Science.gov

Sample records for controlled gene expression

  1. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  2. Mechanisms of control of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, B.; Gage, L.P.; Siddiqui, M.A.Q.; Skalka, A.M.; Weissbach, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines an array of topics on the regulation of gene expression, including an examination of DNA-protein interactions and the role of oncogene proteins in normal and abnormal cellular responses. The book focuses on the control of mRNA transcription in eykaryotes and delineates other areas including gene regulation in prokaryotes and control of stable RNA synthesis.

  3. Reading Genomes and Controlling Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libchaber, Albert

    2000-03-01

    Molecular recognition of DNA sequences is achieved by DNA hybridization of complementary sequences. We present various scenarios for optimization, leading to microarrays and global measurement. Gene expression can be controlled using gene constructs immobilized on a template with micron scale temperature heaters. We will discuss and present results on protein microarrays.

  4. Control mechanisms of plastid gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Gruissem, W.; Tonkyn, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Plastid DNAs of higher plants contain approximately 150 genes that encode RNAs and proteins for genetic and photosynthetic functions of the organelle. Results published in the last few years illustrate that the spatial and temporal expression of these plastid genes is regulated, in part, at the transcriptional level, but that developmentally controlled changes in mRNA stability, translational activity, and protein phosphorylation also have an important role in the control of plastid functions. This comprehensive review summarizes and discusses the mechanisms by which regulation of gene expression is exerted at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. It provides an overview of our current knowledge, but also emphasizes areas that are controversial and in which information on regulatory mechanisms is still incomplete. 455 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Population-level control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Adams, Rhys; van Itallie, Elizabeth; Bennett, Matthew; Balazsi, Gabor

    2011-03-01

    Gene expression is the process that translates genetic information into proteins, that determine the way cells live, function and even die. It was demonstrated that cells with identical genomes exposed to the same environment can differ in their protein composition and therefore phenotypes. Protein levels can vary between cells due to the stochastic nature of intracellular biochemical events, indicating that the genotype-phenotype connection is not deterministic at the cellular level. We asked whether genomes could encode isogenic cell populations more reliably than single cells. To address this question, we built two gene circuits to control three cell population-level characteristics: gene expression mean, coefficient of variation and non-genetic memory of previous expression states. Indeed, we found that these population-level characteristics were more predictable than the gene expression of single cells in a well-controlled environment. This research was supported by the NIH Director's New Innovator Award 1DP2 OD006481-01 and Welch Foundation Grant C-1729.

  6. Posttranscriptional Control of Gene Expression in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John E. G.

    1998-01-01

    Studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have greatly advanced our understanding of the posttranscriptional steps of eukaryotic gene expression. Given the wide range of experimental tools applicable to S. cerevisiae and the recent determination of its complete genomic sequence, many of the key challenges of the posttranscriptional control field can be tackled particularly effectively by using this organism. This article reviews the current knowledge of the cellular components and mechanisms related to translation and mRNA decay, with the emphasis on the molecular basis for rate control and gene regulation. Recent progress in characterizing translation factors and their protein-protein and RNA-protein interactions has been rapid. Against the background of a growing body of structural information, the review discusses the thermodynamic and kinetic principles that govern the translation process. As in prokaryotic systems, translational initiation is a key point of control. Modulation of the activities of translational initiation factors imposes global regulation in the cell, while structural features of particular 5′ untranslated regions, such as upstream open reading frames and effector binding sites, allow for gene-specific regulation. Recent data have revealed many new details of the molecular mechanisms involved while providing insight into the functional overlaps and molecular networking that are apparently a key feature of evolving cellular systems. An overall picture of the mechanisms governing mRNA decay has only very recently begun to develop. The latest work has revealed new information about the mRNA decay pathways, the components of the mRNA degradation machinery, and the way in which these might relate to the translation apparatus. Overall, major challenges still to be addressed include the task of relating principles of posttranscriptional control to cellular compartmentalization and polysome structure and the role of molecular channelling

  7. Optogenetic Control of Gene Expression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yick-Bun; Alekseyenko, Olga V.; Kravitz, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    To study the molecular mechanism of complex biological systems, it is important to be able to artificially manipulate gene expression in desired target sites with high precision. Based on the light dependent binding of cryptochrome 2 and a cryptochrome interacting bHLH protein, we developed a split lexA transcriptional activation system for use in Drosophila that allows regulation of gene expression in vivo using blue light or two-photon excitation. We show that this system offers high spatiotemporal resolution by inducing gene expression in tissues at various developmental stages. In combination with two-photon excitation, gene expression can be manipulated at precise sites in embryos, potentially offering an important tool with which to examine developmental processes. PMID:26383635

  8. The systemic control of circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gerber, A; Saini, C; Curie, T; Emmenegger, Y; Rando, G; Gosselin, P; Gotic, I; Gos, P; Franken, P; Schibler, U

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a central pacemaker in the brain's suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subsidiary oscillators in nearly all body cells. The SCN clock, which is adjusted to geophysical time by the photoperiod, synchronizes peripheral clocks through a wide variety of systemic cues. The latter include signals depending on feeding cycles, glucocorticoid hormones, rhythmic blood-borne signals eliciting daily changes in actin dynamics and serum response factor (SRF) activity, and sensors of body temperature rhythms, such as heat shock transcription factors and the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein CIRP. To study these systemic signalling pathways, we designed and engineered a novel, highly photosensitive apparatus, dubbed RT-Biolumicorder. This device enables us to record circadian luciferase reporter gene expression in the liver and other organs of freely moving mice over months in real time. Owing to the multitude of systemic signalling pathway involved in the phase resetting of peripheral clocks the disruption of any particular one has only minor effects on the steady state phase of circadian gene expression in organs such as the liver. Nonetheless, the implication of specific pathways in the synchronization of clock gene expression can readily be assessed by monitoring the phase-shifting kinetics using the RT-Biolumicorder.

  9. Chromatin mechanisms in the developmental control of imprinted gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sanli, Ildem; Feil, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Hundreds of protein-coding genes and regulatory non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are subject to genomic imprinting. The mono-allelic DNA methylation marks that control imprinted gene expression are somatically maintained throughout development, and this process is linked to specific chromatin features. Yet, at many imprinted genes, the mono-allelic expression is lineage or tissue-specific. Recent studies provide mechanistic insights into the developmentally-restricted action of the 'imprinting control regions' (ICRs). At several imprinted domains, the ICR expresses a long ncRNA that mediates chromatin repression in cis (and probably in trans as well). ICRs at other imprinted domains mediate higher-order chromatin structuration that enhances, or prevents, transcription of close-by genes. Here, we present how chromatin and ncRNAs contribute to developmental control of imprinted gene expression and discuss implications for disease. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Epigenetics dynamics in development and disease.

  10. Control of alphavirus-based gene expression using engineered riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christie L; Yu, Dong; Smolke, Christina D; Geall, Andrew J; Beard, Clayton W; Mason, Peter W

    2015-09-01

    Alphavirus-based replicons are a promising nucleic acid vaccine platform characterized by robust gene expression and immune responses. To further explore their use in vaccination, replicons were engineered to allow conditional control over their gene expression. Riboswitches, comprising a ribozyme actuator and RNA aptamer sensor, were engineered into the replicon 3' UTR. Binding of ligand to aptamer modulates ribozyme activity and, therefore, gene expression. Expression from DNA-launched and VRP-packaged replicons containing riboswitches was successfully regulated, achieving a 47-fold change in expression and modulation of the resulting type I interferon response. Moreover, we developed a novel control architecture where riboswitches were integrated into the 3' and 5' UTR of the subgenomic RNA region of the TC-83 virus, leading to an 1160-fold regulation of viral replication. Our studies demonstrate that the use of riboswitches for control of RNA replicon expression and viral replication holds promise for development of novel and safer vaccination strategies.

  11. Control of alphavirus-based gene expression using engineered riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christie L; Yu, Dong; Smolke, Christina D; Geall, Andrew J; Beard, Clayton W; Mason, Peter W

    2015-09-01

    Alphavirus-based replicons are a promising nucleic acid vaccine platform characterized by robust gene expression and immune responses. To further explore their use in vaccination, replicons were engineered to allow conditional control over their gene expression. Riboswitches, comprising a ribozyme actuator and RNA aptamer sensor, were engineered into the replicon 3' UTR. Binding of ligand to aptamer modulates ribozyme activity and, therefore, gene expression. Expression from DNA-launched and VRP-packaged replicons containing riboswitches was successfully regulated, achieving a 47-fold change in expression and modulation of the resulting type I interferon response. Moreover, we developed a novel control architecture where riboswitches were integrated into the 3' and 5' UTR of the subgenomic RNA region of the TC-83 virus, leading to an 1160-fold regulation of viral replication. Our studies demonstrate that the use of riboswitches for control of RNA replicon expression and viral replication holds promise for development of novel and safer vaccination strategies. PMID:26005949

  12. Magnetic field-controlled gene expression in encapsulated cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortner, Viktoria; Kaspar, Cornelius; Halter, Christian; Töllner, Lars; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Walzer, Johann; Günzburg, Walter H.; Dangerfield, John A.; Hohenadl, Christine; Czerny, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cell and gene therapies have an enormous range of potential applications, but as for most other therapies, dosing is a critical issue, which makes regulated gene expression a prerequisite for advanced strategies. Several inducible expression systems have been established, which mainly rely on small molecules as inducers, such as hormones or antibiotics. The application of these inducers is difficult to control and the effects on gene regulation are slow. Here we describe a novel system for induction of gene expression in encapsulated cells. This involves the modification of cells to express potential therapeutic genes under the control of a heat inducible promoter and the co-encapsulation of these cells with magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticles produce heat when subjected to an alternating magnetic field; the elevated temperatures in the capsules then induce gene expression. In the present study we define the parameters of such systems and provide proof-of-principle using reporter gene constructs. The fine-tuned heating of nanoparticles in the magnetic field allows regulation of gene expression from the outside over a broad range and within short time. Such a system has great potential for advancement of cell and gene therapy approaches. PMID:22197778

  13. Multi-chromatic control of mammalian gene expression and signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Konrad; Engesser, Raphael; Schulz, Simon; Steinberg, Thorsten; Tomakidi, Pascal; Weber, Cornelia C; Ulm, Roman; Timmer, Jens; Zurbriggen, Matias D; Weber, Wilfried

    2013-07-01

    The emergence and future of mammalian synthetic biology depends on technologies for orchestrating and custom tailoring complementary gene expression and signaling processes in a predictable manner. Here, we demonstrate for the first time multi-chromatic expression control in mammalian cells by differentially inducing up to three genes in a single cell culture in response to light of different wavelengths. To this end, we developed an ultraviolet B (UVB)-inducible expression system by designing a UVB-responsive split transcription factor based on the Arabidopsis thaliana UVB receptor UVR8 and the WD40 domain of COP1. The system allowed high (up to 800-fold) UVB-induced gene expression in human, monkey, hamster and mouse cells. Based on a quantitative model, we determined critical system parameters. By combining this UVB-responsive system with blue and red light-inducible gene control technology, we demonstrate multi-chromatic multi-gene control by differentially expressing three genes in a single cell culture in mammalian cells, and we apply this system for the multi-chromatic control of angiogenic signaling processes. This portfolio of optogenetic tools enables the design and implementation of synthetic biological networks showing unmatched spatiotemporal precision for future research and biomedical applications.

  14. Copper-controllable gene expression system for whole plants.

    PubMed

    Mett, V L; Lochhead, L P; Reynolds, P H

    1993-05-15

    We describe a system for gene expression in plants based on the regulation mechanism of the yeast metallothionein (MT) gene. The system consists of two elements: (i) the yeast ace1 (activating copper-MT expression) gene encoding a transcription factor under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA promoter, and (ii) a gene of interest under control of a chimeric promoter consisting of the 90-base-pair domain A of the CaMV 35S RNA promoter linked to the ACE1 transcription factor-binding site. At elevated copper ion concentrations, the ACE1 protein changes conformation, binds to, and activates transcription from the chimeric promoter. To test the functioning of the system in plants, a construct containing the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene under control of the chimeric promoter was prepared, and transgenic tobacco plants were produced. It was shown that GUS activity in the leaves of transgenic plants increased up to 50-fold, either after addition of 50 microM CuSO4 to the nutrient solution or after application of 0.5 microM CuSO4 to the plants in a foliar spray. This GUS expression was repressed after the removal of copper ions. The results show that the activity of the described chimeric promoter directly depends on copper ion concentration and that this system can be used in experiments that demand precise timing of expression.

  15. Small Molecule Control of Virulence Gene Expression in Francisella tularensis

    PubMed Central

    Charity, James C.; Blalock, LeeAnn T.; Costante-Hamm, Michelle M.; Kasper, Dennis L.; Dove, Simon L.

    2009-01-01

    In Francisella tularensis, the SspA protein family members MglA and SspA form a complex that associates with RNA polymerase (RNAP) to positively control the expression of virulence genes critical for the intramacrophage growth and survival of the organism. Although the association of the MglA-SspA complex with RNAP is evidently central to its role in controlling gene expression, the molecular details of how MglA and SspA exert their effects are not known. Here we show that in the live vaccine strain of F. tularensis (LVS), the MglA-SspA complex works in concert with a putative DNA-binding protein we have called PigR, together with the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), to regulate the expression of target genes. In particular, we present evidence that MglA, SspA, PigR and ppGpp regulate expression of the same set of genes, and show that mglA, sspA, pigR and ppGpp null mutants exhibit similar intramacrophage growth defects and are strongly attenuated for virulence in mice. We show further that PigR interacts directly with the MglA-SspA complex, suggesting that the central role of the MglA and SspA proteins in the control of virulence gene expression is to serve as a target for a transcription activator. Finally, we present evidence that ppGpp exerts its effects by promoting the interaction between PigR and the RNAP-associated MglA-SspA complex. Through its responsiveness to ppGpp, the contact between PigR and the MglA-SspA complex allows the integration of nutritional cues into the regulatory network governing virulence gene expression. PMID:19876386

  16. Genome engineering and gene expression control for bacterial strain development.

    PubMed

    Song, Chan Woo; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of techniques and tools have been developed for genome engineering and gene expression control to achieve desired phenotypes of various bacteria. Here we review and discuss the recent advances in bacterial genome manipulation and gene expression control techniques, and their actual uses with accompanying examples. Genome engineering has been commonly performed based on homologous recombination. During such genome manipulation, the counterselection systems employing SacB or nucleases have mainly been used for the efficient selection of desired engineered strains. The recombineering technology enables simple and more rapid manipulation of the bacterial genome. The group II intron-mediated genome engineering technology is another option for some bacteria that are difficult to be engineered by homologous recombination. Due to the increasing demands on high-throughput screening of bacterial strains having the desired phenotypes, several multiplex genome engineering techniques have recently been developed and validated in some bacteria. Another approach to achieve desired bacterial phenotypes is the repression of target gene expression without the modification of genome sequences. This can be performed by expressing antisense RNA, small regulatory RNA, or CRISPR RNA to repress target gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. All of these techniques allow efficient and rapid development and screening of bacterial strains having desired phenotypes, and more advanced techniques are expected to be seen.

  17. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional control of hepatitis B virus gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Uprichard, Susan L.; Wieland, Stefan F.; Althage, Alana; Chisari, Francis V.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects humans and certain nonhuman primates. Viral clearance and acute disease are associated with a strong, polyclonal, multispecific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response. Infiltrating T cells, as well as other activated inflammatory cells, produce cytokines that can regulate hepatocellular gene expression. Using an HBV transgenic mouse model, our laboratory has previously demonstrated that adoptive transfer of HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or injection of IL-2 can noncytopathically inhibit HBV gene expression by a posttranscriptional IFN-γ- and/or tumor necrosis factor α-dependent mechanism. Here, we report that HBV gene expression can also be controlled at the posttranscriptional level during persistent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. In contrast, it is controlled at the transcriptional level during acute murine cytomegalovirus infection or after repetitive polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid injection. Finally, we show that transcriptional inhibition of HBV is associated with changes in liver-specific gene expression. These results elucidate pathways that regulate the viral life cycle and suggest additional approaches for the treatment of chronic HBV infection. PMID:12552098

  18. Control of interferon-τ gene expression by Ets-2

    PubMed Central

    Ezashi, Toshihiko; Ealy, Alan D.; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Roberts, R. Michael

    1998-01-01

    Expression of the multiple interferon-τ (IFN-τ) genes is restricted to embryonic trophectoderm of ruminant ungulate species for a few days in early pregnancy. The promoter regions of these genes are highly conserved. A proximal (bp −91 to −69) sequence has been implicated in controlling trophoblast-specific expression. Here it was used as a target for yeast one-hybrid screening of a day 13 conceptus cDNA library. Two transcription factors of the Ets family, Ets-2 and GABPα, were identified, consistent with the observation that active ovine IFN-τ genes contain a single 10-bp Ets motif (core: GGAA) in the proximal segment, whereas three known inactive ovine genes contain a mutated core motif (TGAA). Cotransfection of a promoter- (−126 to +50) luciferase reporter construct from an active gene (bovineIFN-τ1; boIFNT1) and an Ets-2 expression plasmid in human JAr cells provided up to a 30-fold increase in reporter expression, whereas promoters from inactive genes were not transactivated. GABPα alone was ineffective and had only a ≈2-fold positive effect when coexpressed with its partner GABPβ. Other Ets-related transcription factors, which were not detected in the genetic screen, also provided a range of lesser transactivation effects. Coexpression of Ets-2 and activated Ras failed to transactivate the IFNT promoter greater than Ets-2 alone in JAr cells. The presence of Ets-2 in nuclei of embryonic trophectoderm was confirmed immunocytochemically. Together, these data suggest that Ets-2 plays a role in the transient expression of the nonvirally inducible IFNT genes. PMID:9653109

  19. [Control of gene expression by antisense nucleic acids].

    PubMed

    Lebleu, B; Clarenc, J P; Degols, G; Leonetti, J P; Milhaud, P

    1992-01-01

    The use of antisense RNA or of antisense oligonucleotides for the specific control of viral or cellular genes expression has undergone rapid developments recently; their respective advantages and drawbacks will be discussed. Progresses in oligonucleotides chemistry have lead to the synthesis of analogs with improved pharmacological properties. Besides the antisense approach, which usually targets translation initiation or splicing sites, it is possible to interfere specifically with gene expression through triple helix formation (anti-gene strategy) or through the titration of regulatory proteins (sense approach). A major problem encountered in the use of synthetic oligonucleotides is their delivery to their nuclear or cytoplasmic targets after cell uptake by an endocytic pathway; our own work in this field will be discussed. Finally, we will describe the strategies followed by our group to improve the bioavailability of antisense oligonucleotides, as for instance conjugation to poly (L-lysine) or encapsidation in antibody-targeted liposomes.

  20. A humanized system for pharmacologic control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rivera, V M; Clackson, T; Natesan, S; Pollock, R; Amara, J F; Keenan, T; Magari, S R; Phillips, T; Courage, N L; Cerasoli, F; Holt, D A; Gilman, M

    1996-09-01

    Gene therapy was originally conceived as a medical intervention to replace or correct defective genes in patients with inherited disorders. However, it may have much broader potential as an alternative delivery platform for protein therapeutics, such as cytokines, hormones, antibodies and novel engineered proteins. One key technical barrier to the widespread implementation of this form of therapy is the need for precise control over the level of protein production. A suitable system for pharmacologic control of therapeutic gene expression would permit precise titration of gene product dosage, intermittent or pulsatile treatment, and ready termination of therapy by withdrawal of the activating drug. We set out to design such a system with the following properties: (1) low baseline expression and high induction ratio; (2) positive control by an orally bioavailable small-molecule drug; (3) reduced potential for immune recognition through the exclusive use of human proteins; and (4) modularity to allow the independent optimization of each component using the tools of protein engineering. We report here the properties of this system and demonstrate its use to control circulating levels of human growth hormone in mice implanted with engineered human cells. PMID:8782462

  1. Towards resolving the transcription factor network controlling myelin gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Debra L.; Denarier, Eric; Friedman, Hana C.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Peterson, Alan C.

    2011-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), myelin is produced from spirally-wrapped oligodendrocyte plasma membrane and, as exemplified by the debilitating effects of inherited or acquired myelin abnormalities in diseases such as multiple sclerosis, it plays a critical role in nervous system function. Myelin sheath production coincides with rapid up-regulation of numerous genes. The complexity of their subsequent expression patterns, along with recently recognized heterogeneity within the oligodendrocyte lineage, suggest that the regulatory networks controlling such genes drive multiple context-specific transcriptional programs. Conferring this nuanced level of control likely involves a large repertoire of interacting transcription factors (TFs). Here, we combined novel strategies of computational sequence analyses with in vivo functional analysis to establish a TF network model of coordinate myelin-associated gene transcription. Notably, the network model captures regulatory DNA elements and TFs known to regulate oligodendrocyte myelin gene transcription and/or oligodendrocyte development, thereby validating our approach. Further, it links to numerous TFs with previously unsuspected roles in CNS myelination and suggests collaborative relationships amongst both known and novel TFs, thus providing deeper insight into the myelin gene transcriptional network. PMID:21729871

  2. Temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Manjul; Dhekney, Sadanand A; Soriano, Leonardo; Kandel, Raju; Grosser, Jude W

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology provides plant breeders an additional tool to improve various traits desired by growers and consumers of horticultural crops. It also provides genetic solutions to major problems affecting horticultural crops and can be a means for rapid improvement of a cultivar. With the availability of a number of horticultural genome sequences, it has become relatively easier to utilize these resources to identify DNA sequences for both basic and applied research. Promoters play a key role in plant gene expression and the regulation of gene expression. In recent years, rapid progress has been made on the isolation and evaluation of plant-derived promoters and their use in horticultural crops, as more and more species become amenable to genetic transformation. Our understanding of the tools and techniques of horticultural plant biotechnology has now evolved from a discovery phase to an implementation phase. The availability of a large number of promoters derived from horticultural plants opens up the field for utilization of native sequences and improving crops using precision breeding. In this review, we look at the temporal and spatial control of gene expression in horticultural crops and the usage of a variety of promoters either isolated from horticultural crops or used in horticultural crop improvement. PMID:26504550

  3. Validation of endogenous control reference genes for normalizing gene expression studies in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ayakannu, Thangesweran; Taylor, Anthony H; Willets, Jonathon M; Brown, Laurence; Lambert, David G; McDonald, John; Davies, Quentin; Moss, Esther L; Konje, Justin C

    2015-09-01

    Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique used for the relative quantification of target genes, using reference (housekeeping) genes for normalization to ensure the generation of accurate and robust data. A systematic examination of the suitability of endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in endometrial cancer tissues is absent. The aims of this study were therefore to identify and evaluate from the thirty-two possible reference genes from a TaqMan(®) array panel their suitability as an internal control gene. The mathematical software packages geNorm qBasePLUS identified Pumilio homolog 1 (Drosophila) (PUM1), ubiquitin C (UBC), phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1), mitochondrial ribosomal protein L19 (MRPL19) and peptidylpropyl isomerase A (cyclophilin A) (PPIA) as the best reference gene combination, whilst NormFinder identified MRPL19 as the best single reference gene, with importin 8 (IPO8) and PPIA being the best combination of two reference genes. BestKeeper ranked MRPL19 as the most stably expressed gene. In addition, the study was validated by examining the relative expression of a test gene, which encodes the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). A significant difference in CB1 mRNA expression between malignant and normal endometrium using MRPL19, PPIA, and IP08 in combination was observed. The use of MRPL19, IPO8 and PPIA was identified as the best reference gene combination for the normalization of gene expression levels in endometrial carcinoma. This study demonstrates that the arbitrary selection of endogenous control reference genes for normalization in qRT-PCR studies of endometrial carcinoma, without validation, risks the production of inaccurate data and should therefore be discouraged.

  4. Plasmid vector with temperature-controlled gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, V.V.; Yamshchikov, V.F.; Pletnev, A.G.

    1986-02-01

    In plasmid pBR327, a fragment 169 b.p. long including promotor p/sub 3/ of the bla gene has been deleted. The deletional derivative so obtained (pSP2) has been used to construct a recombinant plasmid bearing a fragment of phage lambda DNA with the p/sub R/ promotor and the gene of the temperature-sensitive repressor cI. It has been shown that the plasmid vector so constructed (pCE119) with promotor cR performs repressor-cI-controlled transcription of the bla gene, as a result of which induction for an hour at 42/sup 0/C leads to an almost 100-fold increase in the amount of product of the bla gene as compared with that at 32/sup 0/C. The possibility of the use of plasmid cPE119 for the expression of other genes has been demonstrated for the case of the semisynthetic ..beta..-galactosidase gene of E. coli. In this case, on induction of the cells with recombinant plasmid pCEZ12 for 3 hours at 42/sup 0/C, a 300-fold increase in the amount of active ..beta..-galactosidase, as compared with that at 32/sup 0/C, was observed. It is important to point out that under these conditions (at 42/sup 0/C), at least 99% of the cells containing the plasmid retain the phenotype lacZ/sup +/, which indicates the stability of the proposed vector system

  5. On TADs and LADs: Spatial Control Over Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Sandoval, Adriana; Gasser, Susan M

    2016-08-01

    The combinatorial action of transcription factors drives cell-type-specific gene expression patterns. However, transcription factor binding and gene regulation occur in the context of chromatin, which modulates DNA accessibility. High-resolution chromatin interaction maps have defined units of chromatin that are in spatial proximity, called topologically associated domains (TADs). TADs can be further classified based on expression activity, replication timing, or the histone marks or non-histone proteins associated with them. Independently, other chromatin domains have been defined by their likelihood to interact with non-DNA structures, such as the nuclear lamina. Lamina-associated domains (LADs) correlate with low gene expression and late replication timing. TADs and LADs have recently been evaluated with respect to cell-type-specific gene expression. The results shed light on the relevance of these forms of chromatin organization for transcriptional regulation, and address specifically how chromatin sequestration influences cell fate decisions during organismal development. PMID:27312344

  6. An autonomous molecular computer for logical control of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenson, Yaakov; Gil, Binyamin; Ben-Dor, Uri; Adar, Rivka; Shapiro, Ehud

    2004-05-01

    Early biomolecular computer research focused on laboratory-scale, human-operated computers for complex computational problems. Recently, simple molecular-scale autonomous programmable computers were demonstrated allowing both input and output information to be in molecular form. Such computers, using biological molecules as input data and biologically active molecules as outputs, could produce a system for `logical' control of biological processes. Here we describe an autonomous biomolecular computer that, at least in vitro, logically analyses the levels of messenger RNA species, and in response produces a molecule capable of affecting levels of gene expression. The computer operates at a concentration of close to a trillion computers per microlitre and consists of three programmable modules: a computation module, that is, a stochastic molecular automaton; an input module, by which specific mRNA levels or point mutations regulate software molecule concentrations, and hence automaton transition probabilities; and an output module, capable of controlled release of a short single-stranded DNA molecule. This approach might be applied in vivo to biochemical sensing, genetic engineering and even medical diagnosis and treatment. As a proof of principle we programmed the computer to identify and analyse mRNA of disease-related genes associated with models of small-cell lung cancer and prostate cancer, and to produce a single-stranded DNA molecule modelled after an anticancer drug.

  7. Post-Transcriptional Control of Chloroplast Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    del Campo, Eva M.

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplasts contain their own genome, organized as operons, which are generally transcribed as polycistronic transcriptional units. These primary transcripts are processed into smaller RNAs, which are further modified to produce functional RNAs. The RNA processing mechanisms remain largely unknown and represent an important step in the control of chloroplast gene expression. Such mechanisms include RNA cleavage of pre-existing RNAs, RNA stabilization, intron splicing, and RNA editing. Recently, several nuclear-encoded proteins that participate in diverse plastid RNA processing events have been characterised. Many of them seem to belong to the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein family that is implicated in many crucial functions including organelle biogenesis and plant development. This review will provide an overview of current knowledge of the post-transcriptional processing in chloroplasts. PMID:19838333

  8. The use of EST expression matrixes for the quality control of gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Milnthorpe, Andrew T; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    EST expression profiling provides an attractive tool for studying differential gene expression, but cDNA libraries' origins and EST data quality are not always known or reported. Libraries may originate from pooled or mixed tissues; EST clustering, EST counts, library annotations and analysis algorithms may contain errors. Traditional data analysis methods, including research into tissue-specific gene expression, assume EST counts to be correct and libraries to be correctly annotated, which is not always the case. Therefore, a method capable of assessing the quality of expression data based on that data alone would be invaluable for assessing the quality of EST data and determining their suitability for mRNA expression analysis. Here we report an approach to the selection of a small generic subset of 244 UniGene clusters suitable for identification of the tissue of origin for EST libraries and quality control of the expression data using EST expression information alone. We created a small expression matrix of UniGene IDs using two rounds of selection followed by two rounds of optimisation. Our selection procedures differ from traditional approaches to finding "tissue-specific" genes and our matrix yields consistency high positive correlation values for libraries with confirmed tissues of origin and can be applied for tissue typing and quality control of libraries as small as just a few hundred total ESTs. Furthermore, we can pick up tissue correlations between related tissues e.g. brain and peripheral nervous tissue, heart and muscle tissues and identify tissue origins for a few libraries of uncharacterised tissue identity. It was possible to confirm tissue identity for some libraries which have been derived from cancer tissues or have been normalised. Tissue matching is affected strongly by cancer progression or library normalisation and our approach may potentially be applied for elucidating the stage of normalisation in normalised libraries or for cancer

  9. Epigenetic control of gene expression in the alcoholic brain.

    PubMed

    Ponomarev, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure causes widespread changes in brain gene expression in humans and animal models. Many of these contribute to cellular adaptations that ultimately lead to behavioral tolerance and alcohol dependence. There is an emerging appreciation for the role of epigenetic processes in alcohol-induced changes in brain gene expression and behavior. For example, chronic alcohol exposure produces changes in DNA and histone methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA expression that affect expression of multiple genes in various types of brain cells (i.e., neurons and glia) and contribute to brain pathology and brain plasticity associated with alcohol abuse and dependence. Drugs targeting the epigenetic "master regulators" are emerging as potential therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders and drug addiction.

  10. Epigenetic Control of Gene Expression in the Alcoholic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarev, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Chronic alcohol exposure causes widespread changes in brain gene expression in humans and animal models. Many of these contribute to cellular adaptations that ultimately lead to behavioral tolerance and alcohol dependence. There is an emerging appreciation for the role of epigenetic processes in alcohol-induced changes in brain gene expression and behavior. For example, chronic alcohol exposure produces changes in DNA and histone methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA expression that affect expression of multiple genes in various types of brain cells (i.e., neurons and glia) and contribute to brain pathology and brain plasticity associated with alcohol abuse and dependence. Drugs targeting the epigenetic “master regulators” are emerging as potential therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders and drug addiction. PMID:24313166

  11. Controlling for gene expression changes in transcription factor protein networks.

    PubMed

    Banks, Charles A S; Lee, Zachary T; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L; Seidel, Chris W; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P

    2014-06-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein-protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions.

  12. Control of erythropoietin gene expression and its use in medicine.

    PubMed

    Jelkmann, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) gene expression is under the control of inhibitory (GATA-2, NF-kappaB) and stimulatory (hypoxia-inducible transcription factor [HIF]-2, hepatocyte nuclear factor [HNF]-4alpha [alpha]) transcription factors. EPO deficiency is the main cause of the anemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a contributing factor in the anemias of inflammation and cancer. Small, orally active compounds capable of stimulating endogenous EPO production are in preclinical or clinical trials for treatment of anemia. These agents include stabilizers of the HIFs that bind to the EPO enhancer and GATA inhibitors which prevent GATA from suppressing the EPO promoter. While HIF stabilizing drugs may prove useful as inexpensive second-line choices, at present, their side effects--particularly tumorigenicity--preclude their use as first-choice therapy. As an alternative, EPO gene therapy has been explored in animal studies and in trials on CKD patients. Here, a major problem is immunogenicity of ex vivo transfected implanted cells and of the recombinant protein produced after ex vivo or in vivo EPO complementary DNA (cDNA) transfer. Recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) engineered in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures (epoetin alpha and epoetin beta [beta]) and its hyperglycosylated analogue darbepoetin alpha are established and safe drugs to avoid allogeneic red blood cell transfusion. Gene-activated EPO (epoetin delta [delta]) from human fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080) has recently been launched for use in CKD. It is important to know the basics of the technologies, production processes, and structural properties of the novel anti-anemic strategies and drugs. PMID:17998055

  13. Bacterial control of host gene expression through RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Lutay, Nataliya; Ambite, Ines; Hernandez, Jenny Grönberg; Rydström, Gustav; Ragnarsdóttir, Bryndís; Puthia, Manoj; Nadeem, Aftab; Zhang, Jingyao; Storm, Petter; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    The normal flora furnishes the host with ecological barriers that prevent pathogen attack while maintaining tissue homeostasis. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) constitute a highly relevant model of microbial adaptation in which some patients infected with Escherichia coli develop acute pyelonephritis, while other patients with bacteriuria exhibit an asymptomatic carrier state similar to bacterial commensalism. It remains unclear if the lack of destructive inflammation merely reflects low virulence or if carrier strains actively inhibit disease-associated responses in the host. Here, we identify a new mechanism of bacterial adaptation through broad suppression of RNA polymerase II–dependent (Pol II–dependent) host gene expression. Over 60% of all genes were suppressed 24 hours after human inoculation with the prototype asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) strain E. coli 83972, and inhibition was verified by infection of human cells. Specific repressors and activators of Pol II–dependent transcription were modified, Pol II phosphorylation was inhibited, and pathogen-specific signaling was suppressed in cell lines and inoculated patients. An increased frequency of strains inhibiting Pol II was epidemiologically verified in ABU and fecal strains compared with acute pyelonephritis, and a Pol II antagonist suppressed the disease-associated host response. These results suggest that by manipulating host gene expression, ABU strains promote tissue integrity while inhibiting pathology. Such bacterial modulation of host gene expression may be essential to sustain asymptomatic bacterial carriage by ensuring that potentially destructive immune activation will not occur. PMID:23728172

  14. Gene Expression Control by Glucocorticoid Receptors during Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Andre Machado; Anunciato, Aparecida Kataryna Olimpio; Rosenstock, Tatiana Rosado; Glezer, Isaias

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are potent anti-inflammatory compounds that have been extensively used in clinical practice for several decades. GC’s effects on inflammation are generally mediated through GC receptors (GRs). Signal transduction through these nuclear receptors leads to dramatic changes in gene expression programs in different cell types, typically due to GR binding to DNA or to transcription modulators. During the last decade, the view of GCs as exclusive anti-inflammatory molecules has been challenged. GR negative interference in pro-inflammatory gene expression was a landmark in terms of molecular mechanisms that suppress immune activity. In fact, GR can induce varied inhibitory molecules, including a negative regulator of Toll-like receptors pathway, or subject key transcription factors, such as NF-κB and AP-1, to a repressor mechanism. In contrast, the expression of some acute-phase proteins and other players of innate immunity generally requires GR signaling. Consequently, GRs must operate context-dependent inhibitory, permissive, or stimulatory effects on host defense signaling triggered by pathogens or tissue damage. This review aims to disclose how contradictory or comparable effects on inflammatory gene expression can depend on pharmacological approach (including selective GC receptor modulators; SEGRMs), cell culture, animal treatment, or transgenic strategies used as models. Although the current view of GR-signaling integrated many advances in the field, some answers to important questions remain elusive. PMID:27148162

  15. Relationship of eukaryotic DNA replication to committed gene expression: general theory for gene control.

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, L P

    1991-01-01

    The historic arguments for the participation of eukaryotic DNA replication in the control of gene expression are reconsidered along with more recent evidence. An earlier view in which gene commitment was achieved with stable chromatin structures which required DNA replication to reset expression potential (D. D. Brown, Cell 37:359-365, 1984) is further considered. The participation of nonspecific stable repressor of gene activity (histones and other chromatin proteins), as previously proposed, is reexamined. The possible function of positive trans-acting factors is now further developed by considering evidence from DNA virus models. It is proposed that these positive factors act to control the initiation of replicon-specific DNA synthesis in the S phase (early or late replication timing). Stable chromatin assembles during replication into potentially active (early S) or inactive (late S) states with prevailing trans-acting factors (early) or repressing factors (late) and may asymmetrically commit daughter templates. This suggests logical schemes for programming differentiation based on replicons and trans-acting initiators. This proposal requires that DNA replication precede major changes in gene commitment. Prior evidence against a role for DNA replication during terminal differentiation is reexamined along with other results from terminal differentiation of lower eukaryotes. This leads to a proposal that DNA replication may yet underlie terminal gene commitment, but that for it to do so there must exist two distinct modes of replication control. In one mode (mitotic replication) replicon initiation is tightly linked to the cell cycle, whereas the other mode (terminal replication) initiation is not cell cycle restricted, is replicon specific, and can lead to a terminally differentiated state. Aberrant control of mitotic and terminal modes of DNA replication may underlie the transformed state. Implications of a replicon basis for chromatin structure-function and

  16. DNA hydroxymethylation controls cardiomyocyte gene expression in development and hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Carolina M.; Kunderfranco, Paolo; Rubino, Marcello; Larcher, Veronica; Carullo, Pierluigi; Anselmo, Achille; Kurz, Kerstin; Carell, Thomas; Angius, Andrea; Latronico, Michael V. G.; Papait, Roberto; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    Methylation at 5-cytosine (5-mC) is a fundamental epigenetic DNA modification associated recently with cardiac disease. In contrast, the role of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC)—5-mC's oxidation product—in cardiac biology and disease is unknown. Here we assess the hydroxymethylome in embryonic, neonatal, adult and hypertrophic mouse cardiomyocytes, showing that dynamic modulation of hydroxymethylated DNA is associated with specific transcriptional networks during heart development and failure. DNA hydroxymethylation marks the body of highly expressed genes as well as distal regulatory regions with enhanced activity. Moreover, pathological hypertrophy is characterized by a shift towards a neonatal 5-hmC distribution pattern. We also show that the ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) enzyme regulates the expression of key cardiac genes, such as Myh7, through 5-hmC deposition on the gene body and at enhancers. Thus, we provide a genome-wide analysis of 5-hmC in the cardiomyocyte and suggest a role for this epigenetic modification in heart development and disease. PMID:27489048

  17. Controlling mammalian gene expression by allosteric hepatitis delta virus ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yoko; Zhou, Linlin; Miu, Anh; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2013-12-20

    We engineered small molecule responsive allosteric ribozymes based on the genomic hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme by replacing the P4-L4 stem-loop with an RNA aptamer through a connector stem. When embedded in the 3' untranslated region of a reporter gene mRNA, these RNA devices enabled regulation of cis-gene expression by theophylline and guanine by up to 29.5-fold in mammalian cell culture. Furthermore, a NOR logic gate device was constructed by placing two engineered ribozymes in tandem, demonstrating the modularity of the RNA devices. The significant improvement in the regulatory dynamic range (ON/OFF ratio) of the RNA devices based on the HDV ribozyme should provide new opportunities for practical applications. PMID:23697539

  18. With Reference to Reference Genes: A Systematic Review of Endogenous Controls in Gene Expression Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Joanne R.; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The choice of reference genes that are stably expressed amongst treatment groups is a crucial step in real-time quantitative PCR gene expression studies. Recent guidelines have specified that a minimum of two validated reference genes should be used for normalisation. However, a quantitative review of the literature showed that the average number of reference genes used across all studies was 1.2. Thus, the vast majority of studies continue to use a single gene, with β-actin (ACTB) and/or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) being commonly selected in studies of vertebrate gene expression. Few studies (15%) tested a panel of potential reference genes for stability of expression before using them to normalise data. Amongst studies specifically testing reference gene stability, few found ACTB or GAPDH to be optimal, whereby these genes were significantly less likely to be chosen when larger panels of potential reference genes were screened. Fewer reference genes were tested for stability in non-model organisms, presumably owing to a dearth of available primers in less well characterised species. Furthermore, the experimental conditions under which real-time quantitative PCR analyses were conducted had a large influence on the choice of reference genes, whereby different studies of rat brain tissue showed different reference genes to be the most stable. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies. PMID:26555275

  19. With Reference to Reference Genes: A Systematic Review of Endogenous Controls in Gene Expression Studies.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Joanne R; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    The choice of reference genes that are stably expressed amongst treatment groups is a crucial step in real-time quantitative PCR gene expression studies. Recent guidelines have specified that a minimum of two validated reference genes should be used for normalisation. However, a quantitative review of the literature showed that the average number of reference genes used across all studies was 1.2. Thus, the vast majority of studies continue to use a single gene, with β-actin (ACTB) and/or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) being commonly selected in studies of vertebrate gene expression. Few studies (15%) tested a panel of potential reference genes for stability of expression before using them to normalise data. Amongst studies specifically testing reference gene stability, few found ACTB or GAPDH to be optimal, whereby these genes were significantly less likely to be chosen when larger panels of potential reference genes were screened. Fewer reference genes were tested for stability in non-model organisms, presumably owing to a dearth of available primers in less well characterised species. Furthermore, the experimental conditions under which real-time quantitative PCR analyses were conducted had a large influence on the choice of reference genes, whereby different studies of rat brain tissue showed different reference genes to be the most stable. These results highlight the importance of validating the choice of normalising reference genes before conducting gene expression studies.

  20. Epigenetic Control of Gene Expression in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics is traditionally defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequence. There are three main classes of epigenetic marks—DNA methylation, modifications of histone tails, and noncoding RNAs—each of which may be influenced by the environment, diet, diseases, and ageing. Importantly, epigenetic marks have been shown to influence immune cell maturation and are associated with the risk of developing various forms of cancer, including lung cancer. Moreover, there is emerging evidence that these epigenetic marks affect gene expression in the lung and are associated with benign lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and interstitial lung disease. Technological advances have made it feasible to study epigenetic marks in the lung, and it is anticipated that this knowledge will enhance our understanding of the dynamic biology in the lung and lead to the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for our patients with lung disease. PMID:21596832

  1. Early pregnancy peripheral blood gene expression and risk of preterm delivery: a nested case control study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Preterm delivery (PTD) is a significant public health problem associated with greater risk of mortality and morbidity in infants and mothers. Pathophysiologic processes that may lead to PTD start early in pregnancy. We investigated early pregnancy peripheral blood global gene expression and PTD risk. Methods As part of a prospective study, ribonucleic acid was extracted from blood samples (collected at 16 weeks gestational age) from 14 women who had PTD (cases) and 16 women who delivered at term (controls). Gene expressions were measured using the GeneChip® Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array. Student's T-test and fold change analysis were used to identify differentially expressed genes. We used hierarchical clustering and principle components analysis to characterize signature gene expression patterns among cases and controls. Pathway and promoter sequence analyses were used to investigate functions and functional relationships as well as regulatory regions of differentially expressed genes. Results A total of 209 genes, including potential candidate genes (e.g. PTGDS, prostaglandin D2 synthase 21 kDa), were differentially expressed. A set of these genes achieved accurate pre-diagnostic separation of cases and controls. These genes participate in functions related to immune system and inflammation, organ development, metabolism (lipid, carbohydrate and amino acid) and cell signaling. Binding sites of putative transcription factors such as EGR1 (early growth response 1), TFAP2A (transcription factor AP2A), Sp1 (specificity protein 1) and Sp3 (specificity protein 3) were over represented in promoter regions of differentially expressed genes. Real-time PCR confirmed microarray expression measurements of selected genes. Conclusions PTD is associated with maternal early pregnancy peripheral blood gene expression changes. Maternal early pregnancy peripheral blood gene expression patterns may be useful for better understanding of PTD pathophysiology and PTD risk

  2. A modified consumer inkjet for spatiotemporal control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Daniel J; Morfino, Roberto C; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a low-cost inkjet dosing system capable of continuous, two-dimensional spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression via delivery of diffusible regulators to a custom-mounted gel culture of E. coli. A consumer-grade, inkjet printer was adapted for chemical printing; E. coli cultures were grown on 750 microm thick agar embedded in micro-wells machined into commercial compact discs. Spatio-temporal regulation of the lac operon was demonstrated via the printing of patterns of lactose and glucose directly into the cultures; X-Gal blue patterns were used for visual feedback. We demonstrate how the bistable nature of the lac operon's feedback, when perturbed by patterning lactose (inducer) and glucose (inhibitor), can lead to coordination of cell expression patterns across a field in ways that mimic motifs seen in developmental biology. Examples of this include sharp boundaries and the generation of traveling waves of mRNA expression. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of reaction-diffusion effects in the well-studied lac operon. A finite element reaction-diffusion model of the lac operon is also presented which predicts pattern formation with good fidelity. PMID:19763256

  3. A modified consumer inkjet for spatiotemporal control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Daniel J; Morfino, Roberto C; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2009-09-18

    This paper presents a low-cost inkjet dosing system capable of continuous, two-dimensional spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression via delivery of diffusible regulators to a custom-mounted gel culture of E. coli. A consumer-grade, inkjet printer was adapted for chemical printing; E. coli cultures were grown on 750 microm thick agar embedded in micro-wells machined into commercial compact discs. Spatio-temporal regulation of the lac operon was demonstrated via the printing of patterns of lactose and glucose directly into the cultures; X-Gal blue patterns were used for visual feedback. We demonstrate how the bistable nature of the lac operon's feedback, when perturbed by patterning lactose (inducer) and glucose (inhibitor), can lead to coordination of cell expression patterns across a field in ways that mimic motifs seen in developmental biology. Examples of this include sharp boundaries and the generation of traveling waves of mRNA expression. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of reaction-diffusion effects in the well-studied lac operon. A finite element reaction-diffusion model of the lac operon is also presented which predicts pattern formation with good fidelity.

  4. Versatile control of Plasmodium falciparum gene expression with an inducible protein-RNA interaction

    PubMed Central

    Goldfless, Stephen J.; Wagner, Jeffrey C.; Niles, Jacquin C.

    2014-01-01

    The available tools for conditional gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum are limited. Here, to enable reliable control of target gene expression, we build a system to efficiently modulate translation. We overcame several problems associated with other approaches for regulating gene expression in P. falciparum. Specifically, our system functions predictably across several native and engineered promoter contexts, and affords control over reporter and native parasite proteins irrespective of their subcellular compartmentalization. Induction and repression of gene expression are rapid, homogeneous, and stable over prolonged periods. To demonstrate practical application of our system, we used it to reveal direct links between antimalarial drugs and their native parasite molecular target. This is an important out come given the rapid spread of resistance, and intensified efforts to efficiently discover and optimize new antimalarial drugs. Overall, the studies presented highlight the utility of our system for broadly controlling gene expression and performing functional genetics in P. falciparum. PMID:25370483

  5. Light Controlled Modulation of Gene Expression by Chemical Optoepigenetic Probes

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Surya A.; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J. Adam; Szantai-Kis, D. Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N.; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatio-temporal control. Here, we present a novel and generalizable approach, referred to as ‘Chemo-Optical Modulation of Epigenetically-regulated Transcription’ (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may translate into novel therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required. PMID:26974814

  6. Posttranscriptional control of bacteriophage lambda gene expression from a site distal to the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Guarneros, G; Montañez, C; Hernandez, T; Court, D

    1982-01-01

    The bacteriophage lambda int gene product, integrase, recombines the phage DNA with the host DNA at specific sites on each to accomplish lysogeny. The int gene is transcribed from two promoters, PL and PI, each regulated positively by lambda proteins. The expression of integrase is also controlled from a site, sib, in the b region of the phage genome. This is a unique regulatory site because it is located distal to the structural gene in relation to the promoters. The expression of int from the PL promoter is inhibited when sib is present. This effect appears to be specific for PL because sib does not cause inhibition of PI-dependent int synthesis. lambda mutants that contain alterations in the site have been isolated. Sequence analyses of the mutations reveal single base changes, spanning 37 base pairs (bp) in the b region, some 240 bp beyond the int gene. Another mutant, hef13, which has a phenotype similar to that of sib, introduces a nucleotide change within the same 37-bp region. The sib and hef mutations cluster within a region of dyad symmetry. Regulation of int synthesis by sib occurs after transcription of the int gene. There is no difference in the rate of PL-promoted int mRNA synthesis in either sib+ or sib- phage infections, yet int mRNA is less stable in the sib+ infection. Because RNase III host mutants are defective in sib regulation, processing of the PL mRNA at sib by this endoribonuclease may cause int mRNA decay and decrease int synthesis. PMID:6281759

  7. Mosquito Passage Dramatically Changes var Gene Expression in Controlled Human Plasmodium falciparum Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anna; Petter, Michaela; Krumkamp, Ralf; Esen, Meral; Held, Jana; Scholz, Judith A. M.; Li, Tao; Sim, B. Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Duffy, Michael F.; Tannich, Egbert

    2016-01-01

    Virulence of the most deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is linked to the variant surface antigen PfEMP1, which is encoded by about 60 var genes per parasite genome. Although the expression of particular variants has been associated with different clinical outcomes, little is known about var gene expression at the onset of infection. By analyzing controlled human malaria infections via quantitative real-time PCR, we show that parasite populations from 18 volunteers expressed virtually identical transcript patterns that were dominated by the subtelomeric var gene group B and, to a lesser extent, group A. Furthermore, major changes in composition and frequency of var gene transcripts were detected between the parental parasite culture that was used to infect mosquitoes and Plasmodia recovered from infected volunteers, suggesting that P. falciparum resets its var gene expression during mosquito passage and starts with the broad expression of a specific subset of var genes when entering the human blood phase. PMID:27070311

  8. Mosquito Passage Dramatically Changes var Gene Expression in Controlled Human Plasmodium falciparum Infections.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Anna; Petter, Michaela; Krumkamp, Ralf; Esen, Meral; Held, Jana; Scholz, Judith A M; Li, Tao; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kremsner, Peter G; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Duffy, Michael F; Tannich, Egbert

    2016-04-01

    Virulence of the most deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is linked to the variant surface antigen PfEMP1, which is encoded by about 60 var genes per parasite genome. Although the expression of particular variants has been associated with different clinical outcomes, little is known about var gene expression at the onset of infection. By analyzing controlled human malaria infections via quantitative real-time PCR, we show that parasite populations from 18 volunteers expressed virtually identical transcript patterns that were dominated by the subtelomeric var gene group B and, to a lesser extent, group A. Furthermore, major changes in composition and frequency of var gene transcripts were detected between the parental parasite culture that was used to infect mosquitoes and Plasmodia recovered from infected volunteers, suggesting that P. falciparum resets its var gene expression during mosquito passage and starts with the broad expression of a specific subset of var genes when entering the human blood phase.

  9. SOURCES OF VARIATION IN BASELINE GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS FROM TOXICOGENOMIC STUDY CONTROL ANIMALS ACROSS MULTIPLE LABORATORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variations in study design are typical for toxicogenomic studies, but their impact on gene expression in control animals has not been well characterized. A dataset of control animal microarray expression data was assembled by a working group of the Health and Environmental Scienc...

  10. Flexible, AAV-equipped Genetic Modules for Inducible Control of Gene Expression in Mammalian Brain

    PubMed Central

    Dogbevia, Godwin K; Roβmanith, Martin; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T

    2016-01-01

    Controlling gene expression in mammalian brain is of utmost importance to causally link the role of gene function to cell circuit dynamics under normal conditions and disease states. We have developed recombinant adeno-associated viruses equipped with tetracycline-controlled genetic switches for inducible and reversible control of gene expression in a cell type specific and brain subregion selective manner. Here, we characterize a two-virus approach to efficiently and reliably switch gene expression on and off, repetitively, both in vitro and in vivo. Our recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-Tet approach is highly flexible and it has great potential for application in basic and biomedical neuroscience research and gene therapy. PMID:27070301

  11. Gene expression in cell lines from propionic acidemia patients, carrier parents, and controls.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Kimberly A; Bush, William S; Zhang, Zhe

    2015-08-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is an inborn of metabolism which usually presents with metabolic acidosis and accumulation of 3-hydroxypropionate among other toxins. Examining the gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from PA patients, their carrier parents and age/sex-matched controls at normal glucose and low glucose growth conditions demonstrated differences among and between these groups. Using three-way ANOVA analysis, four DAVID clusters of response were identified of which three of the four clusters showed that LCLs from carrier parents had an intermediate response between healthy controls and PA patients. These differences included changes in expression of cell cycle regulatory genes, mitochondrial related genes, and transcriptional regulation. In addition, differences also were observed in expression of genes involved in transendothelial migration and focal adhesion at normal growth conditions when comparing the LCLs from PA patients and controls. These studies demonstrate transcriptional differences between LCLs from PA patients, their parents and biochemically normal controls.

  12. The calcineurin-NFAT pathway controls activity-dependent circadian gene expression in slow skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dyar, Kenneth A.; Ciciliot, Stefano; Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio Malagoli; Pallafacchina, Giorgia; Tothova, Jana; Argentini, Carla; Agatea, Lisa; Abraham, Reimar; Ahdesmäki, Miika; Forcato, Mattia; Bicciato, Silvio; Schiaffino, Stefano; Blaauw, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physical activity and circadian rhythms are well-established determinants of human health and disease, but the relationship between muscle activity and the circadian regulation of muscle genes is a relatively new area of research. It is unknown whether muscle activity and muscle clock rhythms are coupled together, nor whether activity rhythms can drive circadian gene expression in skeletal muscle. Methods We compared the circadian transcriptomes of two mouse hindlimb muscles with vastly different circadian activity patterns, the continuously active slow soleus and the sporadically active fast tibialis anterior, in the presence or absence of a functional skeletal muscle clock (skeletal muscle-specific Bmal1 KO). In addition, we compared the effect of denervation on muscle circadian gene expression. Results We found that different skeletal muscles exhibit major differences in their circadian transcriptomes, yet core clock gene oscillations were essentially identical in fast and slow muscles. Furthermore, denervation caused relatively minor changes in circadian expression of most core clock genes, yet major differences in expression level, phase and amplitude of many muscle circadian genes. Conclusions We report that activity controls the oscillation of around 15% of skeletal muscle circadian genes independently of the core muscle clock, and we have identified the Ca2+-dependent calcineurin-NFAT pathway as an important mediator of activity-dependent circadian gene expression, showing that circadian locomotor activity rhythms drive circadian rhythms of NFAT nuclear translocation and target gene expression. PMID:26629406

  13. Growth and gene expression are predominantly controlled by distinct regions of the human IL-4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Ryan, J J; McReynolds, L J; Keegan, A; Wang, L H; Garfein, E; Rothman, P; Nelms, K; Paul, W E

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 causes hematopoietic cells to proliferate and express a series of genes, including CD23. We examined whether IL-4-mediated growth, as measured by 4PS phosphorylation, and gene induction were similarly controlled. Studies of M12.4.1 cells expressing human IL-4R truncation mutants indicated that the region between amino acids 557-657 is necessary for full gene expression, which correlated with Stat6 DNA binding activity. This region was not required for 4PS phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutations in the interval between amino acids 557-657 revealed that as long as one tyrosine remained unmutated, CD23 was fully induced. When all three tyrosines were mutated, the receptor was unable to induce CD23. The results indicate that growth regulation and gene expression are principally controlled by distinct regions of IL-4R.

  14. [Proteolytic control of expression of Vibrio fischeri lux-operon genes in Escherichia coli cells].

    PubMed

    Mel'kina, O E; Manukhov, I V; Zavil'gel'skiĭ, G B

    2010-08-01

    The key elements of the regulatory system activating expression of the lux-operon genes in the sea bacteria Vibrio fischeri are the LuxR protein (an activator oftranscription) and N-(3-oxohexanoyl) L-homoserine lactone (an autoinducer, AI). It is shown that the ATP-dependent proteases ClpXP and Lon take part in the negative control of expression of the lux-operon genes and that AI protects the LuxR protein from proteolysis.

  15. The putative protein methyltransferase LAE1 controls cellulase gene expression in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Seiboth, Bernhard; Karimi, Razieh Aghcheh; Phatale, Pallavi A; Linke, Rita; Hartl, Lukas; Sauer, Dominik G; Smith, Kristina M; Baker, Scott E; Freitag, Michael; Kubicek, Christian P

    2012-06-01

    Trichoderma reesei is an industrial producer of enzymes that degrade lignocellulosic polysaccharides to soluble monomers, which can be fermented to biofuels. Here we show that the expression of genes for lignocellulose degradation are controlled by the orthologous T. reesei protein methyltransferase LAE1. In a lae1 deletion mutant we observed a complete loss of expression of all seven cellulases, auxiliary factors for cellulose degradation, β-glucosidases and xylanases were no longer expressed. Conversely, enhanced expression of lae1 resulted in significantly increased cellulase gene transcription. Lae1-modulated cellulase gene expression was dependent on the function of the general cellulase regulator XYR1, but also xyr1 expression was LAE1-dependent. LAE1 was also essential for conidiation of T. reesei. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing ('ChIP-seq') showed that lae1 expression was not obviously correlated with H3K4 di- or trimethylation (indicative of active transcription) or H3K9 trimethylation (typical for heterochromatin regions) in CAZyme coding regions, suggesting that LAE1 does not affect CAZyme gene expression by directly modulating H3K4 or H3K9 methylation. Our data demonstrate that the putative protein methyltransferase LAE1 is essential for cellulase gene expression in T. reesei through mechanisms that remain to be identified.

  16. Coordinating Gene Expression and Axon Assembly to Control Axon Growth: Potential Role of GSK3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Mei; Hur, Eun-Mi; Zhou, Feng-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Axon growth requires the coordinated regulation of gene expression in the neuronal soma, local protein translation in the axon, anterograde transport of synthesized raw materials along the axon, and assembly of cytoskeleton and membranes in the nerve growth cone. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) signaling has recently been shown to play key roles in the regulation of axonal transport and cytoskeletal assembly during axon growth. GSK3 signaling is also known to regulate gene expression via controlling the functions of many transcription factors, suggesting that GSK3 may be an important regulator of gene transcription supporting axon growth. We review signaling pathways that control local axon assembly at the growth cone and gene expression in the soma during developmental or regenerative axon growth and discuss the potential involvement of GSK3 signaling in these processes, with a particular focus on how GSK3 signaling modulates the function of axon growth-associated transcription factors. PMID:22347166

  17. Photocaged Arabinose: A Novel Optogenetic Switch for Rapid and Gradual Control of Microbial Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Binder, Dennis; Bier, Claus; Grünberger, Alexander; Drobietz, Dagmar; Hage-Hülsmann, Jennifer; Wandrey, Georg; Büchs, Jochen; Kohlheyer, Dietrich; Loeschcke, Anita; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Pietruszka, Jörg; Drepper, Thomas

    2016-02-15

    Controlling cellular functions by light allows simple triggering of biological processes in a non-invasive fashion with high spatiotemporal resolution. In this context, light-regulated gene expression has enormous potential for achieving optogenetic control over almost any cellular process. Here, we report on two novel one-step cleavable photocaged arabinose compounds, which were applied as light-sensitive inducers of transcription in bacteria. Exposure of caged arabinose to UV-A light resulted in rapid activation of protein production, as demonstrated for GFP and the complete violacein biosynthetic pathway. Moreover, single-cell analysis revealed that intrinsic heterogeneity of arabinose-mediated induction of gene expression was overcome when using photocaged arabinose. We have thus established a novel phototrigger for synthetic bio(techno)logy applications that enables precise and homogeneous control of bacterial target gene expression.

  18. Nonhistone Proteins Control Gene Expression in Reconstituted Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, T.; Maryanka, D.; Hamlyn, P. H.; Gould, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    Chromatin was reconstituted from the purified DNA and histones of chicken erythrocytes and the nonhistone proteins of either chicken reticulocytes or chicken liver. Reconstituted chromatins, native chicken reticulocyte chromatin, and free DNA were transcribed with Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and the concentrations of globin-specific sequences in the RNA products were measured by hybridization with [3H]DNA complementary to chicken globin messenger RNA. Reticulocyte, but not liver, nonhistone proteins were shown to activate the globin genes in reconstituted erythrocyte chromatin. The transcripts of native and reconstituted chromatins were indistinguishable in respect of both the total yield of the RNA and the fractional yield of globin-specific sequences. Images PMID:4140516

  19. Genetic control of eosinophilia in mice: gene(s) expressed in bone marrow-derived cells control high responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Vadas, M.A.

    1982-02-01

    A heterogeneity in the capacity of strains of mice to mount eosinophilia is described. BALB/c and C3H are eosinophil high responder strains (EO-HR) and CBA and A/J are eosinophil low responder strains (EO-LR), judged by the response of blood eosinophils to Ascaris suum, and the response of blood, bone marrow, and spleen eosinophils to keyhole limpet hemocyanin given 2 days after 150 mg/kg cyclophosphamide. Some of the gene(s) for high responsiveness appear to be dominant because (EO-HR x EO-LR)F/sub 1/ mice were intermediate to high responders. This gene is expressed in bone marrow-derived cells because radiation chimeras of the type EO-HR..-->..F/sub 1/ were high responders and EO-LR..-->..F/sub 1/ were low responders. This description of a genetic control of eosinophilia in mice may be useful in understanding the role of this cell in parasite immunity and allergy.

  20. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses.

    PubMed

    Pentland, Ieisha; Parish, Joanna L

    2015-07-06

    All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions.

  1. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pentland, Ieisha; Parish, Joanna L.

