Science.gov

Sample records for controlled particle removal

  1. Contamination control: removing small particles from increasingly large wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, A. J.; van der Donck, J. C. J.; Huijser, T.; Kievit, O.; Koops, R.; Koster, N. B.; Molkenboer, F. T.; Theulings, A. M. M. G.

    2012-03-01

    With the introduction of 450 mm wafers, which are considerably larger than the currently largest wafers of 300mm, handling with side grippers is no longer possible and backside grippers are required. Backside gripping increases the possible buildup of particles on the backside of the wafers with possible cross-contamination to the front-side. Therefore, regular backside cleaning is required. Three vacuum compatible cleaning methods were selected. Tacky rollers and highvoltage cleaning were selected for particles and plasma cleaning for molecular layers. A test-bench was designed and constructed implementing these three cleaning methods. The first experiments show promising results for the plasma cleaner and the tacky roller.

  2. Particle Removal by Electrostatic and Dielectrophoretic Forces for Dust Control During Lunar Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; McFall, J. L.; Snyder, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Particle removal during lunar exploration activities is of prime importance for the success of robotic and human exploration of the moon. We report on our efforts to use electrostatic and dielectrophoretic forces to develop a dust removal technology that prevents the accumulation of dust on solar panels and removes dust adhering to those surfaces. Testing of several prototypes showed solar shield output above 90% of the initial potentials after dust clearing.

  3. Biological control of the removal of abiogenic particles from the surface ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deuser, W.G.; Brewer, P.G.; Jickells, T.D.; Commeau, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    Concurrent measurements of particle concentrations in the near-surface water and of particle fluxes in the deep water of the Sargasso Sea show a close coupling between the two for biogenic components. The concentrations of suspended matter appear to follow an annual cycle similar to that of primary production and deepwater particle flux. Although the concentration of particulate aluminum in the surface water appears to vary randomly with respect to that cycle, the removal of aluminum to deep water is intimately linked to the rapid downward transport of organic matter.

  4. Hourglass control for Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics removes tensile and rank-deficiency instabilities. Hourglass control for SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzenmüller, G. C.; Sauer, M.; May, M.; Hiermaier, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present a stabilization scheme for elastoplastic Smooth-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) which overcomes two major challenges: (i) the tensile instability inherent to the updated Lagrangian approach is suppressed and (ii) the rank-deficiency instability inherent to the nodal integration approach is cured. To achieve these goals, lessons learned from the Finite-Element Method are transferred to SPH. In particular, an analogue of hourglass control is derived for SPH, which locally linearizes the deformation field to obtain stable and accurate solutions, without the need to resort to stabilization via excessive artificial viscosity. The resulting SPH scheme combines the ability of updated Lagrangian SPH to model truly large deformations with the accuracy and stability needed to faithfully perform simulations. This claim is supported by the analysis of problematic cases and the simulation of an impact scenario.

  5. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael Dean; Schlager, Richard John; Ebner, Timothy George; Stewart, Robin Michele; Hyatt, David E.; Bustard, Cynthia Jean; Sjostrom, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency.

  6. Plasma polymer-functionalized silica particles for heavy metals removal.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Behnam; Jarvis, Karyn; Majewski, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Highly negatively charged particles were fabricated via an innovative plasma-assisted approach for the removal of heavy metal ions. Thiophene plasma polymerization was used to deposit sulfur-rich films onto silica particles followed by the introduction of oxidized sulfur functionalities, such as sulfonate and sulfonic acid, via water-plasma treatments. Surface chemistry analyses were conducted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Electrokinetic measurements quantified the zeta potentials and isoelectric points (IEPs) of modified particles and indicated significant decreases of zeta potentials and IEPs upon plasma modification of particles. Plasma polymerized thiophene-coated particles treated with water plasma for 10 min exhibited an IEP of less than 3.5. The effectiveness of developed surfaces in the adsorption of heavy metal ions was demonstrated through copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) removal experiments. The removal of metal ions was examined through changing initial pH of solution, removal time, and mass of particles. Increasing the water plasma treatment time to 20 min significantly increased the metal removal efficiency (MRE) of modified particles, whereas further increasing the plasma treatment time reduced the MRE due to the influence of an ablation mechanism. The developed particulate surfaces were capable of removing more than 96.7% of both Cu and Zn ions in 1 h. The combination of plasma polymerization and oxidative plasma treatment is an effective method for the fabrication of new adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals.

  7. Plasma polymer-functionalized silica particles for heavy metals removal.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Behnam; Jarvis, Karyn; Majewski, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Highly negatively charged particles were fabricated via an innovative plasma-assisted approach for the removal of heavy metal ions. Thiophene plasma polymerization was used to deposit sulfur-rich films onto silica particles followed by the introduction of oxidized sulfur functionalities, such as sulfonate and sulfonic acid, via water-plasma treatments. Surface chemistry analyses were conducted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Electrokinetic measurements quantified the zeta potentials and isoelectric points (IEPs) of modified particles and indicated significant decreases of zeta potentials and IEPs upon plasma modification of particles. Plasma polymerized thiophene-coated particles treated with water plasma for 10 min exhibited an IEP of less than 3.5. The effectiveness of developed surfaces in the adsorption of heavy metal ions was demonstrated through copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) removal experiments. The removal of metal ions was examined through changing initial pH of solution, removal time, and mass of particles. Increasing the water plasma treatment time to 20 min significantly increased the metal removal efficiency (MRE) of modified particles, whereas further increasing the plasma treatment time reduced the MRE due to the influence of an ablation mechanism. The developed particulate surfaces were capable of removing more than 96.7% of both Cu and Zn ions in 1 h. The combination of plasma polymerization and oxidative plasma treatment is an effective method for the fabrication of new adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals. PMID:25603034

  8. Selective removal of persistent particles with no photomask damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Tod; Bozak, Ron; White, Roy; Archuletta, Mike; Lee, David

    2009-04-01

    Makers and users of advanced technology photomasks have seen increased difficulties with the removal of persistent, or stubborn, nano-particle contamination. Shrinking pattern geometries, and new mask clean technologies to minimize haze, have both increased the number of problems and loss of mask yield due to these non-removable nano-particles. A novel technique (BitCleanTM) has been developed using a scanning probe microscope system originally designed for nanomachining photomask defect repair. Progress in the technical development of this approach into a manufacture-able solution is reviewed and its effectiveness is shown in selectively removing adherent particles without touching surrounding sensitive structures. Methods for generating targeted edge test particles along with considerations for removal of particles in various pattern geometries and materials are also discussed.

  9. Accelerated simulation of stochastic particle removal processes in particle-resolved aerosol models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, J. H.; Michelotti, M. D.; Riemer, N.; Heath, M. T.; West, M.

    2016-10-01

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods have proven useful for simulating multi-dimensional systems such as composition-resolved aerosol size distributions. While particle-resolved methods have substantial benefits for highly detailed simulations, these techniques suffer from high computational cost, motivating efforts to improve their algorithmic efficiency. Here we formulate an algorithm for accelerating particle removal processes by aggregating particles of similar size into bins. We present the Binned Algorithm for particle removal processes and analyze its performance with application to the atmospherically relevant process of aerosol dry deposition. We show that the Binned Algorithm can dramatically improve the efficiency of particle removals, particularly for low removal rates, and that computational cost is reduced without introducing additional error. In simulations of aerosol particle removal by dry deposition in atmospherically relevant conditions, we demonstrate about 50-times increase in algorithm efficiency.

  10. Removal of endocrine disrupting compounds from wastewater using polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Murray, Audrey; Örmeci, Banu; Lai, Edward P C

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the use of particles of molecularly imprinted and non-imprinted polymers (MIP and NIP) as a wastewater treatment method for endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). MIP and NIP remove EDCs through adsorption and therefore do not result in the formation of partially degraded products. The results show that both MIP and NIP particles are effective for removal of EDCs, and NIP have the advantage of not being as compound-specific as the MIP and hence can remove a diverse range of compounds including 17-β-estradiol (E2), atrazine, bisphenol A, and diethylstilbestrol. Removal of E2 from wastewater was also tested to determine the effectiveness of NIP in the presence of interfering substances and natural organic matter. Removal of E2 from wastewater samples was high and increased with increasing NIP. NIP represent an effective way of removing a wide variety of EDCs from wastewater. PMID:26744949

  11. Paint removal and surface cleaning using ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Terry; Visaisouk, S.

    1993-03-01

    Research into the possibility of using ice particles as a blast medium was first initiated at Defence Research Establishment Pacific (DREP) in an effort to develop a more environmentally acceptable paint removal method. A paint removal process was also required that could be used in areas where normal grit blasting could not be used due to the possibility of the residual blasting grit contaminating machinery and other equipment. As a result of this research a commercial ice blasting system was developed by RETECH. This system is now being used to remove paint from substrates that cannot be easily blasted by conventional techniques and also to clean soiled or contaminated surfaces. The problems involved in the development of an ice blast system, and its components and their functions are described. Due to the complexity of paint removal using ice blasting, parameters such as air pressure, ice particle size and ice particle flow rate were studied and adjusted to suit the nature of the particular coating and substrate of interest. The mechanism of paint removal by ice particles has also been investigated. A theoretical model has been developed to explain the different paint removal mechanisms such as erosion by abrasion and erosion by fracture as they relate to ice blasting. Finally, the use of ice blasting to removal paint from a variety of substrates is presented as well as examples of surface cleaning and surface decontamination.

  12. Paint removal and surface cleaning using ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Terry; Visaisouk, S.

    1995-04-01

    Research into the possibility of using ice particles as a blast medium was first initiated at Defence Research Establishment Pacific (DREP) in an effort to develop a more environmentally acceptable paint removal method. A paint removal process was also required that could be used in areas where normal grit blasting could not be used due to the possibility of the residual blasting grit contaminating machinery and other equipment. As a result of this research a commercial ice blasting system was developed by RETECH. This system is now being used to remove paint from substrates that cannot be easily blasted by conventional techniques and also to clean soiled or contaminated surfaces. The problems involved in the development of an ice blast system and its components and their functions are described. Due to the complexity of paint removal using ice blasting, parameters such as air pressure, ice particle size and ice particle flow rate were studied and adjusted to suit the nature of the particular coating and substrate of interest. The mechanism of paint removal by ice particles has also been investigated. A theoretical model has been developed to explain the different paint removal mechanisms such as erosion by abrasion and erosion by fracture as they relate to ice blasting. Finally, the use of ice blasting to removal paint from a variety of substrates is presented as well as examples of surface cleaning and surface decontamination.

  13. Method for removing undesired particles from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Ebner, T.G.; Stewart, R.M.; Hyatt, D.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Sjostrom, S.

    1998-11-10

    The present invention discloses a process for removing undesired particles from a gas stream including the steps of contacting a composition containing an adhesive with the gas stream; collecting the undesired particles and adhesive on a collection surface to form an aggregate comprising the adhesive and undesired particles on the collection surface; and removing the agglomerate from the collection zone. The composition may then be atomized and injected into the gas stream. The composition may include a liquid that vaporizes in the gas stream. After the liquid vaporizes, adhesive particles are entrained in the gas stream. The process may be applied to electrostatic precipitators and filtration systems to improve undesired particle collection efficiency. 11 figs.

  14. Plasma polymerized allylamine coated quartz particles for humic acid removal.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Karyn L; Majewski, Peter

    2012-08-15

    Allylamine plasma polymerization has been used to modify the surface of quartz particles for humic acid removal via an inductively coupled rotating barrel plasma reactor. Plasma polymerized allylamine (ppAA) films were deposited at a power of 25 W, allylamine flow rate of 4.4 sccm and polymerization times of 5-60 min. The influence of polymerization time on surface chemistry was investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and electrokinetic analysis. Acid orange 7 adsorption/desorption quantified the number of surface amine groups. Humic acid removal via ppAA quartz particles was examined by varying pH, removal time, humic acid concentration, and particle mass. Increasing the polymerization time increased the concentration of amine groups on the ppAA quartz surface, thus also increasing the isoelectric point. ToF-SIMS demonstrated uniform distribution of amine groups across the particle surface. Greatest humic acid removal was observed at pH 5 due to electrostatic attraction. At higher pH values, for longer polymerization times, humic acid removal was also observed due to hydrogen bonding. Increasing the initial humic acid concentration increased the mass of humic acid removed, with longer polymerization times exhibiting the greatest increases. Plasma polymerization using a rotating plasma reactor has shown to be a successful method for modifying quartz particles for the removal of humic acid. Further development of the plasma polymerization process and investigation of additional contaminants will aid in the development of a low cost water treatment system.

  15. STS-31: APU Controller Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The launch April 10 of the STS-31 was scrubbed at T-4 minutes due to a faulty valve in auxiliary power unit (APU) number one. The auxiliary power unit is a hydrazine-fueled, turbine-driven power unit that generates mechanical shaft power to drive a hydraulic pump that produces pressure for the orbiter's hydraulic system. This video shows the removal of the STS-31's auxiliary power unit (APU).

  16. Enhanced removal of radioactive particles by fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.; Harling, O.K.

    1993-08-01

    The proposed research addressed the application of ESI`s particle removal process to the non-destructive decontamination of nuclear equipment. The cleaning medium used in this process is a solution of a high molecular weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid which results in enhanced particle removal. The perfluorinated liquids of interest, which are recycled in the process, are nontoxic, nonflammable, and environmentally compatible, and do not present a hazard to the ozone layer. The information obtained in the Phase 1 program indicated that the proposed ESI process is technically effective and economically attractive. The fluorocarbon surfactant solutions used as working media in the ESI process survived exposure of up to 10 Mrad doses of gamma rays, and are considered sufficiently radiation resistant for the proposed process. Ultrasonic cleaning in perfluorinated surfactant solutions was found to be an effective method of removing radioactive iron (Fe 59) oxide particles from contaminated test pieces. Radioactive particles suspended in the process liquids could be quantitatively removed by filtration through a 0.1 um membrane filter. Projected economics indicate a pre-tax pay back time of 1 month for a commercial scale system.

  17. Dustbathing in food particles does not remove feather lipids.

    PubMed

    Scholz, B; Kjaer, J B; Petow, S; Schrader, L

    2014-08-01

    Within the European Union, dustbathing material in cage-housing systems for laying hens became compulsory in 2012. In practice, most producers use food particles as litter substrate. The feed is dropped in small amounts on scratching mats by an automatic transporting system. However, because dustbathing behavior is meant to remove stale lipids from hens' plumage, food particles may not be a suitable substrate due to their fat content. This study analyzes feather lipid concentration (FLC) of laying hens with access to food particles (F) or lignocellulose (L) as litter substrates. In each of 2 identical trials, 84 laying hens of 2 genotypes (Lohmann Selected Leghorn, Lohmann Brown) were kept in 12 compartments (7 hens each). Compartments were equipped with a grid floor and additionally contained a closed dustbathing tray holding F or L. Feather samples (150 feathers) were taken 2 times throughout the experiment. At 23 wk of age, 4 hens per compartment were sampled after they were allowed pair-wise access to a dustbath for 2.5 h and 3 hens were sampled without access to a dustbathing tray (control). After 10 wk of free access to the dustbathing trays, all hens were sampled again. In trial 2, an additional third sampling was made after dustbaths had been closed again for 6 wk. Here, 6 hens per compartment were sampled immediately before and after a dustbath. Dustbathing in F resulted in higher FLC compared with L and control (P < 0.001), whereas no significant difference was found between L and control (P = 0.103). When open access to litter was provided, hens had higher FLC in F compared with L (P < 0.001). The FLC immediately after dustbathing in F was higher compared with the level before dustbathing (P < 0.001), whereas it was lower after dustbathing in L (P = 0.006). These results show that F are not suitable litter material for laying hens because they lead to lipid accumulation on the plumage. PMID:24894524

  18. Pick up and remove particles by water droplet using dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chuanjin; Pal, Souvik; Li, Zhen; Ma, Yanbao

    2014-11-01

    Particle removal is a crucial concern for many engineering processes, such as, glass cleaning and substrate cleaning, where the removal of nanoparticles is a great challenge. In order to clean the surface without causing any mechanical damage to it, we use water droplets to pick up and remove the nanoparticles. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation is used to model the interaction between the water droplet and nanoparticles, as well as the solid substrate surface. The hydrophilic nanoparticles are successfully cleaned up by water droplet, and the detailed motion of these particles together with droplet is also captured. The results show that the water droplet can be used as an efficient tool for removal of nanoparticles from a surface.

  19. Removal of 10-nm contaminant particles from Si wafers using CO2 bullet particles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Removal of nanometer-sized contaminant particles (CPs) from substrates is essential in successful fabrication of nanoscale devices. The particle beam technique that uses nanometer-sized bullet particles (BPs) moving at supersonic velocity was improved by operating it at room temperature to achieve higher velocity and size uniformity of BPs and was successfully used to remove CPs as small as 10 nm. CO2 BPs were generated by gas-phase nucleation and growth in a supersonic nozzle; appropriate size and velocity of the BPs were obtained by optimizing the nozzle contours and CO2/He mixture fraction. Cleaning efficiency greater than 95% was attained. BP velocity was the most important parameter affecting removal of CPs in the 10-nm size range. Compared to cryogenic Ar or N2 particles, CO2 BPs were more uniform in size and had higher velocity and, therefore, cleaned CPs more effectively. PMID:22494621

  20. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  1. Ultrafine particle removal and generation by portable air cleaners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, Michael S.; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Corsi, Richard L.

    Portable air cleaners can both remove and generate pollutants indoors. To investigate these phenomena, we conducted a two-phase investigation in a 14.75 m 3 stainless steel chamber. In the first phase, particle size-resolved (12.6-514 nm diameter) clean air delivery rates (CADR) and efficiencies were determined, as were ozone emission rates, for two high-efficiency particle arresting (HEPA) filters, one electrostatic precipitator with a fan, and two ion generators without fans. The two HEPA air cleaners had count average CADR (standard deviation) of 188 (30) and 324 (44) m 3 h -1; the electrostatic precipitator 284 (62) m 3 h -1; and the two ion generators 41 (11) and 35 (13) m 3 h -1. The electrostatic precipitator emitted ozone at a rate of 3.8±0.2 mg h -1, and the two ion generators 3.3±0.2 and 4.3±0.2 mg h -1. Ozone initiates reactions with certain unsaturated organic compounds that produce ultrafine and fine particles, carbonyls, other oxidized products, and free radicals. During the second phase, five different ion generators were operated separately in the presence of a plug-in liquid or solid air freshener, representing a strong terpene source. For air exchange rates of between 0.49 and 0.96 h -1, three ion generators acted as steady-state net particle generators in the entire measured range of 4.61-157 nm, and two generated particles in the range of approximately 10 to 39-55 nm. Terpene and aldehyde concentrations were also sampled for one ion generator, and concentrations of terpenes decreased and formaldehyde increased. Given these results, the pollutant removal benefits of ozone-generating air cleaners may be outweighed by the generation of indoor pollution.

  2. Flow-controlled magnetic particle manipulation

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J [Richland, WA; Holman, David A [Las Vegas, NV

    2011-02-22

    Inventive methods and apparatus are useful for collecting magnetic materials in one or more magnetic fields and resuspending the particles into a dispersion medium, and optionally repeating collection/resuspension one or more times in the same or a different medium, by controlling the direction and rate of fluid flow through a fluid flow path. The methods provide for contacting derivatized particles with test samples and reagents, removal of excess reagent, washing of magnetic material, and resuspension for analysis, among other uses. The methods are applicable to a wide variety of chemical and biological materials that are susceptible to magnetic labeling, including, for example, cells, viruses, oligonucleotides, proteins, hormones, receptor-ligand complexes, environmental contaminants and the like.

  3. The removal of deformed submicron particles from silicon wafers by spin rinse and megasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Busnaina, Ahmed A.; Fury, Michael A.; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2000-02-01

    In order to successfully clean particulate contamination from wafer surfaces, it is necessary to understand the adhesion and deformation between the particles and the substrate in contact. The adhesion and removal mechanisms of deformed submicron particles have not been addressed in many previous studies. Submicron polystyrene latex particles (0.1-0.5 µm) were deposited on silicon wafers and removed by spin rinse and megasonic cleanings. Particle rolling is identified as the major removal mechanism for the deformed submicron particles from silicon wafers. Megasonics provides larger streaming velocity because of the extremely thin boundary layer resulting in a larger removal force that is capable of achieving complete removal of contamination particles.

  4. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  5. Controlling particle orientation during forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nycz, Shawn Michael

    Particle orientation is a microstructural feature that can significantly impact the properties of a fired ceramic. For example, Patwardhan and Cannon showed that particle orientation occurring during tape casting affects dimensional control due to the influence that particle shape has on sintering kinetics. The particle orientation was caused by the complex shear state that occurs during tape casting. This dissertation examined the relationship between shear state and the resulting particle orientation and its influence on selected properties of the body. The first step towards this was the determination of the shear state during tape casting. Based on measured geometries and rheologies, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed which predicted shear rates throughout the geometry. The simulations predicted that for slurries exhibiting power-law shear thinning behavior, shear rate is higher near the doctor blade and the slurry is not only sheared between the doctor blade and substrate but also into the slurry reservoir and behind the doctor blade. Tape casting was performed on the compositions that were characterized for the determination of shear state. Casting parameters such as doctor blade gap and casting velocity were varied to alter the shear profile in the system. These samples were then analyzed to determine the particle orientation and texture in various regions throughout the tapes. An optical texture measurement technique based on the birefringence of green bodies was developed to address the need for highly sensitive measurements capable of detecting small variations in green texture. Results given by this technique were found to be consistent with measurements performed by XRD. Experimental samples were analyzed and localized texture measurements were found to follow shear profiles predicted by the CFD simulations. Elastic moduli of fired samples exhibiting a range of textures were measured to reveal effects of particle orientation

  6. Transparent exopolymer particle removal in different drinking water production centers.

    PubMed

    Van Nevel, Sam; Hennebel, Tom; De Beuf, Kristof; Du Laing, Gijs; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2012-07-01

    Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) have recently gained interest in relation to membrane fouling. These sticky, gel-like particles consist of acidic polysaccharides excreted by bacteria and algae. The concentrations, expressed as xanthan gum equivalents L⁻¹ (μg X(eq) L⁻¹), usually reach hundred up to thousands μg X(eq) L⁻¹ in natural waters. However, very few research was performed on the occurrence and fate of TEP in drinking water, this far. This study examined three different drinking water production centers, taking in effluent of a sewage treatment plant (STP), surface water and groundwater, respectively. Each treatment step was evaluated on TEP removal and on 13 other chemical and biological parameters. An assessment on TEP removal efficiency of a diverse range of water treatment methods and on correlations between TEP and other parameters was performed. Significant correlations between particulate TEP (>0.4 μm) and viable cell concentrations were found, as well as between colloidal TEP (0.05-0.4 μm) and total COD, TOC, total cell or viable cell concentrations. TEP concentrations were very dependent on the raw water source; no TEP was detected in groundwater but the STP effluent contained 1572 μg X(eq) L⁻¹ and the surface water 699 μg X(eq) L⁻¹. Over 94% of total TEP in both plants was colloidal TEP, a fraction neglected in nearly every other TEP study. The combination of coagulation and sand filtration was effective to decrease the TEP levels by 67%, while the combination of ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis provided a total TEP removal. Finally, in none of the installations TEP reached the final drinking water distribution system at significant concentrations. Overall, this study described the presence and removal of TEP in drinking water systems.

  7. Fundamentals of particle flocculation and removal from water

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, P.T.; Pratsinis, S.E.

    1994-12-31

    The removal of pollutants during drinking and waste water treatment as well as during the recovery of the products of precipitation, crystallization, and polymerization processes requires that solid particles be separated from a suspension. The flocculation of polystyrene particles with aluminum sulfate or alum (Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}) by turbulent shear was studied as a function of the applied shear rates (63--129 s{sup {minus}1}) and flocculant concentrations (11 and 32 mg/L) in a stirred tank. Increasing the shear rate increased the floc growth rate but decreased the maximum attainable floc size. Increasing the concentration of alum increased the floc growth rate and the maximum floc size. A steady state between floc growth and breakage was attained after which the floc size distribution no longer changed. The normalized steady state size distributions allowed evaluation of the relative contributions of shear rate and flocculant concentration to the performance of the process.

  8. Automation of particle accelerator control

    SciTech Connect

    Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a 'mouseable' representation of a typical beamline. This responds actively to changes input from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beamline itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operator. We have incorporated the Fortran beam optics code TRANSPORT for simulation of the beam. The paper describes the experience gained in this process and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in real-time, on an operating beamline. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Removal of fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments by the unipolar ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uk Lee, Byung; Yermakov, Mikhail; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2004-09-01

    The continuous emission of unipolar ions was evaluated in order to determine its ability to remove fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments. The evolution of the indoor aerosol concentration and particle size distribution was measured in real time with the ELPI in a room-size (24.3 m3) test chamber where the ion emitter was operating. After the results were compared with the natural decay, the air cleaning factor was determined. The particle aerodynamic size range of ∼0.04-2 μm was targeted because it represents many bioaerosol agents that cause emerging diseases, as well as those that can be used for biological warfare or in the event of bioterrorism. The particle electric charge distribution (also measured in the test chamber with the ELPI) was rapidly affected by the ion emission. It was concluded that the corona discharge ion emitters (either positive or negative), which are capable of creating an ion density of 105-106 e± cm-3, can be efficient in controlling fine and ultrafine aerosol pollutants in indoor air environments, such as a typical office or residential room. At a high ion emission rate, the particle mobility becomes sufficient so that the particle migration results in their deposition on the walls and other indoor surfaces. Within the tested ranges of the particle size and ion density, the particles were charged primarily due to the diffusion charging mechanism. The particle removal efficiency was not significantly affected by the particle size, while it increased with increasing ion emission rate and the time of emission. The performance characteristics of three commercially available ionic air purifiers, which produce unipolar ions by corona discharge at relatively high emission rates, were evaluated. A 30-minute operation of the most powerful device among those tested resulted in the removal of about 97% of 0.1 μm particles and about 95% of 1 μm particles from the air in addition to the natural decay effect.

  10. Particle control studies on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, P.

    1987-01-01

    The report consists of viewgraphs. The goal of the particle control program at Tore Supra is to study plasma performance with strong pellet fueling and corresponding particle exhaust in a limiter tokamak. (WRF)

  11. Removal of toxic uranium from synthetic nuclear power reactor effluents using uranyl ion imprinted polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Preetha, Chandrika Ravindran; Gladis, Joseph Mary; Rao, Talasila Prasada; Venkateswaran, Gopala

    2006-05-01

    Major quantities of uranium find use as nuclear fuel in nuclear power reactors. In view of the extreme toxicity of uranium and consequent stringent limits fixed by WHO and various national governments, it is essential to remove uranium from nuclear power reactor effluents before discharge into environment. Ion imprinted polymer (IIP) materials have traditionally been used for the recovery of uranium from dilute aqueous solutions prior to detection or from seawater. We now describe the use of IIP materials for selective removal of uranium from a typical synthetic nuclear power reactor effluent. The IIP materials were prepared for uranyl ion (imprint ion) by forming binary salicylaldoxime (SALO) or 4-vinylpyridine (VP) or ternary SALO-VP complexes in 2-methoxyethanol (porogen) and copolymerizing in the presence of styrene (monomer), divinylbenzene (cross-linking monomer), and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator). The resulting materials were then ground and sieved to obtain unleached polymer particles. Leached IIP particles were obtained by leaching the imprint ions with 6.0 M HCl. Control polymer particles were also prepared analogously without the imprint ion. The IIP particles obtained with ternary complex alone gave quantitative removal of uranyl ion in the pH range 3.5-5.0 with as low as 0.08 g. The retention capacity of uranyl IIP particles was found to be 98.50 mg/g of polymer. The present study successfully demonstrates the feasibility of removing uranyl ions selectively in the range 5 microg - 300 mg present in 500 mL of synthetic nuclear power reactor effluent containing a host of other inorganic species.

  12. Nanoscale Fe(0) particles for pentachlorophenol removal from aqueous solution: temperature effect and particles transformation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Rong; Zheng, Xiang; Liu, Peng; Wang, Jian-Long

    2014-09-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP), as an important contaminant which was toxic and intractable, has received extensive attention. In this paper, the temperature effect during the transformation of PCP using nanoscale Fe(0) particles was studied, and the transformation processes of PCP and iron particles was explained. The results revealed that the removal processes of PCP followed pseudo first-order kinetics. The scale of dechlorination to the transformation of PCP increased with the increase of temperature, though the transformation rate decreased after reacting for 2 h under the experimental condition. However, the initial apparent transformation rate constants were calculated to be 0.312-0.536 h(-1) at the temperature of 20-50 degrees C, which showed an increase of transformation rate along with the increase of temperature. And the surface-area-normalized rate constants were calculated to be 9.50 x 10-3-1.63 x 10-2 L . h-1 . m-2. The experimental activation energy was calculated to be 15.0 kJ x mol(-1) from these rate constants using Arrhenius equation. A phenomenon observed at 50 degrees C indicated that more than one chlorine atom was removed from PCP and suggested β-elimination might be the major pathway for transformation. Sorption experiments showed that the sorption process on the surface of particles could be ignored in the kinetics and thermodynamics models. The changes of morphologies of nanoparticles before and after reaction indicated the transformation process of iron particles, and could be used to explain the changes of activity of nanoparticles. Magnetite (Fe3O4) and/or maghemite (Fe2O3) and lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) were corrosion products of iron. And along with the increase of temperature, the increased intensity of XRD peaks revealed the related a better crystallizing.

  13. Process and apparatus for adding and removing particles from pressurized reactors

    DOEpatents

    Milligan, John D.

    1983-01-01

    A method for adding and removing fine particles from a pressurized reactor is provided, which comprises connecting the reactor to a container, sealing the container from the reactor, filling the container with particles and a liquid material compatible with the reactants, pressurizing the container to substantially the reactor pressure, removing the seal between the reactor and the container, permitting particles to fall into or out of the reactor, and resealing the container from the reactor. An apparatus for adding and removing particles is also disclosed.

  14. Conditions for laser-induced plasma to effectively remove nano-particles on silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinghua; Luo, Li; Zhang, Yubo; Hu, Ruifeng; Feng, Guoying

    2016-09-01

    Particles can be removed from a silicon surface by means of irradiation and a laser plasma shock wave. The particles and silicon are heated by the irradiation and they will expand differently due to their different expansion coefficients, making the particles easier to be removed. Laser plasma can ionize and even vaporize particles more significantly than an incident laser and, therefore, it can remove the particles more efficiently. The laser plasma shock wave plays a dominant role in removing particles, which is attributed to its strong burst force. The pressure of the laser plasma shock wave is determined by the laser pulse energy and the gap between the focus of laser and substrate surface. In order to obtain the working conditions for particle removal, the removal mechanism, as well as the temporal and spatial characteristics of velocity, propagation distance and pressure of shock wave have been researched. On the basis of our results, the conditions for nano-particle removal are achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574221).

  15. Ultrafine particle removal and ozone generation by in-duct electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Poppendieck, Dustin G; Rim, Donghyun; Persily, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to airborne ultrafine particles (UFP, < 100 nm) has been shown to have adverse health effects and can be elevated in buildings. In-duct electrostatic precipitator filters (ESP) have been shown to be an effective particulate control device for reducing UFP concentrations (20-100 nm) in buildings, although they have the potential to increase indoor ozone concentrations. This study investigated residential ESP filters to reduce ultrafine particles between 4 to 15 nm and quantified the resulting ozone generation. In-duct ESPs were operated in the central air handling unit of a test house. Results for the two tested ESP brands indicate that removal efficiency of 8 to 14 nm particles was near zero and always less than 10% (± 15%), possibly due to particle generation or low charging efficiency. Adding a media filter downstream of the ESP increased the decay rate for particles in the same size range. Continuous operation of one brand of ESP raised indoor ozone concentrations to 77 ppbv and 20 ppbv for a second brand. Using commercial filters containing activated carbon downstream of the installed ESP reduced the indoor steady-state ozone concentrations between 6% and 39%.

  16. Ultrafine particle removal and ozone generation by in-duct electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Poppendieck, Dustin G; Rim, Donghyun; Persily, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to airborne ultrafine particles (UFP, < 100 nm) has been shown to have adverse health effects and can be elevated in buildings. In-duct electrostatic precipitator filters (ESP) have been shown to be an effective particulate control device for reducing UFP concentrations (20-100 nm) in buildings, although they have the potential to increase indoor ozone concentrations. This study investigated residential ESP filters to reduce ultrafine particles between 4 to 15 nm and quantified the resulting ozone generation. In-duct ESPs were operated in the central air handling unit of a test house. Results for the two tested ESP brands indicate that removal efficiency of 8 to 14 nm particles was near zero and always less than 10% (± 15%), possibly due to particle generation or low charging efficiency. Adding a media filter downstream of the ESP increased the decay rate for particles in the same size range. Continuous operation of one brand of ESP raised indoor ozone concentrations to 77 ppbv and 20 ppbv for a second brand. Using commercial filters containing activated carbon downstream of the installed ESP reduced the indoor steady-state ozone concentrations between 6% and 39%. PMID:24387032

  17. Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1981-10-26

    In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

  18. A key process controlling the wet removal of aerosols: new observational evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Sho; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Mori, Tatsuhiro; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The lifetime and spatial distributions of accumulation-mode aerosols in a size range of approximately 0.05–1 μm, and thus their global and regional climate impacts, are primarily constrained by their removal via cloud and precipitation (wet removal). However, the microphysical process that predominantly controls the removal efficiency remains unidentified because of observational difficulties. Here, we demonstrate that the activation of aerosols to cloud droplets (nucleation scavenging) predominantly controls the wet removal efficiency of accumulation-mode aerosols, using water-insoluble black carbon as an observable particle tracer during the removal process. From simultaneous ground-based observations of black carbon in air (prior to removal) and in rainwater (after removal) in Tokyo, Japan, we found that the wet removal efficiency depends strongly on particle size, and the size dependence can be explained quantitatively by the observed size-dependent cloud-nucleating ability. Furthermore, our observational method provides an estimate of the effective supersaturation of water vapour in precipitating cloud clusters, a key parameter controlling nucleation scavenging. These novel data firmly indicate the importance of quantitative numerical simulations of the nucleation scavenging process to improve the model’s ability to predict the atmospheric aerosol burden and the resultant climate forcings, and enable a new validation of such simulations. PMID:27703169

  19. A key process controlling the wet removal of aerosols: new observational evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohata, Sho; Moteki, Nobuhiro; Mori, Tatsuhiro; Koike, Makoto; Kondo, Yutaka

    2016-10-01

    The lifetime and spatial distributions of accumulation-mode aerosols in a size range of approximately 0.05–1 μm, and thus their global and regional climate impacts, are primarily constrained by their removal via cloud and precipitation (wet removal). However, the microphysical process that predominantly controls the removal efficiency remains unidentified because of observational difficulties. Here, we demonstrate that the activation of aerosols to cloud droplets (nucleation scavenging) predominantly controls the wet removal efficiency of accumulation-mode aerosols, using water-insoluble black carbon as an observable particle tracer during the removal process. From simultaneous ground-based observations of black carbon in air (prior to removal) and in rainwater (after removal) in Tokyo, Japan, we found that the wet removal efficiency depends strongly on particle size, and the size dependence can be explained quantitatively by the observed size-dependent cloud-nucleating ability. Furthermore, our observational method provides an estimate of the effective supersaturation of water vapour in precipitating cloud clusters, a key parameter controlling nucleation scavenging. These novel data firmly indicate the importance of quantitative numerical simulations of the nucleation scavenging process to improve the model’s ability to predict the atmospheric aerosol burden and the resultant climate forcings, and enable a new validation of such simulations.

