region and comprise microRNA targets and notably AU-rich elements, and exert regulated mRNA decay and translation repression. Defects in this control can lead to increased and sustained production of pro-inflammatory mediators contributing to several chronic inflammatory disease and cancer states. This introduction to the Journal's special issue on the topic summarizes, in a non-comprehensive list, the types of RNA-binding protein and their target cytokines, and potential contributions to disease, and presents the highlights of the individual reviews. PMID:24552151

  2. RNA- and protein-mediated control of Listeria monocytogenes virulence gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, Alice; Cossart, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The model opportunistic pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has been the object of extensive research, aiming at understanding its ability to colonize diverse environmental niches and animal hosts. Bacterial transcriptomes in various conditions reflect this efficient adaptability. We review here our current knowledge of the mechanisms allowing L. monocytogenes to respond to environmental changes and trigger pathogenicity, with a special focus on RNA-mediated control of gene expression. We highlight how these studies have brought novel concepts in prokaryotic gene regulation, such as the ‘excludon’ where the 5′-UTR of a messenger also acts as an antisense regulator of an operon transcribed in opposite orientation, or the notion that riboswitches can regulate non-coding RNAs to integrate complex metabolic stimuli into regulatory networks. Overall, the Listeria model exemplifies that fine RNA tuners act together with master regulatory proteins to orchestrate appropriate transcriptional programmes. PMID:27217337

  3. Long non-coding RNAs: spatial amplifiers that control nuclear structure and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Engreitz, Jesse M; Ollikainen, Noah; Guttman, Mitchell

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that mammalian genomes encode thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), many of which are now implicated in diverse biological processes. Recent work studying the molecular mechanisms of several key examples - including Xist, which orchestrates X chromosome inactivation - has provided new insights into how lncRNAs can control cellular functions by acting in the nucleus. Here we discuss emerging mechanistic insights into how lncRNAs can regulate gene expression by coordinating regulatory proteins, localizing to target loci and shaping three-dimensional (3D) nuclear organization. We explore these principles to highlight biological challenges in gene regulation, in which lncRNAs are well-suited to perform roles that cannot be carried out by DNA elements or protein regulators alone, such as acting as spatial amplifiers of regulatory signals in the nucleus.

  4. Epigenetics in Apicomplexa: control of gene expression during cell cycle progression, differentiation and antigenic variation.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Deitsch, Kirk W

    2007-08-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are important disease causing organisms that infect both animals and humans, causing extensive health and economic damage to human populations, particularly those in the developing world. The ability to perform genetic crosses, to engineer transgenic parasites lines, and the wealth of information made available through recent genome sequencing projects have made the laboratory study of these parasites important not only for understanding the diseases that they cause, but also for gaining insights into basic biological processes. The control of gene expression and cellular differentiation are particularly interesting in these organisms, as the apparent lack of large families of recognizable transcription factors typically found in other eukaryotic organisms suggests that they may be unusually reliant on epigenetic mechanisms. Here we review recent advances in the study of epigenetic gene regulation in the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii.

  5. Control of gene expression in Helicobacter pylori using the Tet repressor

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Mark S.; Duncan, Stacy S.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Cover, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of a versatile system to control gene expression in Helicobacter pylori has hampered efforts to study H. pylori physiology and pathogenesis. To overcome these limitations, we evaluated the utility of an inducible system based on the well-characterized Tet repressor (TetR) and Tet operator (tetO). As validation of this system, we introduced three copies of tetO into the promoter region upstream of the cagUT operon (encoding two virulence factors required for function of the H. pylori Cag type IV secretion system) and expressed tetR by introducing a codon-optimized gene into the chromosomal ureA locus. Introduction of the tetO copies upstream of cagUT did not disrupt promoter activity, as determined by immunoblotting for CagT. The subsequent introduction of tetR, however, did repress CagT synthesis. Production of CagT was restored when strains were cultured in the presence of the inducer, anhydrotetracycline. To demonstrate one potential application of this new tool, we analyzed the function of the Cag type IV secretion system. When the modified H. pylori strains were co-cultured with AGS cells, activity of the Cag type IV secretion system was dependent on the presence of anhydrotetracycline as evidenced by inducer-dependent induction of IL-8 secretion, CagA translocation, and appearance of type IV secretion system pili at the bacteria-host interface. These studies demonstrate the effectiveness of the tetR-tetO system to control gene expression in H. pylori and provide an improved system for studying H. pylori physiology and pathogenesis. PMID:24113399

  6. Developmental and feedforward control of the expression of folate biosynthesis genes in tomato fruit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known about how plants regulate their folate content, including whether the expression of folate biosynthesis genes is orchestrated during development or modulated by folate levels. Nor is much known about how folate levels impact the expression of other genes. These points were addressed ...

  7. Dicer deficiency reveals microRNAs predicted to control gene expression in the developing adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Krill, Kenneth T; Gurdziel, Katherine; Heaton, Joanne H; Simon, Derek P; Hammer, Gary D

    2013-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, endogenous, non-protein-coding RNAs that are an important means of posttranscriptional gene regulation. Deletion of Dicer, a key miRNA processing enzyme, is embryonic lethal in mice, and tissue-specific Dicer deletion results in developmental defects. Using a conditional knockout model, we generated mice lacking Dicer in the adrenal cortex. These Dicer-knockout (KO) mice exhibited perinatal mortality and failure of the adrenal cortex during late gestation between embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5) and E18.5. Further study of Dicer-KO adrenals demonstrated a significant loss of steroidogenic factor 1-expressing cortical cells that was histologically evident as early as E16.5 coincident with an increase in p21 and cleaved-caspase 3 staining in the cortex. However, peripheral cortical proliferation persisted in KO adrenals as assessed by staining of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. To further characterize the embryonic adrenals from Dicer-KO mice, we performed microarray analyses for both gene and miRNA expression on purified RNA isolated from control and KO adrenals of E15.5 and E16.5 embryos. Consistent with the absence of Dicer and the associated loss of miRNA-mediated mRNA degradation, we observed an up-regulation of a small subset of adrenal transcripts in Dicer-KO mice, most notably the transcripts coded by the genes Nr6a1 and Acvr1c. Indeed, several miRNAs, including let-7, miR-34c, and miR-21, that are predicted to target these genes for degradation, were also markedly down-regulated in Dicer-KO adrenals. Together these data suggest a role for miRNA-mediated regulation of a subset of genes that are essential for normal adrenal growth and homeostasis.

  8. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control -- A multi-level and interdisciplinary study

    SciTech Connect

    Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1992-08-01

    This progress report describes gains made in three projects entitled (1) 3-Dimensional nuclear topography of genes and chromosomes in interphase nuclei, (2) Sequence specific identification and perturbation of the genomic DNA in living cells by nonionic oligonucleotide analogs (Matagen), and Resolution and isolation of specific DNA restriction fragments.(DT)

  9. Synthetic Biology Toolbox for Controlling Gene Expression in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The application of synthetic biology requires characterized tools to precisely control gene expression. This toolbox of genetic parts previously did not exist for the industrially promising cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. To address this gap, two orthogonal constitutive promoter libraries, one based on a cyanobacterial promoter and the other ported from Escherichia coli, were built and tested in PCC 7002. The libraries demonstrated 3 and 2.5 log dynamic ranges, respectively, but correlated poorly with E. coli expression levels. These promoter libraries were then combined to create and optimize a series of IPTG inducible cassettes. The resultant induction system had a 48-fold dynamic range and was shown to out-perform Ptrc constructs. Finally, a RBS library was designed and tested in PCC 7002. The presented synthetic biology toolbox will enable accelerated engineering of PCC 7002. PMID:25216157

  10. Cell dynamics and gene expression control in tissue homeostasis and development

    PubMed Central

    Rué, Pau; Martinez Arias, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    During tissue and organ development and maintenance, the dynamic regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation allows cells to build highly elaborate structures. The development of the vertebrate retina or the maintenance of adult intestinal crypts, for instance, involves the arrangement of newly created cells with different phenotypes, the proportions of which need to be tightly controlled. While some of the basic principles underlying these processes developing and maintaining these organs are known, much remains to be learnt from how cells encode the necessary information and use it to attain those complex but reproducible arrangements. Here, we review the current knowledge on the principles underlying cell population dynamics during tissue development and homeostasis. In particular, we discuss how stochastic fate assignment, cell division, feedback control and cellular transition states interact during organ and tissue development and maintenance in multicellular organisms. We propose a framework, involving the existence of a transition state in which cells are more susceptible to signals that can affect their gene expression state and influence their cell fate decisions. This framework, which also applies to systems much more amenable to quantitative analysis like differentiating embryonic stem cells, links gene expression programmes with cell population dynamics. PMID:25716053

  11. Cell dynamics and gene expression control in tissue homeostasis and development.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Martinez Arias, Alfonso

    2015-02-25

    During tissue and organ development and maintenance, the dynamic regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation allows cells to build highly elaborate structures. The development of the vertebrate retina or the maintenance of adult intestinal crypts, for instance, involves the arrangement of newly created cells with different phenotypes, the proportions of which need to be tightly controlled. While some of the basic principles underlying these processes developing and maintaining these organs are known, much remains to be learnt from how cells encode the necessary information and use it to attain those complex but reproducible arrangements. Here, we review the current knowledge on the principles underlying cell population dynamics during tissue development and homeostasis. In particular, we discuss how stochastic fate assignment, cell division, feedback control and cellular transition states interact during organ and tissue development and maintenance in multicellular organisms. We propose a framework, involving the existence of a transition state in which cells are more susceptible to signals that can affect their gene expression state and influence their cell fate decisions. This framework, which also applies to systems much more amenable to quantitative analysis like differentiating embryonic stem cells, links gene expression programmes with cell population dynamics.

  12. Sulfur availability and the SAC1 gene control adenosine triphosphate sulfurylase gene expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, F H; Davies, J P; Grossman, A

    1996-01-01

    A Chlamydomonas reinhardtii adenosine triphosphate (ATP) sulfurylase cDNA clone (pATS1) was selected by complementing a mutation in the ATP sulfurylase gene (cysD) of Escherichia coli. E. coli cysD strains harboring pATS1 grow on medium containing sulfate as the sole sulfur source and exhibit ATP sulfurylase activity. The amino acid sequence of the C. reinhardtii ATP sulfurylase, derived from the nucleotide sequence of the complementing gene (ATS1), is 25 to 40% identical to that of ATP sulfurylases in other eukaryotic organisms and has a putative transit peptide at its amino terminus. ATP sulfurylase mRNA was present when cells were grown in sulfur-replete medium, but accumulated to higher levels when the cells were exposed to sulfur-limiting conditions. Furthermore, sulfur-stress-induced accumulation of the ATS1 transcript was reduced in a strain defective in SAC1, a gene that is critical for acclimation to sulfur-limited growth. PMID:8883379

  13. New regulatory circuit controlling spatial and temporal gene expression in the sea urchin embryo oral ectoderm GRN.

    PubMed

    Li, Enhu; Materna, Stefan C; Davidson, Eric H

    2013-10-01

    The sea urchin oral ectoderm gene regulatory network (GRN) model has increased in complexity as additional genes are added to it, revealing its multiple spatial regulatory state domains. The formation of the oral ectoderm begins with an oral-aboral redox gradient, which is interpreted by the cis-regulatory system of the nodal gene to cause its expression on the oral side of the embryo. Nodal signaling drives cohorts of regulatory genes within the oral ectoderm and its derived subdomains. Activation of these genes occurs sequentially, spanning the entire blastula stage. During this process the stomodeal subdomain emerges inside of the oral ectoderm, and bilateral subdomains defining the lateral portions of the future ciliary band emerge adjacent to the central oral ectoderm. Here we examine two regulatory genes encoding repressors, sip1 and ets4, which selectively prevent transcription of oral ectoderm genes until their expression is cleared from the oral ectoderm as an indirect consequence of Nodal signaling. We show that the timing of transcriptional de-repression of sip1 and ets4 targets which occurs upon their clearance explains the dynamics of oral ectoderm gene expression. In addition two other repressors, the direct Nodal target not, and the feed forward Nodal target goosecoid, repress expression of regulatory genes in the central animal oral ectoderm thereby confining their expression to the lateral domains of the animal ectoderm. These results have permitted construction of an enhanced animal ectoderm GRN model highlighting the repressive interactions providing precise temporal and spatial control of regulatory gene expression.

  14. Epigenetic Control of Virulence Gene Expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a LysR-Type Transcription Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Keith H.; Vallet-Gely, Isabelle; Dove, Simon L.

    2009-01-01

    Phenotypic variation within an isogenic bacterial population is thought to ensure the survival of a subset of cells in adverse conditions. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa variably expresses several phenotypes, including antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation, and the production of CupA fimbriae. Here we describe a previously unidentified bistable switch in P. aeruginosa. This switch controls the expression of a diverse set of genes, including aprA, which encodes the secreted virulence factor alkaline protease. We present evidence that bistable expression of PA2432, herein named bexR (bistable expression regulator), which encodes a LysR-type transcription regulator, controls this switch. In particular, using DNA microarrays, quantitative RT–PCR analysis, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and reporter gene fusions, we identify genes directly under the control of BexR and show that these genes are bistably expressed. Furthermore, we show that bexR is itself bistably expressed and positively autoregulated. Finally, using single-cell analyses of a GFP reporter fusion, we present evidence that positive autoregulation of bexR is necessary for bistable expression of the BexR regulon. Our findings suggest that a positive feedback loop involving a LysR-type transcription regulator serves as the basis for an epigenetic switch that controls virulence gene expression in P. aeruginosa. PMID:20041030

  15. The physics of protein-DNA interaction networks in the control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Leonor

    2012-05-01

    Protein-DNA interaction networks play a central role in many fundamental cellular processes. In gene regulation, physical interactions and reactions among the molecular components together with the physical properties of DNA control how genes are turned on and off. A key player in all these processes is the inherent flexibility of DNA, which provides an avenue for long-range interactions between distal DNA elements through DNA looping. Such versatility enables multiple interactions and results in additional complexity that is remarkably difficult to address with traditional approaches. This topical review considers recent advances in statistical physics methods to study the assembly of protein-DNA complexes with loops, their effects in the control of gene expression, and their explicit application to the prototypical lac operon genetic system of the E. coli bacterium. In the last decade, it has been shown that the underlying physical properties of DNA looping can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including the balance between robustness and sensitivity of the induction process. These physical properties are largely dependent on the free energy of DNA looping, which accounts for DNA bending and twisting effects. These new physical methods have also been used in reverse to uncover the actual in vivo free energy of looping double-stranded DNA in living cells, which was not possible with existing experimental techniques. The results obtained for DNA looping by the lac repressor inside the E. coli bacterium showed a more malleable DNA than expected as a result of the interplay of the simultaneous presence of two distinct conformations of looped DNA.

  16. Cell-cycle control of gene expression in budding and fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Bähler, Jürg

    2005-01-01

    Cell-cycle control of transcription seems to be a universal feature of proliferating cells, although relatively little is known about its biological significance and conservation between organisms. The two distantly related yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe have provided valuable complementary insight into the regulation of periodic transcription as a function of the cell cycle. More recently, genome-wide studies of proliferating cells have identified hundreds of periodically expressed genes and underlying mechanisms of transcriptional control. This review discusses the regulation of three major transcriptional waves, which roughly coincide with three main cell-cycle transitions (initiation of DNA replication, entry into mitosis, and exit from mitosis). I also compare and contrast the transcriptional regulatory networks between the two yeasts and discuss the evolutionary conservation and possible roles for cell cycle-regulated transcription.

  17. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control: A multilevel and inter-disciplinary study

    SciTech Connect

    Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1990-09-01

    The main objectives of this Program Project is to develop strategy and technology for the study of gene structure, organization and function in a multi-disciplinary, highly coordinated manner. In Project I, Molecular Cytology, the establishment of all instrumentation for the computerized microscopic imaging system (CMIS) has been completed with the software in place, including measurement of the third dimension (along the Z-axis). The technique is now at hand to measure single copy DNA in the nucleus, single copy mRNA in the cell, and finally, we are in the process of developing mathematical approaches for the analysis of the relative spatial 3-D relationship among the chromosomes and the individual genes in the interphasal nucleus. Also, we have a sensitive and reliable method for measuring single-stranded DNA breaks which will be useful for the determination of damage to DNA caused by ionizing radiation. In Project II, the mapping of restriction fragments by 2-D enzymatic and electrophoretic analysis has been perfected for application. In Project III, a major finding is that the binding constant and effectiveness of antisense oligonucleotide analogues, Matagen, can be significantly improved by substituting 2{prime}-O-methylribos methylphosphonate backbones for the current 2{prime}-deoxyribomethylphosphonate backbones. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Dysregulated post-transcriptional control of COX-2 gene expression in gestational diabetic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Francesco, Luigia; Dovizio, Melania; Trenti, Annalisa; Marcantoni, Emanuela; Moore, Ashleigh; O’Gaora, Peadar; McCarthy, Cathal; Tacconelli, Stefania; Bruno, Annalisa; Alberti, Sara; Gizzo, Salvatore; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Orso, Genny; Belton, Orina; Trevisi, Lucia; Dixon, Dan A; Patrignani, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hyperglycaemic memory describes the progression of diabetic complications during subsequent periods of improved glycaemia. We addressed the hypothesis that transient hyperglycaemia causes aberrant COX-2 expression in HUVEC in response to IL-1β through the induction of long-lasting epigenetic changes involving microRNA-16 (miR-16), a post-transcriptional modulator of COX-2 expression. Experimental Approach Studies were performed on HUVEC collected from women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (dHUVEC) and normal women (nHUVEC). Key Results In dHUVEC treated with IL-1β, the expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein was enhanced and generation of prostanoids increased (the most abundant was the promitogenic PGF2α). COX-2 mRNA was more stable in dHUVEC and this was associated with miR-16 down-regulation and c-Myc induction (a suppressor of miR expression). dHUVEC showed increased proliferation in response to IL-1β, which was prevented by a COX-2 inhibitor and PGF2α receptor antagonist. Comparable changes in COX-2 mRNA, miR-16 and c-Myc detected in dHUVEC were produced in nHUVEC exposed to transient high glucose and then stimulated with IL-1β under physiological glucose levels; superoxide anion production was enhanced under these experimental conditions. Conclusions and Implications Our results describe a possible mechanism operating in GDM that links the enhanced superoxide anion production and epigenetic changes, associated with hyperglycaemic memory, to endothelial dysfunction through dysregulated post-transcriptional control of COX-2 gene expression in response to inflammatory stimuli. The association of conventional therapy for glycaemic control with agents affecting inflammatory responses and oxidative stress might lead to a more effective prevention of the complications associated with GDM. PMID:26140661

  19. Control of mouse U1a and U1b snRNA gene expression by differential transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, J F; McKenzie, D; Thimmapaya, R; Lund, E; Dahlberg, J E

    1992-01-01

    The expression of mouse embryonic U1 snRNA (mU1b) genes is subject to stage- and tissue-specific control, being restricted to early embryos and adult tissues that contain a high proportion of stem cells capable of further differentiation. To determine the mechanism of this control we have sought to distinguish between differential RNA stability and regulation of U1 gene promoter activity in several cell types. We demonstrate here that mU1b RNA can accumulate to high levels in permanently transfected mouse 3T3 and C127 fibroblast cells which normally do not express the endogenous U1b genes, and apparently can do so without significantly interfering with cell growth. Expression of transfected chimeric U1 genes in such cells is much more efficient when their promoters are derived from a constitutively expressed mU1a gene rather than from an mU1b gene. In transgenic mice, introduced U1 transgenes with an mU1b 5' flanking region are subject to normal tissue-specific control, indicating that U1b promoter activity is restricted to tissues that normally express U1b genes. Inactivation of the embryonic genes during normal differentiation is not associated with methylation of upstream CpG-rich sequences; however, in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, the 5' flanking regions of endogenous mU1b genes are completely methylated, indicating that DNA methylation serves to imprint the inactive state of the mU1b genes in cultured cells. Based on these results, we propose that the developmental control of U1b gene expression is due to differential activity of mU1a and mU1b promoters rather than to differential stability of U1a and U1b RNAs. Images PMID:1508717

  20. Quality control in microarray assessment of gene expression in human airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Tina; O'Connor, Timothy P; Hackett, Neil R; Wang, Wei; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Attiyeh, Marc A; Dang, David T; Teater, Matthew; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for defining gene expression profiles of airway epithelium that lend insight into the pathogenesis of human airway disorders. The focus of this study was to establish rigorous quality control parameters to ensure that microarray assessment of the airway epithelium is not confounded by experimental artifact. Samples (total n = 223) of trachea, large and small airway epithelium were collected by fiberoptic bronchoscopy of 144 individuals and hybridized to Affymetrix microarrays. The pre- and post-chip quality control (QC) criteria established, included: (1) RNA quality, assessed by RNA Integrity Number (RIN) ≥ 7.0; (2) cRNA transcript integrity, assessed by signal intensity ratio of GAPDH 3' to 5' probe sets ≤ 3.0; and (3) the multi-chip normalization scaling factor ≤ 10.0. Results Of the 223 samples, all three criteria were assessed in 191; of these 184 (96.3%) passed all three criteria. For the remaining 32 samples, the RIN was not available, and only the other two criteria were used; of these 29 (90.6%) passed these two criteria. Correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons of expression levels for 100 maintenance genes in which at least one array failed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.90 ± 0.04) were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) than correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons between arrays that passed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.97 ± 0.01). Inter-array variability was significantly decreased (p < 0.0001) among samples passing the QC criteria compared with samples failing the QC criteria. Conclusion Based on the aberrant maintenance gene data generated from samples failing the established QC criteria, we propose that the QC criteria outlined in this study can accurately distinguish high quality from low quality data, and can be used to delete poor quality microarray samples before proceeding to higher-order biological analyses and interpretation. PMID:19852842

  1. Tbx20 controls the expression of the KCNH2 gene and of hERG channels.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Ricardo; Utrilla, Raquel G; Amorós, Irene; Matamoros, Marcos; Pérez-Hernández, Marta; Tinaquero, David; Alfayate, Silvia; Nieto-Marín, Paloma; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Liu, Qing-Hua; Ramos-Mondragón, Roberto; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Herron, Todd; Campbell, Katherine F; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Peinado, Rafael; López-Sendón, José L; Jalife, José; Delpón, Eva; Tamargo, Juan

    2017-01-17

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) exhibits great phenotype variability among family members carrying the same mutation, which can be partially attributed to genetic factors. We functionally analyzed the KCNH2 (encoding for Kv11.1 or hERG channels) and TBX20 (encoding for the transcription factor Tbx20) variants found by next-generation sequencing in two siblings with LQTS in a Spanish family of African ancestry. Affected relatives harbor a heterozygous mutation in KCNH2 that encodes for p.T152HfsX180 Kv11.1 (hERG). This peptide, by itself, failed to generate any current when transfected into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells but, surprisingly, exerted "chaperone-like" effects over native hERG channels in both CHO cells and mouse atrial-derived HL-1 cells. Therefore, heterozygous transfection of native (WT) and p.T152HfsX180 hERG channels generated a current that was indistinguishable from that generated by WT channels alone. Some affected relatives also harbor the p.R311C mutation in Tbx20. In human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), Tbx20 enhanced human KCNH2 gene expression and hERG currents (IhERG) and shortened action-potential duration (APD). However, Tbx20 did not modify the expression or activity of any other channel involved in ventricular repolarization. Conversely, p.R311C Tbx20 did not increase KCNH2 expression in hiPSC-CMs, which led to decreased IhERG and increased APD. Our results suggest that Tbx20 controls the expression of hERG channels responsible for the rapid component of the delayed rectifier current. On the contrary, p.R311C Tbx20 specifically disables the Tbx20 protranscriptional activity over KCNH2 Therefore, TBX20 can be considered a KCNH2-modifying gene.

  2. Molecular characterization, expression analysis and heterologous expression of two translationally controlled tumor protein genes from Cucumis sativus

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiang nan; Chen, Qiu min; Song, Tie feng; Cui, Na; Zhao, Ju yong; Jia, Shu min; Meng, Ke xin

    2017-01-01

    The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a family of abundant and ubiquitous proteins involved in several important primary functions. Cucumbers harbor two TCTP genes, CsTCTP1 and CsTCTP2; however, their functional roles remain unclear. In this study, we isolated CsTCTP1 and CsTCTP2 (XP-004134215 and XP-004135602, respectively) promoters, full-length cDNA and genomic sequences from Cucumis sativus. Bioinformatics analysis, containing cis-acting elements, structural domains, phylogenetic tree and conserved motifs, suggested the conservation and divergence of CsTCTP1 and CsTCTP2, thus providing knowledge regarding their functions. Expression analysis indicated that CsTCTP1 and CsTCTP2 exhibited tissue-specific expression and were regulated by biotic or abiotic stresses in C. sativus. Furthermore, CsTCTP1 and CsTCTP2 were regulated by ABA and may be associated with the TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway. In a prokaryotic expression analysis, CsTCTP1 and CsTCTP2 showed positive responses to salt and heat stresses and a negative response to drought and HgCl2 stresses. TCTP may exert multiple functions in various cellular processes. PMID:28926624

  3. Gene expression profiling in persons with multiple chemical sensitivity before and after a controlled n-butanol exposure session.

    PubMed

    Dantoft, Thomas M; Skovbjerg, Sine; Andersson, Linus; Claeson, Anna-Sara; Engkilde, Kaare; Lind, Nina; Nordin, Steven; Hellgren, Lars I

    2017-02-22

    To investigate the pathophysiological pathways leading to symptoms elicitation in multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) by comparing gene expression in MCS participants and healthy controls before and after a chemical exposure optimised to cause symptoms among MCS participants.The first hypothesis was that unexposed and symptom-free MCS participants have similar gene expression patterns to controls and a second hypothesis that MCS participants can be separated from controls based on differential gene expression upon a controlled n-butanol exposure. Participants were exposed to 3.7 ppm n-butanol while seated in a windowed exposure chamber for 60 min. A total of 26 genes involved in biochemical pathways found in the literature have been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of MCS and other functional somatic syndromes were selected. Expression levels were compared between MCS and controls before, within 15 min after being exposed to and 4 hours after the exposure. Participants suffering from MCS and healthy controls were recruited through advertisement at public places and in a local newspaper. 36 participants who considered themselves sensitive were prescreened for eligibility. 18 sensitive persons fulfilling the criteria for MCS were enrolled together with 18 healthy controls. 17 genes showed sufficient transcriptional level for analysis. Group comparisons were conducted for each gene at the 3 times points and for the computed area under the curve (AUC) expression levels. MCS participants and controls displayed similar gene expression levels both at baseline and after the exposure and the computed AUC values were likewise comparable between the 2 groups. The intragroup variation in expression levels among MCS participants was noticeably greater than the controls. MCS participants and controls have similar gene expression levels at baseline and it was not possible to separate MCS participants from controls based on gene expression measured after the

  4. A controlled double-duration inducible gene expression system for cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying; Li, Junxiang; Yao, Yi; Wei, Daixu; Wang, Rui; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage engineering that combines competent seeding cells and a compatible scaffold is increasingly gaining popularity and is potentially useful for the treatment of various bone and cartilage diseases. Intensive efforts have been made by researchers to improve the viability and functionality of seeding cells of engineered constructs that are implanted into damaged cartilage. Here, we designed an integrative system combining gene engineering and the controlled-release concept to solve the problems of both seeding cell viability and functionality through precisely regulating the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 in the short-term and the chondrogenic master regulator Sox9 in the long-term. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that our system enhances the cell viability and chondrogenic effects of the engineered scaffold after introduction of the system while restricting anti-apoptotic gene expression to only the early stage, thereby preventing potential oncogenic and overdose effects. Our system was designed to be modular and can also be readily adapted to other tissue engineering applications with minor modification. PMID:27222430

  5. A controlled double-duration inducible gene expression system for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Li, Junxiang; Yao, Yi; Wei, Daixu; Wang, Rui; Wu, Qiong

    2016-05-25

    Cartilage engineering that combines competent seeding cells and a compatible scaffold is increasingly gaining popularity and is potentially useful for the treatment of various bone and cartilage diseases. Intensive efforts have been made by researchers to improve the viability and functionality of seeding cells of engineered constructs that are implanted into damaged cartilage. Here, we designed an integrative system combining gene engineering and the controlled-release concept to solve the problems of both seeding cell viability and functionality through precisely regulating the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 in the short-term and the chondrogenic master regulator Sox9 in the long-term. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that our system enhances the cell viability and chondrogenic effects of the engineered scaffold after introduction of the system while restricting anti-apoptotic gene expression to only the early stage, thereby preventing potential oncogenic and overdose effects. Our system was designed to be modular and can also be readily adapted to other tissue engineering applications with minor modification.

  6. Comparison of Gene Expression and Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiling between Phenotypically Normal Cloned Pigs and Conventionally Bred Controls

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengting; Li, Jian; Lin, Lin; Nielsen, Anders Lade; Sørensen, Charlotte Brandt; Vajta, Gábor; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Du, Yutao; Yang, Huanming; Bolund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Animal breeding via Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT) has enormous potential in agriculture and biomedicine. However, concerns about whether SCNT animals are as healthy or epigenetically normal as conventionally bred ones are raised as the efficiency of cloning by SCNT is much lower than natural breeding or In-vitro fertilization (IVF). Thus, we have conducted a genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation profiling between phenotypically normal cloned pigs and control pigs in two tissues (muscle and liver), using Affymetrix Porcine expression array as well as modified methylation-specific digital karyotyping (MMSDK) and Solexa sequencing technology. Typical tissue-specific differences with respect to both gene expression and DNA methylation were observed in muscle and liver from cloned as well as control pigs. Gene expression profiles were highly similar between cloned pigs and controls, though a small set of genes showed altered expression. Cloned pigs presented a more different pattern of DNA methylation in unique sequences in both tissues. Especially a small set of genomic sites had different DNA methylation status with a trend towards slightly increased methylation levels in cloned pigs. Molecular network analysis of the genes that contained such differential methylation loci revealed a significant network related to tissue development. In conclusion, our study showed that phenotypically normal cloned pigs were highly similar with normal breeding pigs in their gene expression, but moderate alteration in DNA methylation aspects still exists, especially in certain unique genomic regions. PMID:22022462

  7. An estradiol-inducible promoter enables fast, graduated control of gene expression in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Makoto J; Hendrickson, David G; Scott McIsaac, R; Rhind, Nicholas

    2017-08-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lacks a diverse toolkit of inducible promoters for experimental manipulation. Available inducible promoters suffer from slow induction kinetics, limited control of expression levels and/or a requirement for defined growth medium. In particular, no S. pombe inducible promoter systems exhibit a linear dose-response, which would allow expression to be tuned to specific levels. We have adapted a fast, orthogonal promoter system with a large dynamic range and a linear dose response, based on β-estradiol-regulated function of the human oestrogen receptor, for use in S. pombe. We show that this promoter system, termed Z3 EV, turns on quickly, can reach a maximal induction of 20-fold, and exhibits a linear dose response over its entire induction range, with few off-target effects. We demonstrate the utility of this system by regulating the mitotic inhibitor Wee1 to create a strain in which cell size is regulated by β-estradiol concentration. This promoter system will be of great utility for experimentally regulating gene expression in fission yeast. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress Programs Expression of Genes Involved in Appetite Control and Energy Expenditure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, E. L.; Al-Shayeb, B.; Baer, L. A.; Ronca, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to stress in the womb shapes neurobiological and physiological outcomes of offspring in later life, including body weight regulation and metabolic profiles. Our previous work utilizing a centrifugation-induced hyper-gravity demonstrated significantly increased (8-15%) body mass in male, but not female, rats exposed throughout gestation to chronic 2-g from conception to birth. We reported a similar outcome in adult offspring exposed throughout gestation to Unpredictable Variable Prenatal Stress (UVPS). Here we examine gene expression changes and the plasma of animals treated with our UVPS model to identify a potential role for prenatal stress in this hypergravity programming effect. Specifically we focused on appetite control and energy expenditure pathways in prenatally stressed adult (90-day-old) male Sprague-Dawley rats.

  9. Control of Gene Expression by RNA Binding Protein Action on Alternative Translation Initiation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Re, Angela; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Transcript levels do not faithfully predict protein levels, due to post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression mediated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and non-coding RNAs. We developed a multivariate linear regression model integrating RBP levels and predicted RBP-mRNA regulatory interactions from matched transcript and protein datasets. RBPs significantly improved the accuracy in predicting protein abundance of a portion of the total modeled mRNAs in three panels of tissues and cells and for different methods employed in the detection of mRNA and protein. The presence of upstream translation initiation sites (uTISs) at the mRNA 5’ untranslated regions was strongly associated with improvement in predictive accuracy. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the recently discovered widespread uTISs in the human genome can be a previously unappreciated substrate of translational control mediated by RBPs. PMID:27923063

  10. Genetic and epigenetic control of gene expression by CRISPR–Cas systems

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Albert; Qi, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The discovery and adaption of bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems has revolutionized the way researchers edit genomes. Engineering of catalytically inactivated Cas variants (nuclease-deficient or nuclease-deactivated [dCas]) combined with transcriptional repressors, activators, or epigenetic modifiers enable sequence-specific regulation of gene expression and chromatin state. These CRISPR–Cas-based technologies have contributed to the rapid development of disease models and functional genomics screening approaches, which can facilitate genetic target identification and drug discovery. In this short review, we will cover recent advances of CRISPR–dCas9 systems and their use for transcriptional repression and activation, epigenome editing, and engineered synthetic circuits for complex control of the mammalian genome. PMID:28649363

  11. Nuclear Compartmentalization Contributes to Stage-Specific Gene Expression Control in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pastro, Lucía; Smircich, Pablo; Di Paolo, Andrés; Becco, Lorena; Duhagon, María A.; Sotelo-Silveira, José; Garat, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    In the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, as in other trypanosomatids, transcription of protein coding genes occurs in a constitutive fashion, producing large polycistronic transcription units. These units are composed of non-functionally related genes which are pervasively processed to yield each mRNA. Therefore, post-transcriptional processes are crucial to regulate gene expression. Considering that nuclear compartmentalization could contribute to gene expression regulation, we comparatively studied the nuclear, cytoplasmic and whole cell transcriptomes of the non-infective epimastigote stage of T. cruzi, using RNA-Seq. We found that the cytoplasmic transcriptome tightly correlates with the whole cell transcriptome and both equally correlate with the proteome. Nonetheless, 1,200 transcripts showed differential abundance between the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. For the genes with transcript content augmented in the nucleus, significant structural and compositional differences were found. The analysis of the reported epimastigote translatome and proteome, revealed scarce ribosome footprints and encoded proteins for them. Ontology analyses unveiled that many of these genes are distinctive of other parasite life-cycle stages. Finally, the relocalization of transcript abundance in the metacyclic trypomastigote infective stage was confirmed for specific genes. While gene expression is strongly dependent on transcript steady-state level, we here highlight the importance of the distribution of transcripts abundance between compartments in T. cruzi. Particularly, we show that nuclear compartmentation is playing an active role in the developmental stage determination preventing off-stage expression. PMID:28243589

  12. Nuclear Compartmentalization Contributes to Stage-Specific Gene Expression Control in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pastro, Lucía; Smircich, Pablo; Di Paolo, Andrés; Becco, Lorena; Duhagon, María A; Sotelo-Silveira, José; Garat, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    In the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, as in other trypanosomatids, transcription of protein coding genes occurs in a constitutive fashion, producing large polycistronic transcription units. These units are composed of non-functionally related genes which are pervasively processed to yield each mRNA. Therefore, post-transcriptional processes are crucial to regulate gene expression. Considering that nuclear compartmentalization could contribute to gene expression regulation, we comparatively studied the nuclear, cytoplasmic and whole cell transcriptomes of the non-infective epimastigote stage of T. cruzi, using RNA-Seq. We found that the cytoplasmic transcriptome tightly correlates with the whole cell transcriptome and both equally correlate with the proteome. Nonetheless, 1,200 transcripts showed differential abundance between the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. For the genes with transcript content augmented in the nucleus, significant structural and compositional differences were found. The analysis of the reported epimastigote translatome and proteome, revealed scarce ribosome footprints and encoded proteins for them. Ontology analyses unveiled that many of these genes are distinctive of other parasite life-cycle stages. Finally, the relocalization of transcript abundance in the metacyclic trypomastigote infective stage was confirmed for specific genes. While gene expression is strongly dependent on transcript steady-state level, we here highlight the importance of the distribution of transcripts abundance between compartments in T. cruzi. Particularly, we show that nuclear compartmentation is playing an active role in the developmental stage determination preventing off-stage expression.