    2015-01-01

    All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions. PMID:26154016

  2. Electrotransfer parameters as a tool for controlled and targeted gene expression in skin

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Spela; Blagus, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Lampreht Tratar, Ursa; Stimac, Monika; Prosen, Lara; Dolinsek, Tanja; Kamensek, Urska; Kranjc, Simona; Steinstraesser, Lars; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Préat, Véronique; Sersa, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Skin is an attractive target for gene electrotransfer. It consists of different cell types that can be transfected, leading to various responses to gene electrotransfer. We demonstrate that these responses could be controlled by selecting the appropriate electrotransfer parameters. Specifically, the application of low or high electric pulses, applied by multi-electrode array, provided the possibility to control the depth of the transfection in the skin, the duration and the level of gene expression, as well as the local or systemic distribution of the transgene. The influence of electric pulse type was first studied using a plasmid encoding a reporter gene (DsRed). Then, plasmids encoding therapeutic genes (IL-12, shRNA against endoglin, shRNA against melanoma cell adhesion molecule) were used, and their effects on wound healing and cutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors were investigated. The high-voltage pulses resulted in gene expression that was restricted to superficial skin layers and induced a local response. In contrast, the low-voltage electric pulses promoted transfection into the deeper skin layers, resulting in prolonged gene expression and higher transgene production, possibly with systemic distribution. Therefore, in the translation into the clinics, it will be of the utmost importance to adjust the electrotransfer parameters for different therapeutic approaches and specific mode of action of the therapeutic gene. PMID:27574782

  3. Electrotransfer parameters as a tool for controlled and targeted gene expression in skin.

    PubMed

    Kos, Spela; Blagus, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Lampreht Tratar, Ursa; Stimac, Monika; Prosen, Lara; Dolinsek, Tanja; Kamensek, Urska; Kranjc, Simona; Steinstraesser, Lars; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Préat, Véronique; Sersa, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Skin is an attractive target for gene electrotransfer. It consists of different cell types that can be transfected, leading to various responses to gene electrotransfer. We demonstrate that these responses could be controlled by selecting the appropriate electrotransfer parameters. Specifically, the application of low or high electric pulses, applied by multi-electrode array, provided the possibility to control the depth of the transfection in the skin, the duration and the level of gene expression, as well as the local or systemic distribution of the transgene. The influence of electric pulse type was first studied using a plasmid encoding a reporter gene (DsRed). Then, plasmids encoding therapeutic genes (IL-12, shRNA against endoglin, shRNA against melanoma cell adhesion molecule) were used, and their effects on wound healing and cutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors were investigated. The high-voltage pulses resulted in gene expression that was restricted to superficial skin layers and induced a local response. In contrast, the low-voltage electric pulses promoted transfection into the deeper skin layers, resulting in prolonged gene expression and higher transgene production, possibly with systemic distribution. Therefore, in the translation into the clinics, it will be of the utmost importance to adjust the electrotransfer parameters for different therapeutic approaches and specific mode of action of the therapeutic gene. PMID:27574782

  4. Deregulated expression of circadian clock and clock-controlled cell cycle genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sobia; Munawar, Mustafa; Shahid, Adeela; Malik, Meera; Ullah, Hafeez; Fatima, Warda; Mohsin, Shahida; Mahmood, Saqib

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous and self-sustained oscillations of multiple biological processes with approximately 24-h rhythmicity. Circadian genes and their protein products constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator that form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circadian regulation extends from core clock genes to various clock-controlled genes that include various cell cycle genes. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes, therefore, may lead to genomic instability and accelerated cellular proliferation potentially promoting carcinogenesis. The current study encompasses the investigation of simultaneous expression of four circadian clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) and three clock-controlled cell cycle genes (Myc, Cyclin D1 and Wee1) at mRNA level and determination of serum melatonin levels in peripheral blood samples of 37 CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) patients and equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls in order to indicate association between deregulated circadian clock and manifestation of CLL. Results showed significantly down-regulated expression of Bmal1, Per1, Per2 and Wee1 and significantly up-regulated expression of Myc and Cyclin D1 (P < 0.0001) in CLL patients as compared to healthy controls. When expression of these genes was compared between shift-workers and non-shift-workers within the CLL group, the expression was found more aberrant in shift-workers as compared to non-shift-workers. However, this difference was found statistically significant for Myc and Cyclin D1 only (P < 0.05). Serum melatonin levels were found significantly low (P < 0.0001) in CLL subjects as compared to healthy controls whereas melatonin levels were found still lower in shift-workers as compared to non-shift-workers within CLL group (P < 0.01). Our results suggest that aberrant expression of circadian clock genes can lead to aberrant expression of their downstream targets that are

  5. Novel regulatory cascades controlling expression of nitrogen-fixation genes in Geobacter sulfurreducens

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01

    Geobacter species often play an important role in bioremediation of environments contaminated with metals or organics and show promise for harvesting electricity from waste organic matter in microbial fuel cells. The ability of Geobacter species to fix atmospheric nitrogen is an important metabolic feature for these applications. We identified novel regulatory cascades controlling nitrogen-fixation gene expression in Geobacter sulfurreducens. Unlike the regulatory mechanisms known in other nitrogen-fixing microorganisms, nitrogen-fixation gene regulation in G. sulfurreducens is controlled by two two-component His–Asp phosphorelay systems. One of these systems appears to be the master regulatory system that activates transcription of the majority of nitrogen-fixation genes and represses a gene encoding glutamate dehydrogenase during nitrogen fixation. The other system whose expression is directly activated by the master regulatory system appears to control by antitermination the expression of a subset of the nitrogen-fixation genes whose transcription is activated by the master regulatory system and whose promoter contains transcription termination signals. This study provides a new paradigm for nitrogen-fixation gene regulation. PMID:20660485

  6. Long-Range Control of Gene Expression: Emerging Mechanisms and Disruption in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kleinjan, Dirk A.; van Heyningen, Veronica

    2005-01-01

    Transcriptional control is a major mechanism for regulating gene expression. The complex machinery required to effect this control is still emerging from functional and evolutionary analysis of genomic architecture. In addition to the promoter, many other regulatory elements are required for spatiotemporally and quantitatively correct gene expression. Enhancer and repressor elements may reside in introns or up- and downstream of the transcription unit. For some genes with highly complex expression patterns—often those that function as key developmental control genes—the cis-regulatory domain can extend long distances outside the transcription unit. Some of the earliest hints of this came from disease-associated chromosomal breaks positioned well outside the relevant gene. With the availability of wide-ranging genome sequence comparisons, strong conservation of many noncoding regions became obvious. Functional studies have shown many of these conserved sites to be transcriptional regulatory elements that sometimes reside inside unrelated neighboring genes. Such sequence-conserved elements generally harbor sites for tissue-specific DNA-binding proteins. Developmentally variable chromatin conformation can control protein access to these sites and can regulate transcription. Disruption of these finely tuned mechanisms can cause disease. Some regulatory element mutations will be associated with phenotypes distinct from any identified for coding-region mutations. PMID:15549674

  7. Circadian expression of clock and putative clock-controlled genes in skeletal muscle of the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Ian P G; Johnston, Ian A

    2012-01-01

    To identify circadian patterns of gene expression in skeletal muscle, adult male zebrafish were acclimated for 2 wk to a 12:12-h light-dark photoperiod and then exposed to continuous darkness for 86 h with ad libitum feeding. The increase in gut food content associated with the subjective light period was much diminished by the third cycle, enabling feeding and circadian rhythms to be distinguished. Expression of zebrafish paralogs of mammalian transcriptional activators of the circadian mechanism (bmal1, clock1, and rora) followed a rhythmic pattern with a ∼24-h periodicity. Peak expression of rora paralogs occurred at the beginning of the subjective light period [Zeitgeber time (ZT)07 and ZT02 for roraa and rorab], whereas the highest expression of bmal1 and clock paralogs occurred 12 h later (ZT13-15 and ZT16 for bmal and clock paralogs). Expression of the transcriptional repressors cry1a, per1a/1b, per2, per3, nr1d2a/2b, and nr1d1 also followed a circadian pattern with peak expression at ZT0-02. Expression of the two paralogs of cry2 occurred in phase with clock1a/1b. Duplicated genes had a high correlation of expression except for paralogs of clock1, nr1d2, and per1, with cry1b showing no circadian pattern. The highest expression difference was 9.2-fold for the activator bmal1b and 51.7-fold for the repressor per1a. Out of 32 candidate clock-controlled genes, only myf6, igfbp3, igfbp5b, and hsf2 showed circadian expression patterns. Igfbp3, igfbp5b, and myf6 were expressed in phase with clock1a/1b and had an average of twofold change in expression from peak to trough, whereas hsf2 transcripts were expressed in phase with cry1a and had a 7.2-fold-change in expression. The changes in expression of clock and clock-controlled genes observed during continuous darkness were also observed at similar ZTs in fish exposed to a normal photoperiod in a separate control experiment. The role of circadian clocks in regulating muscle maintenance and growth are discussed

  8. Evaluation of endogenous control gene(s) for gene expression studies in human blood exposed to 60Co γ-rays ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Vaiphei, S Thangminlal; Keppen, Joshua; Nongrum, Saibadaiahun; Chaubey, R C; Kma, L; Sharan, R N

    2015-01-01

    In gene expression studies, it is critical to normalize data using a stably expressed endogenous control gene in order to obtain accurate and reliable results. However, we currently do not have a universally applied endogenous control gene for normalization of data for gene expression studies, particularly those involving (60)Co γ-ray-exposed human blood samples. In this study, a comparative assessment of the gene expression of six widely used housekeeping endogenous control genes, namely 18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, MT-ATP6 and CDKN1A, was undertaken for a range of (60)Co γ-ray doses (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 Gy) at 8.4 Gy min(-1) at 0 and 24 h post-irradiation time intervals. Using the NormFinder algorithm, real-time PCR data obtained from six individuals (three males and three females) were analyzed with respect to the threshold cycle (Ct) value and abundance, ΔCt pair-wise comparison, intra- and inter-group variability assessments, etc. GAPDH, either alone or in combination with 18S, was found to be the most suitable endogenous control gene and should be used in gene expression studies, especially those involving qPCR of γ-ray-exposed human blood samples.

  9. Shedding light on the chloroplast as a remote control of nuclear gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Godoy Herz, Micaela A; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Petrillo, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Plants rely on a sophisticated light sensing and signaling system that allows them to respond to environmental changes. Photosensory protein systems -phytochromes, cryptochromes, phototropins, and ultraviolet (UV)-B photoreceptors- have evolved to let plants monitor light conditions and regulate different levels of gene expression and developmental processes. However, even though photoreceptor proteins are best characterized and deeply studied, it is also known that chloroplasts are able to sense light conditions and communicate the variations to the nucleus that adjust its transcriptome to the changing environment. The redox state of components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain works as a sensor of photosynthetic activity and can affect nuclear gene expression by a retrograde signaling pathway. Recently, our groups showed that a retrograde signaling pathway can modulate the alternative splicing process, revealing a novel layer of gene expression control by chloroplast retrograde signaling. PMID:25482785

  10. Shedding light on the chloroplast as a remote control of nuclear gene expression.

    PubMed

    Godoy Herz, Micaela A; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Petrillo, Ezequiel

    2014-01-01

    Plants rely on a sophisticated light sensing and signaling system that allows them to respond to environmental changes. Photosensory protein systems -phytochromes, cryptochromes, phototropins, and ultraviolet (UV)-B photoreceptors- have evolved to let plants monitor light conditions and regulate different levels of gene expression and developmental processes. However, even though photoreceptor proteins are best characterized and deeply studied, it is also known that chloroplasts are able to sense light conditions and communicate the variations to the nucleus that adjust its transcriptome to the changing environment. The redox state of components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain works as a sensor of photosynthetic activity and can affect nuclear gene expression by a retrograde signaling pathway. Recently, our groups showed that a retrograde signaling pathway can modulate the alternative splicing process, revealing a novel layer of gene expression control by chloroplast retrograde signaling.

  11. Ultrasound-induced hyperthermia for the spatio-temporal control of gene expression in bone repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher; Padilla, Frédéric; Zhang, Man; Vilaboa, Nuria; Kripfgans, Oliver; Fowlkes, Brian; Franceschi, Renny

    2012-10-01

    Spatial and temporal control over the expression of growth/differentiation factors is of great interest for regeneration of bone, but technologies capable of providing tight and active control over gene expression remain elusive. We propose the use of focused ultrasound for the targeted activation of heat shock-sensitive expression systems in engineered bone. We report in vitro results with cells that express firefly luciferase (fLuc) under the control of a heat shock protein promoter. Cells were embedded in fibrin scaffolds and exposed to focused ultrasound, using a custom 3.3MHz transducer (focal length 4", f-number 1.33", focal dimension 1.2mm lateral FWHM) in CW mode for 2-20 minutes at intensities ISPTA=120-440 W/cm2. The kinetics of ultrasound-mediated activation of the cells was compared with that of strictly thermal activation. Bioluminescence imaging revealed fLuc expression in an area ≥2.5mm in diameter at the position of the ultrasound focus, and the diameter and intensity of the signal increased with the amplitude of the acoustic energy. We also found that ultrasound activated fLuc expression with substantially shorter exposures than thermal activation. Our results demonstrate the potential for focused ultrasound to selectively activate the expression of a gene of interest in an engineered tissue and suggest that focused ultrasound activates the heat shock pathway by a combination of thermal and non-thermal mechanisms.

  12. MicroRNA in Control of Gene Expression: An Overview of Nuclear Functions

    PubMed Central

    Catalanotto, Caterina; Cogoni, Carlo; Zardo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The finding that small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are able to control gene expression in a sequence specific manner has had a massive impact on biology. Recent improvements in high throughput sequencing and computational prediction methods have allowed the discovery and classification of several types of ncRNAs. Based on their precursor structures, biogenesis pathways and modes of action, ncRNAs are classified as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs or esiRNAs), promoter associate RNAs (pRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and sno-derived RNAs. Among these, miRNAs appear as important cytoplasmic regulators of gene expression. miRNAs act as post-transcriptional regulators of their messenger RNA (mRNA) targets via mRNA degradation and/or translational repression. However, it is becoming evident that miRNAs also have specific nuclear functions. Among these, the most studied and debated activity is the miRNA-guided transcriptional control of gene expression. Although available data detail quite precisely the effectors of this activity, the mechanisms by which miRNAs identify their gene targets to control transcription are still a matter of debate. Here, we focus on nuclear functions of miRNAs and on alternative mechanisms of target recognition, at the promoter lavel, by miRNAs in carrying out transcriptional gene silencing. PMID:27754357

  13. Anx7 is required for nutritional control of gene expression in mouse pancreatic islets of Langerhans.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Meera; Eidelman, Ofer; Leighton, Ximena; Glasman, Mirta; Goping, Gertrude; Pollard, Harvey B.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene expression in islets of Langerhans is profoundly sensitive to glucose and other nutrients. Islets of Langerhans in the Anx7(+/-) knockout mouse exhibit a profound reduction in ITPR3 protein expression, defective intracellular calcium signaling, and defective insulin secretion. Additional data presented here also show that mRNA for ITPR3 is virtually undetectable in isolated Anx7(+/-) islets. IP3Receptor type 3 (ITPR3) expression in islets of Langerhans is closely regulated by secretory stimuli, and it has been suggested that the level of the ITPR3 expression controls the ability of the islets to respond to nutritional signals. We report that although control islets respond to glucose in vitro by a transient increment in ITPR3 mRNA, the islets from the Anx7(+/-) mouse remain low. We therefore hypothesized that the Anx7/IP3 Receptor(3)/Ca(2+) signaling pathway plays a role in beta cell responses to glucose, and that in the absence of the Anx7/ITPR3 signaling system, the islets would be unable to discriminate between fed or fasted states in vivo. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To test this hypothesis, we subjected Anx7(+/-) and control mice to either food and water ad libidum or to an overnight fast with access to water only. We then isolated the respective islets and compared nutrient-dependent changes in global gene expression under the four conditions using genome-based microarray technology. RESULTS: Anx7 protein expression in these islets is only about 50% of control levels in normal littermate controls, and IPTR3 message and protein are virtually zero. cDNA microarray analyses show that in control animals gene expression is significantly affected by the fasting state. Many of the affected genes have historical relevance to development and differentiation of islets. These include preproglucagon, APOJ, cadherin2, phosphoglucoisomerase, oncostatin M, PAX6, HGF, and cytokeratin 18. However, there are also many other nutritionally sensitive genes in control

  14. Detection of RUNX2 gene expression in cumulus cells in women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RUNX2 is a transcription factor, whose expression has been recently identified in the mouse ovary. Regulation of RUNX2 expression and its function in the human ovary have not been determined yet. The aim of the present study is the investigation of the possible correlation between RUNX2 gene expression in cumulus cells and controlled ovarian stimulation and pregnancy outcomes after ART treatment. Methods A total of 41 patients undergoing ICSI treatment for male factor infertility were enrolled into a specific ART program, during which cumulus cells were collected. The expression of RUNX2 gene in cumulus cells was examined by real-time PCR. Results Concerning RUNX2 gene expression, 12 out of 41 women were detected with RUNX2 expression, with ratios ranging from 0.84 to 1.00, while 28 out of 41 women had no expression (ratio = 0). Only 1 woman presented a weak RUNX2 gene expression (ratio = 0.52). From 8 women that proceeded to pregnancy, 7 of them did not express RUNX2 gene in cumulus cells, while one was the woman with weak gene expression that also achieved pregnancy. The group of women without RUNX2 expression presented higher number of follicles (p = 0.013), higher number of retrieved oocytes (p = 0.016), higher basal LH serum levels (p = 0.016) and higher peak estradiol levels (p = 0.013), while the number of fertilized oocytes differed marginally between the two groups (p = 0.089). Moreover, RUNX2 expression was negatively associated with LH levels (OR = 0.22, p = 0.021) and E2 levels (OR = 0.25, p = 0.026). Conclusions Consequently, based on the preliminary findings of the present pilot study a potential inhibitory mechanism of RUNX2 gene is observed in the ovary when high mRNA levels are detected, suggesting that RUNX2 could possibly be used as a candidate genetic marker in the monitoring of the outcome of an ART treatment. PMID:23186169

  15. Tunable riboregulator switches for post-transcriptional control of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Malathy; Hennelly, Scott Patrick; Dale, Taraka T.; Starkenburg, Shawn Robert; Marti-Arbona, Ricardo; Fox, David Thomas; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Yoshiko; Unkefer, Clifford Jay

    2015-07-13

    The most straightforward approach to altering the flux through a particular metabolic step is to increase or decrease the concentration of the enzyme catalyst. Until recently engineering strategies for altering gene expression have focused on transcription control using strong inducible promoters or by using one of several strategies to knock down or knock out a wasteful gene. Recently, synthetic riboregulators have been developed for translational regulation of gene expression. We report a new modular synthetic riboregulator class that has the potential to finely tune protein expression and independently control the concentration of each enzyme in an engineered metabolic pathway. Our design includes a cis-repressor at the 5’ end of the mRNA that forms a stem-loop helix occluding the ribosome binding site and blocking translation. An activating-RNA, expressed in trans, frees the RBS turning on translation. The overall architecture of the riboregulators is designed using Watson-Crick base-pairing stability followed by directed evolution on a portion of each trans-activator to fine tune translation. We report a cis-repressor that can completely shut off translation of antibiotic resistance reporters and a trans-activator that restores translation. We have shown it is possible to use riboregulators to achieve translational control of gene expression over a wide dynamic range. Using a bioluminescent reporter system, we demonstrated an ON/OFF ratio >300. We have demonstrated that a targeting sequence can be changed to develop riboregulators that can independently regulate translation of many genes with minimal cross-talk. In a SELEX experiment, we demonstrated that by subtly altering the sequence of the trans-activator, it is possible to alter the equilibrium between repressed and activated states and achieve intermediate translational control.

  16. Tunable riboregulator switches for post-transcriptional control of gene expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Krishnamurthy, Malathy; Hennelly, Scott Patrick; Dale, Taraka T.; Starkenburg, Shawn Robert; Marti-Arbona, Ricardo; Fox, David Thomas; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Yoshiko; Unkefer, Clifford Jay

    2015-07-13

    The most straightforward approach to altering the flux through a particular metabolic step is to increase or decrease the concentration of the enzyme catalyst. Until recently engineering strategies for altering gene expression have focused on transcription control using strong inducible promoters or by using one of several strategies to knock down or knock out a wasteful gene. Recently, synthetic riboregulators have been developed for translational regulation of gene expression. We report a new modular synthetic riboregulator class that has the potential to finely tune protein expression and independently control the concentration of each enzyme in an engineered metabolic pathway. Ourmore » design includes a cis-repressor at the 5’ end of the mRNA that forms a stem-loop helix occluding the ribosome binding site and blocking translation. An activating-RNA, expressed in trans, frees the RBS turning on translation. The overall architecture of the riboregulators is designed using Watson-Crick base-pairing stability followed by directed evolution on a portion of each trans-activator to fine tune translation. We report a cis-repressor that can completely shut off translation of antibiotic resistance reporters and a trans-activator that restores translation. We have shown it is possible to use riboregulators to achieve translational control of gene expression over a wide dynamic range. Using a bioluminescent reporter system, we demonstrated an ON/OFF ratio >300. We have demonstrated that a targeting sequence can be changed to develop riboregulators that can independently regulate translation of many genes with minimal cross-talk. In a SELEX experiment, we demonstrated that by subtly altering the sequence of the trans-activator, it is possible to alter the equilibrium between repressed and activated states and achieve intermediate translational control.« less

  17. Identification of a chromosomal gene controlling temperature-regulated expression of Shigella virulence.

    PubMed

    Maurelli, A T; Sansonetti, P J

    1988-04-01

    Genes required for the full expression of Shigella virulence are on both the chromosome and a large virulence-associated plasmid. Expression of one or more virulence (vir) genes is temperature-regulated, wild-type strains being virulent (invasive) when grown at 37 degrees C but phenotypically avirulent (noninvasive) at 30 degrees C. A vir::lac operon fusion located on the virulence plasmid, which brings the lac genes under control of a temperature-regulated vir gene promoter, was used to select regulatory mutants constitutive for the Lac+ phenotype at the nonpermissive temperature. A transposon Tn10-induced mutant that was Lac+ at 30 degrees C and 37 degrees C was isolated, and the Tn10 insertion was transduced into a wild-type strain. The transductants all simultaneously became deregulated for virulence and invaded HeLa cells equally well at 30 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Other virulence-associated phenotypes were also deregulated and expressed at 30 degrees C. Southern hybridization with a probe for Tn10 determined the insertion to be on the chromosome. Fine mapping by transduction with phage P1L4 positioned the mutation between the galU and trp genes. A cosmid cloned fragment of Shigella chromosomal DNA containing the region around galU was used in complementation studies and showed that the closely linked regulatory gene was able to complement, in trans, the Tn10-induced mutation. We propose that this mutation defines a regulatory gene, virR, and that insertion of Tn10 into this gene inactivates a repressor that normally blocks expression of vir genes at 30 degrees C. PMID:3282241

  18. Mammalian hibernation: differential gene expression and novel application of epigenetic controls.

    PubMed

    Morin, Pier; Storey, Kenneth B

    2009-01-01

    This review highlights current information about the regulatory mechanisms that govern gene expression during mammalian hibernation, in particular the potential role of epigenetic controls in coordinating the global suppression of transcription. Hibernation is characterized by long periods of deep torpor (when core body temperature drops to near ambient) that are interspersed with brief arousal periods back to euthermia. Entry into torpor requires coordinated controls which strongly suppress and reprioritize all metabolic functions, including global controls on both transcription and translation. At the same time, however, selected hibernation-specific genes are up-regulated under the control of specific transcription factors to support the torpid state; this includes genes that encode proteins involved in lipid fuel catabolism and in long term cytoprotection (e.g. antioxidants, chaperones). We evaluate the currently available information on global transcriptional suppression in hibernation and propose that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, SUMOylation and the actions of sirtuins play crucial roles in transcriptional suppression during torpor. Global controls providing translational suppression also occur during hibernation including reversible phosphorylation control of ribosomal initiation and elongation factors as well as polysome dissociation. We also present initial data that mRNA transcripts are regulated via inhibitory interactions with microRNA species during torpor and provide the first evidence of differential expression of miRNAs in hibernators. When taken together, these mechanisms provide hibernators with multiple layers of regulatory controls that achieve both global repression of gene expression and selected enhancement of genes/proteins that achieve the hibernation phenotype.

  19. Epigenetics and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gibney, E R; Nolan, C M

    2010-07-01

    Transcription, translation and subsequent protein modification represent the transfer of genetic information from the archival copy of DNA to the short-lived messenger RNA, usually with subsequent production of protein. Although all cells in an organism contain essentially the same DNA, cell types and functions differ because of qualitative and quantitative differences in their gene expression. Thus, control of gene expression is at the heart of differentiation and development. Epigenetic processes, including DNA methylation, histone modification and various RNA-mediated processes, are thought to influence gene expression chiefly at the level of transcription; however, other steps in the process (for example, translation) may also be regulated epigenetically. The following paper will outline the role epigenetics is believed to have in influencing gene expression.

  20. Synergistic and Dose-Controlled Regulation of Cellulase Gene Expression in Penicillium oxalicum.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghai; Yao, Guangshan; Wu, Ruimei; Gao, Liwei; Kan, Qinbiao; Liu, Meng; Yang, Piao; Liu, Guodong; Qin, Yuqi; Song, Xin; Zhong, Yaohua; Fang, Xu; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum produces diverse lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are regulated by the combinations of many transcription factors. Here, a single-gene disruptant library for 470 transcription factors was constructed and systematically screened for cellulase production. Twenty transcription factors (including ClrB, CreA, XlnR, Ace1, AmyR, and 15 unknown proteins) were identified to play putative roles in the activation or repression of cellulase synthesis. Most of these regulators have not been characterized in any fungi before. We identified the ClrB, CreA, XlnR, and AmyR transcription factors as critical dose-dependent regulators of cellulase expression, the core regulons of which were identified by analyzing several transcriptomes and/or secretomes. Synergistic and additive modes of combinatorial control of each cellulase gene by these regulatory factors were achieved, and cellulase expression was fine-tuned in a proper and controlled manner. With one of these targets, the expression of the major intracellular β-glucosidase Bgl2 was found to be dependent on ClrB. The Bgl2-deficient background resulted in a substantial gene activation by ClrB and proved to be closely correlated with the relief of repression mediated by CreA and AmyR during cellulase induction. Our results also signify that probing the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation mechanisms of cellulolytic regulators and using it for reconstruction of expression regulation network (RERN) may be a promising strategy for cellulolytic fungi to develop enzyme hyper-producers. Based on our data, ClrB was identified as focal point for the synergistic activation regulation of cellulase expression by integrating cellulolytic regulators and their target genes, which refined our understanding of transcriptional-regulatory network as a "seesaw model" in which the coordinated regulation of cellulolytic genes is established by counteracting activators and repressors.

  1. Synergistic and Dose-Controlled Regulation of Cellulase Gene Expression in Penicillium oxalicum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhonghai; Yao, Guangshan; Wu, Ruimei; Gao, Liwei; Kan, Qinbiao; Liu, Meng; Yang, Piao; Liu, Guodong; Qin, Yuqi; Song, Xin; Zhong, Yaohua; Fang, Xu; Qu, Yinbo

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungus Penicillium oxalicum produces diverse lignocellulolytic enzymes, which are regulated by the combinations of many transcription factors. Here, a single-gene disruptant library for 470 transcription factors was constructed and systematically screened for cellulase production. Twenty transcription factors (including ClrB, CreA, XlnR, Ace1, AmyR, and 15 unknown proteins) were identified to play putative roles in the activation or repression of cellulase synthesis. Most of these regulators have not been characterized in any fungi before. We identified the ClrB, CreA, XlnR, and AmyR transcription factors as critical dose-dependent regulators of cellulase expression, the core regulons of which were identified by analyzing several transcriptomes and/or secretomes. Synergistic and additive modes of combinatorial control of each cellulase gene by these regulatory factors were achieved, and cellulase expression was fine-tuned in a proper and controlled manner. With one of these targets, the expression of the major intracellular β-glucosidase Bgl2 was found to be dependent on ClrB. The Bgl2-deficient background resulted in a substantial gene activation by ClrB and proved to be closely correlated with the relief of repression mediated by CreA and AmyR during cellulase induction. Our results also signify that probing the synergistic and dose-controlled regulation mechanisms of cellulolytic regulators and using it for reconstruction of expression regulation network (RERN) may be a promising strategy for cellulolytic fungi to develop enzyme hyper-producers. Based on our data, ClrB was identified as focal point for the synergistic activation regulation of cellulase expression by integrating cellulolytic regulators and their target genes, which refined our understanding of transcriptional-regulatory network as a “seesaw model” in which the coordinated regulation of cellulolytic genes is established by counteracting activators and repressors. PMID:26360497

  2. p53-mediated control of gene expression via mRNA translation during Endoplasmic Reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    López, Ignacio; Tournillon, Anne-Sophie; Nylander, Karin; Fåhraeus, Robin

    2015-01-01

    p53 is activated by different stress and damage pathways and regulates cell biological responses including cell cycle arrest, repair pathways, apoptosis and senescence. Following DNA damage, the levels of p53 increase and via binding to target gene promoters, p53 induces expression of multiple genes including p21(CDKN1A) and mdm2. The effects of p53 on gene expression during the DNA damage response are well mimicked by overexpressing p53 under normal conditions. However, stress to the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and the consequent Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) leads to the induction of the p53/47 isoform that lacks the first 40 aa of p53 and to an active suppression of p21(CDKN1A) transcription and mRNA translation. We now show that during ER stress p53 also suppresses MDM2 protein levels via a similar mechanism. These observations not only raise questions about the physiological role of MDM2 during ER stress but it also reveals a new facet of p53 as a repressor toward 2 of its major target genes during the UPR. As suppression of p21(CDKN1A) and MDM2 protein synthesis is mediated via their coding sequences, it raises the possibility that p53 controls mRNA translation via a common mechanism that might play an important role in how p53 regulates gene expression during the UPR, as compared to the transcription-dependent gene regulation taking place during the DNA damage response.

  3. Synergistic interactions between transcription factors control expression of the apolipoprotein AI gene in liver cells.

    PubMed Central

    Widom, R L; Ladias, J A; Kouidou, S; Karathanasis, S K

    1991-01-01

    The gene coding for apolipoprotein AI (apoAI), a plasma protein involved in the transport of cholesterol and other lipids in the plasma, is expressed predominantly in liver and intestine. Previous work in our laboratory has shown that different cis-acting elements in the 5'-flanking region of the human apoAI gene control its expression in human hepatoma (HepG2) and colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Hepatocyte-specific expression is mediated by elements within the -256 to -41 DNA region relative to the apoAI gene transcription start site (+1). In this study it was found that the -222 to -110 apoAI gene region is necessary and sufficient for expression in HepG2 cells. It was also found that this DNA region functions as a powerful hepatocyte-specific transcriptional enhancer. Gel retardation and DNase I protection experiments showed that HepG2 cells contain proteins that bind to specific sites, sites A (-214 to -192), B (-169 to -146), and C (-134 to -119), within this enhancer. Site-directed mutagenesis that prevents binding of these proteins to individual or different combinations of these sites followed by functional analysis of these mutants in HepG2 cells revealed that protein binding to any one of these sites in the absence of binding to the others was not sufficient for expression. Binding to any two of these sites in any combination was sufficient for only low levels of expression. Binding to all three sites was essential for maximal expression. These results indicate that the transcriptional activity of the apoAI gene in liver cells is dependent on synergistic interactions between transcription factors bound to its enhancer. Images PMID:1846669

  4. Controlled Gene Expression in the Plant Pathogen Cryphonectria parasitica by Use of a Copper-Responsive Element▿

    PubMed Central

    Willyerd, Karyn L.; Kemp, Amanda M.; Dawe, Angus L.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a tool for controlled expression of heterologous or ectopic genes in the chestnut pathogen Cryphonectria parasitica using the promoter region from a putative copper-regulated transporter gene. In addition, we have found that expression control via this system is not affected by the virulence-attenuating hypovirus CHV1-EP713. PMID:19542340

  5. Controlling false discoveries in multidimensional directional decisions, with applications to gene expression data on ordered categories.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenge; Sarkar, Sanat K; Peddada, Shyamal D

    2010-06-01

    Microarray gene expression studies over ordered categories are routinely conducted to gain insights into biological functions of genes and the underlying biological processes. Some common experiments are time-course/dose-response experiments where a tissue or cell line is exposed to different doses and/or durations of time to a chemical. A goal of such studies is to identify gene expression patterns/profiles over the ordered categories. This problem can be formulated as a multiple testing problem where for each gene the null hypothesis of no difference between the successive mean gene expressions is tested and further directional decisions are made if it is rejected. Much of the existing multiple testing procedures are devised for controlling the usual false discovery rate (FDR) rather than the mixed directional FDR (mdFDR), the expected proportion of Type I and directional errors among all rejections. Benjamini and Yekutieli (2005, Journal of the American Statistical Association 100, 71-93) proved that an augmentation of the usual Benjamini-Hochberg (BH) procedure can control the mdFDR while testing simple null hypotheses against two-sided alternatives in terms of one-dimensional parameters. In this article, we consider the problem of controlling the mdFDR involving multidimensional parameters. To deal with this problem, we develop a procedure extending that of Benjamini and Yekutieli based on the Bonferroni test for each gene. A proof is given for its mdFDR control when the underlying test statistics are independent across the genes. The results of a simulation study evaluating its performance under independence as well as under dependence of the underlying test statistics across the genes relative to other relevant procedures are reported. Finally, the proposed methodology is applied to a time-course microarray data obtained by Lobenhofer et al. (2002, Molecular Endocrinology 16, 1215-1229). We identified several important cell-cycle genes, such as DNA

  6. E2F Transcription Factors Control the Roller Coaster Ride of Cell Cycle Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Thurlings, Ingrid; de Bruin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Initially, the E2F transcription factor was discovered as a factor able to bind the adenovirus E2 promoter and activate viral genes. Afterwards it was shown that E2F also binds to promoters of nonviral genes such as C-MYC and DHFR, which were already known at that time to be important for cell growth and DNA metabolism, respectively. These findings provided the first clues that the E2F transcription factor might be an important regulator of the cell cycle. Since this initial discovery in 1987, several additional E2F family members have been identified, and more than 100 targets genes have been shown to be directly regulated by E2Fs, the majority of these are important for controlling the cell cycle. The progression of a cell through the cell cycle is accompanied with the increased expression of a specific set of genes during one phase of the cell cycle and the decrease of the same set of genes during a later phase of the cell cycle. This roller coaster ride, or oscillation, of gene expression is essential for the proper progression through the cell cycle to allow accurate DNA replication and cell division. The E2F transcription factors have been shown to be critical for the temporal expression of the oscillating cell cycle genes. This review will focus on how the oscillation of E2Fs and their targets is regulated by transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanism in mammals, yeast, flies, and worms. Furthermore, we will discuss the functional impact of E2Fs on the cell cycle progression and outline the consequences when E2F expression is disturbed. PMID:26254918

  7. Determination of internal controls for quantitative gene expression of Isochrysis zhangjiangensis at nitrogen stress condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuang; Zhou, Jiannan; Cao, Xupeng; Xue, Song

    2016-02-01

    Isochrysis zhangjiangensis is a potential marine microalga for biodiesel production, which accumulates lipid under nitrogen limitation conditions, but the mechanism on molecular level is veiled. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) provides the possibility to investigate the gene expression levels, and a valid reference for data normalization is an essential prerequisite for firing up the analysis. In this study, five housekeeping genes, actin (ACT), α-tubulin (TUA), ß-tubulin (TUB), ubiquitin (UBI), 18S rRNA (18S) and one target gene, diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), were used for determining the reference. By analyzing the stabilities based on calculation of the stability index and on operating the two types of software, geNorm and bestkeeper, it showed that the reference genes widely used in higher plant and microalgae, such as UBI, TUA and 18S, were not the most stable ones in nitrogen-stressed I. zhangjiangensis, and thus are not suitable for exploring the mRNA expression levels under these experimental conditions. Our results show that ACT together with TUB is the most feasible internal control for investigating gene expression under nitrogen-stressed conditions. Our findings will contribute not only to future qPCR studies of I. zhangjiangensis, but also to verification of comparative transcriptomics studies of the microalgae under similar conditions.

  8. RiboTALE: A modular, inducible system for accurate gene expression control

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Navneet; Ferreiro, Aura; Neckelmann, Alexander; Soon, Amy; Yao, Andrew; Siegel, Justin; Facciotti, Marc T.; Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    A limiting factor in synthetic gene circuit design is the number of independent control elements that can be combined together in a single system. Here, we present RiboTALEs, a new class of inducible repressors that combine the specificity of TALEs with the ability of riboswitches to recognize exogenous signals and differentially control protein abundance. We demonstrate the capacity of RiboTALEs, constructed through different combinations of TALE proteins and riboswitches, to rapidly and reproducibly control the expression of downstream targets with a dynamic range of 243.7 ± 17.6-fold, which is adequate for many biotechnological applications. PMID:26023068

  9. A biomarker based on gene expression indicates plant water status in controlled and natural environments.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Gwenaëlle; Mayjonade, Baptiste; Varès, Didier; Blanchet, Nicolas; Boniface, Marie-Claude; Maury, Pierre; Nambinina Andrianasolo, Fety; Nambinina, Fety Andrianasolo; Burger, Philippe; Debaeke, Philippe; Casadebaig, Pierre; Vincourt, Patrick; Langlade, Nicolas B

    2013-12-01

    Plant or soil water status is required in many scientific fields to understand plant responses to drought. Because the transcriptomic response to abiotic conditions, such as water deficit, reflects plant water status, genomic tools could be used to develop a new type of molecular biomarker. Using the sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) as a model species to study the transcriptomic response to water deficit both in greenhouse and field conditions, we specifically identified three genes that showed an expression pattern highly correlated to plant water status as estimated by the pre-dawn leaf water potential, fraction of transpirable soil water, soil water content or fraction of total soil water in controlled conditions. We developed a generalized linear model to estimate these classical water status indicators from the expression levels of the three selected genes under controlled conditions. This estimation was independent of the four tested genotypes and the stage (pre- or post-flowering) of the plant. We further validated this gene expression biomarker under field conditions for four genotypes in three different trials, over a large range of water status, and we were able to correct their expression values for a large diurnal sampling period.

  10. Dynamic and combinatorial control of gene expression by nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs)

    PubMed Central

    Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Germain, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are transcriptional regulators controlling the expression of specific subsets of genes in a ligand-dependent manner. The basic mechanism for switching on transcription of cognate target genes involves RAR binding at specific response elements and a network of interactions with coregulatory protein complexes, the assembly of which is directed by the C-terminal ligand-binding domain of RARs. In addition to this scenario, new roles for the N-terminal domain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system recently emerged. Moreover, the functions of RARs are not limited to the regulation of cognate target genes, as they can transrepress other gene pathways. Finally, RARs are also involved in nongenomic biological activities such as the activation of translation and of kinase cascades. Here we will review these mechanisms, focusing on how kinase signaling and the proteasome pathway cooperate to influence the dynamics of RAR transcriptional activity. PMID:19471584

  11. Nucleotide sequence of the regulatory locus controlling expression of bacterial genes for bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1987-01-01

    Production of light by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and by recombinant hosts containing cloned lux genes is controlled by the density of the culture. Density-dependent regulation of lux gene expression has been shown to require a locus consisting of the luxR and luxI genes and two closely linked divergent promoters. As part of a genetic analysis to understand the regulation of bioluminescence, we have sequenced the region of DNA containing this control circuit. Open reading frames corresponding to luxR and luxI were identified; transcription start sites were defined by S1 nuclease mapping and sequences resembling promoter elements were located. Images PMID:3697093

  12. Agrobacterium tumefaciens exoR controls acid response genes and impacts exopolysaccharide synthesis, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence gene expression.

    PubMed

    Heckel, Brynn C; Tomlinson, Amelia D; Morton, Elise R; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a facultative plant pathogen and the causative agent of crown gall disease. The initial stage of infection involves attachment to plant tissues, and subsequently, biofilms may form at these sites. This study focuses on the periplasmic ExoR regulator, which was identified based on the severe biofilm deficiency of A. tumefaciens exoR mutants. Genome-wide expression analysis was performed to elucidate the complete ExoR regulon. Overproduction of the exopolysaccharide succinoglycan is a dramatic phenotype of exoR mutants. Comparative expression analyses revealed that the core ExoR regulon is unaffected by succinoglycan synthesis. Several findings are consistent with previous observations: genes involved in succinoglycan biosynthesis, motility, and type VI secretion are differentially expressed in the ΔexoR mutant. In addition, these studies revealed new functional categories regulated by ExoR, including genes related to virulence, conjugation of the pAtC58 megaplasmid, ABC transporters, and cell envelope architecture. To address how ExoR exerts a broad impact on gene expression from its periplasmic location, a genetic screen was performed to isolate suppressor mutants that mitigate the exoR motility phenotype and identify downstream components of the ExoR regulatory pathway. This suppression analysis identified the acid-sensing two-component system ChvG-ChvI, and the suppressor mutant phenotypes suggest that all or most of the characteristic exoR properties are mediated through ChvG-ChvI. Subsequent analysis indicates that exoR mutants are simulating a response to acidic conditions, even in neutral media. This work expands the model for ExoR regulation in A. tumefaciens and underscores the global role that this regulator plays on gene expression. PMID:24982308

  13. Functional characterization of calliphorid cell death genes and cellularization gene promoters for controlling gene expression and cell viability in early embryos.

    PubMed

    Edman, R M; Linger, R J; Belikoff, E J; Li, F; Sze, S-H; Tarone, A M; Scott, M J

    2015-02-01

    The New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, and the Australian sheep blow fly, Lucilia cuprina, are major pests of livestock. The sterile insect technique was used to eradicate C. hominivorax from North and Central America. This involved area-wide releases of male and female flies that had been sterilized by radiation. Genetic systems have been developed for making 'male-only' strains that would improve the efficiency of genetic control of insect pests. One system involves induction of female lethality in embryos through activation of a pro-apoptotic gene by the tetracycline-dependent transactivator. Sex-specific expression is achieved using an intron from the transformer gene, which we previously isolated from several calliphorids. In the present study, we report the isolation of the promoters from the C. hominivorax slam and Lucilia sericata bnk cellularization genes and show that these promoters can drive expression of a GFP reporter gene in early embryos of transgenic L. cuprina. Additionally, we report the isolation of the L. sericata pro-apoptotic hid and rpr genes, identify conserved motifs in the encoded proteins and determine the relative expression of these genes at different stages of development. We show that widespread expression of the L. sericata pro-apoptotic genes was lethal in Drosophila melanogaster. The isolated gene promoters and pro-apoptotic genes could potentially be used to build transgenic embryonic sexing strains of calliphorid livestock pests.

  14. Controlling mesenchymal stem cell gene expression using polymer-mediated delivery of siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Danielle S.W.; Boutin, Molly E.

    2012-01-01

    siRNA treatment has great promise to specifically control gene expression and select cell behaviors but have delivery challenges limiting their use. Particularly for applications in regenerative medicine, uniform and consistent delivery of siRNA to control gene expression and subsequent stem cell functions, such as differentiation, is paramount. Therefore, a diblock copolymer was examined for its ability to effective delivery siRNA to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The diblock copolymers, which are composed of cationic blocks for siRNA complexation, protection, and uptake and pH-responsive blocks for endosomal escape, were shown to facilitate nearly 100% MSC uptake of siRNA, which is vastly superior to a commercially-available control, DharmaFECT, which resulted in only ~60% siRNA positive MSCs. Moreover, the diblock copolymer, at conditions that result in excellent knockdown (down to ~10% of control gene expression), is cytocompatible, causing no negative effects on MSC survivability. In contrast, DharmaFECT:siRNA treatment results in only ~60% survivability of MSCs. Longitudinal knockdown after siRNA treatment was examined and protein knockdown persists for ~6 days regardless of delivery system (diblock copolymer or DharmaFECT). Finally, MSC phenotype and differentiation capacity was examined after treatment with control siRNA. There is no statistically significant differences on cell surface markers of diblock copolymer:siRNA or DharmaFECT:siRNA treated or cells measured 2 weeks after siRNA delivery compared to untreated cells. Upon differentiation with typical media/culture conditions to adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic lineages and examination of histological staining markers, there is no discernable differences between treated and untreated cells, regardless of delivery mechanism. Thus, diblock copolymers examined herein facilitate uniform siRNA treatment of MSCs, inducing siRNA-specific gene and protein knockdown without adversely affecting MSC

  15. DNA methylation mediated control of gene expression is critical for development of crown gall tumors.

    PubMed

    Gohlke, Jochen; Scholz, Claus-Juergen; Kneitz, Susanne; Weber, Dana; Fuchs, Joerg; Hedrich, Rainer; Deeken, Rosalia

    2013-01-01

    Crown gall tumors develop after integration of the T-DNA of virulent Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains into the plant genome. Expression of the T-DNA-encoded oncogenes triggers proliferation and differentiation of transformed plant cells. Crown gall development is known to be accompanied by global changes in transcription, metabolite levels, and physiological processes. High levels of abscisic acid (ABA) in crown galls regulate expression of drought stress responsive genes and mediate drought stress acclimation, which is essential for wild-type-like tumor growth. An impact of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation on crown gall development has been suggested; however, it has not yet been investigated comprehensively. In this study, the methylation pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana crown galls was analyzed on a genome-wide scale as well as at the single gene level. Bisulfite sequencing analysis revealed that the oncogenes Ipt, IaaH, and IaaM were unmethylated in crown galls. Nevertheless, the oncogenes were susceptible to siRNA-mediated methylation, which inhibited their expression and subsequently crown gall growth. Genome arrays, hybridized with methylated DNA obtained by immunoprecipitation, revealed a globally hypermethylated crown gall genome, while promoters were rather hypomethylated. Mutants with reduced non-CG methylation developed larger tumors than the wild-type controls, indicating that hypermethylation inhibits plant tumor growth. The differential methylation pattern of crown galls and the stem tissue from which they originate correlated with transcriptional changes. Genes known to be transcriptionally inhibited by ABA and methylated in crown galls became promoter methylated upon treatment of A. thaliana with ABA. This suggests that the high ABA levels in crown galls may mediate DNA methylation and regulate expression of genes involved in drought stress protection. In summary, our studies provide evidence that epigenetic processes regulate gene

  16. The wheat HMW-glutenin 1Dy10 gene promoter controls endosperm expression in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Thilmony, Roger; Guttman, Mara E; Lin, Jeanie W; Blechl, Ann E

    2014-01-01

    The grass species Brachypodium distachyon has emerged as a model system for the study of gene structure and function in temperate cereals. As a first demonstration of the utility of Brachypodium to study wheat gene promoter function, we transformed it with a T-DNA that included the uidA reporter gene under control of a wheat High-Molecular-Weight Glutenin Subunit (HMW-GS) gene promoter and transcription terminator. For comparison, the same expression cassette was introduced into wheat by biolistics. Histochemical staining for β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity showed that the wheat promoter was highly expressed in the endosperms of all the seeds of Brachypodium and wheat homozygous plants. It was not active in any other tissue of transgenic wheat, but showed variable and sporadic activity in a minority of styles of the pistils of four homozygous transgenic Brachypodium lines. The ease of obtaining transgenic Brachypodium plants and the overall faithfulness of expression of the wheat HMW-GS promoter in those plants make it likely that this model system can be used for studies of other promoters from cereal crop species that are difficult to transform. PMID:24322586

  17. Role of replication time in the control of tissue-specific gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Holmquist, G P

    1987-01-01

    Late-replicating chromatin in vertebrates is repressed. Housekeeping (constitutively active) genes always replicate early and are in the early-replicating R-bands. Tissue-specific genes are usually in the late-replicating G-bands and therein almost always replicate late. Within the G-bands, however, a tissue-specific gene does replicate early in those cell types that express that particular gene. While the condition of late replication may simply be coincident with gene repression, we review evidence suggesting that late replication may actively determine repression. As mammals utilize a developmental program to Lyonize (facultatively heterochromatinize) whole X chromosomes to a late-replicating and somatically heritable repressed state, similarly another program seems to Lyonize individual replicons. In frogs, all genes begin embryogenesis by replicating during a very short interval. As the developmental potency of embryonic cells becomes restricted, late-replicating DNA gradually appears. This addition to the repertoire of gene control--i.e., repression via Lyonization of individual replicons--seems to have evolved in vertebrates with G-bands being a manifestation of the mechanism. PMID:3551593

  18. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Complex and the Control of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Beischlag, Timothy V.; Morales, J. Luis; Hollingshead, Brett D.; Perdew, Gary H.

    2008-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that controls the expression of a diverse set of genes. The toxicity of the potent AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin is almost exclusively mediated through this receptor. However, the key alterations in gene expression that mediate toxicity are poorly understood. It has been established through characterization of AhR-null mice that the AhR has a required physiological function, yet how endogenous mediators regulate this orphan receptor remains to be established. A picture as to how the AhR/ARNT heterodimer actually mediates gene transcription is starting to emerge. The AhR/ARNT complex can alter transcription both by binding to its cognate response element and through tethering to other transcription factors. In addition, many of the coregulatory proteins necessary for AhR-mediated transcription have been identified. Cross talk between the estrogen receptor and the AhR at the promoter of target genes appears to be an important mode of regulation. Inflammatory signaling pathways and the AhR also appear to be another important site of cross talk at the level of transcription. A major focus of this review is to highlight experimental efforts to characterize nonclassical mechanisms of AhR-mediated modulation of gene transcription. PMID:18540824

  19. Aire controls gene expression in the thymic epithelium with ordered stochasticity

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Matthew; Zemmour, David; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Aire controls immunologic tolerance by inducing the ectopic thymic expression of many tissue-specific genes, acting broadly by removing stops on the transcriptional machinery. To better understand Aire’s specificity, we performed single-cell RNAseq and DNA methylation analysis in Aire-sufficient and -deficient medullary epithelial cells (mTECs). Each of Aire’s target genes was induced in only a minority of mTECs, independently of DNA methylation patterns, as small inter-chromosomal gene clusters activated in concert in a proportion of mTECs. These microclusters differed between individual mice, and thus suggest an organization of the DNA or of the epigenome that results from stochastic determinism, but is bookmarked and stable through mTEC divisions, ensuring more effective presentation of self-antigens, and favoring diversity of self-tolerance between individuals. PMID:26237550

  20. Alterations to the remote control of Shh gene expression cause congenital abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert E.; Lettice, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-species conserved non-coding elements occur in the vertebrate genome and are clustered in the vicinity of developmentally regulated genes. Many are known to act as cis-regulators of transcription and may reside at long distances from the genes they regulate. However, the relationship of conserved sequence to encoded regulatory information and indeed, the mechanism by which these contribute to long-range transcriptional regulation is not well understood. The ZRS, a highly conserved cis-regulator, is a paradigm for such long-range gene regulation. The ZRS acts over approximately 1 Mb to control spatio-temporal expression of Shh in the limb bud and mutations within it result in a number of limb abnormalities, including polydactyly, tibial hypoplasia and syndactyly. We describe the activity of this developmental regulator and discuss a number of mechanisms by which regulatory mutations in this enhancer function to cause congenital abnormalities. PMID:23650631

  1. Splicing of a non-coding antisense transcript controls LEF1 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Manuel; Aparicio-Prat, Estel; Mazzolini, Rocco; Millanes-Romero, Alba; Massó, Pere; Jenner, Richard G.; Díaz, Víctor M.; Peiró, Sandra; de Herreros, Antonio García

    2015-01-01

    In this report we have analyzed the role of antisense transcription in the control of LEF1 transcription factor expression. A natural antisense transcript (NAT) is transcribed from a promoter present in the first intron of LEF1 gene and undergoes splicing in mesenchymal cells. Although this locus is silent in epithelial cells, and neither NAT transcript nor LEF1 mRNA are expressed, in cell lines with an intermediate epithelial-mesenchymal phenotype presenting low LEF1 expression, the NAT is synthesized and remains unprocessed. Contrarily to the spliced NAT, this unspliced NAT down-regulates the main LEF1 promoter activity and attenuates LEF1 mRNA transcription. Unspliced LEF1 NAT interacts with LEF1 promoter and facilitates PRC2 binding to the LEF1 promoter and trimethylation of lysine 27 in histone 3. Expression of the spliced form of LEF1 NAT in trans prevents the action of unspliced NAT by competing for interaction with the promoter. Thus, these results indicate that LEF1 gene expression is attenuated by an antisense non-coding RNA and that this NAT function is regulated by the balance between its spliced and unspliced forms. PMID:25990740

  2. Identification of a transcriptional regulator that controls intracellular gene expression in Salmonella Typhi.

    PubMed

    Haghjoo, Erik; Galán, Jorge E

    2007-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), the aetiological agent of typhoid fever, is an exclusively human pathogen. Little is known about specific factors that may confer to this bacterium its unique pathogenic features. One of these determinants is CdtB, a homologue of the active subunit of the cytolethal distending toxin, which causes DNA damage leading to cell cycle arrest and distension of intoxicated cells. A unique property of S. Typhi CdtB is that it is only synthesized when this bacterium is within an intracellular compartment. Through a genetic screen, we have identified a transcriptional regulatory protein that controls the intracellular expression of cdtB. This regulator, which we have named IgeR, is a member of the DeoR family of transcriptional regulatory proteins and is highly conserved in all S. enterica serovars. IgeR directly binds the cdtB promoter and represses its expression in the extracellular environment. Microarray analysis identified additional IgeR-regulated genes that are involved in virulence. Constitutive expression of igeR resulted in the reduction of intracellular expression of cdtB by S. Typhi and in significant impairment of the virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in mice. We propose that IgeR may co-ordinate gene expression during Salmonella's transition from an extracellular to an intracellular environment. PMID:17555437

  3. Four Inducible Promoters for Controlled Gene Expression in the Oleaginous Yeast Rhodotorula toruloides

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Alexander M. B.; Love, John; Aves, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Rhodotorula (Rhodosporidium) toruloides is an oleaginous yeast with great biotechnological potential, capable of accumulating lipid up to 70% of its dry biomass, and of carotenoid biosynthesis. However, few molecular genetic tools are available for manipulation of this basidiomycete yeast and its high genomic GC content can make routine cloning difficult. We have developed plasmid vectors for transformation of R. toruloides which include elements for Saccharomyces cerevisiae in-yeast assembly; this method is robust to the assembly of GC-rich DNA and of large plasmids. Using such vectors we screened for controllable promoters, and identified inducible promoters from the genes NAR1, ICL1, CTR3, and MET16. These four promoters have independent induction/repression conditions and exhibit different levels and rates of induction in R. toruloides, making them appropriate for controllable transgene expression in different experimental situations. Nested deletions were used to identify regulatory regions in the four promoters, and to delimit the minimal inducible promoters, which are as small as 200 bp for the NAR1 promoter. The NAR1 promoter shows very tight regulation under repressed conditions as determined both by an EGFP reporter gene and by conditional rescue of a leu2 mutant. These new tools facilitate molecular genetic manipulation and controllable gene expression in R. toruloides.

  4. Computational design of a Zn2+ receptor that controls bacterial gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, M. A.; Looger, L. L.; Hellinga, H. W.

    2003-09-01

    The control of cellular physiology and gene expression in response to extracellular signals is a basic property of living systems. We have constructed a synthetic bacterial signal transduction pathway in which gene expression is controlled by extracellular Zn2+. In this system a computationally designed Zn2+-binding periplasmic receptor senses the extracellular solute and triggers a two-component signal transduction pathway via a chimeric transmembrane protein, resulting in transcriptional up-regulation of a -galactosidase reporter gene. The Zn2+-binding site in the designed receptor is based on a four-coordinate, tetrahedral primary coordination sphere consisting of histidines and glutamates. In addition, mutations were introduced in a secondary coordination sphere to satisfy the residual hydrogen-bonding potential of the histidines coordinated to the metal. The importance of the secondary shell interactions is demonstrated by their effect on metal affinity and selectivity, as well as protein stability. Three designed protein sequences, comprising two distinct metal-binding positions, were all shown to bind Zn2+ and to function in the cell-based assay, indicating the generality of the design methodology. These experiments demonstrate that biological systems can be manipulated with computationally designed proteins that have drastically altered ligand-binding specificities, thereby extending the repertoire of genetic control by extracellular signals.

  5. Quality controls in cellular immunotherapies: rapid assessment of clinical grade dendritic cells by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Zhao, Yingdong; Tumaini, Barbara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Ping, Jin; Wang, Ena; Wood, Lauren V; Marincola, Francesco M; Puri, Raj K; Stroncek, David F

    2013-02-01

    Cell-based immunotherapies are among the most promising approaches for developing effective and targeted immune response. However, their clinical usefulness and the evaluation of their efficacy rely heavily on complex quality control assessment. Therefore, rapid systematic methods are urgently needed for the in-depth characterization of relevant factors affecting newly developed cell product consistency and the identification of reliable markers for quality control. Using dendritic cells (DCs) as a model, we present a strategy to comprehensively characterize manufactured cellular products in order to define factors affecting their variability, quality and function. After generating clinical grade human monocyte-derived mature DCs (mDCs), we tested by gene expression profiling the degrees of product consistency related to the manufacturing process and variability due to intra- and interdonor factors, and how each factor affects single gene variation. Then, by calculating for each gene an index of variation we selected candidate markers for identity testing, and defined a set of genes that may be useful comparability and potency markers. Subsequently, we confirmed the observed gene index of variation in a larger clinical data set. In conclusion, using high-throughput technology we developed a method for the characterization of cellular therapies and the discovery of novel candidate quality assurance markers.

  6. GABAA receptor subunit gene expression in human prefrontal cortex: comparison of schizophrenics and controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akbarian, S.; Huntsman, M. M.; Kim, J. J.; Tafazzoli, A.; Potkin, S. G.; Bunney, W. E. Jr; Jones, E. G.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics is hypoactive and displays changes related to inhibitory, GABAergic neurons, and GABAergic synapses. These changes include decreased levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme for GABA synthesis, upregulation of muscimol binding, and downregulation of benzodiazepine binding to GABAA receptors. Studies in the visual cortex of nonhuman primates have demonstrated that gene expression for GAD and for several GABAA receptor subunit polypeptides is under control of neuronal activity, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms in the hypoactive prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics may explain the abnormalities in GAD and in GABAA receptor regulation. In the present study, which is the first of its type on human cerebral cortex, levels of mRNAs for six GABAA receptor subunits (alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 2) and their laminar expression patterns were analyzed in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics and matched controls, using in situ hybridization histochemistry and densitometry. Three types of laminar expression pattern were observed: mRNAs for the alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2 subunits, which are the predominant receptor subunits expressed in the mature cortex, were expressed at comparatively high levels by cells of all six cortical layers, but most intensely by cells in lower layer III and layer IV. mRNAs for the alpha 2, alpha 5, and beta 1 subunits were expressed at lower levels; alpha 2 and beta 1 were expressed predominantly by cells in layers II, III, and IV; alpha 5 was expressed predominantly in layers IV, V, and VI. There were no significant changes in overall mRNA levels for any of the receptor subunits in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics, and the laminar expression pattern of all six receptor subunit mRNAs did not differ between schizophrenics and controls. Because gene expression for GABAA receptor subunits is not consistently altered in the prefrontal cortex of

  7. Designing and using synthetic RNA thermometers for temperature-controlled gene expression in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Juliane; Bock, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Many techniques have been developed for studying inducible gene expression, but all of them are multicomponent systems consisting of cis-acting elements at the DNA or RNA level, trans-acting regulator proteins and/or small molecules as inducers. RNA thermometers are the only known single-component regulators of gene expression. They consist of a temperature-sensitive secondary structure in the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA, which contains the ribosome-binding site. The ribosome-binding site can be masked or unmasked by a simple temperature shift, thereby repressing or inducing translation. Recently, we and others have designed synthetic RNA thermometers that are considerably simpler than naturally occurring thermometers and can be exploited as convenient on/off switches of gene expression. In this protocol, we describe the construction and use of synthetic RNA thermometers. We provide guidelines for the in silico design of thermometer-controlled mRNA leaders and for their experimental testing and optimization; the entire procedure can be completed in 2-3 weeks.

  8. Conditional control of mammalian gene expression by tetracycline-dependent hammerhead ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Beilstein, Kim; Wittmann, Alexander; Grez, Manuel; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-05-15

    Robust synthetic devices are requisite for the construction of synthetic genetic circuits and important scientific and technological tools to control cellular processes. We developed tetracycline-dependent ribozymes, which can switch on gene expression up to 8.7-fold upon addition of tetracycline. A tetracycline aptamer was grafted onto the hammerhead ribozyme in such a way that ligand binding to the aptamers destroys a loop-loop interaction within the ribozyme thereby inhibiting ribozyme cleavage and allowing gene expression. The advantage of the presented regulatory system is its independence of any regulatory proteins. The stable integration of the ribozyme into the genome of HeLa cells indicates a low background activity in the absence of ligand. Furthermore, the ligand concentration required to robustly flip the switch does not affect cell viability and therefore allows a long-term application of the system. These properties turn the tetracycline-dependent ribozymes into a very promising tool for conditional gene expression in mammalian cells. PMID:25265236

  9. Conditional control of mammalian gene expression by tetracycline-dependent hammerhead ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Beilstein, Kim; Wittmann, Alexander; Grez, Manuel; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-05-15

    Robust synthetic devices are requisite for the construction of synthetic genetic circuits and important scientific and technological tools to control cellular processes. We developed tetracycline-dependent ribozymes, which can switch on gene expression up to 8.7-fold upon addition of tetracycline. A tetracycline aptamer was grafted onto the hammerhead ribozyme in such a way that ligand binding to the aptamers destroys a loop-loop interaction within the ribozyme thereby inhibiting ribozyme cleavage and allowing gene expression. The advantage of the presented regulatory system is its independence of any regulatory proteins. The stable integration of the ribozyme into the genome of HeLa cells indicates a low background activity in the absence of ligand. Furthermore, the ligand concentration required to robustly flip the switch does not affect cell viability and therefore allows a long-term application of the system. These properties turn the tetracycline-dependent ribozymes into a very promising tool for conditional gene expression in mammalian cells.

  10. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J M; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology. PMID:27417732

  11. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J. M.; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology. PMID:27417732

  12. Automated optogenetic feedback control for precise and robust regulation of gene expression and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Rullan, Marc; Aoki, Stephanie K; Buchmann, Peter; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic control of gene expression can have far-reaching implications for biotechnological applications and biological discovery. Thanks to the advantages of light, optogenetics has emerged as an ideal technology for this task. Current state-of-the-art methods for optical expression control fail to combine precision with repeatability and cannot withstand changing operating culture conditions. Here, we present a novel fully automatic experimental platform for the robust and precise long-term optogenetic regulation of protein production in liquid Escherichia coli cultures. Using a computer-controlled light-responsive two-component system, we accurately track prescribed dynamic green fluorescent protein expression profiles through the application of feedback control, and show that the system adapts to global perturbations such as nutrient and temperature changes. We demonstrate the efficacy and potential utility of our approach by placing a key metabolic enzyme under optogenetic control, thus enabling dynamic regulation of the culture growth rate with potential applications in bacterial physiology studies and biotechnology. PMID:27562138

  13. Automated optogenetic feedback control for precise and robust regulation of gene expression and cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Rullan, Marc; Aoki, Stephanie K.; Buchmann, Peter; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic control of gene expression can have far-reaching implications for biotechnological applications and biological discovery. Thanks to the advantages of light, optogenetics has emerged as an ideal technology for this task. Current state-of-the-art methods for optical expression control fail to combine precision with repeatability and cannot withstand changing operating culture conditions. Here, we present a novel fully automatic experimental platform for the robust and precise long-term optogenetic regulation of protein production in liquid Escherichia coli cultures. Using a computer-controlled light-responsive two-component system, we accurately track prescribed dynamic green fluorescent protein expression profiles through the application of feedback control, and show that the system adapts to global perturbations such as nutrient and temperature changes. We demonstrate the efficacy and potential utility of our approach by placing a key metabolic enzyme under optogenetic control, thus enabling dynamic regulation of the culture growth rate with potential applications in bacterial physiology studies and biotechnology. PMID:27562138

  14. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-03-18

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA-asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions.