  20. Controlled manipulation of engineered colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Janine

    This research utilized the Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINTRTM) technology to fabricate highly tailored colloidal particles. The behavior of these engineered particles were studied as they were subjected to different precisely controlled external influences, including electric fields, magnetic fields and a templating approach based on the PRINT process. Given the tunability in particle properties afforded by the PRINT process, exceptional control of the resulting particle assemblies and particle mobility were observed, suggesting potential applications in numerous materials and life science applications that require control on the nanoscale. As the PRINT process was integral to all aspects of this research, it was important to gain a clear understanding of mechanism by which perfluoropolyether (PFPE) elastomeric molds can generate monodisperse arrays of discrete, uniform particles with tailored size, shape and composition. Thus, fundamental studies were conducted on the PFPE elastomers, focusing on contact mechanics measurements and capillary flow experiments. The results confirmed the low surface energy of PFPE, an important property that renders the PFPE molds ideal for the PRINT process. Capillary flow experiments were conducted to study the method by which PFPE molds can be filled during the PRINT process. The flow in closed PFPE microchannels was compared to that in PDMS and glass. Suspensions of PRINT particles were studied in the presence of electric and magnetic fields. Electric field experiments were conducted using non-uniform alternating current electric fields and uniform direct current electric fields. Magnetic field experiments were conducted using both stationary and rotating magnetic fields. Particle assemblies were observed to form and could be tuned by particle shape and composition. Particle motion, both translational and rotational, was also controlled. Properties were found to be both shape and composition dependent. These

  1. Process optimization for particle removal on blank chrome mask plates in preparation for resist application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Stephen; Smith, Eryn; Woster, Eric; Pelayo, Anthony

    2002-03-01

    As integrated circuits require smaller lines to provide the memory and processing capability for tomorrow's marketplace, the photomask industry is adopting higher contrast resists to improve photomask lithography. Photomask yield for several high-contrast resist recipes may be improved by coating masks at the mask shop. When coating at a mask shop, an effective method is available that uses coat/bake cluster tools to ensure blanks are clean prior to coating. Many high-contrast resists are available, and some are more susceptible to time-dependent performance factors than conventional resists. One of these factors is the time between coating and writing. Although future methods may reduce the impact of this factor, one current trend is to reduce this time by coating plates at the mask shop just prior to writing. Establishing an effective process to clean blanks prior to coating is necessary for product quality control and is a new task that is critical for maskmakers who previously purchased mask plates but have decided to begin coating them within their facility. This paper provides a strategy and method to be used within coat/bake cluster tools to remove particle contamination from mask blanks. The process uses excimer-UV ionizing radiation and ozone to remove organic contaminants, and then uses a wet process combined with megasonic agitation, surfactant, and spin forces. Megasonic agitation with surfactant lifts up particles, while the convective outflow of water enhances centripetal shear without accumulating harmful charge.

  2. Design of Free-Standing Microstructured Conducting Polymer Films for Enhanced Particle Removal from Non-uniform Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laster, Jennifer; Deom, Nicholas; Boudouris, Bryan; Beaudoin, Stephen

    Particle removal from surfaces is important for a wide range of industrial applications (e.g., microelectronics fabrication). One of the main forces of particle adhesion to a surface is the van der Waals attraction force, which will be the focus of this effort. The surface features of interacting bodies can play a controlling role in the adhesion of particles by increasing or decreasing the amount of mass within the range of strong van der Waals forces. In order to control these interactions, specific geometries can be designed in order to manipulate the micro- and nanostructure of a material, which can conform to the features of a corresponding substrate increasing the overall contact area between the two surfaces. In this work, microstructured films of the conducting polymer polypyrrole (PPy) were synthesized through template-assisted electropolymerization techniques. The removal of fluorescently-labeled polystyrene beads from aluminum surfaces of varying roughness was measured and compared for microstructured and flat PPy films. The microstructured films were found to have an overall increase in the amount of particles removed from the aluminum surfaces; this demonstrates the ability to manipulate particle adhesion through advanced nanostructured polymer templating.

  3. Removal of Waterborne Particles by Electrofiltration: Pilot-Scale Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Theoretical analysis using a trajectory approach indicated that in the presence of an external electric field, charged waterborne particles are subject to an additional migration velocity which increases their deposition on the surface of collectors (e.g. sand filter). In this st...

  4. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Removed control measures. 52.1890 Section 52.1890 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... measures. On the dates listed below, Ohio requested that the indicated control measures be removed from...

  5. Controlling chaos in wave-particle interactions.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, M C; Caldas, I L; Rizzato, F B; Pakter, R; Steffens, F M

    2012-07-01

    We analyze the behavior of a relativistic particle moving under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and a stationary electrostatic wave. We work with a set of pulsed waves that allows us to obtain an exact map for the system. We also use a method of control for near-integrable Hamiltonians that consists of the addition of a small and simple control term to the system. This control term creates invariant tori in phase space that prevent chaos from spreading to large regions, making the controlled dynamics more regular. We show numerically that the control term just slightly modifies the system but is able to drastically reduce chaos with a low additional cost of energy. Moreover, we discuss how the control of chaos and the consequent recovery of regular trajectories in phase space are useful to improve regular particle acceleration. PMID:23005517

  6. Apparatus and method for destructive removal of particles contained in flowing fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus and method for destructively removing particles from a flowing gas containing the particles is described. In the specific embodiments disclosed the apparatus is adapted to remove carbon particles from diesel engine exhaust products. The exhaust products are directed to a predetermined location where they are rapidly vaporized and combine with oxygen in the exhaust products to form carbon dioxide. Vaporization in one embodiment is effected by a discharge grid located within an exhaust conduit, the grid being chosen so that alternate conductors defining the grid are spaced apart a distance approximately 125 times the mean diameter of the particles to be removed. A voltage differential of approximately 690 volts is applied across adjacent conductors.

  7. Ice nucleation active particles are efficiently removed by precipitating clouds

    PubMed Central

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E.; Herrmann, Erik; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Alewell, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Ice nucleation in cold clouds is a decisive step in the formation of rain and snow. Observations and modelling suggest that variations in the concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs) affect timing, location and amount of precipitation. A quantitative description of the abundance and variability of INPs is crucial to assess and predict their influence on precipitation. Here we used the hydrological indicator δ18O to derive the fraction of water vapour lost from precipitating clouds and correlated it with the abundance of INPs in freshly fallen snow. Results show that the number of INPs active at temperatures ≥ −10 °C (INPs−10) halves for every 10% of vapour lost through precipitation. Particles of similar size (>0.5 μm) halve in number for only every 20% of vapour lost, suggesting effective microphysical processing of INPs during precipitation. We show that INPs active at moderate supercooling are rapidly depleted by precipitating clouds, limiting their impact on subsequent rainfall development in time and space. PMID:26553559

  8. Ice nucleation active particles are efficiently removed by precipitating clouds.

    PubMed

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E; Herrmann, Erik; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Alewell, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Ice nucleation in cold clouds is a decisive step in the formation of rain and snow. Observations and modelling suggest that variations in the concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs) affect timing, location and amount of precipitation. A quantitative description of the abundance and variability of INPs is crucial to assess and predict their influence on precipitation. Here we used the hydrological indicator δ(18)O to derive the fraction of water vapour lost from precipitating clouds and correlated it with the abundance of INPs in freshly fallen snow. Results show that the number of INPs active at temperatures ≥ -10 °C (INPs-10) halves for every 10% of vapour lost through precipitation. Particles of similar size (>0.5 μm) halve in number for only every 20% of vapour lost, suggesting effective microphysical processing of INPs during precipitation. We show that INPs active at moderate supercooling are rapidly depleted by precipitating clouds, limiting their impact on subsequent rainfall development in time and space.

  9. Ice nucleation active particles are efficiently removed by precipitating clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E.; Herrmann, Erik; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Alewell, Christine

    2015-11-01

    Ice nucleation in cold clouds is a decisive step in the formation of rain and snow. Observations and modelling suggest that variations in the concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs) affect timing, location and amount of precipitation. A quantitative description of the abundance and variability of INPs is crucial to assess and predict their influence on precipitation. Here we used the hydrological indicator δ18O to derive the fraction of water vapour lost from precipitating clouds and correlated it with the abundance of INPs in freshly fallen snow. Results show that the number of INPs active at temperatures ≥ -10 °C (INPs-10) halves for every 10% of vapour lost through precipitation. Particles of similar size (>0.5 μm) halve in number for only every 20% of vapour lost, suggesting effective microphysical processing of INPs during precipitation. We show that INPs active at moderate supercooling are rapidly depleted by precipitating clouds, limiting their impact on subsequent rainfall development in time and space.

  10. Ice nucleation active particles are efficiently removed by precipitating clouds.

    PubMed

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E; Herrmann, Erik; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Alewell, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Ice nucleation in cold clouds is a decisive step in the formation of rain and snow. Observations and modelling suggest that variations in the concentrations of ice nucleating particles (INPs) affect timing, location and amount of precipitation. A quantitative description of the abundance and variability of INPs is crucial to assess and predict their influence on precipitation. Here we used the hydrological indicator δ(18)O to derive the fraction of water vapour lost from precipitating clouds and correlated it with the abundance of INPs in freshly fallen snow. Results show that the number of INPs active at temperatures ≥ -10 °C (INPs-10) halves for every 10% of vapour lost through precipitation. Particles of similar size (>0.5 μm) halve in number for only every 20% of vapour lost, suggesting effective microphysical processing of INPs during precipitation. We show that INPs active at moderate supercooling are rapidly depleted by precipitating clouds, limiting their impact on subsequent rainfall development in time and space. PMID:26553559

  11. Nucleation-assisted process for the removal of fine aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect

    ChinCheng Chen; HanKuan Shu; YeunKwei Yang . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-07-01

    An efficient (up to 99%) multistage process that removes a wide range of fine particles (several microns down to 0.1 [mu]m) assisted by a nucleation method is proposed. In each stage, as a gas stream passed through a supersaturated vapor in a mixing chamber, water vapor condenses onto the particles which grow to bigger sizes in a subsequent cooling chamber and is removed in a cyclone after being accelerated through a nozzle. The desired efficiency can be assured by employing several stages in series. A single-stage bench-scale model is designed, and four types of test aerosol are used to demonstrate the cleaning efficiency. The efficiency increases with increasing ratio of steam to gas stream, wettability of particles, particle size, and degree of cooling in the cooling chamber, and decreases as particle concentration increases. Suggestions on how to achieve desired efficiencies at less cost are also given.

  12. Evaluation of the particle measurement programme (PMP) protocol to remove the vehicles' exhaust aerosol volatile phase.

    PubMed

    Giechaskiel, B; Chirico, R; Decarlo, P F; Clairotte, M; Adam, T; Martini, G; Heringa, M F; Richter, R; Prevot, A S H; Baltensperger, U; Astorga, C

    2010-10-01

    European regulation for Euro 5/6 light duty emissions introduced the measurement of non-volatile particles with diameter >23 nm. The volatile phase is removed by using a heated dilution stage (150 degrees C) and a heated tube (at 300-400 degrees C). We investigated experimentally the removal efficiency for volatile species of the specific protocol by conducting measurements with two Euro 3 diesel light duty vehicles, a Euro 2 moped, and a Euro III heavy duty vehicle with the system's heaters on and off. The particle number distributions were measured with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). An Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was used to identify the non-refractory chemical composition of the particles. A Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) was used to measure the black carbon concentration. The results showed that the condensed material in the accumulation mode (defined here as particles in the diameter range of approximately 50-500 nm) was removed with an efficiency of 50-90%. The (volatile) nucleation mode was also completely evaporated or was decreased to sizes <23 nm; thus these particles wouldn't be counted from the particle counter, indicating the robustness of the protocol.

  13. Evaluation of the particle measurement programme (PMP) protocol to remove the vehicles' exhaust aerosol volatile phase.

    PubMed

    Giechaskiel, B; Chirico, R; Decarlo, P F; Clairotte, M; Adam, T; Martini, G; Heringa, M F; Richter, R; Prevot, A S H; Baltensperger, U; Astorga, C

    2010-10-01

    European regulation for Euro 5/6 light duty emissions introduced the measurement of non-volatile particles with diameter >23 nm. The volatile phase is removed by using a heated dilution stage (150 degrees C) and a heated tube (at 300-400 degrees C). We investigated experimentally the removal efficiency for volatile species of the specific protocol by conducting measurements with two Euro 3 diesel light duty vehicles, a Euro 2 moped, and a Euro III heavy duty vehicle with the system's heaters on and off. The particle number distributions were measured with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). An Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was used to identify the non-refractory chemical composition of the particles. A Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) was used to measure the black carbon concentration. The results showed that the condensed material in the accumulation mode (defined here as particles in the diameter range of approximately 50-500 nm) was removed with an efficiency of 50-90%. The (volatile) nucleation mode was also completely evaporated or was decreased to sizes <23 nm; thus these particles wouldn't be counted from the particle counter, indicating the robustness of the protocol. PMID:20692024

  14. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Removed control measures. 52.1890 Section 52.1890 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Administrative Code 3745-17-05 “Non-degradation Policy.” be removed from the Ohio SIP. The rule was...

  15. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Removed control measures. 52.1890 Section 52.1890 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Administrative Code 3745-17-05 “Non-degradation Policy.” be removed from the Ohio SIP. The rule was...

  16. The removal of nitrate by nanoscale iron particles produced using the sodium borohydride method.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyoung-Chan; Park, Sung Hoon; Ahn, Ho-Geun; Chung, Minchul; Kim, Byungwhan; Kim, Sun-Jae; Seo, Seong-Gyu; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2011-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate removal of nitrate by nanoscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in aqueous solution. ZVI particles was produced from wasted acid that is by-products of a pickling line at a steel work. The reaction activity of ZVI particles was evaluated through decomposition experiments of NO3-N aqueous solution. Addition of a larger amount of ZVI particles resulted in a higher decomposition rate. ZVI particles showed higher decomposition efficiencies than commercially purchased ZVI particles at all pH values. Both ZVIs showed a higher decomposition rate at a lower pH. Virtually no decomposition reaction was observed at pH of 4 or higher for purchased ZVI. The ZVI particles produced directly from wasted acid by the sodium borohydride method were not easy to handle because they were very small (10-200 nm) and were oxidized easily in the air. PMID:21456267

  17. Assessment of Biofilter Media Particle Sizes for Removing Ammonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increased concerns over odor and gas emissions from livestock production facilities more efficient technologies of air pollution control are needed to mitigate the deleterious effects of air contaminants. Gas-phase biofilters for treating contaminant gases from poultry and livestock operations ...

  18. ASSESSMENT OF BIOFILTER MEDIA PARTICLE SIZES FOR REMOVING AMMONIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increased concerns over odor and gas emissions from livestock production facilities more efficient technologies of air pollution control are needed to mitigate the deleterious effects of air contaminants. Gas-phase biofilters for treating contaminant gases from poultry and livestock operations ...

  19. A model of particle removal in a dissolved air flotation tank: importance of stratified flow and bubble size.

    PubMed

    Lakghomi, B; Lawryshyn, Y; Hofmann, R

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model and a computational fluid dynamic model of particle removal in dissolved air flotation were developed that included the effects of stratified flow and bubble-particle clustering. The models were applied to study the effect of operating conditions and formation of stratified flow on particle removal. Both modeling approaches demonstrated that the presence of stratified flow enhanced particle removal in the tank. A higher air fraction was shown to be needed at higher loading rates to achieve the same removal efficiency. The model predictions showed that an optimum bubble size was present that increased with an increase in particle size.

  20. Particle removal from water-submerged tubes with a spark-generated bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaseboer, Evert; Pavard, Delphine; Ohl, Siew-Wan; Feng, S. W.; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2009-12-01

    Some experiments involving the removal of particles from a hole in a (solid) plate are presented in this work. The particles are removed using oscillating bubbles, which are generated with an electric spark. The plate and the bubble are submerged in water. At least one side of the plate is surrounded by water as well. In some cases, one side of the plate (the side that is not exposed to the bubble) is exposed to air (air-backed plate). The experimental technique to generate oscillating bubble is briefly described. A relative simple low voltage system is used here, by short-circuiting a charged capacitor under water. The results show that it is indeed possible to remove particles from holes using this technique. Some typical examples will be given in this article, together with a brief explanation of the physics involved, which are different for water-backed and air-backed plates.

  1. Adhesion and removal of glass, silica and PSL particles from silicon dioxide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiangwei

    As circuit minimum feature size continues to shrink, surface cleanliness requirements become more stringent, making surface cleaning more challenging. To develop effective cleaning techniques, it is important to understand particle adhesion and removal mechanisms. Although many studies have been conducted in particle adhesion, the effects of humidity and aging, hydrogen and covalent bonds, and particle's submicron size on adhesion are not well understood. It is necessary to study and understand how the adhesion force changes with time under different conditions in order to develop effective cleaning techniques. The humidity and aging effects on the adhesion and removal of glass particles on flat panel display glass surface, silica particles on thermal oxide silicon wafers and PSL (Polystyrene Latex) particles on silicon wafers are investigated. The results show that silica particles' contact area increases dramatically in high humidity environment over time. This is due to the water reacting with the silica and forming a covalent bond. The results show that silica particles' adhesion force is found to depend on the aging time. After six weeks 95%RH aging, the adhesion force is larger than MP model (for plastic deformation) predicted adhesion force. This is due to the formation of hydrogen bonds and covalent bonds. Removal of glass particles on Flat Panel Display aged in a humid environment using megasonic cleaning is also investigated. The effect of temperature, cleaning time and megasonic power on particle removal is shown. The time and humidity effect on submicron PSL particles' adhesion is also investigated. The combined effect of time and humidity results in increased particle deformation and consequently the increased adhesion force. An empirical model is proposed to describe the relationship between the contact diameter, particle diameter and aging time. The proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental data. The results suggest that a greater

  2. Polymer hollow particles with controllable holes in their surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyuk Im, Sang; Jeong, Unyong; Xia, Younan

    2005-09-01

    Colloidal particles with hollow interiors play important roles in microencapsulation-a process that has found widespread use in applications such as controlled release of drugs, cosmetics, inks, pigments or chemical reagents; protection of biologically active species; and removal of pollutants. The hollow particles are most commonly prepared by coating the surfaces of colloidal templates with thin layers of the desired material (or its precursor), followed by selective removal of the templates by means of calcination or chemical etching. This simple and straightforward approach works for a variety of materials that include polymers, ceramics, composites and metals. For polymers, methods such as emulsion polymerization, phase separation, crosslinking of micelles and self-assembly have also been demonstrated for generating hollow structures. However, diffusion through these closed shells with pores <10 nm is often a slow process. To solve this problem, macroporous capsules have been fabricated by organizing colloids around liquid droplets to form colloidosomes or by controlling the mixing of liquid droplets. Here we report the preparation of another class of macroporous capsules-polymer shells with controllable holes in their surfaces. After loading of functional materials, the holes can be closed by means of thermal annealing or solvent treatment.

  3. Improvements in laser flare removal for particle image velocimetry using fluorescent dye-doped particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosky, B. J.; Lowe, K. T.; Danehy, P. M.; Wohl, C. J.; Tiemsin, P. I.

    2015-11-01

    Laser flare, or scattering of laser light from a surface, can often be a major issue in particle image velocimetry (PIV) involving solid boundaries in the flow or a gas-liquid interface. The use of fluorescent light from dye-doped particles has been demonstrated in water applications, but reproducing the technique in an airflow is more difficult due to particle size constraints and safety concerns. The following work presents fluorescent Kiton Red 620 (KR620)-doped polystyrene latex microspheres as a solution to this issue. The particles are small and narrowly distributed, with a mean diameter of 0.87 μ \\text{m} and diameter distribution standard deviation of 0.30 μ \\text{m} . Furthermore, the KR620 dye exhibits much lower toxicity than other common fluorescent dyes, and would be safe to use in large flow facilities. The fluorescent signal from the particles is measured on average to be 320  ±  10 times weaker than the Mie scattering signal from the particles. This reduction in signal is counterbalanced by greatly enhanced contrast via optical rejection of the incident laser wavelength. Fluorescent PIV with these particles is shown to eliminate laser flare near surfaces, allowing for velocity measurements as close as 100 μ \\text{m} to the surface. In one case, fluorescent PIV led to velocity vector validation rates more than 20 times that of the Mie scattering results in the boundary layer region of an angled surface.

  4. Alternate particle removal technologies for the Airborne Activity Confinement System at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, J.E.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Gelbard, F. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents a review of the filtration technologies available for the removal of particulate material from a gas stream. It was undertaken to identify alternate filtration technologies that may be employed in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. This report is organized into six sections: (1) a discussion of the aerosol source term and its definition, (2) a short discussion of particle and gaseous contaminant removal mechanisms, (3) a brief overview of particle removal technologies, (4) a discussion of the existing AACS and its potential shortcomings, (5) an enumeration of issues to be addressed in upgrading the AACS, and, (6) a detailed discussion of the identified technologies. The purpose of this report is to identity available options to the existing particle removal system. This system is in continuous operation during routine operation of the reactor. As will be seen, there are a number of options and the selection of any technology or combination of technologies will depend on the design aerosol source term (yet to be appropriately defined) as well as the flow requirements and configuration. This report does not select a specific technology. It focuses on particulate removal and qualitatively on the removal of radio-iodine and mist elimination. Candidate technologies have been selected from industrial and nuclear gas cleaning applications.

  5. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastian, S.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2014-04-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The function control allows unattended quality assurance experiments at remote air quality monitoring or research stations under field conditions. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter while removing diffusive particles smaller than 20 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. Another feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. The performance of the function control is illustrated with the aid of a 1-year data set recorded at Annaberg-Buchholz, a station in the Saxon air quality monitoring network. During the period of concern, the total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer slightly overestimated the particle number concentration recorded by the condensation particle counter by 2 % (grand average). Based on our first year of experience with the function control, we developed tolerance criteria that allow a performance evaluation of a tested mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the total particle number concentration. We conclude that the automated function control enhances the quality and reliability of unattended long-term particle number size distribution measurements. This will have beneficial effects for intercomparison studies involving different measurement sites, and help provide a higher

  6. Particle removal challenges with EUV patterned mask for the sub-22nm HP node

    SciTech Connect

    Rastegar, A.; Eichenlaub, S.; Kadaksham, A. J.; Lee, B.; House, M.; Huh, S.; Cha, B.; Yun, H.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    The particle removal efficiency (PRE) of cleaning processes diminishes whenever the minimum defect size for a specific technology node becomes smaller. For the sub-22 nm half-pitch (HP) node, it was demonstrated that exposure to high power megasonic up to 200 W/cm{sup 2} did not damage 60 nm wide TaBN absorber lines corresponding to the 16 nm HP node on wafer. An ammonium hydroxide mixture and megasonics removes {ge}50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a very high PRE, A sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM) in addition to ammonium hydroxide mixture (APM) and megasonic is required to remove {ge}28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles with a high PRE. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOFSIMS) studies show that the presence of O{sub 2} during a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ({lambda} = 172 nm) surface conditioning step will result in both surface oxidation and Ru removal, which drastically reduce extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask life time under multiple cleanings. New EUV mask cleaning processes show negligible or no EUV reflectivity loss and no increase in surface roughness after up to 15 cleaning cycles. Reviewing of defect with a high current density scanning electron microscope (SEM) drastically reduces PRE and deforms SiO{sub 2} particles. 28 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on EUV masks age very fast and will deform over time, Care must be taken when reviewing EUV mask defects by SEM. Potentially new particles should be identified to calibrate short wavelength inspection tools, Based on actinic image review, 50 nm SiO{sub 2} particles on top of the EUV mask will be printed on the wafer.

  7. Assessment of Different Biofilter Media Particle Sizes for Ammonia Removal Optimization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The main objective of this study is to determine a range of particle sizes that provides low resistance to the air flow but also sufficient surface area for microbial attachment, which is needed for higher biofiltration efficiency. This will be done by assessing ammonia removal and pressure drop in ...

  8. Effect of weathering on mobilization of biochar particles and bacterial removal in a stormwater biofilter.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2015-11-15

    To improve bacterial removal, a traditional stormwater biofilter can be augmented with biochar, but it is unknown whether bacterial removal remains consistent as the biochar weathers during intermittent exposure to stormwater under dry-wet and freeze-thaw cycles. To examine the effect of weathering on bacterial removal capacity of biochar, we subjected biochar-augmented sand filters (or simplified biofilters) to multiple freeze-thaw or dry-wet cycles for a month and then compared their bacterial removal capacity with the removal capacity of unweathered biofilters. To isolate the effect of physical and chemical weathering processes from that of biological processes, the biofilters were operated without any developed biofilm. Biochar particles were mobilized during intermittent infiltration of stormwater, but the mobilization depended on temperature and antecedent conditions. During stormwater infiltration without intermediate drying, exposure to natural organic matter (NOM) in the stormwater decreased the bacterial removal capacity of biochar, partly due to exhaustion of attachment sites by NOM adsorption. In contrast, exposure to the same amount of NOM during stormwater infiltration with intermediate drying resulted in higher bacterial removal. This result suggests that dry-wet cycles may enhance recovery of the previously exhausted attachment sites, possibly due to diffusion of NOM from biochar surfaces into intraparticle pores during intermediate drying periods. Overall, these results indicate that physical weathering has net positive effect on bacterial removal by biochar-augmented biofilters.

  9. Effect of weathering on mobilization of biochar particles and bacterial removal in a stormwater biofilter.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2015-11-15

    To improve bacterial removal, a traditional stormwater biofilter can be augmented with biochar, but it is unknown whether bacterial removal remains consistent as the biochar weathers during intermittent exposure to stormwater under dry-wet and freeze-thaw cycles. To examine the effect of weathering on bacterial removal capacity of biochar, we subjected biochar-augmented sand filters (or simplified biofilters) to multiple freeze-thaw or dry-wet cycles for a month and then compared their bacterial removal capacity with the removal capacity of unweathered biofilters. To isolate the effect of physical and chemical weathering processes from that of biological processes, the biofilters were operated without any developed biofilm. Biochar particles were mobilized during intermittent infiltration of stormwater, but the mobilization depended on temperature and antecedent conditions. During stormwater infiltration without intermediate drying, exposure to natural organic matter (NOM) in the stormwater decreased the bacterial removal capacity of biochar, partly due to exhaustion of attachment sites by NOM adsorption. In contrast, exposure to the same amount of NOM during stormwater infiltration with intermediate drying resulted in higher bacterial removal. This result suggests that dry-wet cycles may enhance recovery of the previously exhausted attachment sites, possibly due to diffusion of NOM from biochar surfaces into intraparticle pores during intermediate drying periods. Overall, these results indicate that physical weathering has net positive effect on bacterial removal by biochar-augmented biofilters. PMID:26320722

  10. Extrinsic stain removal with a toothpowder: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Khalil; Bokhari, Syed Akhtar Hussain; Haleem, Abdul; Kareem, Abdul; Khan, Ayyaz Ali; Hosein, Tasleem; Khan, Muhammad Usama

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The efficacy of a commercially available toothpowder was compared with toothpaste in removing extrinsic dental stains. Methods In this single-blind, randomized controlled trial, 77 volunteers were included from a residential professional college. All study subjects (control toothpaste users and test toothpowder users) plaque control measures. All study subjects were instructed to rinse with 5 ml 0.12% chlorhexidine mouthwash for 1 minute, twice and one cup of double tea bag solution three times daily for three weeks. Subjects were randomized into test (n=36) and control (n=36) groups. Toothpaste (control) and toothpowder (test) was used for two weeks to see the effects on removing stains on the labial surfaces of 12 anterior teeth. For measuring dental extrinsic stains Lobene Stain Index (SI) was used. Results The amount of stain following the use of toothpaste and toothpowder was more controlled with the experimental toothpowder. For all sites combined, there was evidence that the experimental toothpowder was significantly superior to toothpaste in reducing stain area (p<.001), stain intensity (p<.001) and composite/product (area × intensity) (p<.001). Conclusion Stain removing efficacy of toothpowder was significantly higher as compared with toothpaste. A toothpowder may be expected to be of benefit in controlling and removing extrinsic dental staining. PMID:25505862

  11. Impurity and particle control for INTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.

    1985-02-01

    The INTOR impurity control system studies have been focused on the development of an impurity control system which would be able to provide the necessary heat removal and He pumping while satisfying the requirements for (1) minimum plasma contamination by impurities, (2) reasonable component lifetime (approx. 1 year), and (3) minimum size and cost. The major systems examined were poloidal divertors and pumped limiters. The poloidal divertor was chosen as the reference option since it offered the possibility of low sputtering rates due to the formation of a cool, dense plasma near the collector plates. Estimates of the sputtering rates associated with pumped limiters indicated that they would be too high for a reasonable system. Development of an engineering design concept was done for both the poloidal divertor and the pumped limiter.

  12. A concept of an automated function control for ambient aerosol measurements using mobility particle size spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schladitz, A.; Merkel, M.; Bastian, S.; Birmili, W.; Weinhold, K.; Löschau, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-12-01

    An automated function control unit was developed to regularly check the ambient particle number concentration derived from a mobility particle size spectrometer as well as its zero-point behaviour. The aim of the new feature is to conduct unattended quality control experiments under field conditions at remote air quality monitoring or research stations. The automated function control also has the advantage of being able to get a faster system stability response than the recommended on-site comparisons with reference instruments. The method is based on a comparison of the total particle number concentration measured by a mobility particle size spectrometer and a condensation particle counter removing the diffusive particles approximately smaller than 25 nm in diameter. In practice, the small particles are removed by a set of diffusion screens, as traditionally used in a diffusion battery. The other feature of the automated function control is to check the zero-point behaviour of the ambient aerosol passing through a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. An exemplary one-year data set is presented for the measurement site Annaberg-Buchholz as part of the Saxon air quality monitoring network. The total particle number concentration derived from the mobility particle size spectrometer overestimates the particle number concentration by only 2% (grand average offset). Furthermore, tolerance criteria are presented to judge the performance of the mobility particle size spectrometer with respect to the particle number concentration. An upgrade of a mobility particle size spectrometer with an automated function control enhances the quality of long-term particle number size distribution measurements. Quality assured measurements are a precondition for intercomparison studies of different sites. Comparable measurements will improve cohort health and also climate-relevant research studies.

  13. Toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.E.; Silbar, R.R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a program aiming toward automatic control of particle accelerator beams. A hybrid approach is used, combining knowledge- based system programming techniques and traditional numerical simulations. We use an expert system shell for the symbolic processing and have incorporated the FORTRAN beam optics code TRANSPORT for numerical simulation. The paper discusses the symbolic model we built, the reasoning components, how the knowledge base accesses information from an operating beamline, and the experience gained in merging the two worlds of numeric and symbolic processing. We also discuss plans for a future real-time system. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Evidence of DOM Removal by Cretaceous CaCO3 Particles During Chalk-Ex 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goes, J. I.; Balch, W. M.; Bowler, B.; Drapeau, D.; Booth, E.

    2002-12-01

    Any process that regulates the distribution of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater assumes considerable significance, given the role of the DOM pool in radiative transfer, remote sensing and carbon sequestration into the oceans. Since particles that constitute the DOM pool are not dense enough for sinking to be the dominant removal process, their transport into the deep ocean interior has often been associated with advection of the source water mass. In recent years, a growing body of evidence linking DOM with inorganic particles has led to the belief that scavenging and ballasting of DOM by inorganic mineral particles could play an important role in DOM removal from the upper ocean. ChalkEx-2001 was a large-scale manipulative experiment, which involved dispersing a known quantity of Cretaceous chalk into seawater and following its fate by shipboard optical surveys, Langrangian drifters and sediment traps (see Balch et al. presentation for experiment overview). These experiments provided us with the opportunity to assess the importance of DOC binding onto CaCO3 particles. Flow Field-Flow Fractograms of sub-micron particles and dissolved organic carbon measurements in samples obtained from discrete depths prior to, and following deployment of the chalk, provided clear evidence of DOM scavenging by CaCO3 particles. Proof of DOM binding onto the chalk particles was also apparent from the continuous absorption measurements at 412nm of 0.2æm pre-filtered seawater, which showed extreme "lows" in the distribution of colored dissolved organic matter coincident with patches of chalk (see also poster by Bowler et al.). The DOM scavenging capacity of the cretaceous coccolith chalk particles was also evident in independent laboratory investigations. The significance of these findings is that CaCO3 particles, by virtue of their ability to scavenge DOM, could potentially accelerate the transport of DOM to the deep sea.

  15. Eutrophication control and the fallacy of nitrogen removal

    SciTech Connect

    Sincero, A.P.

    1984-11-01

    There has been a great deal of controversy over the issue of nitrogen control from sewage treatment plants discharges to alleviate excessive algae growths in receiving bodies of water. Some of the controversy seems to have risen from a thorough misunderstanding of the microbiology involved in the utilization of nitrogen by microbes. In a haste to control eutrophication, some regulators have required the removal of nitrogen from the effluent of sewage treatment plants; e.g., the Patuxent Nitrogen Removal Policy of the State of Maryland.

  16. Optimization of circular plate separators with cross flow for removal of oil droplets and solid particles.

    PubMed

    Ngu, Hei; Wong, Kien Kuok; Law, Puong Ling

    2012-04-01

    A circular gravity-phase separator using coalescing medium with cross flow was developed to remove oil and suspended solids from wastewaters. Coalescence medium in the form of inclined plates promotes rising of oil droplets through coalescence and settling of solid particles through coagulation. It exhibits 22.67% higher removal of total suspended solids (TSS) compared to separators without coalescing medium. Moreover, it removed more than 70% of oil compared to conventional American Petroleum Institute separators, which exhibit an average of 33% oil removal. The flowrate required to attain an effluent oil concentration of 10 mg/L (Q(o10)) at different influent oil concentrations (C(io)) can be represented by Q(o10) x 10(-5) = -0.0012C(io) + 0.352. The flowrate required to attain an effluent TSS concentration of 50 mg/L (Q(ss50)) at different influent TSS concentrations (C(iss)) can be represented by Q(ss50) x 10(-5) = 1.0 x 10(6) C(iss)(-2.9576). The smallest removable solid particle size was 4.87 microm. PMID:22834217

  17. Experimental investigation of submicron and ultrafine soot particle removal by tree leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hee-Jae; Yook, Se-Jin; Ahn, Kang-Ho

    2011-12-01

    Soot particles emitted from vehicles are one of the major sources of air pollution in urban areas. In this study, five kinds of trees were selected as Pinus densiflora, Taxus cuspidata, Platanus occidentalis, Zelkova serrata, and Ginkgo biloba, and the removal of submicron (<1 μm) and ultrafine (<0.1 μm) soot particles by tree leaves was quantitatively compared in terms of deposition velocity. Soot particles were produced by a diffusion flame burner using acetylene as the fuel. The sizes of monodisperse soot particles classified with the Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMA) were 30, 55, 90, 150, 250, 400, and 600 nm. A deposition chamber was designed to simulate the omni-directional flow condition around the tree leaves. Deposition velocities onto the needle-leaf trees were higher than those onto the broadleaf trees. P. densiflora showed the greatest deposition velocity, followed by T. cuspidata, Platanus occidentalis, Zelkova serrata, and Ginkgo biloba. In addition, from the comparison of deposition velocity between two groups of Platanus occidentalis leaves, i.e. one group of leaves with front sides only and the other with back sides only, it was supposed in case of the broadleaf trees that the removal of airborne soot particles of submicron and ultrafine sizes could be affected by the surface roughness of tree leaves, i.e. the veins and other structures on the leaves.

  18. Development of NSTX Particle Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel; R. Maingi; M. Bell; D. Gates; K. Hill; B. LeBlanc; D. Mueller; R. Kaita; S. Paul; S. Sabbagh; C.H. Skinner; V. Soukhanovskii; B. Stratton; R. Raman

    2004-07-30

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) current-drive discharges will require density control for acceptable efficiency. In NSTX, this involves primarily controlling impurity influxes and recycling. We have compared boronization on hot and cold surfaces, varying helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC) durations, helium discharge cleaning, brief daily boronization, and between discharge boronization to reduce and control spontaneous density rises. Access to Ohmic H-modes was enabled by boronization on hot surfaces, however, the duration of the effectiveness of hot and cold boronization was comparable. A 15 minute HeGDC between discharges was needed for reproducible L-H transitions. Helium discharge conditioning yielded slower density rises than 15 minutes of HeGDC. Brief daily boronization followed by a comparable duration of applied HeGDC restored and enhanced good conditions. Additional brief boronizations between discharges did not improve plasma performance (reduced recycling, reduced impurity luminosities, earlier L-H transitions, longer plasma current flattops, higher stored energies) if conditions were already good. Between discharge boronization required increases in the NSTX duty cycle due to the need for additional HeGDC to remove codeposited D.

  19. Control of respirable particles and radon progeny with portable air cleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-02-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles and radon progeny. Following injection of cigarette smoke and radon in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particles and radon progeny concentrations were measured with and without air cleaner operation. Particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size. In tests with no air cleaner the natural decay rate for cigarette smoke was observed to be 0.2 hr/sup -1/. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filters, a residential ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. The electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters tested had significant particle removal rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in removing radon progeny. At low particle concentrations plateout of the unattached radon progeny is an important removal mechanism. Based on data from these tests, the plateout rate for unattached progeny was found to be 15 hr/sup -1/. The unattached fraction and the overall removal rate due to deposition of attached and unattached nuclides have been estimated for each radon decay product as a function of particle concentration. While air cleaning can be effective in reducing total radon progeny, concentrations of unattached radon progeny can increase with increasing air cleaning. 39 references, 26 figures, 9 tables.

  20. Monodisperse Block Copolymer Particles with Controllable Size, Shape, and Nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Man; Kim, Yongjoo; Kim, Bumjoon; PNEL Team

    Shape-anisotropic particles are important class of novel colloidal building block for their functionality is more strongly governed by their shape, size and nanostructure compared to conventional spherical particles. Recently, facile strategy for producing non-spherical polymeric particles by interfacial engineering received significant attention. However, achieving uniform size distribution of particles together with controlled shape and nanostructure has not been achieved. Here, we introduce versatile system for producing monodisperse BCP particles with controlled size, shape and morphology. Polystyrene-b-polybutadiene (PS-b-PB) self-assembled to either onion-like or striped ellipsoid particle, where final structure is governed by amount of adsorbed sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant at the particle/surrounding interface. Further control of molecular weight and particle size enabled fine-tuning of aspect ratio of ellipsoid particle. Underlying physics of free energy for morphology formation and entropic penalty associated with bending BCP chains strongly affects particle structure and specification.