  13. Translational Control of Host Gene Expression by a Cys-Motif Protein Encoded in a Bracovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunseong; Kim, Yonggyun

    2016-01-01

    Translational control is a strategy that various viruses use to manipulate their hosts to suppress acute antiviral response. Polydnaviruses, a group of insect double-stranded DNA viruses symbiotic to some endoparasitoid wasps, are divided into two genera: ichnovirus (IV) and bracovirus (BV). In IV, some Cys-motif genes are known as host translation-inhibitory factors (HTIF). The genome of endoparasitoid wasp Cotesia plutellae contains a Cys-motif gene (Cp-TSP13) homologous to an HTIF known as teratocyte-secretory protein 14 (TSP14) of Microplitis croceipes. Cp-TSP13 consists of 129 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 13.987 kDa and pI value of 7.928. Genomic DNA region encoding its open reading frame has three introns. Cp-TSP13 possesses six conserved cysteine residues as other Cys-motif genes functioning as HTIF. Cp-TSP13 was expressed in Plutella xylostella larvae parasitized by C. plutellae. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) was purified and injected into non-parasitized P. xylostella that expressed Cp-TSP13. Cp-TSP13 was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector and used to infect Sf9 cells to transiently express Cp-TSP13. The synthesized Cp-TSP13 protein was detected in culture broth. An overlaying experiment showed that the purified Cp-TSP13 entered hemocytes. It was localized in the cytosol. Recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly inhibited protein synthesis of secretory proteins when it was added to in vitro cultured fat body. In addition, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 directly inhibited the translation of fat body mRNAs in in vitro translation assay using rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Moreover, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly suppressed cellular immune responses by inhibiting hemocyte-spreading behavior. It also exhibited significant insecticidal activities by both injection and feeding routes. These results indicate that Cp-TSP13 is a viral HTIF. PMID:27598941

  14. A real-time control system of gene expression using ligand-bound nucleic acid aptamer for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Cui, Xun; Yang, Le; Zhang, Zhe; Lv, Liping; Wang, Haoyuan; Zhao, Zhenmin; Guan, Ningzi; Dong, Lichun; Chen, Rachel

    2017-07-01

    Artificial control of bio-functions through regulating gene expression is one of the most important and attractive technologies to build novel living systems that are useful in the areas of chemical synthesis, nanotechnology, pharmacology, cell biology. Here, we present a novel real-time control system of gene regulation that includes an enhancement element by introducing duplex DNA aptamers upstream promoter and a repression element by introducing a RNA aptamer upstream ribosome binding site. With the presence of ligands corresponding to the DNA aptamers, the expression of the target gene can be potentially enhanced at the transcriptional level by strengthening the recognition capability of RNAP to the recognition region and speeding up the separation efficiency of the unwinding region due to the induced DNA bubble around the thrombin-bound aptamers; while with the presence of RNA aptamer ligand, the gene expression can be repressed at the translational level by weakening the recognition capability of ribosome to RBS due to the shielding of RBS by the formed aptamer-ligand complex upstream RBS. The effectiveness and potential utility of the developed gene regulation system were demonstrated by regulating the expression of ecaA gene in the cell-free systems. The realistic metabolic engineering application of the system has also tested by regulating the expression of mgtC gene and thrombin cDNA in Escherichia coli JD1021 for controlling metabolic flux and improving thrombin production, verifying that the real-time control system of gene regulation is able to realize the dynamic regulation of gene expression with potential applications in bacterial physiology studies and metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Interleukin-1 controls the constitutive expression of the Cyp7a1 gene by regulating the expression of Cyp7a1 transcriptional regulators in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Misaki; Ashino, Takashi; Yoshida, Takemi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Degawa, Masakuni

    2011-01-01

    Our previous study using interleukin-1α/β-knockout (IL-1-KO) and wild-type (WT) mice demonstrated that IL-1 acts as a positive factor for constitutive gene expression of hepatic cytochrome P4507a1 (Cyp7a1). In this study, to clarify the role of IL-1 in the expression of the hepatic Cyp7a1 gene, we focused on Cyp7a1 transcriptional regulators such as α-fetoprotein transcription factor (FTF), liver X receptor α (LXRα), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) and small heterodimer partner (SHP) and examined the effects of IL-1 on their gene expression by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction using IL-1-KO and WT mice. We observed no significant differences between sex-matched IL-1-KO and WT mice with regard to gene expression levels of FTF, LXRα, and HNF4α, all of which are positive transcriptional regulators for the Cyp7a1 gene. However, interindividual differences in hepatic FTF and LXRα expression were closely dependent on the gene expression level(s) of hepatic IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), while interindividual differences in hepatic HNF4α were clearly correlated with the expression of IL-1, but not TNF-α. In contrast, the gene expression level of SHP, which is a negative transcriptional regulator of the Cyp7a1 gene through inhibition of FTF function, was higher in IL-1-KO mice than in sex-matched WT mice. These findings demonstrate that, like TNF-α, IL-1 positively controls the gene expression of Cyp7a1 transcriptional upregulators but, in contrast to the previously reported action of TNF-α, IL-1 also acts to downregulate SHP gene expression.

  16. Changing expression of vertebrate immunity genes in an anthropogenic environment: a controlled experiment.

    PubMed

    Hablützel, Pascal I; Brown, Martha; Friberg, Ida M; Jackson, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    The effect of anthropogenic environments on the function of the vertebrate immune system is a problem of general importance. For example, it relates to the increasing rates of immunologically-based disease in modern human populations and to the desirability of identifying optimal immune function in domesticated animals. Despite this importance, our present understanding is compromised by a deficit of experimental studies that make adequately matched comparisons between wild and captive vertebrates. We transferred post-larval fishes (three-spined sticklebacks), collected in the wild, to an anthropogenic (captive) environment. We then monitored, over 11 months, how the systemic expression of immunity genes changed in comparison to cohort-matched wild individuals in the originator population (total n = 299). We found that a range of innate (lyz, defbl2, il1r-like, tbk1) and adaptive (cd8a, igmh) immunity genes were up-regulated in captivity, accompanied by an increase in expression of the antioxidant enzyme, gpx4a. For some genes previously known to show seasonality in the wild, this appeared to be reduced in captive fishes. Captive fishes tended to express immunity genes, including igzh, foxp3b, lyz, defbl2, and il1r-like, more variably. Furthermore, although gene co-expression patterns (analyzed through gene-by-gene correlations and mutual information theory based networks) shared common structure in wild and captive fishes, there was also significant divergence. For one gene in particular, defbl2, high expression was associated with adverse health outcomes in captive fishes. Taken together, these results demonstrate widespread regulatory changes in the immune system in captive populations, and that the expression of immunity genes is more constrained in the wild. An increase in constitutive systemic immune activity, such as we observed here, may alter the risk of immunopathology and contribute to variance in health in vertebrate populations exposed to

  17. Somatosensory Modulation of Salivary Gene Expression and Oral Feeding in Preterm Infants: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Jill Lamanna; Alterovitz, Gil; Song, Dongli; Wilson, Bernard Joseph; Jegatheesan, Priya; Govindaswami, Balaji; Lee, Jaehoon; Rosner, Austin Oder

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite numerous medical advances in the care of at-risk preterm neonates, oral feeding still represents one of the first and most advanced neurological challenges facing this delicate population. Objective, quantitative, and noninvasive assessment tools, as well as neurotherapeutic strategies, are greatly needed in order to improve feeding and developmental outcomes. Pulsed pneumatic orocutaneous stimulation has been shown to improve nonnutritive sucking (NNS) skills in preterm infants who exhibit delayed or disordered nipple feeding behaviors. Separately, the study of the salivary transcriptome in neonates has helped identify biomarkers directly linked to successful neonatal oral feeding behavior. The combination of noninvasive treatment strategies and transcriptomic analysis represents an integrative approach to oral feeding in which rapid technological advances and personalized transcriptomics can safely and noninvasively be brought to the bedside to inform medical care decisions and improve care and outcomes. Objective The study aimed to conduct a multicenter randomized control trial (RCT) to combine molecular and behavioral methods in an experimental conceptualization approach to map the effects of PULSED somatosensory stimulation on salivary gene expression in the context of the acquisition of oral feeding habits in high-risk human neonates. The aims of this study represent the first attempt to combine noninvasive treatment strategies and transcriptomic assessments of high-risk extremely preterm infants (EPI) to (1) improve oral feeding behavior and skills, (2) further our understanding of the gene ontology of biologically diverse pathways related to oral feeding, (3) use gene expression data to personalize neonatal care and individualize treatment strategies and timing interventions, and (4) improve long-term developmental outcomes. Methods A total of 180 extremely preterm infants from three neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) will be

  18. A synthetic cGMP-sensitive gene switch providing Viagra(®)-controlled gene expression in mammalian cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeuk; Folcher, Marc; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a universal second messenger that is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and hydrolyzed into guanosine monophosphate (GMP) by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Small-molecule drugs that induce high cGMP levels in specialized tissues by boosting GC activity or inhibiting PDE activity have become the predominant treatment strategy for a wide range of medical conditions, including congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis-based claudication and erectile dysfunction. By fusing the cGMP receptor protein (CRP) of Rhodospirillum centenum to the Herpes simplex-derived transactivation domain VP16, we created a novel synthetic mammalian cGMP-sensing transcription factor (GTA) that activates synthetic promoters (PGTA) containing newly identified GTA-specific operator sites in a concentration-dependent manner. In cell lines expressing endogenous natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A) (HeLa), GTA/PGTA-driven transgene expression was induced by B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; Nesiritide(®)) in a concentration-dependent manner, which activated NPR-A׳s intracellular GC domain and triggered a corresponding cGMP surge. Ectopic expression of NPR-A in NPR-A-negative cell lines (HEK-293T) produced high cGMP levels and mediated maximum GTA/PGTA-driven transgene expression, which was suppressed by co-expression of PDEs (PDE-3A, PDE-5A and PDE-9A) and was re-triggered by the corresponding PDE inhibitor drugs (Pletal(®), Perfan(®), Primacor(®) (PDE-3A), Viagra(®), Levitra(®), Cialis(®) (PDE-5A) and BAY73-6691 (PDE-9A)). Mice implanted with microencapsulated designer cells co-expressing the GTA/PGTA device with NPR-A and PDE-5A showed control of blood SEAP levels through administration of sildenafil (Viagra(®)). Designer cells engineered for PDE inhibitor-modulated transgene expression may provide a cell-based PDE-targeting drug discovery platform and enable drug-adjusted gene- and cell

  19. CASCADE, a platform for controlled gene amplification for high, tunable and selection-free gene expression in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Strucko, Tomas; Buron, Line Due; Jarczynska, Zofia Dorota; Nødvig, Christina Spuur; Mølgaard, Louise; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2017-01-01

    Over-expression of a gene by increasing its copy number is often desirable in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may facilitate elucidation of enzyme functions, and in cell factory design it is used to increase production of proteins and metabolites. Current methods are typically exploiting expression from the multicopy 2 μ-derived plasmid or by targeting genes repeatedly into sequences like Ty or rDNA; in both cases, high gene expression levels are often reached. However, with 2 μ-based plasmid expression, the population of cells is very heterogeneous with respect to protein production; and for integration into repeated sequences it is difficult to determine the genetic setup of the resulting strains and to achieve specific gene doses. For both types of systems, the strains often suffer from genetic instability if proper selection pressure is not applied. Here we present a gene amplification system, CASCADE, which enables construction of strains with defined gene copy numbers. One or more genes can be amplified simultaneously and the resulting strains can be stably propagated on selection-free medium. As proof-of-concept, we have successfully used CASCADE to increase heterologous production of two fluorescent proteins, the enzyme β-galactosidase the fungal polyketide 6-methyl salicylic acid and the plant metabolite vanillin glucoside. PMID:28134264

  20. Multiple expression control mechanisms of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and their target genes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nguan Soon; Michalik, Liliane; Desvergne, Beatrice; Wahli, Walter

    2005-02-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) alpha, beta/delta and gamma belong to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. As ligand-activated receptors, they form a functional transcriptional unit upon heterodimerization with retinoid X receptors (RXRs). PPARs are activated by fatty acids and their derivatives, whereas RXR is activated by 9-cis retinoic acid. This heterodimer binds to peroxisome proliferator response elements (PPRE) residing in target genes and stimulates their expression. Recent reports now indicate that PPARs and RXRs can function independently, in the absence of a hetero-partner, to modulate gene expression. Of importance, these non-canonical mechanisms underscore the impact of both cofactors and DNA on gene expression. Furthermore, these different mechanisms reveal the increasing repertoire of PPAR 'target' genes that now encompasses non-PPREs containing genes. It is also becoming apparent that understanding the regulation of PPAR expression and activity, can itself have a significant influence on how the expression of subgroups of target genes is studied and integrated in current knowledge.

  1. Gene expression profiles of alveolar type II cells of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Naoya; Ota, Chiharu; Takahashi, Toru; Suzuki, Takaya; Suzuki, Satoshi; Yamada, Mitsuhiro; Nagatomi, Ryouichi; Kondo, Takashi; Yamaya, Mutsuo; Kubo, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to identify the gene expression pattern specific in alveolar epithelial type II cells (ATII cells) isolated from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Design Case control. Setting Two hospitals in Japan. Participants Three patients without COPD and three patients with COPD in microarray analyses. Five smokers without COPD and nine smokers with COPD in the following analyses. Primary and secondary outcome measured Primary outcome included identification of differentially expressed genes and activated or inhibited pathways in ATII cells of the patients with COPD, compared to those of the patients without COPD, using Affymetrix gene expression arrays. Secondary outcome included validation of the results of microarray analyses by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Results We isolated ATII cells from COPD and non-COPD lungs using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We performed Affymetrix gene expression arrays on both types of ATII cells. Gene set enrichment analyses revealed that two major gene sets were enriched in ATII cells from COPD lungs: interferon-responsive gene sets and gene sets associated with cell cycle progression. Gene ontology term enrichment analyses indicated that among the interferon-stimulated genes, ATII cells in COPD expressed genes such as PSMB8, PSMB9, TAP1 and TAP2 associated with the antigen processing and presentation pathway. We validated the results of the microarray analyses using quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. In addition, FACS analysis indicated that the percentage of ATII cells to CD45-negative lung cells isolated from COPD lungs were significantly increased more than that from non-COPD lungs. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that interferon-stimulated genes involved in the antigen processing and presentation pathway and genes involved in cell cycle progression were enriched in ATII cells of the patients with COPD. These pathways might alter phenotypes of ATII

  2. Contributions of extracellular matrix signaling and tissue architecture to nuclear mechanisms and spatial organization of gene expression control.

    PubMed

    Lelièvre, Sophie A

    2009-09-01

    Post-translational modification of histones, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, and DNA methylation are interconnected nuclear mechanisms that ultimately lead to the changes in chromatin structure necessary to carry out epigenetic gene expression control. Tissue differentiation is characterized by a specific gene expression profile in association with the acquisition of a defined tissue architecture and function. Elements critical for tissue differentiation, like extracellular stimuli, adhesion and cell shape properties, and transcription factors all contribute to the modulation of gene expression and thus, are likely to impinge on the nuclear mechanisms of epigenetic gene expression control. In this review, we analyze how these elements modify chromatin structure in a hierarchical manner by acting on the nuclear machinery. We discuss how mechanotransduction via the structural continuum of the cell and biochemical signaling to the cell nucleus integrate to provide a comprehensive control of gene expression. The role of nuclear organization in this control is highlighted, with a presentation of differentiation-induced nuclear structure and the concept of nuclear organization as a modulator of the response to incoming signals.

  3. Oscillation of p38 activity controls efficient pro-inflammatory gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Tomida, Taichiro; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro; Saito, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    The p38 MAP kinase signalling pathway controls inflammatory responses and is an important target of anti-inflammatory drugs. Although pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) appear to induce only transient activation of p38 (over ∼60 min), longer cytokine exposure is necessary to induce p38-dependent effector genes. Here we study the dynamics of p38 activation in individual cells using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based p38 activity reporter. We find that, after an initial burst of activity, p38 MAPK activity subsequently oscillates for more than 8 h under continuous IL-1β stimulation. However, as this oscillation is asynchronous, the measured p38 activity population average is only slightly higher than basal level. Mathematical modelling, which we have experimentally verified, indicates that the asynchronous oscillation of p38 is generated through a negative feedback loop involving the dual-specificity phosphatase MKP-1/DUSP1. We find that the oscillatory p38 activity is necessary for efficient expression of pro-inflammatory genes such as IL-6, IL-8 and COX-2. PMID:26399197

  4. In vivo regulation of gene expression of enzymes controlling aldosterone synthesis in rat adrenal.

    PubMed

    LeHoux, J G; Tremblay, A

    1992-12-01

    We studied the effect of alterations in the intake of sodium and potassium as well as changes in circulating adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) on the expression of the two rate-limiting systems of aldosterone formation in the rat. Low sodium and high potassium intake promoted time-dependent increases in the zona glomerulosa cytochrome P450scc (P450scc) and cytochrome P450c11 (P450c11) protein and mRNA levels, but no changes were found in the zona fasciculata-reticularis. In addition, these responses were associated with markedly elevated transcriptional activities. To further define the contribution of P450c11 and P450c18 (aldosterone synthase) in response to these differing intakes, we evaluated their mRNA levels using gene-specific oligonucleotide probes. P450c18 mRNA was restricted to the zona glomerulosa, whereas P450c11 mRNA was detected in both zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata-reticularis. Furthermore, only P450c18 mRNA was induced by both low sodium or high potassium intake, as P450c11 mRNA levels remained unchanged. Captopril, an inhibitor of angiotensin-I converting enzyme, abolished the enhancing effects of the low sodium regimen on P450scc and P450c18 mRNA levels. Captopril also suppressed the augmentation of P450c18 mRNA observed with potassium supplementation but had no effect on P450scc mRNA levels. When the hypocholesterolemic drug 4-aminopyrazolopyrimidine (4-APP) was administered to rats for 3 consecurive days, both the level of plasma ACTH and the adrenal content of mRNA encoding P450scc increased 24 h post final injection. The coadministration of dexamethasone with 4-APP prevented these increases. In contrast, the mRNA content of P450c11 remained at control levels. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that variations in the intake of sodium and potassium act on the expression of the CYP11B2 gene, but not on that of the CYP11B1 gene. Moreover angiotensin-II (A-II) is an important factor in this mechanism of action. Both ions also enhance the

  5. Control of stochastic gene expression by host factors at the HIV promoter.

    PubMed

    Burnett, John C; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn; Shah, Priya S; Arkin, Adam P; Schaffer, David V

    2009-01-01

    The HIV promoter within the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) orchestrates many aspects of the viral life cycle, from the dynamics of viral gene expression and replication to the establishment of a latent state. In particular, after viral integration into the host genome, stochastic fluctuations in viral gene expression amplified by the Tat positive feedback loop can contribute to the formation of either a productive, transactivated state or an inactive state. In a significant fraction of cells harboring an integrated copy of the HIV-1 model provirus (LTR-GFP-IRES-Tat), this bimodal gene expression profile is dynamic, as cells spontaneously and continuously flip between active (Bright) and inactive (Off) expression modes. Furthermore, these switching dynamics may contribute to the establishment and maintenance of proviral latency, because after viral integration long delays in gene expression can occur before viral transactivation. The HIV-1 promoter contains cis-acting Sp1 and NF-kappaB elements that regulate gene expression via the recruitment of both activating and repressing complexes. We hypothesized that interplay in the recruitment of such positive and negative factors could modulate the stability of the Bright and Off modes and thereby alter the sensitivity of viral gene expression to stochastic fluctuations in the Tat feedback loop. Using model lentivirus variants with mutations introduced in the Sp1 and NF-kappaB elements, we employed flow cytometry, mRNA quantification, pharmacological perturbations, and chromatin immunoprecipitation to reveal significant functional differences in contributions of each site to viral gene regulation. Specifically, the Sp1 sites apparently stabilize both the Bright and the Off states, such that their mutation promotes noisy gene expression and reduction in the regulation of histone acetylation and deacetylation. Furthermore, the NF-kappaB sites exhibit distinct properties, with kappaB site I serving a stronger activating

  6. Evaluation of internal control for gene expression in Phalaenopsis by quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiu-Yun; Jiang, Su-Hua; Wang, Mo-Fei; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Xian-Yun; Cui, Bo

    2014-07-01

    The selection of appropriate reference genes is one of the most important steps to obtain reliable results for normalizing quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) of MADS-box gene in Phalaenopsis. In this study, we cloned 12 candidate reference genes including 18S ribosomal RNA (18S), elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1α), cytoskeletal structural protein actin (ACT1, ACT2, ACT3, ACT4, ACT5), ubiquitin protein (UBQ1 and UBQ2), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and the cytoskeletal structural proteins α-tubulin (TUA) and β-tubulin (TUB) in Phalaenopsis and evaluated their expression reliability. The expression of these candidate reference genes was analyzed using geNorm and normFinder software packages; the results showed that ACT2 and ACT4 were the highest stability reference genes for all experiment sets based on normFinder, followed by ACT1 or ACT3, while ACT3 and ACT4 were the highest stability reference genes for most experiment sets based on geNorm, then TUB or others. Taken together, Actin genes were the higher stability reference genes for all tissues at total developmental stages, and similar results came from analysis by normFinder. According to geNorm analysis, ACT3 and ACT4 were the most stable reference genes for all tissues tested and tissues at reproductive stages; TUB and ACT5 or ACT4 were the most stable reference genes for vegetative tissues or roots. The most stable reference genes for all vegetative tissues and only leaves were ACT4 and ACT5, ACT2 and ACT3, respectively; ACT1 and ACT3 were the most stable genes and sufficient for reliable normalization of flower tissues. While EF1α, UBQ1, UBQ2, and GAPDH were found to be unsuitable as a reference gene in our analysis for flower tissues, total tissues, and reproductive stages; UBQ2 and 18S were identified as the least stable reference genes for vegetative tissues at different stages, different tissues at vegetative stages; TUA and 18S were the

  7. Nipbl and mediator cooperatively regulate gene expression to control limb development.

    PubMed

    Muto, Akihiko; Ikeda, Shingo; Lopez-Burks, Martha E; Kikuchi, Yutaka; Calof, Anne L; Lander, Arthur D; Schilling, Thomas F

    2014-09-01

    Haploinsufficiency for Nipbl, a cohesin loading protein, causes Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS), the most common "cohesinopathy". It has been proposed that the effects of Nipbl-haploinsufficiency result from disruption of long-range communication between DNA elements. Here we use zebrafish and mouse models of CdLS to examine how transcriptional changes caused by Nipbl deficiency give rise to limb defects, a common condition in individuals with CdLS. In the zebrafish pectoral fin (forelimb), knockdown of Nipbl expression led to size reductions and patterning defects that were preceded by dysregulated expression of key early limb development genes, including fgfs, shha, hand2 and multiple hox genes. In limb buds of Nipbl-haploinsufficient mice, transcriptome analysis revealed many similar gene expression changes, as well as altered expression of additional classes of genes that play roles in limb development. In both species, the pattern of dysregulation of hox-gene expression depended on genomic location within the Hox clusters. In view of studies suggesting that Nipbl colocalizes with the mediator complex, which facilitates enhancer-promoter communication, we also examined zebrafish deficient for the Med12 Mediator subunit, and found they resembled Nipbl-deficient fish in both morphology and gene expression. Moreover, combined partial reduction of both Nipbl and Med12 had a strongly synergistic effect, consistent with both molecules acting in a common pathway. In addition, three-dimensional fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that Nipbl and Med12 are required to bring regions containing long-range enhancers into close proximity with the zebrafish hoxda cluster. These data demonstrate a crucial role for Nipbl in limb development, and support the view that its actions on multiple gene pathways result from its influence, together with Mediator, on regulation of long-range chromosomal interactions.

  8. Nutrient control of gene expression in Drosophila: microarray analysis of starvation and sugar-dependent response

    PubMed Central

    Zinke, Ingo; Schütz, Christina S.; Katzenberger, Jörg D.; Bauer, Matthias; Pankratz, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    We have identified genes regulated by starvation and sugar signals in Drosophila larvae using whole-genome microarrays. Based on expression profiles in the two nutrient conditions, they were organized into different categories that reflect distinct physiological pathways mediating sugar and fat metabolism, and cell growth. In the category of genes regulated in sugar-fed, but not in starved, animals, there is an upregulation of genes encoding key enzymes of the fat biosynthesis pathway and a downregulation of genes encoding lipases. The highest and earliest activated gene upon sugar ingestion is sugarbabe, a zinc finger protein that is induced in the gut and the fat body. Identification of potential targets using microarrays suggests that sugarbabe functions to repress genes involved in dietary fat breakdown and absorption. The current analysis provides a basis for studying the genetic mechanisms underlying nutrient signalling. PMID:12426388

  9. Promoter decoding of transcription factor dynamics involves a trade-off between noise and control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders S; O'Shea, Erin K

    2013-11-05

    Numerous transcription factors (TFs) encode information about upstream signals in the dynamics of their activation, but how downstream genes decode these dynamics remains poorly understood. Using microfluidics to control the nucleocytoplasmic translocation dynamics of the budding yeast TF Msn2, we elucidate the principles that govern how different promoters convert dynamical Msn2 input into gene expression output in single cells. Combining modeling and experiments, we classify promoters according to their signal-processing behavior and reveal that multiple, distinct gene expression programs can be encoded in the dynamics of Msn2. We show that both oscillatory TF dynamics and slow promoter kinetics lead to higher noise in gene expression. Furthermore, we show that the promoter activation timescale is related to nucleosome remodeling. Our findings imply a fundamental trade-off: although the cell can exploit different promoter classes to differentially control gene expression using TF dynamics, gene expression noise fundamentally limits how much information can be encoded in the dynamics of a single TF and reliably decoded by promoters.

  10. In-Vivo Real-Time Control of Protein Expression from Endogenous and Synthetic Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Orabona, Emanuele; De Stefano, Luca; Ferry, Mike; Hasty, Jeff; di Bernardo, Mario; di Bernardo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    We describe an innovative experimental and computational approach to control the expression of a protein in a population of yeast cells. We designed a simple control algorithm to automatically regulate the administration of inducer molecules to the cells by comparing the actual protein expression level in the cell population with the desired expression level. We then built an automated platform based on a microfluidic device, a time-lapse microscopy apparatus, and a set of motorized syringes, all controlled by a computer. We tested the platform to force yeast cells to express a desired fixed, or time-varying, amount of a reporter protein over thousands of minutes. The computer automatically switched the type of sugar administered to the cells, its concentration and its duration, according to the control algorithm. Our approach can be used to control expression of any protein, fused to a fluorescent reporter, provided that an external molecule known to (indirectly) affect its promoter activity is available. PMID:24831205

  11. Design of simple synthetic RNA thermometers for temperature-controlled gene expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Neupert, Juliane; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    RNA thermometers are thermosensors that regulate gene expression by temperature-induced changes in RNA conformation. Naturally occurring RNA thermometers exhibit complex secondary structures which are believed to undergo a series of gradual structural changes in response to temperature shifts. Here, we report the de novo design of considerably simpler RNA thermometers that provide useful RNA-only tools to regulate bacterial gene expression by a shift in the growth temperature. We show that a single small stem-loop structure containing the ribosome binding site is sufficient to construct synthetic RNA thermometers that work efficiently at physiological temperatures. Our data suggest that the thermometers function by a simple melting mechanism and thus provide minimum size on/off switches to experimentally induce or repress gene expression by temperature. PMID:18753148

  12. Optimal control of gene expression for fast proteome adaptation to environmental change.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2013-12-17

    Bacterial populations growing in a changing world must adjust their proteome composition in response to alterations in the environment. Rapid proteome responses to growth medium changes are expected to increase the average growth rate and fitness value of these populations. Little is known about the dynamics of proteome change, e.g., whether bacteria use optimal strategies of gene expression for rapid proteome adjustments and if there are lower bounds to the time of proteome adaptation in response to growth medium changes. To begin answering these types of questions, we modeled growing bacteria as stoichiometrically coupled networks of metabolic pathways. These are balanced during steady-state growth in a constant environment but are initially unbalanced after rapid medium shifts due to a shortage of enzymes required at higher concentrations in the new environment. We identified an optimal strategy for rapid proteome adjustment in the absence of protein degradation and found a lower bound to the time of proteome adaptation after medium shifts. This minimal time is determined by the ratio between the Kullback-Leibler distance from the pre- to the postshift proteome and the postshift steady-state growth rate. The dynamics of optimally controlled proteome adaptation has a simple analytical solution. We used detailed numerical modeling to demonstrate that realistic bacterial control systems can emulate this optimal strategy for rapid proteome adaptation. Our results may provide a conceptual link between the physiology and population genetics of growing bacteria.

  13. Optimal control of gene expression for fast proteome adaptation to environmental change

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Michael Y.; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial populations growing in a changing world must adjust their proteome composition in response to alterations in the environment. Rapid proteome responses to growth medium changes are expected to increase the average growth rate and fitness value of these populations. Little is known about the dynamics of proteome change, e.g., whether bacteria use optimal strategies of gene expression for rapid proteome adjustments and if there are lower bounds to the time of proteome adaptation in response to growth medium changes. To begin answering these types of questions, we modeled growing bacteria as stoichiometrically coupled networks of metabolic pathways. These are balanced during steady-state growth in a constant environment but are initially unbalanced after rapid medium shifts due to a shortage of enzymes required at higher concentrations in the new environment. We identified an optimal strategy for rapid proteome adjustment in the absence of protein degradation and found a lower bound to the time of proteome adaptation after medium shifts. This minimal time is determined by the ratio between the Kullback–Leibler distance from the pre- to the postshift proteome and the postshift steady-state growth rate. The dynamics of optimally controlled proteome adaptation has a simple analytical solution. We used detailed numerical modeling to demonstrate that realistic bacterial control systems can emulate this optimal strategy for rapid proteome adaptation. Our results may provide a conceptual link between the physiology and population genetics of growing bacteria. PMID:24297927

  14. The regulatory region controlling the nitrate-responsive expression of a nitrate reductase gene, NIA1, in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Mineko; Yanagisawa, Shuichi

    2011-05-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) is the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of nitrate assimilation. It is well known that the expression of NR genes is rapidly induced in various plants by nitrate. Previously, the activity of a tobacco NR gene promoter was reported to be high in tobacco plants grown on medium containing ammonium as the sole nitrogen source, but low in tobacco plants grown on nitrate-containing medium. This cast some doubt on the role of the NR gene promoter in the nitrate-inducible expression of this gene. Furthermore, in previous studies, transformation with genomic fragments containing NR loci restored the reduced NR activity in NR mutants to a limited extent, suggesting a complex regulation of NR gene expression. Here, we show that although the 1.9 kb promoter of an NR gene in Arabidopsis, NIA1, is not activated by nitrate, the expression of a GUS (β-glucuronidase) reporter gene inserted between the 5'- and 3'-flanking sequences of the NIA1 coding region is strongly induced by nitrate. When the 3'-flanking sequence was fused downstream of the GUS gene under the control of the 35S minimal promoter, its expression was also strongly induced by nitrate. Furthermore, dissection analysis of the 3'-flanking region revealed that the sequence downstream of the transcriptional terminator rather than the 3'-untranslated region plays a role in nitrate-inducible expression, indicating a requirement for the 3'-flanking sequence for the nitrate-inducible transcription of NIA1. We also show that the 2.7 kb promoter sequence of NIA2, another NR gene of Arabidopsis, cannot direct nitrate-inducible expression.

  15. Controlling the expression of rhizobial genes during nodule development with elements and an inducer of the lac operon.

    PubMed

    Box, Jodie; Noel, K Dale

    2011-04-01

    A simple strategy was tested for imposing artificial regulation of rhizobial genes during nodule development. Isopropyl-β-d-1-thiogalactoside (IPTG) was added to liquid root media to sustain expression of rhizobial genes controlled by Escherichia coli lac promoter/operators and repressor gene lacI. Conversely, a rinsing protocol was devised to remove IPTG sufficiently that genes could be repressed after having been induced. gusA under this control exhibited clearly delineated expression and repression in both the determinate Rhizobium etli-Phaseolus vulgaris and the indeterminate Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago sativa symbioses. Apparently, IPTG was taken up in sufficiently undegraded concentrations that gene expression was derepressed even in interior portions of the nodule. Moreover, the rinsing protocol led to obvious repression of gusA. Importantly, no deleterious effects of IPTG on nodule development, infection, or nitrogen fixation were observed. An R. etli CE3 gene required for lipopolysaccharide O antigen and infection on bean was put under this control by means of a two-plasmid construct. When this construct was added to a strain with a null mutation in this gene, infection, nodule development, and nitrogenase activity all depended on the length of time before IPTG was rinsed from the roots after inoculation.

  16. Graded or threshold response of the tet-controlled gene expression: all depends on the concentration of the transactivator

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Currently, the step-wise integration of tet-dependent transactivator and tet-responsive expression unit is considered to be the most promising tool to achieve stable tet-controlled gene expression in cell populations. However, disadvantages of this strategy for integration into primary cells led us to develop an “All-In-One” vector system, enabling simultaneous integration of both components. The effect on tet-controlled gene expression was analyzed for retroviral “All-In-One” vectors expressing the M2-transactivator either under control of a constitutive or a new type of autoregulated promoter. Results Determination of luciferase activity in transduced cell populations indicated improvement of the dynamic range of gene expression for the autoregulated system. Further differences were observed regarding induction kinetics and dose–response. Most notably, introduction of the autoregulated system resulted in a threshold mode of induction, whereas the constitutive system exhibited pronounced effector-dose dependence. Conclusion Tet-regulated gene expression in the applied autoregulated system resembles a threshold mode, whereby full induction of the tet-unit can be achieved at otherwise limiting doxycycline concentrations. PMID:23336718

  17. Transcriptional programs that control expression of the autoimmune regulator gene Aire.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Yonatan; Nevo, Shir; Bornstein, Chamutal; Brezis, Miriam R; Ben-Hur, Sharon; Shkedy, Aya; Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Levi, Ben; Delacher, Michael; Goldfarb, Yael; David, Eyal; Weinberger, Leehee; Viukov, Sergey; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Giraud, Matthieu; Hanna, Jacob H; Breiling, Achim; Lyko, Frank; Amit, Ido; Feuerer, Markus; Abramson, Jakub

    2017-02-01

    Aire is a transcriptional regulator that induces promiscuous expression of thousands of genes encoding tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). While the target genes of Aire are well characterized, the transcriptional programs that regulate its own expression have remained elusive. Here we comprehensively analyzed both cis-acting and trans-acting regulatory mechanisms and found that the Aire locus was insulated by the global chromatin organizer CTCF and was hypermethylated in cells and tissues that did not express Aire. In mTECs, however, Aire expression was facilitated by concurrent eviction of CTCF, specific demethylation of exon 2 and the proximal promoter, and the coordinated action of several transcription activators, including Irf4, Irf8, Tbx21, Tcf7 and Ctcfl, which acted on mTEC-specific accessible regions in the Aire locus.