  15. Programmable control of bacterial gene expression with the combined CRISPR and antisense RNA system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Je; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Leong, Matthew C.; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-01-01

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to implement diverse cellular functions by predictably controlling gene expression. Though research has focused more on protein regulators than RNA regulators, recent advances in our understanding of RNA folding and functions have motivated the use of RNA regulators. RNA regulators provide an advantage because they are easier to design and engineer than protein regulators, potentially have a lower burden on the cell and are highly orthogonal. Here, we combine the CRISPR system from Streptococcus pyogenes and synthetic antisense RNAs (asRNAs) in Escherichia coli strains to repress or derepress a target gene in a programmable manner. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time that the gene target repressed by the CRISPR system can be derepressed by expressing an asRNA that sequesters a small guide RNA (sgRNA). Furthermore, we demonstrate that tunable levels of derepression can be achieved (up to 95%) by designing asRNAs that target different regions of a sgRNA and by altering the hybridization free energy of the sgRNA–asRNA complex. This new system, which we call the combined CRISPR and asRNA system, can be used to reversibly repress or derepress multiple target genes simultaneously, allowing for rational reprogramming of cellular functions. PMID:26837577

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms, nuclear architecture and the control of gene expression in trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Alsford, Sam; duBois, Kelly; Horn, David; Field, Mark C

    2012-05-29

    The control of gene expression, and more significantly gene cohorts, requires tight transcriptional coordination and is an essential feature of probably all cells. In higher eukaryotes, the mechanisms used involve controlled modifications to both local and global DNA environments, principally through changes in chromatin structure as well as cis-element-driven mechanisms. Although the mechanisms regulating chromatin in terms of transcriptional permissiveness and the relation to developmental programmes and responses to the environment are becoming better understood for animal and fungal cells, it is only just beginning to become clear how these processes operate in other taxa, including the trypanosomatids. Recent advances are now illuminating how African trypanosomes regulate higher-order chromatin structure, and, further, how these mechanisms impact on the expression of major surface antigens that are of fundamental importance to life-cycle progression. It is now apparent that several mechanisms are rather more similar between animal and fungal cells and trypanosomes than it originally appeared, but some aspects do involve gene products unique to trypanosomes. Therefore, both evolutionarily common and novel mechanisms cohabit in trypanosomes, offering both important biological insights and possible therapeutic opportunity.

  17. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control -- A multilevel and inter-disciplinary study

    SciTech Connect

    Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1990-09-01

    All projects are working toward a goal for describing the three dimensional nuclear topography in terms of relative spatial relationships among genes (specific DNA sequence). Methods are now being perfected to detect these genes, quantitatively and spatially, to perturb these genes specifically, and to measure the perturbation in order to assure specificity. We are developing methods to assay, after perturbation of the target DNA within living cells, whether or not only the target sequence are attacked while other sequences remain unharmed. We are now at the stage to do chemical gene modification or masking within living cells in a strictly sequence-specific manner. Soon, we will be able to study the function and the physical location of each gene in living cells with exquisite specificity. 25 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Validation of housekeeping genes as an internal control for gene expression studies in Giardia lamblia using quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Fierro, Francisco; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio

    2016-04-25

    The analysis of transcript levels of specific genes is important for understanding transcriptional regulation and for the characterization of gene function. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a powerful tool to quantify gene expression. The objective of this study was to identify reliable housekeeping genes in Giardia lamblia. Twelve genes were selected for this purpose, and their expression was analyzed in the wild type WB strain and in two strains with resistance to nitazoxanide (NTZ) and metronidazole (MTZ), respectively. RefFinder software analysis showed that the expression of the genes is different in the three strains. The integrated data from the four analyses showed that the NADH oxidase (NADH) and aldolase (ALD) genes were the most steadily expressed genes, whereas the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene was the most unstable. Additionally, the relative expression of seven genes were quantified in the NTZ- and MTZ-resistant strains by RT-qPCR, using the aldolase gene as the internal control, and the results showed a consistent differential pattern of expression in both strains. The housekeeping genes found in this work will facilitate the analysis of mRNA expression levels of other genes of interest in G. lamblia.

  19. The group A streptococcal virR49 gene controls expression of four structural vir regulon genes.

    PubMed

    Podbielski, A; Flosdorff, A; Weber-Heynemann, J

    1995-01-01

    Within a genomic locus termed the vir regulon, virR genes of opacity factor-nonproducing (OF-) group A streptococci (GAS) are known to control the expression of the genes encoding M protein (emm) and C5a peptidase (scpA) and of virR itself. Within the corresponding genomic locus, opacity factor-producing (OF+) GAS harbor additional emm-related genes encoding immunoglobulin G- and immunoglobulin A-binding proteins (fcrA and enn, respectively). The virR gene region of the OF+ GAS M-type 49 strain CS101 was amplified by PCR, and 2,650 bp were directly sequenced. An open reading frame of 1,599 bp exhibited 76% overall homology to published virR sequences. By utilizing mRNA analysis, the 5' ends of two specific transcripts were mapped 370 and 174 bp upstream of the start codon of this open reading frame. The deduced sequences of the corresponding promoters and their locations differed from those of previously reported virR promoters. Transcripts from wild-type fcrA49, emm49, enn49, and scpA49 genes located downstream of virR49 were characterized as being monocistronic. The transcripts were quantified and mapped for their 5' ends. Subsequently, the virR49 gene was inactivated by specific insertion of a nonreplicative pSF152 vector containing recombinant virR49 sequences. The RNA from the resulting vir-mut strain did not contain transcripts of virR49, fcrA49, emm49, or enn49 and contained reduced amounts of the scpA49 transcript when compared with wild-type RNA. The mRNA control from the streptokinase gene was demonstrated not to be affected. When strain vir-mut was rotated in human blood, it was found to be fully sensitive to phagocytosis by human leukocytes. Thus, the present study provides evidence that virR genes in OF+ GAS could be involved in the control of up to five vir regulon genes, and their unaffected regulatory activity is associated with features postulated as crucial for GAS virulence.

  20. Transcriptional expression study in the central nervous system of rats: what gene should be used as internal control?

    PubMed Central

    de Moura, Ana Carolina; Lazzari, Virgínia Meneghini; Agnes, Grasiela; Almeida, Silvana; Giovenardi, Márcia; da Veiga, Ana Beatriz Gorini

    2014-01-01

    Objective A growing number of published articles report the expression of specific genes with different behavior patterns in rats. The levels of messenger ribonucleic acid transcripts are usually analyzed by reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction and quantified after normalization with an internal control or reference gene (housekeeping gene). Nevertheless, housekeeping genes exhibit different expression in the central nervous system, depending on the physiological conditions and the area of the brain to be studied. The choice of a good internal control gene is essential for obtaining reliable results. This study evaluated the expression of three housekeeping genes (beta-actin, cyclophilin A, and ubiquitin C) in different areas of the central nervous system in rats (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, striatum, and prefrontal cortex). Methods Wistar rats (virgin females, n=6) during the diestrum period were used. Total ribonucleic acid was extracted from each region of the brain; the complementary deoxyribonucleic acid was synthesized by reverse transcription and amplified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction using SYBR™ Green and primers specific for each one of the reference genes. The stability of the expression was determined using NormFinder. Results Beta-actin was the most stable gene in the hippocampus and striatum, while cyclophilin A and ubiquitin C showed greater stability in the prefrontal cortex and the olfactory bulb, respectively. Conclusion Based on our study, further studies of gene expression using rats as animal models should take into consideration these results when choosing a reliable internal control gene. PMID:25295456

  1. Ribosome profiling reveals an important role for translational control in circadian gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Christopher; Lahens, Nicholas F.; Hogenesch, John B.; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Physiological and behavioral circadian rhythms are driven by a conserved transcriptional/translational negative feedback loop in mammals. Although most core clock factors are transcription factors, post-transcriptional control introduces delays that are critical for circadian oscillations. Little work has been done on circadian regulation of translation, so to address this deficit we conducted ribosome profiling experiments in a human cell model for an autonomous clock. We found that most rhythmic gene expression occurs with little delay between transcription and translation, suggesting that the lag in the accumulation of some clock proteins relative to their mRNAs does not arise from regulated translation. Nevertheless, we found that translation occurs in a circadian fashion for many genes, sometimes imposing an additional level of control on rhythmically expressed mRNAs and, in other cases, conferring rhythms on noncycling mRNAs. Most cyclically transcribed RNAs are translated at one of two major times in a 24-h day, while rhythmic translation of most noncyclic RNAs is phased to a single time of day. Unexpectedly, we found that the clock also regulates the formation of cytoplasmic processing (P) bodies, which control the fate of mRNAs, suggesting circadian coordination of mRNA metabolism and translation. PMID:26338483

  2. A red light-controlled synthetic gene expression switch for plant systems.

    PubMed

    Müller, Konrad; Siegel, David; Rodriguez Jahnke, Fernando; Gerrer, Katrin; Wend, Sabrina; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2014-07-01

    On command control of gene expression in time and space is required for the comprehensive analysis of key plant cellular processes. Even though some chemical inducible systems showing satisfactory induction features have been developed, they are inherently limited in terms of spatiotemporal resolution and may be associated with toxic effects. We describe here the first synthetic light-inducible system for the targeted control of gene expression in plants. For this purpose, we applied an interdisciplinary synthetic biology approach comprising mammalian and plant cell systems to customize and optimize a split transcription factor based on the plant photoreceptor phytochrome B and one of its interacting factors (PIF6). Implementation of the system in transient assays in tobacco protoplasts resulted in strong (95-fold) induction in red light (660 nm) and could be instantaneously returned to the OFF state by subsequent illumination with far-red light (740 nm). Capitalizing on this toggle switch-like characteristic, we demonstrate that the system can be kept in the OFF state in the presence of 740 nm-supplemented white light, opening up perspectives for future application of the system in whole plants. Finally we demonstrate the system's applicability in basic research, by the light-controlled tuning of auxin signalling networks in N. tabacum protoplasts, as well as its biotechnological potential for the chemical-inducer free production of therapeutic proteins in the moss P. patens.

  3. Ribosome profiling reveals an important role for translational control in circadian gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jang, Christopher; Lahens, Nicholas F; Hogenesch, John B; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-12-01

    Physiological and behavioral circadian rhythms are driven by a conserved transcriptional/translational negative feedback loop in mammals. Although most core clock factors are transcription factors, post-transcriptional control introduces delays that are critical for circadian oscillations. Little work has been done on circadian regulation of translation, so to address this deficit we conducted ribosome profiling experiments in a human cell model for an autonomous clock. We found that most rhythmic gene expression occurs with little delay between transcription and translation, suggesting that the lag in the accumulation of some clock proteins relative to their mRNAs does not arise from regulated translation. Nevertheless, we found that translation occurs in a circadian fashion for many genes, sometimes imposing an additional level of control on rhythmically expressed mRNAs and, in other cases, conferring rhythms on noncycling mRNAs. Most cyclically transcribed RNAs are translated at one of two major times in a 24-h day, while rhythmic translation of most noncyclic RNAs is phased to a single time of day. Unexpectedly, we found that the clock also regulates the formation of cytoplasmic processing (P) bodies, which control the fate of mRNAs, suggesting circadian coordination of mRNA metabolism and translation. PMID:26338483

  4. HISTONE DEACETYLASE6 Controls Gene Expression Patterning and DNA Methylation-Independent Euchromatic Silencing1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Emilija; Fal, Kateryna; Klemme, Laurin; Windels, David; Bucher, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of chromatin regulators in patterning gene expression, we employed a unique epigenetically controlled and highly tissue-specific green fluorescent protein reporter line in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using a combination of forward and reverse genetic approaches on this line, we show here that distinct epigenetic regulators are involved in silencing the transgene in different tissues. The forward genetic screen led to the identification of a novel HISTONE DEACETYLASE6 (HDA6) mutant allele (epigenetic control1, hda6-8). This allele differs from the previously reported alleles, as it did not affect DNA methylation and only had a very modest effect on the release of transposable elements and other heterochromatic transcripts. Overall, our data shows that HDA6 has at least two clearly separable activities in different genomic regions. In addition, we present an unexpected role for HDA6 in the control of DNA methylation at CG dinucleotides. PMID:25918117

  5. Validation of Tuba1a as Appropriate Internal Control for Normalization of Gene Expression Analysis during Mouse Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Aditi; Dobersch, Stephanie; Dammann, Reinhard H.; Bellusci, Saverio; Ilinskaya, Olga N.; Braun, Thomas; Barreto, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The expression ratio between the analysed gene and an internal control gene is the most widely used normalization method for quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) expression analysis. The ideal reference gene for a specific experiment is the one whose expression is not affected by the different experimental conditions tested. In this study, we validate the applicability of five commonly used reference genes during different stages of mouse lung development. The stability of expression of five different reference genes (Tuba1a, Actb Gapdh, Rn18S and Hist4h4) was calculated within five experimental groups using the statistical algorithm of geNorm software. Overall, Tuba1a showed the least variability in expression among the different stages of lung development, while Hist4h4 and Rn18S showed the maximum variability in their expression. Expression analysis of two lung specific markers, surfactant protein C (SftpC) and Clara cell-specific 10 kDA protein (Scgb1a1), normalized to each of the five reference genes tested here, confirmed our results and showed that incorrect reference gene choice can lead to artefacts. Moreover, a combination of two internal controls for normalization of expression analysis during lung development will increase the accuracy and reliability of results. PMID:25723738

  6. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control -- A multi-level and interdisciplinary study

    SciTech Connect

    Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1992-08-01

    This progress report describes gains made in three projects entitled (1) 3-Dimensional nuclear topography of genes and chromosomes in interphase nuclei, (2) Sequence specific identification and perturbation of the genomic DNA in living cells by nonionic oligonucleotide analogs (Matagen), and Resolution and isolation of specific DNA restriction fragments.(DT)

  7. Cell dynamics and gene expression control in tissue homeostasis and development.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Martinez Arias, Alfonso

    2015-02-25

    During tissue and organ development and maintenance, the dynamic regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation allows cells to build highly elaborate structures. The development of the vertebrate retina or the maintenance of adult intestinal crypts, for instance, involves the arrangement of newly created cells with different phenotypes, the proportions of which need to be tightly controlled. While some of the basic principles underlying these processes developing and maintaining these organs are known, much remains to be learnt from how cells encode the necessary information and use it to attain those complex but reproducible arrangements. Here, we review the current knowledge on the principles underlying cell population dynamics during tissue development and homeostasis. In particular, we discuss how stochastic fate assignment, cell division, feedback control and cellular transition states interact during organ and tissue development and maintenance in multicellular organisms. We propose a framework, involving the existence of a transition state in which cells are more susceptible to signals that can affect their gene expression state and influence their cell fate decisions. This framework, which also applies to systems much more amenable to quantitative analysis like differentiating embryonic stem cells, links gene expression programmes with cell population dynamics.

  8. MK3 controls Polycomb target gene expression via negative feedback on ERK

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene-environment interactions are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Polycomb Group proteins constitute part of an epigenetic cellular transcriptional memory system that is subject to dynamic modulation during differentiation. Molecular insight in processes that control dynamic chromatin association and dissociation of Polycomb repressive complexes during and beyond development is limited. We recently showed that MK3 interacts with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). The functional relevance of this interaction, however, remained poorly understood. MK3 is activated downstream of mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (M/SAPKs), all of which fulfill crucial roles during development. We here use activation of the immediate-early response gene ATF3, a bona fide PRC1 target gene, as a model to study how MK3 and its effector kinases MAPK/ERK and SAPK/P38 are involved in regulation of PRC1-dependent ATF3 transcription. Results Our current data show that mitogenic signaling through ERK, P38 and MK3 regulates ATF3 expression by PRC1/chromatin dissociation and epigenetic modulation. Mitogenic stimulation results in transient P38-dependent H3S28 phosphorylation and ERK-driven PRC1/chromatin dissociation at PRC1 targets. H3S28 phosphorylation by itself appears not sufficient to induce PRC1/chromatin dissociation, nor ATF3 transcription, as inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling blocks BMI1/chromatin dissociation and ATF3 expression, despite induced H3S28 phosphorylation. In addition, we establish that concomitant loss of local H3K27me3 promoter marking is not required for ATF3 activation. We identify pERK as a novel signaling-induced binding partner of PRC1, and provide evidence that MK3 controls ATF3 expression in cultured cells via negative regulatory feedback on M/SAPKs. Dramatically increased ectopic wing vein formation in the absence of Drosophila MK in a Drosophila ERK gain-of-function wing vein patterning model, supports the existence of MK

  9. Opportunities in the design and application of RNA for gene expression control

    PubMed Central

    McKeague, Maureen; Wong, Remus S.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade of synthetic biology research has witnessed numerous advances in the development of tools and frameworks for the design and characterization of biological systems. Researchers have focused on the use of RNA for gene expression control due to its versatility in sensing molecular ligands and the relative ease by which RNA can be modeled and designed compared to proteins. We review the recent progress in the field with respect to RNA-based genetic devices that are controlled through small molecule and protein interactions. We discuss new approaches for generating and characterizing these devices and their underlying components. We also highlight immediate challenges, future directions and recent applications of synthetic RNA devices in engineered biological systems. PMID:26969733

  10. The role of long noncoding RNAs in the epigenetic control of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Morlando, Mariangela; Ballarino, Monica; Fatica, Alessandro; Bozzoni, Irene

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in the methodologies employed to deeply analyse the complexity of transcriptomes have unveiled the existence of a new class of transcripts, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). A significant amount of effort has been dedicated to the study of lncRNAs, and a large body of evidence now exists indicating their relevant role in different regulatory steps of gene expression. Given the role of epigenetics in disease development and progression, this Minireview focuses on lncRNAs involved in epigenetic control and provides an overview of the mechanisms used to guide epigenetic-modifying complexes to adjacent (cis-acting) or independent (trans-acting) genomic loci. Furthermore, it describes the activities of these transcripts in controlling the formation and spreading of heterochromatin domains. Just as other RNA molecules have found therapeutic application, though much remains to be elucidated about the structure and function of these lncRNAs, they too could hold potential as biomarkers, targets, and therapeutic agents.

  11. Quality control in microarray assessment of gene expression in human airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Tina; O'Connor, Timothy P; Hackett, Neil R; Wang, Wei; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Attiyeh, Marc A; Dang, David T; Teater, Matthew; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for defining gene expression profiles of airway epithelium that lend insight into the pathogenesis of human airway disorders. The focus of this study was to establish rigorous quality control parameters to ensure that microarray assessment of the airway epithelium is not confounded by experimental artifact. Samples (total n = 223) of trachea, large and small airway epithelium were collected by fiberoptic bronchoscopy of 144 individuals and hybridized to Affymetrix microarrays. The pre- and post-chip quality control (QC) criteria established, included: (1) RNA quality, assessed by RNA Integrity Number (RIN) ≥ 7.0; (2) cRNA transcript integrity, assessed by signal intensity ratio of GAPDH 3' to 5' probe sets ≤ 3.0; and (3) the multi-chip normalization scaling factor ≤ 10.0. Results Of the 223 samples, all three criteria were assessed in 191; of these 184 (96.3%) passed all three criteria. For the remaining 32 samples, the RIN was not available, and only the other two criteria were used; of these 29 (90.6%) passed these two criteria. Correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons of expression levels for 100 maintenance genes in which at least one array failed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.90 ± 0.04) were significantly lower (p < 0.0001) than correlation coefficients for pairwise comparisons between arrays that passed the QC criteria (average Pearson r = 0.97 ± 0.01). Inter-array variability was significantly decreased (p < 0.0001) among samples passing the QC criteria compared with samples failing the QC criteria. Conclusion Based on the aberrant maintenance gene data generated from samples failing the established QC criteria, we propose that the QC criteria outlined in this study can accurately distinguish high quality from low quality data, and can be used to delete poor quality microarray samples before proceeding to higher-order biological analyses and interpretation. PMID:19852842

  12. Genes and gene expression: Localization, damage and control: A multilevel and inter-disciplinary study

    SciTech Connect

    Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1990-09-01

    The main objectives of this Program Project is to develop strategy and technology for the study of gene structure, organization and function in a multi-disciplinary, highly coordinated manner. In Project I, Molecular Cytology, the establishment of all instrumentation for the computerized microscopic imaging system (CMIS) has been completed with the software in place, including measurement of the third dimension (along the Z-axis). The technique is now at hand to measure single copy DNA in the nucleus, single copy mRNA in the cell, and finally, we are in the process of developing mathematical approaches for the analysis of the relative spatial 3-D relationship among the chromosomes and the individual genes in the interphasal nucleus. Also, we have a sensitive and reliable method for measuring single-stranded DNA breaks which will be useful for the determination of damage to DNA caused by ionizing radiation. In Project II, the mapping of restriction fragments by 2-D enzymatic and electrophoretic analysis has been perfected for application. In Project III, a major finding is that the binding constant and effectiveness of antisense oligonucleotide analogues, Matagen, can be significantly improved by substituting 2{prime}-O-methylribos methylphosphonate backbones for the current 2{prime}-deoxyribomethylphosphonate backbones. 15 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. A controlled double-duration inducible gene expression system for cartilage tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ying; Li, Junxiang; Yao, Yi; Wei, Daixu; Wang, Rui; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Cartilage engineering that combines competent seeding cells and a compatible scaffold is increasingly gaining popularity and is potentially useful for the treatment of various bone and cartilage diseases. Intensive efforts have been made by researchers to improve the viability and functionality of seeding cells of engineered constructs that are implanted into damaged cartilage. Here, we designed an integrative system combining gene engineering and the controlled-release concept to solve the problems of both seeding cell viability and functionality through precisely regulating the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 in the short-term and the chondrogenic master regulator Sox9 in the long-term. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that our system enhances the cell viability and chondrogenic effects of the engineered scaffold after introduction of the system while restricting anti-apoptotic gene expression to only the early stage, thereby preventing potential oncogenic and overdose effects. Our system was designed to be modular and can also be readily adapted to other tissue engineering applications with minor modification. PMID:27222430

  14. Comparison of Gene Expression and Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Profiling between Phenotypically Normal Cloned Pigs and Conventionally Bred Controls

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengting; Li, Jian; Lin, Lin; Nielsen, Anders Lade; Sørensen, Charlotte Brandt; Vajta, Gábor; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Du, Yutao; Yang, Huanming; Bolund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Animal breeding via Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT) has enormous potential in agriculture and biomedicine. However, concerns about whether SCNT animals are as healthy or epigenetically normal as conventionally bred ones are raised as the efficiency of cloning by SCNT is much lower than natural breeding or In-vitro fertilization (IVF). Thus, we have conducted a genome-wide gene expression and DNA methylation profiling between phenotypically normal cloned pigs and control pigs in two tissues (muscle and liver), using Affymetrix Porcine expression array as well as modified methylation-specific digital karyotyping (MMSDK) and Solexa sequencing technology. Typical tissue-specific differences with respect to both gene expression and DNA methylation were observed in muscle and liver from cloned as well as control pigs. Gene expression profiles were highly similar between cloned pigs and controls, though a small set of genes showed altered expression. Cloned pigs presented a more different pattern of DNA methylation in unique sequences in both tissues. Especially a small set of genomic sites had different DNA methylation status with a trend towards slightly increased methylation levels in cloned pigs. Molecular network analysis of the genes that contained such differential methylation loci revealed a significant network related to tissue development. In conclusion, our study showed that phenotypically normal cloned pigs were highly similar with normal breeding pigs in their gene expression, but moderate alteration in DNA methylation aspects still exists, especially in certain unique genomic regions. PMID:22022462

  15. 5'-flanking motifs control cell-specific expression of trefoil factor genes (TFF).

    PubMed

    Beck, S; Sommer, P; Blin, N; Gött, P

    1998-09-01

    A group of secreted peptides (trefoil factor family; TFF) is abundantly expressed at mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract and promote epithelial restitution. They are upregulated around areas of epithelial damage, ulceration and neoplasia. The transcriptional regulation of the three human TFF genes was assayed by multiplex RT-PCR and reporter gene analysis in 8 gastrointestinal carcinoma cell lines. The level of endogenous mRNA matched well the reporter gene activity of all TFFs, indicating that the cis-acting elements located less than 1,000 bp upstream of the TATAA box account for cell-specific gene expression. In HT-29, the endogenous TFF expression profile changed in relation to cell growth conditions. Deletion and mutation analysis of TFF promoter constructs revealed enhancing elements shared within the three TFF promoters that were shown to bind nuclear proteins. Thus such specific DNA-protein interaction may explain the TFF peptides' cell specific expression pattern and altered levels in pathological conditions.

  16. Different regulatory sequences control creatine kinase-M gene expression in directly injected skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, C K; Gualberto, A; Patel, C V; Walsh, K

    1993-01-01

    Regulatory sequences of the M isozyme of the creatine kinase (MCK) gene have been extensively mapped in skeletal muscle, but little is known about the sequences that control cardiac-specific expression. The promoter and enhancer sequences required for MCK gene expression were assayed by the direct injection of plasmid DNA constructs into adult rat cardiac and skeletal muscle. A 700-nucleotide fragment containing the enhancer and promoter of the rabbit MCK gene activated the expression of a downstream reporter gene in both muscle tissues. Deletion of the enhancer significantly decreased expression in skeletal muscle but had no detectable effect on expression in cardiac muscle. Further deletions revealed a CArG sequence motif at position -179 within the promoter that was essential for cardiac-specific expression. The CArG element of the MCK promoter bound to the recombinant serum response factor and YY1, transcription factors which control expression from structurally similar elements in the skeletal actin and c-fos promoters. MCK-CArG-binding activities that were similar or identical to serum response factor and YY1 were also detected in extracts from adult cardiac muscle. These data suggest that the MCK gene is controlled by different regulatory programs in adult cardiac and skeletal muscle. Images PMID:8423791

  17. Establishment of a New Quality Control and Vaccine Safety Test for Influenza Vaccines and Adjuvants Using Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Momose, Haruka; Mizukami, Takuo; Kuramitsu, Madoka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Masumi, Atsuko; Araki, Kumiko; Furuhata, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2015-01-01

    We have previously identified 17 biomarker genes which were upregulated by whole virion influenza vaccines, and reported that gene expression profiles of these biomarker genes had a good correlation with conventional animal safety tests checking body weight and leukocyte counts. In this study, we have shown that conventional animal tests showed varied and no dose-dependent results in serially diluted bulk materials of influenza HA vaccines. In contrast, dose dependency was clearly shown in the expression profiles of biomarker genes, demonstrating higher sensitivity of gene expression analysis than the current animal safety tests of influenza vaccines. The introduction of branched DNA based-concurrent expression analysis could simplify the complexity of multiple gene expression approach, and could shorten the test period from 7 days to 3 days. Furthermore, upregulation of 10 genes, Zbp1, Mx2, Irf7, Lgals9, Ifi47, Tapbp, Timp1, Trafd1, Psmb9, and Tap2, was seen upon virosomal-adjuvanted vaccine treatment, indicating that these biomarkers could be useful for the safety control of virosomal-adjuvanted vaccines. In summary, profiling biomarker gene expression could be a useful, rapid, and highly sensitive method of animal safety testing compared with conventional methods, and could be used to evaluate the safety of various types of influenza vaccines, including adjuvanted vaccine. PMID:25909814

  18. Establishment of a new quality control and vaccine safety test for influenza vaccines and adjuvants using gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Momose, Haruka; Mizukami, Takuo; Kuramitsu, Madoka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Masumi, Atsuko; Araki, Kumiko; Furuhata, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2015-01-01

    We have previously identified 17 biomarker genes which were upregulated by whole virion influenza vaccines, and reported that gene expression profiles of these biomarker genes had a good correlation with conventional animal safety tests checking body weight and leukocyte counts. In this study, we have shown that conventional animal tests showed varied and no dose-dependent results in serially diluted bulk materials of influenza HA vaccines. In contrast, dose dependency was clearly shown in the expression profiles of biomarker genes, demonstrating higher sensitivity of gene expression analysis than the current animal safety tests of influenza vaccines. The introduction of branched DNA based-concurrent expression analysis could simplify the complexity of multiple gene expression approach, and could shorten the test period from 7 days to 3 days. Furthermore, upregulation of 10 genes, Zbp1, Mx2, Irf7, Lgals9, Ifi47, Tapbp, Timp1, Trafd1, Psmb9, and Tap2, was seen upon virosomal-adjuvanted vaccine treatment, indicating that these biomarkers could be useful for the safety control of virosomal-adjuvanted vaccines. In summary, profiling biomarker gene expression could be a useful, rapid, and highly sensitive method of animal safety testing compared with conventional methods, and could be used to evaluate the safety of various types of influenza vaccines, including adjuvanted vaccine.

  19. Genetic control of gene expression at novel and established chronic obstructive pulmonary disease loci

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, Peter J.; Cho, Michael H.; Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Mcgeachie, Michael; Celli, Bartolome; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Rennard, Stephen; Harshfield, Benjamin; Lange, Christoph; Singh, Dave; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Riley, John H.; Quackenbush, John; Raby, Benjamin A.; Carey, Vincent J.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic risk loci have been identified for a wide range of diseases through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), but the relevant functional mechanisms have been identified for only a small proportion of these GWAS-identified loci. By integrating results from the largest current GWAS of chronic obstructive disease (COPD) with expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in whole blood and sputum from 121 subjects with COPD from the ECLIPSE Study, this analysis identifies loci that are simultaneously associated with COPD and the expression of nearby genes (COPD eQTLs). After integrative analysis, 19 COPD eQTLs were identified, including all four previously identified genome-wide significant loci near HHIP, FAM13A, and the 15q25 and 19q13 loci. For each COPD eQTL, fine mapping and colocalization analysis to identify causal shared eQTL and GWAS variants identified a subset of sites with moderate-to-strong evidence of harboring at least one shared variant responsible for both the eQTL and GWAS signals. Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) analysis confirms that multiple COPD eQTL lead SNPs disrupt TFBS, and enhancer enrichment analysis for loci with the strongest colocalization signals showed enrichment for blood-related cell types (CD3 and CD4+ T cells, lymphoblastoid cell lines). In summary, integrative eQTL and GWAS analysis confirms that genetic control of gene expression plays a key role in the genetic architecture of COPD and identifies specific blood-related cell types as likely participants in the functional pathway from GWAS-associated variant to disease phenotype. PMID:25315895

  20. Transcriptional control of MHC class II gene expression during differentiation from B cells to plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Dellabona, P; Latron, F; Maffei, A; Scarpellino, L; Accolla, R S

    1989-04-15

    In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the extinction of the constitutive MHC class II gene expression of human B cells on somatic cell hybridization with murine plasmocytoma cells. We found that this event is due to trans-acting suppressor functions of mouse origin pre-existing in the plasmocytoma cells and acting at transcriptional level. Transcription of the entire family of human class II genes is suppressed, including genes as DO beta for which a distinct regulation of expression in B cells had been previously demonstrated. Suppression appears specific for class II genes because in the hybrids expression of MHC class I genes of mouse is unaffected and of human only partially reduced. Interestingly, also murine invariant chain gene is expressed in both parental plasmocytoma and hybrid cells although at reduced amounts as compared to a murine class II positive B cell line. The class II negative phenotype of hybrid cells and parental plasmocytoma cells is highly stable and unaffected by treatment with protein synthesis inhibitors, suggesting that the transcriptional suppressor function is not mediated by rapid, labile turning-over proteins. Possible mechanisms responsible for transcriptional regulation of MHC class II gene expression during terminal differentiation of B cells to plasma cells are discussed. PMID:2495328

  1. Translational Control of Host Gene Expression by a Cys-Motif Protein Encoded in a Bracovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunseong; Kim, Yonggyun

    2016-01-01

    Translational control is a strategy that various viruses use to manipulate their hosts to suppress acute antiviral response. Polydnaviruses, a group of insect double-stranded DNA viruses symbiotic to some endoparasitoid wasps, are divided into two genera: ichnovirus (IV) and bracovirus (BV). In IV, some Cys-motif genes are known as host translation-inhibitory factors (HTIF). The genome of endoparasitoid wasp Cotesia plutellae contains a Cys-motif gene (Cp-TSP13) homologous to an HTIF known as teratocyte-secretory protein 14 (TSP14) of Microplitis croceipes. Cp-TSP13 consists of 129 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 13.987 kDa and pI value of 7.928. Genomic DNA region encoding its open reading frame has three introns. Cp-TSP13 possesses six conserved cysteine residues as other Cys-motif genes functioning as HTIF. Cp-TSP13 was expressed in Plutella xylostella larvae parasitized by C. plutellae. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) was purified and injected into non-parasitized P. xylostella that expressed Cp-TSP13. Cp-TSP13 was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector and used to infect Sf9 cells to transiently express Cp-TSP13. The synthesized Cp-TSP13 protein was detected in culture broth. An overlaying experiment showed that the purified Cp-TSP13 entered hemocytes. It was localized in the cytosol. Recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly inhibited protein synthesis of secretory proteins when it was added to in vitro cultured fat body. In addition, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 directly inhibited the translation of fat body mRNAs in in vitro translation assay using rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Moreover, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly suppressed cellular immune responses by inhibiting hemocyte-spreading behavior. It also exhibited significant insecticidal activities by both injection and feeding routes. These results indicate that Cp-TSP13 is a viral HTIF. PMID:27598941

  2. Translational Control of Host Gene Expression by a Cys-Motif Protein Encoded in a Bracovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunseong; Kim, Yonggyun

    2016-01-01

    Translational control is a strategy that various viruses use to manipulate their hosts to suppress acute antiviral response. Polydnaviruses, a group of insect double-stranded DNA viruses symbiotic to some endoparasitoid wasps, are divided into two genera: ichnovirus (IV) and bracovirus (BV). In IV, some Cys-motif genes are known as host translation-inhibitory factors (HTIF). The genome of endoparasitoid wasp Cotesia plutellae contains a Cys-motif gene (Cp-TSP13) homologous to an HTIF known as teratocyte-secretory protein 14 (TSP14) of Microplitis croceipes. Cp-TSP13 consists of 129 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 13.987 kDa and pI value of 7.928. Genomic DNA region encoding its open reading frame has three introns. Cp-TSP13 possesses six conserved cysteine residues as other Cys-motif genes functioning as HTIF. Cp-TSP13 was expressed in Plutella xylostella larvae parasitized by C. plutellae. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) was purified and injected into non-parasitized P. xylostella that expressed Cp-TSP13. Cp-TSP13 was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector and used to infect Sf9 cells to transiently express Cp-TSP13. The synthesized Cp-TSP13 protein was detected in culture broth. An overlaying experiment showed that the purified Cp-TSP13 entered hemocytes. It was localized in the cytosol. Recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly inhibited protein synthesis of secretory proteins when it was added to in vitro cultured fat body. In addition, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 directly inhibited the translation of fat body mRNAs in in vitro translation assay using rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Moreover, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly suppressed cellular immune responses by inhibiting hemocyte-spreading behavior. It also exhibited significant insecticidal activities by both injection and feeding routes. These results indicate that Cp-TSP13 is a viral HTIF. PMID:27598941

  3. A synthetic cGMP-sensitive gene switch providing Viagra(®)-controlled gene expression in mammalian cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeuk; Folcher, Marc; Charpin-El Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a universal second messenger that is synthesized from guanosine triphosphate (GTP) by guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and hydrolyzed into guanosine monophosphate (GMP) by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Small-molecule drugs that induce high cGMP levels in specialized tissues by boosting GC activity or inhibiting PDE activity have become the predominant treatment strategy for a wide range of medical conditions, including congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis-based claudication and erectile dysfunction. By fusing the cGMP receptor protein (CRP) of Rhodospirillum centenum to the Herpes simplex-derived transactivation domain VP16, we created a novel synthetic mammalian cGMP-sensing transcription factor (GTA) that activates synthetic promoters (PGTA) containing newly identified GTA-specific operator sites in a concentration-dependent manner. In cell lines expressing endogenous natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A) (HeLa), GTA/PGTA-driven transgene expression was induced by B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; Nesiritide(®)) in a concentration-dependent manner, which activated NPR-A׳s intracellular GC domain and triggered a corresponding cGMP surge. Ectopic expression of NPR-A in NPR-A-negative cell lines (HEK-293T) produced high cGMP levels and mediated maximum GTA/PGTA-driven transgene expression, which was suppressed by co-expression of PDEs (PDE-3A, PDE-5A and PDE-9A) and was re-triggered by the corresponding PDE inhibitor drugs (Pletal(®), Perfan(®), Primacor(®) (PDE-3A), Viagra(®), Levitra(®), Cialis(®) (PDE-5A) and BAY73-6691 (PDE-9A)). Mice implanted with microencapsulated designer cells co-expressing the GTA/PGTA device with NPR-A and PDE-5A showed control of blood SEAP levels through administration of sildenafil (Viagra(®)). Designer cells engineered for PDE inhibitor-modulated transgene expression may provide a cell-based PDE-targeting drug discovery platform and enable drug-adjusted gene- and cell

  4. [EXPRESSION OF GENES, WHICH CONTROL GLUCOSE METABOLISM, IN BLOOD CELLS OF THE OBESE BOYS WITH INSULIN RESISTANCE].

    PubMed

    Tiazhka, O V; Minchenko, D O; Davydov, V V; Moliavko, O S; Budreiko, O A; Kulieshova, D K; Minchenko, O H

    2015-01-01

    We studied the expression of genes, which responsible for glucose metabolism, in the blood of obese boys with and without of insulin resistance as well as in normal (control) individuals. It was shown that the expression level of PFKFB3 gene is increased, PFKFB1 and INSIG2--is decreased, but HK2 gene--significantly does not change in the blood cells of obese boys with normal insulin sensitivity as compared to control group. Insulin resistance in obese boys leads to up-regulation of INSIG2 gene expression as well as to down-regulation of PFKFB1, PFKFB3, and HK2 genes in the blood.cells as compared to obese patients with normal insulin sensitivity. Results of this study provide evidence that obesity affects the expression of the subset of glucose metabolism-related genes in the blood cells and that insulin resistance in obesity is associated with changes in the expression level of PFKFB1, PFKFB3, HK2, and INSIG2 genes, which contribute to the development of insulin resistance as well as glucose intolerance. PMID:26827442

  5. Contributions of extracellular matrix signaling and tissue architecture to nuclear mechanisms and spatial organization of gene expression control

    PubMed Central

    Lelièvre, Sophie A.

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational modification of histones, ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling, and DNA methylation are interconnected nuclear mechanisms that ultimately lead to the changes in chromatin structure necessary to carry out epigenetic gene expression control. Tissue differentiation is characterized by a specific gene expression profile in association with the acquisition of a defined tissue architecture and function. Elements critical for tissue differentiation, like extracellular stimuli, adhesion and cell shape properties, and transcription factors all contribute to the modulation of gene expression and thus, are likely to impinge on the nuclear mechanisms of epigenetic gene expression control. In this review, we analyze how these elements modify chromatin structure in a hierarchical manner by acting on the nuclear machinery. We discuss how mechanotransduction via the structural continuum of the cell and biochemical signaling to the cell nucleus integrate to provide a comprehensive control of gene expression. The role of nuclear organization in this control is highlighted, with a presentation of differentiation-induced nuclear structure and the concept of nuclear organization as a modulator of the response to incoming signals. PMID:19328836

  6. Construction and expression of a heterologous protein in Lactococcus lactis by using the nisin-controlled gene expression system: the case of the PRRSV ORF6 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z H; Wang, Y L; Zeng, X Y

    2014-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) continues to be a threat, exerting significant economic effects on the swine industry worldwide. However, none of the current commercially available vaccines can completely prevent respiratory infection, trans-placental transmission, pig-to-pig transmission of the virus, or maintain immune protection in sows. This study provides information on PRRSV and a review of available options for PRRS control strategies based on its pathogenic characteristics, immune properties, and biological characteristics. In this study, the nisin-controlled expression system of Lactococcus lactis was selected as a vector to express the ORF6 gene of PRRSV. Food-grade recombinant, L. lactis PNZ8149/NZ3900-M/PRRS, which contained the lactose operon, was successfully constructed. The molecular weight of the expressed recombinant protein was approximately 19 kDa. Furthermore, the recombinant protein was located on the surface of L. lactis and showed reactogenicity with the antibody against PRRSV. Results of this study are expected to lay a theoretical foundation for development of genetically engineered L. lactis mucosal vaccines and to provide information related to its immune activity and adjuvant effects. PMID:24634130

  7. Evaluation of internal control for gene expression in Phalaenopsis by quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiu-Yun; Jiang, Su-Hua; Wang, Mo-Fei; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Xian-Yun; Cui, Bo

    2014-07-01

    The selection of appropriate reference genes is one of the most important steps to obtain reliable results for normalizing quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) of MADS-box gene in Phalaenopsis. In this study, we cloned 12 candidate reference genes including 18S ribosomal RNA (18S), elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1α), cytoskeletal structural protein actin (ACT1, ACT2, ACT3, ACT4, ACT5), ubiquitin protein (UBQ1 and UBQ2), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and the cytoskeletal structural proteins α-tubulin (TUA) and β-tubulin (TUB) in Phalaenopsis and evaluated their expression reliability. The expression of these candidate reference genes was analyzed using geNorm and normFinder software packages; the results showed that ACT2 and ACT4 were the highest stability reference genes for all experiment sets based on normFinder, followed by ACT1 or ACT3, while ACT3 and ACT4 were the highest stability reference genes for most experiment sets based on geNorm, then TUB or others. Taken together, Actin genes were the higher stability reference genes for all tissues at total developmental stages, and similar results came from analysis by normFinder. According to geNorm analysis, ACT3 and ACT4 were the most stable reference genes for all tissues tested and tissues at reproductive stages; TUB and ACT5 or ACT4 were the most stable reference genes for vegetative tissues or roots. The most stable reference genes for all vegetative tissues and only leaves were ACT4 and ACT5, ACT2 and ACT3, respectively; ACT1 and ACT3 were the most stable genes and sufficient for reliable normalization of flower tissues. While EF1α, UBQ1, UBQ2, and GAPDH were found to be unsuitable as a reference gene in our analysis for flower tissues, total tissues, and reproductive stages; UBQ2 and 18S were identified as the least stable reference genes for vegetative tissues at different stages, different tissues at vegetative stages; TUA and 18S were the

  8. Nipbl and Mediator Cooperatively Regulate Gene Expression to Control Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Akihiko; Ikeda, Shingo; Lopez-Burks, Martha E.

    2014-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency for Nipbl, a cohesin loading protein, causes Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS), the most common “cohesinopathy”. It has been proposed that the effects of Nipbl-haploinsufficiency result from disruption of long-range communication between DNA elements. Here we use zebrafish and mouse models of CdLS to examine how transcriptional changes caused by Nipbl deficiency give rise to limb defects, a common condition in individuals with CdLS. In the zebrafish pectoral fin (forelimb), knockdown of Nipbl expression led to size reductions and patterning defects that were preceded by dysregulated expression of key early limb development genes, including fgfs, shha, hand2 and multiple hox genes. In limb buds of Nipbl-haploinsufficient mice, transcriptome analysis revealed many similar gene expression changes, as well as altered expression of additional classes of genes that play roles in limb development. In both species, the pattern of dysregulation of hox-gene expression depended on genomic location within the Hox clusters. In view of studies suggesting that Nipbl colocalizes with the mediator complex, which facilitates enhancer-promoter communication, we also examined zebrafish deficient for the Med12 Mediator subunit, and found they resembled Nipbl-deficient fish in both morphology and gene expression. Moreover, combined partial reduction of both Nipbl and Med12 had a strongly synergistic effect, consistent with both molecules acting in a common pathway. In addition, three-dimensional fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that Nipbl and Med12 are required to bring regions containing long-range enhancers into close proximity with the zebrafish hoxda cluster. These data demonstrate a crucial role for Nipbl in limb development, and support the view that its actions on multiple gene pathways result from its influence, together with Mediator, on regulation of long-range chromosomal interactions. PMID:25255084

  9. Nipbl and mediator cooperatively regulate gene expression to control limb development.

    PubMed

    Muto, Akihiko; Ikeda, Shingo; Lopez-Burks, Martha E; Kikuchi, Yutaka; Calof, Anne L; Lander, Arthur D; Schilling, Thomas F

    2014-09-01

    Haploinsufficiency for Nipbl, a cohesin loading protein, causes Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS), the most common "cohesinopathy". It has been proposed that the effects of Nipbl-haploinsufficiency result from disruption of long-range communication between DNA elements. Here we use zebrafish and mouse models of CdLS to examine how transcriptional changes caused by Nipbl deficiency give rise to limb defects, a common condition in individuals with CdLS. In the zebrafish pectoral fin (forelimb), knockdown of Nipbl expression led to size reductions and patterning defects that were preceded by dysregulated expression of key early limb development genes, including fgfs, shha, hand2 and multiple hox genes. In limb buds of Nipbl-haploinsufficient mice, transcriptome analysis revealed many similar gene expression changes, as well as altered expression of additional classes of genes that play roles in limb development. In both species, the pattern of dysregulation of hox-gene expression depended on genomic location within the Hox clusters. In view of studies suggesting that Nipbl colocalizes with the mediator complex, which facilitates enhancer-promoter communication, we also examined zebrafish deficient for the Med12 Mediator subunit, and found they resembled Nipbl-deficient fish in both morphology and gene expression. Moreover, combined partial reduction of both Nipbl and Med12 had a strongly synergistic effect, consistent with both molecules acting in a common pathway. In addition, three-dimensional fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that Nipbl and Med12 are required to bring regions containing long-range enhancers into close proximity with the zebrafish hoxda cluster. These data demonstrate a crucial role for Nipbl in limb development, and support the view that its actions on multiple gene pathways result from its influence, together with Mediator, on regulation of long-range chromosomal interactions.

  10. Epigenetic control of expression of the human L- and M- pigment genes.

    PubMed

    Deeb, S S; Bisset, D; Fu, L

    2010-09-01

    Epigenetics alters gene expression by chromatin modification without changing the sequence of DNA. DNA methylation is an essential signal for epigenetic gene regulation. Methylation of cytosine bases at CpG dinucleotides in DNA results in chromatin condensation resulting in suppression of gene expression. DNA methylation has been shown to play important roles in cell differentiation, genomic imprinting and X-chromosome inactivation. We compared the CpG methylation patterns of the promoters of the L-opsin gene (OPN1LW) and the M-opsin gene (OPN1MW), plus a DNase I hypersensitive (DHS) site located about 8 kb (kilobases) upstream of the OPN1LW gene. Comparisons were made using the human retinoblastoma cell line WERI, which expresses the L and M opsin genes when treated with thyroid hormone (T3), and a lymphoblastoid cell line GM06990 that does not express these genes. The results showed that the great majority of the 14 CpGs located within the proximal 200 bp (base pairs) of each promoter, plus 20 bp of the 5'-untranslated region, were hypo-methylated in WERI-Rb-1 cells, whether or not treated with T3, but almost totally methylated in the lymphoblastoid cell line. Three of the CpGs that are located beyond 200 bp from the transcription start site of OPN1LW were hyper-methylated in both WERI and lymphoblastoid cells. Significant differential methylation was also observed within the DHS region (24 CpGs). This DHS region contains a highly conserved motif that binds CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), referred to as a 'chromatin insulator or boundary element', that has been shown to regulate gene expression at several genome locations. The results suggest that DNA methylation is likely to contribute to regulation of expression of the L- and M-opsin genes during differentiation, as well as to the retinal L:M cone ratio. In addition, thyroid hormone induction of the opsin genes does not appear to alter DNA methylation.

  11. Optimal control of gene expression for fast proteome adaptation to environmental change.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2013-12-17

    Bacterial populations growing in a changing world must adjust their proteome composition in response to alterations in the environment. Rapid proteome responses to growth medium changes are expected to increase the average growth rate and fitness value of these populations. Little is known about the dynamics of proteome change, e.g., whether bacteria use optimal strategies of gene expression for rapid proteome adjustments and if there are lower bounds to the time of proteome adaptation in response to growth medium changes. To begin answering these types of questions, we modeled growing bacteria as stoichiometrically coupled networks of metabolic pathways. These are balanced during steady-state growth in a constant environment but are initially unbalanced after rapid medium shifts due to a shortage of enzymes required at higher concentrations in the new environment. We identified an optimal strategy for rapid proteome adjustment in the absence of protein degradation and found a lower bound to the time of proteome adaptation after medium shifts. This minimal time is determined by the ratio between the Kullback-Leibler distance from the pre- to the postshift proteome and the postshift steady-state growth rate. The dynamics of optimally controlled proteome adaptation has a simple analytical solution. We used detailed numerical modeling to demonstrate that realistic bacterial control systems can emulate this optimal strategy for rapid proteome adaptation. Our results may provide a conceptual link between the physiology and population genetics of growing bacteria. PMID:24297927

  12. Probing the Limits to MicroRNA-Mediated Control of Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Araks; Figliuzzi, Matteo; Marinari, Enzo; De Martino, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    According to the 'ceRNA hypothesis', microRNAs (miRNAs) may act as mediators of an effective positive interaction between long coding or non-coding RNA molecules, carrying significant potential implications for a variety of biological processes. Here, inspired by recent work providing a quantitative description of small regulatory elements as information-conveying channels, we characterize the effectiveness of miRNA-mediated regulation in terms of the optimal information flow achievable between modulator (transcription factors) and target nodes (long RNAs). Our findings show that, while a sufficiently large degree of target derepression is needed to activate miRNA-mediated transmission, (a) in case of differential mechanisms of complex processing and/or transcriptional capabilities, regulation by a post-transcriptional miRNA-channel can outperform that achieved through direct transcriptional control; moreover, (b) in the presence of large populations of weakly interacting miRNA molecules the extra noise coming from titration disappears, allowing the miRNA-channel to process information as effectively as the direct channel. These observations establish the limits of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional cross-talk and suggest that, besides providing a degree of noise buffering, this type of control may be effectively employed in cells both as a failsafe mechanism and as a preferential fine tuner of gene expression, pointing to the specific situations in which each of these functionalities is maximized. PMID:26812364

  13. Probing the Limits to MicroRNA-Mediated Control of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Araks; Figliuzzi, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    According to the ‘ceRNA hypothesis’, microRNAs (miRNAs) may act as mediators of an effective positive interaction between long coding or non-coding RNA molecules, carrying significant potential implications for a variety of biological processes. Here, inspired by recent work providing a quantitative description of small regulatory elements as information-conveying channels, we characterize the effectiveness of miRNA-mediated regulation in terms of the optimal information flow achievable between modulator (transcription factors) and target nodes (long RNAs). Our findings show that, while a sufficiently large degree of target derepression is needed to activate miRNA-mediated transmission, (a) in case of differential mechanisms of complex processing and/or transcriptional capabilities, regulation by a post-transcriptional miRNA-channel can outperform that achieved through direct transcriptional control; moreover, (b) in the presence of large populations of weakly interacting miRNA molecules the extra noise coming from titration disappears, allowing the miRNA-channel to process information as effectively as the direct channel. These observations establish the limits of miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional cross-talk and suggest that, besides providing a degree of noise buffering, this type of control may be effectively employed in cells both as a failsafe mechanism and as a preferential fine tuner of gene expression, pointing to the specific situations in which each of these functionalities is maximized. PMID:26812364

  14. Design of molecular control mechanisms and the demand for gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Savageau, M A

    1977-01-01

    Regulation by a repressor protein is the mechanism selected when, in the organism's natural environment, there is low demand for expression of the regulated structural genes. Regulation by an activator protein is selected when there is high demand for expression of the regulated structural genes. These general conclusions are useful in relating physiological function to underlying molecular determinants in a wide variety of systems that includes repressible biosynthetic pathways, inducible biosynthetic enzymes, inducible drug resistance, and prophage induction, as well as inducible catabolic pathways, for which a special case of this prediction previously was reported [Savageau, M. A. (1974) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 71, 2453-2455]. PMID:271992

  15. Murine retroviruses control class I major histocompatibility antigen gene expression via a trans effect at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L D; Flyer, D C; Faller, D V

    1987-07-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) and Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV) exert a regulatory effect on the class I genes of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We have previously shown that M-MuLV infection of mouse fibroblasts results in a substantial increase in cell surface expression of H-2K, H-2D, and H-2L proteins, whereas M-MSV, upon coinfection of the same cells, is apparently able to override the MuLV-induced increase in H-2 expression. As a result of this modulation, immune recognition of the infected cells is profoundly altered. Our efforts have been directed toward elucidating the molecular basis for this phenomenon. We report here that stimulation of interferon production as a result of infection with MuLV does not occur and, therefore, is not the cause of MuLV-induced enhancement of MHC expression. Control of H-2 class I and beta 2-microglobulin gene expression by M-MuLV, and probably by M-MSV, takes place at the transcriptional level as indicated by nuclear runoff studies and analysis of steady-state mRNA levels. Our demonstration that M-MuLV controls expression of widely separated endogenous cellular genes (those coding for H-2D, H-2K, H-2L, and beta 2-microglobulin), transfected class I MHC genes, and unintegrated chimeric genes consisting of fragments of class I MHC genes linked to sequences encoding a procaryotic enzyme, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, suggests that M-MuLV exerts its effect in trans and not by proviral integration in the vicinity of the H-2 gene complex. Finally, we show that the sequences of at least one MHC gene, which are responsive to trans regulation by M-MuLV, lie within 1.2 kilobases upstream of the initiation codon for that gene.

  16. Construction of new synthetic biology tools for the control of gene expression in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Zess, Erin K; Begemann, Matthew B; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-02-01

    Predictive control of gene expression is an essential tool for developing synthetic biological systems. The current toolbox for controlling gene expression in cyanobacteria is a barrier to more in-depth genetic analysis and manipulation. Towards relieving this bottleneck, this work describes the use of synthetic biology to construct an anhydrotetracycline-based induction system and adapt a trans-acting small RNA (sRNA) system for use in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. An anhydrotetracycline-inducible promoter was developed to maximize intrinsic strength and dynamic range. The resulting construct, PEZtet , exhibited tight repression and a maximum 32-fold induction upon addition of anhydrotetracycline. Additionally, a sRNA system based on the Escherichia coli IS10 RNA-IN/OUT regulator was adapted for use in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. This system exhibited 70% attenuation of target gene expression, providing a demonstration of the use of sRNAs for differential gene expression in cyanobacteria. These systems were combined to produce an inducible sRNA system, which demonstrated 59% attenuation of target gene expression. Lastly, the role of Hfq, a critical component of sRNA systems in E. coli, was investigated. Genetic studies showed that the Hfq homolog in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 did not impact repression by the engineered sRNA system. In summary, this work describes new synthetic biology tools that can be applied to physiological studies, metabolic engineering, or sRNA platforms in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

  17. The Chromatin Protein DUET/MMD1 Controls Expression of the Meiotic Gene TDM1 during Male Meiosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Andreuzza, Sébastien; Nishal, Bindu; Singh, Aparna; Siddiqi, Imran

    2015-09-01

    Meiosis produces haploid cells essential for sexual reproduction. In yeast, entry into meiosis activates transcription factors which trigger a transcriptional cascade that results in sequential co-expression of early, middle and late meiotic genes. However, these factors are not conserved, and the factors and regulatory mechanisms that ensure proper meiotic gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes are poorly understood. Here, we report that DUET/MMD1, a PHD finger protein essential for Arabidopsis male meiosis, functions as a transcriptional regulator in plant meiosis. We find that DUET-PHD binds H3K4me2 in vitro, and show that this interaction is critical for function during meiosis. We also show that DUET is required for proper microtubule organization during meiosis II, independently of its function in meiosis I. Remarkably, DUET protein shows stage-specific expression, confined to diplotene. We identify two genes TDM1 and JAS with critical functions in cell cycle transitions and spindle organization in male meiosis, as DUET targets, with TDM1 being a direct target. Thus, DUET is required to regulate microtubule organization and cell cycle transitions during male meiosis, and functions as a direct transcription activator of the meiotic gene TDM1. Expression profiling showed reduced expression of a subset comprising about 12% of a known set of meiosis preferred genes in the duet mutant. Our results reveal the action of DUET as a transcriptional regulator during male meiosis in plants, and suggest that transcription of meiotic genes is under stagewise control in plants as in yeast.

  18. Polynucleotide phosphorylase negatively controls spv virulence gene expression in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Ygberg, Sofia Eriksson; Clements, Mark O; Rytkönen, Anne; Thompson, Arthur; Holden, David W; Hinton, Jay C D; Rhen, Mikael

    2006-02-01

    Mutational inactivation of the cold-shock-associated exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; encoded by the pnp gene) in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was previously shown to enable the bacteria to cause chronic infection and to affect the bacterial replication in BALB/c mice (M. O. Clements et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:8784-8789, 2002). Here, we report that PNPase deficiency results in increased expression of Salmonella plasmid virulence (spv) genes under in vitro growth conditions that allow induction of spv expression. Furthermore, whole-genome microarray-based transcriptome analyses of bacteria growing inside murine macrophage-like J774.A.1 cells revealed six genes as being significantly up-regulated in the PNPase-deficient background, which included spvABC, rtcB, entC, and STM2236. Mutational inactivation of the spvR regulator diminished the increased expression of spv observed in the pnp mutant background, implying that PNPase acts upstream of or at the level of SpvR. Finally, competition experiments revealed that the growth advantage of the pnp mutant in BALB/c mice was dependent on spvR as well. Combined, our results support the idea that in S. enterica PNPase, apart from being a regulator of the cold shock response, also functions in tuning the expression of virulence genes and bacterial fitness during infection. PMID:16428774

  19. Control of transcription elongation by GreA determines rate of gene expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yuzenkova, Yulia; Gamba, Pamela; Herber, Martijn; Attaiech, Laetitia; Shafeeq, Sulman; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Klumpp, Stefan; Zenkin, Nikolay; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase may be interrupted by pauses caused by backtracking or misincorporation that can be resolved by the conserved bacterial Gre-factors. However, the consequences of such pausing in the living cell remain obscure. Here, we developed molecular biology and transcriptome sequencing tools in the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae and provide evidence that transcription elongation is rate-limiting on highly expressed genes. Our results suggest that transcription elongation may be a highly regulated step of gene expression in S. pneumoniae. Regulation is accomplished via long-living elongation pauses and their resolution by elongation factor GreA. Interestingly, mathematical modeling indicates that long-living pauses cause queuing of RNA polymerases, which results in ‘transcription traffic jams’ on the gene and thus blocks its expression. Together, our results suggest that long-living pauses and RNA polymerase queues caused by them are a major problem on highly expressed genes and are detrimental for cell viability. The major and possibly sole function of GreA in S. pneumoniae is to prevent formation of backtracked elongation complexes. PMID:25190458

  20. Gene expression in midgut tissues of Diaphorina citri: Application to biology and vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We produced a gene expression dataset from the midgut tissues of the Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The AsCP is the primary vector associated with the spread of a devastating citrus trees disease, huanglongbing (HLB). The occurrence and spread of the AsCP and H...

  1. Sources of variation in baseline gene expression levels from toxicogenomics study control animals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of gene expression profiling in both clinical and laboratory settings would be enhanced by better characterization ofvariance due to individual, environmental, and technical factors. Meta-analysis ofmicroarray data from untreated or vehicle-treated animals within the con...

  2. The control of histone methylation and gene expression by oxidative stress, hypoxia, and metals.

    PubMed

    Chervona, Yana; Costa, Max

    2012-09-01

    The harmful consequences of carcinogenic metals, such as nickel, arsenic, and chromium, are thought to be in part due to their ability to induce oxidative stress. The ubiquity of oxidative stress in biological systems has made it a fairly obvious culprit in causing cellular damage and/or development of disease. However, the full extent of oxidative stress-induced damage is not limited to its direct effects on cellular components, such as lipids, proteins, and DNA, but may extend to its ability to alter gene expression. Gene expression regulation is an important component of cellular and/or tissue homeostasis, and its alteration can have detrimental consequences. Therefore, a growing amount of interest is being paid to understanding how oxidative stress can influence gene expression. Oxidative stress-induced epigenetic dysregulation in the form of posttranslational histone modifications, in particular, is a popular topic of research. This review will therefore primarily focus on discussing the role of oxidative stress and hypoxia on histone methylation and/or gene expression alterations. The sources of oxidative stress discussed here are carcinogenic metals, such as, nickel, arsenic, and chromium. PMID:22841757

  3. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Hurst, Laurence D

    2015-07-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene's expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking.

  4. Dynamic signal processing by ribozyme-mediated RNA circuits to control gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shensi; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Majer, Eszter; Landrain, Thomas E.; Kirov, Boris; Daròs, José-Antonio; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Organisms have different circuitries that allow converting signal molecule levels to changes in gene expression. An important challenge in synthetic biology involves the de novo design of RNA modules enabling dynamic signal processing in live cells. This requires a scalable methodology for sensing, transmission, and actuation, which could be assembled into larger signaling networks. Here, we present a biochemical strategy to design RNA-mediated signal transduction cascades able to sense small molecules and small RNAs. We design switchable functional RNA domains by using strand-displacement techniques. We experimentally characterize the molecular mechanism underlying our synthetic RNA signaling cascades, show the ability to regulate gene expression with transduced RNA signals, and describe the signal processing response of our systems to periodic forcing in single live cells. The engineered systems integrate RNA–RNA interaction with available ribozyme and aptamer elements, providing new ways to engineer arbitrary complex gene circuits. PMID:25916845

  5. Dynamic signal processing by ribozyme-mediated RNA circuits to control gene expression.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shensi; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Majer, Eszter; Landrain, Thomas E; Kirov, Boris; Daròs, José-Antonio; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2015-05-26

    Organisms have different circuitries that allow converting signal molecule levels to changes in gene expression. An important challenge in synthetic biology involves the de novo design of RNA modules enabling dynamic signal processing in live cells. This requires a scalable methodology for sensing, transmission, and actuation, which could be assembled into larger signaling networks. Here, we present a biochemical strategy to design RNA-mediated signal transduction cascades able to sense small molecules and small RNAs. We design switchable functional RNA domains by using strand-displacement techniques. We experimentally characterize the molecular mechanism underlying our synthetic RNA signaling cascades, show the ability to regulate gene expression with transduced RNA signals, and describe the signal processing response of our systems to periodic forcing in single live cells. The engineered systems integrate RNA-RNA interaction with available ribozyme and aptamer elements, providing new ways to engineer arbitrary complex gene circuits.