  1. Ultrafine particle removal by residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning filters.

    PubMed

    Stephens, B; Siegel, J A

    2013-12-01

    This work uses an in situ filter test method to measure the size-resolved removal efficiency of indoor-generated ultrafine particles (approximately 7-100 nm) for six new commercially available filters installed in a recirculating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in an unoccupied test house. The fibrous HVAC filters were previously rated by the manufacturers according to ASHRAE Standard 52.2 and ranged from shallow (2.5 cm) fiberglass panel filters (MERV 4) to deep-bed (12.7 cm) electrostatically charged synthetic media filters (MERV 16). Measured removal efficiency ranged from 0 to 10% for most ultrafine particles (UFP) sizes with the lowest rated filters (MERV 4 and 6) to 60-80% for most UFP sizes with the highest rated filter (MERV 16). The deeper bed filters generally achieved higher removal efficiencies than the panel filters, while maintaining a low pressure drop and higher airflow rate in the operating HVAC system. Assuming constant efficiency, a modeling effort using these measured values for new filters and other inputs from real buildings shows that MERV 13-16 filters could reduce the indoor proportion of outdoor UFPs (in the absence of indoor sources) by as much as a factor of 2-3 in a typical single-family residence relative to the lowest efficiency filters, depending in part on particle size. PMID:23590456

  2. Ultrafine particle removal by residential heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning filters.

    PubMed

    Stephens, B; Siegel, J A

    2013-12-01

    This work uses an in situ filter test method to measure the size-resolved removal efficiency of indoor-generated ultrafine particles (approximately 7-100 nm) for six new commercially available filters installed in a recirculating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system in an unoccupied test house. The fibrous HVAC filters were previously rated by the manufacturers according to ASHRAE Standard 52.2 and ranged from shallow (2.5 cm) fiberglass panel filters (MERV 4) to deep-bed (12.7 cm) electrostatically charged synthetic media filters (MERV 16). Measured removal efficiency ranged from 0 to 10% for most ultrafine particles (UFP) sizes with the lowest rated filters (MERV 4 and 6) to 60-80% for most UFP sizes with the highest rated filter (MERV 16). The deeper bed filters generally achieved higher removal efficiencies than the panel filters, while maintaining a low pressure drop and higher airflow rate in the operating HVAC system. Assuming constant efficiency, a modeling effort using these measured values for new filters and other inputs from real buildings shows that MERV 13-16 filters could reduce the indoor proportion of outdoor UFPs (in the absence of indoor sources) by as much as a factor of 2-3 in a typical single-family residence relative to the lowest efficiency filters, depending in part on particle size.

  3. Removal of particles from holes in submerged plates with oscillating bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavard, Delphine; Klaseboer, Evert; Ohl, Siew-Wan; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2009-08-01

    This study is motivated by a common problem in submerged tubes and structures, which is the blockage of the tubes by pollutant particles or debris from the surrounding fluid. To clear the obstruction from the tube, an expanding bubble is used to propel the obstruction away from the tube (the tube is represented as a submerged transparent plate with a hole in our experiments). In some cases the obstruction removal effect is reinforced by the impacting jet of such a collapsing bubble. The bubble is generated via a simple low voltage electric spark discharge circuit. The pressure generated by the oscillating bubble effectively pushes the particle away from the tube, thereby successfully clearing the obstruction. High-speed photography is used to record and analyze the phenomenon. The speed of the particle is found to be around 1 m/s shortly after the collapse of the bubble. Interestingly, there is a clear difference between air-backed plates and water-backed plates in terms of bubble and particle dynamics. The bubbles in the current study are typically of millimeter size. Since the physics are similar for smaller bubbles, the process can possibly be downsized for other microapplications such as the removal of blood clots in vessels [S. R. Visuri et al., U.S. Patent No. 6428531 (August 6, 2002)].

  4. A Particle Population Control Method for Dynamic Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweezy, Jeremy; Nolen, Steve; Adams, Terry; Zukaitis, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    A general particle population control method has been derived from splitting and Russian Roulette for dynamic Monte Carlo particle transport. A well-known particle population control method, known as the particle population comb, has been shown to be a special case of this general method. This general method has been incorporated in Los Alamos National Laboratory's Monte Carlo Application Toolkit (MCATK) and examples of it's use are shown for both super-critical and sub-critical systems.

  5. Particle count monitoring of reverse osmosis water treatment for removal of low-level radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, E.J.; Hoffman, C.R.; Hergert, T.R.

    1995-03-01

    Laser diode particle counting technology and analytical measurements were used to evaluate a pilot-scale reverse osmosis (RO) water treatment system for removal of particulate matter and sub-picocurie low-level radionuclides. Stormwater mixed with Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) effluent from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), formerly a Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons production facility, were treated. No chemical pretreatment of the water was utilized during this study. The treatment system was staged as follows: multimedia filtration, granular activated carbon adsorption, hollow tube ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis membrane filtration. Various recovery rates and two RO membrane models were tested. Analytical measurements included total suspended solids (TSS), total dissolved solids (TDS), gross alpha ({alpha}) and gross beta ({beta}) activity, uranium isotopes {sup 233/234}U and {sup 238}U, plutonium {sup 239/240}Pu, and americium {sup 241}Am. Particle measurement between 1--150 microns ({mu}) included differential particle counts (DPC), and total particle counts (TPC) before and after treatment at various sampling points throughout the test. Performance testing showed this treatment system produced a high quality effluent in clarity and purity. Compared to raw water levels, TSS was reduced to below detection of 5 milligrams per liter (mg/L) and TDS reduced by 98%. Gross {alpha} was essentially removed 100%, and gross {beta} was reduced an average of 94%. Uranium activity was reduced by 99%. TPC between 1-150{mu} were reduced by an average 99.8% to less than 1,000 counts per milliliter (mL), similar in purity to a good drinking water treatment plant. Raw water levels of {sup 239/240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were below reliable quantitation limits and thus no removal efficiencies could be determined for these species.

  6. Removal of Microcystis aeruginosa using nano-Fe3O4 particles as a coagulant aid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Dan; Guo, Xiaochen; He, Yiliang; Ong, Choon Nam; Xu, Yongpeng; Pal, Amrita

    2015-12-01

    Blue-green algae bloom is of great concern globally since they adversely affect the water ecosystem and also drinking water treatment processes. This work investigated the removal of Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) by combining the conventional coagulant polyaluminum chloride (PACl) with nano-Fe3O4 particles as a coagulant aid. The results showed that the addition of nano-Fe3O4 significantly improved the removal efficiency of M. aeruginosa by reducing the amount of PACl dosage and simultaneously hastening the sedimentation. At the M. aeruginosa density of an order of magnitude of 10(7), 10(6), and 10(5) pcs/mL, respectively, the corresponding PACl dose of 200, 20, and 2 mg/L and the mass ratio of PACl to nano-Fe3O4 of 4:1, the removal efficiency of M. aeruginosa could be increased by 33.0, 44.7, and 173.1%, respectively. Compared to PACl, PACl combined with the nano-Fe3O4 as a coagulant aid had higher removal efficiency at a wider pH range. SEM images showed that nano-Fe3O4 first combined with PACl to form clusters and further generated the flocs with algae. Results from the laser particle analyzer further suggested that the floc size increased with the addition of nano-Fe3O4. It was noted that the addition of nano-Fe3O4 led to aluminum species change after PACl hydrolyzed in the algae solution, from Ala to Alb and Alc subsequently. As a coagulant aid, the nano-Fe3O4, in conjunction with PACl, apparently provided nucleation sites for larger flocs to integrate with M. aeruginosa. In addition, increased floc density improved the removal of M. aeruginosa. PMID:26194241

  7. Removal of Microcystis aeruginosa using nano-Fe3O4 particles as a coagulant aid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Jiang, Dan; Guo, Xiaochen; He, Yiliang; Ong, Choon Nam; Xu, Yongpeng; Pal, Amrita

    2015-12-01

    Blue-green algae bloom is of great concern globally since they adversely affect the water ecosystem and also drinking water treatment processes. This work investigated the removal of Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) by combining the conventional coagulant polyaluminum chloride (PACl) with nano-Fe3O4 particles as a coagulant aid. The results showed that the addition of nano-Fe3O4 significantly improved the removal efficiency of M. aeruginosa by reducing the amount of PACl dosage and simultaneously hastening the sedimentation. At the M. aeruginosa density of an order of magnitude of 10(7), 10(6), and 10(5) pcs/mL, respectively, the corresponding PACl dose of 200, 20, and 2 mg/L and the mass ratio of PACl to nano-Fe3O4 of 4:1, the removal efficiency of M. aeruginosa could be increased by 33.0, 44.7, and 173.1%, respectively. Compared to PACl, PACl combined with the nano-Fe3O4 as a coagulant aid had higher removal efficiency at a wider pH range. SEM images showed that nano-Fe3O4 first combined with PACl to form clusters and further generated the flocs with algae. Results from the laser particle analyzer further suggested that the floc size increased with the addition of nano-Fe3O4. It was noted that the addition of nano-Fe3O4 led to aluminum species change after PACl hydrolyzed in the algae solution, from Ala to Alb and Alc subsequently. As a coagulant aid, the nano-Fe3O4, in conjunction with PACl, apparently provided nucleation sites for larger flocs to integrate with M. aeruginosa. In addition, increased floc density improved the removal of M. aeruginosa.

  8. Methodologies for Removing/Desorbing and Transporting Particles from Surfaces to Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carla J.; Cespedes, Ernesto R.

    2012-12-01

    Explosive trace detection (ETD) continues to be a key technology supporting the fight against terrorist bombing threats. Very selective and sensitive ETD instruments have been developed to detect explosive threats concealed on personnel, in vehicles, in luggage, and in cargo containers, as well as for forensic analysis (e.g. post blast inspection, bomb-maker identification, etc.) in a broad range of homeland security, law enforcement, and military applications. A number of recent studies have highlighted the fact that significant improvements in ETD systems' capabilities will be achieved, not by increasing the selectivity/sensitivity of the sensors, but by improved techniques for particle/vapor sampling, pre-concentration, and transport to the sensors. This review article represents a compilation of studies focused on characterizing the adhesive properties of explosive particles, the methodologies for removing/desorbing these particles from a range of surfaces, and approaches for transporting them to the instrument. The objectives of this review are to summarize fundamental work in explosive particle characterization, to describe experimental work performed in harvesting and transport of these particles, and to highlight those approaches that indicate high potential for improving ETD capabilities.

  9. Bioinspired production of magnetic laccase-biotitania particles for the removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ardao, Inés; Magnin, Delphine; Agathos, Spiros N

    2015-10-01

    Microbial laccases are powerful enzymes capable of degrading lignin and other recalcitrant compounds including endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Efficient EDC removal on an industrial scale requires robust, stable, easy to handle and cost-effective immobilized biocatalysts. In this direction, magnetic biocatalysts are attractive due to their easy separation through an external magnetic field. Recently, a bioinspired immobilization technique that mimics the natural biomineralization reactions in diatoms has emerged as a fast and versatile tool for generating robust, cheap, and highly stable (nano) biocatalysts. In this work, bioinspired formation of a biotitania matrix is triggered on the surface of magnetic particles in the presence of laccase in order to produce laccase-biotitania (lac-bioTiO2 ) biocatalysts suitable for environmental applications using a novel, fast and versatile enzyme entrapment technique. Highly active lac-bioTiO2 particles have been produced and the effect of different parameters (enzyme loading, titania precursor concentration, pH, duration of the biotitania formation, and laccase adsorption steps) on the apparent activity yield of these biocatalysts were evaluated, the concentration of the titania precursor being the most influential. The lac-bioTiO2 particles were able to catalyze the removal of bisphenol A, 17α-ethinylestradiol and diclofenac in a mixture of six model EDCs and retained 90% of activity after five reaction cycles and 60% after 10 cycles. PMID:26058804

  10. Bioinspired production of magnetic laccase-biotitania particles for the removal of endocrine disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ardao, Inés; Magnin, Delphine; Agathos, Spiros N

    2015-10-01

    Microbial laccases are powerful enzymes capable of degrading lignin and other recalcitrant compounds including endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Efficient EDC removal on an industrial scale requires robust, stable, easy to handle and cost-effective immobilized biocatalysts. In this direction, magnetic biocatalysts are attractive due to their easy separation through an external magnetic field. Recently, a bioinspired immobilization technique that mimics the natural biomineralization reactions in diatoms has emerged as a fast and versatile tool for generating robust, cheap, and highly stable (nano) biocatalysts. In this work, bioinspired formation of a biotitania matrix is triggered on the surface of magnetic particles in the presence of laccase in order to produce laccase-biotitania (lac-bioTiO2 ) biocatalysts suitable for environmental applications using a novel, fast and versatile enzyme entrapment technique. Highly active lac-bioTiO2 particles have been produced and the effect of different parameters (enzyme loading, titania precursor concentration, pH, duration of the biotitania formation, and laccase adsorption steps) on the apparent activity yield of these biocatalysts were evaluated, the concentration of the titania precursor being the most influential. The lac-bioTiO2 particles were able to catalyze the removal of bisphenol A, 17α-ethinylestradiol and diclofenac in a mixture of six model EDCs and retained 90% of activity after five reaction cycles and 60% after 10 cycles.

  11. Particle fueling and impurity control in PDX

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Budny, R.; Couture, P.; Darrow, D.; Dylla, H.; Goldston, R.; Grek, B.; Hawryluk, R.

    1984-12-01

    Fueling requirements and impurity levels in neutral-beam-heated discharges in the PDX tokamak have been compared for plasmas formed with conventional graphite rail limiters, a particle scoop limiter, and an open or closed poloidal divertor. Gas flows necessary to obtain a given density are highest for diverted discharges and lowest for the scoop limiter. Hydrogen pellet injection provides an efficient alternate fueling technique, and a multiple pellet injector has produced high density discharges for an absorbed neutral beam power of up to 600 kW, above which higher speeds or more massive pellets are required for penetration to the plasma core. Power balance studies indicate that 30 to 40% of the total input power is radiated while approx. 15% is absorbed by the limiting surface, except in the open divertor case, where 60% flows to the neutralizer plate. In all operating configurations, Z/sub eff/ usually rises at the onset of neutral beam injection. Both open divertor plasmas and those formed on a well conditioned water-cooled limiter have Z/sub eff/ less than or equal to 2 at the end of neutral injection. A definitive comparison of divertors and limiters for impurity control purposes requires longer beam pulses or higher power levels than available on present machines.

  12. Particle fueling and impurity control in PDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonck, R. J.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Budny, R.; Couture, P.; Darrow, D.; Dylla, H.; Goldston, R.; Grek, B.; Hawryluk, R.; Ida, K.; Jaehnig, K.; Johnson, D.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Leblanc, B.; Mansfield, D.; Mcbride, T.; Mcguire, K.; Milora, S.; Mueller, D.; Okabayashi, M.; Owens, D.; Post, D.; Reusch, M.; Schmidt, G.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; Tenney, F.; Ulrickson, M.

    1984-12-01

    Fueling requirements and impurity levels in neutral-beam-heated discharges in the PDX tokamak have been compared for plasmas formed with conventional graphite rail limiters, a particle scoop limiter, and an open or closed poloidal divertor. Gas flows necessary to obtain a given density are highest for diverted discharges and lowest for the scoop limiter. Hydrogen pellet injection provides an efficient alternative fueling technique, and a multiple pellet injector has produced high density discharges for an absorbed neutral beam power of up to 600 kW, above which higher speeds or more massive pellets are required for penetration to the plasma core. Power balance studies indicate that 30-40% of the total input power is radiated while ~15% is absorbed by the limiting surface, except in the open divertor case, where 60% flows to the neutralizer plate. In all operating configurations, Zeff usually rises at the onset of neutral beam injection. Both open divertor pl;asmas and those formed on a well conditioned water-cooled limiter have Zeff ⪅ 2 at the end of neutral injection. A definitive comparison of divertors and limiters for impurity control purposes requires longer beam pulses or higher power levels than available on present machines.

  13. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the laser shock cleaning process for nanoscale particle removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongsik; Oh, Bukuk; Jang, Deoksuk; Lee, Jeong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Myoung

    2007-07-01

    The laser shock cleaning (LSC) process has been shown to be effective for removing submicron-sized contaminant particles from solid surfaces and thus bears strong potential in various applications. In this work, experimental and theoretical analysis are conducted to reveal the underlying physical mechanisms of the LSC process, with emphasis on the laser-induced hydrodynamics and the effect of external gas-jet injection through a nozzle. A two-dimensional theoretical model is proposed for rigorous simulation of the hydrodynamic phenomena occurring in the LSC process. The hydrodynamics computed by the model is in qualitative agreement with experimental observations and reveal the details of the physics involved in the cleaning process. The effect of gas blowing on the cleaning performance is analyzed both experimentally and theoretically. The results indicate that the gas flow can significantly change the hydrodynamics and increase the cleaning efficiency by reducing the chance of particle redeposition.

  14. One active debris removal control system design and error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weilin; Chen, Lei; Li, Kebo; Lei, Yongjun

    2016-11-01

    The increasing expansion of debris presents a significant challenge to space safety and sustainability. To address it, active debris removal, usually involving a chaser performing autonomous rendezvous with targeted debris to be removed is a feasible solution. In this paper, we explore a mid-range autonomous rendezvous control system based on augmented proportional navigation (APN), establishing a three-dimensional kinematic equation set constructed in a rotating coordinate system. In APN, feedback control is applied in the direction of line of sight (LOS), thus analytical solutions of LOS rate and relative motion are expectedly obtained. To evaluate the effectiveness of the control system, we adopt Zero-Effort-Miss (ZEM) in this research as the index, the uncertainty of which is directly determined by that of LOS rate. Accordingly, we apply covariance analysis (CA) method to analyze the propagation of LOS rate uncertainty. Consequently, we find that the accuracy of the control system can be verified even with uncertainty and the CA method is drastically more computationally efficient compared with nonlinear Monte-Carlo method. Additionally, to justify the superiority of the system, we further discuss more simulation cases to show the robustness and feasibility of APN proposed in the paper.

  15. Aging and removal of Black Carbon measured using a Single Particle Soot Photometer in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, Y.; Miyakawa, T.; Taketani, F.; Oshima, N.; PAN, X.; Komazaki, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Takami, A.; Yoshino, A.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol is one of the most important aerosols, affecting the Earth's radiative budget both directly through light absorption and indirectly by acting as cloud condensation and ice nuclei. Microphysical parameters of soot aerosols are important to assess their roles in atmosphere. A single particle soot photometer (SP2, Droplet Measurement Technologies Inc.) can be used to detect and quantify the mass of refractory BC (rBC) in a soot-containing particle. We conducted ground-measurements of rBC-containing particles using the SP2 at Yokosuka (near industrial sources, early summer of 2014, Fig1) and at Fukue island (outflow from Asian continent, spring of 2015, Fig1). During Fukue observation, we measured carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratio (by 48C, Themo Scientific, Inc.) which is useful for investigating polluted air masses. Air mass histories were analyzed with backward trajectories from the sampling point and precipitation along the trajectory calculated using the NOAA Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model with the meteorological data sets from NCEP's GDAS. We analysed number-/mass-size distributions and mixing states of rBC-containing particles considering the differences in air mass characteristics and history. The observed rBC mass concentrations (at STP) were ranging from ~50 ng m-3 at Fukue island to ~2000 ng m-3 near industrial sources. The size distributions of rBC-containing particles were systematically changed depending on the sites and air mass histories. Modal mass-equivalent diameters of the observed mass-size distributions showed minima (~0.16 μm) near source area and maxima (~0.21 μm) at Fukue island for Asian outflow period without wet removal. In the presentation, we synthetically discuss the relationship between rBC microphysics and air mass characteristics and histories.

  16. Dielectrophoretic sample preparation for environmental monitoring of microorganisms: Soil particle removal.

    PubMed

    Fatoyinbo, Henry O; McDonnell, Martin C; Hughes, Michael P

    2014-07-01

    Detection of pathogens from environmental samples is often hampered by sensors interacting with environmental particles such as soot, pollen, or environmental dust such as soil or clay. These particles may be of similar size to the target bacterium, preventing removal by filtration, but may non-specifically bind to sensor surfaces, fouling them and causing artefactual results. In this paper, we report the selective manipulation of soil particles using an AC electrokinetic microfluidic system. Four heterogeneous soil samples (smectic clay, kaolinitic clay, peaty loam, and sandy loam) were characterised using dielectrophoresis to identify the electrical difference to a target organism. A flow-cell device was then constructed to evaluate dielectrophoretic separation of bacteria and clay in a continous flow through mode. The average separation efficiency of the system across all soil types was found to be 68.7% with a maximal separation efficiency for kaolinitic clay at 87.6%. This represents the first attempt to separate soil particles from bacteria using dielectrophoresis and indicate that the technique shows significant promise; with appropriate system optimisation, we believe that this preliminary study represents an opportunity to develop a simple yet highly effective sample processing system. PMID:25379100

  17. Dielectrophoretic sample preparation for environmental monitoring of microorganisms: Soil particle removal

    PubMed Central

    Fatoyinbo, Henry O.; McDonnell, Martin C.; Hughes, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of pathogens from environmental samples is often hampered by sensors interacting with environmental particles such as soot, pollen, or environmental dust such as soil or clay. These particles may be of similar size to the target bacterium, preventing removal by filtration, but may non-specifically bind to sensor surfaces, fouling them and causing artefactual results. In this paper, we report the selective manipulation of soil particles using an AC electrokinetic microfluidic system. Four heterogeneous soil samples (smectic clay, kaolinitic clay, peaty loam, and sandy loam) were characterised using dielectrophoresis to identify the electrical difference to a target organism. A flow-cell device was then constructed to evaluate dielectrophoretic separation of bacteria and clay in a continous flow through mode. The average separation efficiency of the system across all soil types was found to be 68.7% with a maximal separation efficiency for kaolinitic clay at 87.6%. This represents the first attempt to separate soil particles from bacteria using dielectrophoresis and indicate that the technique shows significant promise; with appropriate system optimisation, we believe that this preliminary study represents an opportunity to develop a simple yet highly effective sample processing system. PMID:25379100

  18. Controlling seepage in discrete particle simulations of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Joldes, Grand R; Wong, Kelvin K L; Tan, Chin Wee; Smith, David W

    2016-01-01

    It is now commonplace to represent materials in a simulation using assemblies of discrete particles. Sometimes, one wishes to maintain the integrity of boundaries between particle types, for example, when modelling multiple tissue layers. However, as the particle assembly evolves during a simulation, particles may pass across interfaces. This behaviour is referred to as 'seepage'. The aims of this study were (i) to examine the conditions for seepage through a confining particle membrane and (ii) to define some simple rules that can be employed to control seepage. Based on the force-deformation response of spheres with various sizes and stiffness, we develop analytic expressions for the force required to move a 'probe particle' between confining 'membrane particles'. We analyse the influence that particle's size and stiffness have on the maximum force that can act on the probe particle before the onset of seepage. The theoretical results are applied in the simulation of a biological cell under unconfined compression. PMID:26629728

  19. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and burrows pond rearing system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal eff...

  20. Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) removal efficiency by a combination of coagulation and ultrafiltration to minimize SWRO membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Lee, Shang-Tse; Sinha, Shahnawaz; Leiknes, TorOve; Amy, Gary L; Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the impact of coagulation on the transformation between colloidal and particulate transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in seawater; and the effectiveness of a combined pretreatment consisting of coagulation and UF on minimizing TEP fouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes. Coagulation with ferric chloride at pH 5 substantially transformed colloidal TEP (0.1-0.4) into particulate TEP (>0.4) leading to a better membrane fouling control. Both 50 and 100 kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) UF membranes removed most of particulate and colloidal TEP without the assistance of coagulation, but coagulation is still necessary for better UF fouling control. The improvement of combined SWRO pretreatment with coagulation and 50 kDa UF membranes was not that much significant compared to UF pretreatment with 50 KDa alone. Therefore, the minimal coagulant dosage for seawater containing TEP should be based on the UF fouling control requirements rather than removal efficiency.

  1. Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) removal efficiency by a combination of coagulation and ultrafiltration to minimize SWRO membrane fouling.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Lee, Shang-Tse; Sinha, Shahnawaz; Leiknes, TorOve; Amy, Gary L; Ghaffour, Noreddine

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the impact of coagulation on the transformation between colloidal and particulate transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in seawater; and the effectiveness of a combined pretreatment consisting of coagulation and UF on minimizing TEP fouling of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes. Coagulation with ferric chloride at pH 5 substantially transformed colloidal TEP (0.1-0.4) into particulate TEP (>0.4) leading to a better membrane fouling control. Both 50 and 100 kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) UF membranes removed most of particulate and colloidal TEP without the assistance of coagulation, but coagulation is still necessary for better UF fouling control. The improvement of combined SWRO pretreatment with coagulation and 50 kDa UF membranes was not that much significant compared to UF pretreatment with 50 KDa alone. Therefore, the minimal coagulant dosage for seawater containing TEP should be based on the UF fouling control requirements rather than removal efficiency. PMID:27403871

  2. Remote Control of T Cell Activation Using Magnetic Janus Particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwahun; Yi, Yi; Yu, Yan

    2016-06-20

    We report a strategy for using magnetic Janus microparticles to control the stimulation of T cell signaling with single-cell precision. To achieve this, we designed Janus particles that are magnetically responsive on one hemisphere and stimulatory to T cells on the other side. By manipulating the rotation and locomotion of Janus particles under an external magnetic field, we could control the orientation of the particle-cell recognition and thereby the initiation of T cell activation. This study demonstrates a step towards employing anisotropic material properties of Janus particles to control single-cell activities without the need of complex magnetic manipulation devices.

  3. Removal of dust particles from metal-mirror surfaces by excimer-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Klaus R.; Wolff-Rottke, B.; Mueller, F.

    1995-07-01

    The effect of particle desorption from Al mirror surfaces by the influence of pulsed UV laser radiation has been studied. The investigations are closely related to the demands of astronomers, who are looking for a more effective way of cleaning the Al coatings of future very large telescope mirrors. A systematic parameter study has been performed in order to determine the irradiation conditions which yield the highest dust removal efficiency (i.e. reflectivity increase) on contaminated samples, taking particularly into account laser-induced damage and degradation effects of coating and substrate. The particle removal rate increases with increasing laser fluence, being limited however by the damage threshold of the coating. Therefore, parameters influencing the damage threshold of metal coatings like wavelength, pulse width, and number of pulses have been studied in detail. Data indicate that on Al coated BK7 and Zerodur samples KrF laser radiation yields the optimum result, with cleaning efficiencies comparable to polymer film stripping. The initial reflectivity of the clean coating can nearly be reinstalled, in particular when an additional solvent film on the sample surface is applied. Hence, laser desorption seems to be a viable method of cleaning large Al mirrors for telescopes.

  4. Particle and microorganism removal in floating plastic media coupled with microfiltration membrane for surface water treatment.

    PubMed

    Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Kornboonraksa, T; Dumrongsukit, C; Threedeach, S; Ngo, H H; Vigneswaran, S

    2005-01-01

    Floating plastic media followed by hollow fiber microfiltration membrane was applied for surface water treatment. The performance of the system in terms of particle and microorganisms was investigated. The floating filter was examined at different filtration rates of 5, 10 and 15 m3/m2 x h. Treated water was then fed into a microfiltration unit where different filtration rates were examined at 0.6, 1.0 and 1.4 m3/m2 x d. It was found that polyaluminum chloride was the best coagulant for the removal of particle, algae and coliform bacteria. Average turbidity in treated water from the floating plastic media filter was 3.3, 12.2 and 15.5 NTU for raw water of 80 NTU and 12.9, 11.7 and 31.2 NTU for raw water of 160 NTU after 6 hours at the filtration rates of 5, 10 and 15 m3/m2 x h, respectively. The microfiltration unit could further reduce the turbidity to 0.2-0.5 NTU with low transmembrane pressure development of 0.3-3.7 kPa. Microfiltration membrane could retain most of algae and coliform bacteria remaining in the effluent from the pretreatment unit. It was found that at higher turbidity, algae and coliform bacteria removal efficiencies were achieved at lower filtration rate of the system of 5 m3/m2 x h whereas a higher filtration rate of 15 m3/m2 x h yielded better coliphage removal.

  5. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M; Knepper, Robert Allen; Weihs, Timothy P; Gash, Alexander E; Sze, John S

    2013-04-30

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  6. Layered reactive particles with controlled geometries, energies, and reactivities, and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Gregory M.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Grzyb, Justin A.

    2016-07-05

    An energetic composite having a plurality of reactive particles each having a reactive multilayer construction formed by successively depositing reactive layers on a rod-shaped substrate having a longitudinal axis, dividing the reactive-layer-deposited rod-shaped substrate into a plurality of substantially uniform longitudinal segments, and removing the rod-shaped substrate from the longitudinal segments, so that the reactive particles have a controlled, substantially uniform, cylindrically curved or otherwise rod-contoured geometry which facilitates handling and improves its packing fraction, while the reactant multilayer construction controls the stability, reactivity and energy density of the energetic composite.

  7. Preparation, characterization, and phosphate removal and recovery of magnetic MnFe2O4 nano-particles as adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shumei; Xu, Xiaoming; Xu, Changsong; Wang, Hongshuai; Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Guangmin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate removal is an important method for controlling eutrophication in bodies of water. Adsorption is an effective phosphate removal approach. In this research, the adsorbent, namely, MnFe2O4, was prepared through the improved co-precipitation method and investigated in terms of phosphate removal. MnFe2O4 was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Phosphate adsorption by MnFe2O4, desorption of adsorbed MnFe2O4 with the regeneration of desorbed MnFe2O4, and phosphate recovery were researched. Experimental results showed that adding the appropriate amount of polyethylene glycol to MnFe2O4 precursors during preparation inhibited the agglomeration of MnFe2O4 between particles because of the magnetic property of MnFe2O4 etc. High crystallinity and strong magnetism were achieved by MnFe2O4 at low temperatures. Average particle size was 5.1 nm. The hysteresis loops confirmed the ferrimagnetic behaviour of MnFe2O4 with a high saturation magnetization (i.e. 26.27 emu/g). The adsorption mechanism of phosphate was mainly physical. The prepared MnFe2O4 had a spinel structure. The proposed technique achieved a phosphate removal rate of 96.06%. A considerable amount of phosphate was desorbed from the adsorbed MnFe2O4 in 15 w/v% NaOH solution. The adsorption capacity of the desorbed MnFe2O4 could be restored to 96.73% in 10 w/v% NaNO3 solution through ion exchange. A sustainable phosphate source was recovered via hydroxyapatite crystallization in the desorption solution, which contained an abundant amount of phosphate as seed for suitable recovery condition. This finding suggested that MnFe2O4 could be a promising adsorbent for efficient phosphate removal.

  8. Preparation, characterization, and phosphate removal and recovery of magnetic MnFe2O4 nano-particles as adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shumei; Xu, Xiaoming; Xu, Changsong; Wang, Hongshuai; Zhang, Xiaowei; Liu, Guangmin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate removal is an important method for controlling eutrophication in bodies of water. Adsorption is an effective phosphate removal approach. In this research, the adsorbent, namely, MnFe2O4, was prepared through the improved co-precipitation method and investigated in terms of phosphate removal. MnFe2O4 was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Phosphate adsorption by MnFe2O4, desorption of adsorbed MnFe2O4 with the regeneration of desorbed MnFe2O4, and phosphate recovery were researched. Experimental results showed that adding the appropriate amount of polyethylene glycol to MnFe2O4 precursors during preparation inhibited the agglomeration of MnFe2O4 between particles because of the magnetic property of MnFe2O4 etc. High crystallinity and strong magnetism were achieved by MnFe2O4 at low temperatures. Average particle size was 5.1 nm. The hysteresis loops confirmed the ferrimagnetic behaviour of MnFe2O4 with a high saturation magnetization (i.e. 26.27 emu/g). The adsorption mechanism of phosphate was mainly physical. The prepared MnFe2O4 had a spinel structure. The proposed technique achieved a phosphate removal rate of 96.06%. A considerable amount of phosphate was desorbed from the adsorbed MnFe2O4 in 15 w/v% NaOH solution. The adsorption capacity of the desorbed MnFe2O4 could be restored to 96.73% in 10 w/v% NaNO3 solution through ion exchange. A sustainable phosphate source was recovered via hydroxyapatite crystallization in the desorption solution, which contained an abundant amount of phosphate as seed for suitable recovery condition. This finding suggested that MnFe2O4 could be a promising adsorbent for efficient phosphate removal. PMID:26292922

  9. Real time ECG artifact removal for myoelectric prosthesis control.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Lock, Blair; Kuiken, Todd A

    2007-04-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) artifact is a major noise source contaminating the electromyogram (EMG) of torso muscles. This study investigates removal of ECG artifacts in real time for myoelectric prosthesis control, a clinical application that demands speed and efficiency. Three methods with simple and fast implementation were investigated. Removal of ECG artifacts by digital high-pass filtering was implemented. The effects of the cutoff frequency and filter order of high-pass filtering on the resulting EMG signal were quantified. An alternative adaptive spike-clipping approach was also developed to dynamically detect and suppress the ECG artifacts in the signal. Finally, the two methods were combined. Experimental surface EMG recordings with different ECG/EMG ratios were used as testing signals to evaluate the proposed methods. As a key parameter for clinical myoelectric prosthesis control, the average rectified amplitude of the signal was used as the performance indicator to quantitatively analyze the EMG content distortion and the ECG artifact suppression imposed by the two methods. Aiming at clinical application, the optimal parameter assignment for each method was determined on the basis of the performance using the suite of testing signals with various ECG/EMG ratios. PMID:17395995

  10. Investigation of high velocity separator for particle removal in coal gasification plants. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Linhardt, H.D.

    1980-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of the High Velocity Particle Separator Program performed under Contract EF-77-C-01-2709. This high velocity wedge separator has the potential to reduce equipment size and cost of high temperature and pressurized particulate removal equipment for coal derived gases. Phase II has been directed toward testing and detailed conceptual design of an element suitable for a commercial scale high temperature, high pressure particle separator (HTPS). Concurrently, Phase IA has been conducted, which utilized the ambient analog method (AAM) for aerodynamic and collection performance investigation of each HTPS configuration prior and during hot testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase IA and II. The AAM effort established correlation of theoretical analysis and experiment for HTPS pressure drop, purge flow ratio and collection efficiency potential. Task I defined the initial test conditions to be the contract design point of 1800/sup 0/F and 350 psia. The 1800/sup 0/F, 350 psia testing represents the main high temperature testing with coal-derived particulates in the 2 to 10 micron range. Phase IA and Phase II have demonstrated efficient particle collection with acceptable pressure drop. In view of these encouraging results, it is reasonable to apply the developed technology toward future hot gas particulate cleanup requirements.

  11. Controlling Charged Particles with Inhomogeneous Electrostatic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An energy analyzer for a charged-particle spectrometer may include a top deflection plate and a bottom deflection plate. The top and bottom deflection plates may be non-symmetric and configured to generate an inhomogeneous electrostatic field when a voltage is applied to one of the top or bottom deflection plates. In some instances, the top and bottom deflection plates may be L-shaped deflection plates.

  12. Method and apparatus for removing coarse unentrained char particles from the second stage of a two-stage coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Donath, Ernest E.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing oversized, unentrained char particles from a two-stage coal gasification process so as to prevent clogging or plugging of the communicating passage between the two gasification stages. In the first stage of the process, recycled process char passes upwardly while reacting with steam and oxygen to yield a first stage synthesis gas containing hydrogen and oxides of carbon. In the second stage, the synthesis gas passes upwardly with coal and steam which react to yield partially gasified char entrained in a second stage product gas containing methane, hydrogen, and oxides of carbon. Agglomerated char particles, which result from caking coal particles in the second stage and are too heavy to be entrained in the second stage product gas, are removed through an outlet in the bottom of the second stage, the particles being separated from smaller char particles by a counter-current of steam injected into the outlet.

  13. The adsorptive removal of disinfection by-product precursors in a high-SUVA water using iron oxide-coated pumice and volcanic slag particles.

    PubMed

    Kaplan Bekaroglu, S S; Yigit, N O; Karanfil, T; Kitis, M

    2010-11-15

    The main objective of this work was to study the effectiveness of iron oxide-coated pumice and volcanic slag particles in removing disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors from a raw drinking water source with high specific UV absorbance (SUVA(254)) value. Iron oxide coating of particles significantly increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC) uptakes and decreased DBP formation after chlorination compared to uncoated particles. pH values close to neutral levels during adsorption and chlorination provided DOC, trihalomethane and haloacetic acid reductions around 60-75% employing 6 g/L coated particle dosage. Higher degree of DOC and DBP reductions (>85%) were obtained with increasing particle dose. The uptake of bromide by iron oxide surfaces was negligible and increasing bromide concentrations (up to 550 μg/L) did not negatively impact the DOC uptake. However, due to competition between natural organic matter (NOM) and bicarbonate for the iron oxide surfaces, increasing bicarbonate alkalinity levels reduced DOC uptakes. Overall, the results indicated that the iron oxide-coated pumice/slag particles are effective adsorbents to remove NOM and control DBP formation in waters with relatively high DOC and SUVA(254) levels. However, they may not be effective for waters with alkalinity levels above 250 mg CaCO(3)/L.