  18. Gene Expression Profile of Adult Human Olfactory Bulb and Embryonic Neural Stem Cell Suggests Distinct Signaling Pathways and Epigenetic Control

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hany E. S.; Ahmed, Abd-Elmaksoud; Michetti, Fabrizio; Pescatori, Mario; Pallini, Roberto; Casalbore, Patricia; Cenciarelli, Carlo; Elhadidy, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Global gene expression profiling was performed using RNA from human embryonic neural stem cells (hENSC), and adult human olfactory bulb-derived neural stem cells (OBNSCs), to define a gene expression pattern and signaling pathways that are specific for each cell lineage. We have demonstrated large differences in the gene expression profile of human embryonic NSC, and adult human OBNSCs, but less variability between parallel cultures. Transcripts of genes involved in neural tube development and patterning (ALDH1A2, FOXA2), progenitor marker genes (LMX1a, ALDH1A1, SOX10), proliferation of neural progenitors (WNT1 and WNT3a), neuroplastin (NPTN), POU3F1 (OCT6), neuroligin (NLGN4X), MEIS2, and NPAS1 were up-regulated in both cell populations. By Gene Ontology, 325 out of 3875 investigated gene sets were scientifically different. 41 out of the 307 investigated Cellular Component (CC) categories, 45 out of the 620 investigated Molecular Function (MF) categories, and 239 out of the 2948 investigated Biological Process (BP) categories were significant. KEGG Pathway Class Comparison had revealed that 75 out of 171 investigated gene sets passed the 0.005 significance threshold. Levels of gene expression were explored in three signaling pathways, Notch, Wnt, and mTOR that are known to be involved in NS cell fates determination. The transcriptional signature also deciphers the role of genes involved in epigenetic modifications. SWI/SNF DNA chromatin remodeling complex family, including SMARCC1 and SMARCE1, were found specifically up-regulated in our OBNSC but not in hENSC. Differences in gene expression profile of transcripts controlling epigenetic modifications, and signaling pathways might indicate differences in the therapeutic potential of our examined two cell populations in relation to in cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation following engraftments in different CNS insults. PMID:22485144

  19. MicroRNAs tend to synergistically control expression of genes encoding extensively-expressed proteins in humans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Zhao, Wei; Yuan, Ye; Bai, Yan; Sun, Yong; Zhu, Wenliang

    2017-01-01

    Considering complicated microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and action mechanisms, it was thought so high energy-consuming for a cell to afford simultaneous over-expression of many miRNAs. Thus it prompts that an alternative miRNA regulation pattern on protein-encoding genes must exist, which has characteristics of energy-saving and precise protein output. In this study, expression tendency of proteins encoded by miRNAs’ target genes was evaluated in human organ scale, followed by quantitative assessment of miRNA synergism. Expression tendency analysis suggests that universally expressed proteins (UEPs) tend to physically interact in clusters and participate in fundamental biological activities whereas disorderly expressed proteins (DEPs) are inclined to relatively independently execute organ-specific functions. Consistent with this, miRNAs that mainly target UEP-encoding mRNAs, such as miR-21, tend to collaboratively or even synergistically act with other miRNAs in fine-tuning protein output. Synergistic gene regulation may maximize miRNAs’ efficiency with less dependence on miRNAs’ abundance and overcome the deficiency that targeting plenty of genes by single miRNA makes miRNA-mediated regulation high-throughput but insufficient due to target gene dilution effect. Furthermore, our in vitro experiment verified that merely 25 nM transfection of miR-21 be sufficient to influence the overall state of various human cells. Thus miR-21 was identified as a hub in synergistic miRNA–miRNA interaction network. Our findings suggest that synergistic miRNA–miRNA interaction is an important endogenous miRNA regulation mode, which ensures adequate potency of miRNAs at low abundance, especially those implicated in fundamental biological regulation. PMID:28828274

  20. Serum influences the expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing genes and QS-controlled virulence genes during early and late stages of growth

    PubMed Central

    Kruczek, Cassandra; Qaisar, Uzma; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2014-01-01

    In response to diverse environmental stimuli at different infection sites, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a serious nosocomial pathogen, coordinates the production of different virulence factors through a complicated network of the hierarchical quorum-sensing (QS) systems including the las, rhl, and the 2-alkyl-4-quinolone-related QS systems. We recently showed that at early stages of growth serum alters the expression of numerous P. aeruginosa genes. In this study, we utilized transcriptional analysis and enzyme assays to examine the effect of serum on the QS and QS-controlled virulence factors during early and late phases of growth of the P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. At early phase, serum repressed the transcription of lasI, rhlI, and pqsA but not lasR or rhlR. However, at late phase, serum enhanced the expression of all QS genes. Serum produced a similar effect on the synthesis of the autoinducers 3OC12-HSL, C4-HSL, and HHQ/PQS. Additionally, serum repressed the expression of several QS-controlled genes in the early phase, but enhanced them in the late phase. Furthermore, serum influenced the expression of different QS-positive (vqsR, gacA, and vfr) as well as QS-negative (rpoN, qscR, mvaT, and rsmA) regulatory genes at either early or late phases of growth. However, with the exception of PAOΔvfr, we detected comparable levels of lasI/lasR expression in PAO1 and PAO1 mutants defective in these regulatory genes. At late stationary phase, serum failed to enhance lasI/lasR expression in PAOΔvfr. These results suggest that depending on the phase of growth, serum differentially influenced the expression of P. aeruginosa QS and QS-controlled virulence genes. In late phase, serum enhanced the expression of las genes through vfr. PMID:24436158

  1. A comparative study of RNA and DNA as internal gene expression controls early in the developmental cycle of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Engström, Patrik; Bailey, Leslie; Onskog, Thomas; Bergström, Sven; Johansson, Jörgen

    2010-03-01

    Many microbial pathogens invade and proliferate within host cells and the molecular mechanism underlying this behavior is currently being revealed for several bacterial species. Testing clinically relevant antibacterial compounds and elucidating their effects on gene expression requires adequate controls, especially when studying genetically intractable organisms such as Chlamydia spp., for which various gene fusions cannot be constructed. Until now, relative mRNA levels in Chlamydia have been measured using different internal gene expression controls, including 16S rRNA, mRNAs, and DNA. Here, we compared the advantages and disadvantages of various internal expression controls during the early phase of Chlamydia pneumoniae development. The relative abundance of target mRNAs varied using the different internal control RNAs. This was partly due to variation in the transcript stability of the RNA species. Also, seven out of nine of the analyzed RNAs increased fivefold or more between 2 and 14 h postinfection, while the amount of DNA and number of cells remained essentially unaltered. Our results suggest that RNA should not be used as a gene expression control during the early phase of Chlamydia development, and that intrinsic bacterial DNA is preferable for that purpose because it is stable, abundant, and its relative amount is generally correlated with bacterial numbers.

  2. Long-Range Control of Renin Gene Expression in Tsukuba Hypertensive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ushiki, Aki; Matsuzaki, Hitomi; Ishida, Junji; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Tanimoto, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Renin, a rate-limiting enzyme in the renin–angiotensin system, is regulated to maintain blood pressure homeostasis: renin gene expression in the kidney is suppressed in a hypertensive environment. We found that expression of a 15-kb human RENIN (hREN) transgene was aberrantly upregulated (>4.2-fold), while the endogenous mouse renin (mRen) gene was suppressed (>1.7-fold) in Tsukuba hypertensive mice (THM), a model for genetically induced hypertension. We then generated transgenic mice using a 13-kb mRen gene fragment that was homologous to the 15-kb hREN transgene and found that its expression was also upregulated (>3.1-fold) in THM, suggesting that putative silencing elements of the renin genes were distally located in the loci. We next examined the possible role of a previously identified mouse distal enhancer (mdE) located outside of the 13-kb mRen gene fragment. Deletion of the mdE in the context of a 156-kb mRen transgene did not affect its transcriptional repression in THM, implying that although the silencing element of the mRen gene is located within the 156-kb fragment tested, it is distinct from the mdE. Consistent with these results, deletion of the 63-kb region upstream of the mdE from the endogenous mRen gene locus abrogated its transcriptional repression in THM. We finally tested whether dysregulation of the short renin transgenes also occurred in the fetal or neonatal kidneys of THM and found that their expression was not aberrantly upregulated, demonstrating that aberrant regulation of short renin transgenes commences sometime between neonate and adult periods. PMID:27861631

  3. NLRC5 controls basal MHC class I gene expression in an MHC enhanceosome-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Neerincx, Andreas; Rodriguez, Galaxia M; Steimle, Viktor; Kufer, Thomas A

    2012-05-15

    Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins play important roles in innate immune responses as pattern-recognition receptors. Although most NLR proteins act in cell autonomous immune pathways, some do not function as classical pattern-recognition receptors. One such NLR protein is the MHC class II transactivator, the master regulator of MHC class II gene transcription. In this article, we report that human NLRC5, which we recently showed to be involved in viral-mediated type I IFN responses, shuttles to the nucleus and activates MHC class I gene expression. Knockdown of NLRC5 in different human cell lines and primary dermal fibroblasts leads to reduced MHC class I expression, whereas introduction of NLRC5 into cell types with very low expression of MHC class I augments MHC class I expression to levels comparable to those found in lymphocytes. Expression of NLRC5 positively correlates with MHC class I expression in human tissues. Functionally, we show that both the N-terminal effector domain of NLRC5 and its C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain are needed for activation of MHC class I expression. Moreover, nuclear shuttling and function depend on a functional Walker A motif. Finally, we identified a promoter sequence in the MHC class I promoter, the X1 box, to be involved in NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene activation. Taken together, this suggested that NLRC5 acts in a manner similar to class II transactivator to drive MHC expression and revealed NLRC5 as an important regulator of basal MHC class I expression.

  4. Type of gonadotropin used during controlled ovarian stimulation induces differential gene expression in human cumulus cells: A randomized study.

    PubMed

    Cruz, María; Requena, Antonio; Agudo, David; García-Velasco, Juan Antonio

    2017-08-01

    The cumulus-oocyte complex plays a central role in the regulation of folliculogenesis where it is important for the maturation, reprogramming, and fertilization of oocytes. Consequently, cumulus cell gene expression profiling is being explored as a promising method for assessing oocyte competence in the near future. Through DNA microarray technology, we analyzed the potential differences in the gene expression profiles of cumulus cells from preovulatory follicles after controlled ovarian stimulation using different types of gonadotropins. A prospective, randomized study was performed among 90 women participating in an oocyte donation program. Subjects were assigned to receive recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), urinary FSH, or human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG). The gene expression profile in cumulus cells was analyzed according the type of gonadotropin received during ovarian stimulation. Furthermore, we also performed a gene ontology analysis to provide structural knowledge. Hierarchical clustering, principal component analysis, and gene enrichment analysis revealed greater differences between the urinary FSH and hMG groups compared to the rest of the pair-wise comparisons; recombinant FSH vs hMG and urinary FSH vs recombinant FSH. Data suggest that controlled ovarian stimulation induces specific gene expression profiles in human cumulus cells depending on the type of gonadotropin used. Registered at clinicaltrials.gov; identifier NCT022437032. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Combinatorial control of suicide gene expression by tissue-specific promoter and microRNA regulation for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxiao; Lin, Jiakai; Hong, Michelle; Choudhury, Yukti; Balani, Poonam; Leung, Doreen; Dang, Lam H; Zhao, Ying; Zeng, Jieming; Wang, Shu

    2009-12-01

    Transcriptional targeting using a tissue-specific cellular promoter is proving to be a powerful means for restricting transgene expression in targeted tissues. In the context of cancer suicide gene therapy, this approach may lead to cytotoxic effects in both cancer and nontarget normal cells. Considering microRNA (miRNA) function in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, we have developed a viral vector platform combining cellular promoter-based transcriptional targeting with miRNA regulation for a glioma suicide gene therapy in the mouse brain. The therapy employed, in a single baculoviral vector, a glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene promoter and the repeated target sequences of three miRNAs that are enriched in astrocytes but downregulated in glioblastoma cells to control the expression of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene. This resulted in significantly improved in vivo selectivity over the use of a control vector without miRNA regulation, enabling effective elimination of human glioma xenografts while producing negligible toxic effects on normal astrocytes. Thus, incorporating miRNA regulation into a transcriptional targeting vector adds an extra layer of security to prevent off-target transgene expression and should be useful for the development of gene delivery vectors with high targeting specificity for cancer therapy.

  6. Construction of new synthetic biology tools for the control of gene expression in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Zess, Erin K; Begemann, Matthew B; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-02-01

    Predictive control of gene expression is an essential tool for developing synthetic biological systems. The current toolbox for controlling gene expression in cyanobacteria is a barrier to more in-depth genetic analysis and manipulation. Towards relieving this bottleneck, this work describes the use of synthetic biology to construct an anhydrotetracycline-based induction system and adapt a trans-acting small RNA (sRNA) system for use in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. An anhydrotetracycline-inducible promoter was developed to maximize intrinsic strength and dynamic range. The resulting construct, PEZtet , exhibited tight repression and a maximum 32-fold induction upon addition of anhydrotetracycline. Additionally, a sRNA system based on the Escherichia coli IS10 RNA-IN/OUT regulator was adapted for use in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. This system exhibited 70% attenuation of target gene expression, providing a demonstration of the use of sRNAs for differential gene expression in cyanobacteria. These systems were combined to produce an inducible sRNA system, which demonstrated 59% attenuation of target gene expression. Lastly, the role of Hfq, a critical component of sRNA systems in E. coli, was investigated. Genetic studies showed that the Hfq homolog in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 did not impact repression by the engineered sRNA system. In summary, this work describes new synthetic biology tools that can be applied to physiological studies, metabolic engineering, or sRNA platforms in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

  7. The Chromatin Protein DUET/MMD1 Controls Expression of the Meiotic Gene TDM1 during Male Meiosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Andreuzza, Sébastien; Nishal, Bindu; Singh, Aparna; Siddiqi, Imran

    2015-09-01

    Meiosis produces haploid cells essential for sexual reproduction. In yeast, entry into meiosis activates transcription factors which trigger a transcriptional cascade that results in sequential co-expression of early, middle and late meiotic genes. However, these factors are not conserved, and the factors and regulatory mechanisms that ensure proper meiotic gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes are poorly understood. Here, we report that DUET/MMD1, a PHD finger protein essential for Arabidopsis male meiosis, functions as a transcriptional regulator in plant meiosis. We find that DUET-PHD binds H3K4me2 in vitro, and show that this interaction is critical for function during meiosis. We also show that DUET is required for proper microtubule organization during meiosis II, independently of its function in meiosis I. Remarkably, DUET protein shows stage-specific expression, confined to diplotene. We identify two genes TDM1 and JAS with critical functions in cell cycle transitions and spindle organization in male meiosis, as DUET targets, with TDM1 being a direct target. Thus, DUET is required to regulate microtubule organization and cell cycle transitions during male meiosis, and functions as a direct transcription activator of the meiotic gene TDM1. Expression profiling showed reduced expression of a subset comprising about 12% of a known set of meiosis preferred genes in the duet mutant. Our results reveal the action of DUET as a transcriptional regulator during male meiosis in plants, and suggest that transcription of meiotic genes is under stagewise control in plants as in yeast.

  8. Sources of variation in baseline gene expression levels from toxicogenomics study control animals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of gene expression profiling in both clinical and laboratory settings would be enhanced by better characterization ofvariance due to individual, environmental, and technical factors. Meta-analysis ofmicroarray data from untreated or vehicle-treated animals within the con...

  9. Control of transcription elongation by GreA determines rate of gene expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yuzenkova, Yulia; Gamba, Pamela; Herber, Martijn; Attaiech, Laetitia; Shafeeq, Sulman; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Klumpp, Stefan; Zenkin, Nikolay; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase may be interrupted by pauses caused by backtracking or misincorporation that can be resolved by the conserved bacterial Gre-factors. However, the consequences of such pausing in the living cell remain obscure. Here, we developed molecular biology and transcriptome sequencing tools in the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae and provide evidence that transcription elongation is rate-limiting on highly expressed genes. Our results suggest that transcription elongation may be a highly regulated step of gene expression in S. pneumoniae. Regulation is accomplished via long-living elongation pauses and their resolution by elongation factor GreA. Interestingly, mathematical modeling indicates that long-living pauses cause queuing of RNA polymerases, which results in ‘transcription traffic jams’ on the gene and thus blocks its expression. Together, our results suggest that long-living pauses and RNA polymerase queues caused by them are a major problem on highly expressed genes and are detrimental for cell viability. The major and possibly sole function of GreA in S. pneumoniae is to prevent formation of backtracked elongation complexes. PMID:25190458

  10. Sources of variation in baseline gene expression levels from toxicogenomics study control animals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of gene expression profiling in both clinical and laboratory settings would be enhanced by better characterization ofvariance due to individual, environmental, and technical factors. Meta-analysis ofmicroarray data from untreated or vehicle-treated animals within the con...

  11. A controllable gene expression system in liposomes that includes a positive feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Shungo; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Kazuta, Yasuaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-06-01

    We introduced a positive feedback loop into a LacI-dependent gene expression system in lipid vesicles, producing a cell-like system that senses and responds to an external signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. This fully reconstituted system will be a useful tool in future applications in in vitro synthetic biology.

  12. Identification of internal control genes for quantitative expression analysis by real-time PCR in bovine peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Spalenza, Veronica; Girolami, Flavia; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Riondato, Fulvio; Rasero, Roberto; Nebbia, Carlo; Sacchi, Paola; Martin, Patrice

    2011-09-01

    Gene expression studies in blood cells, particularly lymphocytes, are useful for monitoring potential exposure to toxicants or environmental pollutants in humans and livestock species. Quantitative PCR is the method of choice for obtaining accurate quantification of mRNA transcripts although variations in the amount of starting material, enzymatic efficiency, and the presence of inhibitors can lead to evaluation errors. As a result, normalization of data is of crucial importance. The most common approach is the use of endogenous reference genes as an internal control, whose expression should ideally not vary among individuals and under different experimental conditions. The accurate selection of reference genes is therefore an important step in interpreting quantitative PCR studies. Since no systematic investigation in bovine lymphocytes has been performed, the aim of the present study was to assess the expression stability of seven candidate reference genes in circulating lymphocytes collected from 15 dairy cows. Following the characterization by flow cytometric analysis of the cell populations obtained from blood through a density gradient procedure, three popular softwares were used to evaluate the gene expression data. The results showed that two genes are sufficient for normalization of quantitative PCR studies in cattle lymphocytes and that YWAHZ, S24 and PPIA are the most stable genes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimization of a yeast RNA interference system for controlling gene expression and enabling rapid metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Crook, Nathan C; Schmitz, Alexander C; Alper, Hal S

    2014-05-16

    Reduction of endogenous gene expression is a fundamental operation of metabolic engineering, yet current methods for gene knockdown (i.e., genome editing) remain laborious and slow, especially in yeast. In contrast, RNA interference allows facile and tunable gene knockdown via a simple plasmid transformation step, enabling metabolic engineers to rapidly prototype knockdown strategies in multiple strains before expending significant cost to undertake genome editing. Although RNAi is naturally present in a myriad of eukaryotes, it has only been recently implemented in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a heterologous pathway and so has not yet been optimized as a metabolic engineering tool. In this study, we elucidate a set of design principles for the construction of hairpin RNA expression cassettes in yeast and implement RNA interference to quickly identify routes for improvement of itaconic acid production in this organism. The approach developed here enables rapid prototyping of knockdown strategies and thus accelerates and reduces the cost of the design-build-test cycle in yeast.

  14. Dynamic signal processing by ribozyme-mediated RNA circuits to control gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shensi; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Majer, Eszter; Landrain, Thomas E.; Kirov, Boris; Daròs, José-Antonio; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Organisms have different circuitries that allow converting signal molecule levels to changes in gene expression. An important challenge in synthetic biology involves the de novo design of RNA modules enabling dynamic signal processing in live cells. This requires a scalable methodology for sensing, transmission, and actuation, which could be assembled into larger signaling networks. Here, we present a biochemical strategy to design RNA-mediated signal transduction cascades able to sense small molecules and small RNAs. We design switchable functional RNA domains by using strand-displacement techniques. We experimentally characterize the molecular mechanism underlying our synthetic RNA signaling cascades, show the ability to regulate gene expression with transduced RNA signals, and describe the signal processing response of our systems to periodic forcing in single live cells. The engineered systems integrate RNA–RNA interaction with available ribozyme and aptamer elements, providing new ways to engineer arbitrary complex gene circuits. PMID:25916845

  15. Dynamic signal processing by ribozyme-mediated RNA circuits to control gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shensi; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Majer, Eszter; Landrain, Thomas E; Kirov, Boris; Daròs, José-Antonio; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2015-05-26

    Organisms have different circuitries that allow converting signal molecule levels to changes in gene expression. An important challenge in synthetic biology involves the de novo design of RNA modules enabling dynamic signal processing in live cells. This requires a scalable methodology for sensing, transmission, and actuation, which could be assembled into larger signaling networks. Here, we present a biochemical strategy to design RNA-mediated signal transduction cascades able to sense small molecules and small RNAs. We design switchable functional RNA domains by using strand-displacement techniques. We experimentally characterize the molecular mechanism underlying our synthetic RNA signaling cascades, show the ability to regulate gene expression with transduced RNA signals, and describe the signal processing response of our systems to periodic forcing in single live cells. The engineered systems integrate RNA-RNA interaction with available ribozyme and aptamer elements, providing new ways to engineer arbitrary complex gene circuits.

  16. TGF-β-induced IκB-ζ controls Foxp3 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    MaruYama, Takashi

    2015-08-21

    Inhibitor of kappa B (IκB)-ζ, a member of the nuclear IκB family of proteins, is induced by the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway and plays a pivotal role in maintaining the balance of T helper (Th) cell subsets. IκB-ζ deficiency results in reduced percentages of Th17 cells and increased percentages of Th1 cells. In this study, the effects of IκB-ζ deficiency on T-cell subsets were examined further. The data showed that IκB-ζ-deficient T cells had a high capacity for generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) when T cells were cultured under TGF-β stimulation in the presence of cytokine-neutralizing antibodies. Mechanistically, IκB-ζ itself negatively regulated activation of the Foxp3 promoter in a nuclear factor of kappaB-dependent manner. Thus, this study showed that IκB-ζ controlled Treg differentiation. - Highlights: • IκB-ζ-deficient T cells exhibited increased generation of Foxp3{sup +} Tregs. • IκB-ζ played a key role in Foxp3 gene expression. • Retroviral overexpression of IκB-ζ was achieved in T cells.

  17. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Hurst, Laurence D

    2015-07-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene's expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking.

  18. The critical role of RNA processing and degradation in the control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Arraiano, Cecília M; Andrade, José M; Domingues, Susana; Guinote, Inês B; Malecki, Michal; Matos, Rute G; Moreira, Ricardo N; Pobre, Vânia; Reis, Filipa P; Saramago, Margarida; Silva, Inês J; Viegas, Sandra C

    2010-09-01

    The continuous degradation and synthesis of prokaryotic mRNAs not only give rise to the metabolic changes that are required as cells grow and divide but also rapid adaptation to new environmental conditions. In bacteria, RNAs can be degraded by mechanisms that act independently, but in parallel, and that target different sites with different efficiencies. The accessibility of sites for degradation depends on several factors, including RNA higher-order structure, protection by translating ribosomes and polyadenylation status. Furthermore, RNA degradation mechanisms have shown to be determinant for the post-transcriptional control of gene expression. RNases mediate the processing, decay and quality control of RNA. RNases can be divided into endonucleases that cleave the RNA internally or exonucleases that cleave the RNA from one of the extremities. Just in Escherichia coli there are >20 different RNases. RNase E is a single-strand-specific endonuclease critical for mRNA decay in E. coli. The enzyme interacts with the exonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), enolase and RNA helicase B (RhlB) to form the degradosome. However, in Bacillus subtilis, this enzyme is absent, but it has other main endonucleases such as RNase J1 and RNase III. RNase III cleaves double-stranded RNA and family members are involved in RNA interference in eukaryotes. RNase II family members are ubiquitous exonucleases, and in eukaryotes, they can act as the catalytic subunit of the exosome. RNases act in different pathways to execute the maturation of rRNAs and tRNAs, and intervene in the decay of many different mRNAs and small noncoding RNAs. In general, RNases act as a global regulatory network extremely important for the regulation of RNA levels.

  19. Control of Foxo1 Gene Expression by Co-activator P300*

    PubMed Central

    Wondisford, Anne R.; Xiong, Lishou; Chang, Evan; Meng, Shumei; Meyers, David J.; Li, Mingsong; Cole, Philip A.; He, Ling

    2014-01-01

    FOXO1 is an important downstream mediator of the insulin signaling pathway. In the fed state, elevated insulin phosphorylates FOXO1 via AKT, leading to its nuclear exclusion and degradation. A reduction in nuclear FOXO1 levels then leads to suppression of hepatic glucose production. However, the mechanism leading to expression of Foxo1 gene in the fasted state is less clear. We found that Foxo1 mRNA and FOXO1 protein levels of Foxo1 were increased significantly in the liver of mice after 16 h of fasting. Furthermore, dibutyrl cAMP stimulated the expression of Foxo1 at both mRNA and protein level in hepatocytes. Because cAMP-PKA regulates hepatic glucose production through cAMP-response element-binding protein co-activators, we depleted these co-activators using adenoviral shRNAs. Interestingly, only depletion of co-activator P300 resulted in the decrease of Foxo1 mRNA and FOXO1 protein levels. In addition, inhibition of histone acetyltransferase activity of P300 significantly decreased hepatic Foxo1 mRNA and FOXO1 protein levels in fasted mice, as well as fasting blood glucose levels. By characterization of Foxo1 gene promoter, P300 regulates the Foxo1 gene expression through the binding to tandem cAMP-response element sites in the proximal promoter region of Foxo1 gene. PMID:24379407

  20. Brassinosteroids can regulate cellulose biosynthesis by controlling the expression of CESA genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuelu

    2011-01-01

    The phytohormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play important roles in regulating cell elongation and cell size, and BR-related mutants in Arabidopsis display significant dwarf phenotypes. Cellulose is a biopolymer which has a major contribution to cell wall formation during cell expansion and elongation. However, whether BRs regulate cellulose synthesis, and if so, what the underlying mechanism of cell elongation induced by BRs is, is unknown. The content of cellulose and the expression levels of the cellulose synthase genes (CESAs) was measured in BR-related mutants and their wild-type counterpart. The chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) experiments and genetic analysis were used to demonstrate that BRs regulate CESA genes. It was found here that the BR-deficient or BR-perceptional mutants contain less cellulose than the wild type. The expression of CESA genes, especially those related to primary cell wall synthesis, was reduced in det2-1 and bri1-301, and was only inducible by BRs in the BR-deficient mutant det2-1. CHIP experiments show that the BR-activated transcription factor BES1 can associate with upstream elements of most CESA genes particularly those related with the primary cell wall. Furthermore, over-expression of the BR receptor BRI1 in CESA1, 3, and 6 mutants can only partially rescue the dwarf phenotypes. Our findings provide potential insights into the mechanism that BRs regulate cellulose synthesis to accomplish the cell elongation process in plant development. PMID:21617247

  1. Abf1 and other general regulatory factors control ribosome biogenesis gene expression in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Bosio, Maria Cristina; Fermi, Beatrice; Spagnoli, Gloria; Levati, Elisabetta; Rubbi, Ludmilla; Ferrari, Roberto; Pellegrini, Matteo; Dieci, Giorgio

    2017-05-05

    Ribosome biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a regulon of >200 genes (Ribi genes) coordinately regulated in response to nutrient availability and cellular growth rate. Two cis-acting elements called PAC and RRPE are known to mediate Ribi gene repression in response to nutritional downshift. Here, we show that most Ribi gene promoters also contain binding sites for one or more General Regulatory Factors (GRFs), most frequently Abf1 and Reb1, and that these factors are enriched in vivo at Ribi promoters. Abf1/Reb1/Tbf1 promoter association was required for full Ribi gene expression in rich medium and for its modulation in response to glucose starvation, characterized by a rapid drop followed by slow recovery. Such a response did not entail changes in Abf1 occupancy, but it was paralleled by a quick increase, followed by slow decrease, in Rpd3L histone deacetylase occupancy. Remarkably, Abf1 site disruption also abolished Rpd3L complex recruitment in response to starvation. Extensive mutational analysis of the DBP7 promoter revealed a complex interplay of Tbf1 sites, PAC and RRPE in the transcriptional regulation of this Ribi gene. Our observations point to GRFs as new multifaceted players in Ribi gene regulation both during exponential growth and under repressive conditions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Nitric oxide regulates gene expression in cancers by controlling histone posttranslational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Divya; Hickok, Jason R.; Bovee, Rhea C.; Pham, Vy; Mantell, Lin L.; Bahroos, Neil; Kanabar, Pinal; Cao, Xing-Jun; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Thomas, Douglas D.

    2015-01-01

    Altered nitric oxide (•NO) metabolism underlies cancer pathology, but mechanisms explaining many •NO-associated phenotypes remain unclear. We have found that cellular exposure to •NO changes histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) by directly inhibiting the catalytic activity of JmjC-domain containing histone demethylases. Herein, we describe how •NO exposure links modulation of histone PTMs to gene expression changes that promote oncogenesis. Through high-resolution mass spectrometry, we generated an extensive map of •NO-mediated histone PTM changes at 15 critical lysine residues on the core histones H3 and H4. Concomitant microarray analysis demonstrated that exposure to physiologic •NO resulted in the differential expression of over 6,500 genes in breast cancer cells. Measurements of the association of H3K9me2 and H3K9ac across genomic loci revealed that differential distribution of these particular PTMs correlated with changes in the level of expression of numerous oncogenes, consistent with epigenetic code. Our results establish that •NO functions as an epigenetic regulator of gene expression mediated by changes in histone PTMs. PMID:26542213

  3. Regulation of adeno-associated virus gene expression in 293 cells: control of mRNA abundance and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Trempe, J.P.; Carter, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied the effects of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) rep gene on the control of gene expression from the AAV p/sub 40/ promoter in 293 cells in the absence of an adenovirus coinfection. AAV vectors containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene were used to measure the levels of cat expression and steady-state mRNA from p/sub 40/. When the rep gene was present in cis or in trans, cat expression from p/sub 40/ was decreased 3- to 10-fold, but there was a 2- to 10-fold increase in the level of p/sub 40/ mRNA. Conversely, cat expression increased and the p/sub 40/ mRNA level decreased in the absence of the rep gene. Both wild-type and carboxyl-terminal truncated Rep proteins were capable of eliciting both effects. These data suggest two roles for the pleiotropic AAV rep gene: as a translational inhibitor and as a positive regulator of p/sub 40/ mRNA levels. They also provide additional evidence for a cis-acting negative regulatory region which decreases RNA from the AAV p/sub 5/ promoter in a fashion independent of rep.

  4. SOA genes encode proteins controlling lipase expression in response to triacylglycerol utilization in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Desfougères, Thomas; Haddouche, Ramdane; Fudalej, Franck; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2010-02-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica efficiently metabolizes hydrophobic substrates such as alkanes, fatty acids or triacylglycerol. This yeast has been identified in oil-polluted water and in lipid-rich food. The enzymes involved in lipid breakdown, for use as a carbon source, are known, but the molecular mechanisms controlling the expression of the genes encoding these enzymes are still poorly understood. The study of mRNAs obtained from cells grown on oleic acid identified a new group of genes called SOA genes (specific for oleic acid). SOA1 and SOA2 are two small genes coding for proteins with no known homologs. Single- and double-disrupted strains were constructed. Wild-type and mutant strains were grown on dextrose, oleic acid and triacylglycerols. The double mutant presents a clear phenotype consisting of a growth defect on tributyrin and triolein, but not on dextrose or oleic acid media. Lipase activity was 50-fold lower in this mutant than in the wild-type strain. The impact of SOA deletion on the expression of the main extracellular lipase gene (LIP2) was monitored using a LIP2-beta-galactosidase promoter fusion protein. These data suggest that Soa proteins are components of a molecular mechanism controlling lipase gene expression in response to extracellular triacylglycerol.

  5. Integrated analyses for genetic markers of polycystic ovary syndrome with 9 case-control studies of gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenqi; Liu, Xiaoqin; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Ning; Yu, Jun; Zhao, Xiaobo; Hu, Hairong; Zheng, Saihua; Li, Xuelian; Wang, Guiying

    2017-01-10

    Due to genetic heterogeneity and variable diagnostic criteria, genetic studies of polycystic ovary syndrome are particularly challenging. Furthermore, lack of sufficiently large cohorts limits the identification of susceptibility genes contributing to polycystic ovary syndrome. Here, we carried out a systematic search of studies deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus database through August 31, 2016. The present analyses included studies with: 1) patients with polycystic ovary syndrome and normal controls, 2) gene expression profiling of messenger RNA, and 3) sufficient data for our analysis. Ultimately, a total of 9 studies with 13 datasets met the inclusion criteria and were performed for the subsequent integrated analyses. Through comprehensive analyses, there were 13 genetic factors overlapped in all datasets and identified as significant specific genes for polycystic ovary syndrome. After quality control assessment, there were six datasets remained. Further gene ontology enrichment and pathway analyses suggested that differentially expressed genes mainly enriched in oocyte pathways. These findings provide potential molecular markers for diagnosis and prognosis of polycystic ovary syndrome, and need in-depth studies on the exact function and mechanism in polycystic ovary syndrome.

  6. Control of Secreted Protein Gene Expression and the Mammalian Secretome by the Metabolic Regulator PGC-1α.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Neri; Roeder, Robert G

    2017-01-06

    Secreted proteins serve pivotal roles in the development of multicellular organisms, acting as structural matrix, extracellular enzymes, and signal molecules. However, how the secretome is regulated remains incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate, unexpectedly, that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α), a critical transcriptional co-activator of metabolic gene expression, functions to down-regulate the expression of diverse genes encoding secreted molecules and extracellular matrix components to modulate the secretome. Using cell lines, primary cells, and mice, we show that both endogenous and exogenous PGC-1α down-regulate the expression of numerous genes encoding secreted molecules. Mechanistically, results obtained using mRNA stability measurements as well as intronic RNA expression analysis are consistent with a transcriptional effect of PGC-1α on the expression of genes encoding secreted proteins. Interestingly, PGC-1α requires the central heat shock response regulator heat shock factor protein 1 (HSF1) to affect some of its targets, and both factors co-reside on several target genes encoding secreted molecules in cells. Finally, using a mass spectrometric analysis of secreted proteins, we demonstrate that PGC-1α modulates the secretome of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Our results define a link between a key pathway controlling metabolic regulation and the regulation of the mammalian secretome.

  7. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  8. Light controls phospholipase A2α and β gene expression in Citrus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hui-Ling; Burns, Jacqueline K.

    2010-01-01

    The low-molecular weight secretory phospholipase A2α (CssPLA2α) and β (CsPLA2β) cloned in this study exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in leaf tissue of Citrus sinensis. Only CssPLA2α displayed distinct diurnal patterns in fruit tissues. CssPLA2α and CsPLA2β diurnal expression exhibited periods of approximately 24 h; CssPLA2α amplitude averaged 990-fold in the leaf blades from field-grown trees, whereas CsPLA2β amplitude averaged 6.4-fold. Diurnal oscillation of CssPLA2α and CsPLA2β gene expression in the growth chamber experiments was markedly dampened 24 h after transfer to continuous light or dark conditions. CssPLA2α and CsPLA2β expressions were redundantly mediated by blue, green, red and red/far-red light, but blue light was a major factor affecting CssPLA2α and CsPLA2β expression. Total and low molecular weight CsPLA2 enzyme activity closely followed diurnal changes in CssPLA2α transcript expression in leaf blades of seedlings treated with low intensity blue light (24 μmol m−2 s−1). Compared with CssPLA2α basal expression, CsPLA2β expression was at least 10-fold higher. Diurnal fluctuation and light regulation of PLA2 gene expression and enzyme activity in citrus leaf and fruit tissues suggests that accompanying diurnal changes in lipophilic second messengers participate in the regulation of physiological processes associated with phospholipase A2 action. PMID:20388744

  9. Light controls phospholipase A2alpha and beta gene expression in Citrus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui-Ling; Burns, Jacqueline K

    2010-05-01

    The low-molecular weight secretory phospholipase A2alpha (CssPLA2alpha) and beta (CsPLA2beta) cloned in this study exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in leaf tissue of Citrus sinensis. Only CssPLA2alpha displayed distinct diurnal patterns in fruit tissues. CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta diurnal expression exhibited periods of approximately 24 h; CssPLA2alpha amplitude averaged 990-fold in the leaf blades from field-grown trees, whereas CsPLA2beta amplitude averaged 6.4-fold. Diurnal oscillation of CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta gene expression in the growth chamber experiments was markedly dampened 24 h after transfer to continuous light or dark conditions. CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta expressions were redundantly mediated by blue, green, red and red/far-red light, but blue light was a major factor affecting CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta expression. Total and low molecular weight CsPLA2 enzyme activity closely followed diurnal changes in CssPLA2alpha transcript expression in leaf blades of seedlings treated with low intensity blue light (24 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Compared with CssPLA2alpha basal expression, CsPLA2beta expression was at least 10-fold higher. Diurnal fluctuation and light regulation of PLA2 gene expression and enzyme activity in citrus leaf and fruit tissues suggests that accompanying diurnal changes in lipophilic second messengers participate in the regulation of physiological processes associated with phospholipase A2 action.