  6. Expression of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) gene of Dirofilaria immitis guided by transcriptomic screening.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yan; Lan, Jingchao; Wu, Xuhang; Yang, Deying; Zhang, Zhihe; Nie, Huaming; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Runhui; Zheng, Wanpeng; Xie, Yue; Yan, Ning; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Chengdong; Luo, Li; Liu, Li; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2014-02-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) infections affect domestic dogs, cats, and various wild mammals with increasing incidence in temperate and tropical areas. More sensitive antibody detection methodologies are required to diagnose asymptomatic dirofilariasis with low worm burdens. Applying current transcriptomic technologies would be useful to discover potential diagnostic markers for D. immitis infection. A filarial homologue of the mammalian translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) was initially identified by screening the assembled transcriptome of D. immitis (DiTCTP). A BLAST analysis suggested that the DiTCTP gene shared the highest similarity with TCTP from Loa loa at protein level (97%). A histidine-tagged recombinant DiTCTP protein (rDiTCTP) of 40 kDa expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) showed immunoreactivity with serum from a dog experimentally infected with heartworms. Localization studies illustrated the ubiquitous presence of rDiTCTP protein in the lateral hypodermal chords, dorsal hypodermal chord, muscle, intestine, and uterus in female adult worms. Further studies on D. immitis-derived TCTP are warranted to assess whether this filarial protein could be used for a diagnostic purpose. PMID:24623877

  7. TGF-β-induced IκB-ζ controls Foxp3 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    MaruYama, Takashi

    2015-08-21

    Inhibitor of kappa B (IκB)-ζ, a member of the nuclear IκB family of proteins, is induced by the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway and plays a pivotal role in maintaining the balance of T helper (Th) cell subsets. IκB-ζ deficiency results in reduced percentages of Th17 cells and increased percentages of Th1 cells. In this study, the effects of IκB-ζ deficiency on T-cell subsets were examined further. The data showed that IκB-ζ-deficient T cells had a high capacity for generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) when T cells were cultured under TGF-β stimulation in the presence of cytokine-neutralizing antibodies. Mechanistically, IκB-ζ itself negatively regulated activation of the Foxp3 promoter in a nuclear factor of kappaB-dependent manner. Thus, this study showed that IκB-ζ controlled Treg differentiation. - Highlights: • IκB-ζ-deficient T cells exhibited increased generation of Foxp3{sup +} Tregs. • IκB-ζ played a key role in Foxp3 gene expression. • Retroviral overexpression of IκB-ζ was achieved in T cells.

  8. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) Gene of Dirofilaria immitis Guided by Transcriptomic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan; Lan, Jingchao; Wu, Xuhang; Yang, Deying; Zhang, Zhihe; Nie, Huaming; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Runhui; Zheng, Wanpeng; Xie, Yue; Yan, Ning; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Chengdong; Luo, Li; Liu, Li; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong

    2014-01-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) infections affect domestic dogs, cats, and various wild mammals with increasing incidence in temperate and tropical areas. More sensitive antibody detection methodologies are required to diagnose asymptomatic dirofilariasis with low worm burdens. Applying current transcriptomic technologies would be useful to discover potential diagnostic markers for D. immitis infection. A filarial homologue of the mammalian translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) was initially identified by screening the assembled transcriptome of D. immitis (DiTCTP). A BLAST analysis suggested that the DiTCTP gene shared the highest similarity with TCTP from Loa loa at protein level (97%). A histidine-tagged recombinant DiTCTP protein (rDiTCTP) of 40 kDa expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) showed immunoreactivity with serum from a dog experimentally infected with heartworms. Localization studies illustrated the ubiquitous presence of rDiTCTP protein in the lateral hypodermal chords, dorsal hypodermal chord, muscle, intestine, and uterus in female adult worms. Further studies on D. immitis-derived TCTP are warranted to assess whether this filarial protein could be used for a diagnostic purpose. PMID:24623877

  9. Expression of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) gene of Dirofilaria immitis guided by transcriptomic screening.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yan; Lan, Jingchao; Wu, Xuhang; Yang, Deying; Zhang, Zhihe; Nie, Huaming; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Runhui; Zheng, Wanpeng; Xie, Yue; Yan, Ning; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Chengdong; Luo, Li; Liu, Li; Gu, Xiaobin; Wang, Shuxian; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2014-02-01

    Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm) infections affect domestic dogs, cats, and various wild mammals with increasing incidence in temperate and tropical areas. More sensitive antibody detection methodologies are required to diagnose asymptomatic dirofilariasis with low worm burdens. Applying current transcriptomic technologies would be useful to discover potential diagnostic markers for D. immitis infection. A filarial homologue of the mammalian translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) was initially identified by screening the assembled transcriptome of D. immitis (DiTCTP). A BLAST analysis suggested that the DiTCTP gene shared the highest similarity with TCTP from Loa loa at protein level (97%). A histidine-tagged recombinant DiTCTP protein (rDiTCTP) of 40 kDa expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) showed immunoreactivity with serum from a dog experimentally infected with heartworms. Localization studies illustrated the ubiquitous presence of rDiTCTP protein in the lateral hypodermal chords, dorsal hypodermal chord, muscle, intestine, and uterus in female adult worms. Further studies on D. immitis-derived TCTP are warranted to assess whether this filarial protein could be used for a diagnostic purpose.

  10. The Expression of Sterigmatocystin and Penicillin Genes in Aspergillus nidulans Is Controlled by veA, a Gene Required for Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Naoki; Brooks, Wilhelmina; Calvo, Ana M.

    2003-01-01

    Secondary metabolism is commonly associated with morphological development in microorganisms, including fungi. We found that veA, a gene previously shown to control the Aspergillus nidulans sexual/asexual developmental ratio in response to light, also controls secondary metabolism. Specifically, veA regulates the expression of genes implicated in the synthesis of the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin and the antibiotic penicillin. veA is necessary for the expression of the transcription factor aflR, which activates the gene cluster that leads to the production of sterigmatocystin. veA is also necessary for penicillin production. Our results indicated that although veA represses the transcription of the isopenicillin synthetase gene ipnA, it is necessary for the expression of acvA, the key gene in the first step of penicillin biosynthesis, encoding the delta-(l-alpha-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine synthetase. With respect to the mechanism of veA in directing morphological development, veA has little effect on the expression of the known sexual transcription factors nsdD and steA. However, we found that veA regulates the expression of the asexual transcription factor brlA by modulating the α/β transcript ratio that controls conidiation. PMID:14665453

  11. [Morphological features of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the Dahlia mosaic virus promoter].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Cheremis, A V; Vakhitov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the 35S promoter and the promoter of dahlia mosaic virus were obtained. The transgenic plants were characterized by increase in the length of the leaves, flower sizes, stem height, and weight of seeds; at the same time, the degree of increase was greater in the case of use of the dahlia mosaic virus promoter as a regulator of transcription. Ectopic expression of the AINTEGUMENTA gene promoted prolongation of leaf growth, while sizes of epidermal cells of the leaves remained unchanged. PMID:23785848

  12. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  13. Regulation of adeno-associated virus gene expression in 293 cells: control of mRNA abundance and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Trempe, J.P.; Carter, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied the effects of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) rep gene on the control of gene expression from the AAV p/sub 40/ promoter in 293 cells in the absence of an adenovirus coinfection. AAV vectors containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene were used to measure the levels of cat expression and steady-state mRNA from p/sub 40/. When the rep gene was present in cis or in trans, cat expression from p/sub 40/ was decreased 3- to 10-fold, but there was a 2- to 10-fold increase in the level of p/sub 40/ mRNA. Conversely, cat expression increased and the p/sub 40/ mRNA level decreased in the absence of the rep gene. Both wild-type and carboxyl-terminal truncated Rep proteins were capable of eliciting both effects. These data suggest two roles for the pleiotropic AAV rep gene: as a translational inhibitor and as a positive regulator of p/sub 40/ mRNA levels. They also provide additional evidence for a cis-acting negative regulatory region which decreases RNA from the AAV p/sub 5/ promoter in a fashion independent of rep.

  14. Nitric Oxide Regulates Gene Expression in Cancers by Controlling Histone Posttranslational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Divya; Hickok, Jason R; Bovee, Rhea C; Pham, Vy; Mantell, Lin L; Bahroos, Neil; Kanabar, Pinal; Cao, Xing-Jun; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Garcia, Benjamin A; Thomas, Douglas D

    2015-12-15

    Altered nitric oxide (•NO) metabolism underlies cancer pathology, but mechanisms explaining many •NO-associated phenotypes remain unclear. We have found that cellular exposure to •NO changes histone posttranslational modifications (PTM) by directly inhibiting the catalytic activity of JmjC-domain containing histone demethylases. Herein, we describe how •NO exposure links modulation of histone PTMs to gene expression changes that promote oncogenesis. Through high-resolution mass spectrometry, we generated an extensive map of •NO-mediated histone PTM changes at 15 critical lysine residues on the core histones H3 and H4. Concomitant microarray analysis demonstrated that exposure to physiologic •NO resulted in the differential expression of over 6,500 genes in breast cancer cells. Measurements of the association of H3K9me2 and H3K9ac across genomic loci revealed that differential distribution of these particular PTMs correlated with changes in the level of expression of numerous oncogenes, consistent with epigenetic code. Our results establish that •NO functions as an epigenetic regulator of gene expression mediated by changes in histone PTMs. PMID:26542213

  15. Spatiotemporal Control of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Using a Heat-Shock-Activated, Rapamycin-Dependent Gene Switch

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Saavedra, Francisco M.; Wilson, Christopher G.; Voellmy, Richard; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A major challenge in regenerative medicine is to develop methods for delivering growth and differentiation factors in specific spatial and temporal patterns, thereby mimicking the natural processes of development and tissue repair. Heat shock (HS)-inducible gene expression systems can respond to spatial information provided by localized heating, but are by themselves incapable of sustained expression. Conversely, gene switches activated by small molecules provide tight temporal control and sustained expression, but lack mechanisms for spatial targeting. Here we combine the advantages of HS and ligand-activated systems by developing a novel rapamycin-regulated, HS-inducible gene switch that provides spatial and temporal control and sustained expression of transgenes such as firefly luciferase and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This gene circuit exhibits very low background in the uninduced state and can be repeatedly activated up to 1 month. Furthermore, dual regulation of VEGF induction in vivo is shown to stimulate localized vascularization, thereby providing a route for temporal and spatial control of angiogenesis. PMID:23527589

  16. Light controls phospholipase A2alpha and beta gene expression in Citrus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui-Ling; Burns, Jacqueline K

    2010-05-01

    The low-molecular weight secretory phospholipase A2alpha (CssPLA2alpha) and beta (CsPLA2beta) cloned in this study exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in leaf tissue of Citrus sinensis. Only CssPLA2alpha displayed distinct diurnal patterns in fruit tissues. CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta diurnal expression exhibited periods of approximately 24 h; CssPLA2alpha amplitude averaged 990-fold in the leaf blades from field-grown trees, whereas CsPLA2beta amplitude averaged 6.4-fold. Diurnal oscillation of CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta gene expression in the growth chamber experiments was markedly dampened 24 h after transfer to continuous light or dark conditions. CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta expressions were redundantly mediated by blue, green, red and red/far-red light, but blue light was a major factor affecting CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta expression. Total and low molecular weight CsPLA2 enzyme activity closely followed diurnal changes in CssPLA2alpha transcript expression in leaf blades of seedlings treated with low intensity blue light (24 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Compared with CssPLA2alpha basal expression, CsPLA2beta expression was at least 10-fold higher. Diurnal fluctuation and light regulation of PLA2 gene expression and enzyme activity in citrus leaf and fruit tissues suggests that accompanying diurnal changes in lipophilic second messengers participate in the regulation of physiological processes associated with phospholipase A2 action.

  17. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja; Jäntti, Jussi; Mojzita, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications. PMID:26901642

  18. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rantasalo, Anssi; Czeizler, Elena; Virtanen, Riitta; Rousu, Juho; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Penttilä, Merja

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF) onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1) the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2) the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3) the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications. PMID:26901642

  19. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine.

  20. [Expression of new mutant alleles of AS1 and AS2 genes controlling leaf morphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana].

    PubMed

    Vu, Kh Ch; Ondar, U N; Soldatova, O P

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the morphology and vein branching of rosette leaves in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants as and sa, which proved to be alleles of the A. thaliana AS1 and AS2 genes, respectively. We have also analyzed the localization of bioactive auxin, as measured by the expression of the DR5::GUS transgene, as well as the expression patterns of BP, as measured by the expression of the BP::GUS transgene in leaves of the mutants. In mature leaves of the mutants, BP was expressed ectopically. Furthermore, the mutants showed some defects in the localization and concentration of free auxin compared to the wild type. Our results of studying new alleles of AS1 and AS2 support their role in control of class I KNOX genes and auxin transport. PMID:18409376

  1. Epithelial and endothelial expression of the green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of bovine prion protein (PrP) gene regulatory sequences in transgenic mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire-Vieille, Catherine; Schulze, Tobias; Podevin-Dimster, Valérie; Follet, Jérome; Bailly, Yannick; Blanquet-Grossard, Françoise; Decavel, Jean-Pierre; Heinen, Ernst; Cesbron, Jean-Yves

    2000-05-01

    The expression of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrPc) gene is required for prion replication and neuroinvasion in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The identification of the cell types expressing PrPc is necessary to understanding how the agent replicates and spreads from peripheral sites to the central nervous system. To determine the nature of the cell types expressing PrPc, a green fluorescent protein reporter gene was expressed in transgenic mice under the control of 6.9 kb of the bovine PrP gene regulatory sequences. It was shown that the bovine PrP gene is expressed as two populations of mRNA differing by alternative splicing of one 115-bp 5' untranslated exon in 17 different bovine tissues. The analysis of transgenic mice showed reporter gene expression in some cells that have been identified as expressing PrP, such as cerebellar Purkinje cells, lymphocytes, and keratinocytes. In addition, expression of green fluorescent protein was observed in the plexus of the enteric nervous system and in a restricted subset of cells not yet clearly identified as expressing PrP: the epithelial cells of the thymic medullary and the endothelial cells of both the mucosal capillaries of the intestine and the renal capillaries. These data provide valuable information on the distribution of PrPc at the cellular level and argue for roles of the epithelial and endothelial cells in the spread of infection from the periphery to the brain. Moreover, the transgenic mice described in this paper provide a model that will allow for the study of the transcriptional activity of the PrP gene promoter in response to scrapie infection.

  2. Orthogonal control of endogenous gene expression in mammalian cells using synthetic ligands.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; McLachlan, Michael J; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-05-01

    Gene switches have wide utility in synthetic biology, gene therapy, and developmental biology, and multiple orthogonal gene switches are needed to construct advanced circuitry or to control complex phenotypes. Endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A) is crucial to angiogenesis, and it has been shown that multiple alternately spliced VEGF-A isoforms are necessary for proper blood vessel formation. Such a necessity limits the utility of direct transgene delivery, which can provide only one splice variant. To overcome this limitation, we constructed a gene switch that can regulate the (VEGF-A) locus in mammalian cells by combining an engineered estrogen receptor (ER) ligand-binding domain (LBD), a p65 activation domain, and an artificial zinc-finger DNA binding domain (DBD). Our gene switch is specifically and reversibly controlled by 4,4'-dyhydroxybenzil (DHB), a small molecule, non-steroid synthetic ligand, which acts orthogonally in a mammalian system. After optimization of the gene switch architecture, an endogenous VEGF-A induction ratio of >100-fold can be achieved in HEK293 cells at 1 µM DHB, which is the highest endogenous induction reported to date. In addition, induction has been shown to be reversible, repeatable, and sustainable. Another advantage is that the ligand response is tunable by varying the clonal composition of a stably integrated cell line. The integration of our findings with the technology to change ligand specificity and DNA binding specificity will provide the framework for generating a wide array of orthogonal gene switches that can control multiple genes with multiple orthogonal ligands.

  3. Intrinsic Expression of a Multiexon Type 3 Deiodinase Gene Controls Zebrafish Embryo Size

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cuicui; Chen, Xia; Song, Huaidong; Maynard, Michelle A.; Zhou, Yi; Lobanov, Alexei V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Ganis, Jared J.; Wiley, David; Jugo, Rebecca H.; Lee, Nicholas Y.; Castroneves, Luciana A.; Zon, Leonard I.; Scanlan, Thomas S.; Feldman, Henry A.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is a master regulator of differentiation and growth, and its action is terminated by the enzymatic removal of an inner-ring iodine catalyzed by the selenoenzyme type 3 deiodinase (dio3). Our studies of the zebrafish reveal that the dio3 gene is duplicated in this species and that embryonic deiodination is an important determinant of embryo size. Although both dio3 paralogs encode enzymatically active proteins with high affinity for thyroid hormones, their anatomic patterns of expression are markedly divergent and only embryos with knockdown of dio3b, a biallelically expressed selenoenzyme expressed in the developing central nervous system, manifest severe thyroid hormone-dependent growth restriction at 72 hours post fertilization. This indicates that the embryonic deficiency of dio3, once considered only a placental enzyme, causes microsomia independently of placental physiology and raises the intriguing possibility that fetal abnormalities in human deiodination may present as intrauterine growth retardation. By mapping the gene structures and enzymatic properties of all four zebrafish deiodinases, we also identify dio3b as the first multiexon dio3 gene, containing a large intron separating its open reading frame from its selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element. PMID:25004091

  4. Intrinsic expression of a multiexon type 3 deiodinase gene controls zebrafish embryo size.

    PubMed

    Guo, Cuicui; Chen, Xia; Song, Huaidong; Maynard, Michelle A; Zhou, Yi; Lobanov, Alexei V; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Ganis, Jared J; Wiley, David; Jugo, Rebecca H; Lee, Nicholas Y; Castroneves, Luciana A; Zon, Leonard I; Scanlan, Thomas S; Feldman, Henry A; Huang, Stephen A

    2014-10-01

    Thyroid hormone is a master regulator of differentiation and growth, and its action is terminated by the enzymatic removal of an inner-ring iodine catalyzed by the selenoenzyme type 3 deiodinase (dio3). Our studies of the zebrafish reveal that the dio3 gene is duplicated in this species and that embryonic deiodination is an important determinant of embryo size. Although both dio3 paralogs encode enzymatically active proteins with high affinity for thyroid hormones, their anatomic patterns of expression are markedly divergent and only embryos with knockdown of dio3b, a biallelically expressed selenoenzyme expressed in the developing central nervous system, manifest severe thyroid hormone-dependent growth restriction at 72 hours post fertilization. This indicates that the embryonic deficiency of dio3, once considered only a placental enzyme, causes microsomia independently of placental physiology and raises the intriguing possibility that fetal abnormalities in human deiodination may present as intrauterine growth retardation. By mapping the gene structures and enzymatic properties of all four zebrafish deiodinases, we also identify dio3b as the first multiexon dio3 gene, containing a large intron separating its open reading frame from its selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) element.

  5. Ovarian cancer treatment with a tumor-targeting and gene expression-controllable lipoplex

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhi-Yao; Deng, Feng; Wei, Xia-Wei; Ma, Cui-Cui; Luo, Min; Zhang, Ping; Sang, Ya-Xiong; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Li; Qin, Han-Xiao; Shen, Ya-Li; Liu, Ting; Liu, Yan-Tong; Wang, Wei; Wen, Yan-Jun; Zhao, Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Qian, Zhi-Yong; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of folate receptor alpha (FRα) and high telomerase activity are considered to be the characteristics of ovarian cancers. In this study, we developed FRα-targeted lipoplexes loaded with an hTERT promoter-regulated plasmid that encodes a matrix protein (MP) of the vesicular stomatitis virus, F-LP/pMP(2.5), for application in ovarian cancer treatment. We first characterized the pharmaceutical properties of F-LP/pMP(2.5). The efficient expression of the MP-driven hTERT promoter in SKOV-3 cells was determined after an in-vitro transfection assay, which was significantly increased compared with a non-modified LP/pMP(2.5) group. F-LP/pMP(2.5) treatment significantly inhibited the growth of tumors and extended the survival of mice in a SKOV-3 tumor model compared with other groups. Such an anti-tumor effect was due to the increased expression of MP in tumor tissue, which led to the induction of tumor cell apoptosis, inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and suppression of tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, a preliminary safety evaluation demonstrated a good safety profile of F-LP/pMP(2.5) as a gene therapy agent. Therefore, FRα-targeted lipoplexes with therapeutic gene expression regulated by an hTERT promoter might be a promising gene therapy agent and a potential translational candidate for the clinical treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27026065

  6. Conditional control of gene expression by synthetic riboswitches in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Martin M; Vockenhuber, Michael-Paul; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    Here we provide a step-by-step protocol for the application of synthetic theophylline-dependent riboswitches for conditional gene expression in Streptomyces coelicolor. Application of the method requires a sequence of only ~85 nt to be inserted between the transcriptional start site and the start codon of a gene of interest. No auxiliary factors are needed. All tested riboswitch variants worked well in concert with the promoters galP2, ermEp1, and SF14. Moreover, they allowed theophylline-dependent expression not only of the heterologous β-glucuronidase reporter gene but also of dagA, an endogenous agarase gene. The right combination of the tested promoters with the riboswitch variants allows for the adjustment of the desired dynamic range of regulation in a highly specific and dose-dependent manner and underlines the orthogonality of riboswitch regulation. We anticipate that any additional natural or synthetic promoter can be combined with the presented riboswitches. Moreover, this system should easily be transferable to other Streptomyces species, and most likely to any other genetically manipulable bacteria. PMID:25605391

  7. Validation of housekeeping genes as internal controls for studying gene expression during Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) development by quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Du, Yishuai; Zhang, Linlin; Xu, Fei; Huang, Baoyu; Zhang, Guofan; Li, Li

    2013-03-01

    Hatchery-reared larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) often suffer from massive mortality induced by Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infection, indicating the importance of better understanding of oyster immune defense systems. The accuracy of measurements of gene expression levels based on quantitative real-time PCR assays relies on the use of housekeeping genes as internal controls; however, few studies have focused on the selection of such internal controls. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of internal control genes during oyster development in virus-infected and uninfected samples. Transcriptome data for 38 developmental stages were downloaded and the gene expression patterns were classified into 30 clusters. A total of 317 orthologs of classical housekeeping genes in the oyster genome were annotated. After combining the expression profiles and oyster housekeeping gene dataset, 14 candidate internal controls were selected for further investigation: Elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), 18S rRNA (18S), 28S rRNA (28S), Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), β-actin (ACT), Ribosomal protein L7 (RL7), Ribosomal protein L27 (RL27), Ribosomal protein L36 (RL36), Ribosomal protein S18 (RS18), Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (RO21), Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (EF2), Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2D2 (UBCD1), S-phase kinase-associated protein 1 (SKP1) and Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein Q (HNRPQ). RNA was extracted from oyster larvae infected with OsHV-1 (group A; GA), and OsHV-1 free larvae (group B; GB). The expression levels of the 14 candidate internal controls were studied in GA and GB larvae by real-time PCR. Their expression stabilities were further analyzed using the GeNorm program. RL7 and RS18 were the most stable genes in both OsHV-1 infected (GA) and uninfected (GB) larvae. These results suggest that RL7 and RS18 could be used as internal controls for studying gene expression in

  8. Remodeling of Kv4.3 potassium channel gene expression under the control of sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Song, M; Helguera, G; Eghbali, M; Zhu, N; Zarei, M M; Olcese, R; Toro, L; Stefani, E

    2001-08-24

    Kv4.3 channels are important molecular components of transient K(+) currents (Ito currents) in brain and heart. They are involved in setting the frequency of neuronal firing and heart pacing. Altered Kv4.3 channel expression has been demonstrated under pathological conditions like heart failure indicating their critical role in heart function. Thyroid hormone studies suggest that their expression in the heart may be hormonally regulated. To explore the possibility that sex hormones control Kv4.3 expression, we investigated whether its expression changes in the pregnant uterus. This organ represents a unique model to study Ito currents, because it possesses this type of K(+) current and undergoes dramatic changes in function and excitability during pregnancy. We cloned Kv4.3 channel from myometrium and found that its protein and transcript expression is greatly diminished during pregnancy. Experiments in ovariectomized rats demonstrate that estrogen is one mechanism responsible for the dramatic reduction in Kv4.3 expression and function prior to parturition. Furthermore, the reduction of plasma membrane Kv4.3 protein is accompanied by a perinuclear localization suggesting that cell trafficking is also controlled by sex hormones. Thus, estrogen remodels the expression of Kv4.3 in myometrium by directly diminishing its transcription and, indirectly, by altering Kv4.3 delivery to the plasma membrane. PMID:11427525

  9. Long noncoding RNA #32 contributes to antiviral responses by controlling interferon-stimulated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nishitsuji, Hironori; Ujino, Saneyuki; Yoshio, Sachiyo; Sugiyama, Masaya; Mizokami, Masashi; Kanto, Tatsuya; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2016-09-13

    Despite the breadth of knowledge that exists regarding the function of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in biological phenomena, the role of lncRNAs in host antiviral responses is poorly understood. Here, we report that lncRNA#32 is associated with type I IFN signaling. The silencing of lncRNA#32 dramatically reduced the level of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression, resulting in sensitivity to encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection. In contrast, the ectopic expression of lncRNA#32 significantly suppressed EMCV replication, suggesting that lncRNA#32 positively regulates the host antiviral response. We further demonstrated the suppressive function of lncRNA#32 in hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection. lncRNA#32 bound to activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) and regulated ISG expression. Our results reveal a role for lncRNA#32 in host antiviral responses. PMID:27582466

  10. Micro-RNA-31 controls hair cycle-associated changes in gene expression programs of the skin and hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Mardaryev, Andrei N; Ahmed, Mohammed I; Vlahov, Nikola V; Fessing, Michael Y; Gill, Jason H; Sharov, Andrey A; Botchkareva, Natalia V

    2010-10-01

    The hair follicle is a cyclic biological system that progresses through stages of growth, regression, and quiescence, which involves dynamic changes in a program of gene regulation. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are critically important for the control of gene expression and silencing. Here, we show that global miRNA expression in the skin markedly changes during distinct stages of the hair cycle in mice. Furthermore, we show that expression of miR-31 markedly increases during anagen and decreases during catagen and telogen. Administration of antisense miR-31 inhibitor into mouse skin during the early- and midanagen phases of the hair cycle results in accelerated anagen development, and altered differentiation of hair matrix keratinocytes and hair shaft formation. Microarray, qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that miR-31 negatively regulates expression of Fgf10, the components of Wnt and BMP signaling pathways Sclerostin and BAMBI, and Dlx3 transcription factor, as well as selected keratin genes, both in vitro and in vivo. Using luciferase reporter assay, we show that Krt16, Krt17, Dlx3, and Fgf10 serve as direct miR-31 targets. Thus, by targeting a number of growth regulatory molecules and cytoskeletal proteins, miR-31 is involved in establishing an optimal balance of gene expression in the hair follicle required for its proper growth and hair fiber formation. PMID:20522784

  11. Micro-RNA-31 controls hair cycle-associated changes in gene expression programs of the skin and hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Mardaryev, Andrei N; Ahmed, Mohammed I; Vlahov, Nikola V; Fessing, Michael Y; Gill, Jason H; Sharov, Andrey A; Botchkareva, Natalia V

    2010-10-01

    The hair follicle is a cyclic biological system that progresses through stages of growth, regression, and quiescence, which involves dynamic changes in a program of gene regulation. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are critically important for the control of gene expression and silencing. Here, we show that global miRNA expression in the skin markedly changes during distinct stages of the hair cycle in mice. Furthermore, we show that expression of miR-31 markedly increases during anagen and decreases during catagen and telogen. Administration of antisense miR-31 inhibitor into mouse skin during the early- and midanagen phases of the hair cycle results in accelerated anagen development, and altered differentiation of hair matrix keratinocytes and hair shaft formation. Microarray, qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that miR-31 negatively regulates expression of Fgf10, the components of Wnt and BMP signaling pathways Sclerostin and BAMBI, and Dlx3 transcription factor, as well as selected keratin genes, both in vitro and in vivo. Using luciferase reporter assay, we show that Krt16, Krt17, Dlx3, and Fgf10 serve as direct miR-31 targets. Thus, by targeting a number of growth regulatory molecules and cytoskeletal proteins, miR-31 is involved in establishing an optimal balance of gene expression in the hair follicle required for its proper growth and hair fiber formation.

  12. Shoot to root communication is necessary to control the expression of iron-acquisition genes in Strategy I plants.

    PubMed

    García, María J; Romera, Francisco J; Stacey, Minviluz G; Stacey, Gary; Villar, Eduardo; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Previous research showed that auxin, ethylene, and nitric oxide (NO) can activate the expression of iron (Fe)-acquisition genes in the roots of Strategy I plants grown with low levels of Fe, but not in plants grown with high levels of Fe. However, it is still an open question as to how Fe acts as an inhibitor and which pool of Fe (e.g., root, phloem, etc.) in the plant acts as the key regulator for gene expression control. To further clarify this, we studied the effect of the foliar application of Fe on the expression of Fe-acquisition genes in several Strategy I plants, including wild-type cultivars of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh], pea [Pisum sativum L.], tomato [Solanum lycopersicon Mill.], and cucumber [Cucumis sativus L.], as well as mutants showing constitutive expression of Fe-acquisition genes when grown under Fe-sufficient conditions [Arabidopsis opt3-2 and frd3-3, pea dgl and brz, and tomato chln (chloronerva)]. The results showed that the foliar application of Fe blocked the expression of Fe-acquisition genes in the wild-type cultivars and in the frd3-3, brz, and chln mutants, but not in the opt3-2 and dgl mutants, probably affected in the transport of a Fe-related repressive signal in the phloem. Moreover, the addition of either ACC (ethylene precursor) or GSNO (NO donor) to Fe-deficient plants up-regulated the expression of Fe-acquisition genes, but this effect did not occur in Fe-deficient plants sprayed with foliar Fe, again suggesting the existence of a Fe-related repressive signal moving from leaves to roots.

  13. A gene expression screen.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Brown, D D

    1991-01-01

    A gene expression screen identifies mRNAs that differ in abundance between two mRNA mixtures by a subtractive hybridization method. The two mRNA populations are converted to double-stranded cDNAs, fragmented, and ligated to linkers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The multiple cDNA fragments isolated from any given gene can be treated as alleles in a genetic screen. Probability analysis of the frequency with which multiple alleles are found provides an estimation of the total number of up- and down-regulated genes. We have applied this method to genes that are differentially expressed in amphibian tadpole tail tissue in the first 24 hr after thyroid hormone treatment, which ultimately induces tail resorption. We estimate that there are about 30 up-regulated genes; 16 have been isolated. Images PMID:1722336

  14. Karyopherin alpha2: a control step of glucose-sensitive gene expression in hepatic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Guillemain, Ghislaine; Muñoz-Alonso, Maria J; Cassany, Aurélia; Loizeau, Martine; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Leturque, Armelle

    2002-01-01

    Glucose is required for an efficient expression of the glucose transporter GLUT2 and other genes. We have shown previously that the intracytoplasmic loop of GLUT2 can divert a signal, resulting in the stimulation of glucose-sensitive gene transcription. In the present study, by interaction with the GLUT2 loop, we have cloned the rat karyopherin alpha2, a receptor involved in nuclear import. The specificity of the binding was restricted to GLUT2, and not GLUT1 or GLUT4, and to karyopherin alpha2, not alpha1. When rendered irreversible by a cross-linking agent, this transitory interaction was detected in vivo in hepatocytes. A role for karyopherin alpha2 in the transcription of two glucose-sensitive genes was investigated by transfection of native and inactive green fluorescent protein-karyopherin alpha2 in GLUT2-expressing hepatoma cells. The amount of inactive karyopherin alpha2 receptor reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, the GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA levels by competition with endogenous active receptor. In contrast, the overexpression of karyopherin alpha2 did not significantly stimulate GLUT2 and liver pyruvate kinase mRNA accumulation in green fluorescent protein-sorted cells. The present study suggests that, in concert with glucose metabolism, karyopherin alpha2 transmits a signal to the nucleus to regulate glucose-sensitive gene expression. The transitory tethering of karyopherin alpha2 to GLUT2 at the plasma membrane might indicate that the receptor can load the cargo to be imported locally. PMID:11988093

  15. RNA aptamers as genetic control devices: the potential of riboswitches as synthetic elements for regulating gene expression.

    PubMed

    Berens, Christian; Groher, Florian; Suess, Beatrix

    2015-02-01

    RNA utilizes many different mechanisms to control gene expression. Among the regulatory elements that respond to external stimuli, riboswitches are a prominent and elegant example. They consist solely of RNA and couple binding of a small molecule ligand to the so-called "aptamer domain" with a conformational change in the downstream "expression platform" which then determines system output. The modular organization of riboswitches and the relative ease with which ligand-binding RNA aptamers can be selected in vitro against almost any molecule have led to the rapid and widespread adoption of engineered riboswitches as artificial genetic control devices in biotechnology and synthetic biology over the past decade. This review highlights proof-of-principle applications to demonstrate the versatility and robustness of engineered riboswitches in regulating gene expression in pro- and eukaryotes. It then focuses on strategies and parameters to identify aptamers that can be integrated into synthetic riboswitches that are functional in vivo, before finishing with a reflection on how to improve the regulatory properties of engineered riboswitches, so that we can not only further expand riboswitch applicability, but also finally fully exploit their potential as control elements in regulating gene expression. PMID:25676052

  16. Expressed sequence tags from Atta laevigata and identification of candidate genes for the control of pest leaf-cutting ants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Leafcutters are the highest evolved within Neotropical ants in the tribe Attini and model systems for studying caste formation, labor division and symbiosis with microorganisms. Some species of leafcutters are agricultural pests controlled by chemicals which affect other animals and accumulate in the environment. Aiming to provide genetic basis for the study of leafcutters and for the development of more specific and environmentally friendly methods for the control of pest leafcutters, we generated expressed sequence tag data from Atta laevigata, one of the pest ants with broad geographic distribution in South America. Results The analysis of the expressed sequence tags allowed us to characterize 2,006 unique sequences in Atta laevigata. Sixteen of these genes had a high number of transcripts and are likely positively selected for high level of gene expression, being responsible for three basic biological functions: energy conservation through redox reactions in mitochondria; cytoskeleton and muscle structuring; regulation of gene expression and metabolism. Based on leafcutters lifestyle and reports of genes involved in key processes of other social insects, we identified 146 sequences potential targets for controlling pest leafcutters. The targets are responsible for antixenobiosis, development and longevity, immunity, resistance to pathogens, pheromone function, cell signaling, behavior, polysaccharide metabolism and arginine kynase activity. Conclusion The generation and analysis of expressed sequence tags from Atta laevigata have provided important genetic basis for future studies on the biology of leaf-cutting ants and may contribute to the development of a more specific and environmentally friendly method for the control of agricultural pest leafcutters. PMID:21682882

  17. Metatranscriptomic insights on gene expression and regulatory controls in Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis

    PubMed Central

    Oyserman, Ben O; Noguera, Daniel R; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tringe, Susannah G; McMahon, Katherine D

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) have focused on reconstructing genomic blueprints for the model polyphosphate-accumulating organism Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis. Here, a time series metatranscriptome generated from enrichment cultures of Accumulibacter was used to gain insight into anerobic/aerobic metabolism and regulatory mechanisms within an EBPR cycle. Co-expressed gene clusters were identified displaying ecologically relevant trends consistent with batch cycle phases. Transcripts displaying increased abundance during anerobic acetate contact were functionally enriched in energy production and conversion, including upregulation of both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound hydrogenases demonstrating the importance of transcriptional regulation to manage energy and electron flux during anerobic acetate contact. We hypothesized and demonstrated hydrogen production after anerobic acetate contact, a previously unknown strategy for Accumulibacter to maintain redox balance. Genes involved in anerobic glycine utilization were identified and phosphorus release after anerobic glycine contact demonstrated, suggesting that Accumulibacter routes diverse carbon sources to acetyl-CoA formation via previously unrecognized pathways. A comparative genomics analysis of sequences upstream of co-expressed genes identified two statistically significant putative regulatory motifs. One palindromic motif was identified upstream of genes involved in PHA synthesis and acetate activation and is hypothesized to be a phaR binding site, hence representing a hypothetical PHA modulon. A second motif was identified ~35 base pairs (bp) upstream of a large and diverse array of genes and hence may represent a sigma factor binding site. This analysis provides a basis and framework for further investigations into Accumulibacter metabolism and the reconstruction of regulatory networks in uncultured organisms. PMID:26555245

  18. Metatranscriptomic insights on gene expression and regulatory controls in Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis.

    PubMed

    Oyserman, Ben O; Noguera, Daniel R; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tringe, Susannah G; McMahon, Katherine D

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies on enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) have focused on reconstructing genomic blueprints for the model polyphosphate-accumulating organism Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis. Here, a time series metatranscriptome generated from enrichment cultures of Accumulibacter was used to gain insight into anerobic/aerobic metabolism and regulatory mechanisms within an EBPR cycle. Co-expressed gene clusters were identified displaying ecologically relevant trends consistent with batch cycle phases. Transcripts displaying increased abundance during anerobic acetate contact were functionally enriched in energy production and conversion, including upregulation of both cytoplasmic and membrane-bound hydrogenases demonstrating the importance of transcriptional regulation to manage energy and electron flux during anerobic acetate contact. We hypothesized and demonstrated hydrogen production after anerobic acetate contact, a previously unknown strategy for Accumulibacter to maintain redox balance. Genes involved in anerobic glycine utilization were identified and phosphorus release after anerobic glycine contact demonstrated, suggesting that Accumulibacter routes diverse carbon sources to acetyl-CoA formation via previously unrecognized pathways. A comparative genomics analysis of sequences upstream of co-expressed genes identified two statistically significant putative regulatory motifs. One palindromic motif was identified upstream of genes involved in PHA synthesis and acetate activation and is hypothesized to be a phaR binding site, hence representing a hypothetical PHA modulon. A second motif was identified ~35 base pairs (bp) upstream of a large and diverse array of genes and hence may represent a sigma factor binding site. This analysis provides a basis and framework for further investigations into Accumulibacter metabolism and the reconstruction of regulatory networks in uncultured organisms. PMID:26555245

  19. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  20. The control of ccn2 (ctgf) gene expression in normal and scleroderma fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Leask, A; Sa, S; Holmes, A; Shiwen, X; Black, C M; Abraham, D J

    2001-06-01

    Although the role of transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) in initiating fibrosis is well established, the role that TGFbeta plays in maintaining fibrosis is unclear. The gene encoding connective tissue growth factor (ccn2; ctgf), which promotes fibrosis, is not normally expressed in dermal fibroblasts unless TGFbeta is present. However, in dermal fibroblasts cultured from lesional areas of scleroderma, ccn2 (ctgf) is expressed constitutively. The contribution of several elements in the ccn2 (ctgf) promoter to basal and TGFbeta induced ccn2 (ctgf) expression in normal and scleroderma fibroblasts has been investigated. A functional SMAD binding site in the ccn2 (ctgf) promoter that is necessary for the TGFbeta mediated induction of this gene has been identified. The previously termed TGFbeta responsive enhancer (TGFbetaRE) in the ccn2 (ctgf) promoter has been found to be necessary for basal promoter activity in normal fibroblasts. The SMAD element is not necessary for the high ccn2 (ctgf) promoter activity seen in scleroderma fibroblasts. However, mutation of the previously termed TGFbetaRE reduces ccn2 (ctgf) promoter activity in scleroderma fibroblasts to that seen in normal fibroblasts. Thus, the maintenance of the scleroderma phenotype, as assessed by a high degree of ccn2 (ctgf) promoter activity, appears to be relatively independent of SMAD action and seems to reflect increased basal promoter activity.

  1. Identification of regulatory pathways controlling gene expression of stress-responsive mitochondrial proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Lois H M; Giraud, Estelle; Uggalla, Vindya; Lister, Ryan; Clifton, Rachel; Glen, Angela; Thirkettle-Watts, Dave; Van Aken, Olivier; Whelan, James

    2008-08-01

    In this study we analyzed transcript abundance and promoters of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins to identify signaling pathways that regulate stress-induced gene expression. We used Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) alternative oxidase AOX1a, external NADP H-dehydrogenase NDB2, and two additional highly stress-responsive genes, At2g21640 and BCS1. As a starting point, the promoter region of AOX1a was analyzed and functional analysis identified 10 cis-acting regulatory elements (CAREs), which played a role in response to treatment with H(2)O(2), rotenone, or both. Six of these elements were also functional in the NDB2 promoter. The promoter region of At2g21640, previously defined as a hallmark of oxidative stress, shared two functional CAREs with AOX1a and was responsive to treatment with H(2)O(2) but not rotenone. Microarray analysis further supported that signaling pathways induced by H(2)O(2) and rotenone are not identical. The promoter of BCS1 was not responsive to H(2)O(2) or rotenone, but highly responsive to salicylic acid (SA), whereas the promoters of AOX1a and NDB2 were unresponsive to SA. Analysis of transcript abundance of these genes in a variety of defense signaling mutants confirmed that BCS1 expression is regulated in a different manner compared to AOX1a, NDB2, and At2g21640. These mutants also revealed a pathway associated with programmed cell death that regulated AOX1a in a manner distinct from the other genes. Thus, at least three distinctive pathways regulate mitochondrial stress response at a transcriptional level, an SA-dependent pathway represented by BCS1, a second pathway that represents a convergence point for signals generated by H(2)O(2) and rotenone on multiple CAREs, some of which are shared between responsive genes, and a third pathway that acts via EDS1 and PAD4 regulating only AOX1a. Furthermore, posttranscriptional regulation accounts for changes in transcript abundance by SA treatment for some genes.

  2. The Chromatin Protein DUET/MMD1 Controls Expression of the Meiotic Gene TDM1 during Male Meiosis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Andreuzza, Sébastien; Nishal, Bindu; Singh, Aparna; Siddiqi, Imran

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis produces haploid cells essential for sexual reproduction. In yeast, entry into meiosis activates transcription factors which trigger a transcriptional cascade that results in sequential co-expression of early, middle and late meiotic genes. However, these factors are not conserved, and the factors and regulatory mechanisms that ensure proper meiotic gene expression in multicellular eukaryotes are poorly understood. Here, we report that DUET/MMD1, a PHD finger protein essential for Arabidopsis male meiosis, functions as a transcriptional regulator in plant meiosis. We find that DUET-PHD binds H3K4me2 in vitro, and show that this interaction is critical for function during meiosis. We also show that DUET is required for proper microtubule organization during meiosis II, independently of its function in meiosis I. Remarkably, DUET protein shows stage-specific expression, confined to diplotene. We identify two genes TDM1 and JAS with critical functions in cell cycle transitions and spindle organization in male meiosis, as DUET targets, with TDM1 being a direct target. Thus, DUET is required to regulate microtubule organization and cell cycle transitions during male meiosis, and functions as a direct transcription activator of the meiotic gene TDM1. Expression profiling showed reduced expression of a subset comprising about 12% of a known set of meiosis preferred genes in the duet mutant. Our results reveal the action of DUET as a transcriptional regulator during male meiosis in plants, and suggest that transcription of meiotic genes is under stagewise control in plants as in yeast. PMID:26348709

  3. AllR Controls the Expression of Streptomyces coelicolor Allantoin Pathway Genes

    PubMed Central

    Navone, Laura; Macagno, Juan Pablo; Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtémoc; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K.; Gramajo, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces species are native inhabitants of soil, a natural environment where nutrients can be scarce and competition fierce. They have evolved ways to metabolize unusual nutrients, such as purines and its derivatives, which are highly abundant in soil. Catabolism of these uncommon carbon and nitrogen sources needs to be tightly regulated in response to nutrient availability and environmental stimulus. Recently, the allantoin degradation pathway was characterized in Streptomyces coelicolor. However, there are questions that remained unanswered, particularly regarding pathway regulation. Here, using a combination of proteomics and genetic approaches, we identified the negative regulator of the allantoin pathway, AllR. In vitro studies confirmed that AllR binds to the promoter regions of allantoin catabolic genes and determined the AllR DNA binding motif. In addition, effector studies showed that allantoic acid, and glyoxylate, to a lesser extent, inhibit the binding of AllR to the DNA. Inactivation of AllR repressor leads to the constitutive expression of the AllR regulated genes and intriguingly impairs actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin production. Genetics and proteomics analysis revealed that among all genes from the allantoin pathway that are upregulated in the allR mutant, the hyi gene encoding a hydroxypyruvate isomerase (Hyi) is responsible of the impairment of antibiotic production. PMID:26187964

  4. AllR Controls the Expression of Streptomyces coelicolor Allantoin Pathway Genes.

    PubMed

    Navone, Laura; Macagno, Juan Pablo; Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtémoc; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K; Gramajo, Hugo; Rodriguez, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    Streptomyces species are native inhabitants of soil, a natural environment where nutrients can be scarce and competition fierce. They have evolved ways to metabolize unusual nutrients, such as purines and its derivatives, which are highly abundant in soil. Catabolism of these uncommon carbon and nitrogen sources needs to be tightly regulated in response to nutrient availability and environmental stimulus. Recently, the allantoin degradation pathway was characterized in Streptomyces coelicolor. However, there are questions that remained unanswered, particularly regarding pathway regulation. Here, using a combination of proteomics and genetic approaches, we identified the negative regulator of the allantoin pathway, AllR. In vitro studies confirmed that AllR binds to the promoter regions of allantoin catabolic genes and determined the AllR DNA binding motif. In addition, effector studies showed that allantoic acid, and glyoxylate, to a lesser extent, inhibit the binding of AllR to the DNA. Inactivation of AllR repressor leads to the constitutive expression of the AllR regulated genes and intriguingly impairs actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin production. Genetics and proteomics analysis revealed that among all genes from the allantoin pathway that are upregulated in the allR mutant, the hyi gene encoding a hydroxypyruvate isomerase (Hyi) is responsible of the impairment of antibiotic production. PMID:26187964

  5. Regulatory regions that control expression of two chloramphenicol-inducible cat genes cloned in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, E J; Williams, D M; Mongkolsuk, S; Lovett, P S

    1984-01-01

    Plasmid pPL603 is a promoter cloning vector for Bacillus subtilis and consists of a 1.1-kilobase fragment of Bacillus pumilus DNA inserted between the EcoRI and BamHI sites of pUB110. The gene cat-86, specifying chloramphenicol-inducible chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, is located on the 1.1-kilobase cloned DNA. When pPL603 is present in B. subtilis, cat-86 is unexpressed during vegetative growth but expressed during sporulation. The regulation of cat-86 in pPL603 is due to sequences within two restriction fragments, designated P1 and R1, that precede the main coding portion of the gene. The P1 fragment promotes transcription of cat-86 only during sporulation, whereas the adjacent R1 fragment lacks promoter function but contains sequences essential to chloramphenicol inducibility. A second B. pumilus gene, cat-66, was cloned in B. subtilis and is expressed throughout the vegetative growth and sporulation cycle. The cat-66 coding region is preceded by two adjacent restriction fragments designated as P2 and R2. P1 and P2 are identical in size and share 95% conservation of base sequence. R1 and R2 are also identical in size and share 91% conservation of base sequence. Fragment substitution experiments demonstrate that R2 can functionally replace R1. The substitution of P2 for P1 promotes cat-86 expression throughout vegetative growth and sporulation. Analysis of a derivative of pPL603 in which P2 has replaced P1 demonstrates that P2 promotes transcription of cat-86 during vegetative growth and that P2 contains the start site for transcription of cat-86. Thus, P1 and P2 differ strikingly in vegetative promoter function, yet they differ by single-base substitutions at only 11 positions of 203. Images PMID:6327638

  6. Multiple regulatory mechanisms control the expression of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus gene for extracellular xylanase.

    PubMed

    Shulami, Smadar; Shenker, Ofer; Langut, Yael; Lavid, Noa; Gat, Orit; Zaide, Galia; Zehavi, Arie; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Shoham, Yuval

    2014-09-12

    Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 produces a single extracellular xylanase (Xyn10A) capable of producing short, decorated xylo-oligosaccharides from the naturally branched polysaccharide, xylan. Gel retardation assays indicated that the master negative regulator, XylR, binds specifically to xylR operators in the promoters of xylose and xylan-utilization genes. This binding is efficiently prevented in vitro by xylose, the most likely molecular inducer. Expression of the extracellular xylanase is repressed in medium containing either glucose or casamino acids, suggesting that carbon catabolite repression plays a role in regulating xynA. The global transcriptional regulator CodY was shown to bind specifically to the xynA promoter region in vitro, suggesting that CodY is a repressor of xynA. The xynA gene is located next to an uncharacterized gene, xynX, that has similarity to the NIF3 (Ngg1p interacting factor 3)-like protein family. XynX binds specifically to a 72-bp fragment in the promoter region of xynA, and the expression of xynA in a xynX null mutant appeared to be higher, indicating that XynX regulates xynA. The specific activity of the extracellular xylanase increases over 50-fold during early exponential growth, suggesting cell density regulation (quorum sensing). Addition of conditioned medium to fresh and low cell density cultures resulted in high expression of xynA, indicating that a diffusible extracellular xynA density factor is present in the medium. The xynA density factor is heat-stable, sensitive to proteases, and was partially purified using reverse phase liquid chromatography. Taken together, these results suggest that xynA is regulated by quorum-sensing at low cell densities. PMID:25070894

  7. Transcribed sequences of the Escherichia coli btuB gene control its expression and regulation by vitamin B12.

    PubMed Central

    Lundrigan, M D; Köster, W; Kadner, R J

    1991-01-01

    The Escherichia coli btuB gene product is an outer membrane protein required for the active transport of vitamin B12 and other cobalamins. Synthesis of BtuB is repressed when cells are grown in the presence of cobalamins. Mapping of the 5' end of the btuB transcript revealed that a 240-nucleotide transcribed leader precedes the coding sequence. Point mutations causing increased expression under repressing conditions were isolated by use of a btuB-lacZ gene fusion. Mutations at many sites within the leader region affected btuB-lacZ regulation, whereas some base changes upstream of the start of transcription affected the absolute level of expression but not its repressibility. Analysis of btuB-phoA gene fusions and btuB-lacZ operon and gene fusions of various lengths showed that sequences within the btuB coding region (between nucleotides +250 and +350) had to be present for proper expression and transcriptional regulation. Sequences within the leader region (up to +250) conferred regulation of translational fusions. These results indicate that btuB expression is controlled at both the transcriptional and translational levels and that different but possibly overlapping sequences in the transcribed region, including the coding region for the transport protein itself, mediate these two modes of regulation. Images PMID:1847525

  8. Gene structure and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book describes the structure of genes in molecular terms and summarizes present knowledge about how their activity is regulated. It covers a range of topics, including a review of the structure and replication of DNA, transcription and translation, prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene organization and expression, retroviruses and oncogenes. The book also includes a chapter on the methodology of DNA manipulation including sections on site-directed mutagenesis, the polymerase chain reaction, reporter genes and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The hemoglobin gene system and the genetics of the proteins of the immune system are presented in the latter half of the book to show the structure and expression of the most well-studied systems in higher eukaryotes. The final chapter reviews the differences between prokaryotic and the eukaryotic genomes.

  9. Control of mouse U1 snRNA gene expression during in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y; Lund, E; Kahan, B W; Dahlberg, J E

    1997-01-01

    Early in mouse development, two classes of U1 RNAs, mU1a and mU1b, are synthesized, but as development proceeds, transcription of the embryo-specific mU1b genes is selectively down-regulated to a barely detectable level. We show here that during in vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, both exogenously introduced and endogenous U1b genes are subject to normal developmental regulation. Thus, ES cells represent a convenient isogenic system for studying the control of expression of developmentally regulated snRNA genes. Using this system, we have identified a region in the proximal 5'flanking region, located outside the PSE element, that is responsible for differential transcription of the mU1a and mU1b genes in both developing cells and transiently transfected NIH 3T3 cells. PMID:9153321

  10. A transgenic approach to control hemipteran insects by expressing insecticidal genes under phloem-specific promoters

    PubMed Central

    Javaid, Shaista; Amin, Imran; Jander, Georg; Mukhtar, Zahid; Saeed, Nasir A.; Mansoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    The first generation transgenic crops used strong constitutive promoters for transgene expression. However, tissue-specific expression is desirable for more precise targeting of transgenes. Moreover, piercing/sucking insects, which are generally resistant to insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins, have emerged as a major pests since the introduction of transgenic crops expressing these toxins. Phloem-specific promoters isolated from Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) were used for the expression of two insecticidal proteins, Hadronyche versuta (Blue Mountains funnel-web spider) neurotoxin (Hvt) and onion leaf lectin, in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Here we demonstrate that transgenic plants expressing Hvt alone or in combination with onion leaf lectin are resistant to Phenacoccus solenopsis (cotton mealybug), Myzus persicae (green peach aphids) and Bemisia tabaci (silver leaf whitefly). The expression of both proteins under different phloem-specific promoters resulted in close to 100% mortality and provided more rapid protection than Hvt alone. Our results suggest the employment of the Hvt and onion leaf lectin transgenic constructs at the commercial level will reduce the use of chemical pesticides for control of hemipteran insect pests. PMID:27708374

  11. Expression of bvg-repressed genes in Bordetella pertussis is controlled by RisA through a novel c-di-GMP signaling pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The BvgAS two component system of Bordetella pertussis controls virulence factor expression. In addition, BvgAS controls expression of the bvg-repressed genes through the action of the repressor, BvgR. The transcription factor RisA is inhibited by BvgR, and when BvgR is not expressed RisA induces th...

  12. Dietary approaches to stop hypertension influence on insulin receptor substrate-1gene expression: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kafeshani, Marzieh; Janghorbani, Mohsen; Salehi, Rasol; Kazemi, Mohammad; Entezari, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Insulin receptor substrate (IRS) Type 1 is a main substrate for the insulin receptor, controls insulin signaling in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the vascular, so it is an important candidate gene for insulin resistance (IR). We aimed to compare the effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and Usual Dietary Advices (UDA) on IRS1 gene expression in women at risk for cardiovascular disease. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled clinical trial was performed in 44 women at risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomly assigned to a UDA diet or the DASH diet. The DASH diet was rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and low-fat dairy products and low in saturated fat, total fat, cholesterol, refined grains, and sweets, with a total of 2400 mg/day sodium. The UDA diet was a regular diet with healthy dietary advice. Gene expression was assessed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction at the first of study and after 12 weeks. Independent sample t-test and paired-samples t-test were used to compare means of all variables within and between two groups respectively. Results: IRS1 gene expression was increased in DASH group compared with UDA diet (P = 0.00). Weight and waist circumference decreased in DASH group significantly compared to the UDA group (P < 0.05) but the results between the two groups showed no significant difference. Conclusion: DASH diet increased IRS1 gene expression and probably has beneficial effects on IR risks. PMID:26759568

  13. Multiple transcribed elements control expression of the Escherichia coli btuB gene.

    PubMed Central

    Franklund, C V; Kadner, R J

    1997-01-01

    Repression by vitamin B12 of the cobalamin transport protein BtuB in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli operates at both the transcriptional and translational levels and is controlled by transcribed sequences within the leader and proximal portion of the btuB coding sequence. The effects of deletions from either end of this region on repression and expression were determined with lac fusions. An element at the 5' end of the transcript and the putative attenuator within the coding sequence were required for transcriptional repression. The presence of either element caused a marked reduction in btuB-lacZ expression which was reversed by the presence of a conserved sequence element in the leader, suggesting the importance of long-range interactions in the btuB leader for expression and regulation. PMID:9190822

  14. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data.

  15. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-09-02

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of 'coherence', we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data.

  16. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of 'coherence', we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  17. Distinct metabolic network states manifest in the gene expression profiles of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease patients and controls

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Carolin; Fretter, Christoph; Rosenstiel, Philip; Krawczak, Michael; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Information on biological networks can greatly facilitate the function-orientated interpretation of high-throughput molecular data. Genome-wide metabolic network models of human cells, in particular, can be employed to contextualize gene expression profiles of patients with the goal of both, a better understanding of individual etiologies and an educated reclassification of (clinically defined) phenotypes. We analyzed publicly available expression profiles of intestinal tissues from treatment-naive pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and age-matched control individuals, using a reaction-centric metabolic network derived from the Recon2 model. By way of defining a measure of ‘coherence’, we quantified how well individual patterns of expression changes matched the metabolic network. We observed a bimodal distribution of metabolic network coherence in both patients and controls, albeit at notably different mixture probabilities. Multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a bisectional pattern as well that overlapped widely with the metabolic network-based results. Expression differences driving the observed bimodality were related to cellular transport of thiamine and bile acid metabolism, thereby highlighting the crosstalk between metabolism and other vital pathways. We demonstrated how classical data mining and network analysis can jointly identify biologically meaningful patterns in gene expression data. PMID:27585741

  18. The Gene Targeting Approach of Small Fragment Homologous Replacement (SFHR) Alters the Expression Patterns of DNA Repair and Cell Cycle Control Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pierandrei, Silvia; Luchetti, Andrea; Sanchez, Massimo; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica; Lucarelli, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Cellular responses and molecular mechanisms activated by exogenous DNA that invades cells are only partially understood. This limits the practical use of gene targeting strategies. Small fragment homologous replacement (SFHR) uses a small exogenous wild-type DNA fragment to restore the endogenous wild-type sequence; unfortunately, this mechanism has a low frequency of correction. In this study, we used a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line with a stably integrated mutated gene for enhanced green fluorescence protein. The restoration of a wild-type sequence can be detected by flow cytometry analysis. We quantitatively analyzed the expression of 84 DNA repair genes and 84 cell cycle control genes. Peculiar temporal gene expression patterns were observed for both pathways. Different DNA repair pathways, not only homologous recombination, as well as the three main cell cycle checkpoints appeared to mediate the cellular response. Eighteen genes were selected as highly significant target/effectors of SFHR. We identified a wide interconnection between SFHR, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. Our results increase the knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in cell invasion by exogenous DNA and SFHR. Specific molecular targets of both the cell cycle and DNA repair machineries were selected for manipulation to enhance the practical application of SFHR. PMID:27045208

  19. Assessing technical performance in differential gene expression experiments with external spike-in RNA control ratio mixtures.

    PubMed

    Munro, Sarah A; Lund, Steven P; Pine, P Scott; Binder, Hans; Clevert, Djork-Arné; Conesa, Ana; Dopazo, Joaquin; Fasold, Mario; Hochreiter, Sepp; Hong, Huixiao; Jafari, Nadereh; Kreil, David P; Łabaj, Paweł P; Li, Sheng; Liao, Yang; Lin, Simon M; Meehan, Joseph; Mason, Christopher E; Santoyo-Lopez, Javier; Setterquist, Robert A; Shi, Leming; Shi, Wei; Smyth, Gordon K; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Su, Zhenqiang; Tong, Weida; Wang, Charles; Wang, Jian; Xu, Joshua; Ye, Zhan; Yang, Yong; Yu, Ying; Salit, Marc

    2014-01-01

    There is a critical need for standard approaches to assess, report and compare the technical performance of genome-scale differential gene expression experiments. Here we assess technical performance with a proposed standard 'dashboard' of metrics derived from analysis of external spike-in RNA control ratio mixtures. These control ratio mixtures with defined abundance ratios enable assessment of diagnostic performance of differentially expressed transcript lists, limit of detection of ratio (LODR) estimates and expression ratio variability and measurement bias. The performance metrics suite is applicable to analysis of a typical experiment, and here we also apply these metrics to evaluate technical performance among laboratories. An interlaboratory study using identical samples shared among 12 laboratories with three different measurement processes demonstrates generally consistent diagnostic power across 11 laboratories. Ratio measurement variability and bias are also comparable among laboratories for the same measurement process. We observe different biases for measurement processes using different mRNA-enrichment protocols. PMID:25254650

  20. SIRT3 Functions in the Nucleus in the Control of Stress-Related Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Toshinori; Bonasio, Roberto; Narendra, Varun

    2012-01-01

    SIRT3 is a member of the Sir2 family of NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases that promotes longevity in many organisms. The processed short form of SIRT3 is a well-established mitochondrial protein whose deacetylase activity regulates various metabolic processes. However, the presence of full-length (FL) SIRT3 in the nucleus and its functional importance remain controversial. Our previous studies demonstrated that nuclear FL SIRT3 functions as a histone deacetylase and is transcriptionally repressive when artificially recruited to a reporter gene. Here, we report that nuclear FL SIRT3 is subjected to rapid degradation under conditions of cellular stress, including oxidative stress and UV irradiation, whereas the mitochondrial processed form is unaffected. FL SIRT3 degradation is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, at least partially through the ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) activity of SKP2. Finally, we show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that some target genes of nuclear SIRT3 are derepressed upon degradation of SIRT3 caused by stress stimuli. Thus, SIRT3 exhibits a previously unappreciated role in the nucleus, modulating the expression of some stress-related and nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. PMID:23045395

  1. Hormonally controlled expression of the Arabidopsis MAX4 shoot branching regulatory gene.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Katherine; Sorefan, Karim; Ward, Sally; Leyser, Ottoline

    2005-11-01

    The Arabidopsis MORE AXILLARY BRANCHING 4 (MAX4) gene is required for the production of a long-range, graft-transmissible signal that inhibits shoot branching. Buds of max4 mutant plants are resistant to the inhibitory effects of apically applied auxin, indicating that MAX4 is required for auxin-mediated bud inhibition. The RAMOSUS 1 (RMS1) and DECREASED APICAL DOMINANCE 1 (DAD1) genes of pea and petunia, respectively, are orthologous to MAX4 and function in a similar way. Here we show that, despite the similarities between these three genes, there are significant differences in the regulation of their expression. RMS1 is known to be upregulated by auxin in the shoot, suggesting a straightforward link between the RMS1-dependent branch-inhibiting signal and auxin, whereas we find that MAX4 is only upregulated by auxin in the root and hypocotyl, and this is not required for the inhibition of shoot branching. Furthermore, both RMS1 and DAD1 are subject to feedback regulation, for which there is no evidence for MAX4. Instead, overexpression studies and reciprocal grafting experiments demonstrate that the most functionally significant point of interaction between auxin and MAX4 is post-transcriptional and indeed post-synthesis of the MAX4-dependent graft-transmissible signal. PMID:16262707

  2. Mapping the mouse dactylaplasia mutation, Dac, and a gene that controls its expression, mdac

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.R.; Lane, P.W.; Ward-Bailey, P.; Davisson, M.T.