  14. Facile synthesis of copper(II)-decorated magnetic particles for selective removal of hemoglobin from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun; Ma, Xiangdong; Yao, Xin; Jia, Li

    2015-12-11

    In this report, the Cu(2+)-immobilized magnetic particles were prepared by a facile route and they were used as adsorbents for removal of high abundance of hemoglobin in blood based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified magnetic particles (EDTA-Fe3O4) were first synthesized through a one-pot solvothermal method and then charged with copper ions. The as-prepared Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and zeta potential. Factors affecting the adsorption of bovine hemoglobin on Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles (including contact time, solution pH, ionic strength and initial concentration of protein) were investigated. The adsorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the adsorption equilibrium could be achieved in 60min. The adsorption isotherm data could be well described by a Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity was 1250mgg(-1). The as-prepared particles showed high efficiency and excellent selectivity for removal of hemoglobin from bovine and human blood. The removal process integrated the selectivity of immobilized metal affinity chromatography and the convenience of magnetic separation. The results demonstrated that Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles had potential application in removal of abundant histidine-rich proteins in biomedical diagnosis analysis.

  15. Facile synthesis of copper(II)-decorated magnetic particles for selective removal of hemoglobin from blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chun; Ma, Xiangdong; Yao, Xin; Jia, Li

    2015-12-11

    In this report, the Cu(2+)-immobilized magnetic particles were prepared by a facile route and they were used as adsorbents for removal of high abundance of hemoglobin in blood based on immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified magnetic particles (EDTA-Fe3O4) were first synthesized through a one-pot solvothermal method and then charged with copper ions. The as-prepared Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry and zeta potential. Factors affecting the adsorption of bovine hemoglobin on Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles (including contact time, solution pH, ionic strength and initial concentration of protein) were investigated. The adsorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the adsorption equilibrium could be achieved in 60min. The adsorption isotherm data could be well described by a Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity was 1250mgg(-1). The as-prepared particles showed high efficiency and excellent selectivity for removal of hemoglobin from bovine and human blood. The removal process integrated the selectivity of immobilized metal affinity chromatography and the convenience of magnetic separation. The results demonstrated that Cu(2+)-EDTA-Fe3O4 particles had potential application in removal of abundant histidine-rich proteins in biomedical diagnosis analysis. PMID:26596870

  16. Removal of endogenous retrovirus-like particles from CHO-cell derived products using Q sepharose fast flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Daniel M; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt; Blank, Gregory S; Chen, Qi; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Retrovirus-like particles (RVLPs) that are expressed during the production of monoclonal antibodies in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures must be removed during product recovery. Anion exchange chromatography (AEX) performed in product flow-through mode, a common component in the purification of monoclonal antibodies, has been shown to provide robust removal of a related retrovirus model, but it's ability to remove the actual RVLP impurities has not been directly investigated. We have determined the ability of a typical Q sepharose process to remove actual CHO RVLP impurities. Using small scale experiments with three model antibodies, we observe that this AEX process is capable of effectively removing both in-process and spiked RVLPs from different feedstocks containing different mAb products. In addition, we show that this AEX process also achieves a similarly high degree of RVLP removal during large scale manufacturing operations.

  17. Advanced CO2 removal process control and monitor instrumentation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Dalhausen, M. J.; Klimes, R.

    1982-01-01

    A progam to evaluate, design and demonstrate major advances in control and monitor instrumentation was undertaken. A carbon dioxide removal process, one whose maturity level makes it a prime candidate for early flight demonstration was investigated. The instrumentation design incorporates features which are compatible with anticipated flight requirements. Current electronics technology and projected advances are included. In addition, the program established commonality of components for all advanced life support subsystems. It was concluded from the studies and design activities conducted under this program that the next generation of instrumentation will be greatly smaller than the prior one. Not only physical size but weight, power and heat rejection requirements were reduced in the range of 80 to 85% from the former level of research and development instrumentation. Using a microprocessor based computer, a standard computer bus structure and nonvolatile memory, improved fabrication techniques and aerospace packaging this instrumentation will greatly enhance overall reliability and total system availability.

  18. Removable inner turbine shell with bucket tip clearance control

    DOEpatents

    Sexton, Brendan F.; Knuijt, Hans M.; Eldrid, Sacheverel Q.; Myers, Albert; Coneybeer, Kyle E.; Johnson, David Martin; Kellock, Iain R.

    2000-01-01

    A turbine includes a plurality of inner shell sections mounting first and second stage nozzle and shroud portions. The inner shell sections are pinned to an outer containment shell formed of sections to preclude circumferential movement of the inner shell relative to the outer shell and enable thermal expansion and contraction of the inner shell relative to the outer shell. Positive bucket tip clearance control is afforded by passing a thermal medium about the inner shell in heat transfer relation with the shrouds about the first and second stage bucket tips, the thermal medium being provided from a source of heating/cooling fluid independent of the turbine. Access is provided to the rotor and turbine buckets by removing the outer and inner shell sections.

  19. Removal of bisphenol A and some heavy metal ions by polydivinylbenzene magnetic latex particles.

    PubMed

    Marzougui, Zied; Chaabouni, Amel; Elleuch, Boubaker; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic polydivinylbenzene latex particles MPDVB with a core-shell structure were tested for the removal of bisphenol A (BPA), copper Cu(II), lead Pb(II), and zinc Zn(II) from aqueous solutions by a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of different parameters, such as initial concentration of pollutant, contact time, adsorbent dose, and initial pH solution on the adsorption of the different adsorbates considered was investigated. The adsorption of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) was found to be fast, and the equilibrium was achieved within 30 min. The pH 5-5.5 was found to be the most suitable pH for metal removal. The presence of electrolytes and their increasing concentration reduced the metal adsorption capacity of the adsorbent. Whereas, the optimal pH for BPA adsorption was found 7, both hydrogen bonds and π-π interaction were thought responsible for the adsorption of BPA on MPDVB. The adsorption kinetics of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) were found to follow a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data for BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) adsorption were fitted well by the Langmuir isotherm model. Furthermore, the desorption and regeneration studies have proven that MPDVB can be employed repeatedly without impacting its adsorption capacity. PMID:26396007

  20. Removal of bisphenol A and some heavy metal ions by polydivinylbenzene magnetic latex particles.

    PubMed

    Marzougui, Zied; Chaabouni, Amel; Elleuch, Boubaker; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic polydivinylbenzene latex particles MPDVB with a core-shell structure were tested for the removal of bisphenol A (BPA), copper Cu(II), lead Pb(II), and zinc Zn(II) from aqueous solutions by a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of different parameters, such as initial concentration of pollutant, contact time, adsorbent dose, and initial pH solution on the adsorption of the different adsorbates considered was investigated. The adsorption of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) was found to be fast, and the equilibrium was achieved within 30 min. The pH 5-5.5 was found to be the most suitable pH for metal removal. The presence of electrolytes and their increasing concentration reduced the metal adsorption capacity of the adsorbent. Whereas, the optimal pH for BPA adsorption was found 7, both hydrogen bonds and π-π interaction were thought responsible for the adsorption of BPA on MPDVB. The adsorption kinetics of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) were found to follow a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data for BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) adsorption were fitted well by the Langmuir isotherm model. Furthermore, the desorption and regeneration studies have proven that MPDVB can be employed repeatedly without impacting its adsorption capacity.

  1. Effect of phosphate on the particle size of ferric oxyhydroxides anchored onto activated carbon: As(V) removal from water.

    PubMed

    Arcibar-Orozco, Javier A; Avalos-Borja, Miguel; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene

    2012-09-01

    The surface area of iron oxyhydroxides is a key factor when removing As from water. However, research related to this matter shows that this issue has not been explored in detail. The use of capping agents is a viable method to synthesize ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticles; however, this method to our knowledge has not been applied for the anchorage of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles on activated carbon (AC). In the present work, the addition of PO(4) (as a capping agent) in forced hydrolysis of FeCl(3) in AC was investigated. Results revealed that the surface area of modified materials reached a maximum of about 900 m(2)/g with a molar ratio PO(4)/Fe of 0.1. Moreover, microscopy studies indicate a size range of iron nanoparticles from 2 to 300 nm, where the smallest particles are attained with the highest concentration of PO(4). The surface charge distribution of modified samples became less positive; however, the As removal increased, indicating that electrostatic interaction is not the controlling sorption mechanism. Modified samples showed a 40% increase on As(V) adsorption capacity when using a molar ratio PO(4)/Fe of 1.5. The proposed method allowed anchoring of iron oxyhydroxides nanoparticles on AC, which have a high As(V) adsorption capacity (5 mg/g).

  2. Schedules of controlled substances: removal of naloxegol from control. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-01-23

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes naloxegol ((5[alpha],6[alpha])-17-allyl-6-((20-hydroxy-3,6,9,12,15,18-hexaoxaicos-1-yl)oxy)-4,5-epoxymorphinon-3,14-diol) and its salts from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). This scheduling action is pursuant to the CSA which requires that such actions be made on the record after opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, naloxegol was a schedule II controlled substance because it can be derived from opium alkaloids. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle naloxegol. PMID:25730920

  3. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena are host to particle accelerators. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems,more » as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Moreover, many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. For the purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We also describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.« less

  4. Sonochemical synthesis of silica particles and their size control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwa-Min; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Bonghwan

    2016-09-01

    Using an ultrasound-assisted sol-gel method, we successfully synthesized very uniformly shaped, monodisperse, and size-controlled spherical silica particles from a mixture of ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of ammonia as catalyst, at room temperature. The diameters of the silica particles were distributed in the range from 40 to 400 nm; their morphology was well characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The silica particle size could be adjusted by choosing suitable concentrations of ammonium hydroxide and water, which in turn determined the nucleation and growth rates of the particles during the reaction. This sonochemical-based silica synthesis offers an alternative way to produce spherical silica particles in a relatively short reaction time. Thus, we suggest that this simple, low-cost, and efficient method of preparing uniform silica particles of various sizes will have practical and wide-ranging industrial applicability.

  5. Method for removing tilt control in adaptive optics systems

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, Joseph Thaddeus

    1998-01-01

    A new adaptive optics system and method of operation, whereby the method removes tilt control, and includes the steps of using a steering mirror to steer a wavefront in the desired direction, for aiming an impinging aberrated light beam in the direction of a deformable mirror. The deformable mirror has its surface deformed selectively by means of a plurality of actuators, and compensates, at least partially, for existing aberrations in the light beam. The light beam is split into an output beam and a sample beam, and the sample beam is sampled using a wavefront sensor. The sampled signals are converted into corresponding electrical signals for driving a controller, which, in turn, drives the deformable mirror in a feedback loop in response to the sampled signals, for compensating for aberrations in the wavefront. To this purpose, a displacement error (gradient) of the wavefront is measured, and adjusted by a modified gain matrix, which satisfies the following equation: G'=(I-X(X.sup.T X).sup.-1 X.sup.T)G(I-A)

  6. Method for removing tilt control in adaptive optics systems

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, J.T.

    1998-04-28

    A new adaptive optics system and method of operation are disclosed, whereby the method removes tilt control, and includes the steps of using a steering mirror to steer a wavefront in the desired direction, for aiming an impinging aberrated light beam in the direction of a deformable mirror. The deformable mirror has its surface deformed selectively by means of a plurality of actuators, and compensates, at least partially, for existing aberrations in the light beam. The light beam is split into an output beam and a sample beam, and the sample beam is sampled using a wavefront sensor. The sampled signals are converted into corresponding electrical signals for driving a controller, which, in turn, drives the deformable mirror in a feedback loop in response to the sampled signals, for compensating for aberrations in the wavefront. To this purpose, a displacement error (gradient) of the wavefront is measured, and adjusted by a modified gain matrix, which satisfies the following equation: G{prime} = (I{minus}X(X{sup T} X){sup {minus}1}X{sup T})G(I{minus}A). 3 figs.

  7. Mixed sulfur-iron particles packed reactor for simultaneous advanced removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from secondary effluent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shenghui; Liang, Peng; Wu, Zhongqin; Su, Fengfeng; Yuan, Lulu; Sun, Yanmei; Wu, Qing; Huang, Xia

    2015-01-01

    A mixed sulfur-iron particles packed reactor (SFe reactor) was developed to simultaneously remove total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) of the secondary effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants. Low effluent TN (<1.5 mg/L) and TP (<0.3 mg/L) concentrations were simultaneously obtained, and high TN removal rate [1.03 g N/(L·d)] and TP removal rate [0.29 g P/(L·d)] were achieved at the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 0.13 h. Kinetic models describing denitrification were experimentally obtained, which predicted a higher denitrification rate [1.98 g N/(L·d)] of SFe reactor than that [1.58 g N/(L·d)] of sulfur alone packed reactor due to the mutual enhancement between sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification and iron-based chemical denitrification. A high TP removal obtained in SFe reactor was attributed to chemical precipitation of iron particles. Microbial community analysis based on 16S rRNA revealed that autotrophic denitrifying bacteria Thiobacillus and Sulfuricella were the dominant genus, indicating that autotrophic denitrification played important role in nitrate removal. These results indicate that sulfur and iron particles can be packed together in a single reactor to effectively remove nitrate and phosphorus.

  8. Dislodgement and removal of dust-particles from a surface by a technique combining acoustic standing wave and airflow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Wu, Junru

    2010-01-01

    It is known that there are many fine particles on the moon and Mars. Their existence may cause risk for the success of a long-term project for NASA, i.e., exploration and habitation of the moon and Mars. These dust-particles might cover the solar panels, making them fail to generate electricity, and they might also penetrate through seals on space suits, hatches, and vehicle wheels causing many incidents. The fine particles would be hazardous to human health if they were inhaled. Development of robust dust mitigation technology is urgently needed for the viable long-term exploration and habilitation of either the moon or Mars. A feasibility study to develop a dust removal technique, which may be used in space-stations or other enclosures for habitation, is reported. It is shown experimentally that the acoustic radiation force produced by a 13.8 kHz 128 dB sound-level standing wave between a 3 cm-aperture tweeter and a reflector separated by 9 cm is strong enough to overcome the van der Waals adhesive force between the dust-particles and the reflector-surface. Thus the majority of fine particles (>2 microm diameter) on a reflector-surface can be dislodged and removed by a technique combining acoustic levitation and airflow methods. The removal efficiency deteriorates for particles of less than 2 microm in size.

  9. Dislodgement and removal of dust-particles from a surface by a technique combining acoustic standing wave and airflow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Di; Wu, Junru

    2010-01-01

    It is known that there are many fine particles on the moon and Mars. Their existence may cause risk for the success of a long-term project for NASA, i.e., exploration and habitation of the moon and Mars. These dust-particles might cover the solar panels, making them fail to generate electricity, and they might also penetrate through seals on space suits, hatches, and vehicle wheels causing many incidents. The fine particles would be hazardous to human health if they were inhaled. Development of robust dust mitigation technology is urgently needed for the viable long-term exploration and habilitation of either the moon or Mars. A feasibility study to develop a dust removal technique, which may be used in space-stations or other enclosures for habitation, is reported. It is shown experimentally that the acoustic radiation force produced by a 13.8 kHz 128 dB sound-level standing wave between a 3 cm-aperture tweeter and a reflector separated by 9 cm is strong enough to overcome the van der Waals adhesive force between the dust-particles and the reflector-surface. Thus the majority of fine particles (>2 microm diameter) on a reflector-surface can be dislodged and removed by a technique combining acoustic levitation and airflow methods. The removal efficiency deteriorates for particles of less than 2 microm in size. PMID:20058949

  10. Controlling Particle Morphologies at Fluid Interfaces: Macro- and Micro- approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beesabathuni, Shilpa Naidu

    The controlled generation of varying shaped particles is important for many applications: consumer goods, biomedical diagnostics, food processing, adsorbents and pharmaceuticals which can benefit from the availability of geometrically complex and chemically inhomogeneous particles. This thesis presents two approaches to spherical and non-spherical particle synthesis using macro and microfluidics. In the first approach, a droplet microfluidic technique is explored to fabricate spherical conducting polymer, polyaniline, particles with precise control over morphology and functionality. Microfluidics has recently emerged as an important alternate to the synthesis of complex particles. The conducting polymer, polyaniline, is widely used and known for its stability, high conductivity, and favorable redox properties. In this approach, monodisperse micron-sized polyaniline spherical particles were synthesized using two-phase droplet microfluidics from Aniline and Ammonium persulfate oxidative polymerization in an oil-based continuous phase. The morphology of the polymerized particles is porous in nature which can be used for encapsulation as well as controlled release applications. Encapsulation of an enzyme, glucose oxidase, was also performed using the technique to synthesize microspheres for glucose sensing. The polymer microspheres were characterized using SEM, UV-Vis and EDX to understand the relationship between their microstructure and stability. In the second approach, molten drop impact in a cooling aqueous medium to generate non-spherical particles was explored. Viscoelastic wax based materials are widely used in many applications and their performance and application depends on the particle morphology and size. The deformation of millimeter size molten wax drops as they impacted an immiscible liquid interface was investigated. Spherical molten wax drops impinged on a cooling water bath, then deformed and as a result of solidification were arrested into various

  11. Quantification of online removal of refractory black carbon using laser-induced incandescence in the single particle soot photometer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aiken, Allison C.; McMeeking, Gavin R.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; DeMott, Paul J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2016-04-05

    Refractory black carbon (rBC) is an aerosol that has important impacts on climate and human health. rBC is often mixed with other species, making it difficult to isolate and quantify its important effects on physical and optical properties of ambient aerosol. To solve this measurement challenge, a new method to remove rBC was developed using laser-induced incandescence (LII) by Levin et al. in 2014. Application of the method with the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) is used to determine the effects of rBC on ice nucleating particles (INP). Here, we quantify the efficacy of the method in the laboratory usingmore » the rBC surrogate Aquadag. Polydisperse and mobility-selected samples (100–500 nm diameter, 0.44–36.05 fg), are quantified by a second SP2. Removal rates are reported by mass and number. For the mobility-selected samples, the average percentages removed by mass and number of the original size are 88.9 ± 18.6% and 87.3 ± 21.9%, respectively. Removal of Aquadag is efficient for particles >100 nm mass-equivalent diameter (dme), enabling application for microphysical studies. However, the removal of particles ≤100 nm dme is less efficient. Absorption and scattering measurements are reported to assess its use to isolate brown carbon (BrC) absorption. Scattering removal rates for the mobility-selected samples are >90% on average, yet absorption rates are 53% on average across all wavelengths. Therefore, application to isolate effects of microphysical properties determined by larger sizes is promising, but will be challenging for optical properties. Lastly, the results reported also have implications for other instruments employing internal LII, e.g., the Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS).« less

  12. Controlling silk fibroin particle features for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lammel, Andreas; Hu, Xiao; Park, Sang-Hyug; Kaplan, David L.; Scheibel, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Silk proteins are a promising material for drug delivery due to their aqueous processability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. A simple aqueous preparation method for silk fibroin particles with controllable size, secondary structure and zeta potential is reported. The particles were produced by salting out a silk fibroin solution with potassium phosphate. The effect of ionic strength and pH of potassium phosphate solution on the yield and morphology of the particles was determined. Secondary structure and zeta potential of the silk particles could be controlled by pH. Particles produced by salting out with 1.25 M potassium phosphate pH 6 showed a dominating silk II (crystalline) structure whereas particles produced at pH 9 were mainly composed of silk I (less crystalline). The results show that silk I rich particles possess chemical and physical stability and secondary structure which remained unchanged during post treatments even upon exposure to 100% ethanol or methanol. A model is presented to explain the process of particle formation based on intra- and intermolecular interactions of the silk domains, influenced by pH and kosmotrope salts. The reported silk fibroin particles can be loaded with small molecule model drugs, such as alcian blue, rhodamine B, and crystal violet, by simple absorption based on electrostatic interactions. In vitro release of these compounds from the silk particles depends on charge – charge interactions between the compounds and the silk. With crystal violet we demonstrated that the release kinetics are dependent on the secondary structure of the particles. PMID:20219241

  13. Controlled epitaxial graphene growth within removable amorphous carbon corrals

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, James; Hu, Yike; Hankinson, John; Guo, Zelei; Heer, Walt A. de; Kunc, Jan; Berger, Claire

    2014-07-14

    We address the question of control of the silicon carbide (SiC) steps and terraces under epitaxial graphene on SiC and demonstrate amorphous carbon (aC) corrals as an ideal method to pin SiC surface steps. aC is compatible with graphene growth, structurally stable at high temperatures, and can be removed after graphene growth. For this, aC is first evaporated and patterned on SiC, then annealed in the graphene growth furnace. There at temperatures above 1200 °C, mobile SiC steps accumulate at the aC corral that provide effective step flow barriers. Aligned step free regions are thereby formed for subsequent graphene growth at temperatures above 1330 °C. Atomic force microscopy imaging supports the formation of step-free terraces on SiC with the step morphology aligned to the aC corrals. Raman spectroscopy indicates the presence of good graphene sheets on the step-free terraces.

  14. Calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles for caries control.

    PubMed

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Birkedal, Henrik; Olsen, Jakob; Skovgaard, Jonas; Sutherland, Duncan S; Wejse, Peter L; Nyvad, Bente; Meyer, Rikke L

    2016-01-01

    Caries is caused by acid production in biofilms on dental surfaces. Preventing caries therefore involves control of microorganisms and/or the acid produced. Here, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles are presented as a new approach to caries control. The particles are made by co-precipitation and designed to bind to bacteria in biofilms, impede biofilm build-up without killing the microflora, and release phosphate ions to buffer bacterial acid production if the pH decreases below 6. Analysis of biofilm formation and pH in a five-species biofilm model for dental caries showed that treatment with particles or pure osteopontin led to less biofilm formation compared to untreated controls or biofilms treated with osteopontin-free particles. The anti-biofilm effect can thus be ascribed to osteopontin. The particles also led to a slower acidification of the biofilm after exposure to glucose, and the pH always remained above 5.5. Hence, calcium-phosphate-osteopontin particles show potential for applications in caries control. PMID:26923119

  15. Enhanced Removal of Hydrophobic Gas by Aerial Ultrasonic Waves and Two Kinds of Water Mists of Different Particle Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Keisuke; Miura, Hikaru

    2012-07-01

    Air pollutants can cause health problems, such as bronchitis and cancer, and are now recognized as a social problem. Hence, a method is proposed for the collection and removal of gaseous air pollutants by aerial ultrasonic waves and water mist. Typically, gas removal effects are studied using lemon oil vapor (“lemon gas”), which is a hydrophobic gas. Previous experiments using lemon gas have shown that a removal rate of up to 40% can be achieved in an intense standing wave at 20 kHz, for an amount of water mist of 1.39 cm3/s and an electrical input power of 50 W. Increasing the surface area of the water mist leads to greater removal of hydrophobic gas. In this study, the effects of gas removal are examined by conducting experiments using intense aerial ultrasonic waves to disperse two kinds of water mists, each composed of particles of different sizes: small particles (diameter: ≈3 µm) and conventional large particles (diameter: ≈60 µm).

  16. Mechanism of natural organic matter removal by polyaluminum chloride: effect of coagulant particle size and hydrolysis kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Wang, Dongsheng; Ni, Jinren; Qu, Jiuhui; Chow, Christopher W K; Liu, Hailong

    2008-07-01

    The mechanism of natural organic matter (NOM) removal by AlCl(3) and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) was investigated through bench-scale tests. The fraction distributions of NOM and residual Al after coagulation in solution, colloid and sediment were analyzed as changes of coagulant dosage and pH. The influence of NOM, coagulant dose and pH on coagulation kinetics of AlCl(3) was investigated using photometric dispersion analyzer compared with PACl. Monomeric Al species (Al(a)) shows high ability to satisfy some unsaturated coordinate bonds of NOM to facilitate particle and NOM removal, while most of the flocs formed by Al(a) are small and difficult to settle. Medium polymerized Al species (Al(b)) can destabilize particle and NOM efficiently, while some flocs formed by Al(b) are not large and not easy to precipitate as compared to those formed by colloidal or solid Al species (Al(c)). Thus, Al(c) could adsorb and remove NOM efficiently. The removal of contaminant by species of Al(a), Al(b) and Al(c) follows mechanisms of complexation, neutralization and adsorption, respectively. Unlike preformed Al(b) in PACl, in-situ-formed Al(b) can remove NOM and particle more efficiently via the mechanism of further hydrolysis and transfer into Al(c) during coagulation. While the presence of NOM would reduce Al(b) formed in-situ due to the complexation of NOM and Al(a).

  17. Morphological Control and Characterization of Monodispersed Ceria Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Minamidate, Y.; Yin, S.; Devaraju, M. K.; Sato, T.

    2010-11-24

    The morphological control of cerium oxide particles was carried out by a homogeneous precipitation followed by calcination in air at 400 deg. C. The effects of pre-aging temperature, aging time and precipitation reagents on the morphologies of final products were investigated. When urea was used as a precipitation reagent, monodispersed spherical and flake-like cerium carbonate hydroxide precursor was precipitated in the solution at 90 deg. C for 2 h after pre-aging at 25 deg. C - 50 deg. C for 24-72 h. On the other hand, monodispersed nanosize rod-like cerium hydroxide particles were obtained using triethanolamine as precipitation reagent. Ceria particles with the same morphologies and slightly smaller particle size than those of as-prepared cerium precursor could be obtained after calcination in air at 400 deg. C. Physical-chemical characteristics of the monodispersed cerium oxide particles were evaluated.

  18. Rock sampling. [method for controlling particle size distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P. (Inventor)

    1971-01-01

    A method for sampling rock and other brittle materials and for controlling resultant particle sizes is described. The method involves cutting grooves in the rock surface to provide a grouping of parallel ridges and subsequently machining the ridges to provide a powder specimen. The machining step may comprise milling, drilling, lathe cutting or the like; but a planing step is advantageous. Control of the particle size distribution is effected primarily by changing the height and width of these ridges. This control exceeds that obtainable by conventional grinding.

  19. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system particle removal system development

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, M.

    1994-03-01

    Solar Turbines developed a direct coal-fueled turbine system (DCFT) and tested each component in subscale facilities and the combustion system was tested at full-scale. The combustion system was comprised of a two-stage slagging combustor with an impact separator between the two combustors. Greater than 90 percent of the native ash in the coal was removed as liquid slag with this system. In the first combustor, coal water slurry mixture (CWM) was injected into a combustion chamber which was operated loan to suppress NO{sub x} formation. The slurry was introduced through four fuel injectors that created a toroidal vortex because of the combustor geometry and angle of orientation of the injectors. The liquid slag that was formed was directed downward toward an impaction plate made of a refractory material. Sixty to seventy percent of the coal-borne ash was collected in this fashion. An impact separator was used to remove additional slag that had escaped the primary combustor. The combined particulate collection efficiency from both combustors was above 95 percent. Unfortunately, a great deal of the original sulfur from the coal still remained in the gas stream and needed to be separated. To accomplish this, dolomite or hydrated lime were injected in the secondary combustor to react with the sulfur dioxide and form calcium sulfite and sulfates. This solution for the sulfur problem increased the dust concentrations to as much as 6000 ppmw. A downstream particulate control system was required, and one that could operate at 150 psia, 1850-1900{degrees}F and with low pressure drop. Solar designed and tested a particulate rejection system to remove essentially all particulate from the high temperature, high pressure gas stream. A thorough research and development program was aimed at identifying candidate technologies and testing them with Solar`s coal-fired system. This topical report summarizes these activities over a period beginning in 1987 and ending in 1992.

  20. Removal of heavy metals in wastewater by using zeolite nano-particles impregnated polysulfone membranes.

    PubMed

    Yurekli, Yilmaz

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the adsorption and the filtration processes were coupled by a zeolite nanoparticle impregnated polysulfone (PSf) membrane which was used to remove the lead and the nickel cations from synthetically prepared solutions. The results obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis indicated that the synthesized zeolite nanoparticles, using conventional hydrothermal method, produced a pure NaX with ultrafine and uniform particles. The performance of the hybrid membrane was determined under dynamic conditions. The results also revealed that the sorption capacity as well as the water hydraulic permeability of the membranes could both be improved by simply tuning the membrane fabricating conditions such as evaporation period of the casting film and NaX loading. The maximum sorption capacity of the hybrid membrane for the lead and nickel ions was measured as 682 and 122 mg/g respectively at the end of 60 min of filtration, under 1 bar of transmembrane pressure. The coupling process suggested that the membrane architecture could be efficiently used for treating metal solutions with low concentrations and transmembrane pressures. PMID:26874311

  1. Applications of Nuclear Track Membranes to Filtration of Medical Injections and Various Transfusions to Remove Solid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi-Bo; Guo, S.-L.

    Nuclear track membranes produced by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) in Beijing, China, and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia have been used in the studies of filtration of medical injections and various transfusion liquid medicine to remove solid particles from the medicine. It shows that the filtration devices made of nuclear track membranes are superior to that made of any other types of membranes. Experiments have demonstrated that the removal efficiencies for solid particles with diameters 5 μm can reach over 95% and the flow rate is high enough for use in medical injection and transfusion. The reproducibility of removal efficiencies and flow rate of the new devices are satisfactory to the use in hospitals. Chinese authority in medicine has approved the new devices for use in Chinese hospitals.

  2. Size control and structure features of spherical calcium carbonate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushina, D. B.; Sulyanov, S. N.; Bukreeva, T. V.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2015-07-01

    The size of porous spherical calcium carbonate particles obtained by precipitation from a supersaturated solution has been controlled using bovine serum albumin as an organic additive and ethylene glycol and glycerol as cosolvents of the reaction mixture. The structural aspects of the formation of these particles, which affect the possibility of controlling their sizes, are considered. Highly porous vaterite particles with an average size of about 500 nm have been obtained by adding ethylene glycol and glycerol to the reaction mixture and agitation for no less than 30 min. It is shown that particles are formed as a result of the attachment of vaterite nanocrystallites, the shape of which is anisotropic and can be described by a biaxial ellipsoid.

  3. Silylated Precision Particles for Controlled Release of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandehlou, Khosrow; Kumbhar, Amar S.; Habibi, Sohrab; Pandya, Ashish A.; Luft, J. Christopher; Khan, Saad A.; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    With the recent advances in the development of novel protein based therapeutics, controlled delivery of these biologics is an important area of research. Herein, we report the synthesis of microparticles from bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein using Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINT) with specific size and shape. These particles were functionalized at room temperature using multifunctional chlorosilane that cross-link the particles to render them to slowly-dissolving in aqueous media. Mass spectrometric study of the reaction products of diisopropyldichlorosilane with individual components of the particles revealed that they are capable of reacting and forming cross-links. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were also used to confirm the functionalization of the particles. Cross sectional analysis using focused ion beam (FIB) and EDS proved that the functionalization occurs throughout the bulk of the particles and is not just limited to the surface. Circular dichroism data confirmed that the fraction of BSA molecules released from the particles retains its secondary structure thereby indicating that the system can be used for delivering protein based formulations while controlling the dissolution kinetics. PMID:25742193

  4. Investigation of the Profile Control Mechanisms of Dispersed Particle Gel

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guang; Dai, Caili; Zhao, Mingwei

    2014-01-01

    Dispersed particle gel (DPG) particles of nano- to micron- to mm-size have been prepared successfully and will be used for profile control treatment in mature oilfields. The profile control and enhanced oil recovery mechanisms of DPG particles have been investigated using core flow tests and visual simulation experiments. Core flow test results show that DPG particles can easily be injected into deep formations and can effectively plug the high permeability zones. The high profile improvement rate improves reservoir heterogeneity and diverts fluid into the low permeability zone. Both water and oil permeability were reduced when DPG particles were injected, but the disproportionate permeability reduction effect was significant. Water permeability decreases more than the oil permeability to ensure that oil flows in its own pathways and can easily be driven out. Visual simulation experiments demonstrate that DPG particles can pass directly or by deformation through porous media and enter deep formations. By retention, adsorption, trapping and bridging, DPG particles can effectively reduce the permeability of porous media in high permeability zones and divert fluid into a low permeability zone, thus improving formation profiles and enhancing oil recovery. PMID:24950174

  5. Control of Respirable Particles in Indoor Air with Portable AirCleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-10-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles using in situ chamber decay tests. Following injection of cigarette smoke in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size with and without air cleaner operation. The size distribution of the tobacco smoke particles was log normal with a count median diameter of 0.15 {micro}m and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Without air cleaner operation, the natural mass-averaged surface deposition rate of particles was observed to be 0.1 h{sup -1}. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filter devices, a residential-sized ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. Electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters removed particles at substantial rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner studied.

  6. Control of respirable particles in indoor air with portable air cleaners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offermann, F. J.; Sextro, R. G.; Fisk, W. J.; Grimsrud, D. T.; Nazaroff, W. W.; Nero, A. V.; Revzan, K. L.; Yater, J.

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles using in situ chamber decay tests. Following injection of cigarette smoke in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size with and without air cleaner operation. The size distribution of the tobacco smoke particles was log normal with a count median diameter of 0.15 μm and a geometric standard deviation of 2.0. Without air cleaner operation, the natural mass-averaged surface deposition rate of particles was observed to be 0.1 h -1. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filter devices, a residential-sized ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. Electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters removed particles at substantial rates, and a HEPA-type filter was most efficient air cleaner studied.

  7. Controlling the geometry (Janus balance) of amphiphilic colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Granick, Steve

    2008-03-18

    A simple, generalizable method is described to produce Janus colloidal particles in large quantity with control over their respective hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas (Janus balance) in large quantity. To this end, charged particles adsorb onto the liquid-liquid interface of emulsions of molten wax and water in the presence of surfactants of opposite charge, whose concentration modifies how deeply particles penetrate the oil-water interface, and subsequent surface chemical modification of the resulting colloidosomes is performed after lowering temperature to solidify the wax. Silica particles modified in this way using different amounts of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) display contact angles that vary controllably between 37 degrees and 75 degrees. Janus balance also varies but over a more limited range with control of pH, salt concentration, or the presence of nonionic surfactant (Tween 20 or ethanol). Purity, Janus balance, and colloidosome structure are evaluated by a combination of fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The three-phase contact angle is obtained by observing SEM images of voids left by particles escaped from the surface. Colloidosomes made in the presence of DDAB are markedly improved with respect to the hexagonal close packing, which helps increase the efficiency of the method. Gram-sized quantities of particles are synthesized. PMID:18237219

  8. Controlling the geometry (Janus balance) of amphiphilic colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Granick, Steve

    2008-03-18

    A simple, generalizable method is described to produce Janus colloidal particles in large quantity with control over their respective hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas (Janus balance) in large quantity. To this end, charged particles adsorb onto the liquid-liquid interface of emulsions of molten wax and water in the presence of surfactants of opposite charge, whose concentration modifies how deeply particles penetrate the oil-water interface, and subsequent surface chemical modification of the resulting colloidosomes is performed after lowering temperature to solidify the wax. Silica particles modified in this way using different amounts of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB) display contact angles that vary controllably between 37 degrees and 75 degrees. Janus balance also varies but over a more limited range with control of pH, salt concentration, or the presence of nonionic surfactant (Tween 20 or ethanol). Purity, Janus balance, and colloidosome structure are evaluated by a combination of fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The three-phase contact angle is obtained by observing SEM images of voids left by particles escaped from the surface. Colloidosomes made in the presence of DDAB are markedly improved with respect to the hexagonal close packing, which helps increase the efficiency of the method. Gram-sized quantities of particles are synthesized.

  9. Controlled particle transport in a plasma chamber with striped electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Ke; Li Yangfang; Shimizu, T.; Konopka, U.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-12-15

    The controlled transport of micrometer size dust particles in a parallel-plate radio frequency discharge has been investigated. The lower stainless steel electrode consisted of 100 independently controllable electrical metal stripes. The voltage signals on these stripes were modulated, causing traveling plasma sheath distortions. Because the particles trapped in local potential wells moved according to the direction of the distortion, the transport velocity could be actively controlled by adjusting frequencies and phase shifts of the applied periodic voltage signals. To investigate the detailed principle of this transport, molecular dynamic simulations was performed to reproduce the observations with the plasma background conditions calculated by separated particle-in-cell simulations for the experimental parameters. The findings will help develop novel technologies for investigating large-scale complex plasma systems and techniques for achieving clean environments in plasma processing reactors.