  10. A red/far-red light-responsive bi-stable toggle switch to control gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Metzger, Stéphanie; Schulz, Simon; Kämpf, Michael M.; Busacker, Moritz; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Ehrbar, Martin; Nagy, Ferenc; Timmer, Jens; Zubriggen, Matias D.; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Growth and differentiation of multicellular systems is orchestrated by spatially restricted gene expression programs in specialized subpopulations. The targeted manipulation of such processes by synthetic tools with high-spatiotemporal resolution could, therefore, enable a deepened understanding of developmental processes and open new opportunities in tissue engineering. Here, we describe the first red/far-red light-triggered gene switch for mammalian cells for achieving gene expression control in time and space. We show that the system can reversibly be toggled between stable on- and off-states using short light pulses at 660 or 740 nm. Red light-induced gene expression was shown to correlate with the applied photon number and was compatible with different mammalian cell lines, including human primary cells. The light-induced expression kinetics were quantitatively analyzed by a mathematical model. We apply the system for the spatially controlled engineering of angiogenesis in chicken embryos. The system’s performance combined with cell- and tissue-compatible regulating red light will enable unprecedented spatiotemporally controlled molecular interventions in mammalian cells, tissues and organisms. PMID:23355611

  11. Design, Characterization, and Use of a Novel Amyloid β-Protein Control for Assembly, Neurotoxicity, and Gene Expression Studies.

    PubMed

    Yamin, Ghiam; Coppola, Giovanni; Teplow, David B

    2016-09-13

    A key pathogenic agent in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the amyloid β-protein (Aβ), which self-assembles into a variety of neurotoxic structures. Establishing structure-activity relationships for these assemblies, which is critical for proper therapeutic target identification and design, requires aggregation and neurotoxicity experiments that are properly controlled with respect to the Aβ peptide itself. "Reverse" Aβ or non-Aβ peptides suffer from the fact that their biophysical properties are too similar or dissimilar, respectively, to those of native Aβ for them to be appropriate controls. For this reason, we used simple protein design principles to create scrambled Aβ peptides predicted to behave distinctly from native Aβ. We showed that our prediction was true by monitoring secondary structure dynamics with thioflavin T fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy, determining oligomer size distributions, and assaying neurotoxic activity. We then demonstrated the utility of the scrambled Aβ peptides by using them to control experiments examining the effects of Aβ monomers, dimers, higher-order oligomers, and fibrils on gene expression in primary rat hippocampal neurons. Significant changes in gene expression were observed for all peptide assemblies, but fibrils induced the largest changes. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis revealed two predominant gene modules related to Aβ treatment. Many genes within these modules were associated with inflammatory signaling pathways.

  12. Altered cytokine gene expression in peripheral blood monocytes across the menstrual cycle in primary dysmenorrhea: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongyue; Hong, Min; Duan, Jinao; Liu, Pei; Fan, Xinsheng; Shang, Erxin; Su, Shulan; Guo, Jianming; Qian, Dawei; Tang, Yuping

    2013-01-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea is one of the most common gynecological complaints in young women, but potential peripheral immunologic features underlying this condition remain undefined. In this paper, we compared 84 common cytokine gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from six primary dysmenorrheic young women and three unaffected controls on the seventh day before (secretory phase), and the first (menstrual phase) and the fifth (regenerative phase) days of menstruation, using a real-time PCR array assay combined with pattern recognition and gene function annotation methods. Comparisons between dysmenorrhea and normal control groups identified 11 (nine increased and two decreased), 14 (five increased and nine decreased), and 15 (seven increased and eight decreased) genes with ≥ 2-fold difference in expression (P<0.05) in the three phases of menstruation, respectively. In the menstrual phase, genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1B, TNF, IL6, and IL8) were up-regulated, and genes encoding TGF-β superfamily members (BMP4, BMP6, GDF5, GDF11, LEFTY2, NODAL, and MSTN) were down-regulated. Functional annotation revealed an excessive inflammatory response and insufficient TGF-β superfamily member signals with anti-inflammatory consequences, which may directly contribute to menstrual pain. In the secretory and regenerative phases, increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased expression of growth factors were also observed. These factors may be involved in the regulation of decidualization, endometrium breakdown and repair, and indirectly exacerbate primary dysmenorrhea. This first study of cytokine gene expression profiles in PBMCs from young primary dysmenorrheic women demonstrates a shift in the balance between expression patterns of pro-inflammatory cytokines and TGF-β superfamily members across the whole menstrual cycle, underlying the peripheral immunologic features of primary dysmenorrhea.

  13. Altered Cytokine Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Monocytes across the Menstrual Cycle in Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongyue; Hong, Min; Duan, Jinao; Liu, Pei; Fan, Xinsheng; Shang, Erxin; Su, Shulan; Guo, Jianming; Qian, Dawei; Tang, Yuping

    2013-01-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea is one of the most common gynecological complaints in young women, but potential peripheral immunologic features underlying this condition remain undefined. In this paper, we compared 84 common cytokine gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from six primary dysmenorrheic young women and three unaffected controls on the seventh day before (secretory phase), and the first (menstrual phase) and the fifth (regenerative phase) days of menstruation, using a real-time PCR array assay combined with pattern recognition and gene function annotation methods. Comparisons between dysmenorrhea and normal control groups identified 11 (nine increased and two decreased), 14 (five increased and nine decreased), and 15 (seven increased and eight decreased) genes with ≥2-fold difference in expression (P<0.05) in the three phases of menstruation, respectively. In the menstrual phase, genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1B, TNF, IL6, and IL8) were up-regulated, and genes encoding TGF-β superfamily members (BMP4, BMP6, GDF5, GDF11, LEFTY2, NODAL, and MSTN) were down-regulated. Functional annotation revealed an excessive inflammatory response and insufficient TGF-β superfamily member signals with anti-inflammatory consequences, which may directly contribute to menstrual pain. In the secretory and regenerative phases, increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased expression of growth factors were also observed. These factors may be involved in the regulation of decidualization, endometrium breakdown and repair, and indirectly exacerbate primary dysmenorrhea. This first study of cytokine gene expression profiles in PBMCs from young primary dysmenorrheic women demonstrates a shift in the balance between expression patterns of pro-inflammatory cytokines and TGF-β superfamily members across the whole menstrual cycle, underlying the peripheral immunologic features of primary dysmenorrhea. PMID:23390521

  14. Introduction, stable integration, and controlled expression of a chimeric adenovirus gene whose product is toxic to the recipient human cell.

    PubMed Central

    Klessig, D F; Brough, D E; Cleghon, V

    1984-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein (DBP) encoded by human adenoviruses is a multifunctional polypeptide which plays a central role in regulating the expression of the viral genes. To gain a better understanding of the relationships between the various functions provided by DBP, an extensive collection of DBP mutants is essential. To this end we have constructed several permissive human cell lines which contain and express the DBP gene at high levels to allow propagation of otherwise lethal, nonrecoverable mutants of DBP. Because DBP is toxic to human cells, cell lines were constructed by using a vector in which the DBP gene is under the control of the dexamethasone-inducible promoter of the mouse mammary tumor virus. The low basal levels of DBP synthesis in the absence of dexamethasone allows isolation and propagation of these cells. Addition of dexamethasone enhances DBP production 50- to 200-fold, and within 8 h its synthesis from the single integrated copy of the chimeric gene is 5 to 15% of that observed during peak DBP synthesis in infected human cells in which hundreds of copies of the DBP gene serve as templates. At the nonpermissive temperature, adenovirus mutants with ts lesions in the DBP gene replicate their DNAs, express their late genes, and form infectious viral particles in these DBP+ cell lines but not in the parental HeLa cells. Images PMID:6542172

  15. The Polycomb-group protein MEDEA regulates seed development by controlling expression of the MADS-box gene PHERES1.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Claudia; Hennig, Lars; Spillane, Charles; Pien, Stephane; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2003-06-15

    The Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins MEDEA, FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM, and FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED2 regulate seed development in Arabidopsis by controlling embryo and endosperm proliferation. All three of these FIS-class proteins are likely subunits of a multiprotein PcG complex, which epigenetically regulates downstream target genes that were previously unknown. Here we show that the MADS-box gene PHERES1 (PHE1) is commonly deregulated in the fis-class mutants. PHE1 belongs to the evolutionarily ancient type I class of MADS-box proteins that have not yet been assigned any function in plants. Both MEDEA and FIE directly associate with the promoter region of PHE1, suggesting that PHE1 expression is epigenetically regulated by PcG proteins. PHE1 is expressed transiently after fertilization in both the embryo and the endosperm; however, it remains up-regulated in the fis mutants, consistent with the proposed function of the FIS genes as transcriptional repressors. Reduced expression levels of PHE1 in medea mutant seeds can suppress medea seed abortion, indicating a key role of PHE1 repression in seed development. PHE1 expression in a hypomethylated medea mutant background resembles the wild-type expression pattern and is associated with rescue of the medea seed-abortion phenotype. In summary, our results demonstrate that seed abortion in the medea mutant is largely mediated by deregulated expression of the type I MADS-box gene PHE1.

  16. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja; Jäntti, Jussi; Mojzita, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications.

  17. Testicular development involves the spatiotemporal control of PDGFs and PDGF receptors gene expression and action

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs) are growth-regulatory molecules that stimulate chemotaxis, proliferation and metabolism primarily of cells of mesenchymal origin. In this study, we found high levels of PDGFs and PDGFs receptors (PDGFRs) mRNAs, and specific immunostaining for the corresponding proteins in the rat testis. PDGFs and PDGFRs expression was shown to be developmentally regulated and tissue specific. Expression of PDGFs and PDGFRs genes was observed in whole testis RNA 2 d before birth, increased through postnatal day 5 and fell to low levels in adult. The predominant cell population expressing transcripts of the PDGFs and PDGFRs genes during prenatal and early postnatal periods were Sertoli cells and peritubular myoid cells (PMC) or their precursors, respectively, while in adult animals PDGFs and PDGFRs were confined in Leydig cells. We also found that early postnatal Sertoli cells produce PDGF-like substances and that this production is inhibited dose dependently by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). The expression of PDGFRs by PMC and of PDGFs by Sertoli cells corresponds in temporal sequence to the developmental period of PMC proliferation and migration from the interstitium to the peritubulum. Moreover, we observed that all the PDGF isoforms and the medium conditioned by early postnatal Sertoli cells show a strong chemotactic activity for PMC which is inhibited by anti-PDGF antibodies. These data indicate that, through the spatiotemporal pattern of PDGF ligands and receptors expression, PDGF may play a role in testicular development and homeostasis. PMID:7490286

  18. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications. PMID:26901642

  19. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine.

  20. Optimization of alpha-acylaminoketone ecdysone agonists for control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Tice, Colin M; Hormann, Robert E; Thompson, Christine S; Friz, Jennifer L; Cavanaugh, Caitlin K; Saggers, Jessica A

    2003-06-02

    Fifteen new alpha-acylaminoketones were prepared by four different routes in an initial effort to optimize the potency of these compounds as ecdysone agonists. The compounds were assayed in mammalian cells expressing the ecdysone receptors from Bombyx mori (BmEcR) and Choristoneura fumiferana (CfEcR) for their ability to cause expression of a reporter gene downstream of an ecdysone response element. A new alpha-acylaminoketone was identified which had activity equal to that of the standard dibenzoylhydrazine ecdysone agonist GS()-E in the assay based on CfEcR.

  1. Tumor-height regression rate after brachytherapy between choroidal melanoma gene expression profile classes: effect of controlling for tumor height.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kishan; McCannel, Colin A; Kamrava, Mitchell; Lamb, James; Almanzor, Robert D; McCannel, Tara A

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the relationship between choroidal melanoma regression rate and its gene expression profile class after iodine-125 brachytherapy at 3 and 6 months, controlling for baseline tumor height. Patients from October 2012 to January 2015 at a single Ophthalmic Oncology Center who had undergone iodine-125 brachytherapy for the treatment of choroidal melanoma and who had a gene expression profile test result obtained from intraoperative fine-needle aspiration biopsy at the time of plaque surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Baseline patient and tumor characteristics were obtained, including tumor height and gene expression profile test result. Tumor height at 3 and 6 months following treatment was obtained. Regression rate was analyzed with two-way analysis of variance to class type and baseline pre-operative tumor height. Class 2 patients were matched to class 1 patients by tumor height and resulting distributions of paired regression rate differences were compared. A total of 114 patients were studied. When preoperative tumor height was controlled for in the comparative analysis, neither group of patients at 3 or 6 months had a significant dependency between gene expression profile class and tumor regression rate. Additionally, class 1 and class 2 patients matched for pre-operative tumor height did not express different regression rates. Our study adds to a growing body of evidence that tumor regression rate does not necessarily depend on gene expression profile class type in choroidal melanoma after brachytherapy at 3 and 6 months when controlling for baseline tumor height.

  2. Orthogonal control of endogenous gene expression in mammalian cells using synthetic ligands.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; McLachlan, Michael J; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-05-01

    Gene switches have wide utility in synthetic biology, gene therapy, and developmental biology, and multiple orthogonal gene switches are needed to construct advanced circuitry or to control complex phenotypes. Endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) is crucial to angiogenesis, and it has been shown that multiple alternately spliced VEGF-A isoforms are necessary for proper blood vessel formation. Such a necessity limits the utility of direct transgene delivery, which can provide only one splice variant. To overcome this limitation, we constructed a gene switch that can regulate the (VEGF-A) locus in mammalian cells by combining an engineered estrogen receptor (ER) ligand-binding domain (LBD), a p65 activation domain, and an artificial zinc-finger DNA binding domain (DBD). Our gene switch is specifically and reversibly controlled by 4,4'-dyhydroxybenzil (DHB), a small molecule, non-steroid synthetic ligand, which acts orthogonally in a mammalian system. After optimization of the gene switch architecture, an endogenous VEGF-A induction ratio of >100-fold can be achieved in HEK293 cells at 1 µM DHB, which is the highest endogenous induction reported to date. In addition, induction has been shown to be reversible, repeatable, and sustainable. Another advantage is that the ligand response is tunable by varying the clonal composition of a stably integrated cell line. The integration of our findings with the technology to change ligand specificity and DNA binding specificity will provide the framework for generating a wide array of orthogonal gene switches that can control multiple genes with multiple orthogonal ligands. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. CAF-1 promotes Notch signaling through epigenetic control of target gene expression during Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhongsheng; Wu, Honggang; Chen, Hanqing; Wang, Ruoqi; Liang, Xuehong; Liu, Jiyong; Li, Changqing; Deng, Wu-Min; Jiao, Renjie

    2013-09-01

    The histone chaperone CAF-1 is known for its role in DNA replication-coupled histone deposition. However, loss of function causes lethality only in higher multicellular organisms such as mice and flies, but not in unicellular organisms such as yeasts, suggesting that CAF-1 has other important functions than histone deposition during animal development. Emerging evidence indicates that CAF-1 also has a role in higher order chromatin organization and heterochromatin-mediated gene expression; it remains unclear whether CAF-1 has a role in specific signaling cascades to promote gene expression during development. Here, we report that knockdown of one of the subunits of Drosophila CAF-1, dCAF-1-p105 (Caf1-105), results in phenotypes that resemble those of, and are augmented synergistically by, mutations of Notch positive regulatory pathway components. Depletion of dCAF-1-p105 leads to abrogation of cut expression and to downregulation of other Notch target genes in wing imaginal discs. dCAF-1-p105 is associated with Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] and regulates its binding to the enhancer region of E(spl)mβ. The association of dCAF-1-p105 with Su(H) on chromatin establishes an active local chromatin status for transcription by maintaining a high level of histone H4 acetylation. In response to induced Notch activation, dCAF-1 associates with the Notch intracellular domain to activate the expression of Notch target genes in cultured S2 cells, manifesting the role of dCAF-1 in Notch signaling. Together, our results reveal a novel epigenetic function of dCAF-1 in promoting Notch pathway activity that regulates normal Drosophila development.

  4. Intrinsic expression of a multiexon type 3 deiodinase gene controls zebrafish embryo size.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cuicui; Chen, Xia; Song, Huaidong; Maynard, Michelle A; Zhou, Yi; Lobanov, Alexei V; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Ganis, Jared J; Wiley, David; Jugo, Rebecca H; Lee, Nicholas Y; Castroneves, Luciana A; Zon, Leonard I; Scanlan, Thomas S; Feldman, Henry A; Huang, Stephen A

    2014-10-01

    Thyroid hormone is a master regulator of differentiation and growth, and its action is terminated by the enzymatic removal of an inner-ring iodine catalyzed by the selenoenzyme type 3 deiodinase (dio3). Our studies of the zebrafish reveal that the dio3 gene is duplicated in this species and that embryonic deiodination is an important determinant of embryo size. Although both dio3 paralogs encode enzymatically active proteins with high affinity for thyroid hormones, their anatomic patterns of expression are markedly divergent and only embryos with knockdown of dio3b, a biallelically expressed selenoenzyme expressed in the developing central nervous system, manifest severe thyroid hormone-dependent growth restriction at 72 hours post fertilization. This indicates that the embryonic deficiency of dio3, once considered only a placental enzyme, causes microsomia independently of placental physiology and raises the intriguing possibility that fetal abnormalities in human deiodination may present as intrauterine growth retardation. By mapping the gene structures and enzymatic properties of all four zebrafish deiodinases, we also identify dio3b as the first multiexon dio3 gene, containing a large intron separating its open reading frame from its selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element.

  5. Intrinsic Expression of a Multiexon Type 3 Deiodinase Gene Controls Zebrafish Embryo Size

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cuicui; Chen, Xia; Song, Huaidong; Maynard, Michelle A.; Zhou, Yi; Lobanov, Alexei V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Ganis, Jared J.; Wiley, David; Jugo, Rebecca H.; Lee, Nicholas Y.; Castroneves, Luciana A.; Zon, Leonard I.; Scanlan, Thomas S.; Feldman, Henry A.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is a master regulator of differentiation and growth, and its action is terminated by the enzymatic removal of an inner-ring iodine catalyzed by the selenoenzyme type 3 deiodinase (dio3). Our studies of the zebrafish reveal that the dio3 gene is duplicated in this species and that embryonic deiodination is an important determinant of embryo size. Although both dio3 paralogs encode enzymatically active proteins with high affinity for thyroid hormones, their anatomic patterns of expression are markedly divergent and only embryos with knockdown of dio3b, a biallelically expressed selenoenzyme expressed in the developing central nervous system, manifest severe thyroid hormone-dependent growth restriction at 72 hours post fertilization. This indicates that the embryonic deficiency of dio3, once considered only a placental enzyme, causes microsomia independently of placental physiology and raises the intriguing possibility that fetal abnormalities in human deiodination may present as intrauterine growth retardation. By mapping the gene structures and enzymatic properties of all four zebrafish deiodinases, we also identify dio3b as the first multiexon dio3 gene, containing a large intron separating its open reading frame from its selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element. PMID:25004091

  6. Epithelial and endothelial expression of the green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of bovine prion protein (PrP) gene regulatory sequences in transgenic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire-Vieille, Catherine; Schulze, Tobias; Podevin-Dimster, Valérie; Follet, Jérome; Bailly, Yannick; Blanquet-Grossard, Françoise; Decavel, Jean-Pierre; Heinen, Ernst; Cesbron, Jean-Yves

    2000-05-01

    The expression of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrPc) gene is required for prion replication and neuroinvasion in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The identification of the cell types expressing PrPc is necessary to understanding how the agent replicates and spreads from peripheral sites to the central nervous system. To determine the nature of the cell types expressing PrPc, a green fluorescent protein reporter gene was expressed in transgenic mice under the control of 6.9 kb of the bovine PrP gene regulatory sequences. It was shown that the bovine PrP gene is expressed as two populations of mRNA differing by alternative splicing of one 115-bp 5' untranslated exon in 17 different bovine tissues. The analysis of transgenic mice showed reporter gene expression in some cells that have been identified as expressing PrP, such as cerebellar Purkinje cells, lymphocytes, and keratinocytes. In addition, expression of green fluorescent protein was observed in the plexus of the enteric nervous system and in a restricted subset of cells not yet clearly identified as expressing PrP: the epithelial cells of the thymic medullary and the endothelial cells of both the mucosal capillaries of the intestine and the renal capillaries. These data provide valuable information on the distribution of PrPc at the cellular level and argue for roles of the epithelial and endothelial cells in the spread of infection from the periphery to the brain. Moreover, the transgenic mice described in this paper provide a model that will allow for the study of the transcriptional activity of the PrP gene promoter in response to scrapie infection.

  7. Pituitary control of branchial NCC, NKCC and Na(+), K (+)-ATPase α-subunit gene expression in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Breves, Jason P; Seale, Andre P; Moorman, Benjamin P; Lerner, Darren T; Moriyama, Shunsuke; Hopkins, Kevin D; Grau, E Gordon

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated endocrine control of branchial ionoregulatory function in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) by prolactin (Prl188 and Prl177), growth hormone (Gh) and cortisol. Branchial expression of Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter (ncc) and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter (nkcc) genes were employed as specific markers for freshwater- and seawater-type ionocytes, respectively. We further investigated whether Prl, Gh and cortisol direct expression of two Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (nka)-α1 subunit genes, denoted nka-α1a and nka-α1b. Tilapia transferred to fresh water following hypophysectomy failed to adequately activate gill ncc expression; ncc expression was subsequently restored by Prl replacement. Prl188 and Prl177 stimulated ncc expression in cultured gill filaments in a concentration-related manner, suggesting that ncc is regulated by Prl in a gill-autonomous fashion. Tilapia transferred to brackish water (23 ‰) following hypophysectomy exhibited a reduced capacity to up-regulate nka-α1b expression. However, Gh and cortisol failed to affect nka-α1b expression in vivo. Similarly, we found no clear effects of Gh or cortisol on nkcc expression both in vivo and in vitro. When considered with patterns previously described in euryhaline Mozambique tilapia (O. mossambicus), the current study suggests that ncc is a conserved target of Prl in tilapiine cichlids. In addition, we revealed contrasting dependencies upon the pituitary to direct nka-α1b expression in hyperosmotic environments between Nile and Mozambique tilapia.

  8. Long-range control of gene expression via RNA-directed DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Rowley, M. Jordan; Kuciński, Jan

    2017-01-01

    RNA-mediated transcriptional silencing, in plants known as RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM), is a conserved process where small interfering RNA (siRNA) and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) help establish repressive chromatin modifications. This process represses transposons and affects the expression of protein-coding genes. We found that in Arabidopsis thaliana AGO4 binding sites are often located distant from genes differentially expressed in ago4. Using Hi-C to compare interactions between genotypes, we show that RdDM-targeted loci have the potential to engage in chromosomal interactions, but these interactions are inhibited in wild-type conditions. In mutants defective in RdDM, the frequency of chromosomal interactions at RdDM targets is increased. This includes increased frequency of interactions between Pol V methylated sites and distal genes that are repressed by RdDM. We propose a model, where RdDM prevents the formation of chromosomal interactions between genes and their distant regulatory elements. PMID:28475589

  9. Long noncoding RNA #32 contributes to antiviral responses by controlling interferon-stimulated gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Nishitsuji, Hironori; Ujino, Saneyuki; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Sugiyama, Masaya; Mizokami, Masashi; Kanto, Tatsuya; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2016-01-01

    Despite the breadth of knowledge that exists regarding the function of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in biological phenomena, the role of lncRNAs in host antiviral responses is poorly understood. Here, we report that lncRNA#32 is associated with type I IFN signaling. The silencing of lncRNA#32 dramatically reduced the level of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression, resulting in sensitivity to encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection. In contrast, the ectopic expression of lncRNA#32 significantly suppressed EMCV replication, suggesting that lncRNA#32 positively regulates the host antiviral response. We further demonstrated the suppressive function of lncRNA#32 in hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection. lncRNA#32 bound to activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) and regulated ISG expression. Our results reveal a role for lncRNA#32 in host antiviral responses. PMID:27582466

  10. TRANSLUCENT GREEN, an ERF family transcription factor, controls water balance in Arabidopsis by activating the expression of aquaporin genes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Danling; Wu, Zhe; Cao, Guangyu; Li, Jigang; Wei, Jia; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Gu, Hongya; Aoyama, Takashi; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-04-01

    Water is the most abundant molecule in almost all living organisms. Aquaporins are channel proteins that play critical roles in controlling the water content of cells. Here, we report the identification of an AP2/EREBP family transcription factor in Arabidopsis thaliana, TRANSLUCENT GREEN (TG), whose overexpression in transgenic plants gave enhanced drought tolerance and vitrified leaves. TG protein is localized in the nucleus, binds DRE and GCC elements in vitro, and acts as a transcriptional activator in yeast cells. Microarray analysis revealed a total of 330 genes regulated by TG, among which five genes encode aquaporins. A transient expression assay showed that TG directly binds to the promoters of three aquaporin genes, such as AtTIP1;1, AtTIP2;3, and AtPIP2;2, indicating that TG directly regulates the expression of these genes. Moreover, overexpression of AtTIP1;1 resulted in vitrified phenotypes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, similar to those observed in TG overexpression lines. Water injection into wild-type leaves recapitulated the vitrified leaf phenotypes, which was reversed by cutting off the water supply from vascular bundles. Taken together, our data support that TG controls water balance in Arabidopsis through directly activating the expression of aquaporin genes.

  11. Use of expression-enhancing terminators in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to increase mRNA half-life and improve gene expression control for metabolic engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Curran, Kathleen A; Karim, Ashty S; Gupta, Akash; Alper, Hal S

    2013-09-01

    Control of gene and protein expression of both endogenous and heterologous genes is a key component of metabolic engineering. While a large amount of work has been published characterizing promoters for this purpose, less effort has been exerted to elucidate the role of terminators in yeast. In this study, we characterize over 30 terminators for use in metabolic engineering applications in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and determine mRNA half-life changes to be the major cause of the varied protein and transcript expression level. We demonstrate that the difference in transcript level can be over 6.5-fold even for high strength promoters. The influence of terminator selection is magnified when coupled with a low-expression promoter, with a maximum difference in protein expression of 11-fold between an expression-enhancing terminator and the parent plasmid terminator and over 35-fold difference when compared with a no-terminator baseline. This is the first time that terminators have been investigated in the context of multiple promoters spanning orders of magnitude in activity. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of terminator selection for metabolic engineering by using a mutant xylose isomerase gene as a proof-of-concept. Through pairing an expression-enhancing terminator with a low-expression promoter, we were able to achieve the same phenotypic result as with a promoter considerably higher in strength. Moreover, we can further boost the phenotype of the high-strength promoter by pairing it with an expression-enhancing terminator. This work highlights how terminator elements can be used to control metabolic pathways in the same way that promoters are traditionally used in yeast. Together, this work demonstrates that terminators will be an important part of heterologous gene expression and metabolic engineering for yeast in the future.

  12. Optimization of a nonviral transfection system to evaluate Cox-2 controlled interleukin-4 expression for osteoarthritis gene therapy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lang, Annemarie; Neuhaus, Johannes; Pfeiffenberger, Moritz; Schröder, Erik; Ponomarev, Igor; Weber, Yvonne; Gaber, Timo; Schmidt, Michael F G

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy appears to have the potential for achieving a long-term remedy for osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is a risk of adverse reactions, especially when using cytomegalovirus-controlled expression. To provide a safe application, we focused on the expression of therapeutic cytokines [e.g. interleukin (IL)-4] in a disease-responsive manner by use of the previously cloned Cox-2 promoter as 'genetic switch'. In the present study, we report the functionality of a controlled gene therapeutic system in an equine osteoarthritic cell model. Different nonviral transfection reagents were tested for their efficiency on equine chondrocytes stimulated with equine IL-1β or lipopolysaccharide to create an inflammatory environment. To optimize the transfection, we successfully redesigned the vector by excluding the internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). The functionality of our Cox-2 promoter construct with respect to expressing IL-4 was proven at the mRNA and protein levels and the anti-inflammatory potential of IL-4 was confirmed by analyzing the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Nonviral transfection reagents yielded transfection rates from 21% to 44% with control vectors with and without IRES, respectively. Stimulation of equine chondrocytes resulted in a 20-fold increase of mRNA expression of IL-1β. Such exogenous stimulation of chondrocytes transfected with pNCox2-IL4 led to an increase of IL-4 mRNA expression, whereas expression of inflammatory mediators decreased. The timely link between these events confirms the anti-inflammatory potential of synthesized IL-4. We consider that this approach has significant potential for translation into a useful anti-inflammation therapy. Molecular tools such as the described therapeutic plasmid pave the way for a local-controlled, self-limiting gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Control of gag-pol gene expression in the Candida albicans retrotransposon Tca2

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Elaine M; Nieduszynska, Siân R; Brunton, Fiona K; Gibson, Joanne; Glover, L Anne; Stansfield, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Background In the C. albicans retrotransposon Tca2, the gag and pol ORFs are separated by a UGA stop codon, 3' of which is a potential RNA pseudoknot. It is unclear how the Tca2 gag UGA codon is bypassed to allow pol expression. However, in other retroelements, translational readthrough of the gag stop codon can be directed by its flanking sequence, including a 3' pseudoknot. Results The hypothesis was tested that in Tca2, gag stop codon flanking sequences direct translational readthrough and synthesis of a gag-pol fusion protein. Sequence from the Tca2 gag-UGA-pol junction (300 nt) was inserted between fused lacZ and luciferase (luc) genes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae dual reporter construct. Although downstream of UGA, luc was expressed, but its expression was unaffected by inserting additional stop codons at the 3' end of lacZ. Luc expression was instead being driven by a previously unknown minor promoter activity within the gag-pol junction region. Evidence together indicated that junction sequence alone cannot direct UGA readthrough. Using reporter genes in C. albicans, the activities of this gag-pol junction promoter and the Tca2 long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter were compared. Of the two promoters, only the LTR promoter was induced by heat-shock, which also triggers retrotransposition. Tca2 pol protein, epitope-tagged in C. albicans to allow detection, was also heat-shock induced, indicating that pol proteins were expressed from a gag-UGA-pol RNA. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that the LTR promoter directs Tca2 pol protein expression, and that pol proteins are translated from a gag-pol RNA, which thus requires a mechanism for stop codon bypass. However, in contrast to most other retroelement and viral readthrough signals, immediate gag UGA-flanking sequences were insufficient to direct stop readthrough in S. cerevisiae, indicating non-canonical mechanisms direct gag UGA bypass in Tca2. PMID:17961216

  14. Validation of housekeeping genes as internal controls for studying gene expression during Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) development by quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Du, Yishuai; Zhang, Linlin; Xu, Fei; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Guofan; Li, Li

    2013-03-01

    Hatchery-reared larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) often suffer from massive mortality induced by Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infection, indicating the importance of better understanding of oyster immune defense systems. The accuracy of measurements of gene expression levels based on quantitative real-time PCR assays relies on the use of housekeeping genes as internal controls; however, few studies have focused on the selection of such internal controls. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of internal control genes during oyster development in virus-infected and uninfected samples. Transcriptome data for 38 developmental stages were downloaded and the gene expression patterns were classified into 30 clusters. A total of 317 orthologs of classical housekeeping genes in the oyster genome were annotated. After combining the expression profiles and oyster housekeeping gene dataset, 14 candidate internal controls were selected for further investigation: Elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), 18S rRNA (18S), 28S rRNA (28S), Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), β-actin (ACT), Ribosomal protein L7 (RL7), Ribosomal protein L27 (RL27), Ribosomal protein L36 (RL36), Ribosomal protein S18 (RS18), Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (RO21), Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (EF2), Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2D2 (UBCD1), S-phase kinase-associated protein 1 (SKP1) and Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein Q (HNRPQ). RNA was extracted from oyster larvae infected with OsHV-1 (group A; GA), and OsHV-1 free larvae (group B; GB). The expression levels of the 14 candidate internal controls were studied in GA and GB larvae by real-time PCR. Their expression stabilities were further analyzed using the GeNorm program. RL7 and RS18 were the most stable genes in both OsHV-1 infected (GA) and uninfected (GB) larvae. These results suggest that RL7 and RS18 could be used as internal controls for studying gene expression in

  15. Micro-RNA-31 controls hair cycle-associated changes in gene expression programs of the skin and hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Mardaryev, Andrei N; Ahmed, Mohammed I; Vlahov, Nikola V; Fessing, Michael Y; Gill, Jason H; Sharov, Andrey A; Botchkareva, Natalia V

    2010-10-01

    The hair follicle is a cyclic biological system that progresses through stages of growth, regression, and quiescence, which involves dynamic changes in a program of gene regulation. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are critically important for the control of gene expression and silencing. Here, we show that global miRNA expression in the skin markedly changes during distinct stages of the hair cycle in mice. Furthermore, we show that expression of miR-31 markedly increases during anagen and decreases during catagen and telogen. Administration of antisense miR-31 inhibitor into mouse skin during the early- and midanagen phases of the hair cycle results in accelerated anagen development, and altered differentiation of hair matrix keratinocytes and hair shaft formation. Microarray, qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that miR-31 negatively regulates expression of Fgf10, the components of Wnt and BMP signaling pathways Sclerostin and BAMBI, and Dlx3 transcription factor, as well as selected keratin genes, both in vitro and in vivo. Using luciferase reporter assay, we show that Krt16, Krt17, Dlx3, and Fgf10 serve as direct miR-31 targets. Thus, by targeting a number of growth regulatory molecules and cytoskeletal proteins, miR-31 is involved in establishing an optimal balance of gene expression in the hair follicle required for its proper growth and hair fiber formation.

  16. An araC-controlled bacterial cre expression system to produce DNA minicircle vectors for nuclear and mitochondrial gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bigger, B W; Tolmachov, O; Collombet, J M; Fragkos, M; Palaszewski, I; Coutelle, C

    2001-06-22

    The presence of CpG motifs and their associated sequences in bacterial DNA causes an immunotoxic response following the delivery of these plasmid vectors into mammalian hosts. We describe a biotechnological approach to the elimination of this problem by the creation of a bacterial cre recombinase expression system, tightly controlled by the arabinose regulon. This permits the Cre-mediated and -directed excision of the entire bacterial vector sequences from plasmid constructs to create supercoiled gene expression minicircles for gene therapy. Minicircle yields using standard culture volumes are sufficient for most in vitro and in vivo applications whereas minicircle expression in vitro is significantly increased over standard plasmid transfection. By the simple expedient of removing the bacterial DNA complement, we significantly reduce the size and CpG content of these expression vectors, which should also reduce DNA-induced inflammatory responses in a dose-dependent manner. We further describe the generation of minicircle expression vectors for mammalian mitochondrial gene therapy, for which no other vector systems currently exist. The removal of bacterial vector sequences should permit appropriate transcription and correct transcriptional cleavage from the mitochondrial minicircle constructs in a mitochondrial environment and brings the realization of mitochondrial gene therapy a step closer.