    1995-09-20

    Dactylaplasia is an inherited mouse limb malformation whose manifestation is clearly dependent on the interaction of two genes and thus represents an excellent model system for studying such gene interactions in vivo. The Dac mutation is inherited as a semidominant trait and may be a model for some forms of human ectrodactyly. Heterozygotes show absence of digits on each foot; the long bones are normal. On the SM/Ckc background on which the mutation occurred, Dac homozygotes die around birth. We mapped Dac to the distal end of Chr 19 by backcross segregation analysis. A closely linked marker was then used to distinguish -/+, Dac/+, and Dac/Dac genotypes of embryos and adults. When intercrossed with the NZB/BINJ strain, DAC homozygotes were shown to be viable and fertile, but had a more severe limb malformation (only a single remaining digit) than heterozygotes. Expression of the abnormal limb phenotypes of Dac/+ and Dac/Dac mice also depends on homozygosity for a recessive allele of another unlinked gene, mdac, that is polymorphic among inbred mouse strains. We mapped mdac to the middle Chr 13 by segregation analysis of both recombinant inbred strains and backcross progeny. 52 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Gene expression changes controlling distinct adaptations in the heart and skeletal muscle of a hibernating mammal.

    PubMed

    Vermillion, Katie L; Anderson, Kyle J; Hampton, Marshall; Andrews, Matthew T

    2015-03-01

    Throughout the hibernation season, the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) experiences extreme fluctuations in heart rate, metabolism, oxygen consumption, and body temperature, along with prolonged fasting and immobility. These conditions necessitate different functional requirements for the heart, which maintains contractile function throughout hibernation, and the skeletal muscle, which remains largely inactive. The adaptations used to maintain these contractile organs under such variable conditions serves as a natural model to study a variety of medically relevant conditions including heart failure and disuse atrophy. To better understand how two different muscle tissues maintain function throughout the extreme fluctuations of hibernation we performed Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing of cDNAs to compare the transcriptome of heart and skeletal muscle across the circannual cycle. This analysis resulted in the identification of 1,076 and 1,466 differentially expressed genes in heart and skeletal muscle, respectively. In both heart and skeletal muscle we identified a distinct cold-tolerant mechanism utilizing peroxisomal metabolism to make use of elevated levels of unsaturated depot fats. The skeletal muscle transcriptome also shows an early increase in oxidative capacity necessary for the altered fuel utilization and increased oxygen demand of shivering. Expression of the fetal gene expression profile is used to maintain cardiac tissue, either through increasing myocyte size or proliferation of resident cardiomyocytes, while skeletal muscle function and mass are protected through transcriptional regulation of pathways involved in protein turnover. This study provides insight into how two functionally distinct muscles maintain function under the extreme conditions of mammalian hibernation.

  4. Preprocessing and Quality Control Strategies for Illumina DASL Assay-Based Brain Gene Expression Studies with Semi-Degraded Samples.

    PubMed

    Chow, Maggie L; Winn, Mary E; Li, Hai-Ri; April, Craig; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Fan, Jian-Bing; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Courchesne, Eric; Schork, Nicholas J

    2012-01-01

    Available statistical preprocessing or quality control analysis tools for gene expression microarray datasets are known to greatly affect downstream data analysis, especially when degraded samples, unique tissue samples, or novel expression assays are used. It is therefore important to assess the validity and impact of the assumptions built in to preprocessing schemes for a dataset. We developed and assessed a data preprocessing strategy for use with the Illumina DASL-based gene expression assay with partially degraded postmortem prefrontal cortex samples. The samples were obtained from individuals with autism as part of an investigation of the pathogenic factors contributing to autism. Using statistical analysis methods and metrics such as those associated with multivariate distance matrix regression and mean inter-array correlation, we developed a DASL-based assay gene expression preprocessing pipeline to accommodate and detect problems with microarray-based gene expression values obtained with degraded brain samples. Key steps in the pipeline included outlier exclusion, data transformation and normalization, and batch effect and covariate corrections. Our goal was to produce a clean dataset for subsequent downstream differential expression analysis. We ultimately settled on available transformation and normalization algorithms in the R/Bioconductor package lumi based on an assessment of their use in various combinations. A log2-transformed, quantile-normalized, and batch and seizure-corrected procedure was likely the most appropriate for our data. We empirically tested different components of our proposed preprocessing strategy and believe that our results suggest that a preprocessing strategy that effectively identifies outliers, normalizes the data, and corrects for batch effects can be applied to all studies, even those pursued with degraded samples.

  5. Controlled expression of the dominant flocculation genes FLO1, FLO5, and FLO11 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Govender, Patrick; Domingo, Jody L; Bester, Michael C; Pretorius, Isak S; Bauer, Florian F

    2008-10-01

    In many industrial fermentation processes, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast should ideally meet two partially conflicting demands. During fermentation, a high suspended yeast count is required to maintain a satisfactory rate of fermentation, while at completion, efficient settling is desired to enhance product clarification and recovery. In most fermentation industries, currently used starter cultures do not satisfy this ideal, probably because nonflocculent yeast strains were selected to avoid fermentation problems. In this paper, we assess molecular strategies to optimize the flocculation behavior of S. cerevisiae. For this purpose, the chromosomal copies of three dominant flocculation genes, FLO1, FLO5, and FLO11, of the haploid nonflocculent, noninvasive, and non-flor-forming S. cerevisiae FY23 strain were placed under the transcriptional control of the promoters of the ADH2 and HSP30 genes. All six promoter-gene combinations resulted in specific flocculation behaviors in terms of timing and intensity. The strategy resulted in stable expression patterns providing a platform for the direct comparison and assessment of the specific impact of the expression of individual dominant FLO genes with regard to cell wall characteristics, such as hydrophobicity, biofilm formation, and substrate adhesion properties. The data also clearly demonstrate that the flocculation behavior of yeast strains can be tightly controlled and fine-tuned to satisfy specific industrial requirements.

  6. Controlled Expression of the Dominant Flocculation Genes FLO1, FLO5, and FLO11 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿

    PubMed Central

    Govender, Patrick; Domingo, Jody L.; Bester, Michael C.; Pretorius, Isak S.; Bauer, Florian F.

    2008-01-01

    In many industrial fermentation processes, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast should ideally meet two partially conflicting demands. During fermentation, a high suspended yeast count is required to maintain a satisfactory rate of fermentation, while at completion, efficient settling is desired to enhance product clarification and recovery. In most fermentation industries, currently used starter cultures do not satisfy this ideal, probably because nonflocculent yeast strains were selected to avoid fermentation problems. In this paper, we assess molecular strategies to optimize the flocculation behavior of S. cerevisiae. For this purpose, the chromosomal copies of three dominant flocculation genes, FLO1, FLO5, and FLO11, of the haploid nonflocculent, noninvasive, and non-flor-forming S. cerevisiae FY23 strain were placed under the transcriptional control of the promoters of the ADH2 and HSP30 genes. All six promoter-gene combinations resulted in specific flocculation behaviors in terms of timing and intensity. The strategy resulted in stable expression patterns providing a platform for the direct comparison and assessment of the specific impact of the expression of individual dominant FLO genes with regard to cell wall characteristics, such as hydrophobicity, biofilm formation, and substrate adhesion properties. The data also clearly demonstrate that the flocculation behavior of yeast strains can be tightly controlled and fine-tuned to satisfy specific industrial requirements. PMID:18708514

  7. Cloning, expression and characterization of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) gene from flatfish turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Guo, Huarong; Zhang, Shicui; Yin, Licheng; Guo, Bin; Wang, Shaojie

    2008-05-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding translationally controlled tumor protein of marine flatfish turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus), SmTCTP, was isolated with rapid amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). SmTCTP consisted of a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 84 bp, a 3' UTR of 451 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 513 bp, encoding a protein of 170 amino acid residues, which contained two signature sequences of TCTP family. The 5'UTR of SmTCTP started with a 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract (5'-TOP), a typical feature for translationally controlled mRNAs. The deduced amino acid sequence of SmTCTP was similar to the other known vertebrate TCTPs in a range of 58.8% to 64.1%. The length of fish TCTPs was diverse among species, e.g., TCP of turbot and sea perch ( Lateolabrax japonicus) is 170 aa in length, while that of zebrafish ( Danio rerio) and rohu ( Labeo rohita) is 171 aa in length. Northern blot analysis revealed that SmTCTP has only one type of mRNA. Its expression level in albino skin was slightly higher than that in normal skin. We constructed the pET30a- SmTCTP expression plasmid. The recombinant protein of His-tag SmTCTP was over-expressed in E. coli, purified and identified with peptide mass fingerprinting. These results may pave the way of further investigation of the biological function of TCTP in fish.

  8. Renin knockout rat: control of adrenal aldosterone and corticosterone synthesis in vitro and adrenal gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Gehrand, Ashley; Bruder, Eric D.; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Engeland, William C.; Moreno, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The classic renin-angiotensin system is partly responsible for controlling aldosterone secretion from the adrenal cortex via the peptide angiotensin II (ANG II). In addition, there is a local adrenocortical renin-angiotensin system that may be involved in the control of aldosterone synthesis in the zona glomerulosa (ZG). To characterize the long-term control of adrenal steroidogenesis, we utilized adrenal glands from renin knockout (KO) rats and compared steroidogenesis in vitro and steroidogenic enzyme expression to wild-type (WT) controls (Dahl S rat). Adrenal capsules (ZG; aldosterone production) and subcapsules [zona reticularis/fasciculata (ZFR); corticosterone production] were separately dispersed and studied in vitro. Plasma renin activity and ANG II concentrations were extremely low in the KO rats. Basal and cAMP-stimulated aldosterone production was significantly reduced in renin KO ZG cells, whereas corticosterone production was not different between WT and KO ZFR cells. As expected, adrenal renin mRNA expression was lower in the renin KO compared with the WT rat. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical analysis showed a significant decrease in P450aldo (Cyp11b2) mRNA and protein expression in the ZG from the renin KO rat. The reduction in aldosterone synthesis in the ZG of the renin KO adrenal seems to be accounted for by a specific decrease in P450aldo and may be due to the absence of chronic stimulation of the ZG by circulating ANG II or to a reduction in locally released ANG II within the adrenal gland. PMID:25394830

  9. Stat3 is involved in control of MASP2 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Unterberger, Claudia; Hanson, Steven; Klingenhoff, Andreas; Oesterle, Daniela; Frankenberger, Marion; Endo, Yuichi; Matsushita, Misao; Fujita, Teizo; Schwaeble, Wilhelm; Weiss, Elisabeth H.; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Stover, Cordula

    2007-12-28

    Little is known about determinants regulating expression of Mannan-binding lectin associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2), the effector component of the lectin pathway of complement activation. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of the MASP2 promoter regions in human, mouse, and rat, revealed conservation of two putative Stat binding sites, termed StatA and StatB. Site directed mutagenesis specific for these sites was performed. Transcription activity was decreased 5-fold when StatB site was mutated in the wildtype reporter gene construct. Gel retardation and competition assays demonstrated that proteins contained in the nuclear extract prepared from HepG2 specifically bound double-stranded StatB oligonucleotides. Supershift analysis revealed Stat3 to be the major specific binding protein. We conclude that Stat3 binding is important for MASP2 promoter activity.

  10. HIF-1α restricts NF-κB-dependent gene expression to control innate immunity signals

    PubMed Central

    Bandarra, Daniel; Biddlestone, John; Mudie, Sharon; Müller, H.-Arno J.; Rocha, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia and inflammation are intimately linked. It is known that nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) regulates the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) system, but little is known about how HIF regulates NF-κB. Here, we show that HIF-1α represses NF-κB-dependent gene expression. HIF-1α depletion results in increased NF-κB transcriptional activity both in mammalian cells and in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. HIF-1α depletion enhances the NF-κB response, and this required not only the TAK-IKK complex, but also CDK6. Loss of HIF-1α results in an increased angiogenic response in mammalian cancer cells and increased mortality in Drosophila following infection. These results indicate that HIF-1α is required to restrain the NF-κB response, and thus prevents excessive and damaging pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:25510503

  11. Ah Receptor Signaling Controls the Expression of Cardiac Development and Homeostasis Genes.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Vinicius S; Fan, Yunxia; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Xiang; Kurita, Hisaka; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-10-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital abnormality and one of the leading causes of newborn death throughout the world. Despite much emerging scientific information, the precise etiology of this disease remains elusive. Here, we show that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) regulates the expression of crucial cardiogenesis genes and that interference with endogenous AHR functions, either by gene ablation or by agonist exposure during early development, causes overlapping structural and functional cardiac abnormalities that lead to altered fetal heart physiology, including higher heart rates, right and left ventricle dilation, higher stroke volume, and reduced ejection fraction. With striking similarity between AHR knockout (Ahr(-/-)) and agonist-exposed wild type (Ahr(+/+)) embryos, in utero disruption of endogenous AHR functions converge into dysregulation of molecular mechanisms needed for attainment and maintenance of cardiac differentiation, including the pivotal signals regulated by the cardiogenic transcription factor NKH2.5, energy balance via oxidative phosphorylation and TCA cycle and global mitochondrial function and homeostasis. Our findings suggest that AHR signaling in the developing mammalian heart is central to the regulation of pathways crucial for cellular metabolism, cardiogenesis, and cardiac function, which are potential targets of environmental factors associated with CHD.

  12. Light-controlled modulation of gene expression by chemical optoepigenetic probes.

    PubMed

    Reis, Surya A; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J Adam; Szantai-Kis, D Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatiotemporal control. Here we present a generalizable approach, referred to as 'chemo-optical modulation of epigenetically regulated transcription' (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may be translated into new therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required. PMID:26974814

  13. Transcriptional control of expression of fungal beta-lactam biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Litzka, O; Then Bergh, K; Van den Brulle, J; Steidl, S; Brakhage, A A

    1999-01-01

    The most commonly used beta-lactam antibiotics for the therapy of infectious diseases are penicillin and cephalosporin. Penicillin is produced as end product by some fungi most notably by Aspergillus (Emericella) nidulans and Penicillium chrysogenum. Cephalosporins are synthesised by several bacteria and fungi, e.g. by the fungus Acremonium chrysogenum (syn. Cephalosporium acremonium). The biosynthetic pathways leading to both secondary metabolites start from the same three amino acid precursors and have the first two enzymatic reactions in common. The penicillin biosynthesis is catalysed by three enzymes encoded by acvA (pcbAB), ipnA (pcbC) and aatA (penDE). The genes are organised into a cluster. In A. chrysogenum, in addition to acvA and ipnA, which are also clustered, a second cluster contains the genes for enzymes catalysing the reactions of the later steps of the cephalosporin pathway (cefEF, cefG). Transcription of biosynthesis genes is subject to sophisticated control by nutritional factors (e.g. glucose, nitrogen), amino acids such as lysine and methionine, and ambient pH. Some regulators have been identified such as the A. nidulans pH regulatory protein PACC and the transcriptional complex PENR1. PENR1 is a HAP-like transcriptional complex similar or identical to AnCF. Additional positive regulatory factors seem to be represented by recessive trans-acting mutations of A. nidulans (prgA1, prgB1, npeE1) and P. chrysogenum (carried by mutants Npe2 and Npe3). The GATA-binding factor NRE appears to be involved in the regulation of the penicillin biosynthesis genes by the nitrogen source in P. chrysogenum. Formal genetic evidence suggests the existence of transcriptional repressors as well.

  14. Layered genetic control of DNA methylation and gene expression: a locus of multiple sclerosis in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jean; Bourdon, Celine; Bernard, Manon; Wilson, Michael D; Reischl, Eva; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ruggeri, Barbara; Schumann, Gunter; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Leemans, Alexander; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leonard, Gabriel; Richer, Louis; Bouchard, Luigi; Gaudet, Daniel; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka

    2015-10-15

    DNA methylation may contribute to the etiology of complex genetic disorders through its impact on genome integrity and gene expression; it is modulated by DNA-sequence variants, named methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs). Most meQTLs influence methylation of a few CpG dinucleotides within short genomic regions (<3 kb). Here, we identified a layered genetic control of DNA methylation at numerous CpGs across a long 300 kb genomic region. This control involved a single long-range meQTL and multiple local meQTLs. The long-range meQTL explained up to 75% of variance in methylation of CpGs located over extended areas of the 300 kb region. The meQTL was identified in four samples (P = 2.8 × 10(-17), 3.1 × 10(-31), 4.0 × 10(-71) and 5.2 × 10(-199)), comprising a total of 2796 individuals. The long-range meQTL was strongly associated not only with DNA methylation but also with mRNA expression of several genes within the 300 kb region (P = 7.1 × 10(-18)-1.0 × 10(-123)). The associations of the meQTL with gene expression became attenuated when adjusted for DNA methylation (causal inference test: P = 2.4 × 10(-13)-7.1 × 10(-20)), indicating coordinated regulation of DNA methylation and gene expression. Further, the long-range meQTL was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with the most replicated locus of multiple sclerosis, a disease affecting primarily the brain white matter. In middle-aged adults free of the disease, we observed that the risk allele was associated with subtle structural properties of the brain white matter found in multiple sclerosis (P = 0.02). In summary, we identified a long-range meQTL that controls methylation and expression of several genes and may be involved in increasing brain vulnerability to multiple sclerosis.

  15. Layered genetic control of DNA methylation and gene expression: a locus of multiple sclerosis in healthy individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jean; Bourdon, Celine; Bernard, Manon; Wilson, Michael D.; Reischl, Eva; Waldenberger, Melanie; Ruggeri, Barbara; Schumann, Gunter; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Leemans, Alexander; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leonard, Gabriel; Richer, Louis; Bouchard, Luigi; Gaudet, Daniel; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation may contribute to the etiology of complex genetic disorders through its impact on genome integrity and gene expression; it is modulated by DNA-sequence variants, named methylation quantitative trait loci (meQTLs). Most meQTLs influence methylation of a few CpG dinucleotides within short genomic regions (<3 kb). Here, we identified a layered genetic control of DNA methylation at numerous CpGs across a long 300 kb genomic region. This control involved a single long-range meQTL and multiple local meQTLs. The long-range meQTL explained up to 75% of variance in methylation of CpGs located over extended areas of the 300 kb region. The meQTL was identified in four samples (P = 2.8 × 10−17, 3.1 × 10−31, 4.0 × 10−71 and 5.2 × 10−199), comprising a total of 2796 individuals. The long-range meQTL was strongly associated not only with DNA methylation but also with mRNA expression of several genes within the 300 kb region (P = 7.1 × 10−18–1.0 × 10−123). The associations of the meQTL with gene expression became attenuated when adjusted for DNA methylation (causal inference test: P = 2.4 × 10−13–7.1 × 10−20), indicating coordinated regulation of DNA methylation and gene expression. Further, the long-range meQTL was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with the most replicated locus of multiple sclerosis, a disease affecting primarily the brain white matter. In middle-aged adults free of the disease, we observed that the risk allele was associated with subtle structural properties of the brain white matter found in multiple sclerosis (P = 0.02). In summary, we identified a long-range meQTL that controls methylation and expression of several genes and may be involved in increasing brain vulnerability to multiple sclerosis. PMID:26220975

  16. Identification of positive and negative regulatory regions controlling expression of the Xenopus laevis betaTrCP gene.

    PubMed

    Ballarino, Monica; Fruscalzo, Alberto; Marchioni, Marcella; Carnevali, Francesca

    2004-07-21

    betaTrCP mediates the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of several key molecules thereby playing a relevant role in different cellular processes during development and in the adult. In Xenopus embryo, betaTrCP acts as a negative regulator of Wnt signaling by interacting with beta-catenin. In this paper, we report results of the study on expression and regulation of the Xenopus betaTrCP gene. We found that xbetaTrCP is expressed in Xenopus oocytes as three transcripts, which very likely correspond to the previously identified localized mRNAs, and four isoforms. The xbetaTrCP promoter functional and structural analysis showed the presence of elements target of positive transcriptional control. Among them, we have identified a beta-catenin/Tcf signaling responsive region and a 45-bp element containing a sequence motif conforming to the SRF binding site, closer to the transcription initiation sites. There are also elements of transcriptional negative control.

  17. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1{sup −/−} A{sup y}/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the

  18. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p < 0.05 for the overall physiologic state effect (lactation vs. control), and a within tissue pairwise comparison of p < 0.01. The proportion of false positives, an estimate of the ratio of false positives in the list of differentially expressed genes, was calculated for each tissue. The number of differentially expressed genes was 420 in the liver, 337 in the duodenum, 402 in the jejunum, and 523 in the ileum. The list of differentially expressed genes was in turn analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) to detect biological pathways that were overrepresented. In all tissues, sterol regulatory element binding protein (Srebp)-regulated genes involved in cholesterol synthesis showed increased mRNA expression, with the fewest changes detected in the jejunum. We detected increased Scap mRNA in the liver only, suggesting an explanation for the difference in response to lactation between the liver and small intestine. Expression of Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In

  19. Expression of the Sinorhizobium meliloti small RNA gene mmgR is controlled by the nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Ceizel Borella, Germán; Lagares, Antonio; Valverde, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Small non-coding regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are key players in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Hundreds of sRNAs have been identified in Sinorhizobium meliloti, but their biological function remains unknown for most of them. In this study, we characterized the expression pattern of the gene encoding the 77-nt sRNA MmgR in S. meliloti strain 2011. A chromosomal transcriptional reporter fusion (PmmgR-gfp) showed that the mmgR promoter is active along different stages of the interaction with alfalfa roots. In pure cultures, PmmgR-gfp activity paralleled the sRNA abundance indicating that mmgR expression is primarily controlled at the level of transcriptional initiation. PmmgR-gfp activity was higher during growth in rhizobial defined medium (RDM) than in TY medium. Furthermore, PmmgR-gfp was induced at 60 min after shifting growing cells from TY to RDM medium, i.e. shorter than the cell doubling time. In defined RDM medium containing NO3 (-), both PmmgR-gfp and MmgR level were repressed by the addition of tryptone or single amino acids, suggesting that mmgR expression depends on the cellular nitrogen (N) status. In silico analysis failed to detect conserved motifs upstream the promoter RNA polymerase binding site, but revealed a strongly conserved motif centered at -28 that may be linked to the observed regulatory pattern by the N source. PMID:27010014

  20. Glial Expression of the Caenorhabditis elegans Gene swip-10 Supports Glutamate Dependent Control of Extrasynaptic Dopamine Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hardaway, J. Andrew; Sturgeon, Sarah M.; Snarrenberg, Chelsea L.; Li, Zhaoyu; Xu, X.Z. Shawn; Bermingham, Daniel P.; Odiase, Peace; Spencer, W. Clay; Miller, David M.; Carvelli, Lucia; Hardie, Shannon L.

    2015-01-01

    Glial cells play a critical role in shaping neuronal development, structure, and function. In a screen for Caenorhabditis elegans mutants that display dopamine (DA)-dependent, Swimming-Induced Paralysis (Swip), we identified a novel gene, swip-10, the expression of which in glia is required to support normal swimming behavior. swip-10 mutants display reduced locomotion rates on plates, consistent with our findings of elevated rates of presynaptic DA vesicle fusion using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. In addition, swip-10 mutants exhibit elevated DA neuron excitability upon contact with food, as detected by in vivo Ca2+ monitoring, that can be rescued by glial expression of swip-10. Mammalian glia exert powerful control of neuronal excitability via transporter-dependent buffering of extracellular glutamate (Glu). Consistent with this idea, swip-10 paralysis was blunted in mutants deficient in either vesicular Glu release or Glu receptor expression and could be phenocopied by mutations that disrupt the function of plasma membrane Glu transporters, most noticeably glt-1, the ortholog of mammalian astrocytic GLT1 (EAAT2). swip-10 encodes a protein containing a highly conserved metallo-β-lactamase domain, within which our swip-10 mutations are located and where engineered mutations disrupt Swip rescue. Sequence alignments identify the CNS-expressed gene MBLAC1 as a putative mammalian ortholog. Together, our studies provide evidence of a novel pathway in glial cells regulated by swip-10 that limits DA neuron excitability, DA secretion, and DA-dependent behaviors through modulation of Glu signaling. PMID:26109664

  1. Expression of the Sinorhizobium meliloti small RNA gene mmgR is controlled by the nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Ceizel Borella, Germán; Lagares, Antonio; Valverde, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Small non-coding regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are key players in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Hundreds of sRNAs have been identified in Sinorhizobium meliloti, but their biological function remains unknown for most of them. In this study, we characterized the expression pattern of the gene encoding the 77-nt sRNA MmgR in S. meliloti strain 2011. A chromosomal transcriptional reporter fusion (PmmgR-gfp) showed that the mmgR promoter is active along different stages of the interaction with alfalfa roots. In pure cultures, PmmgR-gfp activity paralleled the sRNA abundance indicating that mmgR expression is primarily controlled at the level of transcriptional initiation. PmmgR-gfp activity was higher during growth in rhizobial defined medium (RDM) than in TY medium. Furthermore, PmmgR-gfp was induced at 60 min after shifting growing cells from TY to RDM medium, i.e. shorter than the cell doubling time. In defined RDM medium containing NO3 (-), both PmmgR-gfp and MmgR level were repressed by the addition of tryptone or single amino acids, suggesting that mmgR expression depends on the cellular nitrogen (N) status. In silico analysis failed to detect conserved motifs upstream the promoter RNA polymerase binding site, but revealed a strongly conserved motif centered at -28 that may be linked to the observed regulatory pattern by the N source.

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of Wilms’ Tumor 1-Controlled Gene Expression in Podocytes Reveals Key Regulatory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kann, Martin; Ettou, Sandrine; Jung, Youngsook L.; Lenz, Maximilian O.; Taglienti, Mary E.; Park, Peter J.; Schermer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Wilms’ tumor suppressor 1 (WT1) is key to podocyte development and viability; however, WT1 transcriptional networks in podocytes remain elusive. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the genome-wide WT1 transcriptional network in podocytes in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIPseq) and RNA sequencing techniques. Our data show a specific role for WT1 in regulating the podocyte-specific transcriptome through binding to both promoters and enhancers of target genes. Furthermore, we inferred a podocyte transcription factor network consisting of WT1, LMX1B, TCF21, Fox-class and TEAD family transcription factors, and MAFB that uses tissue-specific enhancers to control podocyte gene expression. In addition to previously described WT1-dependent target genes, ChIPseq identified novel WT1-dependent signaling systems. These targets included components of the Hippo signaling system, underscoring the power of genome-wide transcriptional-network analyses. Together, our data elucidate a comprehensive gene regulatory network in podocytes suggesting that WT1 gene regulatory function and podocyte cell-type specification can best be understood in the context of transcription factor-regulatory element network interplay. PMID:25636411

  3. Redundant cis-acting elements control expression of the Drosophila affinidisjuncta Adh gene in the larval fat body.

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, R W; Hu, J; Brennan, M D

    1994-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene in the Hawaiian species of fruit fly, Drosophila affinidisjuncta, like the Adh genes from all Drosophila species analyzed, is expressed at high levels in the larval fat body via a larval-specific promoter. To identify the cis-acting elements involved in this highly conserved aspect of Adh gene expression, deleted D. affinidisjuncta genes were introduced into D. melanogaster by somatic transformation. Unlike previously described methods, this transformation system allows analysis of Adh gene expression specifically in the larval fat body. The arrangement of sequences influencing expression of the proximal promoter of this gene in the larval fat body differs markedly from that described for the Adh gene from the distant relative, D. melanogaster. Multiple redundant elements dispersed 5' and 3' to the gene, only some of which map to regions carrying evolutionarily conserved sequences, affect expression in the fat body. D. affinidisjuncta employs a novel mode of Adh gene regulation in which the proximal promoter is influenced by sequences having roles in expression of the distal promoter. This gene is also unique in that far upstream sequences can compensate for loss of sequences within 200 bp of the proximal RNA start site. Furthermore, expression is influenced in an unusual, context-dependent manner by a naturally-occurring 3' duplication of the proximal promoter--a feature found only in Hawaiian species. Images PMID:8165141

  4. Synthetic RNA-protein modules integrated with native translation mechanisms to control gene expression in malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Suresh M; Falla, Alejandra; Goldfless, Stephen J; Nasamu, Armiyaw S; Niles, Jacquin C

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression is important for understanding fundamental biology and programming new cellular processes in synthetic biology. Previous strategies for regulating translation in eukaryotes have focused on disrupting individual steps in translation, including initiation and mRNA cleavage. In emphasizing modularity and cross-organism functionality, these systems are designed to operate orthogonally to native control mechanisms. Here we introduce a broadly applicable strategy for robustly controlling protein translation by integrating synthetic translational control via a small-molecule-regulated RNA-protein module with native mechanisms that simultaneously regulate multiple facets of cellular RNA fate. We demonstrate that this strategy reduces 'leakiness' to improve overall expression dynamic range, and can be implemented without sacrificing modularity and cross-organism functionality. We illustrate this in Saccharomyces cerevisae and the non-model human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Given the limited functional genetics toolkit available for P. falciparum, we establish the utility of this strategy for defining essential genes. PMID:26925876

  5. Synthetic RNA–protein modules integrated with native translation mechanisms to control gene expression in malaria parasites

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Suresh M.; Falla, Alejandra; Goldfless, Stephen J.; Nasamu, Armiyaw S.; Niles, Jacquin C.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression is important for understanding fundamental biology and programming new cellular processes in synthetic biology. Previous strategies for regulating translation in eukaryotes have focused on disrupting individual steps in translation, including initiation and mRNA cleavage. In emphasizing modularity and cross-organism functionality, these systems are designed to operate orthogonally to native control mechanisms. Here we introduce a broadly applicable strategy for robustly controlling protein translation by integrating synthetic translational control via a small-molecule-regulated RNA–protein module with native mechanisms that simultaneously regulate multiple facets of cellular RNA fate. We demonstrate that this strategy reduces ‘leakiness' to improve overall expression dynamic range, and can be implemented without sacrificing modularity and cross-organism functionality. We illustrate this in Saccharomyces cerevisae and the non-model human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Given the limited functional genetics toolkit available for P. falciparum, we establish the utility of this strategy for defining essential genes. PMID:26925876

  6. The wheat HMW-glutenin 1Dy10 gene promoter controls endosperm expression in Brachypodium distachyon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The grass species Brachypodium distachyon has emerged as a model system for the study of gene structure and function in temperate cereals. As a first demonstration of the utility of Brachypodium to study wheat gene promoter function, we transformed it with a T-DNA that included the GUS reporter gene...

  7. Regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of the DAN/TIR mannoprotein genes during anaerobic remodeling of the cell wall in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Abramova, N E; Cohen, B D; Sertil, O; Kapoor, R; Davies, K J; Lowry, C V

    2001-01-01

    The DAN/TIR genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode homologous mannoproteins, some of which are essential for anaerobic growth. Expression of these genes is induced during anaerobiosis and in some cases during cold shock. We show that several heme-responsive mechanisms combine to regulate DAN/TIR gene expression. The first mechanism employs two repression factors, Mox1 and Mox2, and an activation factor, Mox4 (for mannoprotein regulation by oxygen). The genes encoding these proteins were identified by selecting for recessive mutants with altered regulation of a dan1::ura3 fusion. MOX4 is identical to UPC2, encoding a binucleate zinc cluster protein controlling expression of an anaerobic sterol transport system. Mox4/Upc2 is required for expression of all the DAN/TIR genes. It appears to act through a consensus sequence termed the AR1 site, as does Mox2. The noninducible mox4Delta allele was epistatic to the constitutive mox1 and mox2 mutations, suggesting that Mox1 and Mox2 modulate activation by Mox4 in a heme-dependent fashion. Mutations in a putative repression domain in Mox4 caused constitutive expression of the DAN/TIR genes, indicating a role for this domain in heme repression. MOX4 expression is induced both in anaerobic and cold-shocked cells, so heme may also regulate DAN/TIR expression through inhibition of expression of MOX4. Indeed, ectopic expression of MOX4 in aerobic cells resulted in partially constitutive expression of DAN1. Heme also regulates expression of some of the DAN/TIR genes through the Rox7 repressor, which also controls expression of the hypoxic gene ANB1. In addition Rox1, another heme-responsive repressor, and the global repressors Tup1 and Ssn6 are also required for full aerobic repression of these genes. PMID:11238402

  8. Regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of the DAN/TIR mannoprotein genes during anaerobic remodeling of the cell wall in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Abramova, N E; Cohen, B D; Sertil, O; Kapoor, R; Davies, K J; Lowry, C V

    2001-03-01

    The DAN/TIR genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encode homologous mannoproteins, some of which are essential for anaerobic growth. Expression of these genes is induced during anaerobiosis and in some cases during cold shock. We show that several heme-responsive mechanisms combine to regulate DAN/TIR gene expression. The first mechanism employs two repression factors, Mox1 and Mox2, and an activation factor, Mox4 (for mannoprotein regulation by oxygen). The genes encoding these proteins were identified by selecting for recessive mutants with altered regulation of a dan1::ura3 fusion. MOX4 is identical to UPC2, encoding a binucleate zinc cluster protein controlling expression of an anaerobic sterol transport system. Mox4/Upc2 is required for expression of all the DAN/TIR genes. It appears to act through a consensus sequence termed the AR1 site, as does Mox2. The noninducible mox4Delta allele was epistatic to the constitutive mox1 and mox2 mutations, suggesting that Mox1 and Mox2 modulate activation by Mox4 in a heme-dependent fashion. Mutations in a putative repression domain in Mox4 caused constitutive expression of the DAN/TIR genes, indicating a role for this domain in heme repression. MOX4 expression is induced both in anaerobic and cold-shocked cells, so heme may also regulate DAN/TIR expression through inhibition of expression of MOX4. Indeed, ectopic expression of MOX4 in aerobic cells resulted in partially constitutive expression of DAN1. Heme also regulates expression of some of the DAN/TIR genes through the Rox7 repressor, which also controls expression of the hypoxic gene ANB1. In addition Rox1, another heme-responsive repressor, and the global repressors Tup1 and Ssn6 are also required for full aerobic repression of these genes.

  9. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Jose M.G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a process central to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges to the use of traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses. PMID:23790365

  10. Expression of genes controlling fat deposition in two genetically diverse beef cattle breeds fed high or low silage diets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both genetic background and finishing system can alter fat deposition, thus indicating their influence on adipogenic and lipogenic factors. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying fat deposition and fatty acid composition in beef cattle are not fully understood. This study aimed to assess the effect of breed and dietary silage level on the expression patterns of key genes controlling lipid metabolism in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle of cattle. To that purpose, forty bulls from two genetically diverse Portuguese bovine breeds with distinct maturity rates, Alentejana and Barrosã, were selected and fed either low (30% maize silage/70% concentrate) or high silage (70% maize silage/30% concentrate) diets. Results The results suggested that enhanced deposition of fatty acids in the SAT from Barrosã bulls, when compared to Alentejana, could be due to higher expression levels of lipogenesis (SCD and LPL) and β-oxidation (CRAT) related genes. Our results also indicated that SREBF1 expression in the SAT is increased by feeding the low silage diet. Together, these results point out to a higher lipid turnover in the SAT of Barrosã bulls when compared to Alentejana. In turn, lipid deposition in the LL muscle is related to the expression of adipogenic (PPARG and FABP4) and lipogenic (ACACA and SCD) genes. The positive correlation between ACACA expression levels and total lipids, as well trans fatty acids, points to ACACA as a major player in intramuscular deposition in ruminants. Moreover, results reinforce the role of FABP4 in intramuscular fat development and the SAT as the major site for lipid metabolism in ruminants. Conclusions Overall, the results showed that SAT and LL muscle fatty acid composition are mostly dependent on the genetic background. In addition, dietary silage level impacted on muscle lipid metabolism to a greater extent than on that of SAT, as evaluated by gene expression levels of adipogenic and

  11. Expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes in avocados fumigated with thyme oil vapours and control of anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Bill, Malick; Sivakumar, Dharini; Beukes, Mervyn; Korsten, Lise

    2016-03-01

    Thyme oil (TO) fumigation (96μll(-1)) to cv. Hass and Ryan avocados significantly reduced anthracnose incidence compared to prochloraz and the untreated control. Also, enhanced activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase were noted in both cultivars. TO fumigation induced the expression of both β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase genes in naturally infected fruit of both cultivars, during storage at 7 or 7.5°C for up to 21d and during subsequent simulated market shelf conditions at 20°C for 5d. However, the impact of TO fumigation on the β-1,3-glucanase gene expression was higher in both cultivars. Higher gene regulation and β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase activities were observed in cv. Ryan compared to Hass. Although TO fumigation significantly reduced anthracnose incidence in both naturally infected cultivars, the inhibitory effect was slightly higher in cv. Ryan than Hass. Thus, postharvest TO fumigation had positive effects on enhancing anthracnose disease resistance during storage and also gave a residual effect during the simulated shelf life.

  12. Expression of auxin synthesis gene tms1 under control of tuber-specific promoter enhances potato tuberization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kolachevskaya, Oksana O; Alekseeva, Valeriya V; Sergeeva, Lidiya I; Rukavtsova, Elena B; Getman, Irina A; Vreugdenhil, Dick; Buryanov, Yaroslav I; Romanov, Georgy A

    2015-09-01

    Phytohormones, auxins in particular, play an important role in plant development and productivity. Earlier data showed positive impact of exogenous auxin on potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuberization. The aim of this study was to generate potato plants with increased auxin level predominantly in tubers. To this end, a pBinB33-tms1 vector was constructed harboring the Agrobacterium auxin biosynthesis gene tms1 fused to tuber-specific promoter of the class I patatin gene (B33-promoter) of potato. Among numerous independently generated B33:tms1 lines, those without visible differences from control were selected for detailed studies. In the majority of transgenic lines, tms1 gene transcription was detected, mostly in tubers rather than in shoots. Indoleacetic acid (IAA) content in tubers and the auxin tuber-to-shoot ratio were increased in tms1-expressing transformants. The organ-specific increase in auxin synthesis in B33:tms1-transformants accelerated and intensified the process of tuber formation, reduced the dose of carbohydrate supply required for in vitro tuberization, and decreased the photoperiodic dependence of tuber initiation. Overall, a positive correlation was observed between tms1 expression, IAA content in tubers, and stimulation of tuber formation. The revealed properties of B33:tms1 transformants imply an important role for auxin in potato tuberization and offer prospects to magnify potato productivity by a moderate organ-specific enhancement of auxin content.

  13. Expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes in avocados fumigated with thyme oil vapours and control of anthracnose.

    PubMed

    Bill, Malick; Sivakumar, Dharini; Beukes, Mervyn; Korsten, Lise

    2016-03-01

    Thyme oil (TO) fumigation (96μll(-1)) to cv. Hass and Ryan avocados significantly reduced anthracnose incidence compared to prochloraz and the untreated control. Also, enhanced activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase were noted in both cultivars. TO fumigation induced the expression of both β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase genes in naturally infected fruit of both cultivars, during storage at 7 or 7.5°C for up to 21d and during subsequent simulated market shelf conditions at 20°C for 5d. However, the impact of TO fumigation on the β-1,3-glucanase gene expression was higher in both cultivars. Higher gene regulation and β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase activities were observed in cv. Ryan compared to Hass. Although TO fumigation significantly reduced anthracnose incidence in both naturally infected cultivars, the inhibitory effect was slightly higher in cv. Ryan than Hass. Thus, postharvest TO fumigation had positive effects on enhancing anthracnose disease resistance during storage and also gave a residual effect during the simulated shelf life. PMID:26471637

  14. Zinc transporter gene expression and glycemic control in post-menopausal women with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Meika; Chu, Anna; Petocz, Peter; Samman, Samir

    2014-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated often with underlying zinc deficiency and nutritional supplements such as zinc may be of therapeutic benefit in the disease. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week trial in postmenopausal women (n=48) with Type 2 DM we investigated the effects of supplementation with zinc (40mg/d) and flaxseed oil (FSO; 2g/d) on the gene expression of zinc transporters (ZnT1, ZnT5, ZnT6, ZnT7, ZnT8, Zip1, Zip3, Zip7, and Zip10) and metallothionein (MT-1A, and MT-2A), and markers of glycemic control (glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c]). The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. No significant effects of zinc or FSO supplementation were observed on glycemic marker concentrations, HOMA-IR or fold change over 12 weeks in zinc transporter and metallothionein gene expression. In multivariate analysis, the change over 12 weeks in serum glucose concentrations (P=0.001) and HOMA-IR (P=0.001) predicted the fold change in Zip10. In secondary analysis, marginal statistical significance was observed with the change in both serum glucose concentrations (P=0.003) and HOMA-IR (P=0.007) being predictive of the fold change in ZnT6. ZnT8 mRNA expression was variable; HbA1c levels were higher (P=0.006) in participants who exhibited ZnT8 expression compared to those who did not. The significant predictive relationships between Zip10, ZnT6, serum glucose and HOMA-IR are preliminary, as is the relationship between HbA1c and ZnT8; nevertheless the observations support an association between Type 2 DM and zinc homeostasis that requires further exploration.

  15. Expression of the nos gene and Firefly Flashing: A Test of the Nitric-Oxide-Mediated Flash Control Model

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hajime; Yokoyama, Jun; Ohba, Nobuyoshi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Kawata, Masakado

    2014-01-01

    Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) emit various types of light that differ among species and populations of the same species. Their lights are assumed to be biological properties that play important ecological and evolutionary roles. Some species in the Lampyridae emit periodic luminescence, the patterns of which are characterized by species-specific intervals. In previous work, it was predicted that the nitric oxide (NO) regulates the oxygen supply required for the bioluminescence reaction of fireflies. Here, the expression of the NO synthase (NOS) mRNA in some fireflies was examined to verify the predictive model of nitric-oxide-mediated flash control in these insects. The expression of the nos gene in the lantern organ was observed not only in nocturnal flashing species but also in diurnal non-flashing species. It was shown that the expression levels of nos were higher in the lantern of Luciola cruciata (Motschulsky) larvae, which that emits continuous light, than in other body parts, although expression in the lantern of the adults, who flash periodically, was not high. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression levels among adults of Luciola cruciata characterized by different flashing intervals. The data do not support the model of an NO-mediated flash control mechanism, during which oxygen becomes available for the luciferin-luciferase reaction through NO-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. It is also indicated that flash patterns do not co-vary with NOS production. However, high nos expression in the larval lantern suggests that NO may play a role in producing continuous light by functioning as a neurotransmitter signal for bioluminescence. PMID:25373203

  16. Expression of the nos gene and firefly flashing: a test of the nitric-oxide-mediated flash control model.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Hajime; Yokoyama, Jun; Ohba, Nobuyoshi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Kawata, Masakado

    2014-04-19

    Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) emit various types of light that differ among species and populations of the same species. Their lights are assumed to be biological properties that play important ecological and evolutionary roles. Some species in the Lampyridae emit periodic luminescence, the patterns of which are characterized by species-specific intervals. In previous work, it was predicted that the nitric oxide (NO) regulates the oxygen supply required for the bioluminescence reaction of fireflies. Here, the expression of the NO synthase (NOS) mRNA in some fireflies was examined to verify the predictive model of nitric-oxide-mediated flash control in these insects. The expression of the nos gene in the lantern organ was observed not only in nocturnal flashing species but also in diurnal non-flashing species. It was shown that the expression levels of nos were higher in the lantern of Luciola cruciata (Motschulsky) larvae, which that emits continuous light, than in other body parts, although expression in the lantern of the adults, who flash periodically, was not high. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression levels among adults of Luciola cruciata characterized by different flashing intervals. The data do not support the model of an NO-mediated flash control mechanism, during which oxygen becomes available for the luciferin-luciferase reaction through NO-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. It is also indicated that flash patterns do not co-vary with NOS production. However, high nos expression in the larval lantern suggests that NO may play a role in producing continuous light by functioning as a neurotransmitter signal for bioluminescence.

  17. Epigenetic Control of Macrophage Polarisation and Soluble Mediator Gene Expression during Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages function as sentinel cells, which constantly monitor the host environment for infection or injury. Macrophages have been shown to exhibit a spectrum of activated phenotypes, which can often be categorised under the M1/M2 paradigm. M1 macrophages secrete proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, CCL4, and CXCL10, and induce phagocytosis and oxidative dependent killing mechanisms. In contrast, M2 macrophages support wound healing and resolution of inflammation. In the past decade, interest has grown in understanding the mechanisms involved in regulating macrophage activation. In particular, epigenetic control of M1 or M2 activation states has been shown to rely on posttranslational modifications of histone proteins adjacent to inflammatory-related genes. Changes in methylation and acetylation of histones by methyltransferases, demethylases, acetyltransferases, and deacetylases can all impact how macrophage phenotypes are generated. In this review, we summarise the latest advances in the field of epigenetic regulation of macrophage polarisation to M1 or M2 states, with particular focus on the cytokine and chemokine profiles associated with these phenotypes. PMID:27143818

  18. Post-transcriptional control of light-harvesting genes expression under light stress.

    PubMed

    Floris, Maïna; Bassi, Roberto; Robaglia, Christophe; Alboresi, Alessandro; Lanet, Elodie

    2013-05-01

    Plants have to deal with fluctuating light environment and the regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus is crucial for their survival. The large multigenic family of nuclear encoded chloroplastic proteins called light harvesting complex (LHC) is involved in both light harvesting and photoprotection. Changes in light intensity induce a complex set of molecular events within both the chloroplast and the cytoplasmic compartments of the cell leading to reorganization of the photosynthetic apparatus in order to optimize photosynthesis to the new conditions. In this study we have investigated the occurrence of translational regulations during light stress in Arabidopsis thaliana by using polysomes profiling. We have observed a strong effect of light on global translation activity of the cell. We show that individual LHC genes are translationally regulated in response to light conditions by changing the ratio between polysomal versus total messenger RNA. In addition, we found that cytoplasmic translational regulation can precede nuclear transcriptional regulation. Thus translational control appears as an important component of the crosstalk between chloroplast and the nucleus in plant cells.

  19. Small molecule-mediated density-dependent control of gene expression in prokaryotes: bioluminescence and the biosynthesis of carbapenem antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Williams, P; Bainton, N J; Swift, S; Chhabra, S R; Winson, M K; Stewart, G S; Salmond, G P; Bycroft, B W

    1992-12-15

    Sophisticated signal transduction systems enable prokaryotes to sense their growth environment and mount an appropriate adaptive response. Signal transduction and gene regulation through the phosphorylation of two regulatory components is now recognised as one of the major global regulatory networks in bacteria. However, not all types of sensor-regulator circuits relay information via phosphoryl transfer. The Vibrio fischeri LuxR protein which has previously been characterised as a member of the response-regulator superfamily responds to a small diffusible signal molecule N-(3-oxohexanoyl)homoserine lactone (HSL). Biosynthesis of HSL in V. fischeri is dependent on the expression of the luxI gene. Until recently, the role of HSL as an 'autoinducer' was thought to be restricted to V. fischeri and a few related marine bacteria in which it controls the onset of bioluminescence. However, we have discovered that a diverse group of terrestrial bacteria: (1) produce HSL; (2) possess genes analogous to luxI; and (3) exhibit cell density-dependent induction of bioluminesence when transformed with a recombinant plasmid carrying V. fischeri lux genes but lacking luxI. In one of these, Erwinia carotovora, HSL is shown to mediate the cell density-dependent biosynthesis of a carbapenem antibiotic.

  20. Circadian control by the reduction/oxidation pathway: catalase represses light-dependent clock gene expression in the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Jun; Cho, Sehyung; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2007-10-01

    Light is the key entraining stimulus for the circadian clock, but several features of the signaling pathways that convert the photic signal to clock entrainment remain to be deciphered. Here, we show that light induces the production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) that acts as the second messenger coupling photoreception to the zebrafish circadian clock. Treatment of light-responsive Z3 cells with H(2)O(2) triggers the induction of zCry1a and zPer2 genes and the subsequent circadian oscillation of zPer1. Remarkably, the induction kinetics and oscillation profile in response to H(2)O(2) are identical to those initiated by light. Catalase (Cat), an antioxidant enzyme degrading H(2)O(2), shows an oscillating pattern of expression and activity, antiphasic to zCry1a and zPer2. Interestingly, overexpression of zCAT results in a reduced light-dependent zCry1a and zPer2 gene induction. In contrast, inhibition of zCAT function enhances light-mediated inducibility of these clock genes. These findings implicate the enzymatic function of zCAT enzyme in the negative regulation of light-dependent clock gene transcriptional activation. Our findings provide an attractive link between the regulation of the cellular reduction/oxidation (redox) state and the photic signaling pathways implicated in circadian control.

  1. Gene expression profile of pulpitis

    PubMed Central

    Galicia, Johnah C.; Henson, Brett R.; Parker, Joel S.; Khan, Asma A.

    2016-01-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the Significance Analysis of Microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (≥30mm on VAS) compared to those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  2. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  3. A hormone receptor-based transactivator bridges different binary systems to precisely control spatial-temporal gene expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shu-Yun; Tu, Chiao-Hui; Hsu, Ya-Ting; Wang, Horng-Dar; Wen, Rong-Kun; Lin, Chen-Ta; Wu, Chia-Lin; Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Guan-Shieng; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Fu, Tsai-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The GAL4/UAS gene expression system is a precise means of targeted gene expression employed to study biological phenomena in Drosophila. A modified GAL4/UAS system can be conditionally regulated using a temporal and regional gene expression targeting (TARGET) system that responds to heat shock induction. However heat shock-related temperature shifts sometimes cause unexpected physiological responses that confound behavioral analyses. We describe here the construction of a drug-inducible version of this system that takes advantage of tissue-specific GAL4 driver lines to yield either RU486-activated LexA-progesterone receptor chimeras (LexPR) or β-estradiol-activated LexA-estrogen receptor chimeras (XVE). Upon induction, these chimeras bind to a LexA operator (LexAop) and activate transgene expression. Using GFP expression as a marker for induction in fly brain cells, both approaches are capable of tightly and precisely modulating transgene expression in a temporal and dosage-dependent manner. Additionally, tissue-specific GAL4 drivers resulted in target gene expression that was restricted to those specific tissues. Constitutive expression of the active PKA catalytic subunit using these systems altered the sleep pattern of flies, demonstrating that both systems can regulate transgene expression that precisely mimics regulation that was previously engineered using the GeneSwitch/UAS system. Unlike the limited number of GeneSwitch drivers, this approach allows for the usage of the multitudinous, tissue-specific GAL4 lines for studying temporal gene regulation and tissue-specific gene expression. Together, these new inducible systems provide additional, highly valuable tools available to study gene function in Drosophila. PMID:23239992

  4. Cdk5 controls IL-2 gene expression via repression of the mSin3a-HDAC complex.

    PubMed

    Lam, Eric; Pareek, Tej K; Letterio, John J

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a unique member of a family of serine/threonine cyclin-dependent protein kinases. We previously demonstrated disruption of Cdk5 gene expression in mice impairs T-cell function and ameliorates T-cell-mediated neuroinflammation. Here, we show Cdk5 modulates gene expression during T-cell activation by impairing the repression of gene transcription by histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) through specific phosphorylation of the mSin3a protein at serine residue 861. Disruption of Cdk5 activity in T-cells enhances HDAC activity and binding of the HDAC1/mSin3a complex to the IL-2 promoter, leading to suppression of IL-2 gene expression. These data point to essential roles for Cdk5 in regulating gene expression in T-cells and transcriptional regulation by the co-repressor mSin3a. PMID:25785643

  5. Dual-specificity anti-sigma factor reinforces control of cell-type specific gene expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Mónica; Gao, JinXin; Bota, João; Bate, Ashley R; Meisner, Jeffrey; Eichenberger, Patrick; Moran, Charles P; Henriques, Adriano O

    2015-04-01

    Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue. PMID:25835496

  6. Dual-Specificity Anti-sigma Factor Reinforces Control of Cell-Type Specific Gene Expression in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mónica; Gao, JinXin; Bota, João; Bate, Ashley R.; Meisner, Jeffrey; Eichenberger, Patrick; Moran, Charles P.; Henriques, Adriano O.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue. PMID:25835496

  7. The iron-sensing fur regulator controls expression timing and levels of salmonella pathogenicity island 2 genes in the course of environmental acidification.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunna; Kim, Hyunkeun; Lee, Hwiseop; Nam, Daesil; Choi, Jeongjoon; Shin, Dongwoo

    2014-06-01

    In order to survive inside macrophages, Salmonella produces a series of proteins encoded by genes within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). In the present study, we report that Fur, a central regulator of iron utilization, negatively controls the expression of SPI-2 genes. Time course analysis of SPI-2 expression after the entry of Salmonella into macrophages revealed that SPI-2 genes are induced earlier and at higher levels in the absence of the Fur regulator. It was hypothesized that Fur repressed the SPI-2 expression that was activated during acidification of the phagosome. Indeed, as pH was lowered from pH 7.0 to pH 5.5, the lack of Fur enabled SPI-2 gene expression to be induced at higher pH and to be expressed at higher levels. Fur controlled SPI-2 genes via repression of the SsrB response regulator, a primary activator of SPI-2 expression. Fur repressed ssrB expression both inside macrophages and under acidic conditions, which we ascribe to the direct binding of Fur to the ssrB promoter. Our study suggests that Salmonella could employ iron inside the phagosome to precisely control the timing and levels of SPI-2 expression inside macrophages.

  8. Gene Expression Studies in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xlao-Guang; Mathur, Geetika; James, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Research on gene expression in mosquitoes is motivated by both basic and applied interests. Studies of genes involved in hematophagy, reproduction, olfaction, and immune responses reveal an exquisite confluence of biological adaptations that result in these highly-successful life forms. The requirement of female mosquitoes for a bloodmeal for propagation has been exploited by a wide diversity of viral, protozoan and metazoan pathogens as part of their life cycles. Identifying genes involved in host-seeking, blood feeding and digestion, reproduction, insecticide resistance and susceptibility/refractoriness to pathogen development is expected to provide the bases for the development of novel methods to control mosquito-borne diseases. Advances in mosquito transgenesis technologies, the availability of whole genome sequence information, mass sequencing and analyses of transcriptomes and RNAi techniques will assist development of these tools as well as deepen the understanding of the underlying genetic components for biological phenomena characteristic of these insect species. PMID:19161831

  9. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  10. cis-Regulatory control of the initial neurogenic pattern of onecut gene expression in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Barsi, Julius C; Davidson, Eric H

    2016-01-01

    Specification of the ciliated band (CB) of echinoid embryos executes three spatial functions essential for postgastrular organization. These are establishment of a band about 5 cells wide which delimits and bounds other embryonic territories; definition of a neurogenic domain within this band; and generation within it of arrays of ciliary cells that bear the special long cilia from which the structure derives its name. In Strongylocentrotus purpuratus the spatial coordinates of the future ciliated band are initially and exactly determined by the disposition of a ring of cells that transcriptionally activate the onecut homeodomain regulatory gene, beginning in blastula stage, long before the appearance of the CB per se. Thus the cis-regulatory apparatus that governs onecut expression in the blastula directly reveals the genomic sequence code by which these aspects of the spatial organization of the embryo are initially determined. We screened the entire onecut locus and its flanking region for transcriptionally active cis-regulatory elements, and by means of BAC recombineered deletions identified three separated and required cis-regulatory modules that execute different functions. The operating logic of the crucial spatial control module accounting for the spectacularly precise and beautiful early onecut expression domain depends on spatial repression. Previously predicted oral ectoderm and aboral ectoderm repressors were identified by cis-regulatory mutation as the products of goosecoid and irxa genes respectively, while the pan-ectodermal activator SoxB1 supplies a transcriptional driver function.

  11. Nonadditive gene expression in polyploids.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Liu, Xiaoxian; Pires, J Chris; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    Allopolyploidy involves hybridization and duplication of divergent parental genomes and provides new avenues for gene expression. The expression levels of duplicated genes in polyploids can show deviation from parental additivity (the arithmetic average of the parental expression levels). Nonadditive expression has been widely observed in diverse polyploids and comprises at least three possible scenarios: (a) The total gene expression level in a polyploid is similar to that of one of its parents (expression-level dominance); (b) total gene expression is lower or higher than in both parents (transgressive expression); and (c) the relative contribution of the parental copies (homeologs) to the total gene expression is unequal (homeolog expression bias). Several factors may result in expression nonadditivity in polyploids, including maternal-paternal influence, gene dosage balance, cis- and/or trans-regulatory networks, and epigenetic regulation. As our understanding of nonadditive gene expression in polyploids remains limited, a new generation of investigators should explore additional phenomena (i.e., alternative splicing) and use other high-throughput "omics" technologies to measure the impact of nonadditive expression on phenotype, proteome, and metabolome. PMID:25421600

  12. Global gene expression analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown under redox potential-controlled very-high-gravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Guang; Lin, Yen-Han; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2013-11-01

    Redox potential (ORP) plays a pivotal role in yeast viability and ethanol production during very-high-gravity (VHG) ethanol fermentation. In order to identify the correlation between redox potential profiles and gene expression patterns, global gene expression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Results indicated that significant changes in gene expression occurred at the periods of 0 - 6 h and 30 - 36 h, respectively. Changes noted in the period of 0 - 6 h were mainly related to carbohydrate metabolism. In contrast, gene expression variation at 30 - 36 h could be attributed primarily to stress response. Although CDC19 was down-regulated, expression of PYK2, PDC6 and ADH2 correlated inversely with ORP. Meanwhile, expression of GPD1 decreased due to the depletion of dissolved oxygen in the fermentation broth, but expression of GPD2 correlated with ORP. Transcription of genes encoding heat shock proteins was characterized by uphill, downhill, valley and plateau expression profiles, accordingly to specific function in stress response. These results highlight the role of ORP in modulating yeast physiology and metabolism under VHG conditions.

  13. MICROARRAY QUALITY CONTROL PROJECT: A COMPREHENSIVE GENE EXPRESSION TECHNOLOGY SURVEY DEMONSTRATES MEASURABLE CONSISTENCY AND CONCORDANT RESULTS BETWEEN PLATFORMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last decade, the introduction of microarray technology has had a profound impact on gene expression research. The publication of studies with dissimilar or altogether contradictory results, obtained using different microarray platforms to analyze identical RNA samples, h...

  14. The MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) project shows inter- and intraplatform reproducibility of gene expression measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last decade, the introduction of microarray technology has had a profound impact on gene expression research. The publication of studies with dissimilar or altogether contradictory results, obtained using different microarray platforms to analyze identical RNA samples, ...

  15. Gene expression profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of Chinese nickel refinery workers with high exposures to nickel and control subjects

    PubMed Central

    Arita, Adriana; Muñoz, Alexandra; Chervona, Yana; Niu, Jingping; Qu, Qingshan; Zhao, Najuan; Ruan, Ye; Kiok, Kathrin; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Clancy, Hailey A.; Shamy, Magdy; Costa, Max

    2012-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to nickel (Ni) is associated with an increased risk of lung and nasal cancers. Ni compounds exhibit weak mutagenic activity, alter the cell’s epigenetic homeostasis, and activate signaling pathways. However, changes in gene expression associated with Ni exposure have only been investigated in vitro. This study was conducted in a Chinese population to determine whether occupational exposure to Ni was associated with differential gene expression profiles in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of Ni-refinery workers when compared to referents. Methods Eight Ni-refinery workers and ten referents were selected. PBMC RNA was extracted and gene expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix exon arrays. Differentially expressed genes between both groups were identified in a global analysis. Results There were a total of 2756 differentially expressed genes (DEG) in the Ni-refinery workers relative to the control subjects (FDR adjusted p<0.05) with 770 up-regulated genes and 1986 down-regulated genes. DNA repair and epigenetic genes were significantly overrepresented (p< 0.0002) among the DEG. Of 31 DNA repair genes, 29 were repressed in the high exposure group and two were overexpressed. Of the 16 epigenetic genes 12 were repressed in the high exposure group and 4 were overexpressed. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that occupational exposure to Ni is associated with alterations in gene expression profiles in PBMCs of subjects. Impact Gene expression may be useful in identifying patterns of deregulation that precede clinical identification of Ni-induced cancers. PMID:23195993

  16. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  17. Regulation of Gene Expression in Protozoa Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Consuelo; Esther Ramirez, M.; Calixto-Galvez, Mercedes; Medel, Olivia; Rodríguez, Mario A.