  10. Magnetic control of particle injection in plasma based accelerators.

    PubMed

    Vieira, J; Martins, S F; Pathak, V B; Fonseca, R A; Mori, W B; Silva, L O

    2011-06-01

    The use of an external transverse magnetic field to trigger and to control electron self-injection in laser- and particle-beam driven wakefield accelerators is examined analytically and through full-scale particle-in-cell simulations. A magnetic field can relax the injection threshold and can be used to control main output beam features such as charge, energy, and transverse dynamics in the ion channel associated with the plasma blowout. It is shown that this mechanism could be studied using state-of-the-art magnetic fields in next generation plasma accelerator experiments.

  11. An Optically Controlled Microscale Elevator Using Plasmonic Janus Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we report how Janus particles, composed of a silica sphere with a gold half-shell, can be not only stably trapped by optical tweezers but also displaced controllably along the axis of the laser beam through a complex interplay between optical and thermal forces. Scattering forces orient the asymmetric particle, while strong absorption on the metal side induces a thermal gradient, resulting in particle motion. An increase in the laser power leads to an upward motion of the particle, while a decrease leads to a downward motion. We study this reversible axial displacement, including a hysteretic jump in the particle position that is a result of the complex pattern of a tightly focused laser beam structure above the focal plane. As a first application we simultaneously trap a spherical gold nanoparticle and show that we can control the distance between the two particles inside the trap. This photonic micron-scale “elevator” is a promising tool for thermal force studies, remote sensing, and optical and thermal micromanipulation experiments. PMID:25950013

  12. Optofluidics incorporating actively controlled micro- and nano-particles

    PubMed Central

    Kayani, Aminuddin A.; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Ward, Stephanie A.; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2012-01-01

    The advent of optofluidic systems incorporating suspended particles has resulted in the emergence of novel applications. Such systems operate based on the fact that suspended particles can be manipulated using well-appointed active forces, and their motions, locations and local concentrations can be controlled. These forces can be exerted on both individual and clusters of particles. Having the capability to manipulate suspended particles gives users the ability for tuning the physical and, to some extent, the chemical properties of the suspension media, which addresses the needs of various advanced optofluidic systems. Additionally, the incorporation of particles results in the realization of novel optofluidic solutions used for creating optical components and sensing platforms. In this review, we present different types of active forces that are used for particle manipulations and the resulting optofluidic systems incorporating them. These systems include optical components, optofluidic detection and analysis platforms, plasmonics and Raman systems, thermal and energy related systems, and platforms specifically incorporating biological particles. We conclude the review with a discussion of future perspectives, which are expected to further advance this rapidly growing field. PMID:23864925

  13. Removal of mercury (II) by dithiocarbamate surface functionalized magnetite particles: application to synthetic and natural spiked waters.

    PubMed

    Figueira, P; Lopes, C B; Daniel-da-Silva, A L; Pereira, E; Duarte, A C; Trindade, T

    2011-11-01

    In order to take advantage of the high affinity between mercury and sulphur, magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) particles functionalized with dithiocarbamate groups (CS(2)(-)), were synthesized to be used as a new type of sorbent to remove Hg (II) from synthetic and natural spiked waters. The effectiveness of this type of sorbent was studied, and its potential as cleanup agent for contaminated waters was assessed. Batch stirred tank experiments were carried out by contacting a volume of solution with known amounts of functionalized Fe(3)O(4) particles, in order to study the effect of sorbent dose, salinity, and the kinetics and the equilibrium of this unit operation. A complete Hg (II) removal (ca. 99.8%) was attained with 6 mg/L of magnetic particles for an initial metal concentration of 50 μg/L. It was confirmed that highly complex matrices, such as seawater (ca. 99%) and river water (ca. 97%), do not affect the removal capacity of the functionalized magnetic particles. Concerning isotherms, no significant differences were observed between two- and three-parameter models (P = 0.05%); however, Sips isotherm provided the lowest values of SS and S(x/y), predicting a maximum sorption capacity of 206 mg/g, in the range of experimental conditions under study. The solid loadings measured in this essay surmount the majority of the values found in literature for other type of sorbents.

  14. Nanosize cobalt boride particles: Control of the size and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Pileni, M. P.

    1997-02-01

    Cobalt boride is obtained by the reduction of cobalt (2-ethyl hexyl) sulfosuccinate, Co(AOT) 2, by sodium borohydride either in reverse micelles or in a diphasic system. In Co(AOT) 2/Na(AOT)/H 2O reverse micellar solution, the size and polydispersity of the Co 2B particles is controlled by the size of the water droplets, which increases from 4 to 7.5 nm by increasing the water content. In a diphasic system of Co(AOT) 2/isooctane and sodium borohydride in aqueous solution, large and polydisperse particles of cobalt boride are formed (˜ 10 nm), and their magnetization properties are presented. The smallest particles are in a superparamagnetic regime at room temperature, whereas the largest particles show ferromagnetic behavior.

  15. Whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates for in-duct and portable ventilation systems.

    PubMed

    Macintosh, David L; Myatt, Theodore A; Ludwig, Jerry F; Baker, Brian J; Suh, Helen H; Spengler, John D

    2008-11-01

    A novel method for determining whole house particle removal and clean air delivery rates attributable to central and portable ventilation/air cleaning systems is described. The method is used to characterize total and air-cleaner-specific particle removal rates during operation of four in-duct air cleaners and two portable air-cleaning devices in a fully instrumented test home. Operation of in-duct and portable air cleaners typically increased particle removal rates over the baseline rates determined in the absence of operating a central fan or an indoor air cleaner. Removal rates of 0.3- to 0.5-microm particles ranged from 1.5 hr(-1) during operation of an in-duct, 5-in. pleated media filter to 7.2 hr(-1) for an in-duct electrostatic air cleaner in comparison to a baseline rate of 0 hr(-1) when the air handler was operating without a filter. Removal rates for total particulate matter less than 2.5 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) mass concentrations were 0.5 hr(-1) under baseline conditions, 0.5 hr(-1) during operation of three portable ionic air cleaners, 1 hr(-1) for an in-duct 1-in. media filter, 2.4 hr(-1) for a single high-efficiency particle arrestance (HEPA) portable air cleaner, 4.6 hr(-1) for an in-duct 5-in. media filter, 4.7 hr(-1) during operation of five portable HEPA filters, 6.1 hr(-1) for a conventional in-duct electronic air cleaner, and 7.5 hr(-1) for a high efficiency in-duct electrostatic air cleaner. Corresponding whole house clean air delivery rates for PM2.5 attributable to the air cleaner independent of losses within the central ventilation system ranged from 2 m3/min for the conventional media filter to 32 m3/min for the high efficiency in-duct electrostatic device. Except for the portable ionic air cleaner, the devices considered here increased particle removal indoors over baseline deposition rates. PMID:19044163

  16. Atomic Bose-Hubbard Systems with Single-Particle Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Philipp Moritz

    Experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide outstanding opportunities to realize exotic quantum states due to a high degree of tunability and control. In this thesis, I present experiments that extend this control from global parameters to the level of individual particles. Using a quantum gas microscope for 87Rb, we have developed a single-site addressing scheme based on digital amplitude holograms. The system self-corrects for aberrations in the imaging setup and creates arbitrary beam profiles. We are thus able to shape optical potentials on the scale of single lattice sites and control the dynamics of individual atoms. We study the role of quantum statistics and interactions in the Bose-Hubbard model on the fundamental level of two particles. Bosonic quantum statistics are apparent in the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of massive particles, which we observe in tailored double-well potentials. These underlying statistics, in combination with tunable repulsive interactions, dominate the dynamics in single- and two-particle quantum walks. We observe highly coherent position-space Bloch oscillations, bosonic bunching in Hanbury Brown-Twiss interference and the fermionization of strongly interacting bosons. Many-body states of indistinguishable quantum particles are characterized by large-scale spatial entanglement, which is difficult to detect in itinerant systems. Here, we extend the concept of Hong-Ou-Mandel interference from individual particles to many-body states to directly quantify entanglement entropy. We perform collective measurements on two copies of a quantum state and detect entanglement entropy through many-body interference. We measure the second order Renyi entropy in small Bose-Hubbard systems and detect the buildup of spatial entanglement across the superfluid-insulator transition. Our experiments open new opportunities for the single-particle-resolved preparation and characterization of many-body quantum states.

  17. Entropic control of particle sizes during viral self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelnovo, M.; Muriaux, D.; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.

    2013-03-01

    Morphologic diversity is observed across all families of viruses. However, these supra-molecular assemblies are produced most of the time in a spontaneous way through complex molecular self-assembly scenarios. The modeling of these phenomena remains a challenging problem within the emerging field of physical virology. We present in this work a theoretical analysis aiming at highlighting the particular role of configuration entropy in the control of viral particle size distribution. Specializing this model to retroviruses such as HIV-1, we predict a new mechanism of entropic control of both RNA uptake into the viral particle and of the particle's size distribution. Evidence of this peculiar behavior has recently been reported experimentally.

  18. Method for non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis

    DOEpatents

    Goddard, Gregory Russ; Kaduchak, Gregory; Jett, James Hubert; Graves, Steven Wayde

    2013-09-10

    One or more of the embodiments of the present invention provide for a method of non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis which includes axial and radial acoustic standing wave fields. Particles are suspended in an aqueous solution, and this solution then flows into the cylindrical flow channel. While the solution flows through the flow channel, the outer structure of the flow channel is vibrated at a resonant frequency, causing a radial acoustic standing wave field to form inside the flow channel in the solution. These radial acoustic standing waves focus the particles suspended in the solution to the center axis of the cylindrical flow channel. At the same time, a transducer is used to create an axial acoustic standing wave field in the flow channel parallel to the axis of the flow channel. This drives the particles, which are already being focused to the center axis of the flow channel, to nodes or anti-nodes of the axial standing wave at half-wavelength intervals, depending on whether the particles are more or less dense and more or less compressible than the surrounding fluid.

  19. Facile dispersion and control of internal structure in lyotropic liquid crystalline particles by auxiliary solvent evaporation.

    PubMed

    Martiel, Isabelle; Sagalowicz, Laurent; Handschin, Stephan; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-12-01

    Submicron sized, structured lyotropic liquid crystalline (LLC) particles, so-called hexosomes and cubosomes, are generally obtained by high energy input dispersion methods, notably ultrasonication and high-pressure emulsification. We present a method to obtain dispersions of such LLC particles with a significantly reduced energy input, by evaporation of an auxiliary volatile solvent immiscible with water, e.g. cyclohexane or limonene. The inner structure of the particles can be precisely controlled by the addition of a nonvolatile oil, such as α-tocopherol or tetradecane consistently with bulk phase diagrams,. Two different lyotropic surfactants were employed, industrial grade monolinoleine (MLO) and soy bean phosphatidylcholine (PC). The lyotropic surfactant and oil phase modifier were first dissolved in the volatile solvent to give a liquid reverse micellar (L2) phase, which requires significantly less energy input to be dispersed in an aqueous solution of secondary emulsifier compared to the corresponding gel-like bulk mesophase. The auxiliary volatile solvent was then removed from the emulsion by evaporation at room temperature, yielding LLC particles of the desired inner structure, Pn3̅m, H2, or Fd3̅m. The obtained particles were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Our method enables fine-tuning of the final particle size through the volatile-to-nonvolatile volume ratio and processing conditions. PMID:25384248

  20. Chemistry with spatial control using particles and streams†

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Yevgeniy V.; Murali, Adithya

    2012-01-01

    Spatial control of chemical reactions, with micro- and nanometer scale resolution, has important consequences for one pot synthesis, engineering complex reactions, developmental biology, cellular biochemistry and emergent behavior. We review synthetic methods to engineer this spatial control using chemical diffusion from spherical particles, shells and polyhedra. We discuss systems that enable both isotropic and anisotropic chemical release from isolated and arrayed particles to create inhomogeneous and spatially patterned chemical fields. In addition to such finite chemical sources, we also discuss spatial control enabled with laminar flow in 2D and 3D microfluidic networks. Throughout the paper, we highlight applications of spatially controlled chemistry in chemical kinetics, reaction-diffusion systems, chemotaxis and morphogenesis. PMID:23145348

  1. A comparison of biologically active filters for the removal of ozone by-products, turbidity, and particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, B.M.; Krasner, S.W.; Sclimenti, M.J.; Hacker, P.A.; Gramith, J.T.

    1996-11-01

    Biofiltration tests were performed at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California`s 5.5-mgd (21,000 m{sup 3}d) demonstration plant using two 400 ft{sup 2} (37 m{sup 2}) anthracite/sand filters and a 6 ft{sup 2} (0.56 m{sup 2}) granular activated carbon (GAC)/sand filter operated in parallel. The empty-bed contact time (EBCT) within the GAC and anthracite ranged from 2.1-3.1 min. The filters were evaluated based on (1) conventional filtration performance (turbidity, particle removal, and headloss); (2) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products (assimilable organic carbon [AOC], aldehydes, and aldoketoacids) after startup; (3) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products at steady state; and (4) resistance to short-term process upsets such as intermittent chlorination or filter out-of-service time. Approximately 80 percent formaldehyde removal was achieved by the anthracite/sand filter operated at a 2.1-min EBCT (6 gpm/ft{sup 2} [15 m/h]) within 8 days of ozone operation. The GAC/sand filter operated at the same rate achieved 80 percent removal within 1 day, possibly as an additive effect of adsorption and biological removal. In-depth aldehyde monitoring at four depths (0.5-min EBCT intervals) provided additional insight into the removal kinetics. During periods of warmer water temperature, from 20 to 48 percent of the AOC was removed in the flocculation/sedimentation basins by 40-75 percent. This percentage removal typically resulted in AOC concentrations within 40 {mu}g C/L of the raw, unozonated water levels.

  2. Simulation and control of sediment transport due to dam removal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents two case studies of post dam removal sedimentation in the United States. Two different one-dimensional channel evolution simulation models were used: CCHE1D and CONCEPTS, respectively. The first case is the application of CCHE1D to assess a long-term morphological response to the...

  3. Humidity control of particle emissions in aeolian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna Neuman, Cheryl; Sanderson, Steven

    2008-06-01

    Humidity is an important control of the wind speed required to entrain particles into an air flow and is well known to vary on a global scale, as do dust emissions. This paper reports on wind tunnel experiments which quantify this control through placing a polymer capacitance sensor immediately at the bed surface. The sensor measured changes in the humidity (RH) of the pore air in real time. RH was varied between 15% and 80% and the critical wind speed determined for the release of particles to the air stream. The results strongly support earlier suggestions that fine particles are most affected in relatively dry atmospheres, particularly those which are tightly packed. An analytical model is proposed to describe this relationship which depends on determination of the matric potential from the Kelvin equation. The total contact area between particle asperities adjoined by pendular rings is represented as a power function of the number of layers of adsorbed water. The value of the exponent appears to be governed by the surface roughness of the particles and their packing arrangement. Parallel developments in colloid interface science and atomic force microscopy, relevant to industrial and pharmaceutical applications, support these conclusions in principle and will likely have an important bearing on future progress in parameterization of the proposed model.

  4. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and Burrows pond rearing system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal efficiency, and measures of velocity using several tools. Computational fluid dynamics was used first to characterize hydraulics in the proposed retrofit that included removal of the traditional Burrows pond dividing wall and establishment of four counter rotating cells with appropriate drains and inlet water jets. Hydraulic residence time was subsequently established in the four full scale test tanks using measures of conductivity of a salt tracer introduced into the systems both with and without fish present. Vertical and horizontal velocities were also measured with acoustic Doppler velocimetry in transects across each of the rearing systems. Finally, we introduced ABS sinking beads that simulated fish solids then followed the kinetics of their removal via the drains to establish relative purge rates. The mixed cell raceway provided higher mean velocities and a more uniform velocity distribution than did the Burrows pond. Vectors revealed well-defined, counter-rotating cells in the mixed cell raceway, and were likely contributing factors in achieving a relatively high particle removal efficiency-88.6% versus 8.0% during the test period. We speculate retrofits of rearing ponds to mixed cell systems will improve both the rearing environments for the fish and solids removal, improving the efficiency and bio-security of fish culture. We recommend further testing in hatchery production trials to evaluate fish physiology and growth.

  5. Magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process: Preparation and optimization of particles for removal of transuranic elements

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, L.; Kaminski, M.; Bradley, C.; Buchholz, B.A.; Aase, S.B.; Tuazon, H.E.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Landsberger, S.

    1995-05-01

    The Magnetically Assisted Chemical Separation (MACS) process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractants with magnetic separation by using specially coated magnetic particles to provide a more efficient chemical separation of transuranic (TRU) elements, other radionuclides, and heavy metals from waste streams. Development of the MACS process uses chemical and physical techniques to elucidate the properties of particle coatings and the extent of radiolytic and chemical damage to the particles, and to optimize the stages of loading, extraction, and particle regeneration. This report describes the development of a separation process for TRU elements from various high-level waste streams. Polymer-coated ferromagnetic particles with an adsorbed layer of octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) diluted with tributyl phosphate (TBP) were evaluated for use in the separation and recovery of americium and plutonium from nuclear waste solutions. Due to their chemical nature, these extractants selectively complex americium and plutonium contaminants onto the particles, which can then be recovered from the solution by using a magnet. The partition coefficients were larger than those expected based on liquid[liquid extractions, and the extraction proceeded with rapid kinetics. Extractants were stripped from the particles with alcohols and 400-fold volume reductions were achieved. Particles were more sensitive to acid hydrolysis than to radiolysis. Overall, the optimization of a suitable NMCS particle for TRU separation was achieved under simulant conditions, and a MACS unit is currently being designed for an in-lab demonstration.

  6. Controlled synthesis of ferromagnetic MnSe x particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junjie; Li, Chao; Chen, Duo; Kang, Shishou; Liu, Guolei; Yu, Shuyun; Han, Guangbing; Mei, Liangmo

    2016-10-01

    The MnSe x (x = 1,2) nanoparticles were synthesized under hydrothermal condition, by reaction of the reduced selenium and Mn2+ ion in the presence of hydrazine and acetic acid. By precisely controlling the pH value of the solution, a series of MnSe x particles were synthesized. The structure and morphology of as-prepared particles were examined with x-ray diffractometer (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The average sizes of as-prepared particles varied from nanoscale to microscale with pH value increase. Furthermore, the nucleation and growth mechanism associated with pH values were discussed, which can be applied to the hydrothermal synthesis of metal chalcogenide in general. Finally, the optical and magnetic properties of as-prepared particles were measured. All as-made particles exhibit a ferromagnetic behavior with low coercivity and remanence at room temperature. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB921502), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474184 and 11627805), the 111 Project (Grant No. B13029), and the Fundamental Research Funds of Shandong University, China.

  7. Magnetic microswimmers: Controlling particle approach through magnetic and hydrodynamic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Minjun; Fu, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We investigate magnetic microswimmers actuated by a rotating magnetic field that may be useful for drug delivery, micro-surgery, or diagnostics in human body. For modular swimmers, assembly and disassembly requires understanding the interactions between the swimmer and other modules in the fluid. Here, we discuss possible mechanisms for a frequency-dependent attraction/repulsion between a three-bead, achiral swimmer and other magnetic particles, which represent modular assembly elements. We first investigate the hydrodynamic interaction between a swimmer and nearby particle by studying the Lagrangian trajectories in the vicinity of the swimmer. Then we show that the magnetic forces can be attractive or repulsive depending on the spatial arrangement of the swimmer and particle, with a magnitude that decreases with increasing frequency. Combining magnetic and hydrodynamic effects allows us to understand the overall behavior of magnetic particles near the swimmer. Interestingly, we find that the frequency of rotation can be used to control when the particle can closely approach the swimmer, with potential application to assembly.

  8. Experiments on steady state particle control in Tore Supra and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mioduszewski, P.K.; Hogan, J.T.; Owen, L.W.

    1994-12-31

    Particle control is playing an increasingly important role in tokamak plasma performance. The present paper discusses particle control of hydrogen/deuterium by wall pumping on graphite or carbonized surfaces, as well as by external exhaust with pumped limiters and pumped divertors. Wall pumping is ultimately a transient effect and by itself not suitable for steady state particle exhaust. Therefore, external exhaust techniques with pumped divertors and limiters are being developed. How wall pumping phenomena interact and correlate with these inherently steady state, external exhaust techniques, is not well known to date. In the present paper, the processes involved in wall pumping and in external pumping are investigated in an attempt to evaluate the effect of external exhaust on wall pumping. Some of the key elements of this analysis are: (1) charge-exchange fluxes to the wall play a crucial role in the core-wall particle dynamics, (2) the recycling fluxes of thermal molecules have a high probability of ionization in the scrape-off layer, (3) thermal particles originating from the wall, which are ionized within the scrape-off layer, can be directly exhausted, thus providing a direct path between wall and exhaust which can be used to control the wall inventory. This way, the wall can be kept in a continuous pumping state in the sense that it continuously absorbs energetic particles and releases thermal molecules which are then removed by the external exhaust mechanism. While most of the ingredients of this analysis have been observed individually before, the present evaluation is an attempt to correlate effects of wall recycling and external exhaust.

  9. Dynamic self-assembly and control of microfluidic particle crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonhee; Amini, Hamed; Stone, Howard A.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2010-01-01

    Engineered two-phase microfluidic systems have recently shown promise for computation, encryption, and biological processing. For many of these systems, complex control of dispersed-phase frequency and switching is enabled by nonlinearities associated with interfacial stresses. Introducing nonlinearity associated with fluid inertia has recently been identified as an easy to implement strategy to control two-phase (solid-liquid) microscale flows. By taking advantage of inertial effects we demonstrate controllable self-assembling particle systems, uncover dynamics suggesting a unique mechanism of dynamic self-assembly, and establish a framework for engineering microfluidic structures with the possibility of spatial frequency filtering. Focusing on the dynamics of the particle–particle interactions reveals a mechanism for the dynamic self-assembly process; inertial lift forces and a parabolic flow field act together to stabilize interparticle spacings that otherwise would diverge to infinity due to viscous disturbance flows. The interplay of the repulsive viscous interaction and inertial lift also allow us to design and implement microfluidic structures that irreversibly change interparticle spacing, similar to a low-pass filter. Although often not considered at the microscale, nonlinearity due to inertia can provide a platform for high-throughput passive control of particle positions in all directions, which will be useful for applications in flow cytometry, tissue engineering, and metamaterial synthesis. PMID:21149674

  10. Particle size measurement for the control of industrial crystallizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxman, A.

    1992-01-01

    The need for on-line sensors to monitor particulate processes is rapidly increasing. Such systems are a necessity to understand the complex phenomena of particle formation, growth, and breakage. Some aspects of the design of an on-line sensor for particle size analysis are discussed. The technique used is based on forward light scattering, which covers a size range from about 1 to 2,000 micrometers. The observations are used to develop a physical model and subsequently an effective control strategy for a 970 liter continuous crystallizer. The purpose of the controller is to manipulate the dynamics of the size distribution. Therefore, a firm relation between process inputs and outputs (i.e., the crystal size distribution) must first be established. Secondly, an intelligent interpretation of the recorded data, in this case a light scattering pattern, is required. Chapter headings include the following: Validation of Light Scattering Models for Polydisperse Particle Systems; Deconvolution Algorithm for the Recovery of Particle Size Distributions; Automated Measurement and Interpretation of Scattering Patterns; On-line Measurement of Crystal Size Distribution in Industrial Crystallizers.

  11. Tracking low SNR targets using particle filter with flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshtagh, Nima; Romberg, Paul M.; Chan, Moses W.

    2014-06-01

    In this work we study the problem of detecting and tracking challenging targets that exhibit low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). We have developed a particle filter-based track-before-detect (TBD) algorithm for tracking such dim targets. The approach incorporates the most recent state estimates to control the particle flow accounting for target dynamics. The flow control enables accumulation of signal information over time to compensate for target motion. The performance of this approach is evaluated using a sensitivity analysis based on varying target speed and SNR values. This analysis was conducted using high-fidelity sensor and target modeling in realistic scenarios. Our results show that the proposed TBD algorithm is capable of tracking targets in cluttered images with SNR values much less than one.

  12. Introducing biological phosphorus removal in an alternating plant by means of control: a full scale study.

    PubMed

    Rosen, C; Ingildsen, P; Guildal, T; Nielsen, T Munk; Nielsen, M K; Jacobsen, B N; Thomsen, H A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a control strategy for introducing enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) in an alternating plant designed for enhanced biological nitrogen removal (EBNR) is presented. Alternating aerobic and anaerobic conditions to promote EBPR are provided by controlling the phases of the operational cycle, instead of a separate anaerobic volume. By utilising the control schemes already built in the STAR control system for nitrogen removal, the control strategy is fully integrated in the system. The control system relies on on-line measurements of nitrogen (ammonia and/or nitrate) and orthophosphate. The control strategy has been implemented in full-scale operation at the Avedøre wastewater treatment plant in Denmark and the results show clear indications of success. The control strategy has operated robustly for several months with a 60% decrease in use of precipitation chemicals.

  13. Mitigation of soiling losses in solar collectors: Removal of surface-adhered dust particles using an electrodynamic screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyah, Arash

    Particulate contamination of the optical surfaces of solar collectors, often called "soiling", can have a significant deteriorating impact on energy yield due to the absorption and scattering of incident light. Soiling has more destructive effect on concentrated solar systems than on flat-plate photovoltaic panels, as the former are incapable of converting scattered sunlight. The first part of this thesis deals with the soiling losses of flat-plate photovoltaic (PV), concentrated solar power (CSP), and concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) systems in operation in several regions of the world. Influential parameters in dust accumulation losses, as well as different cleaning mechanisms in pursuit of restoring the efficiency of soiled systems, have been thoroughly investigated. In lieu of the most commonly-practiced manual cleaning method of using high-pressure water jets, the concept of automatic dust removal using the electrostatic forces of electrodynamic screen (EDS) technology is in a developmental stage and on its way toward commercialization. This thesis provides comprehensive analytical solutions for the electric potential and electric field distribution in EDS devices having different configurations. Numerical simulations developed using finite element analysis (FEA) software have corroborated the analytical solutions which can easily be embedded into software programs for particle trajectory simulations while also providing flexibility and generality in the study on the effect of different parameters of the EDS on the electric field and ensuing dust-removal performance. Evaluation and comparison of different repelling and attracting forces exerted on dust particles is of utmost importance to a detailed analysis of EDS performance in dust removal. Hence, the balance of electrostatic and adhesion forces, including van der Waals and capillary forces, have received significant attention in this dissertation. Furthermore, different numerical analyses have been

  14. Changes in Fish Habitat And Demography Following Dam Removal in a Headwater Catchment: Linking Geomorphic, Hydrologic, and Ecological Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magilligan, F. J.; Nislow, K. H.; Kynard, B.; Hackman, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Dam removal is a major component of river restoration efforts in New England. More than 115 dams have been removed in the past few decades with the goal to restore historical runs of diadromous fish. Taking advantage of the Fall 2012 removal of the 5 m high Pelham Dam in central Massachusetts, we sampled pre- and post-removal geomorphic parameters (18 cross-sections along a 800 m reach, Wolman pebble counts, embeddedness surveys, and detailed long profiles) in Amethyst Brook (23 km2) an upstream tributary of the Fort River drainage. These geomorphic assessments were combined with detailed quantitative electrofishing surveys of stream fish richness and abundance above and below the dam site and throughout the watershed; genetic assignments and stable isotope analysis to determine population connectivity; and visual surveys of native anadromous Sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) nest sites. Post-removal assessments were complicated by two events: (1) upstream knickpoint migration exhumed an older (ca. early 19th century) intact wooden crib dam ~ 120 m upstream of the former stone dam, and (2) the occurrence of a 10-20 yr RI flood 6 months after removal which caused further upstream incision and downstream aggradation. Geomorphic results document that all 11 cross-sections downstream of the former dam fined significantly with typical reductions of 30-60% in mean particle size. This has major implications for Sea lamprey that require gravel for spawning which was largely absent downstream of the former sediment-trapping dam. This fining was associated with downstream bed aggradation, reflecting the new, post-removal flux of material. Similarly, post-removal, but pre-flood, bed surveys indicate ~ 2 m of incision had migrated 25 m upstream of the former reservoir before encountering the exhumed dam, which now acts as the new grade control, limiting progressive headcutting. The combination of changes in channel bed sedimentology, the occurrence of a large magnitude flood

  15. Effects of Varying Particle Sizes and Different Types of LDH-Modified Anthracite in Simulated Test Columns for Phosphorous Removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangling; Chen, Qiaozhen; Guo, Lu; Huang, Hualing; Ruan, Chongying

    2015-06-16

    A comparative study was carried out for the removal of phosphorus in simulated unplanted vertical-flow constructed wetlands with different layered double hydroxide (LDHs) coated anthracite substrates. Three particle sizes of anthracites were selected and modified separately with nine kinds of LDH coating. The simulated substrates test columns loaded with the original and modified anthracites were constructed to treat the contaminated water. For the medium and large particle size modified anthracite substrates, the purification effects of total phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus and phosphate were improved by various degrees, and the purification effect of the medium particle size anthracite is better than that of the large size one. The medium size anthracite modified by ZnCo-LDHs had optimal performance with average removal efficiencies of total phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus and phosphate reaching 95%, 95% and 98%, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity on ZnCo-LDHs and ZnAl-LDHs modified medium sizes anthracites were 65.79 (mg/kg) and 48.78 (mg/kg), respectively. In comparison, the small size anthracite is not suitable for LDHs modification.

  16. Transient Colloidal Stability Controls the Particle Formation of SBA-15

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A hypothesis about (transient) colloidal stability as a controlling mechanism for particle formation in SBA-15 is presented. The hypothesis is based on results from both in situ and ex situ investigations, including cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), UV–vis spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cryo-TEM images show that particles grow via the formation of silica–Pluronic–water “flocs”, which coalesce in a seemingly arbitrary manner. Despite this, the final material consists of well-defined particles with a small size distribution. We argue that the interface between the flocs and surrounding media is covered by Pluronic molecules, which provide steric stabilization. As the flocs grow, the coverage of polymers at the interface is increased until a stable size is reached, and that regulates the particle size. By targeting the characteristics of the Pluronic molecules, during the on-going synthesis, the hypothesis is tested. The results are consistent with the concept of (transient) colloidal stability. PMID:22758927

  17. Experimental Study on Ultrafine Particle Removal Performance of Portable Air Cleaners with Different Filters in an Office Room.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huan; Shen, Henggen; Shui, Tiantian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Liuke

    2016-01-05

    Size- and time-dependent aerodynamic behaviors of indoor particles, including PM1.0, were evaluated in a school office in order to test the performance of air-cleaning devices using different filters. In-situ real-time measurements were taken using an optical particle counter. The filtration characteristics of filter media, including single-pass efficiency, volume and effectiveness, were evaluated and analyzed. The electret filter (EE) medium shows better initial removal efficiency than the high efficiency (HE) medium in the 0.3-3.5 μm particle size range, while under the same face velocity, the filtration resistance of the HE medium is several times higher than that of the EE medium. During service life testing, the efficiency of the EE medium decreased to 60% with a total purifying air flow of 25 × 10⁴ m³/m². The resistance curve rose slightly before the efficiency reached the bottom, and then increased almost exponentially. The single-pass efficiency of portable air cleaner (PAC) with the pre-filter (PR) or the active carbon granule filter (CF) was relatively poor. While PAC with the pre-filter and the high efficiency filter (PR&HE) showed maximum single-pass efficiency for PM1.0 (88.6%), PAC with the HE was the most effective at removing PM1.0. The enhancement of PR with HE and electret filters augmented the single-pass efficiency, but lessened the airflow rate and effectiveness. Combined with PR, the decay constant of large-sized particles could be greater than for PACs without PR. Without regard to the lifetime, the electret filters performed better with respect to resource saving and purification improvement. A most penetrating particle size range (MPPS: 0.4-0.65 μm) exists in both HE and electret filters; the MPPS tends to become larger after HE and electret filters are combined with PR. These results serve to provide a better understanding of the indoor particle removal performance of PACs when combined with different kinds of filters in school

  18. Experimental Study on Ultrafine Particle Removal Performance of Portable Air Cleaners with Different Filters in an Office Room

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huan; Shen, Henggen; Shui, Tiantian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Liuke

    2016-01-01

    Size- and time-dependent aerodynamic behaviors of indoor particles, including PM1.0, were evaluated in a school office in order to test the performance of air-cleaning devices using different filters. In-situ real-time measurements were taken using an optical particle counter. The filtration characteristics of filter media, including single-pass efficiency, volume and effectiveness, were evaluated and analyzed. The electret filter (EE) medium shows better initial removal efficiency than the high efficiency (HE) medium in the 0.3–3.5 μm particle size range, while under the same face velocity, the filtration resistance of the HE medium is several times higher than that of the EE medium. During service life testing, the efficiency of the EE medium decreased to 60% with a total purifying air flow of 25 × 104 m3/m2. The resistance curve rose slightly before the efficiency reached the bottom, and then increased almost exponentially. The single-pass efficiency of portable air cleaner (PAC) with the pre-filter (PR) or the active carbon granule filter (CF) was relatively poor. While PAC with the pre-filter and the high efficiency filter (PR&HE) showed maximum single-pass efficiency for PM1.0 (88.6%), PAC with the HE was the most effective at removing PM1.0. The enhancement of PR with HE and electret filters augmented the single-pass efficiency, but lessened the airflow rate and effectiveness. Combined with PR, the decay constant of large-sized particles could be greater than for PACs without PR. Without regard to the lifetime, the electret filters performed better with respect to resource saving and purification improvement. A most penetrating particle size range (MPPS: 0.4–0.65 μm) exists in both HE and electret filters; the MPPS tends to become larger after HE and electret filters are combined with PR. These results serve to provide a better understanding of the indoor particle removal performance of PACs when combined with different kinds of filters in school

  19. Experimental Study on Ultrafine Particle Removal Performance of Portable Air Cleaners with Different Filters in an Office Room.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huan; Shen, Henggen; Shui, Tiantian; Li, Qing; Zhou, Liuke

    2016-01-01

    Size- and time-dependent aerodynamic behaviors of indoor particles, including PM1.0, were evaluated in a school office in order to test the performance of air-cleaning devices using different filters. In-situ real-time measurements were taken using an optical particle counter. The filtration characteristics of filter media, including single-pass efficiency, volume and effectiveness, were evaluated and analyzed. The electret filter (EE) medium shows better initial removal efficiency than the high efficiency (HE) medium in the 0.3-3.5 μm particle size range, while under the same face velocity, the filtration resistance of the HE medium is several times higher than that of the EE medium. During service life testing, the efficiency of the EE medium decreased to 60% with a total purifying air flow of 25 × 10⁴ m³/m². The resistance curve rose slightly before the efficiency reached the bottom, and then increased almost exponentially. The single-pass efficiency of portable air cleaner (PAC) with the pre-filter (PR) or the active carbon granule filter (CF) was relatively poor. While PAC with the pre-filter and the high efficiency filter (PR&HE) showed maximum single-pass efficiency for PM1.0 (88.6%), PAC with the HE was the most effective at removing PM1.0. The enhancement of PR with HE and electret filters augmented the single-pass efficiency, but lessened the airflow rate and effectiveness. Combined with PR, the decay constant of large-sized particles could be greater than for PACs without PR. Without regard to the lifetime, the electret filters performed better with respect to resource saving and purification improvement. A most penetrating particle size range (MPPS: 0.4-0.65 μm) exists in both HE and electret filters; the MPPS tends to become larger after HE and electret filters are combined with PR. These results serve to provide a better understanding of the indoor particle removal performance of PACs when combined with different kinds of filters in school

  20. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: Material removal rate in chemical-mechanical polishing of wafers based on particle trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianxiu, Su; Xiqu, Chen; Jiaxi, Du; Renke, Kang

    2010-05-01

    Distribution forms of abrasives in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process are analyzed based on experimental results. Then the relationships between the wafer, the abrasive and the polishing pad are analyzed based on kinematics and contact mechanics. According to the track length of abrasives on the wafer surface, the relationships between the material removal rate and the polishing velocity are obtained. The analysis results are in accord with the experimental results. The conclusion provides a theoretical guide for further understanding the material removal mechanism of wafers in CMP.

  1. Controlling temperature in magnetic hyperthermia with low Curie temperature particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astefanoaei, Iordana; Dumitru, Ioan; Chiriac, Horia; Stancu, Alexandru

    2014-05-01

    Hyperthermia induced by the heating of magnetic particles (MPs) in alternating magnetic field receives a considerable attention in cancer therapy. An interesting development in the studies dedicated to magnetically based hyperthermia is the possibility to control the temperature using MPs with selective magnetic absorption properties. This paper analyzes the temperature field determined by the heating of MPs having low Curie temperature (a FeCrNbB particulate system) injected within a malignant tissue, subjected to an ac magnetic field. The temperature evolution within healthy and tumor tissues was analyzed by finite element method simulations in a thermo-fluid model. The cooling effect produced by blood flowing in blood vessels was considered. This effect is intensified at the increase of blood velocity. The FeCrNbB particles, having the Curie temperature close to the therapeutic range, transfer the heat more homogeneous in the tumor keeping the temperature within the therapeutic range in whole tumor volume. Having the possibility to automatically control the temperature within a tumor, these particle type opens new research horizons in the magnetic hyperthermia.