  17. Medium-dependent regulation of proteinase gene expression in Lactococcus lactis: control of transcription initiation by specific dipeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Marugg, J D; Meijer, W; van Kranenburg, R; Laverman, P; Bruinenberg, P G; de Vos, W M

    1995-01-01

    Transcriptional gene fusions with the Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase gene (gusA) were used to study the medium- and growth-dependent expression of the divergently transcribed genes involved in proteinase production (prtP and prtM) of Lactococcus lactis SK11. The results show that both the prtP and prtM genes are controlled at the transcriptional level by the peptide content of the medium and, to a lesser extent, by the growth rate. A more than 10-fold regulation in beta-glucuronidase activity was observed for both prtP and prtM promoters in batch and continuous cultures. The level of expression of the prtP and prtM promoters was high in whey permeate medium with relatively low concentrations of peptides, whereas at increased concentrations the expression of the promoters was repressed. The lowest level of expression was observed in peptide- and amino acid-rich laboratory media, such as glucose-M17 and MRS. The addition of specific dipeptides, such as leucylproline and prolylleucine, to the growth medium negatively affected the expression of the prtP-gusA fusions. The repression by dipeptides was not observed in mutants defective in the uptake of di-tripeptides, indicating that the internal concentration of dipeptides or derivatives is important in the regulation of proteinase production. PMID:7768792

  18. Shoot to root communication is necessary to control the expression of iron-acquisition genes in Strategy I plants.

    PubMed

    García, María J; Romera, Francisco J; Stacey, Minviluz G; Stacey, Gary; Villar, Eduardo; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Previous research showed that auxin, ethylene, and nitric oxide (NO) can activate the expression of iron (Fe)-acquisition genes in the roots of Strategy I plants grown with low levels of Fe, but not in plants grown with high levels of Fe. However, it is still an open question as to how Fe acts as an inhibitor and which pool of Fe (e.g., root, phloem, etc.) in the plant acts as the key regulator for gene expression control. To further clarify this, we studied the effect of the foliar application of Fe on the expression of Fe-acquisition genes in several Strategy I plants, including wild-type cultivars of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh], pea [Pisum sativum L.], tomato [Solanum lycopersicon Mill.], and cucumber [Cucumis sativus L.], as well as mutants showing constitutive expression of Fe-acquisition genes when grown under Fe-sufficient conditions [Arabidopsis opt3-2 and frd3-3, pea dgl and brz, and tomato chln (chloronerva)]. The results showed that the foliar application of Fe blocked the expression of Fe-acquisition genes in the wild-type cultivars and in the frd3-3, brz, and chln mutants, but not in the opt3-2 and dgl mutants, probably affected in the transport of a Fe-related repressive signal in the phloem. Moreover, the addition of either ACC (ethylene precursor) or GSNO (NO donor) to Fe-deficient plants up-regulated the expression of Fe-acquisition genes, but this effect did not occur in Fe-deficient plants sprayed with foliar Fe, again suggesting the existence of a Fe-related repressive signal moving from leaves to roots.

  19. Anti‐microbial peptide gene expression during oral vaccination: analysis of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Simuyandi, M.; Kapulu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary We have observed previously that micronutrient supplementation ameliorated suppression of α‐defensin expression during diarrhoea. However, how interactions between anti‐microbial peptide (AMP) expression and diarrhoeal disease are altered by micronutrient supplementation remain unclear. Using oral vaccination as a model of intestinal infection, we measured changes in AMP expression during multiple micronutrient supplementation. In the first part, volunteers underwent duodenal jejunal biopsy before and at 1, 2, 4 or 7 days after administration of one of three live, attenuated oral vaccines against rotavirus, typhoid and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. In the second part, participants were randomized to receive a multiple micronutrient supplement or placebo for 6 weeks before undergoing intestinal biopsy, vaccination against typhoid and rebiopsy after 14 days. Expression of human alpha‐defensin (HD)5, HD6, hBD1, hBD2 and LL‐37 was measured by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, the bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, reduced HD5 expression (P = 0·02, signed‐rank test) and reduced LL‐37 expression in seven of the eight individuals whose biopsies had expression prevaccination (P = 0·03). hBD2 was not detected. In the controlled trial, HD5 and HD6 expression after vaccination was lower [median ratio 0·5, interquartile range (IQR) = 0·07–2·2 and 0·58, IQR = 0·13–2·3, respectively] than before vaccination. There was no significant effect detected of micronutrient supplementation on expression of HD5, HD6, hBD1 or LL‐37. We conclude that live attenuated bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, can reduce intestinal α‐defensins, and typhoid vaccine reduced LL‐37 expression. We found no evidence that micronutrient supplementation in the short term had any impact on anti‐microbial peptide expression. PMID:27465597

  20. Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP1) controls adipogenic gene expression and adipocyte function.

    PubMed

    Erener, Süheda; Hesse, Mareike; Kostadinova, Radina; Hottiger, Michael O

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP1) is a chromatin-associated enzyme that was described to affect chromatin compaction. Previous reports suggested a dynamic modulation of the chromatin landscape during adipocyte differentiation. We thus hypothesized that PARP1 plays an important transcriptional role in adipogenesis and metabolism and therefore used adipocyte development and function as a model to elucidate the molecular action of PARP1 in obesity-related diseases. Our results show that PARP1-dependent ADP-ribose polymer (PAR) formation increases during adipocyte development and, at late time points of adipogenesis, is involved in the sustained expression of PPARγ2 and of PPARγ2 target genes. During adipogenesis, PARP1 was recruited to PPARγ2 target genes such as CD36 or aP2 in a PAR-dependent manner. Our results also reveal a PAR-dependent decrease in repressory histone marks (e.g. H3K9me3) and an increase in stimulatory marks (e.g. H3K4me3) at the PPARγ2 promoter, suggesting that PARP1 may exert its regulatory function during adipogenesis by altering histone marks. Interestingly, activation of PARP1 enzymatic activity was prevented with a topoisomerase II inhibitor. These data hint at topoisomerase II-dependent, transient, site-specific double-strand DNA breaks as the cause for poly(ADP)-ribose formation, adipogenic gene expression, and adipocyte function. Together, our study identifies PARP1 as a critical regulator of PPARγ2-dependent gene expression with implications in adipocyte function and obesity-related disease models.

  1. Environmental control of plant nuclear gene expression by chloroplast redox signals

    PubMed Central

    Pfalz, Jeannette; Liebers, Monique; Hirth, Matthias; Grübler, Björn; Holtzegel, Ute; Schröter, Yvonne; Dietzel, Lars; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Plant photosynthesis takes place in specialized cell organelles, the chloroplasts, which perform all essential steps of this process. The proteins involved in photosynthesis are encoded by genes located on the plastid and nuclear genomes. Proper function and regulation of light harvesting and energy fixation thus requires a tight coordination of the gene expression machineries in the two genetic compartments. This is achieved by a bi-directional exchange of information between nucleus and plastids. Signals emerging from plastids report the functional and developmental state of the organelle to the nucleus and initiate distinct nuclear gene expression profiles, which trigger responses that support or improve plastid functions. Recent research indicated that this signaling is absolutely essential for plant growth and development. Reduction/oxidation (redox) signals from photosynthesis are key players in this information network since they do report functional disturbances in photosynthesis, the primary energy source of plants. Such disturbances are caused by environmental fluctuations for instance in illumination, temperature, or water availability. These environmental changes affect the linear electron flow of photosynthesis and result in changes of the redox state of the components involved [e.g., the plastoquinone (PQ) pool] or coupled to it (e.g., the thioredoxin pool). Thus, the changes in redox state directly reflect the environmental impact and serve as immediate plastidial signals to the nucleus. The triggered responses range from counterbalancing reactions within the physiological range up to severe stress responses including cell death. This review focuses on physiological redox signals from photosynthetic electron transport (PET), their relation to the environment, potential transduction pathways to the nucleus and their impact on nuclear gene expression. PMID:23181068

  2. Karyopherin alpha2: a control step of glucose-sensitive gene expression in hepatic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Guillemain, Ghislaine; Muñoz-Alonso, Maria J; Cassany, Aurélia; Loizeau, Martine; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Leturque, Armelle

    2002-01-01

    Glucose is required for an efficient expression of the glucose transporter GLUT2 and other genes. We have shown previously that the intracytoplasmic loop of GLUT2 can divert a signal, resulting in the stimulation of glucose-sensitive gene transcription. In the present study, by interaction with the GLUT2 loop, we have cloned the rat karyopherin alpha2, a receptor involved in nuclear import. The specificity of the binding was restricted to GLUT2, and not GLUT1 or GLUT4, and to karyopherin alpha2, not alpha1. When rendered irreversible by a cross-linking agent, this transitory interaction was detected in vivo in hepatocytes. A role for karyopherin alpha2 in the transcription of two glucose-sensitive genes was investigated by transfection of native and inactive green fluorescent protein-karyopherin alpha2 in GLUT2-expressing hepatoma cells. The amount of inactive karyopherin alpha2 receptor reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA levels by competition with endogenous active receptor. In contrast, the overexpression of karyopherin alpha2 did not significantly stimulate GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA accumulation in green fluorescent protein-sorted cells. The present study suggests that, in concert with glucose metabolism, karyopherin alpha2 transmits a signal to the nucleus to regulate glucose-sensitive gene expression. The transitory tethering of karyopherin alpha2 to GLUT2 at the plasma membrane might indicate that the receptor can load the cargo to be imported locally. PMID:11988093

  3. Karyopherin alpha2: a control step of glucose-sensitive gene expression in hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Guillemain, Ghislaine; Muñoz-Alonso, Maria J; Cassany, Aurélia; Loizeau, Martine; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Leturque, Armelle

    2002-05-15

    Glucose is required for an efficient expression of the glucose transporter GLUT2 and other genes. We have shown previously that the intracytoplasmic loop of GLUT2 can divert a signal, resulting in the stimulation of glucose-sensitive gene transcription. In the present study, by interaction with the GLUT2 loop, we have cloned the rat karyopherin alpha2, a receptor involved in nuclear import. The specificity of the binding was restricted to GLUT2, and not GLUT1 or GLUT4, and to karyopherin alpha2, not alpha1. When rendered irreversible by a cross-linking agent, this transitory interaction was detected in vivo in hepatocytes. A role for karyopherin alpha2 in the transcription of two glucose-sensitive genes was investigated by transfection of native and inactive green fluorescent protein-karyopherin alpha2 in GLUT2-expressing hepatoma cells. The amount of inactive karyopherin alpha2 receptor reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA levels by competition with endogenous active receptor. In contrast, the overexpression of karyopherin alpha2 did not significantly stimulate GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA accumulation in green fluorescent protein-sorted cells. The present study suggests that, in concert with glucose metabolism, karyopherin alpha2 transmits a signal to the nucleus to regulate glucose-sensitive gene expression. The transitory tethering of karyopherin alpha2 to GLUT2 at the plasma membrane might indicate that the receptor can load the cargo to be imported locally.

  4. Retinal Expression of the Drosophila eyes absent Gene Is Controlled by Several Cooperatively Acting Cis-regulatory Elements.

    PubMed

    Weasner, Bonnie M; Weasner, Brandon P; Neuman, Sarah D; Bashirullah, Arash; Kumar, Justin P

    2016-12-01

    The eyes absent (eya) gene of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a member of an evolutionarily conserved gene regulatory network that controls eye formation in all seeing animals. The loss of eya leads to the complete elimination of the compound eye while forced expression of eya in non-retinal tissues is sufficient to induce ectopic eye formation. Within the developing retina eya is expressed in a dynamic pattern and is involved in tissue specification/determination, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell fate choice. In this report we explore the mechanisms by which eya expression is spatially and temporally governed in the developing eye. We demonstrate that multiple cis-regulatory elements function cooperatively to control eya transcription and that spacing between a pair of enhancer elements is important for maintaining correct gene expression. Lastly, we show that the loss of eya expression in sine oculis (so) mutants is the result of massive cell death and a progressive homeotic transformation of retinal progenitor cells into head epidermis.

  5. Retinal Expression of the Drosophila eyes absent Gene Is Controlled by Several Cooperatively Acting Cis-regulatory Elements

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Sarah D.; Bashirullah, Arash; Kumar, Justin P.

    2016-01-01

    The eyes absent (eya) gene of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a member of an evolutionarily conserved gene regulatory network that controls eye formation in all seeing animals. The loss of eya leads to the complete elimination of the compound eye while forced expression of eya in non-retinal tissues is sufficient to induce ectopic eye formation. Within the developing retina eya is expressed in a dynamic pattern and is involved in tissue specification/determination, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell fate choice. In this report we explore the mechanisms by which eya expression is spatially and temporally governed in the developing eye. We demonstrate that multiple cis-regulatory elements function cooperatively to control eya transcription and that spacing between a pair of enhancer elements is important for maintaining correct gene expression. Lastly, we show that the loss of eya expression in sine oculis (so) mutants is the result of massive cell death and a progressive homeotic transformation of retinal progenitor cells into head epidermis. PMID:27930646

  6. Metatranscriptomic insights on gene expression and regulatory controls in Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis

    DOE PAGES

    Oyserman, Ben O.; Noguera, Daniel R.; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; ...

    2015-11-10

    Previous studies on enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) have focused on reconstructing genomic blueprints for the model polyphosphate-accumulating organism Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis. Here, a time series metatranscriptome generated from enrichment cultures of Accumulibacter was used to gain insight into anerobic/aerobic metabolism and regulatory mechanisms within an EBPR cycle. Co-expressed gene clusters were identified displaying ecologically relevant trends consistent with batch cycle phases. Transcripts displaying increased abundance during anerobic acetate contact were functionally enriched in energy production and conversion, including upregulation of both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound hydrogenases demonstrating the importance of transcriptional regulation to manage energy and electron flux during anerobicmore » acetate contact. We hypothesized and demonstrated hydrogen production after anerobic acetate contact, a previously unknown strategy for Accumulibacter to maintain redox balance. Genes involved in anerobic glycine utilization were identified and phosphorus release after anerobic glycine contact demonstrated, suggesting that Accumulibacter routes diverse carbon sources to acetyl-CoA formation via previously unrecognized pathways. A comparative genomics analysis of sequences upstream of co-expressed genes identified two statistically significant putative regulatory motifs. One palindromic motif was identified upstream of genes involved in PHA synthesis and acetate activation and is hypothesized to be a phaR binding site, hence representing a hypothetical PHA modulon. A second motif was identified ~35 base pairs (bp) upstream of a large and diverse array of genes and hence may represent a sigma factor binding site. As a result, this analysis provides a basis and framework for further investigations into Accumulibacter metabolism and the reconstruction of regulatory networks in uncultured organisms.« less

  7. Metatranscriptomic insights on gene expression and regulatory controls in Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis

    SciTech Connect

    Oyserman, Ben O.; Noguera, Daniel R.; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tringe, Susannah G.; McMahon, Katherine D.

    2015-11-10

    Previous studies on enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) have focused on reconstructing genomic blueprints for the model polyphosphate-accumulating organism Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis. Here, a time series metatranscriptome generated from enrichment cultures of Accumulibacter was used to gain insight into anerobic/aerobic metabolism and regulatory mechanisms within an EBPR cycle. Co-expressed gene clusters were identified displaying ecologically relevant trends consistent with batch cycle phases. Transcripts displaying increased abundance during anerobic acetate contact were functionally enriched in energy production and conversion, including upregulation of both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound hydrogenases demonstrating the importance of transcriptional regulation to manage energy and electron flux during anerobic acetate contact. We hypothesized and demonstrated hydrogen production after anerobic acetate contact, a previously unknown strategy for Accumulibacter to maintain redox balance. Genes involved in anerobic glycine utilization were identified and phosphorus release after anerobic glycine contact demonstrated, suggesting that Accumulibacter routes diverse carbon sources to acetyl-CoA formation via previously unrecognized pathways. A comparative genomics analysis of sequences upstream of co-expressed genes identified two statistically significant putative regulatory motifs. One palindromic motif was identified upstream of genes involved in PHA synthesis and acetate activation and is hypothesized to be a phaR binding site, hence representing a hypothetical PHA modulon. A second motif was identified ~35 base pairs (bp) upstream of a large and diverse array of genes and hence may represent a sigma factor binding site. As a result, this analysis provides a basis and framework for further investigations into Accumulibacter metabolism and the reconstruction of regulatory networks in uncultured organisms.

  8. Metatranscriptomic insights on gene expression and regulatory controls in Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis

    PubMed Central

    Oyserman, Ben O; Noguera, Daniel R; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tringe, Susannah G; McMahon, Katherine D

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) have focused on reconstructing genomic blueprints for the model polyphosphate-accumulating organism Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis. Here, a time series metatranscriptome generated from enrichment cultures of Accumulibacter was used to gain insight into anerobic/aerobic metabolism and regulatory mechanisms within an EBPR cycle. Co-expressed gene clusters were identified displaying ecologically relevant trends consistent with batch cycle phases. Transcripts displaying increased abundance during anerobic acetate contact were functionally enriched in energy production and conversion, including upregulation of both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound hydrogenases demonstrating the importance of transcriptional regulation to manage energy and electron flux during anerobic acetate contact. We hypothesized and demonstrated hydrogen production after anerobic acetate contact, a previously unknown strategy for Accumulibacter to maintain redox balance. Genes involved in anerobic glycine utilization were identified and phosphorus release after anerobic glycine contact demonstrated, suggesting that Accumulibacter routes diverse carbon sources to acetyl-CoA formation via previously unrecognized pathways. A comparative genomics analysis of sequences upstream of co-expressed genes identified two statistically significant putative regulatory motifs. One palindromic motif was identified upstream of genes involved in PHA synthesis and acetate activation and is hypothesized to be a phaR binding site, hence representing a hypothetical PHA modulon. A second motif was identified ~35 base pairs (bp) upstream of a large and diverse array of genes and hence may represent a sigma factor binding site. This analysis provides a basis and framework for further investigations into Accumulibacter metabolism and the reconstruction of regulatory networks in uncultured organisms. PMID:26555245

  9. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  10. Radiation-induced human endogenous retrovirus (HERV)-R env gene expression by epigenetic control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja-Rang; Ahn, Kung; Kim, Yun-Ji; Jung, Yi-Deun; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2012-11-01

    It is commonly accepted that ionizing radiation induces genomic instability by changes in genomic structure, epigenetic regulation and gene expression. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV)-R also are often differentially expressed between normal and disease tissues under unstable genomic conditions and are implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases. To understand the influence of ionizing radiation on HERV-R expression, we performed quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses using γ-irradiated normal human cells. Compared to nonirradiated cells, HERV-R expression was up-regulated in γ-irradiated cells. The regulatory mechanism of HERV-R expression in irradiated cells was investigated by methylation analyses of HERV-R 5'LTRs and treatment with garcinol. These data indicated that the up-regulated transcription of HERV-R may be regulated by radiation-induced epigenetic changes induced by histone modification, and thus could be of great importance for understanding the relationship between radiation-induced biological effects and transposable elements.

  11. Control of alpha-herpesvirus IE gene expression by HCF-1 coupled chromatin modification activities.

    PubMed

    Kristie, Thomas M; Liang, Yu; Vogel, Jodi L

    2010-01-01

    The immediate early genes of the alpha-herpesviruses HSV and VZV are transcriptionally regulated by viral and cellular factors in a complex combinatorial manner. Despite this complexity and the apparent redundancy of activators, the expression of the viral IE genes is critically dependent upon the cellular transcriptional coactivator HCF-1. Although the role of HCF-1 had remained elusive, recent studies have demonstrated that the protein is a component of multiple chromatin modification complexes including the Set1/MLL1 histone H3K4 methyltransferases. Studies using model viral promoter-reporter systems as well as analyses of components recruited to the viral genome during the initiation of infection have elucidated the significance of HCF-1 chromatin modification complexes in contributing to the final state of modified histones assembled on the viral IE promoters. Strikingly, the absence of HCF-1 results in the accumulation of nucleosomes bearing repressive marks on the viral IE promoters and silencing of viral gene expression. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Polycombs and microRNA-223 regulate human granulopoiesis by transcriptional control of target gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zardo, Giuseppe; Ciolfi, Alberto; Vian, Laura; Starnes, Linda M; Billi, Monia; Racanicchi, Serena; Maresca, Carmen; Fazi, Francesco; Travaglini, Lorena; Noguera, Nelida; Mancini, Marco; Nanni, Mauro; Cimino, Giuseppe; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Grignani, Francesco; Nervi, Clara

    2012-04-26

    Epigenetic modifications regulate developmental genes involved in stem cell identity and lineage choice. NFI-A is a posttranscriptional microRNA-223 (miR-223) target directing human hematopoietic progenitor lineage decision: NFI-A induction or silencing boosts erythropoiesis or granulopoiesis, respectively. Here we show that NFI-A promoter silencing, which allows granulopoiesis, is guaranteed by epigenetic events, including the resolution of opposing chromatin "bivalent domains," hypermethylation, recruitment of polycomb (PcG)-RNAi complexes, and miR-223 promoter targeting activity. During granulopoiesis, miR-223 localizes inside the nucleus and targets the NFI-A promoter region containing PcGs binding sites and miR-223 complementary DNA sequences, evolutionarily conserved in mammalians. Remarkably, both the integrity of the PcGs-RNAi complex and DNA sequences matching the seed region of miR-223 are required to induce NFI-A transcriptional silencing. Moreover, ectopic miR-223 expression in human myeloid progenitors causes heterochromatic repression of NFI-A gene and channels granulopoiesis, whereas its stable knockdown produces the opposite effects. Our findings indicate that, besides the regulation of translation of mRNA targets, endogenous miRs can affect gene expression at the transcriptional level, functioning in a critical interface between chromatin remodeling complexes and the genome to direct fate lineage determination of hematopoietic progenitors.

  13. Peripheral blood gene expression patterns discriminate among chronic inflammatory diseases and healthy controls and identify novel targets.

    PubMed

    Mesko, Bertalan; Poliska, Szilard; Szegedi, Andrea; Szekanecz, Zoltan; Palatka, Karoly; Papp, Maria; Nagy, Laszlo

    2010-05-05

    Chronic inflammatory diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis), psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) afflict millions of people worldwide, but their pathogenesis is still not well understood. It is also not well known if distinct changes in gene expression characterize these diseases and if these patterns can discriminate between diseased and control patients and/or stratify the disease. The main focus of our work was the identification of novel markers that overlap among the 3 diseases or discriminate them from each other. Diseased (n = 13, n = 15 and n = 12 in IBD, psoriasis and RA respectively) and healthy patients (n = 18) were recruited based on strict inclusion and exclusion criteria; peripheral blood samples were collected by clinicians (30 ml) in Venous Blood Vacuum Collection Tubes containing EDTA and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated by Ficoll gradient centrifugation. RNA was extracted using Trizol reagent. Gene expression data was obtained using TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) containing 96 genes that were selected by an algorithm and the statistical analyses were performed in Prism by using non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test (P-values < 0.05). Here we show that using a panel of 96 disease associated genes and measuring mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood derived mononuclear cells; we could identify disease-specific gene panels that separate each disease from healthy controls. In addition, a panel of five genes such as ADM, AQP9, CXCL2, IL10 and NAMPT discriminates between all samples from patients with chronic inflammation and healthy controls. We also found genes that stratify the diseases and separate different subtypes or different states of prognosis in each condition. These findings and the identification of five universal markers of chronic inflammation suggest that these diseases have a common background in pathomechanism, but still can be separated by peripheral blood

  14. Stochastic Mechanisms in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdams, Harley H.; Arkin, Adam

    1997-02-01

    In cellular regulatory networks, genetic activity is controlled by molecular signals that determine when and how often a given gene is transcribed. In genetically controlled pathways, the protein product encoded by one gene often regulates expression of other genes. The time delay, after activation of the first promoter, to reach an effective level to control the next promoter depends on the rate of protein accumulation. We have analyzed the chemical reactions controlling transcript initiation and translation termination in a single such ``genetically coupled'' link as a precursor to modeling networks constructed from many such links. Simulation of the processes of gene expression shows that proteins are produced from an activated promoter in short bursts of variable numbers of proteins that occur at random time intervals. As a result, there can be large differences in the time between successive events in regulatory cascades across a cell population. In addition, the random pattern of expression of competitive effectors can produce probabilistic outcomes in switching mechanisms that select between alternative regulatory paths. The result can be a partitioning of the cell population into different phenotypes as the cells follow different paths. There are numerous unexplained examples of phenotypic variations in isogenic populations of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells that may be the result of these stochastic gene expression mechanisms.

  15. AllR Controls the Expression of Streptomyces coelicolor Allantoin Pathway Genes

    PubMed Central

    Navone, Laura; Macagno, Juan Pablo; Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtémoc; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K.; Gramajo, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces species are native inhabitants of soil, a natural environment where nutrients can be scarce and competition fierce. They have evolved ways to metabolize unusual nutrients, such as purines and its derivatives, which are highly abundant in soil. Catabolism of these uncommon carbon and nitrogen sources needs to be tightly regulated in response to nutrient availability and environmental stimulus. Recently, the allantoin degradation pathway was characterized in Streptomyces coelicolor. However, there are questions that remained unanswered, particularly regarding pathway regulation. Here, using a combination of proteomics and genetic approaches, we identified the negative regulator of the allantoin pathway, AllR. In vitro studies confirmed that AllR binds to the promoter regions of allantoin catabolic genes and determined the AllR DNA binding motif. In addition, effector studies showed that allantoic acid, and glyoxylate, to a lesser extent, inhibit the binding of AllR to the DNA. Inactivation of AllR repressor leads to the constitutive expression of the AllR regulated genes and intriguingly impairs actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin production. Genetics and proteomics analysis revealed that among all genes from the allantoin pathway that are upregulated in the allR mutant, the hyi gene encoding a hydroxypyruvate isomerase (Hyi) is responsible of the impairment of antibiotic production. PMID:26187964

  16. Argonaute and the Nuclear RNAs: New Pathways for RNA-Mediated Control of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    Small RNAs are a commonly used tool for gene silencing and a promising platform for nucleic acid drug development. They are almost exclusively used to silence gene expression post-transcriptionally through degradation of mRNA. Small RNAs, however, can have a broader range of function by binding to Argonaute proteins and associating with complementary RNA targets in the nucleus, including long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and pre-mRNA. Argonaute–RNA complexes can regulate nuclear events like transcription, genome maintenance, and splicing. Thousands of lncRNAs and alternatively spliced pre-mRNA isoforms exist in humans, and these RNAs may serve as natural targets for regulation and therapeutic intervention. This review describes nuclear mechanisms for Argonaute proteins and small RNAs, new pathways for sequence-specific targeting, and the potential for therapeutic development of small RNAs with nuclear targets. PMID:22283730

  17. A Hox gene controls lateral line cell migration by regulating chemokine receptor expression downstream of Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Breau, Marie A; Wilkinson, David G; Xu, Qiling

    2013-10-15

    The posterior lateral line primordium in zebrafish provides an amenable model to study mechanisms of collective cell migration. The directed migration of the cell cluster along the path of Sdf1a chemokine requires two receptors, Cxcr4b and Cxcr7b, which are expressed in the leading and trailing part of the primordium, respectively. The polarized expression of receptors is regulated by Wnt signaling, but downstream players mediating this control remain to be found. Here, we show that the Hox homeobox gene Hoxb8a is a critical component that acts downstream of the Wnt pathway to coordinate the expression of both chemokine receptors. We find that Hoxb8a is expressed in the leading part of the primordium and is required for the correct speed and extent of migration. Hoxb8a expression is dependent upon Wnt activity and needed both for cxcr4b expression and to repress and thus restrict cxcr7b expression to the trailing zone of the primordium. In the absence of Wnt activity, overexpressed Hoxb8a is able to repress cxcr7b but not up-regulate cxcr4b expression. Together with results from expressing dominant activator and repressor constructs, these findings suggest that Hoxb8a is induced by and cooperates with Wnt signaling to up-regulate cxcr4b, and acts through multiple mechanisms to repress cxcr7b expression.

  18. Regulatory regions that control expression of two chloramphenicol-inducible cat genes cloned in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Duvall, E J; Williams, D M; Mongkolsuk, S; Lovett, P S

    1984-06-01

    Plasmid pPL603 is a promoter cloning vector for Bacillus subtilis and consists of a 1.1-kilobase fragment of Bacillus pumilus DNA inserted between the EcoRI and BamHI sites of pUB110. The gene cat-86, specifying chloramphenicol-inducible chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, is located on the 1.1-kilobase cloned DNA. When pPL603 is present in B. subtilis, cat-86 is unexpressed during vegetative growth but expressed during sporulation. The regulation of cat-86 in pPL603 is due to sequences within two restriction fragments, designated P1 and R1, that precede the main coding portion of the gene. The P1 fragment promotes transcription of cat-86 only during sporulation, whereas the adjacent R1 fragment lacks promoter function but contains sequences essential to chloramphenicol inducibility. A second B. pumilus gene, cat-66, was cloned in B. subtilis and is expressed throughout the vegetative growth and sporulation cycle. The cat-66 coding region is preceded by two adjacent restriction fragments designated as P2 and R2. P1 and P2 are identical in size and share 95% conservation of base sequence. R1 and R2 are also identical in size and share 91% conservation of base sequence. Fragment substitution experiments demonstrate that R2 can functionally replace R1. The substitution of P2 for P1 promotes cat-86 expression throughout vegetative growth and sporulation. Analysis of a derivative of pPL603 in which P2 has replaced P1 demonstrates that P2 promotes transcription of cat-86 during vegetative growth and that P2 contains the start site for transcription of cat-86. Thus, P1 and P2 differ strikingly in vegetative promoter function, yet they differ by single-base substitutions at only 11 positions of 203.

  19. The Chromatin Protein DUET/MMD1 Controls Expression of the Meiotic Gene TDM1 during Male Meiosis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Andreuzza, Sébastien; Nishal, Bindu; Singh, Aparna; Siddiqi, Imran

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis produces haploid cells essential for sexual reproduction. In yeast, entry into meiosis activates transcription factors which trigger a transcriptional cascade that results in sequential co-expression of early, middle and late meiotic genes. However, these factors are not conserved, and the factors and regulatory mechanisms that ensure proper meiotic gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes are poorly understood. Here, we report that DUET/MMD1, a PHD finger protein essential for Arabidopsis male meiosis, functions as a transcriptional regulator in plant meiosis. We find that DUET-PHD binds H3K4me2 in vitro, and show that this interaction is critical for function during meiosis. We also show that DUET is required for proper microtubule organization during meiosis II, independently of its function in meiosis I. Remarkably, DUET protein shows stage-specific expression, confined to diplotene. We identify two genes TDM1 and JAS with critical functions in cell cycle transitions and spindle organization in male meiosis, as DUET targets, with TDM1 being a direct target. Thus, DUET is required to regulate microtubule organization and cell cycle transitions during male meiosis, and functions as a direct transcription activator of the meiotic gene TDM1. Expression profiling showed reduced expression of a subset comprising about 12% of a known set of meiosis preferred genes in the duet mutant. Our results reveal the action of DUET as a transcriptional regulator during male meiosis in plants, and suggest that transcription of meiotic genes is under stagewise control in plants as in yeast. PMID:26348709

  20. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor N-terminal domain controls isotype-selective gene expression and adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hummasti, Sarah; Tontonoz, Peter

    2006-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARgamma, PPARalpha, and PPARdelta) are important regulators of lipid metabolism. Although they share significant structural similarity, the biological effects associated with each PPAR isotype are distinct. For example, PPARalpha and PPARdelta regulate fatty acid catabolism, whereas PPARgamma controls lipid storage and adipogenesis. The different functions of PPARs in vivo can be explained at least in part by the different tissue distributions of the three receptors. The question of whether the receptors have different intrinsic activities and regulate distinct target genes, however, has not been adequately explored. We have engineered cell lines that express comparable amounts of each receptor. Transcriptional profiling of these cells in the presence of selective agonists reveals partially overlapping but distinct patterns of gene regulation by the three PPARs. Moreover, analysis of chimeric receptors points to the N terminus of each receptor as the key determinant of isotype-selective gene expression. For example, the N terminus of PPARgamma confers the ability to promote adipocyte differentiation when fused to the PPARdelta DNA binding domain and ligand binding domain, whereas the N terminus of PPARdelta leads to the inappropriate expression of fatty acid oxidation genes in differentiated adipocytes when fused to PPARgamma. Finally, we demonstrate that the N terminus of each receptor functions in part to limit receptor activity because deletion of the N terminus leads to nonselective activation of target genes. A more detailed understanding of the mechanisms by which the individual PPARs differentially regulate gene expression should aid in the design of more effective drugs, including tissue- and target gene-selective PPAR modulators.

  1. Evaluating Light-Induced Promoters for the Control of Heterologous Gene Expression in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Albers, Stevan C; Peebles, Christie A M

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are enticing microbial factories, but little is understood how their gene control elements respond to the periodic availability to light. This research tested the capability of PpsbAII to control gene expression during light/dark conditions when moved to a neutral location within the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 genome. When the eYFP reporter gene was run by PpsbAII in the promoter's native genomic location, mutants exposed to 12-hour light conditions experienced a 15.8× increase in transcript abundance over that observed from the same construct exposed to 12-hour dark conditions. When this same construct was moved to the hypothetical coding region slr0168 in the genome, transcripts generated during 12 hour light conditions accumulated to 1.67X of the levels of transcripts generated by the same construct during 12 hour dark conditions. Three additional promoter constructs, PpsbAIII , PgroEL2 , and PsigD were also tested for differential expression in light and dark conditions within the neutral region slr0168. While low amounts of transcript accumulation were observed from PgroEL2 and PsigD , the PpsbAIII construct accumulated 5.79× more transcripts when compared to transcript abundance during dark conditions, which highlights the potential of this promoter to control gene expression during diel-cycle light conditions. Additionally, nucleotide mutations were made to regions within PpsbAII . Mutations to the cis-acting hexo-nucleotide region increased expression 3.71× over that of the native promoter, while the addition of the "HLR" nucleotide region to the PpsbAII::ΔHex construct increased expression 2.76× over that of the native promoter. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:45-53, 2017.

  2. Region between the canine distemper virus M and F genes modulates virulence by controlling fusion protein expression.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Danielle E; von Messling, Veronika

    2008-11-01

    Morbilliviruses, including measles and canine distemper virus (CDV), are nonsegmented, negative-stranded RNA viruses that cause severe diseases in humans and animals. The transcriptional units in their genomes are separated by untranslated regions (UTRs), which contain essential transcription and translation signals. Due to its increased length, the region between the matrix (M) protein and fusion (F) protein open reading frames is of particular interest. In measles virus, the entire F 5' region is untranslated, while several start codons are found in most other morbilliviruses, resulting in a long F protein signal peptide (Fsp). To characterize the role of this region in morbillivirus pathogenesis, we constructed recombinant CDVs, in which either the M-F UTR was replaced with that between the nucleocapsid (N) and phosphoprotein (P) genes, or 106 Fsp residues were deleted. The Fsp deletion alone had no effect in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, substitution of the UTR was associated with a slight increase in F gene and protein expression. Animals infected with this virus either recovered completely or experienced prolonged disease and death due to neuroinvasion. The combination of both changes resulted in a virus with strongly increased F gene and protein expression and complete attenuation. Taken together, our results provide evidence that the region between the morbillivirus M and F genes modulates virulence through transcriptional control of the F gene expression.