    2010-01-01

    Infections with protozoa parasites are associated with high burdens of morbidity and mortality across the developing world. Despite extensive efforts to control the transmission of these parasites, the spread of populations resistant to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines against them contribute to their persistence as major public health problems. Parasites should perform a strict control on the expression of genes involved in their pathogenicity, differentiation, immune evasion, or drug resistance, and the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in that control could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies. However, until now these mechanisms are poorly understood in protozoa. Recent investigations into gene expression in protozoa parasites suggest that they possess many of the canonical machineries employed by higher eukaryotes for the control of gene expression at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, but they also contain exclusive mechanisms. Here, we review the current understanding about the regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium sp., Trypanosomatids, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. PMID:20204171

  18. Serial analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Velculescu, V E; Zhang, L; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, K W

    1995-10-20

    The characteristics of an organism are determined by the genes expressed within it. A method was developed, called serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), that allows the quantitative and simultaneous analysis of a large number of transcripts. To demonstrate this strategy, short diagnostic sequence tags were isolated from pancreas, concatenated, and cloned. Manual sequencing of 1000 tags revealed a gene expression pattern characteristic of pancreatic function. New pancreatic transcripts corresponding to novel tags were identified. SAGE should provide a broadly applicable means for the quantitative cataloging and comparison of expressed genes in a variety of normal, developmental, and disease states. PMID:7570003

  19. Utilization of gene expression signature for quality control of traditional Chinese medicine formula Si-Wu-Tang.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Zhijun; Wang, Charles; Xu, Jun; Wen, Zhining; Wang, Haitian; Shi, Leming; Chow, Moses S S; Huang, Ying; Zuo, Zhong

    2013-07-01

    The current study utilized a combined pharmacokinetic and genomic approach to demonstrate the feasibility of a new quality control method by using a panel of special differentially expressed genes (DEGs) as unique fingerprint to serve as marker of in vivo bioactivity for a representative traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula, Si-Wu-Tang (SWT). The method involves firstly obtaining possible in vivo active components, i.e., the "absorbable" components from the permeate of the Caco-2 monolayer model to simulate oral administration of two specific SWT products (CU-SWT, J-SWT), their component single herbs (Angelicae, Chuanxiong, Paeoniae, and Rehmanniae), and a standard mixture of active compounds (ferulic acid, ligustilide, senkyunolide A). Then, these respective absorbable components were incubated with MCF-7 cells to determine the gene expression profile using microarray processing/analysis as well as real-time PCR. From the available DEGs identified following the incubation, the magnitude of change in DEGs by real-time PCR was found to be consistent with that by microarray. The designated DEGs from the CU-SWT permeate were found to be distinct from other 19 products. Furthermore, the changes in the DEGs resulting from MCF-7 cells treated by eight replicate extracts of CU-SWT on three separate days were consistent. These results demonstrated sufficient specificity and consistency of the DEG panel which could serve as a unique bioactive "fingerprint" for the designated SWT product. The present method for DEG determination may be applied to other TCM products and with further definitive study can potentially provide a unique method for quality control of TCM in the future.

  20. Serum Albumin Alters the Expression of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Iron Controlled Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effect serum on global transcription within P. aeruginosa at different phases of growth and the role of iron in this regulation. Results presented in this study suggest a novel mechanism through which serum regulates the expression of different P. ae...

  1. Dosage compensation and nuclear organization: cluster to control chromosome-wide gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Meister, Peter

    2016-04-01

    In many species, male and female animals differ in the number of X chromosomes they possess. As a consequence, large scale differences in gene dosage exist between sexes; a phenomenon that is rarely tolerated by the organism for changes in autosome dosage. Several strategies have evolved independently to balance X-linked gene dosage between sexes, named dosage compensation (DC). The molecular basis of DC differs among the three best-studied examples: mammals, fruit fly and nematodes. In this short review, we summarize recent microscopic and chromosome conformation capture data that reveal key features of the compensated X chromosome and highlight the events leading to the establishment of a functional, specialized nuclear compartment, the X domain. PMID:26748388

  2. Shifting boundaries of retinoic acid activity control hindbrain segmental gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sirbu, Ioan Ovidiu; Gresh, Lionel; Barra, Jacqueline; Duester, Gregg

    2005-06-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) generated by Raldh2 in paraxial mesoderm is required for specification of the posterior hindbrain, including restriction of Hoxb1 expression to presumptive rhombomere 4 (r4). Hoxb1 expression requires 3' and 5' RA response elements for widespread induction up to r4 and for r3/r5 repression, but RA has previously been detected only from r5-r8, and vHnf1 is required for repression of Hoxb1 posterior to r4 in zebrafish. We demonstrate in mouse embryos that an RA signal initially travels from the paraxial mesoderm to r3, forming a boundary next to the r2 expression domain of Cyp26a1 (which encodes an RA-degrading enzyme). After Hoxb1 induction, the RA boundary quickly shifts to r4/r5, coincident with induction of Cyp26c1 in r4. A functional role for Cyp26c1 in RA degradation was established through examination of RA-treated embryos. Analysis of Raldh2-/- and vHnf1-/- embryos supports a direct role for RA in Hoxb1 induction up to r4 and repression in r3/r5, as well as an indirect role for RA in Hoxb1 repression posterior to r4 via RA induction of vHnf1 up to the r4/r5 boundary. Our findings suggest that Raldh2 and Cyp26 generate shifting boundaries of RA activity, such that r3-r4 receives a short pulse of RA and r5-r8 receives a long pulse of RA. These two pulses of RA activity function to establish expression of Hoxb1 and vHnf1 on opposite sides of the r4/r5 boundary.

  3. [Mosaic expression of the lacZ reporter-gene under control of 5'-regulatory sequences of the alpha-S1-casein gene in transgenic mice].

    PubMed

    Serova, I A; Andreeva, L E; Khaĭdarova, N V; Dias, L P; Dvorianchikov, G A; Burkov, I A; Baginskaia, N V

    2009-01-01

    Phenomenon of mosaic expression at cellular level is widely presented in tissues and organs of transgenic animals. The communication is concerned a study of the mosaics in transgenic mice carrying the lacZ reporter-gene under control of the bovine and goat alpha-S1-casein genes with 5'-flanked sequences of various ex-tent: pCLZ1--721bp, pCLZ2-- 2001 bp and pCLZ3 3409 bp constructs. Five transgenic founders were generated by injection of the recombinant DNA into zygotes: pCLZ 1 - N 16, pCLZ2 - N 37 and pCLZ3 N 7, N 36, and N 48. Positive for J3-galactosidase activity cells were detected in lactating mammary glands of all transgenic females, however, distribution of the positive cells was variable. We observed two types of mosaics: clonal or "lobule" type with positive cells filling the whole of the globule or stochastic type with single positive cells scattered over one or different lobules. Two types of mosaics were characteristic of all the transgenic animals, although, females carrying the pCLZ2 transgene showed "lobule" type more often than transgenic animals with the transgenes pCLZ and pCLZ3. It is suggested that the stochastic type of mosaics occurs in the cells at terminal stage of differentiation, whereas the type arises from positive for P-galactosidase proliferating precursors. Analysis of the inheritance of the transgenes in different lines demonstrated that the pCLZl transgene was inserted in the X-chromosome of the founder whereas the other two localized in autosomes. Localization of the pCLZl transgene in the X-chromosome did not influence the mosaicism; it was similar to that of transgenic animals carrying the transgenes in autosomes. Ectopic expression of the reporter-gene was detected in mandibular glands from the offsprings of the founders N 16 and N 37 only, as well as in atrezed follicles in N 37. The weak ectopic expression saggests that the 5 S-flanked regulatory sequences used in the constructs are able to provide perfect tissue

  4. Cumulus Cells Gene Expression Profiling in Terms of Oocyte Maturity in Controlled Ovarian Hyperstimulation Using GnRH Agonist or GnRH Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Devjak, Rok; Fon Tacer, Klementina; Juvan, Peter; Virant Klun, Irma; Rozman, Damjana; Vrtačnik Bokal, Eda

    2012-01-01

    In in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) is established by gonadotropins in combination with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists or antagonists, to prevent premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. The aim of our study was to improve the understanding of gene expression profile of cumulus cells (CC) in terms of ovarian stimulation protocol and oocyte maturity. We applied Affymetrix gene expression profiling in CC of oocytes at different maturation stages using either GnRH agonists or GnRH antagonists. Two analyses were performed: the first involved CC of immature metaphase I (MI) and mature metaphase II (MII) oocytes where 359 genes were differentially expressed, and the second involved the two GnRH analogues where no differentially expressed genes were observed at the entire transcriptome level. A further analysis of 359 differentially genes was performed, focusing on anti-Müllerian hormone receptor 2 (AMHR2), follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGFC) and serine protease inhibitor E2 (SERPINE2). Among other differentially expressed genes we observed a marked number of new genes connected to cell adhesion and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, glycine and γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). No differential expression in CC between the two GnRH analogues supports the findings of clinical studies where no significant difference in live birth rates between both GnRH analogues has been proven. PMID:23082142

  5. Gearbox gene expression and growth rate.

    PubMed

    Aldea, M; Garrido, T; Tormo, A

    1993-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression in prokaryotic cells usually takes place at the level of transcription initiation. Different forms of RNA polymerase recognizing specific promoters are engaged in the control of many prokaryotic regulons. This also seems to be the case for some Escherichia coli genes that are induced at low growth rates and by nutrient starvation. Their gene products are synthesized at levels inversely proportional to growth rate, and this mode of regulation has been termed gearbox gene expression. This kind of growth-rate modulation is exerted by specific transcriptional initiation signals, the gearbox promoters, and some of them depend on a putative new σ factor (RpoS). Gearbox promoters drive expression of morphogenetic and cell division genes at constant levels per cell and cycle to meet the demands of cell division and septum formation. A mechanism is proposed that could sense the growth rate of the cell to alter gene expression by the action of specific σ factors.

  6. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D H; Young, M A; Lamprecht, T L; Helton, N M; Fulton, R; O'Laughlin, M; Fronick, C; Magrini, V; Demeter, R T; Miller, C A; Klco, J M; Wilson, R K; Ley, T J

    2015-06-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34(+) cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements.

  7. Epigenomic analysis of the HOX gene loci reveals mechanisms that may control canonical expression patterns in AML and normal hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, David H.; Young, Margaret A.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Helton, Nichole M.; Fulton, Robert; O’Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan T.; Miller, Christopher A.; Klco, Jeffery M.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    HOX genes are highly expressed in many acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples, but the patterns of expression and associated regulatory mechanisms are not clearly understood. We analyzed RNA sequencing data from 179 primary AML samples and normal hematopoietic cells to understand the range of expression patterns in normal versus leukemic cells. HOX expression in AML was restricted to specific genes in the HOXA or HOXB loci, and was highly correlated with recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities. However, the majority of samples expressed a canonical set of HOXA and HOXB genes that was nearly identical to the expression signature of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Transcriptional profiles at the HOX loci were similar between normal cells and AML samples, and involved bidirectional transcription at the center of each gene cluster. Epigenetic analysis of a subset of AML samples also identified common regions of chromatin accessibility in AML samples and normal CD34+ cells that displayed differences in methylation depending on HOX expression patterns. These data provide an integrated epigenetic view of the HOX gene loci in primary AML samples, and suggest that HOX expression in most AML samples represents a normal stem cell program that is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms at specific regulatory elements. PMID:25600023

  8. The Mouse Gene Expression Database (GXD)

    PubMed Central

    Ringwald, Martin; Eppig, Janan T.; Begley, Dale A.; Corradi, John P.; McCright, Ingeborg J.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; Hill, David P.; Kadin, James A.; Richardson, Joel E.

    2001-01-01

    The Gene Expression Database (GXD) is a community resource of gene expression information for the laboratory mouse. By combining the different types of expression data, GXD aims to provide increasingly complete information about the expression profiles of genes in different mouse strains and mutants, thus enabling valuable insights into the molecular networks that underlie normal development and disease. GXD is integrated with the Mouse Genome Database (MGD). Extensive interconnections with sequence databases and with databases from other species, and the development and use of shared controlled vocabularies extend GXD’s utility for the analysis of gene expression information. GXD is accessible through the Mouse Genome Informatics web site at http://www.informatic s.jax.org/ or directly at http://www.informatics.jax.org/me nus/expression_menu.shtml. PMID:11125060

  9. An embryonic story: analysis of the gene regulative network controlling Xist expression in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Pablo; Avner, Philip

    2010-07-01

    In mice, dosage compensation of X-linked gene expression is achieved through the inactivation of one of the two X-chromosomes in XX female cells. The complex epigenetic process leading to X-inactivation is largely controlled by Xist and Tsix, two non-coding genes of opposing function. Xist RNA triggers X-inactivation by coating the inactive X, while Tsix is critical for the designation of the active X-chromosome through cis-repression of Xist RNA accumulation. Recently, a plethora of trans-acting factors and cis-regulating elements have been suggested to act as key regulators of either Xist, Tsix or both; these include ubiquitous factors such as Yy1 and Ctcf, developmental proteins such as Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2, and X-linked regulators such as Rnf12. In this paper we summarise recent advances in our knowledge of the regulation of Xist and Tsix in embryonic stem (ES) and differentiating ES cells.

  10. An Autoregulatory Loop Controlling CYP1A1 Gene Expression: Role of H2O2 and NFI

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Yannick; Mermod, Nicolas; Barouki, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), like many monooxygenases, can produce reactive oxygen species during its catalytic cycle. Apart from the well-characterized xenobiotic-elicited induction, the regulatory mechanisms involved in the control of the steady-state activity of CYP1A1 have not been elucidated. We show here that reactive oxygen species generated from the activity of CYP1A1 limit the levels of induced CYP1A1 mRNAs. The mechanism involves the repression of the CYP1A1 gene promoter activity in a negative-feedback autoregulatory loop. Indeed, increasing the CYP1A1 activity by transfecting CYP1A1 expression vectors into hepatoma cells elicited an oxidative stress and led to the repression of a reporter gene driven by the CYP1A1 gene promoter. This negative autoregulation is abolished by ellipticine (an inhibitor of CYP1A1) and by catalase (which catalyzes H2O2 catabolism), thus implying that H2O2 is an intermediate. Down-regulation is also abolished by the mutation of the proximal nuclear factor I (NFI) site in the promoter. The transactivating domain of NFI/CTF was found to act in synergy with the arylhydrocarbon receptor pathway during the induction of CYP1A1 by 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin. Using an NFI/CTF-Gal4 fusion, we show that NFI/CTF transactivating function is decreased by a high activity of CYP1A1. This regulation is also abolished by catalase or ellipticine. Consistently, the transactivating function of NFI/CTF is repressed in cells treated with H2O2, a novel finding indicating that the transactivating domain of a transcription factor can be targeted by oxidative stress. In conclusion, an autoregulatory loop leads to the fine tuning of the CYP1A1 gene expression through the down-regulation of NFI activity by CYP1A1-based H2O2 production. This mechanism allows a limitation of the potentially toxic CYP1A1 activity within the cell. PMID:10490621

  11. Control of Gene Expression by the Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptor Alpha in HepG2 Human Hepatoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chauvet, Caroline; Vanhoutteghem, Amandine; Duhem, Christian; Saint-Auret, Gaëlle; Bois-Joyeux, Brigitte; Djian, Philippe; Staels, Bart; Danan, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Retinoic acid-related Orphan Receptor alpha (RORα; NR1F1) is a widely distributed nuclear receptor involved in several (patho)physiological functions including lipid metabolism, inflammation, angiogenesis, and circadian rhythm. To better understand the role of this nuclear receptor in liver, we aimed at displaying genes controlled by RORα in liver cells by generating HepG2 human hepatoma cells stably over-expressing RORα. Genes whose expression was altered in these cells versus control cells were displayed using micro-arrays followed by qRT-PCR analysis. Expression of these genes was also altered in cells in which RORα was transiently over-expressed after adenoviral infection. A number of the genes found were involved in known pathways controlled by RORα, for instance LPA, NR1D2 and ADIPOQ in lipid metabolism, ADIPOQ and PLG in inflammation, PLG in fibrinolysis and NR1D2 and NR1D1 in circadian rhythm. This study also revealed that genes such as G6PC, involved in glucose homeostasis, and AGRP, involved in the control of body weight, are also controlled by RORα. Lastly, SPARC, involved in cell growth and adhesion, and associated with liver carcinogenesis, was up-regulated by RORα. SPARC was found to be a new putative RORα target gene since it possesses, in its promoter, a functional RORE as evidenced by EMSAs and transfection experiments. Most of the other genes that we found regulated by RORα also contained putative ROREs in their regulatory regions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) confirmed that the ROREs present in the SPARC, PLG, G6PC, NR1D2 and AGRP genes were occupied by RORα in HepG2 cells. Therefore these genes must now be considered as direct RORα targets. Our results open new routes on the roles of RORα in glucose metabolism and carcinogenesis within cells of hepatic origin. PMID:21818335

  12. Gene expression and fractionation resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous work on whole genome doubling in plants established the importance of gene functional category in provoking or suppressing duplicate gene loss, or fractionation. Other studies, particularly in Paramecium have correlated levels of gene expression with vulnerability or resistance to duplicate loss. Results Here we analyze the simultaneous effect of function category and expression in two plant data sets, rosids and asterids. Conclusion We demonstrate function category and expression level have independent effects, though expression does not play the dominant role it does in Paramecium. PMID:25573431

  13. Spatiotemporal control of gene expression in bone-marrow derived cells of the tumor microenvironment induced by MRI guided focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Lepetit-Coiffé, Matthieu; Genevois, Coralie; Debeissat, Christelle; Quesson, Bruno; Moonen, Chrit T W; Konsman, Jan Pieter; Couillaud, Franck

    2015-09-15

    The tumor microenvironment is an interesting target for anticancer therapies but modifying this compartment is challenging. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a gene therapy strategy that combined targeting to bone marrow-derived tumor microenvironment using genetically modified bone-marrow derived cells and control of transgene expression by local hyperthermia through a thermo-inducible promoter. Chimera were obtained by engraftment of bone marrow from transgenic mice expressing reporter genes under transcriptional control of heat shock promoter and inoculated sub-cutaneously with tumors cells. Heat shocks were applied at the tumor site using a water bath or magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound device. Reporter gene expression was followed by bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging and immunohistochemistry. Bone marrow-derived cells expressing reporter genes were identified to be mainly tumor-associated macrophages. We thus provide the proof of concept for a gene therapy strategy that allows for spatiotemporal control of transgenes expression by macrophages targeted to the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26299614

  14. Spatiotemporal control of gene expression in bone-marrow derived cells of the tumor microenvironment induced by MRI guided focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Lepetit-Coiffé, Matthieu; Genevois, Coralie; Debeissat, Christelle; Quesson, Bruno; Moonen, Chrit T W; Konsman, Jan Pieter; Couillaud, Franck

    2015-09-15

    The tumor microenvironment is an interesting target for anticancer therapies but modifying this compartment is challenging. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a gene therapy strategy that combined targeting to bone marrow-derived tumor microenvironment using genetically modified bone-marrow derived cells and control of transgene expression by local hyperthermia through a thermo-inducible promoter. Chimera were obtained by engraftment of bone marrow from transgenic mice expressing reporter genes under transcriptional control of heat shock promoter and inoculated sub-cutaneously with tumors cells. Heat shocks were applied at the tumor site using a water bath or magnetic resonance guided high intensity focused ultrasound device. Reporter gene expression was followed by bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging and immunohistochemistry. Bone marrow-derived cells expressing reporter genes were identified to be mainly tumor-associated macrophages. We thus provide the proof of concept for a gene therapy strategy that allows for spatiotemporal control of transgenes expression by macrophages targeted to the tumor microenvironment.

  15. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis

    PubMed Central

    Hampel, Martin; Jakobi, Mareike; Schmitz, Lara; Meyer, Ute; Finkernagel, Florian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Heimel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs) in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP) analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors. PMID:27093436

  16. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Martin; Jakobi, Mareike; Schmitz, Lara; Meyer, Ute; Finkernagel, Florian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Heimel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs) in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP) analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors.

  17. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Martin; Jakobi, Mareike; Schmitz, Lara; Meyer, Ute; Finkernagel, Florian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Heimel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs) in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP) analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors. PMID:27093436

  18. Optogenetics for gene expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Konrad; Naumann, Sebastian; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-02-01

    Molecular switches that are controlled by chemicals have evolved as central research instruments in mammalian cell biology. However, these tools are limited in terms of their spatiotemporal resolution due to freely diffusing inducers. These limitations have recently been addressed by the development of optogenetic, genetically encoded, and light-responsive tools that can be controlled with the unprecedented spatiotemporal precision of light. In this article, we first provide a brief overview of currently available optogenetic tools that have been designed to control diverse cellular processes. Then, we focus on recent developments in light-controlled gene expression technologies and provide the reader with a guideline for choosing the most suitable gene expression system.

  19. H2A.Z controls the stability and mobility of nucleosomes to regulate expression of the LH genes

    PubMed Central

    Rudnizky, Sergei; Bavly, Adaiah; Malik, Omri; Pnueli, Lilach; Melamed, Philippa; Kaplan, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of promoter chromatin have a profound effect on the expression levels of genes. Yet, the contribution of DNA sequence, histone post-translational modifications, histone variant usage and other factors in shaping the architecture of chromatin, and the mechanisms by which this architecture modulates expression of specific genes are not yet completely understood. Here we use optical tweezers to study the roles that DNA sequence and the histone variant H2A.Z have in shaping the chromatin landscape at the promoters of two model genes, Cga and Lhb. Guided by MNase mapping of the promoters of these genes, we reconstitute nucleosomes that mimic those located near the transcriptional start site and immediately downstream (+1), and measure the forces required to disrupt these nucleosomes, and their mobility along the DNA sequence. Our results indicate that these genes are basally regulated by two distinct strategies, making use of H2A.Z to modulate separate phases of transcription, and highlight how DNA sequence, alternative histone variants and remodelling machinery act synergistically to modulate gene expression. PMID:27653784

  20. Expression of exogenous genes under the control of endogenous HSP70 and CAB promoters in the Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale complex.

    PubMed

    Abe, Jun; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Ito, Motomi; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Sekimoto, Hiroyuki

    2008-04-01

    A unicellular charophyte alga, Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale complex (C. psl. complex), has been studied in order to obtain basic information regarding sexual reproduction in plants. Systems for gene introduction and transient expression were developed for endogenous genes using phleomycin resistance (ble) and Chlamydomonas green fluorescent protein (cgfp) genes as selection markers. These genes have codon usage similar to that of genes in the C. psl. complex. To drive these genes strongly into C. psl. complex cells, two native promoters of the C. psl. complex genome-CpHSP70 and CpCAB1-were linked to a ble::cgfp fusion gene and introduced into the cells by particle bombardment. Following 2 d of incubation, we found 500 cells expressing GFP under the control of the CpHSP70 promoter, which were identified following heat shock treatment at 42 degrees C, and 100 cells expressing GFP under the control of the CpCAB1 promoter, which were observed in lit conditions. In contrast, the GFP signal was only detected in two cells when ble::cgfp under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter was introduced. The ble::cgfp fusion protein was detected in the nucleus, whereas the single cgfp protein was detected in the cytoplasm. Our results indicate that the newly isolated native promoters of CpHSP70 and CpCAB1 are useful tools for inducing exogenous gene expression under heat shock and lit conditions, respectively. In addition, this strategy can be used for transient assays, such as the intracellular localization of unknown gene products in the C. psl. complex.

  1. Direct interplay among histones, histone chaperones, and a chromatin boundary protein in the control of histone gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zunder, Rachel M; Rine, Jasper

    2012-11-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the histone chaperone Rtt106 binds newly synthesized histone proteins and mediates their delivery into chromatin during transcription, replication, and silencing. Rtt106 is also recruited to histone gene regulatory regions by the HIR histone chaperone complex to ensure S-phase-specific expression. Here we showed that this Rtt106:HIR complex included Asf1 and histone proteins. Mutations in Rtt106 that reduced histone binding reduced Rtt106 enrichment at histone genes, leading to their increased transcription. Deletion of the chromatin boundary element Yta7 led to increased Rtt106:H3 binding, increased Rtt106 enrichment at histone gene regulatory regions, and decreased histone gene transcription at the HTA1-HTB1 locus. These results suggested a unique regulatory mechanism in which Rtt106 sensed the level of histone proteins to maintain the proper level of histone gene transcription. The role of these histone chaperones and Yta7 differed markedly among the histone gene loci, including the two H3-H4 histone gene pairs. Defects in silencing in rtt106 mutants could be partially accounted for by Rtt106-mediated changes in histone gene repression. These studies suggested that feedback mediated by histone chaperone complexes plays a pivotal role in regulating histone gene transcription.

  2. Blood cell gene expression associated with cellular stress defense is modulated by antioxidant-rich food in a randomised controlled clinical trial of male smokers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant-based diets rich in fruit and vegetables can prevent development of several chronic age-related diseases. However, the mechanisms behind this protective effect are not elucidated. We have tested the hypothesis that intake of antioxidant-rich foods can affect groups of genes associated with cellular stress defence in human blood cells. Trial registration number: NCT00520819 http://clinicaltrials.gov. Methods In an 8-week dietary intervention study, 102 healthy male smokers were randomised to either a diet rich in various antioxidant-rich foods, a kiwifruit diet (three kiwifruits/d added to the regular diet) or a control group. Blood cell gene expression profiles were obtained from 10 randomly selected individuals of each group. Diet-induced changes on gene expression were compared to controls using a novel application of the gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on transcription profiles obtained using Affymetrix HG-U133-Plus 2.0 whole genome arrays. Results Changes were observed in the blood cell gene expression profiles in both intervention groups when compared to the control group. Groups of genes involved in regulation of cellular stress defence, such as DNA repair, apoptosis and hypoxia, were significantly upregulated (GSEA, FDR q-values < 5%) by both diets compared to the control group. Genes with common regulatory motifs for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR nuclear translocator (AhR/ARNT) were upregulated by both interventions (FDR q-values < 5%). Plasma antioxidant biomarkers (polyphenols/carotenoids) increased in both groups. Conclusions The observed changes in the blood cell gene expression profiles suggest that the beneficial effects of a plant-based diet on human health may be mediated through optimization of defence processes. PMID:20846424

  3. Developmental Progression in the Coral Acropora digitifera Is Controlled by Differential Expression of Distinct Regulatory Gene Networks

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Bermudez, Alejandro; Villar-Briones, Alejandro; Ramirez-Portilla, Catalina; Hidaka, Michio; Mikheyev, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    Corals belong to the most basal class of the Phylum Cnidaria, which is considered the sister group of bilaterian animals, and thus have become an emerging model to study the evolution of developmental mechanisms. Although cell renewal, differentiation, and maintenance of pluripotency are cellular events shared by multicellular animals, the cellular basis of these fundamental biological processes are still poorly understood. To understand how changes in gene expression regulate morphogenetic transitions at the base of the eumetazoa, we performed quantitative RNA-seq analysis during Acropora digitifera’s development. We collected embryonic, larval, and adult samples to characterize stage-specific transcription profiles, as well as broad expression patterns. Transcription profiles reconstructed development revealing two main expression clusters. The first cluster grouped blastula and gastrula and the second grouped subsequent developmental time points. Consistently, we observed clear differences in gene expression between early and late developmental transitions, with higher numbers of differentially expressed genes and fold changes around gastrulation. Furthermore, we identified three coexpression clusters that represented discrete gene expression patterns. During early transitions, transcriptional networks seemed to regulate cellular fate and morphogenesis of the larval body. In late transitions, these networks seemed to play important roles preparing planulae for switch in lifestyle and regulation of adult processes. Although developmental progression in A. digitifera is regulated to some extent by differential coexpression of well-defined gene networks, stage-specific transcription profiles appear to be independent entities. While negative regulation of transcription is predominant in early development, cell differentiation was upregulated in larval and adult stages. PMID:26941230

  4. Direct and indirect effects of H-NS and Fis on global gene expression control in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kahramanoglou, Christina; Seshasayee, Aswin S. N.; Prieto, Ana I.; Ibberson, David; Schmidt, Sabine; Zimmermann, Jurgen; Benes, Vladimir; Fraser, Gillian M.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) are global regulators of gene expression in Escherichia coli, which affect DNA conformation by bending, wrapping and bridging the DNA. Two of these—H-NS and Fis—bind to specific DNA sequences and structures. Because of their importance to global gene expression, the binding of these NAPs to the DNA was previously investigated on a genome-wide scale using ChIP-chip. However, variation in their binding profiles across the growth phase and the genome-scale nature of their impact on gene expression remain poorly understood. Here, we present a genome-scale investigation of H-NS and Fis binding to the E. coli chromosome using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq). By performing our experiments under multiple time-points during growth in rich media, we show that the binding regions of the two proteins are mutually exclusive under our experimental conditions. H-NS binds to significantly longer tracts of DNA than Fis, consistent with the linear spread of H-NS binding from high- to surrounding lower-affinity sites; the length of binding regions is associated with the degree of transcriptional repression imposed by H-NS. For Fis, a majority of binding events do not lead to differential expression of the proximal gene; however, it has a significant indirect effect on gene expression partly through its effects on the expression of other transcription factors. We propose that direct transcriptional regulation by Fis is associated with the interaction of tandem arrays of Fis molecules to the DNA and possible DNA bending, particularly at operon-upstream regions. Our study serves as a proof-of-principle for the use of ChIP-seq for global DNA-binding proteins in bacteria, which should become significantly more economical and feasible with the development of multiplexing techniques. PMID:21097887

  5. Expression of the Mouse Pre-T Cell Receptor α Gene Is Controlled by an Upstream Region Containing a Transcriptional Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Reizis, Boris; Leder, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The pre-T cell receptor α (pTα) protein is a critical component of the pre-T cell receptor complex in early thymocytes. The expression of the pTα gene is one of the earliest markers of the T cell lineage and occurs exclusively in pre-T cells. To investigate the molecular basis of thymocyte-specific gene expression, we searched for the genomic elements regulating transcription of the mouse pTα gene. We now report that expression of the pTα gene is primarily controlled by an upstream genomic region, which can drive thymocyte-specific expression of a marker gene in transgenic mice. Within this region, we have identified two specific DNase-hypersensitive sites corresponding to a proximal promoter and an upstream transcriptional enhancer. The pTα enhancer appears to function preferentially in pre-T cell lines and binds multiple nuclear factors, including YY1. The enhancer also contains two G-rich stretches homologous to a critical region of the thymocyte-specific lck proximal promoter. Here we show that these sites bind a common nuclear factor and identify it as the zinc finger protein ZBP-89. Our data establish a novel experimental model for thymocyte-specific gene expression and suggest an important role for ZBP-89 in T cell development. PMID:10330446

  6. Rituximab Downregulates Gene Expression Associated with Cell Proliferation, Survival, and Proteolysis in the Peripheral Blood from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Link between High Baseline Autophagy-Related ULK1 Expression and Improved Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Tchetina, Elena V.; Pivanova, Anastasya N.; Markova, Galina A.; Lukina, Galina V.; Aleksandrova, Elena N.; Aleksankin, Andrey P.; Makarov, Sergey A.; Kuzin, Aleksandr N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To clarify molecular mechanisms for the response to rituximab in a longitudinal study. Methods. Peripheral blood from 16 RA patients treated with rituximab for a single treatment course and 26 healthy controls, blood and knee articular cartilages from 18 patients with long-standing RA, and cartilages from 14 healthy subjects were examined. Clinical response was assessed using ESR, ACPA, CRP, RF, DAS28 levels, CD19+ B-cell counts, bone erosion, and joint space narrowing scores. Protein expression in PBMCs was quantified using ELISA. Gene expression was performed with quantitative real-time PCR. Results. A decrease (p < 0.05) in DAS28, ESR, and CRP values after rituximab treatment was associated with the downregulation of MTOR, p21, caspase 3, ULK1, TNFα, IL-1β, and cathepsin K gene expression in the peripheral blood to levels found in healthy subjects. MMP-9 expression remained significantly higher compared to controls although decreased (p < 0.05) versus baseline. A negative correlation between baseline ULK1 gene expression and the number of tender joints at the end of follow-up was observed. Conclusions. The response to rituximab was associated with decreased MTOR, p21, caspase 3, ULK1, TNFα, IL-1β, and cathepsin K gene expression compared to healthy subjects. Residual increased expression in MMP-9, IFNα, and COX2 might account for remaining inflammation and pain. High baseline ULK1 gene expression indicates a good response in respect to pain. PMID:27057353

  7. Rituximab Downregulates Gene Expression Associated with Cell Proliferation, Survival, and Proteolysis in the Peripheral Blood from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Link between High Baseline Autophagy-Related ULK1 Expression and Improved Pain Control.

    PubMed

    Tchetina, Elena V; Pivanova, Anastasya N; Markova, Galina A; Lukina, Galina V; Aleksandrova, Elena N; Aleksankin, Andrey P; Makarov, Sergey A; Kuzin, Aleksandr N

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To clarify molecular mechanisms for the response to rituximab in a longitudinal study. Methods. Peripheral blood from 16 RA patients treated with rituximab for a single treatment course and 26 healthy controls, blood and knee articular cartilages from 18 patients with long-standing RA, and cartilages from 14 healthy subjects were examined. Clinical response was assessed using ESR, ACPA, CRP, RF, DAS28 levels, CD19+ B-cell counts, bone erosion, and joint space narrowing scores. Protein expression in PBMCs was quantified using ELISA. Gene expression was performed with quantitative real-time PCR. Results. A decrease (p < 0.05) in DAS28, ESR, and CRP values after rituximab treatment was associated with the downregulation of MTOR, p21, caspase 3, ULK1, TNFα, IL-1β, and cathepsin K gene expression in the peripheral blood to levels found in healthy subjects. MMP-9 expression remained significantly higher compared to controls although decreased (p < 0.05) versus baseline. A negative correlation between baseline ULK1 gene expression and the number of tender joints at the end of follow-up was observed. Conclusions. The response to rituximab was associated with decreased MTOR, p21, caspase 3, ULK1, TNFα, IL-1β, and cathepsin K gene expression compared to healthy subjects. Residual increased expression in MMP-9, IFNα, and COX2 might account for remaining inflammation and pain. High baseline ULK1 gene expression indicates a good response in respect to pain. PMID:27057353

  8. [Genetic engineering with a gene encoding a soybean storage protein to identify DNA sequences to control its expression]: Annual report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R.N.

    1993-12-31

    The {beta}-conglycinins are soybean storage proteins encoded by genes that are tightly regulated both spatially and temporally. The author has studied the Soybean Embryo Factors that bind to the cis elements that are presumably involved in regulating the expression of these gene promoters using both in vitro binding assays and in vivo expression assays in transgenic plants. The results obtained to date have made it evident that there are no clear correlations between the in vivo and the in vitro results, i.e., changes in single nucleotides that alter protein:DNA interactions can have little or no impact on expression of the promoters in vivo. In contrast, the CATGCAT (RY element) sequence, for which no binding proteins have been identified, appear to be very important for controlling gene expression. Although the author has been attempting to isolate and characterize the SEF 3 and SEF 4 proteins he has to date not been successful using protein expression libraries derived from embryo cDNAs. He is continuing experiments of this type, as well as more standard protein purification procedures. He has constructed a number of chimeric promoters with different upstream and downstream regulatory sequences in an attempt to identify, by expression assays in transgenic plants, those sequences that are uniquely responsible for the temporal and spatially regulated expression of the {beta}-conglycinin genes. Because of the results of previously published work from this laboratory, the author concluded that the core promoters themselves may be responsible for the regulation. Therefore, he has focused his efforts on these sequences, the RY element, and the SEF 3 binding sequences. In a follow-up to the studies to modify the expression of genes in seeds, he will express several types of human and other animal genes in seeds of transgenic plants.

  9. Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri)

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Michael R.; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Narum, Shawn R.

    2015-01-01

    Organisms can adapt to local environmental conditions as a plastic response or become adapted through natural selection on genetic variation. The ability to adapt to increased water temperatures will be of paramount importance for many fish species as the climate continues to warm and water resources become limited. Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration. Of the 80 transcripts, 7 showed ≥ 2-fold difference in expression levels in gill tissue from desert fish under heat stress whereas the montane fish had none and the F1 only had one differentially expressed gene. A structural analysis of the proteins encoded by those genes suggests that the response could coordinate the formation of supercomplexes and oligomers. Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration. Significant differences in gene expression patterns in response to heat stress in a common environment indicate that the response was not due to plasticity but had a genetic basis. PMID:25943341

  10. A green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based plasmid system to study post-transcriptional control of gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Urban, Johannes H; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are an emerging class of regulators of bacterial gene expression, which mainly modulate the translation of trans-encoded mRNAs. Typically, these molecules are 50-200 nucleotides in size and do not contain expressed open reading frames (ORFs). In Escherichia coli, about 70 members of this group have been identified to date and further estimates assume hundreds of sRNAs per bacterial genome. Regulation of gene expression by sRNAs is predominantly mediated by physical sRNA/target mRNA interactions that are based on short and imperfect complementarity. Although the contribution of sRNAs to overall bacterial gene regulation is now being appreciated, the function of many sRNAs is still unknown and their targets await to be uncovered. We recently developed a modular two-plasmid system, based on the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as non-invasive reporter of gene expression, to rapidly monitor the regulatory potential of sRNA/target mRNA pairs under investigation in vivo. The specialized reporter plasmid series also provides a suitable platform to study the function of cis-encoded riboregulators such as natural riboswitches, thermosensors, or engineered aptamer-based regulatory switches. PMID:19381569

  11. Differential Expression of Genes that Control Respiration Contribute to Thermal Adaptation in Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Garvin, Michael R; Thorgaard, Gary H; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-05-04

    Organisms can adapt to local environmental conditions as a plastic response or become adapted through natural selection on genetic variation. The ability to adapt to increased water temperatures will be of paramount importance for many fish species as the climate continues to warm and water resources become limited. Because increased water temperatures will reduce the dissolved oxygen available for fish, we hypothesized that adaptation to low oxygen environments would involve improved respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To test this hypothesis, we subjected individuals from two ecologically divergent populations of inland (redband) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri) with historically different temperature regimes (desert and montane) and their F1 progeny to diel cycles of temperature stress and then examined gene expression data for 80 nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded OXPHOS subunits that participate in respiration. Of the 80 transcripts, 7 showed ≥ 2-fold difference in expression levels in gill tissue from desert fish under heat stress whereas the montane fish had none and the F1 only had one differentially expressed gene. A structural analysis of the proteins encoded by those genes suggests that the response could coordinate the formation of supercomplexes and oligomers. Supercomplexes may increase the efficiency of respiration because complexes I, III, and IV are brought into close proximity and oligomerization of complex V alters the macrostructure of mitochondria to improve respiration. Significant differences in gene expression patterns in response to heat stress in a common environment indicate that the response was not due to plasticity but had a genetic basis.

  12. Focal adhesion kinase protein regulates Wnt3a gene expression to control cell fate specification in the developing neural plate

    PubMed Central

    Fonar, Yuri; Gutkovich, Yoni E.; Root, Heather; Malyarova, Anastasia; Aamar, Emil; Golubovskaya, Vita M.; Elias, Sarah; Elkouby, Yaniv M.; Frank, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase protein localized to regions called focal adhesions, which are contact points between cells and the extracellular matrix. FAK protein acts as a scaffold to transfer adhesion-dependent and growth factor signals into the cell. Increased FAK expression is linked to aggressive metastatic and invasive tumors. However, little is known about its normal embryonic function. FAK protein knockdown during early Xenopus laevis development anteriorizes the embryo. Morphant embryos express increased levels of anterior neural markers, with reciprocally reduced posterior neural marker expression. Posterior neural plate folding and convergence-extension is also inhibited. This anteriorized phenotype resembles that of embryos knocked down zygotically for canonical Wnt signaling. FAK and Wnt3a genes are both expressed in the neural plate, and Wnt3a expression is FAK dependent. Ectopic Wnt expression rescues this FAK morphant anteriorized phenotype. Wnt3a thus acts downstream of FAK to balance anterior–posterior cell fate specification in the developing neural plate. Wnt3a gene expression is also FAK dependent in human breast cancer cells, suggesting that this FAK–Wnt linkage is highly conserved. This unique observation connects the FAK- and Wnt-signaling pathways, both of which act to promote cancer when aberrantly activated in mammalian cells. PMID:21551070

  13. [STUDY RELATIVE EXPRESSION OF GENES THAT CONTROL GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN THE LIVER IN MICE WITH DEVELOPMENT OF MELANOCORTIN OBESITY].

    PubMed

    Baklanov, A V; Bazhan, N M

    2015-06-01

    The relative gene expressions of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6P), phosphoenolpyruvate carbo- xykinase (PEPCK)--markers of gluconeogenesis, glucokinase (GK)--a marker of glycolysis, glucose transporter type 2 (GLUT2)--a marker of input and output of glucose in the liver were measured during the development of melanocortin (MC) obesity in male mice of C57BL/6J strain with mutation yellow in the Agouti locus (Ay/a mice). The mutation decreases MC receptor activity and induces hyperphagia and MC obesity. The males of the same line with mutation nonagouti were used as control. Tissue samples were taken at age 10 (before obesity), 15 (moderate obesity) and 30 (developed obesity) weeks. It has been shown that Ay/a mice had decreased glucose tolerance since 10-week age. There were age-related changes in mRNA levels in the liver of Ay/a mice, unlike a/a mice. In Ay/a mice the mRNA GLUT2 levels at the age of 10 weeks, mRNA GK levels at the age of 15 weeks, and mRNA G6P levels at the age of 3O weeks were higher than those in Ada mice of other ages. InAYfa mice the mRNA GK levels at the age of 15 weeks and mRNA G6F levels at the age of 30 weeks were increased relatively to those in a/a mice. Thus, Ay/a mice before the development of MK obesity had changes in the mRNA levels genes of proteins that regulate hepatic glucose metabolism, which may contribute to the compensation of glucose metabolism disorders caused by a hereditary decrease of MK system activity

  14. Specific Colon Cancer Cell Cytotoxicity Induced by Bacteriophage E Gene Expression under Transcriptional Control of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Promoter.

    PubMed

    Rama, Ana R; Hernandez, Rosa; Perazzoli, Gloria; Burgos, Miguel; Melguizo, Consolación; Vélez, Celia; Prados, Jose

    2015-06-04

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Patients in advanced stages often develop metastases that require chemotherapy and usually show a poor response, have a low survival rate and develop considerable toxicity with adverse symptoms. Gene therapy may act as an adjuvant therapy in attempts to destroy the tumor without affecting normal host tissue. The bacteriophage E gene has demonstrated significant antitumor activity in several cancers, but without any tumor-specific activity. The use of tumor-specific promoters may help to direct the expression of therapeutic genes so they act against specific cancer cells. We used the carcinoembryonic antigen promoter (CEA) to direct E gene expression (pCEA-E) towards colon cancer cells. pCEA-E induced a high cell growth inhibition of human HTC-116 colon adenocarcinoma and mouse MC-38 colon cancer cells in comparison to normal human CCD18co colon cells, which have practically undetectable levels of CEA. In addition, in vivo analyses of mice bearing tumors induced using MC-38 cells showed a significant decrease in tumor volume after pCEA-E treatment and a low level of Ki-67 in relation to untreated tumors. These results suggest that the CEA promoter is an excellent candidate for directing E gene expression specifically toward colon cancer cells.

  15. Characterization of CRTAM gene promoter: AP-1 transcription factor control its expression in human T CD8 lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Valle-Rios, Ricardo; Patiño-Lopez, Genaro; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Canche-Pool, Elsy; Recillas-Targa, Felix; Lopez-Bayghen, Esther; Zlotnik, Albert; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2009-10-01

    Class-I MHC-restricted T-cell associated molecule (CRTAM) is a member of the Nectin-like adhesion molecule family. It is rapidly induced in NK, NKT and CD8(+) T cells. Interaction with its ligand Nectin-like 2 results in increased secretion of IFN-gamma by activated CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Through sequential bioinformatic analyses of the upstream region of the human CRTAM gene, we detected cis-elements potentially important for CRTAM gene transcription. Analyzing 2kb upstream from the ATG translation codon by mutation analysis in conjunction with luciferase reporter assays, electrophoretic mobility shify assay (EMSA) and supershift assays, we identified an AP-1 binding site, located at 1.4kb from the ATG translation codon of CRTAM gene as an essential element for CRTAM expression in activated but not resting human CD8(+) T cells. CRTAM expression was reduced in activated CD8(+) T cells treated with the JNK inhibitor SP600125, indicating that CRTAM expression is driven by the JNK-AP-1 signaling pathway. This study represents the first CRTAM gene promoter analysis in human T cells and indicates that AP-1 is a positive transcriptional regulator of this gene, a likely important finding because CRTAM has recently been shown to play a role in IFN-gamma and IL-17 production and T cell proliferation.

  16. Improvement of cloned [alpha]-amylase gene expression in fed-batch culture of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae by regulating both glucose and ethanol concentrations using a fuzzy controller

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, Sumihisa; Nishida, Yoshio; Park, Y.S.; Iijima, Shinji; Kobayashi, Takeshi . Dept. of Biotechnology)

    1994-11-05

    The effect of ethanol concentration on cloned gene expression in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 20B-12 containing one of two plasmids, pNA3 and pNA7, was investigated in batch cultures. Plasmids pNA3 and pNA7 contain the [alpha]-amylase gene under the control of the SUC2 or PGK promoter, respectively. When the ethanol concentration was controlled at 2 to 5 g/L, the gene expressions were two times higher than those at 20 g/L ethanol. To increase the gene expression by maintaining both the ethanol and glucose concentrations at low levels, a fuzzy controller was developed. The concentrations of glucose and ethanol were controlled simultaneously at 0.15 and 2 g/L, respectively, in the production phase using the fuzzy controller in fed-batch culture. The synthesis of [alpha]-amylase was induced by the low glucose concentration and maintained at a high level of activity by regulating the ethanol concentration at 2 g/L. The secretory [alpha]-amylase activities of cells harboring plasmids pNA3 and pNA7 in fed-batch culture were 175 and 392 U/mL, and their maximal specific activities 7.7 and 12.4 U/mg dry cells, respectively. These values are two to three times higher in activity and three to four times higher in specific activity than those obtained when glucose only was controlled.

  17. Catabolic cytokines disrupt the circadian clock and the expression of clock-controlled genes in cartilage via an NFкB-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guo, B.; Yang, N.; Borysiewicz, E.; Dudek, M.; Williams, J.L.; Li, J.; Maywood, E.S.; Adamson, A.; Hastings, M.H.; Bateman, J.F.; White, M.R.H.; Boot-Handford, R.P.; Meng, Q.J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To define how the catabolic cytokines (Interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)) affect the circadian clock mechanism and the expression of clock-controlled catabolic genes within cartilage, and to identify the downstream pathways linking the cytokines to the molecular clock within chondrocytes. Methods Ex vivo cartilage explants were isolated from the Cry1-luc or PER2::LUC clock reporter mice. Clock gene dynamics were monitored in real-time by bioluminescence photon counting. Gene expression changes were studied by qRT-PCR. Functional luc assays were used to study the function of the core Clock/BMAL1 complex in SW-1353 cells. NFкB pathway inhibitor and fluorescence live-imaging of cartilage were performed to study the underlying mechanisms. Results Exposure to IL-1β severely disrupted circadian gene expression rhythms in cartilage. This effect was reversed by an anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone, but not by other clock synchronizing agents. Circadian disruption mediated by IL-1β was accompanied by disregulated expression of endogenous clock genes and clock-controlled catabolic pathways. Mechanistically, NFкB signalling was involved in the effect of IL-1β on the cartilage clock in part through functional interference with the core Clock/BMAL1 complex. In contrast, TNFα had little impact on the circadian rhythm and clock gene expression in cartilage. Conclusion In our experimental system (young healthy mouse cartilage), we demonstrate that IL-1β (but not TNFα) abolishes circadian rhythms in Cry1-luc and PER2::LUC gene expression. These data implicate disruption of the chondrocyte clock as a novel aspect of the catabolic responses of cartilage to pro-inflammatory cytokines, and provide an additional mechanism for how chronic joint inflammation may contribute to osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:26521744

  18. Analysis of baseline gene expression levels from toxicogenomics study control animals to identify sources of variation and predict responses to chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of gene expression profiling to predict chemical mode of action would be enhanced by better characterization of variance due to individual, environmental, and technical factors. Meta-analysis of microarray data from untreated or vehicle-treated animals within the control ...

  19. Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-04-20

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  20. Epstein–Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B.; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G.; Sinclair, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  1. Regulation of Neuronal Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Gerald; Lietz, Michael; Leichter, Michael

    Humans as multicellular organisms contain a variety of different cell types where each cell population must fulfill a distinct function in the interest of the whole organism. The molecular basis for the variations in morphology, biochemistry, molecular biology, and function of the various cell types is the cell-type specific expression of genes. These genes encode proteins necessary for executing the specialized functions of each cell type within an organism. We describe here a regulatory mechanism for the expression of neuronal genes. The zinc finger protein REST binds to the regulatory region of many neuronal genes and represses neuronal gene expression in nonneuronal tissues. A negative regulatory mechanism, involving a transcriptional repressor, seems to play an important role in establishing the neuronal phenotype.

  2. The 5' flanking region of a barley B hordein gene controls tissue and developmental specific CAT expression in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Marris, C; Gallois, P; Copley, J; Kreis, M

    1988-07-01

    The 549 base pairs of the 5' flanking region of a barley seed storage protein (B1 hordein) gene were linked to the reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). The chimaeric gene was transferred into tobacco plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. CAT enzyme activity was detected in the seeds, but not in the leaves, of the transgenic plants. Furthermore, enzyme activity was found only in the endosperm, and only from fifteen days after pollination. In contrast, the constitutive 19S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) directed the expression of the CAT gene in the leaves as well as in both the endosperm and embryo and at all stages in seed development.

  3. Expression of silicatein and collagen genes in the marine sponge Suberites domuncula is controlled by silicate and myotrophin.

    PubMed

    Krasko, A; Lorenz, B; Batel, R; Schröder, H C; Müller, I M; Müller, W E

    2000-08-01

    The major skeletal elements in the (Porifera) sponges, are spicules formed from inorganic material. The spicules in the Demospongiae class are composed of hydrated, amorphous silica. Recently an enzyme, silicatein, which polymerizes alkoxide substrates to silica was described from the sponge Tethya aurantia. In the present study the cDNA encoding silicatein was isolated from the sponge Suberites domuncula. The deduced polypeptide comprises 331 amino acids and has a calculated size of Mr 36 306. This cDNA was used as a probe to study the potential role of silicate on the expression of the silicatein gene. For these studies, primmorphs, a special form of aggregates composed of proliferating cells, have been used. It was found that after increasing the concentration of soluble silicate in the seawater medium from around 1 microM to approximately 60 microM, this gene is strongly upregulated. Without additional silicate only a very weak expression could be measured. Because silica as well as collagen are required for the formation of spicules, the expression of the gene encoding collagen was measured in parallel. It was also found that the level of transcripts for collagen strongly increases in the presence of 60 microM soluble silicate. In addition, it is demonstrated that the expression of collagen is also upregulated in those primmorphs which were treated with recombinant myotrophin obtained from the same sponge. Myotrophin, however, had no effect on the expression of silicatein. From these data we conclude that silicate influences the expression of the enzyme silicatein and also the expression of collagen, (via the mediator myotrophin).

  4. Different gene expression profiles in normo- and dyslipidemic men after fish oil supplementation: results from a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have suggested the benefits of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) on cardiovascular health, but only limited data are available describing n-3 PUFA regulated pathways in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of n-3 PUFA administration on whole genome expression profiles in the blood of normo- and dyslipidemic subjects. Methods Differentially expressed genes were detected after four hours, one week and twelve weeks of supplementation with either fish oil (FO) or corn oil in normo- and dyslipidemic men using whole genome microarrays. Results Independent of the oil, a significantly higher number of genes was regulated in dyslipidemic subjects compared to normolipidemic subjects. Pathway analyses discovered metabolisms dominantly affected by FO after twelve weeks of supplementation, including the lipid metabolism, immune system and cardiovascular diseases. Several pro-inflammatory genes, in particular, were down-regulated in dyslipidemic subjects, indicating the immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory capability of FO and its bioactive FAs, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Conclusions This is the first study showing significant differences in gene expression profiles between normo- and dyslipidemic men after FO supplementation. Further studies need to clarify the exact role of n-3 PUFAs in pathways and metabolisms which were identified as being regulated after FO supplementation in this study. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (ID: NCT01089231) PMID:22929118

  5. Oscillatory control of Delta-like1 in cell interactions regulates dynamic gene expression and tissue morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, Hiromi; Isomura, Akihiro; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Kori, Hiroshi; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling regulates tissue morphogenesis through cell–cell interactions. The Notch effectors Hes1 and Hes7 are expressed in an oscillatory manner and regulate developmental processes such as neurogenesis and somitogenesis, respectively. Expression of the mRNA for the mouse Notch ligand Delta-like1 (Dll1) is also oscillatory. However, the dynamics of Dll1 protein expression are controversial, and their functional significance is unknown. Here, we developed a live-imaging system and found that Dll1 protein expression oscillated in neural progenitors and presomitic mesoderm cells. Notably, when Dll1 expression was accelerated or delayed by shortening or elongating the Dll1 gene, Dll1 oscillations became severely dampened or quenched at intermediate levels, as modeled mathematically. Under this condition, Hes1 and Hes7 oscillations were also dampened. In the presomitic mesoderm, steady Dll1 expression led to severe fusion of somites and their derivatives, such as vertebrae and ribs. In the developing brain, steady Dll1 expression inhibited proliferation of neural progenitors and accelerated neurogenesis, whereas optogenetic induction of Dll1 oscillation efficiently maintained neural progenitors. These results indicate that the appropriate timing of Dll1 expression is critical for the oscillatory networks and suggest the functional significance of oscillatory cell–cell interactions in tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26728556

  6. Mutational analysis of cat-86 gene expression controlled by lactococcal promoters in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bojovic, B; Djordjevic, G; Banina, A; Topisirovic, L

    1994-01-01

    Promoters were cloned from the chromosomal DNA of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NP4510 by using promoter-probe vector pGKV210. N-Methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced mutagenesis of L. lactis-(pBV413), with low-level expression of the cat-86 gene, resulted in enhanced expression. Subcloning and sequencing of the mutated plasmid designated pBV415 revealed that the mutation is located within the PstI-HindIII fragment containing the coding sequence of the cat-86 gene (the 10th CTG codon was replaced by a TTG; both code for leucine). A set of otherwise identical plasmids with four combinations of CTG and TTG codons at the 10th and 46th positions in the cat-86 gene were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. These plasmids containing cat-86 derivatives displayed a significant variation in cat expression in L. lactis and E. coli. The data suggest that cat expression is dependent on the secondary structure of the cat mRNA. New cat-86 derivatives described here can be used in lactococci, in which they provide additional flexibility for promoter cloning. PMID:7961430

  7. In Silico Identification and Experimental Characterization of Regulatory Elements Controlling the Expression of the Salmonella csrB and csrC Genes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Luary C.; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Salgado, Heladia; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Puente, José L.; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The small RNAs CsrB and CsrC of Salmonella indirectly control the expression of numerous genes encoding widespread cellular functions, including virulence. The expression of csrB and csrC genes, which are located in different chromosomal regions, is coordinated by positive transcriptional control mediated by the two-component regulatory system BarA/SirA. Here, we identified by computational analysis an 18-bp inverted repeat (IR) sequence located far upstream from the promoter of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium csrB and csrC genes. Deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of the csrB and csrC regulatory regions revealed that this IR sequence is required for transcriptional activation of both genes. Protein-DNA and protein-protein interaction assays showed that the response regulator SirA specifically binds to the IR sequence and provide evidence that SirA acts as a dimer. Interestingly, whereas the IR sequence was essential for the SirA-mediated expression of csrB, our results revealed that SirA controls the expression of csrC not only by binding to the IR sequence but also by an indirect mode involving the Csr system. Additional computational, biochemical, and genetic analyses demonstrated that the integration host factor (IHF) global regulator positively controls the expression of csrB, but not of csrC, by interacting with a sequence located between the promoter and the SirA-binding site. These findings contribute to the better understanding of the regulatory mechanism controlling the expression of CsrB and CsrC. PMID:24187088

  8. In silico identification and experimental characterization of regulatory elements controlling the expression of the Salmonella csrB and csrC genes.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Luary C; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Salgado, Heladia; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Puente, José L; Collado-Vides, Julio; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2014-01-01

    The small RNAs CsrB and CsrC of Salmonella indirectly control the expression of numerous genes encoding widespread cellular functions, including virulence. The expression of csrB and csrC genes, which are located in different chromosomal regions, is coordinated by positive transcriptional control mediated by the two-component regulatory system BarA/SirA. Here, we identified by computational analysis an 18-bp inverted repeat (IR) sequence located far upstream from the promoter of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium csrB and csrC genes. Deletion analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of the csrB and csrC regulatory regions revealed that this IR sequence is required for transcriptional activation of both genes. Protein-DNA and protein-protein interaction assays showed that the response regulator SirA specifically binds to the IR sequence and provide evidence that SirA acts as a dimer. Interestingly, whereas the IR sequence was essential for the SirA-mediated expression of csrB, our results revealed that SirA controls the expression of csrC not only by binding to the IR sequence but also by an indirect mode involving the Csr system. Additional computational, biochemical, and genetic analyses demonstrated that the integration host factor (IHF) global regulator positively controls the expression of csrB, but not of csrC, by interacting with a sequence located between the promoter and the SirA-binding site. These findings contribute to the better understanding of the regulatory mechanism controlling the expression of CsrB and CsrC.

  9. Expression of multiple Bacillus subtilis genes is controlled by decay of slrA mRNA from Rho-dependent 3′ ends

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Kearns, Daniel B.; Bechhofer, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Timely turnover of RNA is an important element in the control of bacterial gene expression, but relatively few specific targets of RNA turnover regulation are known. Deletion of the Bacillus subtilis pnpA gene, encoding the major 3′ exonuclease turnover enzyme, polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), was shown previously to cause a motility defect correlated with a reduced level of the 32-gene fla/che flagellar biosynthesis operon transcript. fla/che operon transcript abundance has been shown to be inhibited by an excess of the small regulatory protein, SlrA, and here we find that slrA mRNA accumulated in the pnpA-deletion mutant. Mutation of slrA was epistatic to mutation of pnpA for the motility-related phenotype. Further, Rho-dependent termination was required for PNPase turnover of slrA mRNA. When the slrA gene was provided with a Rho-independent transcription terminator, gene regulation was no longer PNPase-dependent. Thus we show that the slrA transcript is a direct target of PNPase and that regulation of RNA turnover is a major determinant of motility gene expression. The interplay of specific transcription termination and mRNA decay mechanisms suggests selection for fine-tuning of gene expression. PMID:26857544

  10. Phytochrome-dependent coordinate control of distinct aspects of nuclear and plastid gene expression during anterograde signaling and photomorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sookyung; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2014-01-01

    Light perception by photoreceptors impacts plastid transcription, development, and differentiation. This photoreceptor-dependent activity suggests a mechanism for photoregulation of gene expression in the nucleus and plastid that serves to coordinate expression of critical genes of these two organelles. This coordinate expression is required for proper stoichiometric accumulation of components needed for assembly of plastids, photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes and components such as phytochromes. Chloroplast-targeted sigma factors, which function together with the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase to regulate expression of plastid-encoded genes, and nuclear-encoded plastid development factors, such as GLK1 and GLK2, are targets of phytochrome regulation. Such phytochrome-dependent functions are hypothesized to allow light-dependent regulation, and feasibly tuning, of plastid components and function in response to changes in the external environment, which directly affects photosynthesis and the potential for light-induced damage. When the size and protein composition of the light-harvesting complexes are not tuned to the external environment, imbalances in electron transport can impact the cellular redox state and cause cellular damage. We show that phytochromes specifically regulate the expression of multiple factors that function to modulate plastid transcription and, thus, provide a paradigm for coordinate expression of the nuclear and plastid genomes in response to changes in external light conditions. As phytochromes respond to changes in the prevalent wavelengths of light and light intensity, we propose that specific phytochrome-dependent molecular mechanisms are used during light-dependent signaling between the nucleus and chloroplast during photomorphogenesis to coordinate chloroplast development with plant developmental stage and the external environment. PMID:24817873

  11. Gene Positioning Effects on Expression in Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy Q; Bosco, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The packaging and organization of the genome within the eukaryotic interphase nucleus directly influence how the genes are expressed. An underappreciated aspect of genome structure is that it is highly dynamic and that the physical positioning of a gene can impart control over its transcriptional status. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how gene positioning at different levels of genome organization can directly influence gene expression during interphase. The levels of organization discussed include chromatin looping, topologically associated domains, chromosome territories, and nuclear compartments. We discuss specific studies demonstrating that gene positioning is a dynamic and highly regulated feature of the eukaryotic genome that allows for the essential spatiotemporal regulation of genes.