  2. Nitrogen Removal over Nitrite by Aeration Control in Aerobic Granular Sludge Sequencing Batch Reactors

    PubMed Central

    Lochmatter, Samuel; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of aeration control for the achievement of N-removal over nitrite with aerobic granular sludge in sequencing batch reactors. N-removal over nitrite requires less COD, which is particularly interesting if COD is the limiting parameter for nutrient removal. The nutrient removal performances for COD, N and P have been analyzed as well as the concentration of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the granular sludge. Aeration phase length control combined with intermittent aeration or alternate high-low DO, has proven to be an efficient way to reduce the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria population and hence achieve N-removal over nitrite. N-removal efficiencies of up to 95% were achieved for an influent wastewater with COD:N:P ratios of 20:2.5:1. The total N-removal rate was 0.18 kgN·m−3·d−1. With N-removal over nitrate the N-removal was only 74%. At 20 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased by over 95% in 60 days and it was possible to switch from N-removal over nitrite to N-removal over nitrate and back again. At 15 °C, the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria concentration decreased too but less, and nitrite oxidation could not be completely suppressed. However, the combination of aeration phase length control and high-low DO was also at 15 °C successful to maintain the nitrite pathway despite the fact that the maximum growth rate of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria at temperatures below 20 °C is in general higher than the one of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:25006970

  3. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR AND METHOD OF CONTROLLING THE TEMPERATURE THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1960-10-11

    A method and means for controlling the temperature of a particle accelerator and more particularly to the maintenance of a constant and uniform temperature throughout a particle accelerator is offered. The novel feature of the invention resides in the provision of two individual heating applications to the accelerator structure. The first heating application provided is substantially a duplication of the accelerator heat created from energization, this first application being employed only when the accelerator is de-energized thereby maintaining the accelerator temperature constant with regard to time whether the accelerator is energized or not. The second heating application provided is designed to add to either the first application or energization heat in a manner to create the same uniform temperature throughout all portions of the accelerator.

  4. Enhancement removal of tartrazine dye using HCl-doped polyaniline and TiO2-decorated PANI particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M. A.; Gobara, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    HCl-doped polyaniline (HCl-PANI) and titanium dioxide decorated with polyaniline (TiO2-decorated PANI) with different TiO2:PANI ratios were chemically prepared and utilized for the removal of tartrazine (TZ) dye from a synthetic aqueous solution. The mechanism of preparation of the sample suggested that aniline was adsorbed on the TiO2 surface before the polymerization process took place. Samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The results showed that HCl-PANI and TiO2-decorated PANI have an amorphous structure. The thermal stability of the prepared samples was characterized using thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis. HCl-PANI is stable up to 200 °C and the relative weight per cent of PANI in the TiO2-decorated PANI was 20, 25, 40 and 45%. The removal activity of TiO2-decorated PANI via TZ azo dye was investigated under UV light irradiations and compared with HCl-PANI and TiO2 particles. The results indicated the superiority of the TiO2-decorated PANI over pure HCl-PANI and TiO2. However, the excessive PANI percentage tends to form a relatively thick layer, and even aggregates on the surface of TiO2. This hinders the migration of excited electrons from the outer PANI layer to the inner TiO2 particles, which consequently leads to a decrease in the removal efficiency. A possible mechanism for the removal oxidative degradation is also mentioned.

  5. Enhancement removal of tartrazine dye using HCl-doped polyaniline and TiO2-decorated PANI particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M. A.; Gobara, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    HCl-doped polyaniline (HCl-PANI) and titanium dioxide decorated with polyaniline (TiO2-decorated PANI) with different TiO2:PANI ratios were chemically prepared and utilized for the removal of tartrazine (TZ) dye from a synthetic aqueous solution. The mechanism of preparation of the sample suggested that aniline was adsorbed on the TiO2 surface before the polymerization process took place. Samples were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The results showed that HCl-PANI and TiO2-decorated PANI have an amorphous structure. The thermal stability of the prepared samples was characterized using thermo-gravimetric (TG) analysis. HCl-PANI is stable up to 200 °C and the relative weight per cent of PANI in the TiO2-decorated PANI was 20, 25, 40 and 45%. The removal activity of TiO2-decorated PANI via TZ azo dye was investigated under UV light irradiations and compared with HCl-PANI and TiO2 particles. The results indicated the superiority of the TiO2-decorated PANI over pure HCl-PANI and TiO2. However, the excessive PANI percentage tends to form a relatively thick layer, and even aggregates on the surface of TiO2. This hinders the migration of excited electrons from the outer PANI layer to the inner TiO2 particles, which consequently leads to a decrease in the removal efficiency. A possible mechanism for the removal oxidative degradation is also mentioned.

  6. 40 CFR 52.1890 - Removed control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... oxides of nitrogen from combustion sources and nitric acid plants. This action was preceded by a negative declaration regarding nitric acid plants dated April 11, 1994, and rule approvals (NOX SIP Call, NSPS, budget... plan controlling nitrogen oxide emissions from stationary sources in the State. The request...

  7. Rapid removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions using thiol-functionalized Zn-doped biomagnetite particles.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Wang, Wei; Moon, Ji-Won; Howe, Jane; Pierce, Eric M; Liang, Liyuan

    2012-08-01

    The surfaces of Zn-doped biomagnetite nanostructured particles were functionalized with (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and used as a high-capacity and collectable adsorbent for the removal of Hg(II) from water. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the attachment of MPTMS on the particle surface. The crystallite size of the Zn-doped biomagnetite was ∼17 nm, and the thickness of the MPTMS coating was ∼5 nm. Scanning transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analyses revealed that the particles formed aggregates in aqueous solution with an average hydrodynamic size of 826 ± 32 nm. Elemental analyses indicate that the chemical composition of the biomagnetite is Zn(0.46)Fe(2.54)O(4), and the loading of sulfur is 3.6 mmol/g. The MPTMS-modified biomagnetite has a calculated saturation magnetization of 37.9 emu/g and can be separated from water within a minute using a magnet. Sorption of Hg(II) to the nanostructured particles was much faster than other commercial sorbents, and the Hg(II) sorption isotherm in an industrial wastewater follows the Langmuir model with a maximum capacity of ∼416 mg/g, indicating two -SH groups bonded to one Hg. This new Hg(II) sorbent was stable in a range of solutions, from contaminated water to 0.5 M acid solutions, with low leaching of Fe, Zn, Si, and S (<10%).

  8. Wall conditioning and particle control in Extrap T2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsåker, H.; Larsson, D.; Brunsell, P.; Möller, A.; Tramontin, L.

    1997-02-01

    The Extrap T2 reversed field pinch experiment is operated with the former OHTE vacuum vessel, of dimensions R = 1.24 m and a = 0.18 m and with a complete graphite liner. It is shown that a rudimentary density control can be achieved by means of frequent helium glow discharge conditioning of the wall. The standard He-GDC is well characterized and reproducible. The trapping and release of hydrogen and impurities at the wall surfaces have been studied by mass spectrometry and surface analysis. The shot to shot particle exchange between wall and plasma can be approximately accounted for.

  9. Induction plasma calcining of pigment particles for thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Induction plasma heating techniques were studied for calcining zinc orthotitanate particles for use in thermal control coatings. Previous studies indicated that the optimum calcining temperature is between 1400 and 1750 C. An intermediate temperature (1670 C) was chosen as a reference point for running a temperature series at the reference point and 220 C on both sides. The effect of varying chamber temperature on the reflectance spectra, before and after vacuum UV irradiation, is presented. The correlation between Zn2Ti04 paramagnetic resonance activity and its susceptibility to vacuum UV damage is discussed.

  10. Effects of Aftermarket Control Technologies on Gas and Particle Phase Oxidative Potential from Diesel Engine Emissions.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Jelica; Holder, Amara L; Yelverton, Tiffany L B

    2015-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) originating from diesel combustion is a public health concern due to its association with adverse effects on respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and lung cancer. This study investigated emissions from three stationary diesel engines (gensets) and varying power output (230 kW, 400 kW, and 600 kW) at 50% and 90% load to determine concentrations of gaseous (GROS) and PM reactive oxygen species (PMROS). In addition, the influence of three modern emission control technologies on ROS emissions was evaluated: active and passive diesel particulate filters (A-DPF and P-DPF) and a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). PMROS made up 30-50% of the total ROS measured without aftermarket controls. All applied controls removed PMROS by more than 75% on average. However, the oxidative potential of PM downstream of these devices was not diminished at the same rate and particles surviving the A-PDF had an even higher oxidative potential on a per PM mass basis compared to the particles emitted by uncontrolled gensets. Further, the GROS as compared to PMROS emissions were not reduced with the same efficiency (<36%). GROS concentrations were highest with the DOC in use, indicating continued formation of GROS with this control. Correlation analyses showed that PMROS and to a lesser extent GROS have a good correlation with semivolatile organic carbon (OC1) subfraction. In addition, results suggest that chemical composition, rather than PM size, is responsible for differences in the PM oxidative potential.

  11. Effects of Aftermarket Control Technologies on Gas and Particle Phase Oxidative Potential from Diesel Engine Emissions.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Jelica; Holder, Amara L; Yelverton, Tiffany L B

    2015-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) originating from diesel combustion is a public health concern due to its association with adverse effects on respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and lung cancer. This study investigated emissions from three stationary diesel engines (gensets) and varying power output (230 kW, 400 kW, and 600 kW) at 50% and 90% load to determine concentrations of gaseous (GROS) and PM reactive oxygen species (PMROS). In addition, the influence of three modern emission control technologies on ROS emissions was evaluated: active and passive diesel particulate filters (A-DPF and P-DPF) and a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). PMROS made up 30-50% of the total ROS measured without aftermarket controls. All applied controls removed PMROS by more than 75% on average. However, the oxidative potential of PM downstream of these devices was not diminished at the same rate and particles surviving the A-PDF had an even higher oxidative potential on a per PM mass basis compared to the particles emitted by uncontrolled gensets. Further, the GROS as compared to PMROS emissions were not reduced with the same efficiency (<36%). GROS concentrations were highest with the DOC in use, indicating continued formation of GROS with this control. Correlation analyses showed that PMROS and to a lesser extent GROS have a good correlation with semivolatile organic carbon (OC1) subfraction. In addition, results suggest that chemical composition, rather than PM size, is responsible for differences in the PM oxidative potential. PMID:26252945

  12. Controlled human exposures to ambient pollutant particles in susceptible populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have established an association between exposures to air pollution particles and human mortality and morbidity at concentrations of particles currently found in major metropolitan areas. The adverse effects of pollution particles are most prominent in suscep...

  13. Novel electrostatic precipitator using unipolar soft X-ray charger for removing fine particles: Application to a dry de-NOX process.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongan; Kim, Hak Joon; Kim, Yong Jin; Kim, Sang Soo; Jung, Jae Hee

    2016-02-13

    The novel electrostatic precipitator (ESP), consisting of a soft X-ray charger and a collection part, was demonstrated and applied to a dry de-NOX process to evaluate its performance in by-product particle removal. NOX gas was oxidized by ozone (O3) and neutralized by ammonia (NH3) sequentially, and finally converted to an ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) aerosol with ∼ 100-nm peak particle diameter. The unipolar soft X-ray charger was introduced for charging the by-product particles in this dry de-NOX process. For the highest particle collection efficiency, the optimal operating conditions of the soft X-ray charger and collection part were investigated by adjusting the applied voltage of each device. The results showed that ∼ 99% of NOX was removed when the O3/NOX ratio was increased to 2 (i.e., the maximum production conditions of the NH4NO3 by-product particles by the gas-to-particle conversion process). The highest removal efficiency of particle (∼ 90%) was observed with operating conditions of positive polarity and an applied voltage of ∼ 2-3 kV in the charger chamber. The unipolar soft X-ray charger has potential for particle removal systems in industrial settings because of its compact size, ease of operation, and non-interruptive charging mechanism.

  14. Thermal control system. [removing waste heat from industrial process spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, D. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The temperature of an exothermic process plant carried aboard an Earth orbiting spacecraft is regulated using a number of curved radiator panels accurately positioned in a circular arrangement to form an open receptacle. A module containing the process is insertable into the receptacle. Heat exchangers having broad exterior surfaces extending axially above the circumference of the module fit within arcuate spacings between adjacent radiator panels. Banks of variable conductance heat pipes partially embedded within and thermally coupled to the radiator panels extend across the spacings and are thermally coupled to broad exterior surfaces of the heat exchangers by flanges. Temperature sensors monitor the temperature of process fluid flowing from the module through the heat exchanges. Thermal conduction between the heat exchangers and the radiator panels is regulated by heating a control fluid within the heat pipes to vary the effective thermal length of the heat pipes in inverse proportion to changes in the temperature of the process fluid.

  15. Transit Scratchitti Removal and Glass Resurfacing by Controlled Fire Polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Seongchan; Hong, Shane Y.

    Scratchitti vandalism, a new type of graffiti vandalism, in public transits systems and city neighborhood is a serious problem. To solve this problem, an innovative approach was developed-controlled fire polishing, which incorporates a technique of localized softening and surface tension. Intensive heat is positioned near to the scratch marks on the glass panel. The heat melts a thin layer of glass into liquid, changing the glass’s viscosity to a formable state. The glass is melted to a level close to the depth of the scratch, and allowed to cool down naturally. During the cooling process, the surface tension of the melted glass will even out the scratching indent. After cooling, the glass will be as even and smooth as it was originally. The process will enable the reuse of the damaged window/door and eliminate the otherwise waste by replacement new glass.

  16. Removal efficiencies of PCDDs/PCDFs by air pollution control devices in municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Kim, S C; Jeon, S H; Jung, I R; Kim, K H; Kwon, M H; Kim, J H; Yi, J H; Kim, S J; You, J C; Jung, D H

    2001-01-01

    Removal efficiencies of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs) by air pollution control devices (APCDs) in the commercial-scale municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators with a capacity of above 200 ton/day were evaluated. The removal efficiencies of PCDDs/PCDFs were up to 95% when the activated carbon (AC) was injected in front of electrostatic precipitator (EP). Spray dryer absorber/bag filter (SDA/BF) had high removal efficiency (99%)) of PCDDs/PCDFs when a mixture of lime and AC was sprayed into the SDA. When the AC was not added in scrubbing solution, the whole congeners of PCDDs/PCDFs were enriched in the wet scrubber (WS) with negative removal efficiencies of -25% to -5731%. Discharge of PCDDs/PCDFs was decreased with increasing the proportions of AC added in scrubbing solution. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system had the removal efficiencies of up to 93% during the test operation.

  17. Effect of particle size on the performance of autotrophic nitrogen removal in the granular sludge bed reactor and microbiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Zheng, Ping; Xing, Yajuan; Li, Wei; Yang, Jian; Abbas, Ghulam; Liu, Shuai; He, Zhanfei; Zhang, Jiqiang; Zhang, Hongtao; Lu, Huifeng

    2014-04-01

    The effect of particle size on the performance of autotrophic nitrogen removal in the granular sludge bed reactor (GSB-ANR) and microbiological mechanisms were investigated. The results indicated that performance of GSB-ANR process decreased gradually with the increase of the granular sludge size. Indeed small granules ranging between 0.5 and 0.9mm had a higher nitrogen removal capacity than large ones. The reasons of this effect were that (i) the aerobic ammonium oxidizing capacity of microorganisms was the bottle neck of nitrogen removal in GSB-ANR process, and the increase of aerobic ammonium oxidizing activity enhances nitrite production in nitrification and promotes subsequent nitrite consumption during anaerobic ammonia oxidation; (ii) the aerobic/anaerobic zone separation in granular sludge was the key factor affecting the aerobic ammonium oxidizing capacity of microorganisms. The small granules had a larger aerobic functional zone (75.1%) which was profitable for up-regulating the expression level of functional gene in aerobic ammonium oxidizing microorganisms. PMID:24561629

  18. An hourglass control algorithm for Lagrangian Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a stabilization scheme which addresses the rank-deficiency problem in meshless collocation methods for solid mechanics. Specifically, Smooth-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) in the Total Lagrangian formalism is considered. This method is rank-deficient in the sense that the SPH approximation of the deformation gradient is not unique with respect to the positions of the integration points. The non-uniqueness can result in the formation of zero-energy modes. If undetected, these modes can grow and completely dominate the solution. Here, an algorithm is introduced, which effectively suppresses these modes in a fashion similar to hour-glass control mechanisms in Finite-Element methods. Simulations utilizing this control algorithm result exhibit much improved stability, accuracy, and error convergence properties. In contrast to an alternative method which eliminates zero-energy modes, namely the use of additional integration points, the here presented algorithm is easy to implement and computationally very efficient.

  19. Controllable surface haptics via particle jamming and pneumatics.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Andrew A; Okamura, Allison M

    2015-01-01

    The combination of particle jamming and pneumatics allows the simultaneous control of shape and mechanical properties in a tactile display. A hollow silicone membrane is molded into an array of thin cells, each filled with coffee grounds such that adjusting the vacuum level in any individual cell rapidly switches it between flexible and rigid states. The array clamps over a pressure-regulated air chamber with internal mechanisms designed to pin the nodes between cells at any given height. Various sequences of cell vacuuming, node pinning, and chamber pressurization allow the surface to balloon into a variety of shapes. Experiments were performed to expand existing physical models of jamming at the inter-particle level to define the rheological characteristics of jammed systems from a macroscopic perspective, relevant to force-displacement interactions that would be experienced by human users. Force-displacement data show that a jammed cell in compression fits a Maxwell model and a cell deflected in the center while supported only at the edges fits a Zener model, each with stiffness and damping parameters that increase at higher levels of applied vacuum. This provides framework to tune and control the mechanical properties of a jamming haptic interface.

  20. A novel control strategy for efficient biological phosphorus removal with carbon-limited wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Javier; Guisasola, Albert; Baeza, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    This work shows the development and the in silico evaluation of a novel control strategy aiming at successful biological phosphorus removal in a wastewater treatment plant operating in an A(2)/O configuration with carbon-limited influent. The principle of this novel approach is that the phosphorus in the effluent can be controlled with the nitrate setpoint in the anoxic reactor as manipulated variable. The theoretical background behind this control strategy is that reducing nitrate entrance to the anoxic reactor would result in more organic matter available for biological phosphorus removal. Thus, phosphorus removal would be enhanced at the expense of increasing nitrate in the effluent (but always below legal limits). The work shows the control development, tuning and performance in comparison to open-loop conditions and to two other conventional control strategies for phosphorus removal based on organic matter and metal addition. It is shown that the novel proposed strategy achieves positive nutrient removal results with similar operational costs to the other control strategies and open-loop operation.

  1. A novel control strategy for efficient biological phosphorus removal with carbon-limited wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Javier; Guisasola, Albert; Baeza, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    This work shows the development and the in silico evaluation of a novel control strategy aiming at successful biological phosphorus removal in a wastewater treatment plant operating in an A(2)/O configuration with carbon-limited influent. The principle of this novel approach is that the phosphorus in the effluent can be controlled with the nitrate setpoint in the anoxic reactor as manipulated variable. The theoretical background behind this control strategy is that reducing nitrate entrance to the anoxic reactor would result in more organic matter available for biological phosphorus removal. Thus, phosphorus removal would be enhanced at the expense of increasing nitrate in the effluent (but always below legal limits). The work shows the control development, tuning and performance in comparison to open-loop conditions and to two other conventional control strategies for phosphorus removal based on organic matter and metal addition. It is shown that the novel proposed strategy achieves positive nutrient removal results with similar operational costs to the other control strategies and open-loop operation. PMID:25116500

  2. Statistical estimate of mercury removal efficiencies for air pollution control devices of municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumitake; Kida, Akiko; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2010-10-15

    Although representative removal efficiencies of gaseous mercury for air pollution control devices (APCDs) are important to prepare more reliable atmospheric emission inventories of mercury, they have been still uncertain because they depend sensitively on many factors like the type of APCDs, gas temperature, and mercury speciation. In this study, representative removal efficiencies of gaseous mercury for several types of APCDs of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) were offered using a statistical method. 534 data of mercury removal efficiencies for APCDs used in MSWI were collected. APCDs were categorized as fixed-bed absorber (FA), wet scrubber (WS), electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and fabric filter (FF), and their hybrid systems. Data series of all APCD types had Gaussian log-normality. The average removal efficiency with a 95% confidence interval for each APCD was estimated. The FA, WS, and FF with carbon and/or dry sorbent injection systems had 75% to 82% average removal efficiencies. On the other hand, the ESP with/without dry sorbent injection had lower removal efficiencies of up to 22%. The type of dry sorbent injection in the FF system, dry or semi-dry, did not make more than 1% difference to the removal efficiency. The injection of activated carbon and carbon-containing fly ash in the FF system made less than 3% difference. Estimation errors of removal efficiency were especially high for the ESP. The national average of removal efficiency of APCDs in Japanese MSWI plants was estimated on the basis of incineration capacity. Owing to the replacement of old APCDs for dioxin control, the national average removal efficiency increased from 34.5% in 1991 to 92.5% in 2003. This resulted in an additional reduction of about 0.86Mg emission in 2003. Further study using the methodology in this study to other important emission sources like coal-fired power plants will contribute to better emission inventories.

  3. Evaluation of riverbank infiltration as a process for removing particles and DBP precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Smith, J.; Dooley, L.

    1996-11-01

    Recent outbreaks of waterborne disease attributed to Cryptosporidium in drinking water have raised serious concerns over the effectiveness of conventional water treatment processes to produce safe drinking water supplies. Past studies have shown Cryptosporidium and Giardia to be prevalent in surface water supplies, particularly in urban-impacted surface waters such as the Ohio River which Louisville Water Company (LWC) treatment facilities utilize as their source water. Such indications of the widespread occurrence of these pathogens in source waters underscore the need for the water supply industry to evaluate alternative technologies to conventional water treatment to reduce the risk of waterborne disease occurrence. Public health concerns, shared by the water utility industry, drinking water regulators, and public water supply consumers alike, prompted the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to propose regulatory action aimed at balancing the risks of microbial disease occurrence and the health risks associated with exposure to potentially harmful compounds formed during drinking water disinfection. In pursuit of this objective, USEPA proposed the Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (ESWTR) to improve public water supply treatment performance for microbial removal and proposed the Disinfectant/Disinfection Byproduct (D/DBP) Rule to reduce DBP exposure levels. As a consequence of these rules, many water utilities will be tasked with the challenge of developing treatment capabilities which improve microbial removal performance while minimizing the production of DBPs.

  4. Method for non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Gregory R; Kaduchak, Gregory; Jett, James H; Graves, Steven W

    2015-01-13

    Method and system for uniformly spacing particles in a flowing system comprising suspending particles in an elongated fluid filled cavity; exposing said cavity to an axial acoustic standing wave field, wherein said axial acoustic standing wave field drives said particles to nodal and anti-nodal positions along the center axis of said cavity to result in uniformly spaced particles; and focusing said particles to the center axis of said cavity.

  5. Method for non-contact particle manipulation and control of particle spacing along an axis

    DOEpatents

    Goddard, Gregory Russ; Kaduchak, Gregory; Jett, James Hubert; Graves, Steven Wayde

    2012-09-11

    Method and system for uniformly spacing particles in a flowing system comprising suspending particles in an elongated fluid filled cavity; exposing said cavity to an axial acoustic standing wave field, wherein said axial acoustic standing wave field drives said particles to nodal and anti-nodal positions along the center axis of said cavity to result in uniformly spaced particles; and focusing said particles to the center axis of said cavity.

  6. Aspects of droplet and particle size control in miniemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saygi-Arslan, Oznur

    Miniemulsion polymerization has become increasingly popular among researchers since it can provide significant advantages over conventional emulsion polymerization in certain cases, such as production of high-solids, low-viscosity latexes with better stability and polymerization of highly water-insoluble monomers. Miniemulsions are relatively stable oil (e.g., monomer) droplets, which can range in size from 50 to 500 nm, and are normally dispersed in an aqueous phase with the aid of a surfactant and a costabilizer. These droplets are the primary locus of the initiation of the polymerization reaction. Since particle formation takes place in the monomer droplets, theoretically, in miniemulsion systems the final particle size can be controlled by the initial droplet size. The miniemulsion preparation process typically generates broad droplet size distributions and there is no complete treatment in the literature regarding the control of the mean droplet size or size distribution. This research aims to control the miniemulsion droplet size and its distribution. In situ emulsification, where the surfactant is synthesized spontaneously at the oil/water interface, has been put forth as a simpler method for the preparation of miniemulsions-like systems. Using the in situ method of preparation, emulsion stability and droplet and particle sizes were monitored and compared with conventional emulsions and miniemulsions. Styrene emulsions prepared by the in situ method do not demonstrate the stability of a comparable miniemulsion. Upon polymerization, the final particle size generated from the in situ emulsion did not differ significantly from the comparable conventional emulsion polymerization; the reaction mechanism for in situ emulsions is more like conventional emulsion polymerization rather than miniemulsion polymerization. Similar results were found when the in situ method was applied to controlled free radical polymerizations (CFRP), which have been advanced as a

  7. Effect of UV radiations to control particle size of Mn-Zn spinel ferrite nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameen Ramiza, F.; Ajmal, S. K.; Khan, M. B.; Nasim, A.; Jamil, Y.; Kashif, K.; Amira, S.

    2016-08-01

    MnxZn1-xFe2O4 (0.0 < x < 1.0) ferrite nano particles were synthesized for concentration varying from 0.27 to 0.87 to obtain chemically homogenous powder for obtaining fine particle size by co precipitation technique. Keeping in view the interest of scientists for particle size, the present work focus on the impact of UV radiation to control the particle size of prepared fine magnetic particles. The particles were digested for ninety minutes at a temperature of 90oC. The samples were divided into four equal quantities and were subjected to different doses of UV radiation. The chemically produced samples of Mn-Zn ferrite nano particles were analyzed by XRD which confirmed cubic spinel structure of the material. The average crystallite size (t), lattice parameter (a) and other structural parameters of UV-irradiated MnxZni-xFe2O4 spinel ferrite were calculated from XRD data. The spinel peak of the irradiated sample when compared with the control sample, shifted from 35.38 to 35.15. In few samples, additional peaks supporting the ferrite structure were also observed. The variation in the particle sizes observed for various doses of UV irradiation were in the range of 17.6 to 6.2 nm, whereas the particle size of the control was 8.82nm. The experiment was repeated for different concentrations, at the same digestion temperature and time revealed the similar results indicating that UV radiations can have a remarkable effect to control the phase and size of nano size fine magnetic ferrite particles. The present work successfully document the impact of UV to control the particle size.

  8. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Removal of [123I]Ioflupane From Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-11

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes [123I]ioflupane from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act. This action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act which requires that such actions be made on the record after an opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, [123I]ioflupane was, by definition, a schedule II controlled substance because it is derived from cocaine via ecgonine, both of which are schedule II controlled substances. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle [123I]ioflupane. PMID:26364325

  9. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Removal of [123I]Ioflupane From Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-11

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes [123I]ioflupane from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act. This action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act which requires that such actions be made on the record after an opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, [123I]ioflupane was, by definition, a schedule II controlled substance because it is derived from cocaine via ecgonine, both of which are schedule II controlled substances. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle [123I]ioflupane.

  10. Multi-particle assembled porous nanostructured MgO: its application in fluoride removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangaiah, Vijayakumar; Siddaramanna, Ashoka; Thimanna Chandrappa, Gujjarahalli

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a simple and economical route based on ethylene glycol mediated process was developed to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) multiparticle assembled nanostructured MgO using magnesium acetate and urea as reactants. Porous multiparticle chain-like MgO has been synthesized by the calcination of a solvothermally derived single nanostructured precursor. The prepared products were characterized by an x-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, thermogravimetry, scanning/transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) and N2 adsorption (BET). As a proof of concept, the porous multiparticle chain-like MgO has been applied in a water treatment for isolated and rural communities, and it has exhibited an excellent adsorption capability to remove fluoride in waste water. In addition, this method could be generalized to prepare other 1D nanostructures with great potential for various attractive applications.

  11. Use of hybrid composite particles prepared using alkoxysilane-functionalized amphiphilic polymer precursors for simultaneous removal of various pollutants from water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seulki; Kim, Nahae; Lee, Soonjae; Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Kim, Juyoung; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we present new inorganic-organic hybrid particles and their possible application as an adsorbent for simultaneous removal of hydrophobic and hydrophilic pollutants from water. These hybrid particles were prepared using tailor-made alkoxysilane-functionalized amphiphilic polymer precursors (M-APAS), which have amphiphilic polymers and reactive alkoxysilane groups attached to the same backbone. Through a single conventional sol-gel process, the polymerization of M-APAS and the chemical conjugation of M-APAS onto silica nanoparticles was simultaneous, resulting in the formation of hybrid particles (M-APAS-SiO2) comprised of hyperbranch-like amphiphilic polymers bonded onto silica nanoparticles with a relatively high grafting efficiency. A test for the adsorption of water-soluble dye (organe-16) and water insoluble dye (solvent blue-35) onto the hybrid particles was performed to evaluate the possibility of adsorbing hydrophilic and hydrophobic compound within the same particle. The hybrid particle was also evaluated as an adsorbent for the removal of contaminated water containing various pollutants by wastewater treatment test. The hybrid particle could remove phenolic compounds from wastewater and the azo dye reactive orange-16 from aqueous solutions, and it was easily separated from the treated wastewater because of the different densities involved. These results demonstrate that the hybrid particles are a promising sorbent for hydrophilic and/or hydrophobic pollutants in water.

  12. Knowledge engineering for PACES, the particle accelerator control expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, P. C.; Poehlman, W. F. S.; Stark, J. W.; Cousins, T.

    1992-04-01

    The KN-3000 used at Defense Research Establishment Ottawa is a Van de Graaff particle accelerator employed primarily to produce monoenergetic neutrons for calibrating radiation detectors. To provide training and assistance for new operators, it was decided to develop an expert system for accelerator operation. Knowledge engineering aspects of the expert system are reviewed. Two important issues are involved: the need to encapsulate expert knowledge into the system in a form that facilitates automatic accelerator operation and to partition the system so that time-consuming inferencing is minimized in favor of faster, more algorithmic control. It is seen that accelerator control will require fast, narrowminded decision making for rapid fine tuning, but slower and broader reasoning for machine startup, shutdown, fault diagnosis, and correction. It is also important to render the knowledge base in a form conducive to operator training. A promising form of the expert system involves a hybrid system in which high level reasoning is performed on the host machine that interacts with the user, while an embedded controller employs neural networks for fast but limited adjustment of accelerator performance. This partitioning of duty facilitates a hierarchical chain of command yielding an effective mixture of speed and reasoning ability.

  13. [Characteristics of nitrogen and phosphorus removal and control of membrane fouling in MBR and SMBR].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Ma; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Kai-Yan; Zhao Yang-Guo

    2015-03-01

    To improve the efficiency and running stability of wastewater advanced treatment, a sequencing membrane bioreactor (SMBR) and a traditional membrane bioreactor (MBR) were used to investigate the characteristics of nitrogen and phosphorus removal, and the effect of anoxic time on treatment systems and membrane fouling. Simultaneously, molecular biology techniques were applied to analyze the composition of microbial community and the structure of suspended sludge. The results showed that SMBR had higher efficiency in removing TN than MBR, which indicated that intermittent aeration could enhance the ability of nitrogen removal. SMBR and MBR had a similar removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N, TP, COD, and turbidity with the removal rates of 94%, 78%, 80%, and 97%, respectively. Extension of SMBR anoxic time had no effect on COD, NH4(+) -N removal but decreased TN and TP removal rate, dropping from 61% and 74% to 46% and 52%, respectively. Intermittent aeration and powder activated carbon (PAC) could both mitigate membrane fouling. The analysis on microbial community indicated that there was no difference in the composition and structure of microbial community between SMBR and MBR. Nitrospira and Dechloromonas were both highly abundant functional groups, which provided the basis for highly efficient control of bioreactors.

  14. Controls on the Efficiency of Estuarine Particle Trapping: Ecosystem Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jay, D. A.; Orton, P. M.; Chisholm, T. A.

    2002-12-01

    Comparisons between the Columbia and Fraser river estuaries suggest several important controls on retention of suspended particulate matter (SPM) in estuarine turbidity maxima (ETM). Observations were carried out in spring 1997 and 1999 in the Columbia under moderate to high-flow conditions. Because of flow regulation, flow levels were ~60% of their natural values, considerably increasing the salinity intrusion length and efficiency of particle trapping. Observations in the Fraser were made under extreme high-flow conditions (1999) and under normal spring conditions (2000). Concentrations of coarse material (sand and flocs landward of salinity intrusion, primarily large aggregates within the salt-water mass) were inferred from acoustic backscatter (ABS). Concentrations of silt and clay were estimated from optical backscatter (OBS). Both were calibrated through gravimetric analysis of pump samples and Owen tube results. The very high flows in the Fraser prevented efficient SPM retention for several reasons, and no permanent ETM was observed. First, the salinity intrusion was forced out of the estuary mouth on every greater ebb, exposing the bed to high bedstress levels. Moreover, the estuary was so short that individual silt particles could not settle to the bed before being exported by the river flow. Finally, aggregation appeared to be rate-limited, such that fluvial particles were unable to form into large aggregates during their rapid transit through the estuary. Aggregation occurred instead in the buoyant plume outside the estuary. Thus, the time scale for particle retention in the Fraser was <1 day. Conditions for ETM particle trapping were more favorable in the Columbia, because salt was never totally expelled from the system, and the fronts at the upstream limit of salinity intrusion were never forced back to the plume lift-off zone at the mouth. Also, near-surface waters required most of a tide to transit the length of salinity intrusion, allowing formation

  15. Biochar Supported Nanoscale Iron Particles for the Efficient Removal of Methyl Orange Dye in Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shichen; Yan, Jingchun; Qian, Linbo; Chen, Mengfang

    2015-01-01

    The presence of organic contaminants in industrial effluents is an environmental concern of increasing global importance. One innovative technology for treating contaminated industrial effluents is nanoscale zero-valent iron supported on biochar (nZVI/BC). Based on Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller characterizations, the nZVI was well dispersed on the biochar and aggregation was dramatically reduced. Methyl orange (MO) served as the representative organic contaminant for verifying the effectiveness of the composite. Using decolorization efficiency as an indicator of treatment effectiveness, increasing doses of nZVI/BC yielded progressively better results with 98.51% of MO decolorized by 0.6 g/L of composite at an nZVI/BC mass ratio of 1:5. The superior decolorization efficiency of the nZVI/BC was attributed to the increase in the dispersion and reactivity of nZVI while biochar increasing the contact area with contaminant and the adsorption of composites. Additionally, the buffering function of acid-washed biochar could be in favor of maintaining the reactivity of nZVI. Furthermore, the aging nZVI/BC for 30 day was able to maintain the removal efficiency indicating that the oxidation of nZVI may be delayed in the presence of biochar. Therefore, the composite of nZVI/BC could represent an effective functional material for treating wastewater containing organic dyes in the future. PMID:26204523

  16. Biochar Supported Nanoscale Iron Particles for the Efficient Removal of Methyl Orange Dye in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Xue, Song; Zhao, Shichen; Yan, Jingchun; Qian, Linbo; Chen, Mengfang

    2015-01-01

    The presence of organic contaminants in industrial effluents is an environmental concern of increasing global importance. One innovative technology for treating contaminated industrial effluents is nanoscale zero-valent iron supported on biochar (nZVI/BC). Based on Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller characterizations, the nZVI was well dispersed on the biochar and aggregation was dramatically reduced. Methyl orange (MO) served as the representative organic contaminant for verifying the effectiveness of the composite. Using decolorization efficiency as an indicator of treatment effectiveness, increasing doses of nZVI/BC yielded progressively better results with 98.51% of MO decolorized by 0.6 g/L of composite at an nZVI/BC mass ratio of 1:5. The superior decolorization efficiency of the nZVI/BC was attributed to the increase in the dispersion and reactivity of nZVI while biochar increasing the contact area with contaminant and the adsorption of composites. Additionally, the buffering function of acid-washed biochar could be in favor of maintaining the reactivity of nZVI. Furthermore, the aging nZVI/BC for 30 day was able to maintain the removal efficiency indicating that the oxidation of nZVI may be delayed in the presence of biochar. Therefore, the composite of nZVI/BC could represent an effective functional material for treating wastewater containing organic dyes in the future. PMID:26204523

  17. Extinction and backscatter measurements of Antarctic PSC's, 1987: Implications for particle and vapor removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.; Mccormick, M. Patrick; Browell, Edward V.; Trepte, C. R.; Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Ferry, G. V.; Pueschel, R. F.; Jones, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The temperature dependence is examined of optical properties measured in the Antarctic during 1987 at the 70 mb level (near 18 km), a level chosen to correlate the results with in situ measurements made from the NASA-Ames ER-2 aircraft during the 1987 Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE). The data set consists of extinction measurements by Sam 2 inside the Antarctic polar vortex from May to October 1987; and backscatter measurements by the UV-DIAL (Ultraviolet Differential Absorption Lidar) system aboard the Ames DC-8 aircraft during selected AAOE flights. Observed trends are compared with results from a revised version of Pole and McCormick's model to classify the PSC observations by Type (1 or 2) and infer the temporal behavior of the ambient aerosol and ambient vapor mixing ratios. The sample figures show monthly ensembles of the 70-mb Sam 2 extinction ratio (the ratio of aerosol or PSC extinction to molecule extinction) as a function of NMC temperature at the beginning (June) and (October) of the 1987 Antarctic winter. Both ensembles show two rather distinct clusters of points: one oriented in the near vertical direction which depicts the change with temperature of the ambient aerosol extinction ratio; and a second cluster oriented in the near horizontal direction whose position on the vertical scale marks a change in particle phase (i.e., PSC formation) and whose length (the extinction enhancement related to that of the ambient aerosol) is an indicator of PSC type.