  3. Foxp1 in forebrain pyramidal neurons controls gene expression required for spatial learning and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Daniel J; Toriumi, Kazuya; Escamilla, Christine O; Kulkarni, Ashwinikumar; Anderson, Ashley G; Harper, Matthew; Usui, Noriyoshi; Ellegood, Jacob; Lerch, Jason P; Birnbaum, Shari G; Tucker, Haley O; Powell, Craig M; Konopka, Genevieve

    2017-10-04

    Genetic perturbations of the transcription factor Forkhead Box P1 (FOXP1) are causative for severe forms of autism spectrum disorder that are often comorbid with intellectual disability. Recent work has begun to reveal an important role for FoxP1 in brain development, but the brain-region-specific contributions of Foxp1 to autism and intellectual disability phenotypes have yet to be fully determined. Here, we describe Foxp1 conditional knockout (Foxp1(cKO) ) male and female mice with loss of Foxp1 in the pyramidal neurons of the neocortex and the CA1/CA2 subfields of the hippocampus. Foxp1(cKO) mice exhibit behavioral phenotypes that are of potential relevance to autism spectrum disorder including hyperactivity, increased anxiety, communication impairments, and decreased sociability. In addition, Foxp1(cKO) mice have gross deficits in learning and memory tasks of relevance to intellectual disability. Using a genome-wide approach, we identified differentially expressed genes in the hippocampus of Foxp1(cKO) mice associated with synaptic function and development. Furthermore, using magnetic resonance imaging, we uncovered a significant reduction in the volumes of both the entire hippocampus as well as individual hippocampal subfields of Foxp1(cKO) mice. Finally, we observed reduced maintenance of long-term potentiation in area CA1 of the hippocampus in these mutant mice. Together, these data suggest that proper expression of Foxp1 in the pyramidal neurons of the forebrain is important for regulating gene expression pathways that contribute to specific behaviors reminiscent of those seen in autism and intellectual disability. In particular, Foxp1 regulation of gene expression appears to be crucial for normal hippocampal development, CA1 plasticity, and spatial learning.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTLoss-of-function mutations in the transcription factor FOXP1 lead to autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Understanding the potential brain

  4. A synthetic library of RNA control modules for predictable tuning of gene expression in yeast.

    PubMed

    Babiskin, Andrew H; Smolke, Christina D

    2011-03-01

    Advances in synthetic biology have resulted in the development of genetic tools that support the design of complex biological systems encoding desired functions. The majority of efforts have focused on the development of regulatory tools in bacteria, whereas fewer tools exist for the tuning of expression levels in eukaryotic organisms. Here, we describe a novel class of RNA-based control modules that provide predictable tuning of expression levels in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A library of synthetic control modules that act through posttranscriptional RNase cleavage mechanisms was generated through an in vivo screen, in which structural engineering methods were applied to enhance the insulation and modularity of the resulting components. This new class of control elements can be combined with any promoter to support titration of regulatory strategies encoded in transcriptional regulators and thus more sophisticated control schemes. We applied these synthetic controllers to the systematic titration of flux through the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway, providing insight into endogenous control strategies and highlighting the utility of this control module library for manipulating and probing biological systems.

  5. A transgenic approach to control hemipteran insects by expressing insecticidal genes under phloem-specific promoters

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, Shaista; Amin, Imran; Jander, Georg; Mukhtar, Zahid; Saeed, Nasir A.; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    The first generation transgenic crops used strong constitutive promoters for transgene expression. However, tissue-specific expression is desirable for more precise targeting of transgenes. Moreover, piercing/sucking insects, which are generally resistant to insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins, have emerged as a major pests since the introduction of transgenic crops expressing these toxins. Phloem-specific promoters isolated from Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) were used for the expression of two insecticidal proteins, Hadronyche versuta (Blue Mountains funnel-web spider) neurotoxin (Hvt) and onion leaf lectin, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Here we demonstrate that transgenic plants expressing Hvt alone or in combination with onion leaf lectin are resistant to Phenacoccus solenopsis (cotton mealybug), Myzus persicae (green peach aphids) and Bemisia tabaci (silver leaf whitefly). The expression of both proteins under different phloem-specific promoters resulted in close to 100% mortality and provided more rapid protection than Hvt alone. Our results suggest the employment of the Hvt and onion leaf lectin transgenic constructs at the commercial level will reduce the use of chemical pesticides for control of hemipteran insect pests. PMID:27708374

  6. Light-responsive control of bacterial gene expression: precise triggering of the lac promoter activity using photocaged IPTG.

    PubMed

    Binder, Dennis; Grünberger, Alexander; Loeschcke, Anita; Probst, Christopher; Bier, Claus; Pietruszka, Jörg; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Drepper, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Light can be used to control numerous cellular processes including protein function and interaction as well as gene expression in a non-invasive fashion and with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution. However, for chemical phototriggers tight, gradual, and homogeneous light response has never been attained in living cells. Here, we report on a light-responsive bacterial T7 RNA polymerase expression system based on a photocaged derivative of the inducer molecule isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). We have comparatively analyzed different Escherichia coli lac promoter-regulated expression systems in batch and microfluidic single-cell cultivation. The lacY-deficient E. coli strain Tuner(DE3) harboring additional plasmid-born copies of the lacI gene exhibited a sensitive and defined response to increasing IPTG concentrations. Photocaged IPTG served as a synthetic photo-switch to convert the E. coli system into an optogenetic expression module allowing for precise and gradual light-triggering of gene expression as demonstrated at the single cell level.

  7. Human DNA polymerase alpha gene: sequences controlling expression in cycling and serum-stimulated cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, B E; Nasheuer, H P; Wang, T S

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the DNA polymerase alpha promoter sequence requirements for the expression of a heterologous gene in actively cycling cells and following serum addition to serum-deprived cells. An 11.4-kb genomic clone that spans the 5' end of this gene and includes 1.62 kb of sequence upstream from the translation start site was isolated. The transcription start site was mapped at 46 +/- 1 nucleotides upstream from the translation start site. The upstream sequence is GC rich and lacks a TATA sequence but has a CCAAT sequence on the opposite strand. Analysis of a set of deletion constructs in transient transfection assays demonstrated that efficient expression of the reporter in cycling cells requires 248 bp of sequence upstream from the cap site. Clustered within these 248 nucleotides are sequences similar to consensus sequences for Sp1-, Ap1-, Ap2-, and E2F-binding sites. The CCAAT sequence and the potential E2F- and Ap1-binding sites are shown to be protected from DNase I digestion by partially purified nuclear proteins. The DNA polymerase alpha promoter can confer upon the reporter an appropriate, late response to serum addition. No single sequence element could be shown to confer serum inducibility. Rather, multiple sequence elements appear to mediate the full serum response. Images PMID:2005899

  8. Tumor necrosis factor and transforming growth factor β regulate clock genes by controlling the expression of the cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRBP).

    PubMed

    Lopez, Martin; Meier, Daniel; Müller, Andreas; Franken, Paul; Fujita, Jun; Fontana, Adriano

    2014-01-31

    The circadian clock drives the rhythmic expression of a broad array of genes that orchestrate metabolism, sleep wake behavior, and the immune response. Clock genes are transcriptional regulators engaged in the generation of circadian rhythms. The cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRBP) guarantees high amplitude expression of clock. The cytokines TNF and TGFβ impair the expression of clock genes, namely the period genes and the proline- and acidic amino acid-rich basic leucine zipper (PAR-bZip) clock-controlled genes. Here, we show that TNF and TGFβ impair the expression of Cirbp in fibroblasts and neuronal cells. IL-1β, IL-6, IFNα, and IFNγ do not exert such effects. Depletion of Cirbp is found to increase the susceptibility of cells to the TNF-mediated inhibition of high amplitude expression of clock genes and modulates the TNF-induced cytokine response. Our findings reveal a new mechanism of cytokine-regulated expression of clock genes.

  9. Expression of bvg-repressed genes in Bordetella pertussis is controlled by RisA through a novel c-di-GMP signaling pathway

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The BvgAS two component system of Bordetella pertussis controls virulence factor expression. In addition, BvgAS controls expression of the bvg-repressed genes through the action of the repressor, BvgR. The transcription factor RisA is inhibited by BvgR, and when BvgR is not expressed RisA induces th...

  10. Mapping the mouse dactylaplasia mutation, Dac, and a gene that controls its expression, mdac

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.R.; Lane, P.W.; Ward-Bailey, P.; Davisson, M.T.

    1995-09-20

    Dactylaplasia is an inherited mouse limb malformation whose manifestation is clearly dependent on the interaction of two genes and thus represents an excellent model system for studying such gene interactions in vivo. The Dac mutation is inherited as a semidominant trait and may be a model for some forms of human ectrodactyly. Heterozygotes show absence of digits on each foot; the long bones are normal. On the SM/Ckc background on which the mutation occurred, Dac homozygotes die around birth. We mapped Dac to the distal end of Chr 19 by backcross segregation analysis. A closely linked marker was then used to distinguish -/+, Dac/+, and Dac/Dac genotypes of embryos and adults. When intercrossed with the NZB/BINJ strain, DAC homozygotes were shown to be viable and fertile, but had a more severe limb malformation (only a single remaining digit) than heterozygotes. Expression of the abnormal limb phenotypes of Dac/+ and Dac/Dac mice also depends on homozygosity for a recessive allele of another unlinked gene, mdac, that is polymorphic among inbred mouse strains. We mapped mdac to the middle Chr 13 by segregation analysis of both recombinant inbred strains and backcross progeny. 52 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Ovine aquaporin-2: cDNA cloning, ontogeny and control of renal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Butkus, A; Earnest, L; Jeyaseelan, K; Moritz, K; Johnston, H; Tenis, N; Wintour, E M

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the relative insensitivity of the ovine fetal kidney to arginine vasopressin (AVP) is due to low levels of expression of the gene for aquaporin-2 (AQP2) which encodes the AVP-regulated water channel. We report the cloning of the cDNA for the ovine AQP2 which has a major transcript at 4.2 kilobases (kb) and a minor transcript at 1.5 kb, resembling the human gene transcripts. At 40-60 days' (term = 145-150 days'), mRNA levels are very low, detectable only by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). By Northern blot analysis AQP2 mRNA is detectable at 75 days'. The ratio of AQP2/glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA increases approximately 2.4-fold between 100 and 140 days' when it is about 41% of adult values. Both glucocorticoids and the renin-angiotensin system are involved in maturation of renal function. When fetuses at 75 or 85 days of gestation were exposed to high levels of dexamethasone for 2-3 days, mRNAs for both GAPDH and AQP2 doubled, but the ratio was unchanged. Angiotensin I, infused for 3 days at 115-120 days' gestation, increased the AQP2/GAPDH mRNA ratios by twofold (major transcript) and sixfold (minor transcript), which were highly significant (P<0.001). The increasing sensitivity of the ovine fetal kidney to AVP, from 100-140 days of gestation, is largely due to increasing AQP2 gene expression over this period.

  12. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  13. Thyroglobulin repression of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) gene expression is mediated by decreased DNA binding of nuclear factor I proteins which control constitutive TTF-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, M; Chung, H K; Ulianich, L; Grassadonia, A; Suzuki, K; Kohn, L D

    2000-11-01

    Follicular thyroglobulin (TG) selectively suppresses the expression of thyroid-restricted transcription factors, thereby altering the expression of thyroid-specific proteins. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which TG suppresses the prototypic thyroid-restricted transcription factor, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), in rat FRTL-5 thyrocytes. We show that the region between bp -264 and -153 on the TTF-1 promoter contains two nuclear factor I (NFI) elements whose function is involved in TG-mediated suppression. Thus, NFI binding to these elements is critical for constitutive expression of TTF-1; TG decreases NFI binding to the NFI elements in association with TG repression. NFI is a family of transcription factors that is ubiquitously expressed and contributes to constitutive and cell-specific gene expression. In contrast to the contribution of NFI proteins to constitutive gene expression in other systems, we demonstrate that follicular TG transcriptionally represses all NFI RNAs (NFI-A, -B, -C, and -X) in association with decreased NFI binding and that the RNA levels decrease as early as 4 h after TG treatment. Although TG treatment for 48 h results in a decrease in NFI protein-DNA complexes measured in DNA mobility shift assays, NFI proteins are still detectable by Western analysis. We show, however, that the binding of all NFI proteins is redox regulated. Thus, diamide treatment of nuclear extracts strongly reduces the binding of NFI proteins, and the addition of higher concentrations of dithiothreitol to nuclear extracts from TG-treated cells restores NFI-DNA binding to levels in extracts from untreated cells. We conclude that NFI binding to two NFI elements, at bp -264 to -153, positively regulates TTF-1 expression and controls constitutive TTF-1 levels. TG mediates the repression of TTF-1 gene expression by decreasing NFI RNA and protein levels, as well as by altering the binding activity of NFI, which is redox controlled.

  14. Gene expression changes controlling distinct adaptations in the heart and skeletal muscle of a hibernating mammal

    PubMed Central

    Vermillion, Katie L.; Anderson, Kyle J.; Hampton, Marshall

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the hibernation season, the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) experiences extreme fluctuations in heart rate, metabolism, oxygen consumption, and body temperature, along with prolonged fasting and immobility. These conditions necessitate different functional requirements for the heart, which maintains contractile function throughout hibernation, and the skeletal muscle, which remains largely inactive. The adaptations used to maintain these contractile organs under such variable conditions serves as a natural model to study a variety of medically relevant conditions including heart failure and disuse atrophy. To better understand how two different muscle tissues maintain function throughout the extreme fluctuations of hibernation we performed Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing of cDNAs to compare the transcriptome of heart and skeletal muscle across the circannual cycle. This analysis resulted in the identification of 1,076 and 1,466 differentially expressed genes in heart and skeletal muscle, respectively. In both heart and skeletal muscle we identified a distinct cold-tolerant mechanism utilizing peroxisomal metabolism to make use of elevated levels of unsaturated depot fats. The skeletal muscle transcriptome also shows an early increase in oxidative capacity necessary for the altered fuel utilization and increased oxygen demand of shivering. Expression of the fetal gene expression profile is used to maintain cardiac tissue, either through increasing myocyte size or proliferation of resident cardiomyocytes, while skeletal muscle function and mass are protected through transcriptional regulation of pathways involved in protein turnover. This study provides insight into how two functionally distinct muscles maintain function under the extreme conditions of mammalian hibernation. PMID:25572546

  15. Assessing technical performance in differential gene expression experiments with external spike-in RNA control ratio mixtures.

    PubMed

    Munro, Sarah A; Lund, Steven P; Pine, P Scott; Binder, Hans; Clevert, Djork-Arné; Conesa, Ana; Dopazo, Joaquin; Fasold, Mario; Hochreiter, Sepp; Hong, Huixiao; Jafari, Nadereh; Kreil, David P; Łabaj, Paweł P; Li, Sheng; Liao, Yang; Lin, Simon M; Meehan, Joseph; Mason, Christopher E; Santoyo-Lopez, Javier; Setterquist, Robert A; Shi, Leming; Shi, Wei; Smyth, Gordon K; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Su, Zhenqiang; Tong, Weida; Wang, Charles; Wang, Jian; Xu, Joshua; Ye, Zhan; Yang, Yong; Yu, Ying; Salit, Marc

    2014-09-25

    There is a critical need for standard approaches to assess, report and compare the technical performance of genome-scale differential gene expression experiments. Here we assess technical performance with a proposed standard 'dashboard' of metrics derived from analysis of external spike-in RNA control ratio mixtures. These control ratio mixtures with defined abundance ratios enable assessment of diagnostic performance of differentially expressed transcript lists, limit of detection of ratio (LODR) estimates and expression ratio variability and measurement bias. The performance metrics suite is applicable to analysis of a typical experiment, and here we also apply these metrics to evaluate technical performance among laboratories. An interlaboratory study using identical samples shared among 12 laboratories with three different measurement processes demonstrates generally consistent diagnostic power across 11 laboratories. Ratio measurement variability and bias are also comparable among laboratories for the same measurement process. We observe different biases for measurement processes using different mRNA-enrichment protocols.

  16. Phylogenetic comparisons suggest that distance from the locus control region guides developmental expression of primate β-type globin genes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Robert M.; Prychitko, Tom; Gumucio, Deborah; Wildman, Derek E.; Uddin, Monica; Goodman, Morris

    2006-01-01

    Phylogenetic inferences drawn from comparative data on mammalian β-globin gene clusters indicate that the ancestral primate cluster contained a locus control region (LCR) and five paralogously related β-type globin loci (5′-LCR-ε-γ-ψη-δ-β-3′), with ε and γ expressed solely during embryonic life. A γ locus tandem duplication (5′-γ1-γ2-3′) triggered γ’s evolution toward fetal expression but by a different trajectory in platyrrhines (New World monkeys) than in catarrhines (Old World monkeys and apes, including humans). In platyrrhine (e.g., Cebus) fetuses, γ1 at the ancestral distance from ε is down-regulated, whereas γ2 at increased distance is up-regulated. Catarrhine γ1 and γ2 acquired longer distances from ε (14 and 19 kb, respectively), and both are up-regulated throughout fetal life with γ1’s expression predominating over γ2’s. On enlarging the platyrrhine expression data, we find Aotus γ is embryonic, Alouatta γ is inactive at term, and in Callithrix, γ1 is down-regulated fetally, whereas γ2 is up-regulated. Of eight mammalian taxa now represented per taxon by embryonic, fetal, and postnatal β-type globin gene expression data, four taxa are primates, and data for three of these primates are from this laboratory. Our results support a model in which a short distance (<10 kb) between ε and the adjacent γ is a plesiomorphic character that allows the LCR to drive embryonic expression of both genes, whereas a longer distance (>10 kb) impedes embryonic activation of the downstream gene. PMID:16488971

  17. Systematic Dissection of the Sequence Determinants of Gene 3’ End Mediated Expression Control

    PubMed Central

    Lubliner, Shai; Regev, Ifat; Lotan-Pompan, Maya; Yakhini, Zohar; Segal, Eran

    2015-01-01

    The 3’end genomic region encodes a wide range of regulatory process including mRNA stability, 3’ end processing and translation. Here, we systematically investigate the sequence determinants of 3’ end mediated expression control by measuring the effect of 13,000 designed 3’ end sequence variants on constitutive expression levels in yeast. By including a high resolution scanning mutagenesis of more than 200 native 3’ end sequences in this designed set, we found that most mutations had only a mild effect on expression, and that the vast majority (~90%) of strongly effecting mutations localized to a single positive TA-rich element, similar to a previously described 3’ end processing efficiency element, and resulted in up to ten-fold decrease in expression. Measurements of 3’ UTR lengths revealed that these mutations result in mRNAs with aberrantly long 3’UTRs, confirming the role for this element in 3’ end processing. Interestingly, we found that other sequence elements that were previously described in the literature to be part of the polyadenylation signal had a minor effect on expression. We further characterize the sequence specificities of the TA-rich element using additional synthetic 3’ end sequences and show that its activity is sensitive to single base pair mutations and strongly depends on the A/T content of the surrounding sequences. Finally, using a computational model, we show that the strength of this element in native 3’ end sequences can explain some of their measured expression variability (R = 0.41). Together, our results emphasize the importance of efficient 3’ end processing for endogenous protein levels and contribute to an improved understanding of the sequence elements involved in this process. PMID:25875337

  18. Estrogens maintain bone mass by regulating expression of genes controlling function and life span in mature osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Imai, Yuuki; Youn, Ming-Young; Kondoh, Shino; Nakamura, Takashi; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Takada, Ichiro; Takaoka, Kunio; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-09-01

    Estrogens play a key role in regulation of bone mass and strength by controlling activity of bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Cellular effects of estrogens are mediated predominantly by the action of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). In earlier studies, ablation of the ERalpha gene in mice did not result in osteoporotic phenotypes due to systemic endocrine disturbance and compensatory effects of elevated levels of testosterone. Despite the relatively well-established effects in osteoblasts, little is known about the direct action of estrogen in osteoclasts. Development in the last decade of more sophisticated genetic manipulation approaches opened new possibilities to explore cell-specific roles of nuclear receptors in bone tissue. Recently, we have generated osteoclast-specific ERalpha gene knockout mice and shown that in vivo estrogens directly regulate the life span of mature osteoclasts by inducing the expression of pro-apoptotic Fas ligand (FasL). Inhibitory effects of estrogens on osteoclast function were further studied in vitro. We observed sufficiently detectable ERalpha expression in osteoclasts differentiating from primary bone marrow cells or RAW264 cells, although levels of ERalpha were decreasing during progression of the differentiation into mature osteoclasts. Treatment with estrogens led to reduction in expression of osteoclast-specific genes controlling bone resorption activity. However, estrogens did not affect the size of multinucleated osteoclasts or number of nuclei in a mature osteoclast. In conclusion, in osteoclasts, estrogens function to inhibit bone resorption activity and vitality rather than differentiation.

  19. Identification of Multicomponent Histidine-Aspartate Phosphorelay System Controlling Flagellar and Motility Gene Expression in Geobacter Species*

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Leang, Ching; Inoue, Kengo; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    Geobacter species play an important role in the natural biogeochemical cycles of aquatic sediments and subsurface environments as well as in subsurface bioremediation by oxidizing organic compounds with the reduction of insoluble Fe(III) oxides. Flagellum-based motility is considered to be critical for Geobacter species to locate fresh sources of Fe(III) oxides. Functional and comparative genomic approaches, coupled with genetic and biochemical methods, identified key regulators for flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species. A master transcriptional regulator, designated FgrM, is a member of the enhancer-binding protein family. The fgrM gene in the most studied strain of Geobacter species, Geobacter sulfurreducens strain DL-1, is truncated by a transposase gene, preventing flagellar biosynthesis. Integrating a functional FgrM homolog restored flagellar biosynthesis and motility in G. sulfurreducens DL-1 and enhanced the ability to reduce insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Interrupting the fgrM gene in G. sulfurreducens strain KN400, which is motile, removed the capacity for flagellar production and inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. FgrM, which is also a response regulator of the two-component His-Asp phosphorelay system, was phosphorylated by histidine kinase GHK4, which was essential for flagellar production and motility. GHK4, which is a hybrid kinase with a receiver domain at the N terminus, was phosphorylated by another histidine kinase, GHK3. Therefore, the multicomponent His-Asp phosphorelay system appears to control flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species. PMID:22362768

  20. Identification of multicomponent histidine-aspartate phosphorelay system controlling flagellar and motility gene expression in Geobacter species.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Leang, Ching; Inoue, Kengo; Lovley, Derek R

    2012-03-30

    Geobacter species play an important role in the natural biogeochemical cycles of aquatic sediments and subsurface environments as well as in subsurface bioremediation by oxidizing organic compounds with the reduction of insoluble Fe(III) oxides. Flagellum-based motility is considered to be critical for Geobacter species to locate fresh sources of Fe(III) oxides. Functional and comparative genomic approaches, coupled with genetic and biochemical methods, identified key regulators for flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species. A master transcriptional regulator, designated FgrM, is a member of the enhancer-binding protein family. The fgrM gene in the most studied strain of Geobacter species, Geobacter sulfurreducens strain DL-1, is truncated by a transposase gene, preventing flagellar biosynthesis. Integrating a functional FgrM homolog restored flagellar biosynthesis and motility in G. sulfurreducens DL-1 and enhanced the ability to reduce insoluble Fe(III) oxide. Interrupting the fgrM gene in G. sulfurreducens strain KN400, which is motile, removed the capacity for flagellar production and inhibited Fe(III) oxide reduction. FgrM, which is also a response regulator of the two-component His-Asp phosphorelay system, was phosphorylated by histidine kinase GHK4, which was essential for flagellar production and motility. GHK4, which is a hybrid kinase with a receiver domain at the N terminus, was phosphorylated by another histidine kinase, GHK3. Therefore, the multicomponent His-Asp phosphorelay system appears to control flagellar gene expression in Geobacter species.

  1. Multi-focal control of mitochondrial gene expression by oncogenic MYC provides potential therapeutic targets in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Amanda R.; Adams, Clare M.; Zhang, Xiao-yong; Gennaro, Victoria J.; Pfeiffer, Harla K.; Mellert, Hestia S.; Seidel, Hans E.; Mascioli, Kirsten; Kaplan, Jordan; Gaballa, Mahmoud R.; Shen, Chen; Rigoutsos, Isidore; King, Michael P.; Cotney, Justin L.; Arnold, Jamie J.; Sharma, Suresh D.; Martinez, Ubaldo E.; Vakoc, Christopher R.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Thompson, James E.; Bradner, James E.; Cameron, Craig E.; Shadel, Gerald S.; Eischen, Christine M.; McMahon, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Despite ubiquitous activation in human cancer, essential downstream effector pathways of the MYC transcription factor have been difficult to define and target. Using a structure/function-based approach, we identified the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT) locus as a critical downstream target of MYC. The multifunctional POLRMT enzyme controls mitochondrial gene expression, a process required both for mitochondrial function and mitochondrial biogenesis. We further demonstrate that inhibition of this newly defined MYC effector pathway causes robust and selective tumor cell apoptosis, via an acute, checkpoint-like mechanism linked to aberrant electron transport chain complex assembly and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Fortuitously, MYC-dependent tumor cell death can be induced by inhibiting the mitochondrial gene expression pathway using a variety of strategies, including treatment with FDA-approved antibiotics. In vivo studies using a mouse model of Burkitt's Lymphoma provide pre-clinical evidence that these antibiotics can successfully block progression of MYC-dependent tumors. PMID:27590350

  2. New insights into the signaling pathways controlling defense gene expression in rice roots during the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Campos-Soriano, Lidia; Segundo, Blanca San

    2011-04-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi form a mutualistic relationship with the roots of most plant species. This association provides the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus with sugars while the fungus improves the uptake of water and mineral nutrients in the host plant. Moreover, the induction of defence gene expression in mycorrhizal roots has been described. While salicylic acid (SA)-regulated Pathogenesis-Related (PR) proteins accumulate in rice roots colonized by the AM fungus G. intraradices, the SA content is not significantly altered in the mycorrhizal roots. Sugars, in addition to being a source of carbon for the fungus, might act as signals for the control of defence gene expression. We hypothesize that increased demands for sugars by the fungus might be responsible for the activation of the host defence responses which will then contribute to the stabilization of root colonization by the AM fungus. An excessive root colonization might change a mutualistic association into a parasitic association.

  3. Cloning, expression and characterization of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) gene from flatfish turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Guo, Huarong; Zhang, Shicui; Yin, Licheng; Guo, Bin; Wang, Shaojie

    2008-05-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding translationally controlled tumor protein of marine flatfish turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus), SmTCTP, was isolated with rapid amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). SmTCTP consisted of a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 84 bp, a 3' UTR of 451 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 513 bp, encoding a protein of 170 amino acid residues, which contained two signature sequences of TCTP family. The 5'UTR of SmTCTP started with a 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract (5'-TOP), a typical feature for translationally controlled mRNAs. The deduced amino acid sequence of SmTCTP was similar to the other known vertebrate TCTPs in a range of 58.8% to 64.1%. The length of fish TCTPs was diverse among species, e.g., TCP of turbot and sea perch ( Lateolabrax japonicus) is 170 aa in length, while that of zebrafish ( Danio rerio) and rohu ( Labeo rohita) is 171 aa in length. Northern blot analysis revealed that SmTCTP has only one type of mRNA. Its expression level in albino skin was slightly higher than that in normal skin. We constructed the pET30a- SmTCTP expression plasmid. The recombinant protein of His-tag SmTCTP was over-expressed in E. coli, purified and identified with peptide mass fingerprinting. These results may pave the way of further investigation of the biological function of TCTP in fish.

  4. Stat3 is involved in control of MASP2 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Unterberger, Claudia; Hanson, Steven; Klingenhoff, Andreas; Oesterle, Daniela; Frankenberger, Marion; Endo, Yuichi; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita, Teizo; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Weiss, Elisabeth H.; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Stover, Cordula

    2007-12-28

    Little is known about determinants regulating expression of Mannan-binding lectin associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2), the effector component of the lectin pathway of complement activation. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of the MASP2 promoter regions in human, mouse, and rat, revealed conservation of two putative Stat binding sites, termed StatA and StatB. Site directed mutagenesis specific for these sites was performed. Transcription activity was decreased 5-fold when StatB site was mutated in the wildtype reporter gene construct. Gel retardation and competition assays demonstrated that proteins contained in the nuclear extract prepared from HepG2 specifically bound double-stranded StatB oligonucleotides. Supershift analysis revealed Stat3 to be the major specific binding protein. We conclude that Stat3 binding is important for MASP2 promoter activity.

  5. HIF-1α restricts NF-κB-dependent gene expression to control innate immunity signals

    PubMed Central

    Bandarra, Daniel; Biddlestone, John; Mudie, Sharon; Müller, H.-Arno J.; Rocha, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia and inflammation are intimately linked. It is known that nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) regulates the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) system, but little is known about how HIF regulates NF-κB. Here, we show that HIF-1α represses NF-κB-dependent gene expression. HIF-1α depletion results in increased NF-κB transcriptional activity both in mammalian cells and in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. HIF-1α depletion enhances the NF-κB response, and this required not only the TAK-IKK complex, but also CDK6. Loss of HIF-1α results in an increased angiogenic response in mammalian cancer cells and increased mortality in Drosophila following infection. These results indicate that HIF-1α is required to restrain the NF-κB response, and thus prevents excessive and damaging pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:25510503

  6. Differential control of cellular gene expression by diffusible and non-diffusible EGF.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Chen, G; Imanishi, Y; Morooka, T; Nishida, E; Okabayashi, Y; Kasuga, M

    2001-05-01

    Cell gene expression is affected by both the kind and mode of growth factor stimulation (diffusive vs. non-diffusive). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was pattern-immobilized on a polystyrene plate. Although the growth of the rat phaeochromocytoma cell line PC12 is stimulated by diffusible EGF, and differentiation is stimulated by diffusible nerve growth factor (NGF), immobilized (non-diffusible) EGF stimulated PC12 differentiation. The immobilized EGF caused a long-lasting stimulation of the intracellular signal protein mitogen-associated protein MAP kinase (MAPK, also known as ERK) and p38 (a subfamily of the MAPK superfamily) in cells, as did diffusible NGF. The switching between growth stimulation and differentiation is considered to be due to the duration of the stimulus. The function of the biosignal conjugate was regulated using conjugation methodology.

  7. Ah Receptor Signaling Controls the Expression of Cardiac Development and Homeostasis Genes

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Xiang; Kurita, Hisaka; Ko, Chia-I.; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital abnormality and one of the leading causes of newborn death throughout the world. Despite much emerging scientific information, the precise etiology of this disease remains elusive. Here, we show that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) regulates the expression of crucial cardiogenesis genes and that interference with endogenous AHR functions, either by gene ablation or by agonist exposure during early development, causes overlapping structural and functional cardiac abnormalities that lead to altered fetal heart physiology, including higher heart rates, right and left ventricle dilation, higher stroke volume, and reduced ejection fraction. With striking similarity between AHR knockout (Ahr−/−) and agonist-exposed wild type (Ahr+/+) embryos, in utero disruption of endogenous AHR functions converge into dysregulation of molecular mechanisms needed for attainment and maintenance of cardiac differentiation, including the pivotal signals regulated by the cardiogenic transcription factor NKH2.5, energy balance via oxidative phosphorylation and TCA cycle and global mitochondrial function and homeostasis. Our findings suggest that AHR signaling in the developing mammalian heart is central to the regulation of pathways crucial for cellular metabolism, cardiogenesis, and cardiac function, which are potential targets of environmental factors associated with CHD. PMID:26139165

  8. The genetic control of neocortex volume and covariation with neocortical gene expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gaglani, Shiv M; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W; Rosen, Glenn D

    2009-01-01

    Background The size of the cerebral cortex varies widely within human populations, and a large portion of this variance is modulated by genetic factors. The discovery and characterization of these genes and their variants can contribute to an understanding of individual differences in brain development, behavior, and disease susceptibility. Here we use unbiased stereological techniques to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that modulate the volume of neocortex. Results We estimated volumes bilaterally in an expanded set of BXD recombinant inbred strains (n = 56 strains and 223 animals) taken from the Mouse Brain Library . We generated matched microarray data for the cerebral cortex in the same large panel of strains and in parental neonates to efficiently nominate and evaluate candidate genes. Volume of the neocortex varies widely, and is a heritable trait. Genome-wide mapping of this trait revealed two QTLs – one on chromosome (Chr) 6 at 88 ± 5 Mb and another at Chr 11 (41 ± 8 Mb). We generated both neonatal and adult neocortical gene expression databases using microarray technology. Using these databases in combination with other bioinformatic tools we have identified positional candidates on these QTL intervals. Conclusion This study is the first to use the expanded set of BXD strains to map neocortical volume, and we found that normal variation of this trait is, at least in part, genetically modulated. These results provide a baseline from which to assess the genetic contribution to regional variation in neocortical volume, as well as other neuroanatomic phenotypes that may contribute to variation in regional volume, such as proliferation, death, and number and packing density of neurons PMID:19426526

  9. Light-controlled modulation of gene expression by chemical optoepigenetic probes.

    PubMed

    Reis, Surya A; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J Adam; Szantai-Kis, D Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatiotemporal control. Here we present a generalizable approach, referred to as 'chemo-optical modulation of epigenetically regulated transcription' (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may be translated into new therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required.

  10. Achieving large dynamic range control of gene expression with a compact RNA transcription-translation regulator.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Alexandra M; Lucks, Julius B

    2017-04-06

    RNA transcriptional regulators are emerging as versatile components for genetic network construction. However, these regulators suffer from incomplete repression in their OFF state, making their dynamic range less than that of their protein counterparts. This incomplete repression causes expression leak, which impedes the construction of larger synthetic regulatory networks as leak propagation can interfere with desired network function. To address this, we demonstrate how naturally derived antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators can be configured to regulate both transcription and translation in a single compact RNA mechanism that functions in Escherichia coli. Using in vivo gene expression assays, we show that a combination of transcriptional termination and ribosome binding site sequestration increases repression from 85% to 98%, or activation from 10-fold to over 900-fold, in response to cognate antisense RNAs. We also show that orthogonal repressive versions of this mechanism can be created through engineering minimal antisense RNAs. Finally, to demonstrate the utility of this mechanism, we use it to reduce network leak in an RNA-only cascade. We anticipate these regulators will find broad use as synthetic biology moves beyond parts engineering to the design and construction of more sophisticated regulatory networks.

  11. Achieving large dynamic range control of gene expression with a compact RNA transcription–translation regulator

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract RNA transcriptional regulators are emerging as versatile components for genetic network construction. However, these regulators suffer from incomplete repression in their OFF state, making their dynamic range less than that of their protein counterparts. This incomplete repression causes expression leak, which impedes the construction of larger synthetic regulatory networks as leak propagation can interfere with desired network function. To address this, we demonstrate how naturally derived antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators can be configured to regulate both transcription and translation in a single compact RNA mechanism that functions in Escherichia coli. Using in vivo gene expression assays, we show that a combination of transcriptional termination and ribosome binding site sequestration increases repression from 85% to 98%, or activation from 10-fold to over 900-fold, in response to cognate antisense RNAs. We also show that orthogonal repressive versions of this mechanism can be created through engineering minimal antisense RNAs. Finally, to demonstrate the utility of this mechanism, we use it to reduce network leak in an RNA-only cascade. We anticipate these regulators will find broad use as synthetic biology moves beyond parts engineering to the design and construction of more sophisticated regulatory networks. PMID:28387839

  12. Dysregulation of leukocyte gene expression in women with medication-refractory depression versus healthy non-depressed controls

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Depressive Disorders (DD) are a great financial and social burden. Females display 70% higher rate of depression than males and more than 30% of these patients do not respond to conventional medications. Thus medication-refractory female patients are a large, under-served, group where new biological targets for intervention are greatly needed. Methods We used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to evaluate mRNA gene expression from peripheral blood leukocytes for 27 genes, including immune, HPA-axis, ion channels, and growth and transcription factors. Our sample included 23 females with medication refractory DD: 13 with major depressive disorder (MDD), 10 with bipolar disorder (BPD). Our comparison group was 19 healthy, non-depressed female controls. We examined differences in mRNA expression in DD vs. controls, in MDD vs. BPD, and in patients with greater vs. lesser depression severity. Results DD patients showed increased expression for IL-10, IL-6, OXTR, P2RX7, P2RY1, and TRPV1. BPD patients showed increased APP, CREB1, NFKB1, NR3C1, and SPARC and decreased TNF expression. Depression severity was related to increased IL-10, P2RY1, P2RX1, and TRPV4 expression. Conclusions These results support prior findings of dysregulation in immune genes, and provide preliminary evidence of dysregulation in purinergic and other ion channels in females with medication-refractory depression, and in transcription and growth factors in those with BPD. If replicated in future research examining protein levels as well as mRNA, these pathways could potentially be used to explore biological mechanisms of depression and to develop new drug targets. PMID:24143878

  13. Layered genetic control of DNA methylation and gene expression: a locus of multiple sclerosis in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jean; Bourdon, Celine; Bernard, Manon; Wilson, Michael D.; Reischl, Eva; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ruggeri, Barbara; Schumann, Gunter; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Leemans, Alexander; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leonard, Gabriel; Richer, Louis; Bouchard, Luigi; Gaudet, Daniel; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation may contribute to the etiology of complex genetic disorders through its impact on genome integrity and gene expression; it is modulated by DNA-sequence variants, named methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs). Most meQTLs influence methylation of a few CpG dinucleotides within short genomic regions (<3 kb). Here, we identified a layered genetic control of DNA methylation at numerous CpGs across a long 300 kb genomic region. This control involved a single long-range meQTL and multiple local meQTLs. The long-range meQTL explained up to 75% of variance in methylation of CpGs located over extended areas of the 300 kb region. The meQTL was identified in four samples (P = 2.8 × 10−17, 3.1 × 10−31, 4.0 × 10−71 and 5.2 × 10−199), comprising a total of 2796 individuals. The long-range meQTL was strongly associated not only with DNA methylation but also with mRNA expression of several genes within the 300 kb region (P = 7.1 × 10−18–1.0 × 10−123). The associations of the meQTL with gene expression became attenuated when adjusted for DNA methylation (causal inference test: P = 2.4 × 10−13–7.1 × 10−20), indicating coordinated regulation of DNA methylation and gene expression. Further, the long-range meQTL was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with the most replicated locus of multiple sclerosis, a disease affecting primarily the brain white matter. In middle-aged adults free of the disease, we observed that the risk allele was associated with subtle structural properties of the brain white matter found in multiple sclerosis (P = 0.02). In summary, we identified a long-range meQTL that controls methylation and expression of several genes and may be involved in increasing brain vulnerability to multiple sclerosis. PMID:26220975

  14. Sexually dimorphic control of gene expression in sensory neurons regulates decision-making behavior in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Zoë A; Kim, Dennis H

    2017-01-24

    Animal behavior is directed by the integration of sensory information from internal states and the environment. Neuroendocrine regulation of diverse behaviors of Caenorhabditis elegans is under the control of the DAF-7/TGF-β ligand that is secreted from sensory neurons. Here, we show that C. elegans males exhibit an altered, male-specific expression pattern of daf-7 in the ASJ sensory neuron pair with the onset of reproductive maturity, which functions to promote male-specific mate-searching behavior. Molecular genetic analysis of the switch-like regulation of daf-7 expression in the ASJ neuron pair reveals a hierarchy of regulation among multiple inputs-sex, age, nutritional status, and microbial environment-which function in the modulation of behavior. Our results suggest that regulation of gene expression in sensory neurons can function in the integration of a wide array of sensory information and facilitate decision-making behaviors in C. elegans.