  12. RNA-Seq Analysis of Abdominal Fat in Genetically Fat and Lean Chickens Highlights a Divergence in Expression of Genes Controlling Adiposity, Hemostasis, and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Resnyk, Christopher W.; Chen, Chuming; Huang, Hongzhan; Wu, Cathy H.; Simon, Jean; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Duclos, Michel J.; Cogburn, Larry A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic selection for enhanced growth rate in meat-type chickens (Gallus domesticus) is usually accompanied by excessive adiposity, which has negative impacts on both feed efficiency and carcass quality. Enhanced visceral fatness and several unique features of avian metabolism (i.e., fasting hyperglycemia and insulin insensitivity) mimic overt symptoms of obesity and related metabolic disorders in humans. Elucidation of the genetic and endocrine factors that contribute to excessive visceral fatness in chickens could also advance our understanding of human metabolic diseases. Here, RNA sequencing was used to examine differential gene expression in abdominal fat of genetically fat and lean chickens, which exhibit a 2.8-fold divergence in visceral fatness at 7 wk. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that many of 1687 differentially expressed genes are associated with hemostasis, endocrine function and metabolic syndrome in mammals. Among the highest expressed genes in abdominal fat, across both genotypes, were 25 differentially expressed genes associated with de novo synthesis and metabolism of lipids. Over-expression of numerous adipogenic and lipogenic genes in the FL chickens suggests that in situ lipogenesis in chickens could make a more substantial contribution to expansion of visceral fat mass than previously recognized. Distinguishing features of the abdominal fat transcriptome in lean chickens were high abundance of multiple hemostatic and vasoactive factors, transporters, and ectopic expression of several hormones/receptors, which could control local vasomotor tone and proteolytic processing of adipokines, hemostatic factors and novel endocrine factors. Over-expression of several thrombogenic genes in abdominal fat of lean chickens is quite opposite to the pro-thrombotic state found in obese humans. Clearly, divergent genetic selection for an extreme (2.5–2.8-fold) difference in visceral fatness provokes a number of novel regulatory responses that govern

  13. RNA-Seq Analysis of Abdominal Fat in Genetically Fat and Lean Chickens Highlights a Divergence in Expression of Genes Controlling Adiposity, Hemostasis, and Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Resnyk, Christopher W; Chen, Chuming; Huang, Hongzhan; Wu, Cathy H; Simon, Jean; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Duclos, Michel J; Cogburn, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    Genetic selection for enhanced growth rate in meat-type chickens (Gallus domesticus) is usually accompanied by excessive adiposity, which has negative impacts on both feed efficiency and carcass quality. Enhanced visceral fatness and several unique features of avian metabolism (i.e., fasting hyperglycemia and insulin insensitivity) mimic overt symptoms of obesity and related metabolic disorders in humans. Elucidation of the genetic and endocrine factors that contribute to excessive visceral fatness in chickens could also advance our understanding of human metabolic diseases. Here, RNA sequencing was used to examine differential gene expression in abdominal fat of genetically fat and lean chickens, which exhibit a 2.8-fold divergence in visceral fatness at 7 wk. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that many of 1687 differentially expressed genes are associated with hemostasis, endocrine function and metabolic syndrome in mammals. Among the highest expressed genes in abdominal fat, across both genotypes, were 25 differentially expressed genes associated with de novo synthesis and metabolism of lipids. Over-expression of numerous adipogenic and lipogenic genes in the FL chickens suggests that in situ lipogenesis in chickens could make a more substantial contribution to expansion of visceral fat mass than previously recognized. Distinguishing features of the abdominal fat transcriptome in lean chickens were high abundance of multiple hemostatic and vasoactive factors, transporters, and ectopic expression of several hormones/receptors, which could control local vasomotor tone and proteolytic processing of adipokines, hemostatic factors and novel endocrine factors. Over-expression of several thrombogenic genes in abdominal fat of lean chickens is quite opposite to the pro-thrombotic state found in obese humans. Clearly, divergent genetic selection for an extreme (2.5-2.8-fold) difference in visceral fatness provokes a number of novel regulatory responses that govern

  14. Composition of the SAGA complex in plants and its role in controlling gene expression in response to abiotic stresses

    PubMed Central

    Moraga, Felipe; Aquea, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Protein complexes involved in epigenetic regulation of transcription have evolved as molecular strategies to face environmental stress in plants. SAGA (Spt–Ada–Gcn5 Acetyltransferase) is a transcriptional co-activator complex that regulates numerous cellular processes through the coordination of multiple post-translational histone modifications, including acetylation, deubiquitination, and chromatin recognition. The diverse functions of the SAGA complex involve distinct modules that are highly conserved between yeast, flies, and mammals. In this review, the composition of the SAGA complex in plants is described and its role in gene expression regulation under stress conditions summarized. Some of these proteins are likely involved in the regulation of the inducible expression of genes under light, cold, drought, salt, and iron stress, although the functions of several of its components remain unknown. PMID:26528322

  15. Expression of genes controlling unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis and oil deposition in developing seeds of Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Aizhong

    2014-10-01

    Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L., Euphorbiaceae) seed oil is rich in α-linolenic acid, a kind of n-3 fatty acids with many health benefits. To discover the mechanism underlying α-linolenic acid accumulation in sacha inchi seeds, preliminary research on sacha inchi seed development was carried out from one week after fertilization until maturity, focusing on phenology, oil content, and lipid profiles. The results suggested that the development of sacha inchi seeds from pollination to mature seed could be divided into three periods. In addition, investigations on the effect of temperature on sacha inchi seeds showed that total oil content decreased in the cool season, while unsaturated fatty acid and linolenic acid concentrations increased. In parallel, expression profiles of 17 unsaturated fatty acid related genes were characterized during seed development and the relationships between gene expression and lipid/unsaturated fatty acid accumulation were discussed.

  16. Expression of genes controlling unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis and oil deposition in developing seeds of Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Aizhong

    2014-10-01

    Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L., Euphorbiaceae) seed oil is rich in α-linolenic acid, a kind of n-3 fatty acids with many health benefits. To discover the mechanism underlying α-linolenic acid accumulation in sacha inchi seeds, preliminary research on sacha inchi seed development was carried out from one week after fertilization until maturity, focusing on phenology, oil content, and lipid profiles. The results suggested that the development of sacha inchi seeds from pollination to mature seed could be divided into three periods. In addition, investigations on the effect of temperature on sacha inchi seeds showed that total oil content decreased in the cool season, while unsaturated fatty acid and linolenic acid concentrations increased. In parallel, expression profiles of 17 unsaturated fatty acid related genes were characterized during seed development and the relationships between gene expression and lipid/unsaturated fatty acid accumulation were discussed. PMID:25119487

  17. Long-term and tight control of gene expression in mouse skeletal muscle by a new hybrid human transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Roscilli, Giuseppe; Rinaudo, Cira Daniela; Cimino, Monica; Sporeno, Elisabetta; Lamartina, Stefania; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Toniatti, Carlo

    2002-11-01

    Diseases requiring frequent and lifelong injections of recombinant proteins would be more efficaciously treated by intramuscular delivery of genes encoding secretable proteins. However, the success of this approach largely depends on our capability to temporally regulate transcription of delivered genes. Therefore, we sought to generate a humanized transcription factor to regulate transgene expression in muscle. A novel 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT)-dependent transcriptional regulator (called HEA-3) was constructed by fusing in-frame the DNA binding domain of the human hepatocyte nuclear factor-1alpha (HNF1alpha), which is not expressed in muscle cells, a G(521)R mutant of the ligand binding domain of human estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha), and the activation domain derived from human nuclear factor-kappaB p65 subunit (NF-kappaB p65). We demonstrate that an artificial promoter containing multimeric HNF1alpha binding sites is silent in muscles and in cell lines that lack endogenous HNF1alpha. HEA-3 stimulated transcription from this target promoter in a stringent 4-OHT-dependent manner. The dynamic range of transgene regulation was high, because of the low basal activity and high inducibility of the system. Ex vivo, HEA-3 increased expression of the transfected reporter gene by more than 1000-fold in a ligand-dependent manner. In vivo, HEA-3 stimulated by more than 100-fold, the expression of secreted alkaline phosphatase after delivery as plasmid DNA into mouse muscles. Moreover, long-term modulation of the expression of intramuscularly delivered mouse erythropoietin was achieved in immunocompetent mice.

  18. Quality control of astrocyte-directed Cre transgenic mice: the benefits of a direct link between loss of gene expression and reporter activation.

    PubMed

    Requardt, Robert Pascal; Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Dublin, Pavel; Wallraff-Beck, Anke; Mikeska, Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Waha, Andreas; Steinhäuser, Christian; Willecke, Klaus; Theis, Martin

    2009-04-15

    Cre recombinase activity for cell-type restricted deletion of floxed target genes (i.e., flanked by Cre recognition loxP-sites) is often measured by separate matings with recombination-activated reporter gene mice. Using a floxed Gja1 (Cx43) allele, we demonstrate the benefits of a direct link between reporter gene expression and target gene deletion to overcome critical limitations of the Cre/loxP system. The widely used human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP)-Cre transgene exhibits variable recombination activity and requires postexperimental validation. Such quality control is essential to correlate the extent of Cre-mediated Gja1 ablation with phenotypical alterations and to maintain the activity status of hGFAP-Cre in transgenic mouse colonies. We present several strategies to control for the fidelity of hGFAP-Cre mediated recombination. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of 100K gene of fowl adenovirus-4 for prevention and control of hydropericardium syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shah, M S; Ashraf, A; Khan, M I; Rahman, M; Habib, M; Qureshi, J A

    2016-01-01

    Fowl adenovirus-4 is an infectious agent causing Hydropericardium syndrome in chickens. Adenovirus are non-enveloped virions having linear, double stranded DNA. Viral genome codes for few structural and non structural proteins. 100K is an important non-structural viral protein. Open reading frame for coding sequence of 100K protein was cloned with oligo histidine tag and expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein. Nucleotide sequence of the gene revealed that 100K gene of FAdV-4 has high homology (98%) with the respective gene of FAdV-10. Recombinant 100K protein was expressed in E. coli and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Immunization of chickens with recombinant 100K protein elicited significant serum antibody titers. However challenge protection test revealed that 100K protein conferred little protection (40%) to the immunized chicken against pathogenic viral challenge. So it was concluded that 100K gene has 2397 bp length and recombinant 100K protein has molecular weight of 95 kDa. It was also found that the recombinant protein has little capacity to affect the immune response because in-spite of having an important role in intracellular transport & folding of viral capsid proteins during viral replication, it is not exposed on the surface of the virus at any stage.

  20. Control of placental alkaline phosphatase gene expression in HeLa cells: induction of synthesis by prednisolone and sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.Y.; Takahashi, S.

    1987-06-16

    HeLa S/sub 3/ cells produce an alkaline phosphatase indistinguishable from the enzyme from human term placenta. The phosphatase activity in these cells was induced by both prednisolone and sodium butyrate. Both agents stimulated de novo synthesis of the enzyme. The increase in phosphatase activity paralleled the increase in immunoactivity and biosynthesis of placental alkaline phosphatase. The fully processed phosphatase monomer in control, prednisolone-treated or butyrate-treated cells was a 64.5 K polypeptide, measured by both incorporation of L-(/sup 35/S)methionine into enzyme protein and active-site labeling. The 64.5K polypeptide was formed by the incorporation of additional N-acetylneuraminic acid moieties to a precursor polypeptide of 61.5K. However, this biosynthetic pathway was identified only in butyrate-treated cells. In prednisolone-treated cells, the processing of 61.5K to 64.5K monomer was accelerated, and the presence of the 61.5 precursor could only be detected by either neuraminidase or monensin treatment. Phosphatase mRNA which comigrated with the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA of 2.7 kilobases was induced in the presence of either prednisolone or butyrate. Alkaline phosphatase mRNA is untreated HeLa S/sub 3/ cells migrated slightly faster than the term placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Butyrate also induced a second still faster migrating alkaline phosphatase mRNA. Both prednisolone and butyrate increased the steady-state levels of placental alkaline phosphatase mRNA. The data indicate that the increase in phosphatase mRNA by prednisolone and butyrate resulted in the induction of alkaline phosphatase activity and biosynthesis in HeLa S/sub 3/ cells. Furthermore, both agents induced the expression of different alkaline phosphatase gene transcripts without altering its protein product.

  1. Investigation into the role of catabolite control protein A in the metabolic regulation of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 using gene expression profile analysis

    PubMed Central

    LANG, XULONG; WAN, ZHONGHAI; PAN, YING; WANG, XIURAN; WANG, XIAOXU; BU, ZHAOYANG; QIAN, JING; ZENG, HUAZONG; WANG, XINGLONG

    2015-01-01

    Catabolite control protein A (CcpA) serves a key function in the catabolism of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2) by affecting the biological function and metabolic regulatory mechanisms of this bacterium. The aim of the present study was to identify variations in CcpA expression in S. suis 2 using gene expression profile analysis. Using sequencing and functional analysis, CcpA was demonstrated to play a regulatory role in the expression and regulation of virulence genes, carbon metabolism and immunoregulation in S. suis 2. Gene Ontology and Kyto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses indicated that CcpA in S. suis 2 is involved in the regulation of multiple metabolic processes. Furthermore, combined analysis of the transcriptome and metabolite data suggested that metabolites varied due to the modulation of gene expression levels under the influence of CcpA regulation. In addition, metabolic network analysis indicated that CcpA impacted carbon metabolism to a certain extent. Therefore, the present study has provided a more comprehensive analysis of the role of CcpA in the metabolic regulation of S. suis 2, which may facilitate future investigation into this mechanism. Furthermore, the results of the present study provide a foundation for further research into the regulatory function of CcpA and associated metabolic pathways in S. suis 2. PMID:26170923

  2. Retinoic Acid Controls Expression of Tissue Remodeling Genes Hmgn1 and Fgf18 at the Digit-Interdigit Junction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xianling; Brade, Thomas; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Duester, Gregg

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies on retinoic acid receptor (RAR) mutants suggested that retinoic acid (RA) is required for loss of interdigital mesenchyme during digit formation. Here, we report that the RA-generating enzyme retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (Raldh2) is expressed in the interdigital mesenchyme whereas Cyp26b1, controlling RA degradation, is expressed in digits, limiting autopodal RA action to the interdigital zones. E13.5 Raldh2−/− mouse embryos lose expression of the RARE-lacZ RA-reporter transgene and matrix metalloproteinase-11 (Mmp11) throughout the interdigital mesenchyme, while expression of RARb, Fgf18, and high mobility group N1 (Hmgn1) is lost at the digit-interdigit junction. Raldh2−/− autopods exhibit reduced interdigital apoptosis associated with loss of Bmp7 expression, but Bmp2, Bmp4, Msx2, and Fgf8 were unaffected. Although interdigital expression of Hmgn1 was greatly down-regulated in Raldh2−/− autopods, complementary expression of Sox9 in digit cartilage was unaffected. Regulation of Hmgn1 and Fgf18 at the digit-interdigit junction suggests RA controls tissue remodeling as well as apoptosis. PMID:20034106

  3. Nutritional regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cousins, R J

    1999-01-25

    Genes are regulated by complex arrays of response elements that influence the rate of transcription. Nutrients and hormones either act directly to influence these rates or act indirectly through specialized signaling pathways. Metabolites of vitamins A and D, fatty acids, some sterols, and zinc are among the nutrients that influence transcription directly. Components of dietary fiber may influence gene expression indirectly through changes in hormonal signaling, mechanical stimuli, and metabolites produced by the intestinal microflora. In addition, consumption of water-soluble fibers may lead to changes in gene expression mediated through indirect mechanisms that influence transcription rates. In the large intestine, short-chain fatty acids, including butyric acid, are produced by microflora. Butyric acid can indirectly influence gene expression. Some sources of fiber limit nutrient absorption, particularly of trace elements. This could have direct or indirect effects on gene expression. Identification of genes in colonic epithelial cells that are differentially regulated by dietary fiber will be an important step toward understanding the role of dietary factors in colorectal cancer progression.

  4. Modeling gene expression in time and space.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Cell populations rarely exhibit gene-expression profiles that are homogeneous in time and space. In the temporal domain, dynamical behaviors such as oscillations and pulses of protein production pervade cell biology, underlying phenomena as diverse as circadian rhythmicity, cell cycle control, stress and damage responses, and stem-cell pluripotency. In multicellular populations, spatial heterogeneities are crucial for decision making and development, among many other functions. Cells need to exquisitely coordinate this temporal and spatial variation to survive. Although the spatiotemporal character of gene expression is challenging to quantify experimentally at the level of individual cells, it is beneficial from the modeling viewpoint, because it provides strong constraints that can be probed by theoretically analyzing mathematical models of candidate gene and protein circuits. Here, we review recent examples of temporal dynamics and spatial patterning in gene expression to show how modeling such phenomenology can help us unravel the molecular mechanisms of cellular function.

  5. Selection of reference genes as internal controls for gene expression in tissues of red abalone Haliotis rufescens (Mollusca, Vetigastropoda; Swainson, 1822).

    PubMed

    López-Landavery, Edgar A; Portillo-López, Amelia; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Del Río-Portilla, Miguel A

    2014-10-10

    The red abalone Haliotis rufescens is one of the most important species for aquaculture in Baja California, México, and despite this, few gene expression studies have been done in tissues such as gill, head and gonad. For this purpose, reverse transcription and quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) is a powerful tool for gene expression evaluation. For a reliable analysis, however, it is necessary to select and validate housekeeping genes that allow proper transcription quantification. Stability of nine housekeeping genes (ACTB, BGLU, TUBB, CY, GAPDH, HPRTI, RPL5, SDHA and UBC) was evaluated in different tissues of red abalone (gill, head and gonad/digestive gland). Four-fold serial dilutions of cDNA (from 25 ngμL(-1) to 0.39 ngμL(-1)) were used to prepare the standard curve, and it showed gene efficiencies between 0.95 and 0.99, with R(2)=0.99. geNorm and NormFinder analysis showed that RPL5 and CY were the most stable genes considering all tissues, whereas in gill HPRTI and BGLU were most stable. In gonad/digestive gland, RPL5 and TUBB were the most stable genes with geNorm, while SDHA and HPRTI were the best using NormFinder. Similarly, in head the best genes were RPL5 and UBC with geNorm, and GAPDH and CY with NormFinder. The technical variability analysis with RPL5 and abalone gonad/digestive gland tissue indicated a high repeatability with a variation coefficient within groups ≤ 0.56% and between groups ≤ 1.89%. These results will help us for further research in reproduction, thermoregulation and endocrinology in red abalone.

  6. Epigenetic Control of Cytokine Gene Expression: Regulation of the TNF/LT Locus and T Helper Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Falvo, James V.; Jasenosky, Luke D.; Kruidenier, Laurens; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics encompasses transient and heritable modifications to DNA and nucleosomes in the native chromatin context. For example, enzymatic addition of chemical moieties to the N-terminal “tails” of histones, particularly acetylation and methylation of lysine residues in the histone tails of H3 and H4, plays a key role in regulation of gene transcription. The modified histones, which are physically associated with gene regulatory regions that typically occur within conserved noncoding sequences, play a functional role in active, poised, or repressed gene transcription. The “histone code” defined by these modifications, along with the chromatin-binding acetylases, deacetylases, methylases, demethylases, and other enzymes that direct modifications resulting in specific patterns of histone modification, shows considerable evolutionary conservation from yeast to humans. Direct modifications at the DNA level, such as cytosine methylation at CpG motifs that represses promoter activity, are another highly conserved epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Furthermore, epigenetic modifications at the nucleosome or DNA level can also be coupled with higher-order intra- or interchromosomal interactions that influence the location of regulatory elements and that can place them in an environment of specific nucleoprotein complexes associated with transcription. In the mammalian immune system, epigenetic gene regulation is a crucial mechanism for a range of physiological processes, including the innate host immune response to pathogens and T cell differentiation driven by specific patterns of cytokine gene expression. Here, we will review current findings regarding epigenetic regulation of cytokine genes important in innate and/or adaptive immune responses, with a special focus upon the tumor necrosis factor/lymphotoxin locus and cytokine-driven CD4+ T cell differentiation into the Th1, Th2, and Th17 lineages. PMID:23683942

  7. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  8. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  9. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  10. Evidence that Altered Cis Element Spacing Affects PpsR Mediated Redox Control of Photosynthesis Gene Expression in Rubrivivax gelatinosus.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takayuki; Cheng, Zhuo; Matsuura, Katsumi; Masuda, Shinji; Bauer, Carl E

    2015-01-01

    PpsR is a major regulator of photosynthesis gene expression among all characterized purple photosynthetic bacteria. This transcription regulator has been extensively characterized in Rhodobacter (Rba.) capsulatus and Rba. sphaeroides which are members of the α-proteobacteria lineage. In this study, we have investigated the biochemical properties and mutational effects of a ppsR deletion strain in the β-proteobacterium Rubrivivax (Rvi.) gelatinosus in order to reveal phylogenetically conserved mechanisms and species-specific characteristics. A deletion of the ppsR gene resulted in de-repression of photosystem synthesis showing that PpsR functions as a repressor of photosynthesis genes in this species. We also constructed a Rvi. gelatinosus PpsR mutant in which a conserved cysteine at position 436 was changed to an alanine to examine whether or not this residue is important for sensing redox, as reported in Rhodobacter species. Surprisingly, the Cys436 Ala mutant retained the ability to repress photosynthesis gene expression under aerobic conditions, suggesting that PpsR from Rvi. gelatinosus has different redox-responding characteristics. Furthermore, biochemical analyses demonstrated that Rvi. gelatinosus PpsR only shows redox-dependent binding to promoters with 9-bp spacing, but not 8-bp spacing, between two PpsR-recognition sequences. These results indicate that redox-dependent binding of PpsR requires appropriate cis configuration of PpsR target sequences in Rvi. gelatinosus. These results also indicate that PpsR homologs from different species regulate photosynthesis genes with altered biochemical properties.

  11. Severe congenital limb deficiencies, vertebral hypersegmentation, absent thymus and mirror polydactyly: a defect expression of a developmental control gene?

    PubMed

    Urioste, M; Lorda-Sánchez, I; Blanco, M; Burón, E; Aparicio, P; Martínez-Frías, M L

    1996-02-01

    We describe two unrelated patients with a complex malformation pattern that may be a candidate for a developmental gene disorder. These two patients had severe, symmetrical upper and lower limb deficiencies, vertebral hypersegmentation, and duodenal atresia. Patient 1 also had mirror-image polydactyly of his feet; patient 2 was athymic. The concurrence in two unrelated patients of additional vertebrae with severe anomalies in limb development, including a symmetrical deficiency of the four limbs and either mirror-image duplication of some toes (only in patient 1) or absence of the thymus (only in patient 2), represents an early alteration in body-plan organization. Since limb development, thymus development and segmentation are possibly under the control of homeobox genes in the human embryo, it seems reasonable that the malformations observed in these two patients resulted from a defect of a gene controlling developmental pattern formation, possibly a homeobox gene or a paired-box gene. Severe limb deficiencies have been reported in other well-known genetic entities, such as Roberts syndrome, Baller-Gerold syndrome, X-linked amelia, and DK-phocomelia syndrome. However, since the specific pattern of anomalies observed in these patients makes the diagnosis of some of the abovementioned disorders unlikely, we conclude that our patients have a previously undescribed disorder.

  12. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  13. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-02-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1; i.e., they obey Zipf’s law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intracellular reaction network, we found that Zipf’s law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  14. Translational control of germ cell-expressed mRNA imposed by alternative splicing: opioid peptide gene expression in rat testis.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J E; Collard, M W; Douglass, J O

    1989-01-01

    The three genes encoding the opioid peptide precursors (prodynorphin, proenkephalin, and proopiomelanocortin) are expressed in the rat testis. The sizes of the three opioid mRNAs in the testis differ from the sizes of the corresponding mRNAs in other rat tissues in which these genes are expressed. The smaller testicular proopiomelanocortin mRNA has previously been demonstrated to arise from alternative transcriptional initiation. In the present study, we found that the smaller testicular prodynorphin mRNA, expressed in Sertoli cells, results from alternative mRNA processing. Exon 2, which makes up 5' untranslated sequence, is removed from the mature transcript. Polysome analysis of brain and testis RNA indicates that the alteration of the prodynorphin leader sequence in the testis-specific transcript does not affect the efficiency of translation of this mRNA. The larger testicular proenkephalin transcript, expressed in developing germ cells, also results from alternative mRNA processing. Alternative acceptor site usage in the splicing of intron A results in a germ cell-specific proenkephalin transcript with a 491-nucleotide 5' untranslated leader sequence preceding the preproenkephalin-coding sequence. Polysome analysis indicates that this germ cell-specific proenkephalin mRNA is not efficiently translated. Mechanisms by which alternative mRNA splicing may serve to confer translational regulation upon the testicular proenkephalin transcript are discussed. Images PMID:2573832

  15. Expression of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene under control of the 5'-regulatory sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene with and without a MAR element in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Burkov, I A; Serova, I A; Battulin, N R; Smirnov, A V; Babkin, I V; Andreeva, L E; Dvoryanchikov, G A; Serov, O L

    2013-10-01

    Expression of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) gene under the control of the 5'-regulatory sequence of the goat alpha-S1-casein gene with and without a matrix attachment region (MAR) element from the Drosophila histone 1 gene was studied in four and eight transgenic mouse lines, respectively. Of the four transgenic lines carrying the transgene without MAR, three had correct tissues-specific expression of the hGM-CSF gene in the mammary gland only and no signs of cell mosaicism. The concentration of hGM-CSF in the milk of transgenic females varied from 1.9 to 14 μg/ml. One line presented hGM-CSF in the blood serum, indicating ectopic expression. The values of secretion of hGM-CSF in milk of 6 transgenic lines carrying the transgene with MAR varied from 0.05 to 0.7 μg/ml, and two of these did not express hGM-CSF. Three of the four examined animals from lines of this group showed ectopic expression of the hGM-CSF gene, as determined by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses, as well as the presence of hGM-CSF in the blood serum. Mosaic expression of the hGM-CSF gene in mammary epithelial cells was specific to all examined transgenic mice carrying the transgene with MAR but was never observed in the transgenic mice without MAR. The mosaic expression was not dependent on transgene copy number. Thus, the expected "protective or enhancer effect" from the MAR element on the hGM-CSF gene expression was not observed.

  16. Putative methyltransferase LaeA and transcription factor CreA are necessary for proper asexual development and controlling secondary metabolic gene cluster expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujun; Zhu, Yingying; Bao, Longfei; Gao, Liwei; Yao, Guangshan; Li, Yanan; Yang, Zhifeng; Li, Zhonghai; Zhong, Yaohua; Li, Fuli; Yin, Heng; Qu, Yinbo; Qin, Yuqi

    2016-09-01

    The morphological development of fungi is a complex process and is often coupled with secondary metabolite production. In this study, we assessed the function of putative methyltransferase LaeA and transcription factor CreA in controlling asexual development and secondary metabolic gene cluster expression in Penicillium oxalicum. The deletion of laeA (ΔlaeA) impaired the conidiation in P. oxalicum, with a downregulated expression of brlA. Overexpression of P. oxalicum brlA in ΔlaeA could upregulate brlA and abaA remarkably, but could not rescue the conidiation defect; therefore, brlA and abaA expression were necessary but not sufficient for conidiation. Deletion of creA in ΔlaeA background (ΔlaeAΔcreA) blocked conidiation with a white fluffy phenotype. Nutrient-rich medium could not rescue developmental defects in ΔlaeAΔcreA mutant but could rescue defects in ΔlaeA. Expression of 10 genes, namely, albA/wA, abrB/yA, arpA, aygA, arpA-like, arpB, arpB-like, rodA, rodA-like, and rodB, for pigmentation and spore wall protein genes was silenced in ΔlaeAΔcreA, whereas only six of them were downregulated in ΔlaeA. Among the 28 secondary metabolism gene clusters in P. oxalicum, four secondary metabolism gene clusters were silenced in ΔlaeA and two were also silenced in ΔbrlA mutant. A total of 10 physically linked and coregulated genes were distributed over five chromosomes in ΔlaeA. Six of these genes were located in subtelomeric regions, thus demonstrating a positional bias for LaeA-regulated clusters toward subtelomeric regions. All of silenced clusters located in subtelomeric regions were derepressed in ΔlaeAΔcreA, hence showing that lack of CreA could remediate the repression of gene clusters in ΔlaeA background. Results show that both putative methyltransferase LaeA and transcription factor CreA are necessary for proper asexual development and controlling secondary metabolic gene cluster expression. PMID:27387217

  17. Stress-induced gene expression and behavior are controlled by DNA methylation and methyl donor availability in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Saunderson, Emily A; Spiers, Helen; Mifsud, Karen R; Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Trollope, Alexandra F; Shaikh, Abeera; Mill, Jonathan; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2016-04-26

    Stressful events evoke long-term changes in behavioral responses; however, the underlying mechanisms in the brain are not well understood. Previous work has shown that epigenetic changes and immediate-early gene (IEG) induction in stress-activated dentate gyrus (DG) granule neurons play a crucial role in these behavioral responses. Here, we show that an acute stressful challenge [i.e., forced swimming (FS)] results in DNA demethylation at specific CpG (5'-cytosine-phosphate-guanine-3') sites close to the c-Fos (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog) transcriptional start site and within the gene promoter region of Egr-1 (early growth response protein 1) specifically in the DG. Administration of the (endogenous) methyl donor S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) did not affect CpG methylation and IEG gene expression at baseline. However, administration of SAM before the FS challenge resulted in an enhanced CpG methylation at the IEG loci and suppression of IEG induction specifically in the DG and an impaired behavioral immobility response 24 h later. The stressor also specifically increased the expression of the de novo DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a [DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 alpha] in this hippocampus region. Moreover, stress resulted in an increased association of Dnmt3a enzyme with the affected CpG loci within the IEG genes. No effects of SAM were observed on stress-evoked histone modifications, including H3S10p-K14ac (histone H3, phosphorylated serine 10 and acetylated lysine-14), H3K4me3 (histone H3, trimethylated lysine-4), H3K9me3 (histone H3, trimethylated lysine-9), and H3K27me3 (histone H3, trimethylated lysine-27). We conclude that the DNA methylation status of IEGs plays a crucial role in FS-induced IEG induction in DG granule neurons and associated behavioral responses. In addition, the concentration of available methyl donor, possibly in conjunction with Dnmt3a, is critical for the responsiveness of dentate neurons to environmental stimuli in

  18. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Giaever, Guri; Kumm, Jochen; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-01-15

    All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  19. Coordinate Control of Expression of Nrf2-Modulated Genes in the Human Small Airway Epithelium Is Highly Responsive to Cigarette Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Ralf-Harto; Schwartz, Jamie D; De Bishnu, P; Ferris, Barbara; Omberg, Larsson; Mezey, Jason G; Hackett, Neil R; Crystal, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an oxidant-responsive transcription factor known to induce detoxifying and antioxidant genes. Cigarette smoke, with its large oxidant content, is a major stress on the cells of small airway epithelium, which are vulnerable to oxidant damage. We assessed the role of cigarette smoke in activation of Nrf2 in the human small airway epithelium in vivo. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was used to sample the small airway epithelium in healthy-nonsmoker and healthy-smoker, and gene expression was assessed using microarrays. Relative to nonsmokers, Nrf2 protein in the small airway epithelium of smokers was activated and localized in the nucleus. The human homologs of 201 known murine Nrf2-modulated genes were identified, and 13 highly smoking-responsive Nrf2-modulated genes were identified. Construction of an Nrf2 index to assess the expression levels of these 13 genes in the airway epithelium of smokers showed coordinate control, an observation confirmed by quantitative PCR. This coordinate level of expression of the 13 Nrf2-modulated genes was independent of smoking history or demographic parameters. The Nrf2 index was used to identify two novel Nrf2-modulated, smoking-responsive genes, pirin (PIR) and UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1-family polypeptide A4 (UGT1A4). Both genes were demonstrated to contain functional antioxidant response elements in the promoter region. These observations suggest that Nrf2 plays an important role in regulating cellular defenses against smoking in the highly vulnerable small airway epithelium cells, and that there is variability within the human population in the Nrf2 responsiveness to oxidant burden. PMID:19593404

  20. Comparative RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals That Regulatory Network of Maize Root Development Controls the Expression of Genes in Response to N Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiongwei; Nie, Shujun; Li, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhiming; Shen, Yaou; Chen, Qi; Lu, Yanli; Lan, Hai; Zhou, Shufeng; Gao, Shibin; Pan, Guangtang; Lin, Haijian

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential nutrient for plants, and it directly affects grain yield and protein content in cereal crops. Plant root systems are not only critical for anchorage in the soil, but also for N acquisition. Therefore, genes controlling root development might also affect N uptake by plants. In this study, the responses of nitrogen on root architecture of mutant rtcs and wild-type of maize were investigated by morphological and physiological analysis. Subsequently, we performed a comparative RNA-Seq analysis to compare gene expression profiles between mutant rtcs roots and wild-type roots under different N conditions. We identified 786 co-modulated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to root development. These genes participated in various metabolic processes. A co-expression cluster analysis and a cis-regulatory motifs analysis revealed the importance of the AP2-EREBP transcription factor family in the rtcs-dependent regulatory network. Some genotype-specific DEGs contained at least one LBD motif in their promoter region. Further analyses of the differences in gene transcript levels between rtcs and wild-type under different N conditions revealed 403 co-modulated DEGs with distinct functions. A comparative analysis revealed that the regulatory network controlling root development also controlled gene expression in response to N-deficiency. Several AP2-EREBP family members involved in multiple hormone signaling pathways were among the DEGs. These transcription factors might play important roles in the rtcs-dependent regulatory network related to root development and the N-deficiency response. Genes encoding the nitrate transporters NRT2-1, NAR2.1, NAR2.2, and NAR2.3 showed much higher transcript levels in rtcs than in wild-type under normal-N conditions. This result indicated that the LBD gene family mainly functions as transcriptional repressors, as noted in other studies. In summary, using a comparative RNA-Seq-based approach, we identified

  1. Comparative RNA-Seq Analysis Reveals That Regulatory Network of Maize Root Development Controls the Expression of Genes in Response to N Stress.

    PubMed

    He, Xiujing; Ma, Haixia; Zhao, Xiongwei; Nie, Shujun; Li, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhiming; Shen, Yaou; Chen, Qi; Lu, Yanli; Lan, Hai; Zhou, Shufeng; Gao, Shibin; Pan, Guangtang; Lin, Haijian

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential nutrient for plants, and it directly affects grain yield and protein content in cereal crops. Plant root systems are not only critical for anchorage in the soil, but also for N acquisition. Therefore, genes controlling root development might also affect N uptake by plants. In this study, the responses of nitrogen on root architecture of mutant rtcs and wild-type of maize were investigated by morphological and physiological analysis. Subsequently, we performed a comparative RNA-Seq analysis to compare gene expression profiles between mutant rtcs roots and wild-type roots under different N conditions. We identified 786 co-modulated differentially expressed genes (DEGs) related to root development. These genes participated in various metabolic processes. A co-expression cluster analysis and a cis-regulatory motifs analysis revealed the importance of the AP2-EREBP transcription factor family in the rtcs-dependent regulatory network. Some genotype-specific DEGs contained at least one LBD motif in their promoter region. Further analyses of the differences in gene transcript levels between rtcs and wild-type under different N conditions revealed 403 co-modulated DEGs with distinct functions. A comparative analysis revealed that the regulatory network controlling root development also controlled gene expression in response to N-deficiency. Several AP2-EREBP family members involved in multiple hormone signaling pathways were among the DEGs. These transcription factors might play important roles in the rtcs-dependent regulatory network related to root development and the N-deficiency response. Genes encoding the nitrate transporters NRT2-1, NAR2.1, NAR2.2, and NAR2.3 showed much higher transcript levels in rtcs than in wild-type under normal-N conditions. This result indicated that the LBD gene family mainly functions as transcriptional repressors, as noted in other studies. In summary, using a comparative RNA-Seq-based approach, we identified

  2. Riboswitch Control of Gene Expression in Plants by Splicing and Alternative 3′ End Processing of mRNAs[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Andreas; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Grove, Beth C.; Green, Pamela J.; Shintani, David K.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    The most widespread riboswitch class, found in organisms from all three domains of life, is responsive to the vitamin B1 derivative thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP). We have established that a TPP-sensing riboswitch is present in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the thiamin biosynthetic gene THIC of all plant species examined. The THIC TPP riboswitch controls the formation of transcripts with alternative 3′ UTR lengths, which affect mRNA accumulation and protein production. We demonstrate that riboswitch-mediated regulation of alternative 3′ end processing is critical for TPP-dependent feedback control of THIC expression. Our data reveal a mechanism whereby metabolite-dependent alteration of RNA folding controls splicing and alternative 3′ end processing of mRNAs. These findings highlight the importance of metabolite sensing by riboswitches in plants and further reveal the significance of alternative 3′ end processing as a mechanism of gene control in eukaryotes. PMID:17993623

  3. Coordinated Regulation of the Orosomucoid-like Gene Family Expression Controls de Novo Ceramide Synthesis in Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Kerstin; Carreras-Sureda, Amado; García-López, Roberto; Rubio-Moscardó, Fanny; Casas, Josefina; Fabriàs, Gemma; Vicente, Rubén

    2015-01-01

    The orosomucoid-like (ORMDL) protein family is involved in the regulation of de novo sphingolipid synthesis, calcium homeostasis, and unfolded protein response. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase ORMDL3 expression have been associated with various immune/inflammatory diseases, although the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this association are poorly understood. ORMDL proteins are claimed to be inhibitors of the serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). However, it is not clear whether individual ORMDL expression levels have an impact on ceramide synthesis. The present study addressed the interaction with and regulation of SPT activity by ORMDLs to clarify their pathophysiological relevance. We have measured ceramide production in HEK293 cells incubated with palmitate as a direct substrate for SPT reaction. Our results showed that a coordinated overexpression of the three isoforms inhibits the enzyme completely, whereas individual ORMDLs are not as effective. Immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies showed that mammalian ORMDLs form oligomeric complexes that change conformation depending on cellular sphingolipid levels. Finally, using macrophages as a model, we demonstrate that mammalian cells modify ORMDL genes expression levels coordinately to regulate the de novo ceramide synthesis pathway. In conclusion, we have shown a physiological modulation of SPT activity by general ORMDL expression level regulation. Moreover, because single ORMDL3 protein alteration produces an incomplete inhibition of SPT activity, this work argues against the idea that ORMDL3 pathophysiology could be explained by a simple on/off mechanism on SPT activity. PMID:25519910

  4. Gibberellin-Regulation and Genetic Variations in Leaf Elongation for Tall Fescue in Association with Differential Gene Expression Controlling Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qian; Krishnan, Sanalkumar; Merewitz, Emily; Xu, Jichen; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Leaf elongation rate (LER) is an important factor controlling plant growth and productivity. The objective of this study was to determine whether genetic variation in LER for a fast-growing (‘K-31’), and a dwarf cultivar (‘Bonsai’) of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and gibberellic acid (GA) regulation of LER were associated with differential expression of cell-expansion genes. Plants were treated with GA3, trinexapac-ethyl (TE) (GA inhibitor), or water (untreated control) in a hydroponic system. LER of ‘K-31’ was 63% greater than that of ‘Bonsai’, which corresponded with 32% higher endogenous GA4 content in leaf and greater cell elongation and production rates under the untreated control condition. Exogenous application of GA3 significantly enhanced LER while TE treatment inhibited leaf elongation due to GA3-stimulation or TE-inhibition of cell elongation and production rate in leaves for both cultivars. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that three α-expansins, one β-expansin, and three xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) genes were associated with GA-stimulation of leaf elongation, of which, the differential expression of EXPA4 and EXPA7 was related to the genotypic variation in LER of two cultivars. Those differentially-expressed expansin and XET genes could play major roles in genetic variation and GA-regulated leaf elongation in tall fescue. PMID:27457585

  5. Gibberellin-Regulation and Genetic Variations in Leaf Elongation for Tall Fescue in Association with Differential Gene Expression Controlling Cell Expansion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Krishnan, Sanalkumar; Merewitz, Emily; Xu, Jichen; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Leaf elongation rate (LER) is an important factor controlling plant growth and productivity. The objective of this study was to determine whether genetic variation in LER for a fast-growing ('K-31'), and a dwarf cultivar ('Bonsai') of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea) and gibberellic acid (GA) regulation of LER were associated with differential expression of cell-expansion genes. Plants were treated with GA3, trinexapac-ethyl (TE) (GA inhibitor), or water (untreated control) in a hydroponic system. LER of 'K-31' was 63% greater than that of 'Bonsai', which corresponded with 32% higher endogenous GA4 content in leaf and greater cell elongation and production rates under the untreated control condition. Exogenous application of GA3 significantly enhanced LER while TE treatment inhibited leaf elongation due to GA3-stimulation or TE-inhibition of cell elongation and production rate in leaves for both cultivars. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that three α-expansins, one β-expansin, and three xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) genes were associated with GA-stimulation of leaf elongation, of which, the differential expression of EXPA4 and EXPA7 was related to the genotypic variation in LER of two cultivars. Those differentially-expressed expansin and XET genes could play major roles in genetic variation and GA-regulated leaf elongation in tall fescue. PMID:27457585

  6. An extracytoplasmic function sigma factor controls beta-lactamase gene expression in Bacillus anthracis and other Bacillus cereus group species.

    PubMed

    Ross, Cana L; Thomason, Kerrie S; Koehler, Theresa M

    2009-11-01

    The susceptibility of most Bacillus anthracis strains to beta-lactam antibiotics is intriguing considering that the closely related species Bacillus cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis typically produce beta-lactamases and the B. anthracis genome harbors two beta-lactamase genes, bla1 and bla2. We show that beta-lactamase activity associated with B. anthracis is affected by two genes, sigP (BA2502) and rsiP (BA2503), predicted to encode an extracytoplasmic function sigma factor and an anti-sigma factor, respectively. Deletion of the sigP-rsiP locus abolished beta-lactamase activity in a naturally occurring penicillin-resistant strain and had no effect on beta-lactamase activity in a prototypical penicillin-susceptible strain. Complementation with sigP and rsiP from the penicillin-resistant strain, but not with sigP and rsiP from the penicillin-susceptible strain, conferred constitutive beta-lactamase activity in both mutants. These results are attributed to a nucleotide deletion near the 5' end of rsiP in the penicillin-resistant strain that is predicted to result in a nonfunctional protein. B. cereus and B. thuringiensis sigP and rsiP homologues are required for inducible penicillin resistance in these species. Expression of the B. cereus or B. thuringiensis sigP and rsiP genes in a B. anthracis sigP-rsiP-null mutant confers inducible production of beta-lactamase activity, suggesting that while B. anthracis contains the genes necessary for sensing beta-lactam antibiotics, the B. anthracis sigP and rsiP gene products are not sufficient for bla induction. PMID:19717606

  7. Allograft rejection in the mixed cell reaction system of the demosponge Suberites domuncula is controlled by differential expression of apoptotic genes.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Matthias; Perović-Ottstadt, Sanja; Müller, Isabel M; Müller, Werner E G

    2004-11-01

    Until recently, the lack of molecular probes hampered the determination of the expression of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes in sponge. In an approach to solve this problem, the present study describes a variety of cDNAs from the demosponge Suberites domuncula, coding for proteins that are characteristic for the initiation of apoptosis (caspase, MA3, ALG-2 protein), for the prevention of programmed cells death (2 Bcl-2 homology proteins, FAIM-related polypeptide, and DAD-1-related protein), and for morphogenetic processes (retinoid X receptor). They were used as probes to monitor the expression levels in vitro in the allogeneic mixed sponge cell reaction (MSCR) system. In the allogeneic MSCR, two-cell aggregates (primmorphs) from genetically different animals of the same species were positioned next to each other. After approximately 8 days in culture, one of the primmorphs underwent apoptotic death, while the second remained alive. The expression levels of the aforementioned genes were determined by Northern blotting and by in situ hybridization. These experiments revealed that in the apoptotic primmorph, the characteristic apoptotic genes were expressed, while in the non-apoptotic aggregates the cell-survival genes are highly upregulated. Interestingly, the transcript levels of retinoid X receptor were higher in apoptotic primmorphs than in the non-apoptotic aggregate in the assay. Our data show for the first time that in the in vitro MSCR system, allogeneic recognition led to apoptotic cell death in one partner, while the other one survived. We suggest that this process is controlled by a differential expression of the pro-apoptotic and pro-survival genes studied here.

  8. Vascular gene expression: a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Navarro, Angélica C.; Galván-Gordillo, Santiago V.; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a “primitive” vascular tissue (a lycophyte), as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte), and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non-vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT, and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants. PMID:23882276

  9. Inducible gene expression systems for plants.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Several systems for induction of transgene expression in plants have been described recently. Inducible systems were used mainly in tobacco, rice, Arabidopsis, tomato, and maize. Inducible systems offer researchers the possibility to deregulate gene expression levels at particular stages of plant development and in particular tissues of interest. The more precise temporal and spatial control, obtained by providing the transgenic plant with the appropriate chemical compound or treatment, permits to analyze also the function of those genes required for plant viability. In addition, inducible systems allow promoting local changes in gene expression levels without causing gross alterations to the whole plant development. Here, protocols will be presented to work with five different inducible systems: AlcR/AlcA (ethanol inducible); GR fusions, GVG, and pOp/LhGR (dexamethasone inducible); XVE/OlexA (beta-estradiol inducible); and heat shock induction. PMID:20734254

  10. Environment Control to Improve Recombinant Protein Yields in Plants Based on Agrobacterium-Mediated Transient Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Fujiuchi, Naomichi; Matoba, Nobuyuki; Matsuda, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression systems enable plants to produce a wide range of recombinant proteins on a rapid timescale. To achieve economically feasible upstream production and downstream processing, two yield parameters should be considered: (1) recombinant protein content per unit biomass and (2) recombinant protein productivity per unit area-time at the end of the upstream production. Because environmental factors in the upstream production have impacts on these parameters, environment control is important to maximize the recombinant protein yield. In this review, we summarize the effects of pre- and postinoculation environmental factors in the upstream production on the yield parameters and discuss the basic concept of environment control for plant-based transient expression systems. Preinoculation environmental factors associated with planting density, light quality, and nutrient supply affect plant characteristics, such as biomass and morphology, which in turn affect recombinant protein content and productivity. Accordingly, environment control for such plant characteristics has significant implications to achieve a high yield. On the other hand, postinoculation environmental factors, such as temperature, light intensity, and humidity, have been shown to affect recombinant protein content. Considering that recombinant protein production in Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression systems is a result of a series of complex biological events starting from T-DNA transfer from Agrobacterium tumefaciens to protein biosynthesis and accumulation in leaf tissue, we propose that dynamic environment control during the postinoculation process, i.e., changing environmental conditions at an appropriate timing for each event, may be a promising approach to obtain a high yield. Detailed descriptions of plant growth conditions and careful examination of environmental effects will significantly contribute to our knowledge to stably obtain high recombinant

  11. Environment Control to Improve Recombinant Protein Yields in Plants Based on Agrobacterium-Mediated Transient Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fujiuchi, Naomichi; Matoba, Nobuyuki; Matsuda, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression systems enable plants to produce a wide range of recombinant proteins on a rapid timescale. To achieve economically feasible upstream production and downstream processing, two yield parameters should be considered: (1) recombinant protein content per unit biomass and (2) recombinant protein productivity per unit area–time at the end of the upstream production. Because environmental factors in the upstream production have impacts on these parameters, environment control is important to maximize the recombinant protein yield. In this review, we summarize the effects of pre- and postinoculation environmental factors in the upstream production on the yield parameters and discuss the basic concept of environment control for plant-based transient expression systems. Preinoculation environmental factors associated with planting density, light quality, and nutrient supply affect plant characteristics, such as biomass and morphology, which in turn affect recombinant protein content and productivity. Accordingly, environment control for such plant characteristics has significant implications to achieve a high yield. On the other hand, postinoculation environmental factors, such as temperature, light intensity, and humidity, have been shown to affect recombinant protein content. Considering that recombinant protein production in Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression systems is a result of a series of complex biological events starting from T-DNA transfer from Agrobacterium tumefaciens to protein biosynthesis and accumulation in leaf tissue, we propose that dynamic environment control during the postinoculation process, i.e., changing environmental conditions at an appropriate timing for each event, may be a promising approach to obtain a high yield. Detailed descriptions of plant growth conditions and careful examination of environmental effects will significantly contribute to our knowledge to stably obtain high recombinant

  12. Control of human cytomegalovirus gene expression by differential histone modifications during lytic and latent infection of a monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Ioudinkova, Elena; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Rynditch, Alla; De Conto, Flora; Motta, Federica; Covan, Silvia; Pinardi, Federica; Razin, Sergey V; Chezzi, Carlo

    2006-12-15

    Non-differentiated THP-1 cells can be infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) Towne strain, which persists in these cells in a non-active (latent) form without undergoing a productive cycle. The same cells become permissive for HCMV lytic infection after induction of cell differentiation by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. We used this cellular model to study the possible role of histone modifications in the control of HCMV latency. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation with antibodies against histone H3 acetylated or dimethylated in position K9, we demonstrated that in lytically infected cells the HCMV enhancer was associated with heavy acetylated but not dimethylated H3. In the case of latent infection, the HCMV enhancer was associated with neither acetylated nor dimethylated H3. HCMV genes encoding DNA polymerase (early), pp65 (early-late) and pp150 (late) proteins were associated preferentially with acetylated H3 in lytically infected cells and with dimethylated H3 in latently infected cells. These data strongly suggest that K9 methylation of H3 is involved in HCMV gene repression, while association of the above genes with acetylated histones is likely to be necessary for active transcription. It can be postulated that the same histone modifications are used to mark active and repressed genes in both cellular and viral chromatin. PMID:16989963

  13. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  14. Design and in vitro characterization of a single regulatory module for efficient control of gene expression in both plasmid DNA and a self-inactivating lentiviral vector.

    PubMed Central

    Ogueta, S. B.; Yao, F.; Marasco, W. A.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regulation of transgene expression in target cells represents a critical and challenging aspect of gene therapy. Recently, a two-plasmid tetracycline-inducible system was developed in which the tetracycline repressor (tetR) alone, rather than the tetR-VP16 fusion derivative, was shown to function as a potent trans-modulator of a second plasmid that contains two tandem repeats of the tetracycline operator (tetO) inserted between the TATA box and the transcription start site of the hCMV major immediate-early promoter. A technological advance in this area would be the development of a single autoregulatory cassette that incorporates both of these components into nonviral and viral gene transfer vectors. For the latter, an inducible lentiviral vector that is capable of temporal and quantitative control of gene expression in either dividing or nondividing cells is highly desirable. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A one-piece inducible (1Pi) autoregulatory cassette was constructed to provide IRES-mediated translation of the tetR as well as tight control over the tetO unit preventing transcription initiation of the first cistron in the absence of the tetracycline. To increase efficiency of tetR-mediated repression, a nuclear localization signal was incorporated at the 3' end of the tetR gene. Regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional and protein level was analyzed in transient transfection experiments using plasmid DNA. Construction of a self-inactivating lentiviral vector containing this 1Pi cassette allowed the study of its long-term effectiveness in primary human cells. RESULTS: The 1Pi autoregulatory cassette when incorporated into plasmid DNA allows efficient control of the secretable hEGF as well as eGFP expression in a variety of cell types. Transient transfection studies demonstrated that the time course of repression is different for the 1Pi and two-plasmid system (2Pi). In the 2Pi system, greater repression is seen with the first 24-48 hr; however

  15. OsERF2 controls rice root growth and hormone responses through tuning expression of key genes involved in hormone signaling and sucrose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guiqing; Qin, Hua; Zhou, Jiahao; Quan, Ruidang; Lu, Xiangyang; Huang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Haiwen

    2016-02-01

    Root determines plant distribution, development progresses, stress response, as well as crop qualities and yields, which is under the tight control of genetic programs and environmental stimuli. Ethylene responsive factor proteins (ERFs) play important roles in plant growth and development. Here, the regulatory function of OsERF2 involved in root growth was investigated using the gain-function mutant of OsERF2 (nsf2857) and the artificial microRNA-mediated silenced lines of OsERF2 (Ami-OsERF2). nsf2857 showed short primary roots compared with the wild type (WT), while the primary roots of Ami-OsERF2 lines were longer than those of WT. Consistent with this phenotype, several auxin/cytokinin responsive genes involved in root growth were downregulated in nsf2857, but upregulated in Ami-OsERF2. Then, we found that nsf2857 seedlings exhibited decreased ABA accumulation and sensitivity to ABA and reduced ethylene-mediated root inhibition, while those were the opposite in Ami-ERF2 plants. Moreover, several key genes involved in ABA synthesis were downregulated in nsf2857, but unregulated in Ami-ERF2 lines. In addition, OsERF2 affected the accumulation of sucrose and UDPG by mediating expression of key genes involved in sucrose metabolism. These results indicate that OsERF2 is required for the control of root architecture and ABA- and ethylene-response by tuning expression of series genes involved in sugar metabolism and hormone signaling pathways.

  16. Duplicate genes increase gene expression diversity within and between species.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenglong; Rifkin, Scott A; White, Kevin P; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2004-06-01

    Using microarray gene expression data from several Drosophila species and strains, we show that duplicated genes, compared with single-copy genes, significantly increase gene expression diversity during development. We show further that duplicate genes tend to cause expression divergences between Drosophila species (or strains) to evolve faster than do single-copy genes. This conclusion is also supported by data from different yeast strains.

  17. The Arabidopsis thaliana MYB60 promoter provides a tool for the spatio-temporal control of gene expression in stomatal guard cells.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Fabio; Simeoni, Fabio; Francia, Priscilla; Cominelli, Eleonora; Conti, Lucio; Riboni, Matteo; Simoni, Laura; Martin, Cathie R; Tonelli, Chiara; Galbiati, Massimo

    2013-08-01

    Plants have evolved different strategies to resist drought, of which the best understood is the abscisic acid (ABA)-induced closure of stomatal pores to reduce water loss by transpiration. The availability of useful promoters that allow for precise spatial and temporal control of gene expression in stomata is essential both for investigating stomatal regulation in model systems and for biotechnological applications in field crops. Previous work indicated that the regulatory region of the transcription factor AtMYB60 specifically drives gene expression in guard cells of Arabidopsis, although its activity is rapidly down-regulated by ABA. Here, the activity of the full-length and minimal AtMYB60 promoters is reported in rice (Oryza sativa), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), using a reporter gene approach. In rice, the activity of both promoters was completely abolished, whereas it was spatially restricted to guard cells in tobacco and tomato. To overcome the negative effect of ABA on the AtMYB60 promoter, a chimeric inducible system was developed, which combined the cellular specificity of the AtMYB60 minimal promoter with the positive responsiveness to dehydration and ABA of the rd29A promoter. Remarkably, the synthetic module specifically up-regulated gene expression in guard cells of Arabidopsis, tobacco, and tomato in response to dehydration or ABA. The comparative analysis of different native and synthetic regulatory modules derived from the AtMYB60 promoter offers new insights into the functional conservation of the cis-mechanisms that mediate gene expression in guard cells in distantly related dicotyledonous species and provides novel tools for modulating stomatal activity in plants.

  18. flrA, flrB and flrC regulate adhesion by controlling the expression of critical virulence genes in Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Gang; Huang, Lixing; Su, Yongquan; Qin, Yingxue; Xu, Xiaojin; Zhao, Lingmin; Yan, Qingpi

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion is an important virulence trait of Vibrio alginolyticus. Bacterial adhesion is influenced by environmental conditions; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. The expression levels of flrA, flrB and flrC were significantly downregulated in adhesion-deficient V. alginolyticus strains cultured under Cu2+, Pb2+, Hg2+ and low-pH stresses. Silencing these genes led to deficiencies in adhesion, motility, flagellar assembly, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production. The expression levels of fliA, flgH, fliS, fliD, cheR, cheV and V12G01_22158 (Gene ID) were significantly downregulated in all of the RNAi groups, whereas the expression levels of toxT, ctxB, acfA, hlyA and tlh were upregulated in flrA- and flrC-silenced groups. These genes play a key role in the virulence mechanisms of most pathogenic Vibrio species. Furthermore, the expression of flrA, flrB and flrC was significantly influenced by temperature, salinity, starvation and pH. These results indicate that (1) flrA, flrB and flrC are important for V. alginolyticus adhesion; (2) flrA, flrB and flrC significantly influence bacterial adhesion, motility, biofilm formation and EPS production by controlling expression of key genes involved in those phenotypes; and (3) flrA, flrB and flrC regulate adhesion in the natural environment with different temperatures, pH levels, salinities and starvation time. PMID:27485498

  19. flrA, flrB and flrC regulate adhesion by controlling the expression of critical virulence genes in Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Huang, Lixing; Su, Yongquan; Qin, Yingxue; Xu, Xiaojin; Zhao, Lingmin; Yan, Qingpi

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion is an important virulence trait of Vibrio alginolyticus. Bacterial adhesion is influenced by environmental conditions; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. The expression levels of flrA, flrB and flrC were significantly downregulated in adhesion-deficient V. alginolyticus strains cultured under Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Hg(2+) and low-pH stresses. Silencing these genes led to deficiencies in adhesion, motility, flagellar assembly, biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production. The expression levels of fliA, flgH, fliS, fliD, cheR, cheV and V12G01_22158 (Gene ID) were significantly downregulated in all of the RNAi groups, whereas the expression levels of toxT, ctxB, acfA, hlyA and tlh were upregulated in flrA- and flrC-silenced groups. These genes play a key role in the virulence mechanisms of most pathogenic Vibrio species. Furthermore, the expression of flrA, flrB and flrC was significantly influenced by temperature, salinity, starvation and pH. These results indicate that (1) flrA, flrB and flrC are important for V. alginolyticus adhesion; (2) flrA, flrB and flrC significantly influence bacterial adhesion, motility, biofilm formation and EPS production by controlling expression of key genes involved in those phenotypes; and (3) flrA, flrB and flrC regulate adhesion in the natural environment with different temperatures, pH levels, salinities and starvation time. PMID:27485498

  20. Signal transduction controls heterogeneous NF-κB dynamics and target gene expression through cytokine-specific refractory states.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Antony; Boddington, Christopher; Downton, Polly; Rowe, William; Bagnall, James; Lam, Connie; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Schmidt, Lorraine; Harper, Claire V; Spiller, David G; Rand, David A; Jackson, Dean A; White, Michael R H; Paszek, Pawel

    2016-07-06

    Cells respond dynamically to pulsatile cytokine stimulation. Here we report that single, or well-spaced pulses of TNFα (>100 min apart) give a high probability of NF-κB activation. However, fewer cells respond to shorter pulse intervals (<100 min) suggesting a heterogeneous refractory state. This refractory state is established in the signal transduction network downstream of TNFR and upstream of IKK, and depends on the level of the NF-κB system negative feedback protein A20. If a second pulse within the refractory phase is IL-1β instead of TNFα, all of the cells respond. This suggests a mechanism by which two cytokines can synergistically activate an inflammatory response. Gene expression analyses show strong correlation between the cellular dynamic response and NF-κB-dependent target gene activation. These data suggest that refractory states in the NF-κB system constitute an inherent design motif of the inflammatory response and we suggest that this may avoid harmful homogenous cellular activation.

  1. Control by H-2 genes of the Th1 response induced against a foreign antigen expressed by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Lo-Man, R; Martineau, P; Dériaud, E; Newton, S M; Jehanno, M; Clément, J M; Fayolle, C; Hofnung, M; Leclerc, C D

    1996-01-01

    Attenuated salmonellae represent an attractive vehicle for the delivery of heterologous protective antigens to the immune system. Here, we have investigated the influence of the genetic background of the host which regulates the growth and elimination of Salmonella cells on the cellular response induced against a foreign antigen delivered by an aroA Salmonella strain. We have tested CD4+ T-cell responses (cell proliferation and cytokine production) in various mouse strains following immunization with Salmonella typhimurium SL3261 expressing a high level of the recombinant Escherichia coli MalE protein. We were able to detect a CD4+ T-cell response against the recombinant MalE protein only in a restricted number of mouse strains, whereas all mice produced good levels of anti-MalE immunoglobulin G antibodies. The Ity gene did not play a major role in these differences in T-cell responses, since both Ity-resistant and -susceptible strains of mice were found to be unresponsive to MalE delivered by recombinant salmonellae. In contrast, when B10 congenic mice were used, a correlation was established between MalE-specific T-cell unresponsiveness and H-2 genes. The discrepancies described in this paper in the ability of various strains of mice to develop an efficient Th1 response against a recombinant antigen displayed by a live Salmonella vaccine underscore the difficulties that can be encountered in the vaccination of human populations by such a strategy. PMID:8890187

  2. Signal transduction controls heterogeneous NF-κB dynamics and target gene expression through cytokine-specific refractory states

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Antony; Boddington, Christopher; Downton, Polly; Rowe, William; Bagnall, James; Lam, Connie; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Schmidt, Lorraine; Harper, Claire V.; Spiller, David G.; Rand, David A.; Jackson, Dean A.; White, Michael R. H.; Paszek, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Cells respond dynamically to pulsatile cytokine stimulation. Here we report that single, or well-spaced pulses of TNFα (>100 min apart) give a high probability of NF-κB activation. However, fewer cells respond to shorter pulse intervals (<100 min) suggesting a heterogeneous refractory state. This refractory state is established in the signal transduction network downstream of TNFR and upstream of IKK, and depends on the level of the NF-κB system negative feedback protein A20. If a second pulse within the refractory phase is IL-1β instead of TNFα, all of the cells respond. This suggests a mechanism by which two cytokines can synergistically activate an inflammatory response. Gene expression analyses show strong correlation between the cellular dynamic response and NF-κB-dependent target gene activation. These data suggest that refractory states in the NF-κB system constitute an inherent design motif of the inflammatory response and we suggest that this may avoid harmful homogenous cellular activation. PMID:27381163

  3. The toxR Gene of Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum Controls Expression of the Major Outer Membrane Proteins but Not Virulence in a Natural Host Model

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Jun; Nakai, Toshihiro; Chang, Park Se; Oh, Takanori; Nishino, Takeshi; Koitabashi, Tsutomu; Nishibuchi, Mitsuaki

    2001-01-01

    To examine the hypothesis that the ancestral role of the toxR gene in the family Vibrionaceae is control of the expression of outer membrane protein (OMP)-encoding genes for adaptation to environmental change, we investigated the role of the toxR gene in Vibrio anguillarum, an important fish pathogen. The toxR gene of V. angullarum (Va-toxR) was cloned from strain PT-87050 isolated from diseased ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis), and the sequence was analyzed. The toxR sequence was 63 to 51% identical to those reported for other species of the family Vibrionaceae. Distribution of the Va-toxR gene sequence in V. anguillarum strains of various serotypes was confirmed by using DNA probe and PCR methods. An isogenic toxR mutant of V. anguillarum PT-24, isolated from diseased ayu, was constructed by using an allelic exchange method. The wild-type strain and the toxR mutant did not differ in the ability to produce a protease(s) and a hemolysin(s) or in pathogenicity for ayu when examined by the intramuscular injection and immersion methods. A 35-kDa major OMP was not produced by the toxR mutant. However, a 46-kDa OMP was hardly detected in the wild-type strain but was produced as the major OMP by the toxR mutant. For the toxR mutant, the MICs of two β-lactam antibiotics were higher and the minimum bactericidal concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate was lower than for the wild-type strain. Analysis of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the 35- and 46-kDa OMPs indicated that these proteins are the porin-like OMPs and are related to the toxR-regulated major OMPs of the family Vibrionaceae. The results indicate that the toxR gene is not involved in virulence expression in V. anguillarum PT-24 and that toxR regulation of major OMPs is universal in the family Vibrionaceae. These results support the hypothesis that the ancestral role of the toxR gene is regulation of OMP gene expression and that only in some Vibrio species has ToxR been appropriated for the regulation of a

  4. A σE-Mediated Temperature Gauge Controls a Switch from LuxR-Mediated Virulence Gene Expression to Thermal Stress Adaptation in Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Dan; Guo, Min; Yang, Minjun; Zhang, Yuanxing; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Qiyao

    2016-01-01

    In vibrios, the expression of virulence factors is often controlled by LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator. Here, we investigate the interplay between LuxR and σE, an alternative sigma factor, during the control of virulence-related gene expression and adaptations to temperature elevations in the zoonotic pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus. An rpoE null V. alginolyticus mutant was unable to adapt to various stresses and was survival-deficient in fish. In wild type V. alginolyticus, the expression of LuxR-regulated virulence factors increased as the temperature was increased from 22°C to 37°C, but mutants lacking σE did not respond to temperature, indicating that σE is critical for the temperature-dependent upregulation of virulence genes. Further analyses revealed that σE binds directly to -10 and -35 elements in the luxR promoter that drive its transcription. ChIP assays showed that σE binds to the promoter regions of luxR, rpoH and rpoE at high temperatures (e.g., 30°C and 37°C). However, at higher temperatures (42°C) that induce thermal stress, σE binding to the luxR promoter decreased, while its binding to the rpoH and rpoE promoters was unchanged. Thus, the temperature-dependent binding of σE to distinct promoters appears to underlie a σE-controlled switch between the expression of virulence genes and adaptation to thermal stress. This study illustrates how a conserved temperature response mechanism integrates into quorum-sensing circuits to regulate both virulence and stress adaptation. PMID:27253371

  5. Chromatin modifications remodel cardiac gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mathiyalagan, Prabhu; Keating, Samuel T; Du, Xiao-Jun; El-Osta, Assam

    2014-07-01

    Signalling and transcriptional control involve precise programmes of gene activation and suppression necessary for cardiovascular physiology. Deep sequencing of DNA-bound transcription factors reveals a remarkable complexity of co-activators or co-repressors that serve to alter chromatin modification and regulate gene expression. The regulated complexes characterized by genome-wide mapping implicate the recruitment and exchange of proteins with specific enzymatic activities that include roles for histone acetylation and methylation in key developmental programmes of the heart. As for transcriptional changes in response to pathological stress, co-regulatory complexes are also differentially utilized to regulate genes in cardiac disease. Members of the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family catalyse the removal of acetyl groups from proteins whose pharmacological inhibition has profound effects preventing heart failure. HDACs interact with a complex co-regulatory network of transcription factors, chromatin-remodelling complexes, and specific histone modifiers to regulate gene expression in the heart. For example, the histone methyltransferase (HMT), enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2), is regulated by HDAC inhibition and associated with pathological cardiac hypertrophy. The challenge now is to target the activity of enzymes involved in protein modification to prevent or reverse the expression of genes implicated with cardiac hypertrophy. In this review, we discuss the role of HDACs and HMTs with a focus on chromatin modification and gene function as well as the clinical treatment of heart failure. PMID:24812277

  6. A global transcriptional regulator in Thermococcus kodakaraensis controls the expression levels of both glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzyme-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Tamotsu; Akerboom, Jasper; Takedomi, Shogo; van de Werken, Harmen J G; Blombach, Fabian; van der Oost, John; Murakami, Taira; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2007-11-16

    We identified a novel regulator, Thermococcales glycolytic regulator (Tgr), functioning as both an activator and a repressor of transcription in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. Tgr (TK1769) displays similarity (28% identical) to Pyrococcus furiosus TrmB (PF1743), a transcriptional repressor regulating the trehalose/maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter genes, but is more closely related (67%) to a TrmB paralog in P. furiosus (PF0124). Growth of a tgr disruption strain (Deltatgr) displayed a significant decrease in growth rate under gluconeogenic conditions compared with the wild-type strain, whereas comparable growth rates were observed under glycolytic conditions. A whole genome microarray analysis revealed that transcript levels of almost all genes related to glycolysis and maltodextrin metabolism were at relatively high levels in the Deltatgr mutant even under gluconeogenic conditions. The Deltatgr mutant also displayed defects in the transcriptional activation of gluconeogenic genes under these conditions, indicating that Tgr functions as both an activator and a repressor. Genes regulated by Tgr contain a previously identified sequence motif, the Thermococcales glycolytic motif (TGM). The TGM was positioned upstream of the Transcription factor B-responsive element (BRE)/TATA sequence in gluconeogenic promoters and downstream of it in glycolytic promoters. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that recombinant Tgr protein specifically binds to promoter regions containing a TGM. Tgr was released from the DNA when maltotriose was added, suggesting that this sugar is most likely the physiological effector. Our results strongly suggest that Tgr is a global transcriptional regulator that simultaneously controls, in response to sugar availability, both glycolytic and gluconeogenic metabolism in T. kodakaraensis via its direct binding to the TGM.