  18. Removal of Laryngeal Mask Airway in Adults Under Target-Controlled, Propofol–Fentanyl Infusion Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ren-Chih; Hung, Nan-Kai; Lu, Chueng-He; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After emergence from anesthesia, the incidence and severity of adverse airway effects caused by the laryngeal mask airway (LMA) can vary, depending on when the device was removed; nonetheless, reports differ regarding the exact optimal timing of LMA removal. The purpose of this study was to compare the rate of adverse events between 2 groups: those whose LMA was removed under general anesthesia (“deep” group) or under target-controlled infusion (TCI) of propofol (“awake” group). Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent were obtained; 124 patients were then randomly allocated into either the “awake” group or the “deep” group. Anesthesia was induced and maintained using TCI of propofol, as well as intravenous fentanyl. In the “deep” group, the LMA was removed after surgery while the patients were deeply anesthetized using a target effect-site propofol concentration of 2 μg/mL, whereas in the “awake” group, the device was removed while the patients followed verbal instructions. The incidence of the following adverse events was recorded: coughing, straining, bronchospasm, laryngospasm, clenching, breath holding, gross purposeful movement, airway obstruction, retching, vomiting, and oxygen desaturation. If any such event occurred, the LMA removal was considered a failure. Airway hyperreactivity was recorded and graded – based on the severity of cough, breath holding, and oxygen desaturation. The failure rate was higher in the “awake” group (15/61; 24.6%) than in the “deep” group (5/60; 8.3%). Airway hyperreactivity was mild (score, <3) in both groups. Removal of the LMA under deep anesthesia using a target-controlled, effect-site propofol concentration of 2 μg/mL may be safer and more successful than removal when patients are fully awake after surgery. PMID:27124034

  19. Control Experiment of Positively Charged Fine Particles at the Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Toshiaki; Ando, Ayumi; Sato, Noriyoshi

    2005-10-31

    It is already reported that the negatively charged fine particle flow was controlled by application of external electric field. The control of positively charged fine particles was examined in this experiment.The fine particles are able to take charges in the air under the atmospheric pressure by irradiation of UV light. The control of the positively charged fine particles has been attempted by the external electric field applied the negative potential. The fine particles for experiments are volcanic ashes, nylon 16, glass, and ice. Experiment was performed in the T-shaped glass chamber under the atmospheric pressure. The halogen lamp (500 W) was used to exit the electrons from particles by photo-emission. The ring and disk electrodes to control the positively charged particles were set at the bottom of chamber. The parallel electrodes were set at the middle of chamber and horizontal static electric fields (E = 0 {approx} 210 V/cm) were created in order to estimate the charge of fine particles. The charges of particle were estimated by the deflection of particle trajectory in the static electric fields and particle velocity. The estimated charges were 104e {approx} 5x106e and 103e {approx} 105e for volcanic ashes and nylon 16, respectively. When positively charged particles were introduced into collecting electrodes, the fine particles are collected in the electrodes. The result of control of positively charged fine particles is shown in this conference.

  20. Γ-Al₂O₃-based nanocomposite adsorbents for arsenic(V) removal: assessing performance, toxicity and particle leakage.

    PubMed

    Onnby, Linda; Svensson, Christian; Mbundi, Lubinda; Busquets, Rosa; Cundy, Andrew; Kirsebom, Harald

    2014-03-01

    The generation and development of effective adsorption materials for arsenic removal are urgently needed due to acute arsenic contamination of water sources in many regions around the world. In the search for these new adsorbents, the application of nanomaterials or nanocomposites, and especially the use of nanoparticles (NPs), has proven increasingly attractive. While the adsorptive performance of a range of nanocomposite and nanomaterial-based systems has been extensively reviewed in previously-published literature, the stability of these systems in terms of NP release, i.e. the ability of the nanomaterial or nanocomposite to retain incorporated NPs, is less well understood. Here we examine the performance of nanocomposites comprised of aluminium oxide nanoparticles (AluNPs) incorporated in macroporous polyacrylamide-based cryogels (n-Alu-cryo, where n indicates the percentage of AluNPs in the polymer material (n=0-6%, w/v)) for As(V) adsorption, and evaluate AluNP leakage before and after the use of these materials. A range of techniques is utilised and assessed (SEM, TEM, mass weight change, PIXE and in vitro toxicity studies). The 4-Alu-cryo nanocomposite was shown to be optimal for minimising AluNP losses while maximising As(V) removal. From the same nanocomposite we were further able to show that NP losses were not detectable at the AluNP concentrations used in the study. Toxicity tests revealed that no cytotoxic effects could be observed. The cryogel-AluNPs composites were not only effective in As(V) removal but also in immobilising the AluNPs. More challenging flow-through conditions for the evaluation of NP leakage could be included as a next step in a continued study assessing particle loss and subsequent toxicity.

  1. Γ-Al₂O₃-based nanocomposite adsorbents for arsenic(V) removal: assessing performance, toxicity and particle leakage.

    PubMed

    Onnby, Linda; Svensson, Christian; Mbundi, Lubinda; Busquets, Rosa; Cundy, Andrew; Kirsebom, Harald

    2014-03-01

    The generation and development of effective adsorption materials for arsenic removal are urgently needed due to acute arsenic contamination of water sources in many regions around the world. In the search for these new adsorbents, the application of nanomaterials or nanocomposites, and especially the use of nanoparticles (NPs), has proven increasingly attractive. While the adsorptive performance of a range of nanocomposite and nanomaterial-based systems has been extensively reviewed in previously-published literature, the stability of these systems in terms of NP release, i.e. the ability of the nanomaterial or nanocomposite to retain incorporated NPs, is less well understood. Here we examine the performance of nanocomposites comprised of aluminium oxide nanoparticles (AluNPs) incorporated in macroporous polyacrylamide-based cryogels (n-Alu-cryo, where n indicates the percentage of AluNPs in the polymer material (n=0-6%, w/v)) for As(V) adsorption, and evaluate AluNP leakage before and after the use of these materials. A range of techniques is utilised and assessed (SEM, TEM, mass weight change, PIXE and in vitro toxicity studies). The 4-Alu-cryo nanocomposite was shown to be optimal for minimising AluNP losses while maximising As(V) removal. From the same nanocomposite we were further able to show that NP losses were not detectable at the AluNP concentrations used in the study. Toxicity tests revealed that no cytotoxic effects could be observed. The cryogel-AluNPs composites were not only effective in As(V) removal but also in immobilising the AluNPs. More challenging flow-through conditions for the evaluation of NP leakage could be included as a next step in a continued study assessing particle loss and subsequent toxicity. PMID:24370695

  2. In-situ removal and characterisation of uranium-containing particles from sediments surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. G.; Griffiths, I.; Jones, C. P.; Stitt, C. A.; Davies-Milner, M.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Yamashiki, Y.; Richards, D. A.; Scott, T. B.

    2016-03-01

    Traditional methods to locate and subsequently study radioactive fallout particles have focused heavily on autoradiography coupled with in-situ analytical techniques. Presented here is the application of a Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope with both backscattered electron and energy dispersive spectroscopy detectors, along with a micromanipulator setup and electron-hardening adhesive to isolate and remove individual particles before synchrotron radiation analysis. This system allows for a greater range of new and existing analytical techniques, at increased detail and speed, to be applied to the material. Using this method, it was possible to erform detailed energy dispersive spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation characterisation of material likely ejected from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant found within a sediment sample collected from the edge of the 30 km exclusion zone. Particulate material sub-micron in maximum dimension examined during this work via energy dispersive spectroscopy was observed to contain uranium at levels between 19.68 and 28.35 weight percent, with the application of synchrotron radiation spectroscopy confirming its presence as a major constituent. With great effort and cost being devoted to the remediation of significant areas of eastern Japan affected by the incident, it is crucial to gain the greatest possible understanding of the nature of this contamination in order to inform the most appropriate clean-up response.

  3. A new method to evaluate polydisperse kaolinite clay particle removal in roughing filtration using colloid filtration theory.

    PubMed

    Lin, Edwin; Page, Declan; Pavelic, Paul

    2008-02-01

    Previous application of colloid filtration theory to roughing filtration has not considered a reliable method for determining a representative attachment factor for a polydisperse suspension (of constant particle density). Establishment of such a method would broaden the application of trajectory modelling in roughing filtration, and progress the development of a comprehensive database of attachment factors and surface charge potentials for various particle and fluid types. This study establishes a methodology for the application of colloid filtration theory to roughing filtration and incorporates recent advancements in theoretical single-collector efficiency. A polydisperse kaolinite clay suspension was passed through a series of four gravel upflow roughing filters and removal efficiencies were calculated. Both the classical and Tufenkji and Elimelech's more recent correlation equations were used to calculate theoretical single-collector efficiencies and associated attachment factors for three different filter media sizes, flow rates, and suspended solids concentrations (0.137+/-0.023). The use of Tufenkji and Elimelech's modified correlation equation resulted in reduced variability in the estimation of theoretical single-collector efficiencies. PMID:17884131

  4. Tuning selectivity in catalysis by controlling particle shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ilkeun; Delbecq, Françoise; Morales, Ricardo; Albiter, Manuel A.; Zaera, Francisco

    2009-02-01

    A catalytic process for the selective formation of cis olefins would help minimize the production of unhealthy trans fats during the partial hydrogenation of edible oils. Here we report on the design of such a process on the basis of studies with model systems. Temperature programmed desorption data on single crystals showed that the isomerization of trans olefins to their cis counterparts is promoted by (111) facets of platinum, and that such selectivity is reversed on more open surfaces. Quantum mechanics calculations suggested that the extra stability of cis olefins seen on hydrogen-saturated Pt(111) surfaces may be due to a lesser degree of surface reconstruction, a factor found to be significant in the adsorption on close-packed platinum surfaces. Kinetic data using catalysts made out of dispersed tetrahedral Pt nanoparticles corroborated the selective promotion of the trans-to-cis isomerization on the (111) facets of the metal. Our work provides an example for how catalytic selectivity may be controlled by controlling the shape of the catalytic particles.

  5. An experimental study for biological nitrogen removal and control strategies in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Venegas, C; Palma-Acosta, M J; Abad, D

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present an overview about an experimental study for biological nitrogen removal implemented in a pilot-scale plant, located in the Universidad Del Norte in Barranquilla, Colombia. This plant was studied in two different periods. The first period, which was carried out in 90 days, was dedicated to study the influence of the daily variations on the influent and effluent wastewater, and prove some control routines for nitrogen removal. In the second period, which was carried out in 120 days, the removal process was optimized with the addition of acetic acid as an external carbon source, and the implementation of the final control strategy was performed based on the results of the previous period.

  6. An experimental study for biological nitrogen removal and control strategies in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR).

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Venegas, C; Palma-Acosta, M J; Abad, D

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present an overview about an experimental study for biological nitrogen removal implemented in a pilot-scale plant, located in the Universidad Del Norte in Barranquilla, Colombia. This plant was studied in two different periods. The first period, which was carried out in 90 days, was dedicated to study the influence of the daily variations on the influent and effluent wastewater, and prove some control routines for nitrogen removal. In the second period, which was carried out in 120 days, the removal process was optimized with the addition of acetic acid as an external carbon source, and the implementation of the final control strategy was performed based on the results of the previous period. PMID:17674653

  7. IET control building (TAN620). equipment removed. Lube oil and waste ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET control building (TAN-620). equipment removed. Lube oil and waste piping at upper right. Fire door on right. Rebar exposed in concrete of ceiling. INEEL negative no. HD-21-5-3 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer attitude control electronics box design and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, K.; Clagett, C.; Correll, T.; Gruner, T.; Quinn, T.; Shiflett, L.; Schnurr, R.; Wennersten, M.; Frederick, M.; Fox, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    The attitude Control Electronics (ACE) Box is the center of the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) for the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) satellite. This unit is the single point interface for all of the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) related sensors and actuators. Commands and telemetry between the SAMPEX flight computer and the ACE Box are routed via a MIL-STD-1773 bus interface, through the use of an 80C85 processor. The ACE Box consists of the flowing electronic elements: power supply, momentum wheel driver, electromagnet driver, coarse sun sensor interface, digital sun sensor interface, magnetometer interface, and satellite computer interface. In addition, the ACE Box also contains an independent Safehold electronics package capable of keeping the satellite pitch axis pointing towards the sun. The ACE Box has dimensions of 24 x 31 x 8 cm, a mass of 4.3 kg, and an average power consumption of 10.5 W. This set of electronics was completely designed, developed, integrated, and tested by personnel at NASA GSFC. SAMPEX was launched on July 3, 1992, and the initial attitude acquisition was successfully accomplished via the analog Safehold electronics in the ACE Box. This acquisition scenario removed the excess body rates via magnetic control and precessed the satellite pitch axis to within 10 deg of the sun line. The performance of the SAMPEX ACS in general and the ACE Box in particular has been quite satisfactory.

  9. The role and control of sludge age in biological nutrient removal activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Ekama, G A

    2010-01-01

    The sludge age is the most fundamental and important parameter in the design, operation and control of biological nutrient removal (BNR) activated sludge (AS) systems. Generally, the better the effluent and waste sludge quality required from the system, the longer the sludge age, the larger the biological reactor and the more wastewater characteristics need to be known. Controlling the reactor concentration does not control sludge age, only the mass of sludge in the system. When nitrification is a requirement, sludge age control becomes a requirement and the secondary settling tanks can no longer serve the dual purpose of clarifier and waste activated sludge thickeners. The easiest and most practical way to control sludge age is with hydraulic control by wasting a defined proportion of the reactor volume daily. In AS plants with reactor concentration control, nitrification fails first. With hydraulic control of sludge age, nitrification will not fail, rather the plant fails by shedding solids over the secondary settling tank effluent weirs.

  10. The effect of particle size distribution on the design of urban stormwater control measures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, William R.; Fienen, Michael N.; Horwatich, Judy A.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    2016-01-01

    An urban pollutant loading model was used to demonstrate how incorrect assumptions on the particle size distribution (PSD) in urban runoff can alter the design characteristics of stormwater control measures (SCMs) used to remove solids in stormwater. Field-measured PSD, although highly variable, is generally coarser than the widely-accepted PSD characterized by the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program (NURP). PSDs can be predicted based on environmental surrogate data. There were no appreciable differences in predicted PSD when grouped by season. Model simulations of a wet detention pond and catch basin showed a much smaller surface area is needed to achieve the same level of solids removal using the median value of field-measured PSD as compared to NURP PSD. Therefore, SCMs that used the NURP PSD in the design process could be unnecessarily oversized. The median of measured PSDs, although more site-specific than NURP PSDs, could still misrepresent the efficiency of an SCM because it may not adequately capture the variability of individual runoff events. Future pollutant loading models may account for this variability through regression with environmental surrogates, but until then, without proper site characterization, the adoption of a single PSD to represent all runoff conditions may result in SCMs that are under- or over-sized, rendering them ineffective or unnecessarily costly.

  11. Synthesizing aluminum particles towards controlling electrostatic discharge ignition sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Eric S. Collins; Jeffery P. Gesner; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael A. Daniels

    2014-02-01

    Aluminum particles were synthesized with shell thicknesses ranging from 2.7 to 8.3 nm and a constant diameter of 95 nm. These fuel particles were combined with molybdenum trioxide particles and the electrostatic discharge (ESD) sensitivity of the mixture was measured. Results show ignition delay increased as the alumina shell thickness increased. These results correlated with electrical resistivity measurements of the mixture which increased with alumina concentration. A model was developed using COMSOL for ignition of a single Al particle. The ignition delay in the model was consistent with the experimental results suggesting that the primary ESD ignition mechanism is joule heating.

  12. Removal of Particles and Acid Gases (SO2 or HCl) with a Ceramic Filter by Addition of Dry Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmer, G.; Kasper, G.; Wang, J.; Schaub, G.

    2002-09-20

    The present investigation intends to add to the fundamental process design know-how for dry flue gas cleaning, especially with respect to process flexibility, in cases where variations in the type of fuel and thus in concentration of contaminants in the flue gas require optimization of operating conditions. In particular, temperature effects of the physical and chemical processes occurring simultaneously in the gas-particle dispersion and in the filter cake/filter medium are investigated in order to improve the predictive capabilities for identifying optimum operating conditions. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}) and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH){sub 2}) are known as efficient sorbents for neutralizing acid flue gas components such as HCl, HF, and SO{sub 2}. According to their physical properties (e.g. porosity, pore size) and chemical behavior (e.g. thermal decomposition, reactivity for gas-solid reactions), optimum conditions for their application vary widely. The results presented concentrate on the development of quantitative data for filtration stability and overall removal efficiency as affected by operating temperature. Experiments were performed in a small pilot unit with a ceramic filter disk of the type Dia-Schumalith 10-20 (Fig. 1, described in more detail in Hemmer 2002 and Hemmer et al. 1999), using model flue gases containing SO{sub 2} and HCl, flyash from wood bark combustion, and NaHCO{sub 3} as well as Ca(OH){sub 2} as sorbent material (particle size d{sub 50}/d{sub 84} : 35/192 {micro}m, and 3.5/16, respectively). The pilot unit consists of an entrained flow reactor (gas duct) representing the raw gas volume of a filter house and the filter disk with a filter cake, operating continuously, simulating filter cake build-up and cleaning of the filter medium by jet pulse. Temperatures varied from 200 to 600 C, sorbent stoichiometric ratios from zero to 2, inlet concentrations were on the order of 500 to 700 mg/m{sup 3}, water vapor contents ranged from

  13. Efficacy of potential chemical control compounds for removing invasive American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana).

    PubMed

    Witmer, Gary W; Snow, Nathan P; Moulton, Rachael S

    2015-01-01

    Invasive American bullfrogs [Rana catesbeiana (Lithobates catesbeianus)] are outcompeting and predating on native biota and contributing to reductions in biodiversity worldwide. Current methods for controlling American bullfrogs are incapable of stopping their expansion, thus more cost-effective and broadly applicable methods are needed. Although chemical control compounds have been identified as effective for removing other invasive amphibians, none have been tested for American bullfrogs. Our objective was to expand on previous research and test the efficacy of 10 potential chemical control compounds for removing invasive American bullfrogs. After a dermal spray-application of 4 ml, we found 3 compounds (i.e., chloroxylenol, rotenone with permethrin, and caffeine) at 5-10 % concentrations in water were 100 % lethal for adult American bullfrogs. Chloroxylenol and rotenone with permethrin were fast acting with time-to-death <2 h. This research presents a first-step toward incorporating chemical control as part of integrated pest management strategy for controlling invasive American bullfrogs. Follow-up studies on delivery systems and reducing non-target hazards should ensue with these compounds to confirm their effectiveness and safety for removing invasive American bullfrogs. PMID:26389022

  14. Efficacy of potential chemical control compounds for removing invasive American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana).

    PubMed

    Witmer, Gary W; Snow, Nathan P; Moulton, Rachael S

    2015-01-01

    Invasive American bullfrogs [Rana catesbeiana (Lithobates catesbeianus)] are outcompeting and predating on native biota and contributing to reductions in biodiversity worldwide. Current methods for controlling American bullfrogs are incapable of stopping their expansion, thus more cost-effective and broadly applicable methods are needed. Although chemical control compounds have been identified as effective for removing other invasive amphibians, none have been tested for American bullfrogs. Our objective was to expand on previous research and test the efficacy of 10 potential chemical control compounds for removing invasive American bullfrogs. After a dermal spray-application of 4 ml, we found 3 compounds (i.e., chloroxylenol, rotenone with permethrin, and caffeine) at 5-10 % concentrations in water were 100 % lethal for adult American bullfrogs. Chloroxylenol and rotenone with permethrin were fast acting with time-to-death <2 h. This research presents a first-step toward incorporating chemical control as part of integrated pest management strategy for controlling invasive American bullfrogs. Follow-up studies on delivery systems and reducing non-target hazards should ensue with these compounds to confirm their effectiveness and safety for removing invasive American bullfrogs.

  15. Adaptive control for space debris removal with uncertain kinematics, dynamics and states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Fan; Meng, Zhongjie; Liu, Zhengxiong

    2016-11-01

    As the Tethered Space Robot is considered to be a promising solution for the Active Debris Removal, a lot of problems arise in the approaching, capturing and removing phases. Particularly, kinematics and dynamics parameters of the debris are unknown, and parts of the states are unmeasurable according to the specifics of tether, which is a tough problem for the target retrieval/de-orbiting. This work proposes a full adaptive control strategy for the space debris removal via a Tethered Space Robot with unknown kinematics, dynamics and part of the states. First we derive a dynamics model for the retrieval by treating the base satellite (chaser) and the unknown space debris (target) as rigid bodies in the presence of offsets, and involving the flexibility and elasticity of tether. Then, a full adaptive controller is presented including a control law, a dynamic adaption law, and a kinematic adaption law. A modified controller is also presented according to the peculiarities of this system. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the performance of two proposed controllers.

  16. Removal of oxygen demand and nitrogen using different particle-sizes of anthracite coated with nine kinds of LDHs for wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangling; Guo, Lu; Wang, Yafen; Ruan, Congying

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the application of anthracite particles of different sizes and coated with nine kinds of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) varying in MII-MIII cations, as alternative substrates in the simulated vertical-flow constructed wetland columns. Effects of LDHs-coating and particle size of modified anthracites were examined to evaluate their abilities in removing oxygen demand and nitrogen from sewage wastewater. Results showed that LDHs modification effectively enhanced the removal of nitrogen and organics. The removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) , ammonia and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were best improved by 28.5%, 11.9% and 4.1% for the medium particle size (1-3 mm), followed by 9.2%, 5.5% and 13.6% for the large size (3-5 mm), respectively. Only TN removal was improved up to 16.6% for the small particle size (0.5-1 mm). Nitrate tended to accumulate and fluctuate greatly across all the treatments, probably due to the dominancy of aerobic condition in the vertical-flow columns. Overall, MgFe-LDHs was selected as the best-modified coating for anthracite. The results suggested LDHs modification would be one of the promising strategies to provide new-types of highly efficient and lasting wetland substrates.

  17. Biofiltration for removal of BOM and residual ammonia following control of bromate formation.

    PubMed

    Wert, Eric C; Neemann, Jeffrey J; Rexing, David J; Zegers, Ronald E

    2008-01-01

    Nitrification was developed within a biological filter to simultaneously remove biodegradable organic matter (BOM) and residual ammonia added to control bromate formation during the ozonation of drinking water. Testing was performed at pilot-scale using three filters containing sand and anthracite filter media. BOM formed during ozonation (e.g., assimilable organic carbon (396-572 microg/L), formaldehyde (11-20 microg/L), and oxalate (83-145 microg/L)) was up to 70% removed through biofiltration. Dechlorinated backwash water was required to develop the nitrifying bacteria needed to convert the residual ammonia (0.1-0.5 mg/L NH(3)-N) to nitrite and then to nitrate. Chlorinated backwash water resulted in biofiltration without nitrification. Deep-bed filtration (empty-bed contact time (EBCT) = 8.3 min) did not enhance the development of nitrification when compared with shallow-bed filtration (EBCT = 3.2 min). Variable filtration rates between 4.8 and 14.6 m/h (2 and 6 gpm/sf) had minimal impact on BOM removal. However, conversion of ammonia to nitrite was reduced by 60% when increasing the filtration rate from 4.8 to 14.6 m/h. The results provide drinking water utilities practicing ozonation with a cost-effective alternative to remove the residual ammonia added for bromate control. PMID:17692888

  18. Particle control near reticle and optics using showerhead

    DOEpatents

    Delgado, Gildardo R.; Chilese, Frank; Garcia, Rudy; Torczynski, John R.; Geller, Anthony S.; Rader, Daniel J.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Gallis, Michail A.

    2016-01-26

    A method and an apparatus to protect a reticle against particles and chemicals in an actinic EUV reticle inspection tool are presented. The method and apparatus utilizes a pair of porous metal diffusers in the form of showerheads to provide a continual flow of clean gas. The main showerhead bathes the reticle surface to be inspected in smoothly flowing, low pressure gas, isolating it from particles coming from surrounding volumes. The secondary showerhead faces away from the reticle and toward the EUV illumination and projection optics, supplying them with purge gas while at the same time creating a buffer zone that is kept free of any particle contamination originating from those optics.

  19. Ammonia-based intermittent aeration control optimized for efficient nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Pusker; Bunce, Ryder; Miller, Mark W; Park, Hongkeun; Chandran, Kartik; Wett, Bernhard; Murthy, Sudhir; Bott, Charles B

    2015-10-01

    This work describes the development of an intermittently aerated pilot-scale process (V = 0.45 m(3) ) operated for optimized efficient nitrogen removal in terms of volume, supplemental carbon and alkalinity requirements. The intermittent aeration pattern was controlled using a strategy based on effluent ammonia concentration set-points. The unique feature of the ammonia-based aeration control was that a fixed dissolved oxygen (DO) set-point was used and the length of the aerobic and anoxic time (anoxic time ≥25% of total cycle time) were changed based on the effluent ammonia concentration. Unlike continuously aerated ammonia-based aeration control strategies, this approach offered control over the aerobic solids retention time (SRT) to deal with fluctuating ammonia loading without solely relying on changes to the total SRT. This approach allowed the system to be operated at a total SRT with a small safety factor. The benefits of operating at an aggressive SRT were reduced hydraulic retention time (HRT) for nitrogen removal. As a result of such an operation, nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) out-selection was also obtained (ammonia oxidizing bacteria [AOB] maximum activity: 400 ± 79 mgN/L/d, NOB maximum activity: 257 ± 133 mgN/L/d, P < 0.001) expanding opportunities for short-cut nitrogen removal. The pilot demonstrated a total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) removal rate of 95 ± 30 mgN/L/d at an influent chemical oxygen demand: ammonia (COD/NH4 (+) -N) ratio of 10.2 ± 2.2 at 25°C within the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 h and within a total SRT of 5-10 days. The TIN removal efficiency up to 91% was observed during the study, while effluent TIN was 9.6 ± 4.4 mgN/L. Therefore, this pilot-scale study demonstrates that application of the proposed on-line aeration control is capable of relatively high nitrogen removal without supplemental carbon and alkalinity addition at a low HRT.

  20. A hybrid mathematical model for controlling particle size, particle size distribution, and color properties of toner particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ataeefard, Maryam; Shadman, Alireza; Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Mohammadi, Yousef

    2016-08-01

    A mathematical modeling approach was proposed combining the capabilities of response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF) and implemented successfully in production of printing toner particles. Toner powders were systematically synthesized through suspension copolymerization process. Applying RSM, a series of experiments were designed and toner particles were prepared and the effects of monomer ratio, colorant and surfactant content on the particle size (PS), particle size distribution (PSD), thermal and colorimetric properties (∆ E) of the resulting toner were monitored and discussed. The second-order models corresponding to each target characteristic, i.e., PS, PSD, and ∆ E of different types of toner powders, were obtained by individual optimization to express variation of each property in terms of polymerization parameters. Applying statistical calculations, the best reduced models were identified to be fed in the second step of optimization. Since toners with appropriate PS, PSD, and CP were needed, we applied multi-objective optimization based on DF approach. The results show that exact tuning of toner properties is closely possible with the aid of hybrid mathematical model developed in this work. Noticeably, desirabilities are very close to 100 %.

  1. Computational Prediction of Cryogenic Micro-nano Solid Nitrogen Particle Production Using Laval Nozzle for Physical Photo Resist Removal-cleaning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Abe, Haruto; Ochiai, Naoya

    The fundamental characteristics of the cryogenic single-component micro-nano solid nitrogen (SN2) particle production using super adiabatic Laval nozzle and its application to the physical photo resist removal-cleaning technology are investigated by a new type of integrated measurement coupled computational technique. As a result of present computation, it is found that high-speed ultra-fine SN2 particles are continuously generated due to the freezing of liquid nitrogen (LN2) droplets induced by rapid adiabatic expansion of transonic subcooled two-phase nitrogen flow passing through the Laval nozzle. Furthermore, the effect of SN2 particle diameter, injection velocity, and attack angle to the wafer substrate on resist removal-cleaning performance is investigated in detail by integrated measurement coupled computational technique.

  2. Control of manganese dioxide particles resulting from in situ chemical oxidation using permanganate.

    PubMed

    Crimi, Michelle; Ko, Saebom

    2009-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation using permanganate is an approach to organic contaminant site remediation. Manganese dioxide particles are products of permanganate reactions. These particles have the potential to deposit in the subsurface and impact the flow-regime in/around permanganate injection, including the well screen, filter pack, and the surrounding subsurface formation. Control of these particles can allow for improved oxidant injection and transport and contact between the oxidant and contaminants of concern. The goals of this research were to determine if MnO(2) can be stabilized/controlled in an aqueous phase, and to determine the dependence of particle stabilization on groundwater characteristics. Bench-scale experiments were conducted to study the ability of four stabilization aids (sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP), Dowfax 8390, xanthan gum, and gum arabic) in maintaining particles suspended in solution under varied reaction conditions and time. Variations included particle and stabilization aid concentrations, ionic content, and pH. HMP demonstrated the most promising results, as compared to xanthan gum, gum arabic, and Dowfax 8390 based on results of spectrophotometric studies of particle behavior, particle filtration, and optical measurements of particle size and zeta potential. HMP inhibited particle settling, provided for greater particle stability, and resulted in particles of a smaller average size over the range of experimental conditions evaluated compared to results for systems that did not include HMP. Additionally, HMP did not react unfavorably with permanganate. These results indicate that the inclusion of HMP in a permanganate oxidation system improves conditions that may facilitate particle transport.

  3. A facile method for the structure control of TiO2 particles at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhaoqing; Zhu, Yun; Wang, Lianwen; Wang, Jiatai; Guo, Qian; Li, Jiangong

    2015-11-01

    Crystalline and amorphous TiO2 particles have important potential applications in photocatalysis, structural ceramics, solar batteries and nanoglasses. Hence controlling the structure of TiO2 particles is of practical importance. Crystalline TiO2 particles are usually prepared by calcination of their amorphous precursor. Here a facile method was developed to control the structure of TiO2 particles at a low temperature. TiO2 particles were prepared by sol-gel method; and it was found that during the washing process, the TiO2 particles washed with water are crystalline whereas the TiO2 particles washed with ethanol are amorphous. Further analyses indicate that ethanol washing may introduce an organic cover layer on the TiO2 particles which hinders the crystallization of amorphous TiO2 particles. Therefore, the structure of TiO2 particles, amorphous or crystalline (anatase), can be controlled just by changing the washing medium, water or ethanol. This method seems a common method for controlling the (amorphous or crystalline) structure of metal oxides and hydroxides and was verified in the preparation of ZrO2, FeO(OH), and Al(OH)3 particles.

  4. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol removal using superfine powdered activated carbon: shell adsorption and branched-pore kinetic model analysis and optimal particle size.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku

    2013-05-15

    2-Methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin are naturally occurring compounds responsible for musty-earthy taste and odor in public drinking-water supplies, a severe problem faced by many utilities throughout the world. In this study, we investigated adsorptive removal of these compounds by superfine powdered activation carbon (SPAC, particle size <1 μm) produced by novel micro-grinding of powdered activated carbon; we also discuss the optimization of carbon particle size to efficiently enhance the adsorptive removal. After grinding, the absorptive capacity remained unchanged for a 2007 carbon sample and was increased for a 2010 carbon sample; the capacity increase was quantitatively described by the shell adsorption model, in which MIB and geosmin adsorbed more in the exterior of a carbon particle than in the center. The extremely high uptake rates of MIB and geosmin by SPAC were simulated well by a combination of the branched-pore kinetic model and the shell adsorption model, in which intraparticle diffusion through macropores was followed by diffusion from macropore to micropore. Simulations suggested that D40 was on the whole the best characteristic diameter to represent a size-disperse group of adsorbent particles; D40 is the diameter through which 40% of the particles by volume pass. Therefore, D40 can be used as an index for evaluating the improvement of adsorptive removal that resulted from pulverization. The dose required for a certain percentage removal of MIB or geosmin decreased linearly with carbon particle size (D40), but the dose reduction became less effective as the activated carbon was ground down to smaller sizes around a critical value of D40. For a 60-min contact time, critical D40 was 2-2.5 μm for MIB and 0.4-0.5 μm for geosmin. The smaller critical D40 was when the shorter the carbon-water contact time was or the slower the intraparticle mass transfer rate of an adsorbate was. PMID:23528781

  5. Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol removal using superfine powdered activated carbon: shell adsorption and branched-pore kinetic model analysis and optimal particle size.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku

    2013-05-15

    2-Methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin are naturally occurring compounds responsible for musty-earthy taste and odor in public drinking-water supplies, a severe problem faced by many utilities throughout the world. In this study, we investigated adsorptive removal of these compounds by superfine powdered activation carbon (SPAC, particle size <1 μm) produced by novel micro-grinding of powdered activated carbon; we also discuss the optimization of carbon particle size to efficiently enhance the adsorptive removal. After grinding, the absorptive capacity remained unchanged for a 2007 carbon sample and was increased for a 2010 carbon sample; the capacity increase was quantitatively described by the shell adsorption model, in which MIB and geosmin adsorbed more in the exterior of a carbon particle than in the center. The extremely high uptake rates of MIB and geosmin by SPAC were simulated well by a combination of the branched-pore kinetic model and the shell adsorption model, in which intraparticle diffusion through macropores was followed by diffusion from macropore to micropore. Simulations suggested that D40 was on the whole the best characteristic diameter to represent a size-disperse group of adsorbent particles; D40 is the diameter through which 40% of the particles by volume pass. Therefore, D40 can be used as an index for evaluating the improvement of adsorptive removal that resulted from pulverization. The dose required for a certain percentage removal of MIB or geosmin decreased linearly with carbon particle size (D40), but the dose reduction became less effective as the activated carbon was ground down to smaller sizes around a critical value of D40. For a 60-min contact time, critical D40 was 2-2.5 μm for MIB and 0.4-0.5 μm for geosmin. The smaller critical D40 was when the shorter the carbon-water contact time was or the slower the intraparticle mass transfer rate of an adsorbate was.

  6. Evaluation of mercury speciation and removal through air pollution control devices of a 190 MW boiler.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengli; Cao, Yan; Dong, Zhongbing; Cheng, Chinmin; Li, Hanxu; Pan, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution control devices (APCDs) are installed at coal-fired power plants for air pollutant regulation. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems have the co-benefits of air pollutant and mercury removal. Configuration and operational conditions of APCDs and mercury speciation affect mercury removal efficiently at coal-fired utilities. The Ontario Hydro Method (OHM) recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was used to determine mercury speciation simultaneously at five sampling locations through SCR-ESP-FGD at a 190 MW unit. Chlorine in coal had been suggested as a factor affecting the mercury speciation in flue gas; and low-chlorine coal was purported to produce less oxidized mercury (Hg2+) and more elemental mercury (Hg0) at the SCR inlet compared to higher chlorine coal. SCR could oxidize elemental mercury into oxidized mercury when SCR was in service, and oxidation efficiency reached 71.0%. Therefore, oxidized mercury removal efficiency was enhanced through a wet FGD system. In the non-ozone season, about 89.5%-96.8% of oxidized mercury was controlled, but only 54.9%-68.8% of the total mercury was captured through wet FGD. Oxidized mercury removal efficiency was 95.9%-98.0%, and there was a big difference in the total mercury removal efficiencies from 78.0% to 90.2% in the ozone season. Mercury mass balance was evaluated to validate reliability of OHM testing data, and the ratio of mercury input in the coal to mercury output at the stack was from 0.84 to 1.08.