  15. A Microfluidic Device for Temporally Controlled Gene Expression and Long-Term Fluorescent Imaging in Unperturbed Dividing Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Charvin, Gilles; Cross, Frederick R.; Siggia, Eric D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Imaging single cells with fluorescent markers over multiple cell cycles is a powerful tool for unraveling the mechanism and dynamics of the cell cycle. Over the past ten years, microfluidic techniques in cell biology have emerged that allow for good control of growth environment. Yet the control and quantification of transient gene expression in unperturbed dividing cells has received less attention. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe a microfluidic flow cell to grow Saccharomyces Cerevisiae for more than 8 generations (≈12 hrs) starting with single cells, with controlled flow of the growth medium. This setup provides two important features: first, cells are tightly confined and grow in a remarkably planar array. The pedigree can thus be determined and single-cell fluorescence measured with 3 minutes resolution for all cells, as a founder cell grows to a micro-colony of more than 200 cells. Second, we can trigger and calibrate rapid and transient gene expression using reversible administration of inducers that control the GAL1 or MET3 promoters. We then show that periodic 10–20 minutes gene induction pulses can drive many cell division cycles with complete coherence across the cell cluster, with either a G1/S trigger (cln1 cln2 cln3 MET3-CLN2) or a mitotic trigger (cdc20 GALL-CDC20). Conclusions/Significance In addition to evident cell cycle applications, this device can be used to directly measure the amount and duration of any fluorescently scorable signal-transduction or gene-induction response over a long time period. The system allows direct correlation of cell history (e.g., hysteresis or epigenetics) or cell cycle position with the measured response. PMID:18213377

  16. (Im)Perfect robustness and adaptation of metabolic networks subject to metabolic and gene-expression regulation: marrying control engineering with metabolic control analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Fromion, Vincent; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2013-11-21

    Metabolic control analysis (MCA) and supply-demand theory have led to appreciable understanding of the systems properties of metabolic networks that are subject exclusively to metabolic regulation. Supply-demand theory has not yet considered gene-expression regulation explicitly whilst a variant of MCA, i.e. Hierarchical Control Analysis (HCA), has done so. Existing analyses based on control engineering approaches have not been very explicit about whether metabolic or gene-expression regulation would be involved, but designed different ways in which regulation could be organized, with the potential of causing adaptation to be perfect. This study integrates control engineering and classical MCA augmented with supply-demand theory and HCA. Because gene-expression regulation involves time integration, it is identified as a natural instantiation of the 'integral control' (or near integral control) known in control engineering. This study then focuses on robustness against and adaptation to perturbations of process activities in the network, which could result from environmental perturbations, mutations or slow noise. It is shown however that this type of 'integral control' should rarely be expected to lead to the 'perfect adaptation': although the gene-expression regulation increases the robustness of important metabolite concentrations, it rarely makes them infinitely robust. For perfect adaptation to occur, the protein degradation reactions should be zero order in the concentration of the protein, which may be rare biologically for cells growing steadily. A proposed new framework integrating the methodologies of control engineering and metabolic and hierarchical control analysis, improves the understanding of biological systems that are regulated both metabolically and by gene expression. In particular, the new approach enables one to address the issue whether the intracellular biochemical networks that have been and are being identified by genomics and systems

  17. [Design, synthesis and evaluation of polyamide-nucleoside hybrids and oligonucleotides conjugated hybrid as a novel gene expression control compound].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Etsuko; Kamaike, Kazuo

    2010-03-01

    On the basis of reports that a minor groove binder pyrrolepolyamide can interfere with gene expression by the sequence-specific recognition of DNA, we expected that nucleoside bearing a pyrrolepolyamide would be able to regulate gene expression. Therefore, we designed and synthesized the pyrrolepolyamide-adenosine (Hybrid 1) and -2'-deoxyguanosine hybrids (Hybrid 2 and Hybrid 3) as lead compounds for gene expression control compounds. The pyrrolepolyamide frame of Hybrid 2 and Hybrid 3 combines at the 2-exocyclic amino group of the 2'-deoxyguanosine by a linker and the 2-exocyclic amino group of guanine exists in the minor groove side of the duplex. Hybrid 2 is the 2'-deoxyguanosine-pyrrolepolyamide hybrid using the 3-aminopropionyl linker, while Hybrid 3 uses the 3-aminopropyl linker. An evaluation of the DNA binding sequence selectivity was performed by analysis of T(m) values and CD spectra, using distamycin A as a contrast. Hybrid 3 has provided more excellent sequence-distinguishable ability than other hybrids and Distamycin A. Moreover, on the basis of these results, we synthesized oligonucleotides conjugated to Hybrid 4, which is stable under conditions of DNA oligonucleotide solid phase synthesis, arranged from Hybrid 3. From T(m) values and CD spectral analysis, it was found that oligonucleotides conjugating Hybrid 4 possess high recognition ability and very high binding ability for the DNA that includes the pyrrolepolyamide binding sequence.

  18. A SHATTERPROOF-like gene controls ripening in non-climacteric strawberries, and auxin and abscisic acid antagonistically affect its expression.

    PubMed

    Daminato, Margherita; Guzzo, Flavia; Casadoro, Giorgio

    2013-09-01

    Strawberries (Fragaria×ananassa) are false fruits the ripening of which follows the non-climacteric pathway. The role played by a C-type MADS-box gene [SHATTERPROOF-like (FaSHP)] in the ripening of strawberries has been studied by transiently modifying gene expression through either over-expression or RNA-interference-mediated down-regulation. The altered expression of the FaSHP gene caused a change in the time taken by the over-expressing and the down- regulated fruits to attain the pink stage, which was slightly shorter and much longer, respectively, compared to controls. In parallel with the modified ripening times, the metabolome components and the expression of ripening-related genes also appeared different in the transiently modified fruits. Differences in the response time of the analysed genes suggest that FaSHP can control the expression of ripening genes either directly or indirectly through other transcription factor-encoding genes. Because fleshy strawberries are false fruits these results indicate that C-type MADS-box genes like SHATTERPROOF may act as modulators of ripening in fleshy fruit-like structures independently of their anatomical origin. Treatment of strawberries with either auxin or abscisic acid had antagonistic impacts on both the expression of FaSHP and the expression of ripening-related genes and metabolome components.

  19. Olive oil polyphenols enhance the expression of cholesterol efflux related genes in vivo in humans. A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Farràs, Marta; Valls, Rosa M; Fernández-Castillejo, Sara; Giralt, Montserrat; Solà, Rosa; Subirana, Isaac; Motilva, María-José; Konstantinidou, Valentini; Covas, María-Isabel; Fitó, Montserrat

    2013-07-01

    Both oleic acid and polyphenols have been shown to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and to protect HDL from oxidation, a phenomenon associated with a low cholesterol efflux from cells. Our goal was to determine whether polyphenols from olive oil could exert an in vivo nutrigenomic effect on genes related to cholesterol efflux in humans. In a randomized, controlled, cross-over trial, 13 pre/hypertensive patients were assigned 30 ml of two similar olive oils with high (961 mg/kg) and moderate (289 mg/kg) polyphenol content. We found an increase in ATP binding cassette transporter-A1, scavenger receptor class B type 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)BP, PPARα, PPARγ, PPARδ and CD36 gene expression in white blood cells at postprandial after high polyphenol olive oil when compared with moderate polyphenol olive oil intervention (P<.017), with COX-1 reaching borderline significance (P=.024). Linear regression analyses showed that changes in gene expression were related to a decrease in oxidized low-density lipoproteins and with an increase in oxygen radical absorbance capacity and olive oil polyphenols (P<.05). Our results indicate a significant role of olive oil polyphenols in the up-regulation of genes involved in the cholesterol efflux from cells to HDL in vivo in humans. These results are in agreement with previous ones concerning the fact that benefits associated with polyphenol-rich olive oil consumption on cardiovascular risk could be mediated through an in vivo nutrigenomic effect in humans.

  20. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1{sup −/−} A{sup y}/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the

  1. Comparative analysis of the locus control region of the rabbit beta-like gene cluster: HS3 increases transient expression of an embryonic epsilon-globin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hardison, R; Xu, J; Jackson, J; Mansberger, J; Selifonova, O; Grotch, B; Biesecker, J; Petrykowska, H; Miller, W

    1993-01-01

    The rabbit homolog to the locus control region (LCR) of the human beta-like globin gene cluster was isolated, and long segments containing the DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) were sequenced. The order and spacing of HS4, HS3, HS2 and HS1 are conserved between rabbit and human. Alignment of these sequences with their homologs from human, goat, and mouse shows that very long segments of DNA match between species, for over a thousand base pairs on either side of the previously identified functional cores, indicating that some important functions are found outside the cores. The activity of rabbit HS2 and HS3 was tested by attaching each to a novel reporter gene constructed by inserting the luciferase coding region into the rabbit epsilon-globin gene. In contrast to previous reports showing no effect of human or mouse HS3 on transient expression, both the rabbit HS2 and HS3 DNA fragments separately increased transient expression from the epsilon-luciferase hybrid gene and expression from stably integrated constructs in K562 erythroleukemia cells. PMID:8464710

  2. Electronic control of gene expression and cell behaviour in Escherichia coli through redox signalling

    PubMed Central

    Tschirhart, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; McKay, Ryan; Ueda, Hana; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Pottash, Alex Eli; Zargar, Amin; Negrete, Alejandro; Shiloach, Joseph; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to interconvert information between electronic and ionic modalities has transformed our ability to record and actuate biological function. Synthetic biology offers the potential to expand communication ‘bandwidth' by using biomolecules and providing electrochemical access to redox-based cell signals and behaviours. While engineered cells have transmitted molecular information to electronic devices, the potential for bidirectional communication stands largely untapped. Here we present a simple electrogenetic device that uses redox biomolecules to carry electronic information to engineered bacterial cells in order to control transcription from a simple synthetic gene circuit. Electronic actuation of the native transcriptional regulator SoxR and transcription from the PsoxS promoter allows cell response that is quick, reversible and dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the imposed electronic signals. Further, induction of bacterial motility and population based cell-to-cell communication demonstrates the versatility of our approach and potential to drive intricate biological behaviours. PMID:28094788

  3. Electronic control of gene expression and cell behaviour in Escherichia coli through redox signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschirhart, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; McKay, Ryan; Ueda, Hana; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Pottash, Alex Eli; Zargar, Amin; Negrete, Alejandro; Shiloach, Joseph; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to interconvert information between electronic and ionic modalities has transformed our ability to record and actuate biological function. Synthetic biology offers the potential to expand communication `bandwidth' by using biomolecules and providing electrochemical access to redox-based cell signals and behaviours. While engineered cells have transmitted molecular information to electronic devices, the potential for bidirectional communication stands largely untapped. Here we present a simple electrogenetic device that uses redox biomolecules to carry electronic information to engineered bacterial cells in order to control transcription from a simple synthetic gene circuit. Electronic actuation of the native transcriptional regulator SoxR and transcription from the PsoxS promoter allows cell response that is quick, reversible and dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the imposed electronic signals. Further, induction of bacterial motility and population based cell-to-cell communication demonstrates the versatility of our approach and potential to drive intricate biological behaviours.

  4. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p < 0.05 for the overall physiologic state effect (lactation vs. control), and a within tissue pairwise comparison of p < 0.01. The proportion of false positives, an estimate of the ratio of false positives in the list of differentially expressed genes, was calculated for each tissue. The number of differentially expressed genes was 420 in the liver, 337 in the duodenum, 402 in the jejunum, and 523 in the ileum. The list of differentially expressed genes was in turn analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to detect biological pathways that were overrepresented. In all tissues, sterol regulatory element binding protein (Srebp)-regulated genes involved in cholesterol synthesis showed increased mRNA expression, with the fewest changes detected in the jejunum. We detected increased Scap mRNA in the liver only, suggesting an explanation for the difference in response to lactation between the liver and small intestine. Expression of Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In

  5. Distal regulatory element of the STAT1 gene potentially mediates positive feedback control of STAT1 expression.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Katsutoshi; Hijikata, Takao

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified a distal regulatory element located approximately 5.5-kb upstream of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) gene, thereafter designating it as 5.5-kb upstream regulatory region (5.5URR). In this study, we investigated the functional roles of 5.5URR in the transcriptional regulation of STAT1 gene. A chromosome conformation capture assay indicated physical interaction of 5.5URR with the STAT1 core promoter. In luciferase reporter assays, 5.5URR-combined STAT1 core promoter exhibited significant increase in reporter activity enhanced by forced STAT1 expression or interferon (IFN) treatment, but STAT1 core promoter alone did not. The 5.5URR contained IFN-stimulated response element and GAS sites, which bound STAT1 complexes in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays of HEK293 cells with Halo-tagged STAT1 expression indicated the association of Halo-tagged STAT1 with 5.5URR. ChIP assays with IFN treatment demonstrated that IFNs promoted the recruitment of Halo-tagged STAT1 to 5.5URR. Forced STAT1 expression or IFN treatment increased the expression of endogenous STAT1 and other IFN signaling pathway components, such as STAT2, IRF9 and IRF1, besides IFN-responsive genes. Collectively, the results suggest that 5.5URR may provide a regulatory platform for positive feedback control of STAT1 expression possibly to amplify or sustain the intracellular IFN signals.

  6. Chromatin architecture: A new dimension in the dynamic control of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Prado, Juan Sebastian; Rodriguez-Granados, Natalia Yaneth; Ariel, Federico; Raynaud, Cécile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT As the most recent evidence of eukaryotic cell complexity, genome architecture has astounded the scientific community and prompted a variety of technical and cognitive challenges. Several technologies have emerged and evidenced the integration of chromatin packaging and topology, epigenetic processes, and transcription for the pertinent regulation of gene expression. In the present addendum we present and discuss some of our recent research, directed toward the holistic comprehension of the processes by which plants respond to environmental and developmental stimuli. We propose that the study of genome topology and genomic interactions is essential for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind a phenotype. Even though our knowledge and understanding of genome architecture and hierarchy has improved substantially in the last few years -in Arabidopsis and other eukaryotes -, there is still a long way ahead in this relatively new field of study. For this, it is necessary to take advantage of the high resolution of the emerging available techniques, and perform integrative approaches with which it will be possible to depict the role of chromatin architecture in the regulation of transcription and ultimately, physiological processes. PMID:27611230

  7. Nuclear BK Channels Regulate Gene Expression via the Control of Nuclear Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Boxing; Jie, Wei; Huang, Lianyan; Wei, Peng; Li, Shuji; Luo, Zhengyi; Friedman, Allyson K.; Meredith, Andrea L.; Han, Ming-Hu; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels are essential for the regulation of neuronal functions. The significance of plasma membrane, mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum, and lysosomal ion channels in the regulation of Ca2+ is well established. In contrast, surprisingly less is known about the function of ion channels on the nuclear envelope (NE). Here we demonstrate the presence of functional large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK channels) on the NE of rodent hippocampal neurons. Functionally blockade of nuclear BK channels (nBK channels) induces NE-derived Ca2+ release, nucleoplasmic Ca2+ elevation, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcription. More importantly, blockade of nBK channels regulates nuclear Ca2+-sensitive gene expression and promotes dendritic arborization in a nuclear Ca2+-dependent manner. These results suggest that nBK channel functions as a molecular linker between neuronal activity and nuclear Ca2+ to convey the signals from synapse to nucleus and is a new modulator for synaptic activity-dependent neuronal functions at the NE level. PMID:24952642

  8. SETD6 controls the expression of estrogen-responsive genes and proliferation of breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Daniel J; Williamson, Stuart Charles; Alkharaif, Dhuha; Monteiro, Isabella Christina Mazzaro; Goudreault, Marilyn; Gaughan, Luke; Robson, Craig N; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Binda, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The lysine methyltransferase SETD6 modifies the histone variant H2AZ, a key component of nuclear receptor-dependent transcription. Herein, we report the identification of several factors that associate with SETD6 and are implicated in nuclear hormone receptor signaling. Specifically, SETD6 associates with the estrogen receptor α (ERα), histone deacetylase HDAC1, metastasis protein MTA2, and the transcriptional co-activator TRRAP. Luciferase reporter assays identify SETD6 as a transcriptional repressor, in agreement with its association with HDAC1 and MTA2. However, SETD6 behaves as a co-activator of several estrogen-responsive genes, such as PGR and TFF1. Consistent with these results, silencing of SETD6 in several breast carcinoma cell lines induced cellular proliferation defects accompanied by enhanced expression of the cell cycle inhibitor CDKN1A and induction of apoptosis. Herein, we have identified several chromatin proteins that associate with SETD6 and described SETD6 as an essential factor for nuclear receptor signaling and cellular proliferation. PMID:24751716

  9. The effect of experimental diabetes and glycaemic control on guided bone regeneration: histology and gene expression analyses.

    PubMed

    Retzepi, M; Calciolari, E; Wall, I; Lewis, M P; Donos, N

    2017-07-18

    To investigate the effect of experimental diabetes and metabolic control on intramembranous bone healing following guided bone regeneration (GBR). Ninety-three Wistar rats were allocated to three experimental groups, healthy (H), uncontrolled diabetes (D) and controlled diabetes (CD). Twenty one days following diabetes induction, a standardised 5-mm defect was created at the mid-portion of each parietal bone. In 75 animals (25H, 25D, 25CD), one defect was treated with an intracranial and extracranial membrane according to the GBR principle, and one defect was left empty (control); five animals per group were then randomly sacrificed at 3, 7, 15, 30 and 60 days and processed for decalcified histology. In 18 animals (6H, 6D, 6CD), both defects were treated according to the GBR principle; three animals from each group were then randomly sacrificed at 7 and 15 days of healing and employed for gene expression analysis. Application of the GBR therapeutic principle led to significant bone regeneration even in the D group. However, at 15 and 30 days, the osteogenesis process was impaired by uncontrolled diabetes, as shown by the significant reduction in terms of defect closure (38-42%) and newly formed bone (54-61%) compared to the healthy group. The comparison of the D vs. H group at 15 days of healing yielded the largest number of genes with significantly differential expression, among which various genes associated with the ossification process (bmp4, ltbp4, thra and cd276) were identified. Uncontrolled diabetes seems to affect early phases of the bone regeneration following GBR. A misregulation of genes and pathways related to cell division, energy production, inflammation and osteogenesis may account for the impaired regeneration process in D rats. Further studies are warranted to optimise the GBR process in this medically compromised patient population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. (Im)Perfect robustness and adaptation of metabolic networks subject to metabolic and gene-expression regulation: marrying control engineering with metabolic control analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metabolic control analysis (MCA) and supply–demand theory have led to appreciable understanding of the systems properties of metabolic networks that are subject exclusively to metabolic regulation. Supply–demand theory has not yet considered gene-expression regulation explicitly whilst a variant of MCA, i.e. Hierarchical Control Analysis (HCA), has done so. Existing analyses based on control engineering approaches have not been very explicit about whether metabolic or gene-expression regulation would be involved, but designed different ways in which regulation could be organized, with the potential of causing adaptation to be perfect. Results This study integrates control engineering and classical MCA augmented with supply–demand theory and HCA. Because gene-expression regulation involves time integration, it is identified as a natural instantiation of the ‘integral control’ (or near integral control) known in control engineering. This study then focuses on robustness against and adaptation to perturbations of process activities in the network, which could result from environmental perturbations, mutations or slow noise. It is shown however that this type of ‘integral control’ should rarely be expected to lead to the ‘perfect adaptation’: although the gene-expression regulation increases the robustness of important metabolite concentrations, it rarely makes them infinitely robust. For perfect adaptation to occur, the protein degradation reactions should be zero order in the concentration of the protein, which may be rare biologically for cells growing steadily. Conclusions A proposed new framework integrating the methodologies of control engineering and metabolic and hierarchical control analysis, improves the understanding of biological systems that are regulated both metabolically and by gene expression. In particular, the new approach enables one to address the issue whether the intracellular biochemical networks that have been and

  11. Co-dependence between trypanosome nuclear lamina components in nuclear stability and control of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Maishman, Luke; Obado, Samson O.; Alsford, Sam; Bart, Jean-Mathieu; Chen, Wei-Ming; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Navarro, Miguel; Horn, David; Aitchison, John D.; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Field, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a filamentous structure subtending the nuclear envelope and required for chromatin organization, transcriptional regulation and maintaining nuclear structure. The trypanosomatid coiled-coil NUP-1 protein is a lamina component functionally analogous to lamins, the major lamina proteins of metazoa. There is little evidence for shared ancestry, suggesting the presence of a distinct lamina system in trypanosomes. To find additional trypanosomatid lamina components we identified NUP-1 interacting proteins by affinity capture and mass-spectrometry. Multiple components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and a second coiled-coil protein, which we termed NUP-2, were found. NUP-2 has a punctate distribution at the nuclear periphery throughout the cell cycle and is in close proximity to NUP-1, the NPCs and telomeric chromosomal regions. RNAi-mediated silencing of NUP-2 leads to severe proliferation defects, gross alterations to nuclear structure, chromosomal organization and nuclear envelope architecture. Further, transcription is altered at telomere-proximal variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites (ESs), suggesting a role in controlling ES expression, although NUP-2 silencing does not increase VSG switching. Transcriptome analysis suggests specific alterations to Pol I-dependent transcription. NUP-1 is mislocalized in NUP-2 knockdown cells and vice versa, implying that NUP-1 and NUP-2 form a co-dependent network and identifying NUP-2 as a second trypanosomatid nuclear lamina component. PMID:27625397

  12. Co-dependence between trypanosome nuclear lamina components in nuclear stability and control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Maishman, Luke; Obado, Samson O; Alsford, Sam; Bart, Jean-Mathieu; Chen, Wei-Ming; Ratushny, Alexander V; Navarro, Miguel; Horn, David; Aitchison, John D; Chait, Brian T; Rout, Michael P; Field, Mark C

    2016-12-15

    The nuclear lamina is a filamentous structure subtending the nuclear envelope and required for chromatin organization, transcriptional regulation and maintaining nuclear structure. The trypanosomatid coiled-coil NUP-1 protein is a lamina component functionally analogous to lamins, the major lamina proteins of metazoa. There is little evidence for shared ancestry, suggesting the presence of a distinct lamina system in trypanosomes. To find additional trypanosomatid lamina components we identified NUP-1 interacting proteins by affinity capture and mass-spectrometry. Multiple components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and a second coiled-coil protein, which we termed NUP-2, were found. NUP-2 has a punctate distribution at the nuclear periphery throughout the cell cycle and is in close proximity to NUP-1, the NPCs and telomeric chromosomal regions. RNAi-mediated silencing of NUP-2 leads to severe proliferation defects, gross alterations to nuclear structure, chromosomal organization and nuclear envelope architecture. Further, transcription is altered at telomere-proximal variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites (ESs), suggesting a role in controlling ES expression, although NUP-2 silencing does not increase VSG switching. Transcriptome analysis suggests specific alterations to Pol I-dependent transcription. NUP-1 is mislocalized in NUP-2 knockdown cells and vice versa, implying that NUP-1 and NUP-2 form a co-dependent network and identifying NUP-2 as a second trypanosomatid nuclear lamina component. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. A CRISPR screen identifies genes controlling Etv2 threshold expression in murine hemangiogenic fate commitment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiyong; Choi, Kyunghee

    2017-09-14

    The ETS transcription factor Etv2 is necessary and sufficient for the generation of hematopoietic and endothelial cells. However, upstream regulators of Etv2 in hemangiogenesis, generation of hematopoietic and endothelial cells, have not been clearly addressed. Here we track the developmental route of hemangiogenic progenitors from mouse embryonic stem cells, perform genome-wide CRISPR screening, and transcriptome analysis of en route cell populations by utilizing Brachyury, Etv2, or Scl reporter embryonic stem cell lines to further understand the mechanisms that control hemangiogenesis. We identify the forkhead transcription factor Foxh1, in part through Eomes, to be critical for the formation of FLK1(+) mesoderm, from which the hemangiogenic fate is specified. Importantly, hemangiogenic fate is specified not simply by the onset of Etv2 expression, but by a threshold-dependent mechanism, in which VEGF-FLK1 signaling plays an instructive role by promoting Etv2 threshold expression. These studies reveal comprehensive cellular and molecular pathways governing the hemangiogenic cell lineage development.How haematopoietic and endothelial cell lineages are specified is unclear. Here, the authors identify the forkhead transcription factor Foxh1 as regulating FLK1+ mesoderm formation in mouse embryonic stem cells, which in turn specifies hemangiogenic fate via Etv2.

  14. The tmRNA-tagging mechanism and the control of gene expression: a review.

    PubMed

    Barends, Sharief; Kraal, Barend; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2011-01-01

    The tmRNA-mediated trans-translation system is a unique quality control system in eubacteria that combines translational surveillance with the rescue of stalled ribosomes. During trans-translation, the chimeric tmRNA molecule--which acts as both tRNA and mRNA--is delivered to the ribosomal A site by a ribonucleoprotein complex of SmpB and EF-Tu-GTP, allowing the stalled ribosome to switch template and resume translation on a small coding sequence inside the tmRNA molecule. As a result, the aberrant protein becomes tagged by a sequence that is a target for proteolytic degradation. Thus, the system elegantly combines ribosome recycling with a clean-up function when triggered by truncated transcripts or rare codons. In addition, recent observations point to a specific regulation of the translation of a small number of genes by tmRNA-mediated inhibition or stimulation. In this review, we discuss the most prominent biochemical and structural aspects of trans-translation and then focus on the specific role of tmRNA in stress management and cell-cycle control of morphologically complex bacteria. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The wheat HMW-glutenin 1Dy10 gene promoter controls endosperm expression in Brachypodium distachyon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The grass species Brachypodium distachyon has emerged as a model system for the study of gene structure and function in temperate cereals. As a first demonstration of the utility of Brachypodium to study wheat gene promoter function, we transformed it with a T-DNA that included the GUS reporter gene...

  16. Regulation of ABO gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kominato, Yoshihiko; Hata, Yukiko; Matsui, Kazuhiro; Takizawa, Hisao

    2005-07-01

    The ABO blood group system is important in blood transfusions and in identifying individuals during criminal investigations. Two carbohydrate antigens, the A and B antigens, and their antibodies constitute this system. Although biochemical and molecular genetic studies have demonstrated the molecular basis of the histo-blood group ABO system, some aspects remain to be elucidated. To explain the molecular basis of how the ABO genes are controlled in cell type-specific expression, during normal cell differentiation, and in cancer cells with invasive and metastatic potential that lack A/B antigens, it is essential to understand the regulatory mechanism of ABO gene transcription. We review the transcriptional regulation of the ABO gene, including positive and negative elements in the upstream region of the gene, and draw some inferences that help to explain the phenomena described above.

  17. Cross talk among PMCA, calcineurin and NFAT transcription factors in control of calmodulin gene expression in differentiating PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Boczek, Tomasz; Lisek, Malwina; Ferenc, Bozena; Zylinska, Ludmila

    2017-04-01

    Brain aging is characterized by progressive loss of plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA) and its activator - calmodulin (CaM), but the mechanism of this phenomenon remains unresolved. CaM encoded by three genes Calm1, Calm2, Calm3, works to translate Ca(2+) signal into changes in frequently opposite cellular activities. This unique function allows CaM to affect gene expression via stimulation of calcineurin (CaN) and its downstream target - nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and to terminate Ca(2+) signal by stimulation of its extrusion. PMCA, which exists in four isoforms PMCA1-4, may in turn shape the pattern of Ca(2+) transients and control CaN activity by its direct binding. Therefore, the interplay between PMCA, CaM and CaN/NFAT is highly plausible. To verify that, we used differentiated PC12 cells with reduced expression of PMCA2 or PMCA3 to mimic the potential changes in aged brain. Manipulation in PMCAs level decreased CaM protein in PMCA2 or PMCA3-reduced lines that was accompanied by down-regulation of Calm1 and Calm2 in both lines, but Calm3 only in PMCA2-reduced cells. Further studies showed substantially higher NFATc2 nuclear accumulation and increased NFAT transcriptional activity. Blocking of CaN/NFAT signalling resulted in almost full CaM recovery, mainly due to up-regulation of Calm2 and Calm3 genes. Moreover, higher occupancy of Calm2 and Calm3 promoters by NFATc2 and increased expression of these genes in response to NFATc2 silencing were demonstrated in PMCA2 and PMCA3-reduced lines. Our results indicate that decrease in CaM level in response to PMCAs downregulation can be driven by CaN/NFAT pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression of genes controlling fat deposition in two genetically diverse beef cattle breeds fed high or low silage diets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both genetic background and finishing system can alter fat deposition, thus indicating their influence on adipogenic and lipogenic factors. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying fat deposition and fatty acid composition in beef cattle are not fully understood. This study aimed to assess the effect of breed and dietary silage level on the expression patterns of key genes controlling lipid metabolism in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle of cattle. To that purpose, forty bulls from two genetically diverse Portuguese bovine breeds with distinct maturity rates, Alentejana and Barrosã, were selected and fed either low (30% maize silage/70% concentrate) or high silage (70% maize silage/30% concentrate) diets. Results The results suggested that enhanced deposition of fatty acids in the SAT from Barrosã bulls, when compared to Alentejana, could be due to higher expression levels of lipogenesis (SCD and LPL) and β-oxidation (CRAT) related genes. Our results also indicated that SREBF1 expression in the SAT is increased by feeding the low silage diet. Together, these results point out to a higher lipid turnover in the SAT of Barrosã bulls when compared to Alentejana. In turn, lipid deposition in the LL muscle is related to the expression of adipogenic (PPARG and FABP4) and lipogenic (ACACA and SCD) genes. The positive correlation between ACACA expression levels and total lipids, as well trans fatty acids, points to ACACA as a major player in intramuscular deposition in ruminants. Moreover, results reinforce the role of FABP4 in intramuscular fat development and the SAT as the major site for lipid metabolism in ruminants. Conclusions Overall, the results showed that SAT and LL muscle fatty acid composition are mostly dependent on the genetic background. In addition, dietary silage level impacted on muscle lipid metabolism to a greater extent than on that of SAT, as evaluated by gene expression levels of adipogenic and

  19. Expression of auxin synthesis gene tms1 under control of tuber-specific promoter enhances potato tuberization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kolachevskaya, Oksana O; Alekseeva, Valeriya V; Sergeeva, Lidiya I; Rukavtsova, Elena B; Getman, Irina A; Vreugdenhil, Dick; Buryanov, Yaroslav I; Romanov, Georgy A

    2015-09-01

    Phytohormones, auxins in particular, play an important role in plant development and productivity. Earlier data showed positive impact of exogenous auxin on potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuberization. The aim of this study was to generate potato plants with increased auxin level predominantly in tubers. To this end, a pBinB33-tms1 vector was constructed harboring the Agrobacterium auxin biosynthesis gene tms1 fused to tuber-specific promoter of the class I patatin gene (B33-promoter) of potato. Among numerous independently generated B33:tms1 lines, those without visible differences from control were selected for detailed studies. In the majority of transgenic lines, tms1 gene transcription was detected, mostly in tubers rather than in shoots. Indoleacetic acid (IAA) content in tubers and the auxin tuber-to-shoot ratio were increased in tms1-expressing transformants. The organ-specific increase in auxin synthesis in B33:tms1-transformants accelerated and intensified the process of tuber formation, reduced the dose of carbohydrate supply required for in vitro tuberization, and decreased the photoperiodic dependence of tuber initiation. Overall, a positive correlation was observed between tms1 expression, IAA content in tubers, and stimulation of tuber formation. The revealed properties of B33:tms1 transformants imply an important role for auxin in potato tuberization and offer prospects to magnify potato productivity by a moderate organ-specific enhancement of auxin content.

  20. Expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes in avocados fumigated with thyme oil vapours and control of anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Bill, Malick; Sivakumar, Dharini; Beukes, Mervyn; Korsten, Lise

    2016-03-01

    Thyme oil (TO) fumigation (96μll(-1)) to cv. Hass and Ryan avocados significantly reduced anthracnose incidence compared to prochloraz and the untreated control. Also, enhanced activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase were noted in both cultivars. TO fumigation induced the expression of both β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase genes in naturally infected fruit of both cultivars, during storage at 7 or 7.5°C for up to 21d and during subsequent simulated market shelf conditions at 20°C for 5d. However, the impact of TO fumigation on the β-1,3-glucanase gene expression was higher in both cultivars. Higher gene regulation and β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase activities were observed in cv. Ryan compared to Hass. Although TO fumigation significantly reduced anthracnose incidence in both naturally infected cultivars, the inhibitory effect was slightly higher in cv. Ryan than Hass. Thus, postharvest TO fumigation had positive effects on enhancing anthracnose disease resistance during storage and also gave a residual effect during the simulated shelf life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vitamin D receptor controls expression of the anti-aging klotho gene in mouse and human renal cells.