  7. RANGE: Gene Transfer of Reversibly Controlled Polycistronic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiwei; Cao, Liji; Luo, Chonglin; Ditzel, Désirée AW; Peter, Jörg; Sprengel, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    We developed a single vector recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) expression system for spatial and reversible control of polycistronic gene expression. Our approach (i) integrates the advantages of the tetracycline (Tet)-controlled transcriptional silencer tTSKid and the self-cleaving 2A peptide bridge, (ii) combines essential regulatory components as an autoregulatory loop, (iii) simplifies the gene delivery scheme, and (iv) regulates multiple genes in a synchronized manner. Controlled by an upstream Tet-responsive element (TRE), both the ubiquitous chicken β-actin promoter (CAG) and the neuron-specific synapsin-1 promoter (Syn) could regulate expression of tTSKid together with two 2A-linked reporter genes. Transduction in vitro exhibited maximally 50-fold regulation by doxycycline (Dox). Determined by gene delivery method as well as promoter, highly specific tissues were transduced in vivo. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) visualized reversible “ON/OFF” gene switches over repeated “Doxy-Cycling” in living mice. Thus, the reversible rAAV-mediated N-cistronic gene expression system, termed RANGE, may serve as a versatile tool to achieve reversible polycistronic gene regulation for the study of gene function as well as gene therapy. PMID:23571608

  8. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    PubMed Central

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  9. The Gene Expression Omnibus Database.

    PubMed

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome-protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  10. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  11. Developmental regulation of ecdysone receptor (EcR) and EcR-controlled gene expression during pharate-adult development of honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Mello, Tathyana R P; Aleixo, Aline C; Pinheiro, Daniel G; Nunes, Francis M F; Bitondi, Márcia M G; Hartfelder, Klaus; Barchuk, Angel R; Simões, Zilá L P

    2014-01-01

    Major developmental transitions in multicellular organisms are driven by steroid hormones. In insects, these, together with juvenile hormone (JH), control development, metamorphosis, reproduction and aging, and are also suggested to play an important role in caste differentiation of social insects. Here, we aimed to determine how EcR transcription and ecdysteroid titers are related during honeybee postembryonic development and what may actually be the role of EcR in caste development of this social insect. In addition, we expected that knocking-down EcR gene expression would give us information on the participation of the respective protein in regulating downstream targets of EcR. We found that in Apis mellifera females, EcR-A is the predominantly expressed variant in postembryonic development, while EcR-B transcript levels are higher in embryos, indicating an early developmental switch in EcR function. During larval and pupal stages, EcR-B expression levels are very low, while EcR-A transcripts are more variable and abundant in workers compared to queens. Strikingly, these transcript levels are opposite to the ecdysteroid titer profile. 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) application experiments revealed that low 20E levels induce EcR expression during development, whereas high ecdysteroid titers seem to be repressive. By means of RNAi-mediated knockdown (KD) of both EcR transcript variants we detected the differential expression of 234 poly-A(+) transcripts encoding genes such as CYPs, MRJPs and certain hormone response genes (Kr-h1 and ftz-f1). EcR-KD also promoted the differential expression of 70 miRNAs, including highly conserved ones (e.g., miR-133 and miR-375), as well honeybee-specific ones (e.g., miR-3745 and miR-3761). Our results put in evidence a broad spectrum of EcR-controlled gene expression during postembryonic development of honeybees, revealing new facets of EcR biology in this social insect.

  12. Developmental regulation of ecdysone receptor (EcR) and EcR-controlled gene expression during pharate-adult development of honeybees (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Tathyana R. P.; Aleixo, Aline C.; Pinheiro, Daniel G.; Nunes, Francis M. F.; Bitondi, Márcia M. G.; Hartfelder, Klaus; Barchuk, Angel R.; Simões, Zilá L. P.

    2014-01-01

    Major developmental transitions in multicellular organisms are driven by steroid hormones. In insects, these, together with juvenile hormone (JH), control development, metamorphosis, reproduction and aging, and are also suggested to play an important role in caste differentiation of social insects. Here, we aimed to determine how EcR transcription and ecdysteroid titers are related during honeybee postembryonic development and what may actually be the role of EcR in caste development of this social insect. In addition, we expected that knocking-down EcR gene expression would give us information on the participation of the respective protein in regulating downstream targets of EcR. We found that in Apis mellifera females, EcR-A is the predominantly expressed variant in postembryonic development, while EcR-B transcript levels are higher in embryos, indicating an early developmental switch in EcR function. During larval and pupal stages, EcR-B expression levels are very low, while EcR-A transcripts are more variable and abundant in workers compared to queens. Strikingly, these transcript levels are opposite to the ecdysteroid titer profile. 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) application experiments revealed that low 20E levels induce EcR expression during development, whereas high ecdysteroid titers seem to be repressive. By means of RNAi-mediated knockdown (KD) of both EcR transcript variants we detected the differential expression of 234 poly-A+ transcripts encoding genes such as CYPs, MRJPs and certain hormone response genes (Kr-h1 and ftz-f1). EcR-KD also promoted the differential expression of 70 miRNAs, including highly conserved ones (e.g., miR-133 and miR-375), as well honeybee-specific ones (e.g., miR-3745 and miR-3761). Our results put in evidence a broad spectrum of EcR-controlled gene expression during postembryonic development of honeybees, revealing new facets of EcR biology in this social insect. PMID:25566327

  13. Regulated expression of virulence gene mviN provides protective immunity and colonization control of Salmonella in poultry.

    PubMed

    Rubinelli, Peter M; Lee, Sang In; Roto, Stephanie M; Park, Si Hong; Ricke, Steven C

    2015-10-01

    Current live attenuated vaccines for control of Salmonella in poultry persist in the ceca and may persist in the environment. In this paper we report the construction and characterization of the vaccine efficacy of a Salmonella mutant strain with inducible mviN expression and rapid clearance from the host. The mutant was effective in oral immunization of the broiler chicken host against a virulent Salmonella oral challenge strain, having a mean 7×10(6)CFU/g in the ceca of unvaccinated controls compared to a mean 2×10(3)CFU/g in the ceca of vaccinated chickens at 4 weeks post-challenge (6 weeks of age). The mutant strain also demonstrated immunogenicity, reduced organ colonization, and rapid clearance in broiler chickens within 3 weeks of inoculation.

  14. Enriched Expression and Developmental Regulation of the Middle-Weight Neurofilament (NF-M) Gene in Song Control Nuclei of the Zebra Finch

    PubMed Central

    VELHO, TARCISO A.F.; LOVELL, PETER; MELLO, CLAUDIO V.

    2014-01-01

    Songbirds evolved a complex set of dimorphic telencephalic nuclei that are essential for the learning and production of song. These nuclei, which together make up the oscine song control system, present several neurochemical properties that distinguish them from the rest of the telencephalon. Here we show that the expression of the gene encoding the middle-weight neurofilament (NF-M), an important component of the neuronal cytoskeleton and a useful tool for studying the cytarchitectonic organization of mammalian cortical areas, is highly enriched in large neurons within pallial song control nuclei (nucleus HVC, robustus nucleus of the arcopallium, and lateral magnocellular nucleus of the nidopallium) of male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We also show that this transcript is highly expressed in large neurons in the medulla, pons, midbrain, and thalamus. Moreover, we demonstrate that NF-M expression in song control nuclei changes during postembryonic development, peaking during an early phase of the song-learning period that coincides with the maturation of the song system. We did not observe changes in NF-M expression in auditory areas or in song control nuclei in the contexts of hearing song or singing, although these contexts result in marked induction of the transcription factor ZENK. This observation suggests that NF-M might not be under the regulatory control of ZENK in auditory areas or in song control nuclei. Overall, our data indicate that NF-M is a neurochemical marker for pallial song control nuclei and provide suggestive evidence of an involvement of NF-M in the development and/or maturation of the oscine song control system. PMID:17120287

  15. Stochastic models of gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul; Jia, Tao

    2011-10-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can give rise to phenotypic heterogeneity in a population of genetically identical cells. Correspondingly, there is considerable interest in understanding how different molecular mechanisms impact the 'noise' in gene expression. Of particular interest are post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involving genes called small RNAs, which control important processes such as development and cancer. We propose and analyze general stochastic models of gene expression and derive exact analytical expressions quantifying the noise in protein distributions [1]. Focusing on specific regulatory mechanisms, we analyze a general model for post-transcriptional regulation of stochastic gene expression [2]. The results obtained provide new insights into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the noise in gene expression. [4pt] [1] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett.,106, 058102 (2011) [0pt] [2] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett., 105, 018101 (2010)

  16. Expression and developmental control of platelet-derived growth factor A-chain and B-chain/Sis genes in rat aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Majesky, M.W.; Benditt, E.P.; Schwartz, S.M.

    1988-03-01

    Cultured arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC) can produce platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-like molecules. This property raises the possibility that SMC-derived PDGFs function as autocrine/paracrine regulators in the formation and maintenance of the artery wall. In this study the authors have asked if levels of mRNAs directing synthesis of PDFG are modulated in aortic SMC during postnatal development. The authors report here that genes encoding PDGF A- and B-chain precursors are expressed at similar low levels in intact aortas from newborn and adult rats. Marked differences in regulation of transcript abundance of these genes were revealed when aortic SMC were grown in cell culture. PDGF B-chain transcripts accumulated in passaged newborn rat SMC but not adult rat SMC, whereas PDGF A-chain RNA was found in comparable amounts in SMC from both age groups. Similarly, SMC from newborn rats secreted at least 60-fold more PDGF-like activity into conditioned medium than did adult rat SMC. These results show that PDGF A- and B-chain genes are transcribed in the normal rat aorta and provide evidence for age-related change in the control of PDGF B-chain gene expression in aortic SMC. Independent regulation of transcript levels in cultured SMC leaves open the possibility that PDGFs of different composition (AA, AB, BB) play different roles in normal function of the artery wall.

  17. Genes expressed by the biological control bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 on seed surfaces under the control of the global regulators GacA and RpoS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The GacA/Rsm signal transduction system and the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS have both been shown to affect secondary metabolite production and biological control in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 and related strains. Microarray analysis of Pf-5 grown on pea seed surfaces showed that 595 genes ar...

  18. Genetic basis of differential opsin gene expression in cichlid fishes.

    PubMed

    Carleton, K L; Hofmann, C M; Klisz, C; Patel, Z; Chircus, L M; Simenauer, L H; Soodoo, N; Albertson, R C; Ser, J R

    2010-04-01

    Visual sensitivity can be tuned by differential expression of opsin genes. Among African cichlid fishes, seven cone opsin genes are expressed in different combinations to produce diverse visual sensitivities. To determine the genetic architecture controlling these adaptive differences, we analysed genetic crosses between species expressing different complements of opsin genes. Quantitative genetic analyses suggest that expression is controlled by only a few loci with correlations among some genes. Genetic mapping identifies clear evidence of trans-acting factors in two chromosomal regions that contribute to differences in opsin expression as well as one cis-regulatory region. Therefore, both cis and trans regulation are important. The simple genetic architecture suggested by these results may explain why opsin gene expression is evolutionarily labile, and why similar patterns of expression have evolved repeatedly in different lineages.

  19. Modification of Leaf Glucosinolate Contents in Brassica oleracea by Divergent Selection and Effect on Expression of Genes Controlling Glucosinolate Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Tamara; Velasco, Pablo; Soengas, Pilar; Rodríguez, Víctor M; Cartea, María E

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the content of secondary metabolites opens the possibility of obtaining vegetables enriched in these compounds related to plant defense and human health. We report the first results of a divergent selection for glucosinolate (GSL) content of the three major GSL in leaves: sinigrin (SIN), glucoiberin (GIB), and glucobrassicin (GBS) in order to develop six kale genotypes (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) with high (HSIN, HIGIB, HGBS) and low (LSIN, LGIB, LGBS) content. The aims were to determine if the three divergent selections were successful in leaves, how each divergent selection affected the content of the same GSLs in flower buds and seeds and to determine which genes would be involved in the modification of the content of the three GSL studied. The content of SIN and GIB after three cycles of divergent selection increased 52.5% and 77.68%, and decreased 51.9% and 45.33%, respectively. The divergent selection for GBS content was only successful and significant for decreasing the concentration, with a reduction of 39.04%. Mass selection is an efficient way of modifying the concentration of individual GSLs. Divergent selections realized in leaves had a side effect in the GSL contents of flower buds and seeds due to the novo synthesis in these organs and/or translocation from leaves. The results obtained suggest that modification in the SIN and GIB concentration by selection is related to the GSL-ALK locus. We suggest that this locus could be related with the indirect response found in the GBS concentration. Meantime, variations in the CYP81F2 gene expression could be the responsible of the variations in GBS content. The genotypes obtained in this study can be used as valuable materials for undertaking basic studies about the biological effects of the major GSLs present in kales.

  20. Modification of Leaf Glucosinolate Contents in Brassica oleracea by Divergent Selection and Effect on Expression of Genes Controlling Glucosinolate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sotelo, Tamara; Velasco, Pablo; Soengas, Pilar; Rodríguez, Víctor M.; Cartea, María E.

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the content of secondary metabolites opens the possibility of obtaining vegetables enriched in these compounds related to plant defense and human health. We report the first results of a divergent selection for glucosinolate (GSL) content of the three major GSL in leaves: sinigrin (SIN), glucoiberin (GIB), and glucobrassicin (GBS) in order to develop six kale genotypes (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) with high (HSIN, HIGIB, HGBS) and low (LSIN, LGIB, LGBS) content. The aims were to determine if the three divergent selections were successful in leaves, how each divergent selection affected the content of the same GSLs in flower buds and seeds and to determine which genes would be involved in the modification of the content of the three GSL studied. The content of SIN and GIB after three cycles of divergent selection increased 52.5% and 77.68%, and decreased 51.9% and 45.33%, respectively. The divergent selection for GBS content was only successful and significant for decreasing the concentration, with a reduction of 39.04%. Mass selection is an efficient way of modifying the concentration of individual GSLs. Divergent selections realized in leaves had a side effect in the GSL contents of flower buds and seeds due to the novo synthesis in these organs and/or translocation from leaves. The results obtained suggest that modification in the SIN and GIB concentration by selection is related to the GSL-ALK locus. We suggest that this locus could be related with the indirect response found in the GBS concentration. Meantime, variations in the CYP81F2 gene expression could be the responsible of the variations in GBS content. The genotypes obtained in this study can be used as valuable materials for undertaking basic studies about the biological effects of the major GSLs present in kales. PMID:27471510

  1. Modification of Leaf Glucosinolate Contents in Brassica oleracea by Divergent Selection and Effect on Expression of Genes Controlling Glucosinolate Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Tamara; Velasco, Pablo; Soengas, Pilar; Rodríguez, Víctor M; Cartea, María E

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the content of secondary metabolites opens the possibility of obtaining vegetables enriched in these compounds related to plant defense and human health. We report the first results of a divergent selection for glucosinolate (GSL) content of the three major GSL in leaves: sinigrin (SIN), glucoiberin (GIB), and glucobrassicin (GBS) in order to develop six kale genotypes (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) with high (HSIN, HIGIB, HGBS) and low (LSIN, LGIB, LGBS) content. The aims were to determine if the three divergent selections were successful in leaves, how each divergent selection affected the content of the same GSLs in flower buds and seeds and to determine which genes would be involved in the modification of the content of the three GSL studied. The content of SIN and GIB after three cycles of divergent selection increased 52.5% and 77.68%, and decreased 51.9% and 45.33%, respectively. The divergent selection for GBS content was only successful and significant for decreasing the concentration, with a reduction of 39.04%. Mass selection is an efficient way of modifying the concentration of individual GSLs. Divergent selections realized in leaves had a side effect in the GSL contents of flower buds and seeds due to the novo synthesis in these organs and/or translocation from leaves. The results obtained suggest that modification in the SIN and GIB concentration by selection is related to the GSL-ALK locus. We suggest that this locus could be related with the indirect response found in the GBS concentration. Meantime, variations in the CYP81F2 gene expression could be the responsible of the variations in GBS content. The genotypes obtained in this study can be used as valuable materials for undertaking basic studies about the biological effects of the major GSLs present in kales. PMID:27471510

  2. IDENTIFICATION OF BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT GENES USING A DATABASE OF RAT LIVER AND KIDNEY BASELINE GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray data from independent labs and studies can be compared to potentially identify toxicologically and biologically relevant genes. The Baseline Animal Database working group of HESI was formed to assess baseline gene expression from microarray data derived from control or...

  3. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinberger, T.; Flint, Y.B.; Blank, M.; Etkin, S.; Lavi, S.

    1988-03-01

    The authors report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later.

  4. Carcinogen-induced trans activation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberger, T; Flint, Y B; Blank, M; Etkin, S; Lavi, S

    1988-01-01

    We report a new mechanism of carcinogen action by which the expression of several genes was concomitantly enhanced. This mechanism involved the altered activity of cellular factors which modulate the expression of genes under their control. The increased expression was regulated at least in part on the transcriptional level and did not require amplification of the overexpressed genes. This phenomenon was transient; it was apparent as early as 24 h after carcinogen treatment and declined a few days later. Images PMID:2835673

  5. Inefficient control of host gene expression by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus NS1 protein.

    PubMed

    Hale, Benjamin G; Steel, John; Medina, Rafael A; Manicassamy, Balaji; Ye, Jianqiang; Hickman, Danielle; Hai, Rong; Schmolke, Mirco; Lowen, Anice C; Perez, Daniel R; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2010-07-01

    In 2009, a novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza A virus emerged. Here, we characterize the multifunctional NS1 protein of this human pandemic virus in order to understand factors that may contribute to replication efficiency or pathogenicity. Although the 2009 H1N1 virus NS1 protein (2009/NS1) is an effective interferon antagonist, we found that this NS1 (unlike those of previous human-adapted influenza A viruses) is unable to block general host gene expression in human or swine cells. This property could be restored in 2009/NS1 by replacing R108, E125, and G189 with residues corresponding to human virus consensus. Mechanistically, these previously undescribed mutations acted by increasing binding of 2009/NS1 to the cellular pre-mRNA processing protein CPSF30. A recombinant 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus (A/California/04/09) expressing NS1 with these gain-of-function substitutions was more efficient than the wild type at antagonizing host innate immune responses in primary human epithelial cells. However, such mutations had no significant effect on virus replication in either human or swine tissue culture substrates. Surprisingly, in a mouse model of pathogenicity, the mutant virus appeared to cause less morbidity, and was cleared faster, than the wild type. The mutant virus also demonstrated reduced titers in the upper respiratory tracts of ferrets; however, contact and aerosol transmissibility of the virus was unaffected. Our data highlight a potential human adaptation of NS1 that seems absent in "classically derived" swine-origin influenza A viruses, including the 2009 H1N1 virus. We discuss the impact that a natural future gain of this NS1 function may have on the new pandemic virus in humans.

  6. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  7. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, Alexis A.; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized “mitochondrial RNA granules,” mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  8. Two Opines Control Conjugal Transfer of an Agrobacterium Plasmid by Regulating Expression of Separate Copies of the Quorum-Sensing Activator Gene traR

    PubMed Central

    Oger, Philippe; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    Conjugal transfer of Ti plasmids from Agrobacterium spp. is controlled by a hierarchical regulatory system designed to sense two environmental cues. One signal, a subset of the opines produced by crown gall tumors initiated on plants by the pathogen, serves to induce production of the second, an acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal, the quormone, produced by the bacterium itself. This second signal activates TraR, and this transcriptional activator induces expression of the tra regulon. Opines control transfer because the traR gene is a member of an operon the expression of which is regulated by the conjugal opine. Among the Ti plasmid systems studied to date, only one of the two or more opine families produced by the associated tumor induces transfer. However, two chemically dissimilar opines, nopaline and agrocinopines A and B, induce transfer of the opine catabolic plasmid pAtK84b found in the nonpathogenic Agrobacterium radiobacter isolate K84. In this study we showed that this plasmid contains two copies of traR, and each is associated with a different opine-regulated operon. One copy, traRnoc, is the last gene of the nox operon and was induced by nopaline but not by agrocinopines A and B. Mutating traRnoc abolished induction of transfer by nopaline but not by the agrocinopines. A mutation in ocd, an upstream gene of the nox operon, abolished utilization of nopaline and also induction of transfer by this opine. The second copy, traRacc, is located in an operon of four genes and was induced by agrocinopines A and B but not by nopaline. Genetic analysis indicated that this gene is required for induction of transfer by agrocinopines A and B but not by nopaline. pAtK84b with mutations in both traR genes was not induced for transfer by either opine. However, expression of a traR gene in trans to this plasmid resulted in opine-independent transfer. The association of traRnoc with nox is unique, but the operon containing traRacc is related to the arc operons

  9. Gene expression profiling analysis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    YIN, JI-GANG; LIU, XIAN-YING; WANG, BIN; WANG, DAN-YANG; WEI, MAN; FANG, HUA; XIANG, MEI

    2016-01-01

    As a gynecological oncology, ovarian cancer has high incidence and mortality. To study the mechanisms of ovarian cancer, the present study analyzed the GSE37582 microarray. GSE37582 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included data from 74 ovarian cancer cases and 47 healthy controls. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using linear models for microarray data package in R and were further screened for functional annotation. Next, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was conducted. The interaction associations of the proteins encoded by the DEGs were searched using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes, and the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized by Cytoscape. Moreover, module analysis of the PPI network was performed using the BioNet analysis tool in R. A total of 284 DEGs were screened, consisting of 145 upregulated genes and 139 downregulated genes. In particular, downregulated FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) was an oncogene, while downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) was a tumor suppressor gene and upregulated cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) was classed as an ‘other’ gene. The enriched functions included collagen catabolic process, stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases cascade and insulin receptor signaling pathway. Meanwhile, FOS (degree, 15), CD44 (degree, 9), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2; degree, 7), CDKN1A (degree, 7) and matrix metallopeptidase 3 (MMP3; degree, 6) had higher connectivity degrees in the PPI network for the DEGs. These genes may be involved in ovarian cancer by interacting with other genes in the module of the PPI network (e.g., BCL2-FOS, BCL2-CDKN1A, FOS-CDKN1A, FOS-CD44, MMP3-MMP7 and MMP7-CD44). Overall, BCL2, FOS, CDKN1A, CD44, MMP3 and MMP7 may be correlated with ovarian cancer. PMID:27347159

  10. The MODY1 Gene for Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α and a Feedback Loop Control COUP-TFII Expression in Pancreatic Beta Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Perilhou, Anaïs; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Zhang, Pili; Kharroubi, Ilham; Wang, Haiyan; Fauveau, Véronique; Scott, Donald K.; Wollheim, Claes B.; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic islet beta cell differentiation and function are dependent upon a group of transcription factors that maintain the expression of key genes and suppress others. Knockout mice with the heterozygous deletion of the gene for chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) or the complete disruption of the gene for hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) in pancreatic beta cells have similar insulin secretion defects, leading us to hypothesize that there is transcriptional cross talk between these two nuclear receptors. Here, we demonstrate specific HNF4α activation of a reporter plasmid containing the COUP-TFII gene promoter region in transfected pancreatic beta cells. The stable association of the endogenous HNF4α with a region of the COUP-TFII gene promoter that contains a direct repeat 1 (DR-1) binding site was revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Mutation experiments showed that this DR-1 site is essential for HNF4α transactivation of COUP-TFII. The dominant negative suppression of HNF4α function decreased endogenous COUP-TFII expression, and the specific inactivation of COUP-TFII by small interfering RNA caused HNF4α mRNA levels in 832/13 INS-1 cells to decrease. This positive regulation of HNF4α by COUP-TFII was confirmed by the adenovirus-mediated overexpression of human COUP-TFII (hCOUP-TFII), which increased HNF4α mRNA levels in 832/13 INS-1 cells and in mouse pancreatic islets. Finally, hCOUP-TFII overexpression showed that there is direct COUP-TFII autorepression, as COUP-TFII occupies the proximal DR-1 binding site of its own gene in vivo. Therefore, COUP-TFII may contribute to the control of insulin secretion through the complex HNF4α/maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1 (MODY1) transcription factor network operating in beta cells. PMID:18474611

  11. The MODY1 gene for hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha and a feedback loop control COUP-TFII expression in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Perilhou, Anaïs; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Zhang, Pili; Kharroubi, Ilham; Wang, Haiyan; Fauveau, Véronique; Scott, Donald K; Wollheim, Claes B; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille

    2008-07-01

    Pancreatic islet beta cell differentiation and function are dependent upon a group of transcription factors that maintain the expression of key genes and suppress others. Knockout mice with the heterozygous deletion of the gene for chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) or the complete disruption of the gene for hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha) in pancreatic beta cells have similar insulin secretion defects, leading us to hypothesize that there is transcriptional cross talk between these two nuclear receptors. Here, we demonstrate specific HNF4alpha activation of a reporter plasmid containing the COUP-TFII gene promoter region in transfected pancreatic beta cells. The stable association of the endogenous HNF4alpha with a region of the COUP-TFII gene promoter that contains a direct repeat 1 (DR-1) binding site was revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Mutation experiments showed that this DR-1 site is essential for HNF4alpha transactivation of COUP-TFII. The dominant negative suppression of HNF4alpha function decreased endogenous COUP-TFII expression, and the specific inactivation of COUP-TFII by small interfering RNA caused HNF4alpha mRNA levels in 832/13 INS-1 cells to decrease. This positive regulation of HNF4alpha by COUP-TFII was confirmed by the adenovirus-mediated overexpression of human COUP-TFII (hCOUP-TFII), which increased HNF4alpha mRNA levels in 832/13 INS-1 cells and in mouse pancreatic islets. Finally, hCOUP-TFII overexpression showed that there is direct COUP-TFII autorepression, as COUP-TFII occupies the proximal DR-1 binding site of its own gene in vivo. Therefore, COUP-TFII may contribute to the control of insulin secretion through the complex HNF4alpha/maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1 (MODY1) transcription factor network operating in beta cells. PMID:18474611

  12. The low noise limit in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Roy D.; Weinberger, Leor S.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.; Razooky, Brandon S.

    2015-10-21

    Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i) the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii) the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiency can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. Lastly, these results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1) a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2) high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.

  13. The low noise limit in gene expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dar, Roy D.; Weinberger, Leor S.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.; Razooky, Brandon S.

    2015-10-21

    Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i) the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii) the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiencymore » can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. Lastly, these results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1) a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2) high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.« less

  14. Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lundin, A-C; Aspenberg, P; Eliasson, P

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis. PMID:22882155

  15. Gene expression regulation in roots under drought.

    PubMed

    Janiak, Agnieszka; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szarejko, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Stress signalling and regulatory networks controlling expression of target genes are the basis of plant response to drought. Roots are the first organs exposed to water deficiency in the soil and are the place of drought sensing. Signalling cascades transfer chemical signals toward the shoot and initiate molecular responses that lead to the biochemical and morphological changes that allow plants to be protected against water loss and to tolerate stress conditions. Here, we present an overview of signalling network and gene expression regulation pathways that are actively induced in roots under drought stress. In particular, the role of several transcription factor (TF) families, including DREB, AP2/ERF, NAC, bZIP, MYC, CAMTA, Alfin-like and Q-type ZFP, in the regulation of root response to drought are highlighted. The information provided includes available data on mutual interactions between these TFs together with their regulation by plant hormones and other signalling molecules. The most significant downstream target genes and molecular processes that are controlled by the regulatory factors are given. These data are also coupled with information about the influence of the described regulatory networks on root traits and root development which may translate to enhanced drought tolerance. This is the first literature survey demonstrating the gene expression regulatory machinery that is induced by drought stress, presented from the perspective of roots.

  16. Expression of mouse metallothionein genes in tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, I.B.; Yeargan, R.; Wagner, G.J.; Hunt, A.G. )

    1990-05-01

    We have expressed a mouse metallothionein (NT) gene in tobacco under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and a pea ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) gene promoter. Seedlings in which MT gene expression is driven by the 35S promoter are resistant to toxic levels of cadmium. Mature plants carrying the 35S-MT gene accumulate less Cd in their leaves when exposed to low levels of Cd in laboratory growth conditions. Plants with the rbcS-MT construction express this gene in a light-regulated and tissue-specific manner, as expected. Moreover, the MT levels in leaves in these plants are about 20% of those seen in 35S-MT plants. These plants are currently being tested for Cd resistance. In addition, a small field evaluation of 35S-MT lines for Cd levels is being evaluated. These experiments will address the possibility of using MTs to alter Cd levels in crop species.

  17. Coordination of plastid and nuclear gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, John C; Sullivan, James A; Wang, Jun-Hui; Jerome, Cheryl A; MacLean, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The coordinated expression of genes distributed between the nuclear and plastid genomes is essential for the assembly of functional chloroplasts. Although the nucleus has a pre-eminent role in controlling chloroplast biogenesis, there is considerable evidence that the expression of nuclear genes encoding photosynthesis-related proteins is regulated by signals from plastids. Perturbation of several plastid-located processes, by inhibitors or in mutants, leads to decreased transcription of a set of nuclear photosynthesis-related genes. Characterization of arabidopsis gun (genomes uncoupled) mutants, which express nuclear genes in the presence of norflurazon or lincomycin, has provided evidence for two separate signalling pathways, one involving tetrapyrrole biosynthesis intermediates and the other requiring plastid protein synthesis. In addition, perturbation of photosynthetic electron transfer produces at least two different redox signals, as part of the acclimation to altered light conditions. The recognition of multiple plastid signals requires a reconsideration of the mechanisms of regulation of transcription of nuclear genes encoding photosynthesis-related proteins. PMID:12594922

  18. Sucrose controls storage lipid breakdown on gene expression level in germinating yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Borek, Sławomir; Nuc, Katarzyna

    2011-10-15

    This study revealed that cytosolic aconitase (ACO, EC 4.2.1.3) and isocitrate lyase (ICL, EC 4.1.3.1, marker of the glyoxylate cycle) are active in germinating protein seeds of yellow lupine. The glyoxylate cycle seems to function not only in the storage tissues of food-storage organs, but also in embryonic tissue of growing embryo axes. Sucrose (60mM) added to the medium of in vitro culture of embryo axes and cotyledons decreased activity of lipase (LIP, EC 3.1.1.3) and activity of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADH-GDH, EC 1.4.1.2). The opposite effect was caused by sucrose on activity of cytosolic ACO, ICL as well as NADP(+)-dependent (EC 1.1.1.42) and NAD(+)-dependent (EC 1.1.1.41) isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-IDH and NAD-IDH, respectively); activity of these enzymes was clearly stimulated by sucrose. Changes in the activity of LIP, ACO, NADP-IDH, and NAD-IDH caused by sucrose were based on modifications in gene expression because corresponding changes in the enzyme activities and in the mRNA levels were observed. The significance of cytosolic ACO and NADP-IDH in carbon flow from storage lipid to amino acids, as well as the peculiar features of storage lipid breakdown during germination of lupine seeds are discussed.

  19. Adaptive regulation of testis gene expression and control of male fertility by the Drosophila hairpin RNA pathway. [Corrected].

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiayu; Duan, Hong; Bejarano, Fernando; Okamura, Katsutomo; Fabian, Lacramioara; Brill, Julie A; Bortolamiol-Becet, Diane; Martin, Raquel; Ruby, J Graham; Lai, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Although endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) have been described in many species, still little is known about their endogenous utility. Here, we show that Drosophila hairpin RNAs (hpRNAs) generate an endo-siRNA class with predominant expression in testes. Although hpRNAs are universally recently evolved, we identify highly complementary protein-coding targets for all hpRNAs. Importantly, we find broad evidence for evolutionary divergences that preferentially maintain compensatory pairing between hpRNAs and targets, serving as first evidence for adaptive selection for siRNA-mediated target regulation in metazoans. We demonstrate organismal impact of hpRNA activity, since knockout of hpRNA1 derepresses its target ATP synthase-β in testes and compromises spermatogenesis and male fertility. Moreover, we reveal surprising male-specific impact of RNAi factors on germ cell development and fertility, consistent with testis-directed function of the hpRNA pathway. Finally, the collected hpRNA loci chronicle an evolutionary timeline that reflects their origins from prospective target genes, mirroring a strategy described for plant miRNAs.

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 controls adult neural stem cell expansion by regulating Sox2 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Marqués-Torrejón, M Ángeles; Porlan, Eva; Banito, Ana; Gómez-Ibarlucea, Esther; Lopez-Contreras, Andrés J; Fernández-Capetillo, Oscar; Vidal, Anxo; Gil, Jesús; Torres, Josema; Fariñas, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    In the adult brain, continual neurogenesis of olfactory neurons is sustained by the existence of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subependymal niche. Elimination of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21) leads to premature exhaustion of the subependymal NSC pool, suggesting a relationship between cell cycle control and long-term self-renewal, but the molecular mechanisms underlying NSC maintenance by p21 remain unexplored. Here we identify a function of p21 in the direct regulation of the expression of pluripotency factor Sox2, a key regulator of the specification and maintenance of neural progenitors. We observe that p21 directly binds a Sox2 enhancer and negatively regulates Sox2 expression in NSCs. Augmented levels of Sox2 in p21 null cells induce replicative stress and a DNA damage response that leads to cell growth arrest mediated by increased levels of p19(Arf) and p53. Our results show a regulation of NSC expansion driven by a p21/Sox2/p53 axis.

  1. Quaking promotes monocyte differentiation into pro-atherogenic macrophages by controlling pre-mRNA splicing and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Ruben G.; Shiue, Lily; Prins, Jurriën; de Boer, Hetty C.; Singh, Anjana; Fagg, W. Samuel; van Gils, Janine M.; Duijs, Jacques M. G. J.; Katzman, Sol; Kraaijeveld, Adriaan O.; Böhringer, Stefan; Leung, Wai Y.; Kielbasa, Szymon M.; Donahue, John P.; van der Zande, Patrick H.J.; Sijbom, Rick; van Alem, Carla M. A.; Bot, Ilze; van Kooten, Cees; Jukema, J. Wouter; Van Esch, Hilde; Rabelink, Ton J.; Kazan, Hilal; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Ares Jr., Manuel; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van der Veer, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of inflammatory diseases is the excessive recruitment and influx of monocytes to sites of tissue damage and their ensuing differentiation into macrophages. Numerous stimuli are known to induce transcriptional changes associated with macrophage phenotype, but posttranscriptional control of human macrophage differentiation is less well understood. Here we show that expression levels of the RNA-binding protein Quaking (QKI) are low in monocytes and early human atherosclerotic lesions, but are abundant in macrophages of advanced plaques. Depletion of QKI protein impairs monocyte adhesion, migration, differentiation into macrophages and foam cell formation in vitro and in vivo. RNA-seq and microarray analysis of human monocyte and macrophage transcriptomes, including those of a unique QKI haploinsufficient patient, reveal striking changes in QKI-dependent messenger RNA levels and splicing of RNA transcripts. The biological importance of these transcripts and requirement for QKI during differentiation illustrates a central role for QKI in posttranscriptionally guiding macrophage identity and function. PMID:27029405

  2. Quaking promotes monocyte differentiation into pro-atherogenic macrophages by controlling pre-mRNA splicing and gene expression.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Ruben G; Shiue, Lily; Prins, Jurriën; de Boer, Hetty C; Singh, Anjana; Fagg, W Samuel; van Gils, Janine M; Duijs, Jacques M G J; Katzman, Sol; Kraaijeveld, Adriaan O; Böhringer, Stefan; Leung, Wai Y; Kielbasa, Szymon M; Donahue, John P; van der Zande, Patrick H J; Sijbom, Rick; van Alem, Carla M A; Bot, Ilze; van Kooten, Cees; Jukema, J Wouter; Van Esch, Hilde; Rabelink, Ton J; Kazan, Hilal; Biessen, Erik A L; Ares, Manuel; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van der Veer, Eric P

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of inflammatory diseases is the excessive recruitment and influx of monocytes to sites of tissue damage and their ensuing differentiation into macrophages. Numerous stimuli are known to induce transcriptional changes associated with macrophage phenotype, but posttranscriptional control of human macrophage differentiation is less well understood. Here we show that expression levels of the RNA-binding protein Quaking (QKI) are low in monocytes and early human atherosclerotic lesions, but are abundant in macrophages of advanced plaques. Depletion of QKI protein impairs monocyte adhesion, migration, differentiation into macrophages and foam cell formation in vitro and in vivo. RNA-seq and microarray analysis of human monocyte and macrophage transcriptomes, including those of a unique QKI haploinsufficient patient, reveal striking changes in QKI-dependent messenger RNA levels and splicing of RNA transcripts. The biological importance of these transcripts and requirement for QKI during differentiation illustrates a central role for QKI in posttranscriptionally guiding macrophage identity and function. PMID:27029405

  3. Controlled reperfusion for different durations in the treatment of ischemia-reperfusion injury of the rat ovary: evaluation of biochemical features, molecular gene expression, and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Yapca, Omer Erkan; Kumbasar, Serkan; Salman, Suleyman; Yarali, Oguzhan; Sener, Ebru; Mammadov, Renad; Tekin, Yesim Bayoglu; Aksoy, Aysenur; Albayrak, Abdulmecit; Cetin, Nihal

    2015-04-01

    High numbers of proinflammatory cells (PMNLs), which are carried by the blood to ischemic tissue during reperfusion, are considered responsible for inducing the inflammatory response that occurs in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Our objective was to determine the controlled reperfusion (CR) interval duration (CRID) that would minimize the injury caused by the PMNLs that infiltrate ischemic tissue. Animal groups were divided into the following groups: Sham group, ovarian I/R group (OIR), and ovarian ischemia controlled-reperfusion groups OICR-1, OICR-2, OICR-3, OICR-4, OICR-5, OICR-6, which had their ovarian artery opened and then closed for 10, 8, 6, 4, 2, or 1 s, respectively. The results show that the COX-2 activity and the gene expression decreased while the COX-1 activity and the gene expression were found to be increased in parallel to the shortening of the period in CRID. From the histopathological examinations, the findings of hemorrhage, edema, congested vascular structures, degenerated cells, and migration and adhesion of PMNLs were scaled as follows: Sham group < OICR-6 < OICR-5 < OICR-4 < OICR-3 < OICR-2 < OICR-1. The results from the histopathological assessments were consistent with the molecular and biochemical findings. In conclusion, our findings suggest that increased COX-2 activity plays a role in I/R injury of the rat ovary, and that controlled reperfusion for 3, 2, or 1 s following 2 h of ischemia may attenuate the effects of I/R injury. PMID:25730518

  4. YB-1 gene expression is kept constant during myocyte differentiation through replacement of different transcription factors and then falls gradually under the control of neural activity.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Toru; Moue, Masamitsu; Ohashi, Sachiyo; Nishikawa, Taishi

    2015-11-01

    We have previously reported that translation of acetylcholine receptor α-subunit (AChR α) mRNA in skeletal muscle cells is regulated by Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) in response to neural activity, and that in the postnatal mouse developmental changes in the amount of YB-1 mRNA are similar to those of AChR α mRNA, which is known to be regulated by myogenic transcription factors. Here, we examined transcriptional regulation of the YB-1 gene in mouse skeletal muscle and differentiating C2C12 myocytes. Although neither YB-1 nor AChR α was detected at either the mRNA or protein level in adult hind limb muscle, YB-1 expression was transiently activated in response to denervation of the sciatic nerve and completely paralleled that of AChR α, suggesting that these genes are regulated by the same transcription factors. However, during differentiation of C2C12 cells to myotubes, the level of YB-1 remained constant even though the level of AChR α increased markedly. Reporter gene, gel mobility shift and ChIP assays revealed that in the initial stage of myocyte differentiation, transcription of the YB-1 gene was regulated by E2F1 and Sp1, and was then gradually replaced under the control of both MyoD and myogenin through an E-box sequence in the proximal region of the YB-1 gene promoter. These results suggest that transcription factors for the YB-1 gene are exchanged during skeletal muscle cell differentiation, perhaps playing a role in translational control of mRNAs by YB-1 in both myotube formation and the response of skeletal muscle tissues to neural stimulation.

  5. Two-stage control of an oxidative stress regulon: the Escherichia coli SoxR protein triggers redox-inducible expression of the soxS regulatory gene.

    PubMed Central

    Nunoshiba, T; Hidalgo, E; Amábile Cuevas, C F; Demple, B

    1992-01-01

    Escherichia coli responds to the redox stress imposed by superoxide-generating agents such as paraquat by activating the synthesis of as many as 80 polypeptides. Expression of a key group of these inducible proteins is controlled at the transcriptional level by the soxRS locus (the soxRS regulon). A two-stage control system was hypothesized for soxRS, in which an intracellular redox signal would trigger the SoxR protein as a transcriptional activator of the soxS gene and the resulting increased levels of SoxS protein would activate transcription of the various soxRS regulon genes (B. Demple and C.F. Amábile Cuevas, Cell 67:837-839, 1990). We have constructed operon fusions of the E. coli lac genes to the soxS promoter to monitor soxS transcription. Expression from the soxS promoter is strongly inducible by paraquat in a manner strictly dependent on a functional soxR gene. Several other superoxide-generating agents also trigger soxR(+)-dependent soxS expression, and the inductions by paraquat and phenazine methosulfate were dependent on the presence of oxygen. Numerous other oxidative stress agents (H2O2, gamma rays, heat shock, etc.) failed to induce soxS, while aerobic growth of superoxide dismutase-deficient bacteria triggered soxR-dependent soxS expression. These results indicate a specific redox signal for soxS induction. A direct role for SoxR protein in the activation of the soxS gene is indicated by band-shift and DNase I footprinting experiments that demonstrate specific binding of the SoxR protein in cell extracts to the soxS promoter. The mode of SoxR binding to DNA appears to be similar to that of its homolog MerR in that the SoxR footprint spans the -10 to -35 region of the soxS promoter. Images PMID:1400156

  6. Ambient pH Controls Glycogen Levels by Regulating Glycogen Synthase Gene Expression in Neurospora crassa. New Insights into the pH Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; de Paula, Renato Magalhães; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a polysaccharide widely distributed in microorganisms and animal cells and its metabolism is under intricate regulation. Its accumulation in a specific situation results from the balance between glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase activities that control synthesis and degradation, respectively. These enzymes are highly regulated at transcriptional and post-translational levels. The existence of a DNA motif for the Aspergillus nidulans pH responsive transcription factor PacC in the promoter of the gene encoding glycogen synthase (gsn) in Neurospora crassa prompted us to investigate whether this transcription factor regulates glycogen accumulation. Transcription factors such as PacC in A. nidulans and Rim101p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae play a role in the signaling pathway that mediates adaptation to ambient pH by inducing the expression of alkaline genes and repressing acidic genes. We showed here that at pH 7.8 pacC was over-expressed and gsn was down-regulated in wild-type N. crassa coinciding with low glycogen accumulation. In the pacCKO strain the glycogen levels and gsn expression at alkaline pH were, respectively, similar to and higher than the wild-type strain at normal pH (5.8). These results characterize gsn as an acidic gene and suggest a regulatory role for PACC in gsn expression. The truncated recombinant protein, containing the DNA-binding domain specifically bound to a gsn DNA fragment containing the PacC motif. DNA-protein complexes were observed with extracts from cells grown at normal and alkaline pH and confirmed by ChIP-PCR analysis. The PACC present in these extracts showed equal molecular mass, indicating that the protein is already processed at normal pH, in contrast to A. nidulans. Together, these results show that the pH signaling pathway controls glycogen accumulation by regulating gsn expression and suggest the existence of a different mechanism for PACC activation in N. crassa. PMID:22952943

  7. Dynamic changes in the localization of MAPK cascade components controlling pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression during innate immunity in parsley.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justin; Rudd, Jason J; Macioszek, Violetta K; Scheel, Dierk

    2004-05-21

    The activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades is an important mechanism for stress adaptation through the control of gene expression in mammals, yeast, and plants. MAPK activation has emerged as a common mechanism by which plants trigger pathogen defense responses following innate immune recognition of potential microbial pathogens. We are studying the non-host plant defense response of parsley to attempted infection by Phytophthora species using an experimental system of cultured parsley cells and the Phytophthora-derived Pep-13 peptide elicitor. Following receptor-mediated recognition of this peptide, parsley cells trigger a multifaceted innate immune response, involving the activation of three MAPKs that have been shown to function in the oxidative burst-independent activation of defense gene expression. Using this same experimental model we now report the identification of a MAPK kinase (MAPKK) that functions upstream in this pathway. This kinase, referred to as PcMKK5 based on sequence similarity to Arabidopsis thaliana AtMKK5, is activated in parsley cells following Pep-13 treatment and functions as an in vivo activator of all three MAPKs previously shown to be involved in this response. Gain- and loss-of-function mutant versions of PcMKK5, when used in protoplast co-transfection assays, demonstrated that kinase activity of PcMKK5 is required for PR gene promoter activation following Pep-13 treatment. Furthermore, using specific antibodies and immunofluorescent labeling, we demonstrate that activation of MAPKs in parsley cells correlates with an increase in their nuclear localization, which is not detectable for activated PcMKK5. These results suggest that activation of gene expression through MAPK cascades during innate immune responses in plants involves dynamic changes in the localization of the proteins involved, which may reflect the distribution of key protein substrates for the activated MAPKs.

  8. Expression of a chemically synthesized gene for human epidermal growth factor under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Higo, K; Saito, Y; Higo, H

    1993-09-01

    Nicotiana tabacum was transformed with a chemically synthesized gene encoding the human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) under control of the CaMV-35S promoter. The hEGF gene sequence was present at one to several copies in the primary transformant plants (R0), and a transcript with the expected length was produced. Slot blot analysis of total RNAs of the progeny (R1) seedlings, originating from self-pollination of the R0 plants, showed that the level of mRNA expression was generally, but not always, heritable. The highest hEGF peptide content per unit of total soluble protein in young (upper) R1 leaves so far examined by an immunological method was about 0.001%. These results suggest that either the hEGF peptide was less stable than the average leaf protein, or the hEGF mRNAs were not efficiently translated.

  9. Features of Gene Expression of Bacillus pumilus Metalloendopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Rudakova, N L; Sabirova, A R; Balaban, N P; Tikhonova, A O; Sharipova, M R

    2016-08-01

    Features of gene expression of the secreted Bacillus pumilus metalloendopeptidase belonging to the adamalysin/reprolysin family were investigated. In the regulatory region of the gene, we identified hypothetical binding sites for transcription factors CcpA and TnrA. We found that the expression of the metalloendopeptidase gene is controlled by mechanisms of carbon and nitrogen catabolite repression. In experiments involving nitrogen metabolism regulatory protein mutant strains, we found that the control of the metalloendopeptidase gene expression involves proteins of ammonium transport GlnK and AmtB interacting with the TnrA-regulator. PMID:27677556

  10. OsERF2 controls rice root growth and hormone responses through tuning expression of key genes involved in hormone signaling and sucrose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guiqing; Qin, Hua; Zhou, Jiahao; Quan, Ruidang; Lu, Xiangyang; Huang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Haiwen

    2016-02-01

    Root determines plant distribution, development progresses, stress response, as well as crop qualities and yields, which is under the tight control of genetic programs and environmental stimuli. Ethylene responsive factor proteins (ERFs) play important roles in plant growth and development. Here, the regulatory function of OsERF2 involved in root growth was investigated using the gain-function mutant of OsERF2 (nsf2857) and the artificial microRNA-mediated silenced lines of OsERF2 (Ami-OsERF2). nsf2857 showed short primary roots compared with the wild type (WT), while the primary roots of Ami-OsERF2 lines were longer than those of WT. Consistent with this phenotype, several auxin/cytokinin responsive genes involved in root growth were downregulated in nsf2857, but upregulated in Ami-OsERF2. Then, we found that nsf2857 seedlings exhibited decreased ABA accumulation and sensitivity to ABA and reduced ethylene-mediated root inhibition, while those were the opposite in Ami-ERF2 plants. Moreover, several key genes involved in ABA synthesis were downregulated in nsf2857, but unregulated in Ami-ERF2 lines. In addition, OsERF2 affected the accumulation of sucrose and UDPG by mediating expression of key genes involved in sucrose metabolism. These results indicate that OsERF2 is required for the control of root architecture and ABA- and ethylene-response by tuning expression of series genes involved in sugar metabolism and hormone signaling pathways. PMID:26659593

  11. Wuschel-related homeobox5 gene expression and interaction of CLE peptides with components of the systemic control add two pieces to the puzzle of autoregulation of nodulation.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Maria A; Mortier, Virginie; Demchenko, Kirill N; Tsyganov, Victor E; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Lutova, Ludmila A; Dolgikh, Elena A; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2012-03-01

    In legumes, the symbiotic nodules are formed as a result of dedifferentiation and reactivation of cortical root cells. A shoot-acting receptor complex, similar to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CLAVATA1 (CLV1)/CLV2 receptor, regulating development of the shoot apical meristem, is involved in autoregulation of nodulation (AON), a mechanism that systemically controls nodule number. The targets of CLV1/CLV2 in the shoot apical meristem, the WUSCHEL (WUS)-RELATED HOMEOBOX (WOX) family transcription factors, have been proposed to be important regulators of apical meristem maintenance and to be expressed in apical meristem "organizers." Here, we focus on the role of the WOX5 transcription factor upon nodulation in Medicago truncatula and pea (Pisum sativum) that form indeterminate nodules. Analysis of temporal WOX5 expression during nodulation with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and promoter-reporter fusion revealed that the WOX5 gene was expressed during nodule organogenesis, suggesting that WOX genes are common regulators of cell proliferation in different systems. Furthermore, in nodules of supernodulating mutants, defective in AON, WOX5 expression was higher than that in wild-type nodules. Hence, a conserved WUS/WOX-CLV regulatory system might control cell proliferation and differentiation not only in the root and shoot apical meristems but also in nodule meristems. In addition, the link between nodule-derived CLE peptides activating AON in different legumes and components of the AON system was investigated. We demonstrate that the identified AON component, NODULATION3 of pea, might act downstream from or beside the CLE peptides during AON. PMID:22232385

  12. Global analysis of patterns of gene expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomancak, Pavel; Berman, Benjamin P; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Kwan, Elaine; Hartenstein, Volker; Celniker, Susan E; Rubin, Gerald M

    2007-01-01

    Background Cell and tissue specific gene expression is a defining feature of embryonic development in multi-cellular organisms. However, the range of gene expression patterns, the extent of the correlation of expression with function, and the classes of genes whose spatial expression are tightly regulated have been unclear due to the lack of an unbiased, genome-wide survey of gene expression patterns. Results We determined and documented embryonic expression patterns for 6,003 (44%) of the 13,659 protein-coding genes identified in the Drosophila melanogaster genome with over 70,000 images and controlled vocabulary annotations. Individual expression patterns are extraordinarily diverse, but by supplementing qualitative in situ hybridization data with quantitative microarray time-course data using a hybrid clustering strategy, we identify groups of genes with similar expression. Of 4,496 genes with detectable expression in the embryo, 2,549 (57%) fall into 10 clusters representing broad expression patterns. The remaining 1,947 (43%) genes fall into 29 clusters representing restricted expression, 20% patterned as early as blastoderm, with the majority restricted to differentiated cell types, such as epithelia, nervous system, or muscle. We investigate the relationship between expression clusters and known molecular and cellular-physiological functions. Conclusion Nearly 60% of the genes with detectable expression exhibit broad patterns reflecting quantitative rather than qualitative differences between tissues. The other 40% show tissue-restricted expression; the expression patterns of over 1,500 of these genes are documented here for the first time. Within each of these categories, we identified clusters of genes associated with particular cellular and developmental functions. PMID:17645804

  13. Insights into SAGA function during gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Histone modifications are a crucial source of epigenetic control. SAGA (Spt–Ada–Gcn5 acetyltransferase) is a chromatin-modifying complex that contains two distinct enzymatic activities, Gcn5 and Ubp8, through which it acetylates and deubiquitinates histone residues, respectively, thereby enforcing a pattern of modifications that is decisive in regulating gene expression. Here, I discuss the latest contributions to understanding the roles of the SAGA complex, highlighting the characterization of the SAGA-deubiquitination module, and emphasizing the functions newly ascribed to SAGA during transcription elongation and messenger-RNA export. These findings suggest that a crosstalk exists between chromatin remodelling, transcription and messenger-RNA export, which could constitute a checkpoint for accurate gene expression. I focus particularly on the new components of human SAGA, which was recently discovered and confirms the conservation of the SAGA complex throughout evolution. PMID:19609321

  14. Pathophysiological factors affecting CAR gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pascussi, Jean Marc; Dvorák, Zdenek; Gerbal-Chaloin, Sabine; Assenat, Eric; Maurel, Patrick; Vilarem, Marie José

    2003-11-01

    The body defends itself against potentially harmful compounds, such as drugs and toxic endogenous compounds and their metabolites, by inducing the expression of enzymes and transporters involved in their metabolism and elimination. The orphan nuclear receptor CAR (NR1I3 controls phase I (CYP2B, CYP2C, CYP3A), phase II (UGT1A1), and transporter (SLC21A6, MRP2) genes involved in drug metabolism and bilirubin clearance. Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is activated by xenobiotics, such as phenobarbital, but also by toxic endogenous compounds such as bilirubin metabolite(s). To better understand the inter- and intravariability in drug detoxification, we studied the molecular mechanisms involved in CAR gene expression in human hepatocytes. We clearly identified CAR as a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) target gene, and we proposed the hypothesis of a signal transduction where the activation of GR plays a critical function in CAR-mediated cellular response. According to our model, chemicals or pathophysiological factors that affect GR function should decrease CAR function. To test this hypothesis, we recently investigated the effect of microtubule disrupting agents (MIAs) or proinflammatory cytokines. These compounds are well-known inhibitors of GR transactivation property. MIAs activate c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which phosphorylates and inactivates GR, whereas proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 or IL1beta, induce AP-1 or NF-kB activation, respectively, leading to GR inhibition. As expected, we observed that these molecules inhibit both CAR gene expression and phenobarbital-mediated CYP gene expression in human hepatocytes. PMID:14705859

  15. Expression of foreign genes in filamentous cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kuritz, T.; Wolk, C.P. )

    1993-06-01

    Several advantages make cyanobacteria attractive hosts for biodegradative genes and possibly for other exogenous genes that have practical uses. The authors have obtained expression in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 and Nostoc ellipsosporum of a dechlorination operon, fcbAB, from Arthrobacter globiformis, and have also developed a simple method for qualitative assessment of dechlorination by microorganisms, such as cyanobacteria, whose metabolism is dependent on the presence of chloride in the medium. Transcription of fcbAB under the control of a variety of promoters was monitored by placing luxAB (encoding luciferase) downstream from fcbAB, and by measuring light emission from luciferase. They believe that the system that they have described has value as a means to screen for factors influencing transcription of foreign genes in cyanobacteria.

  16. Gene Expression in First Trimester Preeclampsia Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Founds, Sandra A.; Terhorst, Lauren A.; Conrad, Kirk P.; Hogge, W. Allen; Jeyabalan, Arun; Conley, Yvette P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to further validate eight candidate genes identified in a microarray analysis of first trimester placentas in preeclampsia. Material and method Surplus chorionic villus sampling (CVS) specimens of 4 women subsequently diagnosed with preeclampsia (PE) and 8 control women (C) without preeclampsia analyzed previously by microarray and 24 independent additional control samples (AS) were submitted for confirmatory studies by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Downregulation was significant in FSTL3 in PE as compared to C and AS (p = .04). PAEP was downregulated, but the difference was only significant between C and AS (p = .002) rather than between PE and either of the control groups. Expression levels for CFH, EPAS1, IGFBP1, MMP12, and SEMA3C were not statistically different among groups, but trends were consistent with microarray results; there was no anti-correlation. S100A8 was not measurable in all samples, probably because different probes and primers were needed. Conclusions This study corroborates reduced FSTL3 expression in the first trimester of preeclampsia. Nonsignificant trends in the other genes may require follow-up in studies powered for medium or medium/large effect sizes. qRT-PCR verification of the prior microarray of CVS may support the placental origins of preeclampsia hypothesis. Replication is needed for the candidate genes as potential biomarkers of susceptibility, early detection, and/or individualized care of maternal–infant preeclampsia. PMID:21044967

  17. Targeting Chromatin-Mediated Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Therapy: Preclinical Rationale and Clinical Results.

    PubMed

    Pasini, Alice; Delmonte, Angelo; Tesei, Anna; Calistri, Daniele; Giordano, Emanuele

    2015-10-01

    Targeting chromatin-mediated transcriptional control of gene expression is nowadays considered a promising new strategy, transcending conventional anticancer therapy. As a result, molecules acting as DNA demethylating agents or histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have entered the clinical arena in the last decade. Given the evidence suggesting that epigenetic regulation is significantly involved in lung cancer development and progression, the potential of epigenetically active compounds to modulate gene expression and reprogram cancer cells to a less aggressive phenotype is, at present, a promising strategy. Accordingly, a large number of compounds that interact with the epigenetic machinery of gene expression regulation are now being developed and tested as potential antitumor agents, either alone or in combination with standard therapy. The preclinical rationale and clinical data concerning the pharmacological modulation of chromatin organization in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is described in this review. Although preclinical data suggest that a pharmacological treatment targeting the epigenetic machinery has relevant activity over the neoplastic phenotype of NSCLC cells, clinical results are disappointing, leading only to short periods of disease stabilization in NSCLC patients. This evidence calls for a significant rethinking of strategies for an effective epigenetic therapy of NSCLC. The synergistic effect of concurrent epigenetic therapies, use at low doses, the priming of current treatments with previous epigenetic drugs, and the selection of clinical trial populations based on epigenetic biomarkers/signatures appear to be the cornerstones of a mature therapeutic strategy aiming to establish new regimens for reprogramming malignant cells and improving the clinical history of affected patients. PMID:26347133

  18. Deciphering the Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning the Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression by Master Transcriptional Regulators in Arabidopsis Seed.

    PubMed

    Baud, Sébastien; Kelemen, Zsolt; Thévenin, Johanne; Boulard, Céline; Blanchet, Sandrine; To, Alexandra; Payre, Manon; Berger, Nathalie; Effroy-Cuzzi, Delphine; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Godoy, Marta; Solano, Roberto; Thevenon, Emmanuel; Parcy, François; Lepiniec, Loïc; Dubreucq, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), transcriptional control of seed maturation involves three related regulators with a B3 domain, namely LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2), ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3), and FUSCA3 (ABI3/FUS3/LEC2 [AFLs]). Although genetic analyses have demonstrated partially overlapping functions of these regulators, the underlying molecular mechanisms remained elusive. The results presented here confirmed that the three proteins bind RY DNA elements (with a 5'-CATG-3' core sequence) but with different specificities for fl