    PubMed

    Forster, Ryan E; Jurutka, Peter W; Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Haussler, Carol A; Lowmiller, Christine L; Kaneko, Ichiro; Haussler, Mark R; Kerr Whitfield, G

    2011-10-28

    Isoforms of the mammalian klotho protein serve as membrane co-receptors that regulate renal phosphate and calcium reabsorption. Phosphaturic effects of klotho are mediated in cooperation with fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 and its FGF23 ligand. The vitamin D receptor and its 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) ligand are also crucial for calcium and phosphate regulation at the kidney and participate in a feedback loop with FGF23 signaling. Herein we characterize vitamin D receptor-mediated regulation of klotho mRNA expression, including the identification of vitamin D responsive elements (VDREs) in the vicinity of both the mouse and human klotho genes. In keeping with other recent studies of vitamin D-regulated genes, multiple VDREs control klotho expression, with the most active elements located at some distance (-31 to -46 kb) from the klotho transcriptional start site. We therefore postulate that the mammalian klotho gene is up-regulated by liganded VDR via multiple remote VDREs. The phosphatemic actions of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) are thus opposed via the combined phosphaturic effects of FGF23 and klotho, both of which are upregulated by the liganded vitamin D receptor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Epigenetic Control of Macrophage Polarisation and Soluble Mediator Gene Expression during Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages function as sentinel cells, which constantly monitor the host environment for infection or injury. Macrophages have been shown to exhibit a spectrum of activated phenotypes, which can often be categorised under the M1/M2 paradigm. M1 macrophages secrete proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, CCL4, and CXCL10, and induce phagocytosis and oxidative dependent killing mechanisms. In contrast, M2 macrophages support wound healing and resolution of inflammation. In the past decade, interest has grown in understanding the mechanisms involved in regulating macrophage activation. In particular, epigenetic control of M1 or M2 activation states has been shown to rely on posttranslational modifications of histone proteins adjacent to inflammatory-related genes. Changes in methylation and acetylation of histones by methyltransferases, demethylases, acetyltransferases, and deacetylases can all impact how macrophage phenotypes are generated. In this review, we summarise the latest advances in the field of epigenetic regulation of macrophage polarisation to M1 or M2 states, with particular focus on the cytokine and chemokine profiles associated with these phenotypes. PMID:27143818

  3. Zinc transporter gene expression and glycemic control in post-menopausal women with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Meika; Chu, Anna; Petocz, Peter; Samman, Samir

    2014-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated often with underlying zinc deficiency and nutritional supplements such as zinc may be of therapeutic benefit in the disease. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week trial in postmenopausal women (n=48) with Type 2 DM we investigated the effects of supplementation with zinc (40mg/d) and flaxseed oil (FSO; 2g/d) on the gene expression of zinc transporters (ZnT1, ZnT5, ZnT6, ZnT7, ZnT8, Zip1, Zip3, Zip7, and Zip10) and metallothionein (MT-1A, and MT-2A), and markers of glycemic control (glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c]). The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. No significant effects of zinc or FSO supplementation were observed on glycemic marker concentrations, HOMA-IR or fold change over 12 weeks in zinc transporter and metallothionein gene expression. In multivariate analysis, the change over 12 weeks in serum glucose concentrations (P=0.001) and HOMA-IR (P=0.001) predicted the fold change in Zip10. In secondary analysis, marginal statistical significance was observed with the change in both serum glucose concentrations (P=0.003) and HOMA-IR (P=0.007) being predictive of the fold change in ZnT6. ZnT8 mRNA expression was variable; HbA1c levels were higher (P=0.006) in participants who exhibited ZnT8 expression compared to those who did not. The significant predictive relationships between Zip10, ZnT6, serum glucose and HOMA-IR are preliminary, as is the relationship between HbA1c and ZnT8; nevertheless the observations support an association between Type 2 DM and zinc homeostasis that requires further exploration.

  4. Expression of the nos gene and firefly flashing: a test of the nitric-oxide-mediated flash control model.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Hajime; Yokoyama, Jun; Ohba, Nobuyoshi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Kawata, Masakado

    2014-04-19

    Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) emit various types of light that differ among species and populations of the same species. Their lights are assumed to be biological properties that play important ecological and evolutionary roles. Some species in the Lampyridae emit periodic luminescence, the patterns of which are characterized by species-specific intervals. In previous work, it was predicted that the nitric oxide (NO) regulates the oxygen supply required for the bioluminescence reaction of fireflies. Here, the expression of the NO synthase (NOS) mRNA in some fireflies was examined to verify the predictive model of nitric-oxide-mediated flash control in these insects. The expression of the nos gene in the lantern organ was observed not only in nocturnal flashing species but also in diurnal non-flashing species. It was shown that the expression levels of nos were higher in the lantern of Luciola cruciata (Motschulsky) larvae, which that emits continuous light, than in other body parts, although expression in the lantern of the adults, who flash periodically, was not high. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression levels among adults of Luciola cruciata characterized by different flashing intervals. The data do not support the model of an NO-mediated flash control mechanism, during which oxygen becomes available for the luciferin-luciferase reaction through NO-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. It is also indicated that flash patterns do not co-vary with NOS production. However, high nos expression in the larval lantern suggests that NO may play a role in producing continuous light by functioning as a neurotransmitter signal for bioluminescence.

  5. Expression of the nos gene and Firefly Flashing: A Test of the Nitric-Oxide-Mediated Flash Control Model

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hajime; Yokoyama, Jun; Ohba, Nobuyoshi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Kawata, Masakado

    2014-01-01

    Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) emit various types of light that differ among species and populations of the same species. Their lights are assumed to be biological properties that play important ecological and evolutionary roles. Some species in the Lampyridae emit periodic luminescence, the patterns of which are characterized by species-specific intervals. In previous work, it was predicted that the nitric oxide (NO) regulates the oxygen supply required for the bioluminescence reaction of fireflies. Here, the expression of the NO synthase (NOS) mRNA in some fireflies was examined to verify the predictive model of nitric-oxide-mediated flash control in these insects. The expression of the nos gene in the lantern organ was observed not only in nocturnal flashing species but also in diurnal non-flashing species. It was shown that the expression levels of nos were higher in the lantern of Luciola cruciata (Motschulsky) larvae, which that emits continuous light, than in other body parts, although expression in the lantern of the adults, who flash periodically, was not high. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression levels among adults of Luciola cruciata characterized by different flashing intervals. The data do not support the model of an NO-mediated flash control mechanism, during which oxygen becomes available for the luciferin-luciferase reaction through NO-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. It is also indicated that flash patterns do not co-vary with NOS production. However, high nos expression in the larval lantern suggests that NO may play a role in producing continuous light by functioning as a neurotransmitter signal for bioluminescence. PMID:25373203

  6. Effects of gibberellin treatment during flowering induction period on global gene expression and the transcription of flowering-control genes in Citrus buds.

    PubMed

    Goldberg-Moeller, Ravit; Shalom, Liron; Shlizerman, Lyudmila; Samuels, Sivan; Zur, Naftali; Ophir, Ron; Blumwald, Eduardo; Sadka, Avi

    2013-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) affect flowering in a species-dependent manner: in long-day and biennial plants they promote flowering, whereas in other plants, including fruit trees, they inhibit it. The mechanism by which GAs promote flowering in Arabidopsis is not fully understood, although there is increasing evidence that they may act through more than one pathway. In citrus, GA treatment during the flowering induction period reduces the number of flowers; the mechanism of flowering inhibition is not clear; the hormone may act directly in the bud to determine its fate toward vegetative growth, generate a mobile signal, or both. However, bud metabolic and regulatory pathways are expected to be altered upon GA treatment. We investigated the effect of GA treatments on global gene expression in the bud during the induction period, and on the expression of key flowering genes. Overall, about 2000 unigenes showed altered expression, with about 300 showing at least a two-fold change. Changes in flavonoids and trehalose metabolic pathways were validated, and among other altered pathways, such as cell-wall components, were discussed in light of GA's inhibition of flowering. Among flowering-control genes, GA treatment resulted in reduced mRNA levels of FT, AP1 and a few flower-organ-identity genes. mRNA levels of FLC-like and SOC1 were not altered by the treatment, whereas LEAFY mRNA was induced in GA-treated buds. Surprisingly, FT expression was higher in buds than leaves. Overall, our results shed light on changes taking place in the bud during flowering induction in response to GA treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Homeotic selector genes control the patterning of seven-up expressing cells in the Drosophila dorsal vessel.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Kathryn M; Hoshizaki, Deborah K; Cripps, Richard M

    2005-09-01

    The linear cardiac tube of Drosophila, the dorsal vessel, is an important model organ for the study of cardiac specification and patterning in vertebrates. In Drosophila, the Hox segmentation gene abdominal-A (abd-A) is required for the specification of a functionally distinct heart region at the posterior of the dorsal vessel, from which blood is pumped anteriorly through a tube termed the aorta. Since we have previously shown that the posterior part of the aorta is specified during embryogenesis to form the adult heart during metamorphosis, we determined if the embryonic aorta is also patterned by the function of Hox segmentation genes. Using gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrate that the three Hox genes expressed in the posterior aorta and heart are sufficient to confer heart or posterior aorta fate throughout the dorsal vessel. Additionally, we demonstrate that Ultrabithorax and abd-A, but not Antennapedia, function to control cell number in the dorsal vessel. These studies add robustness to the model that homeotic selector genes pattern the Drosophila dorsal vessel, and further extend our understanding of how the cardiac tube is patterned in animal models.

  8. Dynamic Expression of Imprinted Genes Associates with Maternally Controlled Nutrient Allocation during Maize Endosperm Development[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Mingming; Yang, Ruolin; Li, Guosheng; Chen, Hao; Laurie, John; Ma, Chuang; Wang, Dongfang; Yao, Yingyin; Larkins, Brian A.; Sun, Qixin; Yadegari, Ramin; Wang, Xiangfeng; Ni, Zhongfu

    2013-01-01

    In angiosperms, the endosperm provides nutrients for embryogenesis and seed germination and is the primary tissue where gene imprinting occurs. To identify the imprintome of early developing maize (Zea mays) endosperm, we performed high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of whole kernels at 0, 3, and 5 d after pollination (DAP) and endosperms at 7, 10, and 15 DAP, using B73 by Mo17 reciprocal crosses. We observed gradually increased expression of paternal transcripts in 3- and 5-DAP kernels. In 7-DAP endosperm, the majority of the genes tested reached a 2:1 maternal versus paternal ratio, suggesting that paternal genes are nearly fully activated by 7 DAP. A total of 116, 234, and 63 genes exhibiting parent-specific expression were identified at 7, 10, and 15 DAP, respectively. The largest proportion of paternally expressed genes was at 7 DAP, mainly due to the significantly deviated parental allele expression ratio of these genes at this stage, while nearly 80% of the maternally expressed genes (MEGs) were specific to 10 DAP and were primarily attributed to sharply increased expression levels compared with the other stages. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of the imprinted genes suggested that 10-DAP endosperm-specific MEGs are involved in nutrient uptake and allocation and the auxin signaling pathway, coincident with the onset of starch and storage protein accumulation. PMID:24058158

  9. Differential Gene Expression in Human Cerebrovascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Shenkar, Robert; Elliott, J. Paul; Diener, Katrina; Gault, Judith; Hu, Ling-Jia; Cohrs, Randall J.; Phang, Tzulip; Hunter, Lawrence; Breeze, Robert E.; Awad, Issam A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to identify genes with differential expression in cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), and control superficial temporal arteries (STAs) and to confirm differential expression of genes previously implicated in the pathobiology of these lesions. METHODS Total ribonucleic acid was isolated from four CCM, four AVM, and three STA surgical specimens and used to quantify lesion-specific messenger ribonucleic acid expression levels on human gene arrays. Data were analyzed with the use of two separate methodologies: gene discovery and confirmation analysis. RESULTS The gene discovery method identified 42 genes that were significantly up-regulated and 36 genes that were significantly down-regulated in CCMs as compared with AVMs and STAs (P = 0.006). Similarly, 48 genes were significantly up-regulated and 59 genes were significantly down-regulated in AVMs as compared with CCMs and STAs (P = 0.006). The confirmation analysis showed significant differential expression (P < 0.05) in 11 of 15 genes (angiogenesis factors, receptors, and structural proteins) that previously had been reported to be expressed differentially in CCMs and AVMs in immunohistochemical analysis. CONCLUSION We identify numerous genes that are differentially expressed in CCMs and AVMs and correlate expression with the immunohistochemistry of genes implicated in cerebrovascular malformations. In future efforts, we will aim to confirm candidate genes specifically related to the pathobiology of cerebrovascular malformations and determine their biological systems and mechanistic relevance. PMID:12535382

  10. Replicable and Coupled Changes in Innate and Adaptive Immune Gene Expression in Two Case-Control Studies of Blood Microarrays in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Leday, Gwenaël G R; Vértes, Petra E; Richardson, Sylvia; Greene, Jonathan R; Regan, Tim; Khan, Shahid; Henderson, Robbie; Freeman, Tom C; Pariante, Carmine M; Harrison, Neil A; Perry, V Hugh; Drevets, Wayne C; Wittenberg, Gayle M; Bullmore, Edward T

    2017-07-06

    Peripheral inflammation is often associated with major depressive disorder (MDD), and immunological biomarkers of depression remain a focus of investigation. We used microarray data on whole blood from two independent case-control studies of MDD: the GlaxoSmithKline-High-Throughput Disease-specific target Identification Program [GSK-HiTDiP] study (113 patients and 57 healthy control subjects) and the Janssen-Brain Resource Company study (94 patients and 100 control subjects). Genome-wide differential gene expression analysis (18,863 probes) resulted in a p value for each gene in each study. A Bayesian method identified the largest p-value threshold (q = .025) associated with twice the number of genes differentially expressed in both studies compared with the number of coincidental case-control differences expected by chance. A total of 165 genes were differentially expressed in both studies with concordant direction of fold change. The 90 genes overexpressed (or UP genes) in MDD were significantly enriched for immune response to infection, were concentrated in a module of the gene coexpression network associated with innate immunity, and included clusters of genes with correlated expression in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and neutrophils. In contrast, the 75 genes underexpressed (or DOWN genes) in MDD were associated with the adaptive immune response and included clusters of genes with correlated expression in T cells, natural killer cells, and erythroblasts. Consistently, the MDD patients with overexpression of UP genes also had underexpression of DOWN genes (correlation > .70 in both studies). MDD was replicably associated with proinflammatory activation of the peripheral innate immune system, coupled with relative inactivation of the adaptive immune system, indicating the potential of transcriptional biomarkers for immunological stratification of patients with depression. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier

  11. Developmental Control of Stress Stimulons in Streptomyces coelicolor Revealed by Statistical Analyses of Global Gene Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Vohradsky, J.; Li, X.-M.; Dale, G.; Folcher, M.; Nguyen, L.; Viollier, P. H.; Thompson, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Stress-induced regulatory networks coordinated with a procaryotic developmental program were revealed by two-dimensional gel analyses of global gene expression. Four developmental stages were identified by their distinctive protein synthesis patterns using principal component analysis. Statistical analyses focused on five stress stimulons (induced by heat, cold, salt, ethanol, or antibiotic shock) and their synthesis during development. Unlike other bacteria, for which various stresses induce expression of similar sets of protein spots, in Streptomyces coelicolor heat, salt, and ethanol stimulons were composed of independent sets of proteins. This suggested independent control by different physiological stress signals and their corresponding regulatory systems. These stress proteins were also under developmental control. Cluster analysis of stress protein synthesis profiles identified 10 different developmental patterns or “synexpression groups.” Proteins induced by cold, heat, or salt shock were enriched in three developmental synexpression groups. In addition, certain proteins belonging to the heat and salt shock stimulons were coregulated during development. Thus, stress regulatory systems controlling these stimulons were implicated as integral parts of the developmental program. This correlation suggested that thermal shock and salt shock stress response regulatory systems either allow the cell to adapt to stresses associated with development or directly control the developmental program. PMID:10940043

  12. A 211-bp enhancer of the rat uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) gene controls specific and regulated expression in brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Cassard-Doulcier, A M; Gelly, C; Bouillaud, F; Ricquier, D

    1998-01-01

    The uncoupling protein-1 gene is uniquely expressed in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and is positively regulated by cold exposure of animals and the sympathetic nervous system. To analyse the importance of a previously identified 211-bp enhancer [Cassard-Doulcier, Gelly, Fox, Schrementi, Raimbault, Klaus, Forest, Bouillaud and Ricquier (1993) Mol. Endocrinol. 7, 497-506] in the tissue-specific expression of this gene, transgenic mice were generated using the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene as a reporter gene. One out of fourteen lines of the control transgenic mice bearing the Herpes simplex thymidine kinase (TK) promoter expressed weakly the CAT reporter gene in several tissues, whereas the other lines did not express CAT. Eight founders bearing the 211-bp enhancer-TK transgene were obtained. In six lines, no expression of CAT was detected. In one line, the expression of CAT was restricted to BAT. In another line, the expression of CAT was found in BAT and, to a lesser extent, in testis. Moreover, in these lines a marked and specific increase in the expression of the reporter gene in BAT was observed either after exposure of mice to the cold or by treating them with a beta-adrenoceptor agonist drug. These results demonstrate that the 211-bp enhancer alone is sufficient to both direct and restrict expression to BAT. This enhancer also mediates the transcriptional response of the gene to beta-adrenergic stimulation, although it does not contain conserved cAMP response element. PMID:9657961

  13. Gene expression profile of pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Galicia, Johnah C.; Henson, Brett R.; Parker, Joel S.; Khan, Asma A.

    2016-01-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the Significance Analysis of Microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (≥30mm on VAS) compared to those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  14. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology.

  15. Radiofrequency radiation (900 MHz) induces Egr-1 gene expression and affects cell-cycle control in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Buttiglione, M; Roca, L; Montemurno, E; Vitiello, F; Capozzi, V; Cibelli, G

    2007-12-01

    Many environmental signals, including ionizing radiation and UV rays, induce activation of Egr-1 gene, thus affecting cell growth and apoptosis. The paucity and the controversial knowledge about the effect of electromagnetic fields (EMF) exposure of nerve cells prompted us to investigate the bioeffects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The effect of a modulated RF field of 900 MHz, generated by a wire patch cell (WPC) antenna exposure system on Egr-1 gene expression, was studied as a function of time. Short-term exposures induced a transient increase in Egr-1 mRNA level paralleled with activation of the MAPK subtypes ERK1/2 and SAPK/JNK. The effects of RF radiations on cell growth rate and apoptosis were also studied. Exposure to RF radiation had an anti-proliferative activity in SH-SY5Y cells with a significant effect observed at 24 h. RF radiation impaired cell cycle progression, reaching a significant G2-M arrest. In addition, the appearance of the sub-G1 peak, a hallmark of apoptosis, was highlighted after a 24-h exposure, together with a significant decrease in mRNA levels of Bcl-2 and survivin genes, both interfering with signaling between G2-M arrest and apoptosis. Our results provide evidence that exposure to a 900 MHz-modulated RF radiation affect both Egr-1 gene expression and cell regulatory functions, involving apoptosis inhibitors like Bcl-2 and survivin, thus providing important insights into a potentially broad mechanism for controlling in vitro cell viability. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Dual-Specificity Anti-sigma Factor Reinforces Control of Cell-Type Specific Gene Expression in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mónica; Gao, JinXin; Bota, João; Bate, Ashley R.; Meisner, Jeffrey; Eichenberger, Patrick; Moran, Charles P.; Henriques, Adriano O.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue. PMID:25835496

  17. Expression of master regulatory genes controlling skeletal development in benign cartilage and bone forming tumors.

    PubMed

    Dancer, Jane Y; Henry, Stephen P; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Lee, Sangkyou; Ayala, Alberto G; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2010-12-01

    Recent progress in skeletal molecular biology has led to the clarification of the transcriptional mechanisms of chondroblastic and osteoblastic lineage differentiation. Three master transcription factors-Sox9, Runx2, and Osterix-were shown to play an essential role in determining the skeletal progenitor cells' fate. The present study evaluates the expression of these factors in 4 types of benign bone tumors-chondromyxoid fibroma, chondroblastoma, osteoid osteoma, and osteoblastoma-using immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays. Osteoid osteoma and osteoblastoma showed strong nuclear expression of Osterix and Runx2. In contrast, only a few chondroblastomas showed positive nuclear expression of Osterix. Strong nuclear expression of Sox9 was detected in all chondroblastomas, whereas nearly half of the osteoblastomas showed focal weak cytoplasmic expression of Sox9.

  18. Expression of master regulatory genes controlling skeletal development in benign cartilage and bone forming tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dancer, Jane Y.; Henry, Stephen P.; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Lee, Sangkyou; Ayala, Alberto G.; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Recent progress in skeletal molecular biology has led to the clarification of the transcriptional mechanisms of chondroblastic and osteoblastic lineage differentiation. Three master transcription factors—Sox9, Runx2, and Osterix—were shown to play an essential role in determining the skeletal progenitor cells' fate. The present study evaluates the expression of these factors in 4 types of benign bone tumors—chondromyxoid fibroma, chondroblastoma, osteoid osteoma, and osteoblastoma—using immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays. Osteoid osteoma and osteoblastoma showed strong nuclear expression of Osterix and Runx2. In contrast, only a few chondroblastomas showed positive nuclear expression of Osterix. Strong nuclear expression of Sox9 was detected in all chondroblastomas, whereas nearly half of the osteoblastomas showed focal weak cytoplasmic expression of Sox9. PMID:21078438

  19. Fsh controls gene expression in fish both independently of and through steroid mediation.

    PubMed

    Sambroni, Elisabeth; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Gac, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms and the mediators relaying Fsh action on testicular functions are poorly understood. Unlike in mammals, in fish both gonadotropins (Fsh and Lh) are able to efficiently stimulate steroidogenesis, likely through a direct interaction with their cognate receptors present on the Leydig cells. In this context, it is crucial to understand if Fsh effects are mediated through the production of steroids. To address this issue we performed transcriptome studies after in vitro incubations of rainbow trout testis explants in the presence of Fsh alone or in combination with trilostane, an inhibitor of Δ4- steroidogenesis. Trilostane significantly reduced or suppressed the response of many genes to Fsh (like wisp1, testis gapdhs, cldn11, inha, vt1 or dmrt1) showing that, in fish, important aspects of Fsh action follow indirect pathways and require the production of Δ4-steroids. What is more, most of the genes regulated by Fsh through steroid mediation were similarly regulated by Lh (and/or androgens). In contrast, the response to Fsh of other genes was not suppressed in the presence of trilostane. These latter included genes encoding for anti-mullerian hormone, midkine a (pleiotrophin related), angiopoietine-related protein, cyclins E1 and G1, hepatocyte growth factor activator, insulin-like growth factor 1b/3. A majority of those genes were preferentially regulated by Fsh, when compared to Lh, suggesting that specific regulatory effects of Fsh did not depend on steroid production. Finally, antagonistic effects between Fsh and steroids were found, in particular for genes encoding key factors of steroidogenesis (star, hsd3b1, cyp11b2-2) or for genes of the Igf system (igf1b/3). Our study provides the first clear evidence that, in fish, Fsh exerts Δ4-steroid-independent regulatory functions on many genes which are highly relevant for the onset of spermatogenesis.

  20. Expression of the Sinorhizobium meliloti small RNA gene mmgR is controlled by the nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Ceizel Borella, Germán; Lagares, Antonio; Valverde, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Small non-coding regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are key players in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Hundreds of sRNAs have been identified in Sinorhizobium meliloti, but their biological function remains unknown for most of them. In this study, we characterized the expression pattern of the gene encoding the 77-nt sRNA MmgR in S. meliloti strain 2011. A chromosomal transcriptional reporter fusion (PmmgR-gfp) showed that the mmgR promoter is active along different stages of the interaction with alfalfa roots. In pure cultures, PmmgR-gfp activity paralleled the sRNA abundance indicating that mmgR expression is primarily controlled at the level of transcriptional initiation. PmmgR-gfp activity was higher during growth in rhizobial defined medium (RDM) than in TY medium. Furthermore, PmmgR-gfp was induced at 60 min after shifting growing cells from TY to RDM medium, i.e. shorter than the cell doubling time. In defined RDM medium containing NO3 (-), both PmmgR-gfp and MmgR level were repressed by the addition of tryptone or single amino acids, suggesting that mmgR expression depends on the cellular nitrogen (N) status. In silico analysis failed to detect conserved motifs upstream the promoter RNA polymerase binding site, but revealed a strongly conserved motif centered at -28 that may be linked to the observed regulatory pattern by the N source. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  2. The iron-sensing fur regulator controls expression timing and levels of salmonella pathogenicity island 2 genes in the course of environmental acidification.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunna; Kim, Hyunkeun; Lee, Hwiseop; Nam, Daesil; Choi, Jeongjoon; Shin, Dongwoo

    2014-06-01

    In order to survive inside macrophages, Salmonella produces a series of proteins encoded by genes within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). In the present study, we report that Fur, a central regulator of iron utilization, negatively controls the expression of SPI-2 genes. Time course analysis of SPI-2 expression after the entry of Salmonella into macrophages revealed that SPI-2 genes are induced earlier and at higher levels in the absence of the Fur regulator. It was hypothesized that Fur repressed the SPI-2 expression that was activated during acidification of the phagosome. Indeed, as pH was lowered from pH 7.0 to pH 5.5, the lack of Fur enabled SPI-2 gene expression to be induced at higher pH and to be expressed at higher levels. Fur controlled SPI-2 genes via repression of the SsrB response regulator, a primary activator of SPI-2 expression. Fur repressed ssrB expression both inside macrophages and under acidic conditions, which we ascribe to the direct binding of Fur to the ssrB promoter. Our study suggests that Salmonella could employ iron inside the phagosome to precisely control the timing and levels of SPI-2 expression inside macrophages.

  3. Post-Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression in Mouse Early Embryo Development: A View from the Tip of the Iceberg

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Enrica; Sette, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Fertilization is a very complex biological process that requires the perfect cooperation between two highly specialized cells: the male and female gametes. The oocyte provides the physical space where this process takes place, most of the energetic need, and half of the genetic contribution. The spermatozoon mostly contributes the other half of the chromosomes and it is specialized to reach and to penetrate the oocyte. Notably, the mouse oocyte and early embryo are transcriptionally inactive. Hence, they fully depend on the maternal mRNAs and proteins stored during oocyte maturation to drive the onset of development. The new embryo develops autonomously around the four-cell stage, when maternal supplies are exhausted and the zygotic genome is activated in mice. This oocyte-to-embryo transition needs an efficient and tightly regulated translation of the maternally-inherited mRNAs, which likely contributes to embryonic genome activation. Full understanding of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in early embryos is crucial to understand the reprogramming of the embryonic genome, it might help driving reprogramming of stem cells in vitro and will likely improve in vitro culturing of mammalian embryos for assisted reproduction. Nevertheless, the knowledge of the mechanism(s) underlying this fundamental step in embryogenesis is still scarce, especially if compared to other model organisms. We will review here the current knowledge on the post-transcriptional control of gene expression in mouse early embryos and discuss some of the unanswered questions concerning this fascinating field of biology. PMID:24710195

  4. Selective translational control and nonspecific posttranscriptional regulation of ribosomal protein gene expression during development and regeneration of rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Aloni, R; Peleg, D; Meyuhas, O

    1992-01-01

    Mammalian liver development is accompanied by a transition from rapid growth in the fetus to a quiescent state in the adult. However, extensive proliferation can be induced in the adult liver by partial hepatectomy. In this study, we examined the regulation of ribosomal protein (rp) gene expression in the developing and regenerating rat liver. Our results indicate that the translation of rp mRNAs is selectively repressed by about 70% upon development from fetal to adult life, as illustrated by the decrease in ribosomal loading. In addition, the relative abundance of these mRNAs, like that of several other, but not all, housekeeping mRNAs, declines during development through a posttranscriptional mechanism. When liver cells commence growth following partial hepatectomy, translation of rp mRNAs is resumed to near-maximal capacity, as judged by their very efficient recruitment into polysomes. The concomitant increase in the abundance rp mRNAs under these circumstances is achieved by a posttranscriptional mechanism. The apparent fluctuations in the translation efficiency of rp mRNAs are accompanied by parallel changes in the expression of the genes encoding the initiation factors eIF-4E and eIF-4A. Our results indicate that selective translational control of rp mRNAs in mammals is not confined to manipulated cells in culture but constitutes an important regulatory mechanism operating in vivo in the course of liver development and regeneration. Images PMID:1373810

  5. Molecular cloning and expression of a gene that controls the high-temperature regulon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Neidhardt, F C; VanBogelen, R A; Lau, E T

    1983-01-01

    The high-temperature production (HTP) regulon of Escherichia coli consists of a set of operons that are induced coordinately by a shift to a high temperature under the control of a single chromosomal gene called htpR or hin. To identify more components of this regulon, the rates of synthesis of many polypeptides resolved on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels were measured in various strains by pulse-labeling after a temperature shift-up. A total of 13 polypeptides were found to be heat inducible only in cells bearing a normal htpR gene on the chromosome or on a plasmid; on this basis these polypeptides were designated products of the HTP regulon. Several hybrid plasmids that contain segments of the E. coli chromosome in the 75-min region were found to carry the htpR gene. A restriction map of this region was constructed, and selected fragments were subcloned and tested for the ability to complement an htpR mutant. The polypeptides encoded by these fragments were detected by permitting expression in maxicells, minicells, and chloramphenicol-treated cells. Complementation was accompanied by production of a polypeptide having a molecular weight of approximately 33,000. This polypeptide, designated F33.4, was markedly reduced in amount in an htpR mutant expected to contain very little htpR gene product. Polypeptide F33.4 is postulated to be the product of htpR and to be an effector that controls heat induction of the HTP regulon. Images PMID:6337122

  6. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  7. Efficient expression of a protein coding gene under the control of an RNA polymerase I promoter.

    PubMed

    Palmer, T D; Miller, A D; Reeder, R H; McStay, B

    1993-07-25

    In mammalian cells, RNA polymerase I transcripts are uncapped and retain a polyphosphate 5' terminus. It is probably for this reason that they are poorly translated as messenger RNA. We show in this report that insertion of an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) into the 5' leader of an RNA polymerase I transcript overcomes the block to translation, presumably by substituting for the 5' trimethyl G cap. Addition of an SV40 polyA addition signal also enhances protein production from the RNA polymerase I transcript. RNA Polymerase I driven expression vectors containing both elements produce protein at levels comparable to that produced from RNA polymerase II driven expression vectors which utilize a retroviral LTR. RNA Polymerase I driven expression vectors may have a variety of uses both for basic research and for practical expression of recombinant proteins.

  8. Characterization and lysine control of expression of the lys1 gene of Penicillium chrysogenum encoding homocitrate synthase.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, O; Casqueiro, J; Fierro, F; Hijarrubia, M J; Gutiérrez, S; Martín, J F

    1999-01-08

    A 2071-bp DNA fragment, containing a gene (lys1) encoding a protein that showed 71.1% identical amino acids with the Yarrowia lipolytica homocitrate synthase and 71.7% identity with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologous enzyme, was cloned from a genomic library of Penicillium chrysogenum. The lys1 gene contained three introns and encoded a protein of 474 amino acids with a deduced molecular mass of 52kDa. lys1 was located in chromosome II (9.6Mb) in the wild-type P. chrysogenum NRRL 1951, whereas it hybridized with chromosome III (7.5Mb) in the high penicillin production strain AS-P-78. The lys1 gene is transcribed as a monocistronic transcript of 2.0kb. Levels of the lys1 transcript were high in P. chrysogenum Wis 54-1255 cultures in defined penicillin production medium at 24 and 48h, coinciding with the rapid growth phase, but clearly decreased during the penicillin production phase, suggesting that alpha-aminoadipic acid formation for penicillin biosynthesis may be limited at the homocitrate synthase level. Expression of lys1 was partially repressed by high concentrations of lysine in the culture medium, but lysine repression seems to be a weak mechanism of control of the lysine pathway as compared to lysine inhibition of homocitrate synthase.

  9. Riboswitches. A riboswitch-containing sRNA controls gene expression by sequestration of a response regulator.

    PubMed

    DebRoy, Sruti; Gebbie, Margo; Ramesh, Arati; Goodson, Jonathan R; Cruz, Melissa R; van Hoof, Ambro; Winkler, Wade C; Garsin, Danielle A

    2014-08-22

    The ethanolamine utilization (eut) locus of Enterococcus faecalis, containing at least 19 genes distributed over four polycistronic messenger RNAs, appears to be regulated by a single adenosyl cobalamine (AdoCbl)-responsive riboswitch. We report that the AdoCbl-binding riboswitch is part of a small, trans-acting RNA, EutX, which additionally contains a dual-hairpin substrate for the RNA binding-response regulator, EutV. In the absence of AdoCbl, EutX uses this structure to sequester EutV. EutV is known to regulate the eut messenger RNAs by binding dual-hairpin structures that overlap terminators and thus prevent transcription termination. In the presence of AdoCbl, EutV cannot bind to EutX and, instead, causes transcriptional read through of multiple eut genes. This work introduces riboswitch-mediated control of protein sequestration as a posttranscriptional mechanism to coordinately regulate gene expression. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Transcription factor Ctip2 controls epidermal lipid metabolism and regulates expression of genes involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis during skin development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhixing; Kirkwood, Jay S.; Taylor, Alan W.; Stevens, Jan F.; Leid, Mark; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K.

    2012-01-01

    The stratum corneum is composed of protein-enriched corneocytes embedded in an intercellular matrix of nonpolar lipids organized as lamellar layers and give rise to epidermal permeability barrier (EPB). EPB defects play an important role in the pathophysiology of skin diseases such as eczema. The transcriptional control of skin lipid metabolism is poorly understood. We have discovered that mouse lacking a transcription factor COUP-TF interacting protein 2 (Ctip2) exhibit EPB defects including altered keratinocyte terminal differentiation, delayed skin barrier development and interrupted neutral lipid distribution in the epidermis. We adapted herein a targeted lipidomic approach using mass spectrometry, and have determined that Ctip2−/− mice (germline deletion of Ctip2 gene) display altered composition of major epidermal lipids such as ceramides and sphingomyelins compared to wildtype at different stages of skin development. Interestingly, expressions of several genes involved in skin sphingolipid biosynthesis and metabolism were altered in mutant skin. Ctip2 was found to be recruited to the promoter region of a subset of those genes, suggesting their possible direct regulation by Ctip2. Our results confirm an important role of Ctip2 in regulating skin lipid metabolism and indicate that profiling of epidermal sphingolipid could be useful for designing effective strategies to improve barrier dysfunctions. PMID:23096701

  11. Cell cycle regulated gene expression in yeasts.

    PubMed

    McInerny, Christopher J

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression through the mitotic cell cycle, so that genes are transcribed at particular cell cycle times, is widespread among eukaryotes. In some cases, it appears to be important for control mechanisms, as deregulated expression results in uncontrolled cell divisions, which can cause cell death, disease, and malignancy. In this review, I describe the current understanding of such regulated gene expression in two established simple eukaryotic model organisms, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In these two yeasts, the global pattern of cell cycle gene expression has been well described, and most of the transcription factors that control the various waves of gene expression, and how they are in turn themselves regulated, have been characterized. As related mechanisms occur in all other eukaryotes, including humans, yeasts offer an excellent paradigm to understand this important molecular process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nonadditive gene expression in polyploids.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Liu, Xiaoxian; Pires, J Chris; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    Allopolyploidy involves hybridization and duplication of divergent parental genomes and provides new avenues for gene expression. The expression levels of duplicated genes in polyploids can show deviation from parental additivity (the arithmetic average of the parental expression levels). Nonadditive expression has been widely observed in diverse polyploids and comprises at least three possible scenarios: (a) The total gene expression level in a polyploid is similar to that of one of its parents (expression-level dominance); (b) total gene expression is lower or higher than in both parents (transgressive expression); and (c) the relative contribution of the parental copies (homeologs) to the total gene expression is unequal (homeolog expression bias). Several factors may result in expression nonadditivity in polyploids, including maternal-paternal influence, gene dosage balance, cis- and/or trans-regulatory networks, and epigenetic regulation. As our understanding of nonadditive gene expression in polyploids remains limited, a new generation of investigators should explore additional phenomena (i.e., alternative splicing) and use other high-throughput "omics" technologies to measure the impact of nonadditive expression on phenotype, proteome, and metabolome.

  13. Global gene expression analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown under redox potential-controlled very-high-gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2013-11-01

    Redox potential (ORP) plays a pivotal role in yeast viability and ethanol production during very-high-gravity (VHG) ethanol fermentation. In order to identify the correlation between redox potential profiles and gene expression patterns, global gene expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Results indicated that significant changes in gene expression occurred at the periods of 0 - 6 h and 30 - 36 h, respectively. Changes noted in the period of 0 - 6 h were mainly related to carbohydrate metabolism. In contrast, gene expression variation at 30 - 36 h could be attributed primarily to stress response. Although CDC19 was down-regulated, expression of PYK2, PDC6 and ADH2 correlated inversely with ORP. Meanwhile, expression of GPD1 decreased due to the depletion of dissolved oxygen in the fermentation broth, but expression of GPD2 correlated with ORP. Transcription of genes encoding heat shock proteins was characterized by uphill, downhill, valley and plateau expression profiles, accordingly to specific function in stress response. These results highlight the role of ORP in modulating yeast physiology and metabolism under VHG conditions.