  7. Evaluation of mercury speciation and removal through air pollution control devices of a 190 MW boiler.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengli; Cao, Yan; Dong, Zhongbing; Cheng, Chinmin; Li, Hanxu; Pan, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution control devices (APCDs) are installed at coal-fired power plants for air pollutant regulation. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems have the co-benefits of air pollutant and mercury removal. Configuration and operational conditions of APCDs and mercury speciation affect mercury removal efficiently at coal-fired utilities. The Ontario Hydro Method (OHM) recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was used to determine mercury speciation simultaneously at five sampling locations through SCR-ESP-FGD at a 190 MW unit. Chlorine in coal had been suggested as a factor affecting the mercury speciation in flue gas; and low-chlorine coal was purported to produce less oxidized mercury (Hg2+) and more elemental mercury (Hg0) at the SCR inlet compared to higher chlorine coal. SCR could oxidize elemental mercury into oxidized mercury when SCR was in service, and oxidation efficiency reached 71.0%. Therefore, oxidized mercury removal efficiency was enhanced through a wet FGD system. In the non-ozone season, about 89.5%-96.8% of oxidized mercury was controlled, but only 54.9%-68.8% of the total mercury was captured through wet FGD. Oxidized mercury removal efficiency was 95.9%-98.0%, and there was a big difference in the total mercury removal efficiencies from 78.0% to 90.2% in the ozone season. Mercury mass balance was evaluated to validate reliability of OHM testing data, and the ratio of mercury input in the coal to mercury output at the stack was from 0.84 to 1.08. PMID:20397418

  8. Control of conducting polymer actuators without physical feedback: simulated feedback control approach with particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xingcan; Mutlu, Rahim; Alici, Gursel; Li, Weihua

    2014-03-01

    Conducting polymer actuators have shown significant potential in articulating micro instruments, manipulation devices, and robotics. However, implementing a feedback control strategy to enhance their positioning ability and accuracy in any application requires a feedback sensor, which is extremely large in size compared to the size of the actuators. Therefore, this paper proposes a new sensorless control scheme without the use of a position feedback sensor. With the help of the system identification technique and particle swarm optimization, the control scheme, which we call the simulated feedback control system, showed a satisfactory command tracking performance for the conducting polymer actuator’s step and dynamic displacement responses, especially under a disturbance, without needing a physical feedback loop, but using a simulated feedback loop. The primary contribution of this study is to propose and experimentally evaluate the simulated feedback control scheme for a class of the conducting polymer actuators known as tri-layer polymer actuators, which can operate both in dry and wet media. This control approach can also be extended to other smart actuators or systems, for which the feedback control based on external sensing is impractical.

  9. Reconstitutable control assembly having removable control rods with detachable split upper end plugs

    SciTech Connect

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Knott, R.P.; Sparrow, J.A.

    1989-12-19

    This patent describes, in a reconstitutable control assembly for use with a nuclear fuel assembly, the control assembly including a spider structure and at least one control rod, an attachment joint for detachable fastening the control rod to the spider structure. The attachment joint comprising: a hollow connecting finger on the spider structure; and an elongated detachable split upper end plug on the control rod having a pair of separate upper and lower plug portions, the upper plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly- arranged upper, middle and lower sections. The lower plug portion having integrally-connected tandemly-arranged upper, middle and lower segments.

  10. Optimal planning of LEO active debris removal based on hybrid optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao-qian; Chen, Li-hu

    2015-06-01

    The mission planning of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) active debris removal problem is studied in this paper. Specifically, the Servicing Spacecraft (SSc) and several debris exist on near-circular near-coplanar LEOs. The SSc should repeatedly rendezvous with the debris, and de-orbit them until all debris are removed. Considering the long-duration effect of J2 perturbation, a linear dynamics model is used for each rendezvous. The purpose of this paper is to find the optimal service sequence and rendezvous path with minimum total rendezvous cost (Δv) for the whole mission, and some complex constraints (communication time window constraint, terminal state constraint, and time distribution constraint) should be satisfied meanwhile. Considering this mission as a hybrid optimal control problem, a mathematical model is proposed, as well as the solution method. The proposed approach is demonstrated by a typical active debris removal problem. Numerical experiments show that (1) the model and solution method proposed in this paper can effectively address the planning problem of LEO debris removal; (2) the communication time window constraint and the J2 perturbation have considerable influences on the optimization results; and (3) under the same configuration, some suboptimal sequences are equivalent to the optimal one since their difference in Δv cost is very small.

  11. Improvement of COD removal by controlling the substrate degradability during the anaerobic digestion of recalcitrant wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Minako; Nagao, Norio; Kawasaki, Nobuyuki; Imai, Akio; Toda, Tatsuki

    2016-10-01

    The recalcitrant landfill leachate was anaerobically digested at various mixing ratios with labile synthetic wastewater to evaluate the degradation properties of recalcitrant wastewater. The proportion of leachate to the digestion system was increased in three equal steps, starting from 0% to 100%, and later decreased back to 0% with the same steps. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) for organic carbon and other components were calculated by analyzing the COD and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were evaluated separately. The degradation properties of COD carbon and COD others shifted owing to changing of substrate degradability, and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were improved after supplying 100% recalcitrant wastewater. The UV absorptive property and total organic carbon (TOC) of each molecular size using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with UVA and TOC detectors were also investigated, and the degradability of different molecular sizes was determined. Although the SEC system detected extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are produced by microbes in stressful environments, during early stages of the experiment, EPS were not detected after feeding 100% recalcitrant wastewater. These results suggest that the microbes had acclimatized to the recalcitrant wastewater degradation. The high removal rates of both COD carbon and COD others were sustained when the proportion of labile wastewater in the substrate was 33%, indicating that the effective removal of recalcitrant COD might be controlled by changing the substrate's degradability. PMID:27449962

  12. Improvement of COD removal by controlling the substrate degradability during the anaerobic digestion of recalcitrant wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Minako; Nagao, Norio; Kawasaki, Nobuyuki; Imai, Akio; Toda, Tatsuki

    2016-10-01

    The recalcitrant landfill leachate was anaerobically digested at various mixing ratios with labile synthetic wastewater to evaluate the degradation properties of recalcitrant wastewater. The proportion of leachate to the digestion system was increased in three equal steps, starting from 0% to 100%, and later decreased back to 0% with the same steps. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) for organic carbon and other components were calculated by analyzing the COD and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were evaluated separately. The degradation properties of COD carbon and COD others shifted owing to changing of substrate degradability, and the removal efficiencies of COD carbon and COD others were improved after supplying 100% recalcitrant wastewater. The UV absorptive property and total organic carbon (TOC) of each molecular size using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with UVA and TOC detectors were also investigated, and the degradability of different molecular sizes was determined. Although the SEC system detected extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are produced by microbes in stressful environments, during early stages of the experiment, EPS were not detected after feeding 100% recalcitrant wastewater. These results suggest that the microbes had acclimatized to the recalcitrant wastewater degradation. The high removal rates of both COD carbon and COD others were sustained when the proportion of labile wastewater in the substrate was 33%, indicating that the effective removal of recalcitrant COD might be controlled by changing the substrate's degradability.

  13. Enhanced control of fine particles following Title IV coal switching and NOx control

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.D.; Baldrey, K.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Martin, C.

    1997-12-31

    Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) serve as the primary particle control devices for a majority of coal-fired power generating units in the United States. ESPs are used to collect particulate matter that range in size from less than one micrometer in diameter to several hundred micrometers. Many of the options that utilities will use to respond to Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments will result in changes to the ash that will be detrimental to the performance of the ESP causing increased emissions of fine particles and higher opacity. For example, a switch to low-sulfur coal significantly increases particle resistivity while low-NO{sub x} burners increase the carbon content of ashes. Both of these changes could result in derating of the boiler to comply with emissions standards. ADA has developed a chemical additive that is designed to improve the operation of ESI`s to bring these systems into compliance operation without the need for expensive capital modifications. The additives provide advantages over competing technologies in terms of low capital cost, easy to handle chemicals, and relatively non-toxic chemicals. In addition, the new additive is insensitive to ash chemistry which will allow the utility complete flexibility to select the most economical coal. Results from full-scale and pilot plant demonstrations are reported.

  14. Inspection Report on "Internal Controls over Accountable Classified Removable Electronic Media at Oak Ridge National Laboratory"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts cutting edge scientific research. ORNL utilizes removable electronic media, such as computer hard drives, compact disks, data tapes, etc., to store vast amounts of classified information. Incidents involving breakdowns in controls over classified removable electronic media have been a continuous challenge for the Department. The loss of even one piece of such media can have serious national security implications. In 2004, the Department had a complex-wide 'stand-down' of all activities using classified removable electronic media, and such media containing Secret/Restricted Data or higher classified data was designated 'Accountable Classified Removable Electronic Media' (ACREM). As part of the stand-down, sites were required to conduct a 100 percent physical inventory of all ACREM; enter it all into accountability; and conduct security procedure reviews and training. Further, the Department implemented a series of controls, including conducting periodic inventories, utilizing tamper proof devices on ACREM safes, and appointing trained custodians to be responsible for the material. After performance testing and validation that the required accountability systems were in place, ACREM operations at ORNL were approved for restart on August 10, 2004. We conducted a review at ORNL and associated facilities to determine whether ACREM is managed, protected, and controlled consistent with applicable requirements. We found that: (1) Eight pieces of Secret/Restricted Data media had not been identified as ACREM and placed into a system of accountability. Consequently, the items were not subject to all required protections and controls, such as periodic accountability inventories, oversight by a trained custodian, or storage in a designated ACREM safe. (However, the items were secured in safes approved for classified material.) (2) Other required ACREM protections and controls were not implemented as

  15. Passivation of pigment particles for thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, E. P.; Sancier, K. M.; Morrison, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    Five powders were received for plasma calcining during this report period. The particle size using a fluid energy mill, and obtained pigments that could be plasma calcined. Optimum results are obtained in the plasma calcining of zinc orthotitanate when finely dispersed particles are subjected to a calculated plasma temperature of 1670 C. Increasing the plasma calcining time by using multiple passes through the plasma stabilized the pigment to vacuum UV irradiation was evidenced by the resulting ESR spectra but slightly decreased the whiteness of the pigment. The observed darkening is apparently associated with the formation of Ti(+3) color centers.

  16. Adsorption of inorganic and organic ligands onto hydrous aluminum oxide: evaluation of surface charge and the impacts on particle and NOM removal during water treatment.

    PubMed

    Pommerenk, Peter; Schafran, Gary C

    2005-09-01

    The variable removal from solution of sulfate, orthophosphate, fluoride, five simple organic acids, and natural organic matterfromtwo sources by adsorption on aluminum hydroxide was examined to assess their potential influence on coagulation during drinking water treatment. Measurements of electrophoretic mobility were conducted with adsorption studies to provide means of evaluating the impact of the adsorption of these anions on the removal of particulate material during coagulation at water treatment facilities. The three inorganic ions exhibited widely different trends in terms of removal from solution and effect on the surface charge of the aluminum hydroxide. Phosphate was nearly completely removed from solution across a wide pH range and was observed to lower surface charge and shift the isoelectric point. Sulfate was removed to a lesser extent than phosphate, lowered the surface charge on the precipitate, but did not shiftthe isoelectric point. Fluoride was well-removed through adsorption but exhibited no influence on the charge of the hydrous aluminum oxide. The organic acids similarly displayed varying abilities to be removed through adsorption and different influences on surface charge. The results indicate the importance of the number and location of functional groups and their acid/ base properties. The ability to strongly influence surface charge illustrates the impact that adsorption of these anions can have on particle stability.

  17. Demolition and removal of radioactively contaminated concrete soil: Aerosol control and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, G.J.; Hoover, M.D.; Grace, A.C. III

    1995-12-01

    From 1963 to 1985, two concrete-lined ponds were used to reduce the volume of radioactive liquids from the Institute`s research programs. Following withdrawal of the {open_quotes}hot ponds{close_quotes} from active use, the residual sludges and plastic liners of the ponds were removed and shipped to a radioactive waste disposal site. From 1987 to 1994, the concrete structures remained undisturbed pending environmental restoration on the site. Restoration began in 1994 and was completed in 1995. Restoration involved mechanical breakup and removal of the concrete structures and removal of areas of contaminated soils from the site. This report describes the design and results of the aerosol control and monitoring program that was conducted to ensure protection of workers and the environment during the restoration process. The aerosol control and monitoring strategy developed for remediation of the ITRI hot ponds was successful both in preventing dispersion of radioactive dusts and in demonstrating that exposures of workers and offsite releases were within statutory limits.

  18. Nitrogen Removal in Aerobic Granular Sludge SBR: Real-time Control Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiangjuan; Gao, Dawen

    2010-11-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with aerobic granules was operated to determine the effect of different DO concentration on biological nitrogen removal for synthetic sewage treatment, and the spatial profiles of DO, ORP and pH as on-line control parameters in such systems were investigated. The results showed that DO concentrations had significant effect on nitrification efficiencies and the profiles of DO, ORP and pH. High DO concentration improved the nitrification causing volumetric NH4+-N removal increased and shortened the nitrification duration. Also there existed a good correlation between on-line control parameters (ORP, pH) and nutrients (COD, NH4+-N, NO2--N, NO3--N) variations in aerobic granules when DO was 2.5 mg/L, 3.5 mg/L and 4.5 mg/L. However it is difficult to identify the end of nitrification and denitrification when DO was 1.0 mg/L, due to no apparent bending points on ORP and pH curves. In conclusion the optimal DO concentration was suggested at 2.5 mg/L as it not only achieved high nitrogen removal efficiency and decreased the reaction duration, but also saved operation cost by aeration and mixing.

  19. Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles supported on reduced graphene oxides by using a plasma technique and their application for removal of heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Chen, Changlun; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles supported on reduced graphene oxides (NZVI/rGOs) from spent graphene oxide (GO)-bound iron ions were developed by using a hydrogen/argon plasma reduction method to improve the reactivity and stability of NZVI. The NZVI/rGOs exhibited excellent water treatment performance with excellent removal capacities of 187.16 and 396.37 mg g(-1) for chromium and lead, respectively. Moreover, the NZVI/rGOs could be regenerated by plasma treatment and maintained high removal ability after four cycles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis results implied that the removal mechanisms could be attributed to adsorption/precipitation, reduction, or both. Such multiple removal mechanisms by the NZVI/rGOs were attributed to the reduction ability of the NZVI particles and the role of dispersing and stabilizing abilities of the rGOs. The results indicated that the NZVI/rGOs prepared by a hydrogen/argon plasma reduction method might be an effective composite for heavy-metal-ion removal.

  20. Simple synthesis of smart magnetically driven fibrous films for remote controllable oil removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Nü; Zhao, Yong; Jiang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the marine mussel adhesive protein, smart, magnetically controllable, oil adsorption nanofibrous materials were successfully fabricated in this research. Taking advantage of the properties of dopamine whose molecular structure mimics the single unit of the marine mussel adhesive protein and can be polymerized in alkaline solution forming a ``glue'' layer on many kinds of material surfaces, magnetic iron(ii, iii) oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were easily and robustly anchored on to electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) fibrous films. After fluorination, the as-prepared hierarchical structured films exhibited superhydrophobicity, superoleophilicity and an excellent oil adsorption capacity from water. Importantly, because of the magnetically controllable property endowed by the Fe3O4 nanoparticles, such fibrous films act as a ``smart magnetically controlled oil removal carrier'', which effectively overcome the drawbacks of other in situ oil adsorbant materials and can also be easily recovered. This work provides a simple strategy to fabricate magnetic responsive intelligent oil removal materials, which will find broad applications in complex environment oil-water separation.Inspired by the marine mussel adhesive protein, smart, magnetically controllable, oil adsorption nanofibrous materials were successfully fabricated in this research. Taking advantage of the properties of dopamine whose molecular structure mimics the single unit of the marine mussel adhesive protein and can be polymerized in alkaline solution forming a ``glue'' layer on many kinds of material surfaces, magnetic iron(ii, iii) oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were easily and robustly anchored on to electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) fibrous films. After fluorination, the as-prepared hierarchical structured films exhibited superhydrophobicity, superoleophilicity and an excellent oil adsorption capacity from water. Importantly, because of the magnetically controllable property endowed by the Fe3

  1. Link removal for the control of stochastically evolving epidemics over networks: a comparison of approaches.

    PubMed

    Enns, Eva A; Brandeau, Margaret L

    2015-04-21

    For many communicable diseases, knowledge of the underlying contact network through which the disease spreads is essential to determining appropriate control measures. When behavior change is the primary intervention for disease prevention, it is important to understand how to best modify network connectivity using the limited resources available to control disease spread. We describe and compare four algorithms for selecting a limited number of links to remove from a network: two "preventive" approaches (edge centrality, R0 minimization), where the decision of which links to remove is made prior to any disease outbreak and depends only on the network structure; and two "reactive" approaches (S-I edge centrality, optimal quarantining), where information about the initial disease states of the nodes is incorporated into the decision of which links to remove. We evaluate the performance of these algorithms in minimizing the total number of infections that occur over the course of an acute outbreak of disease. We consider different network structures, including both static and dynamic Erdös-Rényi random networks with varying levels of connectivity, a real-world network of residential hotels connected through injection drug use, and a network exhibiting community structure. We show that reactive approaches outperform preventive approaches in averting infections. Among reactive approaches, removing links in order of S-I edge centrality is favored when the link removal budget is small, while optimal quarantining performs best when the link removal budget is sufficiently large. The budget threshold above which optimal quarantining outperforms the S-I edge centrality algorithm is a function of both network structure (higher for unstructured Erdös-Rényi random networks compared to networks with community structure or the real-world network) and disease infectiousness (lower for highly infectious diseases). We conduct a value-of-information analysis of knowing which

  2. Humic substances interfere with phosphate removal by Lanthanum modified clay in controlling eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Lürling, Miquel; Waajen, Guido; van Oosterhout, Frank

    2014-05-01

    The lanthanum (La) modified bentonite Phoslock(®) has been proposed as dephosphatisation technique aiming at removing Filterable Reactive Phosphorus (FRP) from the water and blocking the release of FRP from the sediment. In the modified clay La is expected the active ingredient. We conducted controlled laboratory experiments to measure the FRP removal by Phoslock(®) in the presence and absence of humic substances, as La complexation with humic substances might lower the effectiveness of La (Phoslock(®)) to bind FRP. The results of our study support the hypothesis that the presence of humic substances can interfere with the FRP removal by the La-modified bentonite. Both a short-term (1 d) and long-term (42 d) experiment were in agreement with predictions derived from chemical equilibrium modelling and showed lower FRP removal in presence of humic substances. This implies that in DOC-rich inland waters the applicability of exclusively Phoslock(®) as FRP binder should be met critically. In addition, we observed a strong increase of filterable La in presence of humic substances reaching in a week more than 270 μg La l(-1) that would infer a violation of the Dutch La standard for surface water, which is 10.1 μg La l(-1). Hence, humic substances are an important factor that should be given attention when considering chemical FRP inactivation as they might play a substantial role in lowering the efficacy of metal-based FRP-sorbents, which makes measurements of humic substances (DOC) as well as controlled experiments vital. PMID:24565799

  3. Humic substances interfere with phosphate removal by Lanthanum modified clay in controlling eutrophication.

    PubMed

    Lürling, Miquel; Waajen, Guido; van Oosterhout, Frank

    2014-05-01

    The lanthanum (La) modified bentonite Phoslock(®) has been proposed as dephosphatisation technique aiming at removing Filterable Reactive Phosphorus (FRP) from the water and blocking the release of FRP from the sediment. In the modified clay La is expected the active ingredient. We conducted controlled laboratory experiments to measure the FRP removal by Phoslock(®) in the presence and absence of humic substances, as La complexation with humic substances might lower the effectiveness of La (Phoslock(®)) to bind FRP. The results of our study support the hypothesis that the presence of humic substances can interfere with the FRP removal by the La-modified bentonite. Both a short-term (1 d) and long-term (42 d) experiment were in agreement with predictions derived from chemical equilibrium modelling and showed lower FRP removal in presence of humic substances. This implies that in DOC-rich inland waters the applicability of exclusively Phoslock(®) as FRP binder should be met critically. In addition, we observed a strong increase of filterable La in presence of humic substances reaching in a week more than 270 μg La l(-1) that would infer a violation of the Dutch La standard for surface water, which is 10.1 μg La l(-1). Hence, humic substances are an important factor that should be given attention when considering chemical FRP inactivation as they might play a substantial role in lowering the efficacy of metal-based FRP-sorbents, which makes measurements of humic substances (DOC) as well as controlled experiments vital.

  4. Escherichia coli removal in biochar-augmented biofilter: effect of infiltration rate, initial bacterial concentration, biochar particle size, and presence of compost.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2014-10-01

    Bioretention systems and biofilters are used in low impact development to passively treat urban stormwater. However, these engineered natural systems are not efficient at removing fecal indicator bacteria, the contaminants responsible for a majority of surface water impairments. The present study investigates the efficacy of biochar-augmented model sand biofilters for Escherichia coli removal under a variety of stormwater bacterial concentrations and infiltration rates. Additionally, we test the role of biochar particle size and "presence of compost on model" biofilter performance. Our results show that E. coli removal in a biochar-augmented sand biofilter is ∼ 96% and is not greatly affected by increases in stormwater infiltration rates and influent bacterial concentrations, particularly within the ranges expected in field. Removal of fine (<125 μm) biochar particles from the biochar-sand biofilter decreased the removal capacity from 95% to 62%, indicating biochar size is important. Addition of compost to biochar-sand biofilters not only lowered E. coli removal capacity but also increased the mobilization of deposited bacteria during intermittent infiltration. This result is attributed to exhaustion of attachment sites on biochar by the dissolved organic carbon leached from compost. Overall, our study indicates that biochar has potential to remove bacteria from stormwater under a wide range of field conditions, but for biochar to be effective, the size should be small and biochar should be applied without compost. Although the results aid in the optimization of biofilter design, further studies are needed to examine biochar potential in the field over an entire rainy season.

  5. The effectiveness of an air cleaner in controlling droplet/aerosol particle dispersion emitted from a patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Weilin; Dong, Lei; An, Na; Ouyang, Xiangying

    2010-07-01

    Dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to droplets and aerosol particles emitted from patients' mouths during treatment. We evaluated the effectiveness of an air cleaner in reducing droplet and aerosol contamination by positioning the device in four different locations in an actual dental clinic. We applied computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to solve the governing equations of airflow, energy and dispersion of different-sized airborne droplets/aerosol particles. In a dental clinic, we measured the supply air velocity and temperature of the ventilation system, the airflow rate and the particle removal efficiency of the air cleaner to determine the boundary conditions for the CFD simulations. Our results indicate that use of an air cleaner in a dental clinic may be an effective method for reducing DHCWs' exposure to airborne droplets and aerosol particles. Further, we found that the probability of droplet/aerosol particle removal and the direction of airflow from the cleaner are both important control measures for droplet and aerosol contamination in a dental clinic. Thus, the distance between the air cleaner and droplet/aerosol particle source as well as the relative location of the air cleaner to both the source and the DHCW are important considerations for reducing DHCWs' exposure to droplets/aerosol particles emitted from the patient's mouth during treatments.

  6. The effectiveness of an air cleaner in controlling droplet/aerosol particle dispersion emitted from a patient's mouth in the indoor environment of dental clinics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Weilin; Dong, Lei; An, Na; Ouyang, Xiangying

    2010-01-01

    Dental healthcare workers (DHCWs) are at high risk of occupational exposure to droplets and aerosol particles emitted from patients' mouths during treatment. We evaluated the effectiveness of an air cleaner in reducing droplet and aerosol contamination by positioning the device in four different locations in an actual dental clinic. We applied computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to solve the governing equations of airflow, energy and dispersion of different-sized airborne droplets/aerosol particles. In a dental clinic, we measured the supply air velocity and temperature of the ventilation system, the airflow rate and the particle removal efficiency of the air cleaner to determine the boundary conditions for the CFD simulations. Our results indicate that use of an air cleaner in a dental clinic may be an effective method for reducing DHCWs' exposure to airborne droplets and aerosol particles. Further, we found that the probability of droplet/aerosol particle removal and the direction of airflow from the cleaner are both important control measures for droplet and aerosol contamination in a dental clinic. Thus, the distance between the air cleaner and droplet/aerosol particle source as well as the relative location of the air cleaner to both the source and the DHCW are important considerations for reducing DHCWs' exposure to droplets/aerosol particles emitted from the patient's mouth during treatments. PMID:20031985

  7. Controlling the scattering properties of thin, particle-doped coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, William; Corbett, Madeleine; Manoharan, Vinothan

    2013-03-01

    Coatings and thin films of small particles suspended in a matrix possess optical properties that are important in several industries from cosmetics and paints to polymer composites. Many of the most interesting applications require coatings that produce several bulk effects simultaneously, but it is often difficult to rationally formulate materials with these desired optical properties. Here, we focus on the specific challenge of designing a thin colloidal film that maximizes both diffuse and total hemispherical transmission. We demonstrate that these bulk optical properties follow a simple scaling with two microscopic length scales: the scattering and transport mean free paths. Using these length scales and Mie scattering calculations, we generate basic design rules that relate scattering at the single particle level to the film's bulk optical properties. These ideas will be useful in the rational design of future optically active coatings.

  8. Controlling self-sustained spiking activity by adding or removing one network link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kesheng; Huang, Wenwen; Li, Baowen; Dhamala, Mukesh; Liu, Zonghua

    2013-06-01

    Being able to control the neuronal spiking activity in specific brain regions is central to a treatment scheme in several brain disorders such as epileptic seizures, mental depression, and Parkinson's diseases. Here, we present an approach for controlling self-sustained oscillations by adding or removing one directed network link in coupled neuronal oscillators, in contrast to previous approaches of adding stimuli or noise. We find that such networks can exhibit a variety of activity patterns such as on-off switch, sustained spikes, and short-term spikes. We derive the condition for a specific link to be the controller of the on-off effect. A qualitative analysis is provided to facilitate the understanding of the mechanism for spiking activity by adding one link. Our findings represent the first report on generating spike activity with the addition of only one directed link to a network and provide a deeper understanding of the microscopic roots of self-sustained spiking.

  9. Electrostatic particle precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiya, T.; Hikizi, S.; Yabuta, H.

    1984-04-03

    An electrostatic particle precipitator for removing dust particles from a flue gas. The precipitator includes a plurality of collecting electrodes in the shape of plates mounted on endless chains and moving between a first region through which flue gas to be treated flows and a second region where the flow of gas is extremely scarce. A dust removal mechanism is positioned in the second region to remove dust which accumulates on the electrode plates. The moving speed of the collecting electrodes is controlled within a certain range to maintain a prescribed thickness of dust on the electrodes whereby the ocurrence of reverse ionization phenomenon is prevented.

  10. Controlled capillary assembly of magnetic Janus particles at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qingguang; Davies, Gary B; Harting, Jens

    2016-08-21

    Capillary interactions can be used to direct assembly of particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces. Precisely controlling the magnitude and direction of capillary interactions to assemble particles into favoured structures for materials science purposes is desirable but challenging. In this paper, we investigate capillary interactions between magnetic Janus particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces. We develop a pair-interaction model that predicts that these particles should arrange into a side-side configuration, and carry out simulations that confirm the predictions of our model. Finally, we investigate the monolayer structures that form when many magnetic Janus particles adsorb at the interface. We find that the particles arrange into long, straight chains exhibiting little curvature, in contrast with capillary interactions between ellipsoidal particles. We further find a regime in which highly ordered, lattice-like monolayer structures form, which can be tuned dynamically using an external magnetic field.

  11. Removal of trace nonylphenol from water in the coexistence of suspended inorganic particles and NOMs by using a cellulose-based flocculant.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Ren, Kexin; Guibal, Eric; Jia, Shuying; Shen, Jiachun; Zhang, Xuntong; Yang, Weiben

    2016-10-01

    A flocculation method was used for the removal of trace nonylphenol (NP) from synthetic surface water containing natural organic matters (humic acid, HA) and suspended inorganic particles (kaolin). A polymeric flocculant (CMCND), with enhanced cationic property and unique switchable hydrophobic/hydrophilic characteristic, was specially designed for this application. CMCND showed a high efficiency for trace NP removal, turbidity and UV254 abatements: under optimized conditions (pH: 4; T: 35 °C; dosage: 40 mg/L), the removal of NP reached up to 79%. By using dosage-pH flocculation diagrams and correlation analyses as tools, kaolin and HA were found to exert synergistic effects on NP removal, with the aid of CMCND; the synergistic effect of HA is higher due to π-π stacking. Zeta potential-dosage profiles clearly demonstrated charge neutralization predominated at pH 4, due to the strong cationic groups in the flocculant. Floc size monitoring displayed that the delayed phase transformation process (from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity) of CMCND at 35 °C enhanced NP removal. In addition, spectral analyses clarified the interactions among CMCND, NP, kaolin and HA: charge attraction and hydrophobic interaction between CMCND and NP played the key roles. The findings are of significance for removing endocrine-disrupting chemicals in environmental remediation. PMID:27459160

  12. Simple synthesis of smart magnetically driven fibrous films for remote controllable oil removal.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Nü; Zhao, Yong; Jiang, Lei

    2015-02-14

    Inspired by the marine mussel adhesive protein, smart, magnetically controllable, oil adsorption nanofibrous materials were successfully fabricated in this research. Taking advantage of the properties of dopamine whose molecular structure mimics the single unit of the marine mussel adhesive protein and can be polymerized in alkaline solution forming a "glue" layer on many kinds of material surfaces, magnetic iron(II, III) oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were easily and robustly anchored on to electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride) fibrous films. After fluorination, the as-prepared hierarchical structured films exhibited superhydrophobicity, superoleophilicity and an excellent oil adsorption capacity from water. Importantly, because of the magnetically controllable property endowed by the Fe3O4 nanoparticles, such fibrous films act as a "smart magnetically controlled oil removal carrier", which effectively overcome the drawbacks of other in situ oil adsorbant materials and can also be easily recovered. This work provides a simple strategy to fabricate magnetic responsive intelligent oil removal materials, which will find broad applications in complex environment oil-water separation. PMID:25581419

  13. 40 CFR 63.9323 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.9323 Section 63.9323 Protection of Environment... Pollutants for Engine Test Cells/Stands Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.9323 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must use the...

  14. 40 CFR 63.3545 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... also use as an alternative to Method 3B the manual method for measuring the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.3545 Section 63.3545 Protection of Environment... Option § 63.3545 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal...

  15. 40 CFR 63.4766 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... also use as an alternative to Method 3B, the manual method for measuring the oxygen, carbon dioxide... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4766 Section 63.4766 Protection of Environment... Option § 63.4766 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal...

  16. 40 CFR 63.3545 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... also use as an alternative to Method 3B the manual method for measuring the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.3545 Section 63.3545 Protection of Environment... Option § 63.3545 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal...

  17. 40 CFR 63.4362 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide content of exhaust gas in ANSI/ASME, PTC 19.10-1981, “Flue and... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4362 Section 63.4362 Protection of Environment... § 63.4362 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?...

  18. 40 CFR 63.4965 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... an alternative to Method 3B, the manual method for measuring the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and carbon... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4965 Section 63.4965 Protection of Environment....4965 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You...

  19. 40 CFR 63.4766 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... also use as an alternative to Method 3B, the manual method for measuring the oxygen, carbon dioxide... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4766 Section 63.4766 Protection of Environment... Option § 63.4766 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal...

  20. 40 CFR 63.4166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... also use as an alternative to Method 3B, the manual method for measuring the oxygen, carbon dioxide... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4166 Section 63.4166 Protection of Environment....4166 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 63.4166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... also use as an alternative to Method 3B, the manual method for measuring the oxygen, carbon dioxide... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4166 Section 63.4166 Protection of Environment....4166 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? (a)...

  2. 40 CFR 63.4362 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide content of exhaust gas in ANSI/ASME, PTC 19.10-1981, “Flue and... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4362 Section 63.4362 Protection of Environment... Requirements § 63.4362 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal...

  3. 40 CFR 63.4362 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide content of exhaust gas in ANSI/ASME, PTC 19.10-1981, “Flue and... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4362 Section 63.4362 Protection of Environment... Requirements § 63.4362 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal...

  4. 40 CFR 63.3545 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... an alternative to Method 3B the manual method for measuring the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and carbon... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.3545 Section 63.3545 Protection of Environment... How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You must...

  5. 40 CFR 63.4362 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide content of exhaust gas in ANSI/ASME, PTC 19.10-1981, “Flue and... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4362 Section 63.4362 Protection of Environment... Requirements § 63.4362 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal...

  6. 40 CFR 63.4965 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... an alternative to Method 3B, the manual method for measuring the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and carbon... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4965 Section 63.4965 Protection of Environment....4965 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency? You...

  7. 40 CFR 63.3545 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... also use as an alternative to Method 3B the manual method for measuring the oxygen, carbon dioxide, and... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.3545 Section 63.3545 Protection of Environment... Option § 63.3545 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal...

  8. Ubiquitin facilitates a quality-control pathway that removes damaged chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Woodson, Jesse D.; Joens, Matthew S.; Sinson, Andrew B.; Gilkerson, Jonathan; Salomé, Patrice A.; Weigel, Detlef; Fitzpatrick, James A.; Chory, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Energy production by chloroplasts and mitochondria causes constant oxidative damage. A functioning photosynthetic cell requires quality-control mechanisms to turn over and degrade chloroplasts damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we generated a conditionally lethal Arabidopsis mutant that accumulated excess protoporphyrin IX in the chloroplast and produced singlet oxygen. Damaged chloroplasts were subsequently ubiquitinated and selectively degraded. A genetic screen identified the plant U-box 4 (PUB4) E3 ubiquitin ligase as being necessary for this process. pub4-6 mutants had defects in stress adaptation and longevity. Thus, we have identified a signal that leads to the targeted removal of ROS-overproducing chloroplasts. PMID:26494759

  9. Ubiquitin facilitates a quality-control pathway that removes damaged chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Jesse D; Joens, Matthew S; Sinson, Andrew B; Gilkerson, Jonathan; Salomé, Patrice A; Weigel, Detlef; Fitzpatrick, James A; Chory, Joanne

    2015-10-23

    Energy production by chloroplasts and mitochondria causes constant oxidative damage. A functioning photosynthetic cell requires quality-control mechanisms to turn over and degrade chloroplasts damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we generated a conditionally lethal Arabidopsis mutant that accumulated excess protoporphyrin IX in the chloroplast and produced singlet oxygen. Damaged chloroplasts were subsequently ubiquitinated and selectively degraded. A genetic screen identified the plant U-box 4 (PUB4) E3 ubiquitin ligase as being necessary for this process. pub4-6 mutants had defects in stress adaptation and longevity. Thus, we have identified a signal that leads to the targeted removal of ROS-overproducing chloroplasts.

  10. Synthesis of green nano iron particles (GnIP) and their application in adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Kumar Suranjit; Gandhi, Pooja; Selvaraj, Kaliaperumal

    2014-10-01

    The present study reports a new approach to synthesise nano iron particles using leaf extract of Mint (Mentha spicata L.) plant. The synthesised GnIPs were subjected to detailed adsorption studies for removal of arsenite and arsenate from aqueous solution of defined concentration. Iron nanoparticles synthesised using leaf extract showed UV-vis absorption peaks at 360 and 430 nm. TEM result showed the formation of polydispersed nanoparticles of size ranging from 20 to 45 nm. Nanoparticles were found to have core-shell structure. The planer reflection of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and XRD analysis suggested that iron particles were crystalline and belonged to fcc (face centred cubic) type. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) shows that Fe was an integral component of synthesised nanoparticles. The content of Fe in nanoparticles was found to be 40%, in addition to other elements like C (16%), O (19%) and Cl (23%). FT-IR study suggested that functional groups like sbnd NH, sbnd Cdbnd O, sbnd Cdbnd N and sbnd Cdbnd C were involved in particle formation. The removal efficiency of GnIP-chitosan composite for As(III) and As(V) was found to be 98.79 and 99.65%. Regeneration of adsorbent suggested that synthesised green GnIP may work as an effective tool for removal of arsenic from contaminated water.

  11. THE EFFECT OF WATER CHEMISTRY AND IRON PARTICLE PROPERTIES ON THE REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FOLLOWING THE OXIDATION OF FERROUS IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current MCL for arsenic is being revised to a lower level by the USEPA. Many new utilities, particularly small utilities, will be forced to add an arsenic removal process or fine tune their curent water treatment process to meet the new MCL. Many arsenic removal processes rel...

  12. Contamination and particle control system in immersion exposure tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masamichi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Arakawa, Mikio; Tanabe, Masayuki; Toyoda, Koji; Chibana, Takahito; Matsuoka, Yoichi; Kawasaki, Youji

    2007-03-01

    Water-based immersion technology has overcome various obstacles and is approaching the mass production phase. Canon is in the process of developing an ArF immersion exposure tool, FPA-7000AS7 (NA>1.3), to meet both mass production of the 65nm HP and development of the 45nm HP, which starts in 2007. In the Canon immersion nozzle, there is little influence of vibration on the lens and the stage, and particle generation from the nozzle during treatment of the nozzle in the manufacturing process has successfully been prevented. We evaluated contamination due to leaching and cleaning technology with a test bench. Contamination due to PAG (Photo-acid Generator) leaching from resist to water could be completely eliminated by dipping it into a cleaning fluid. With periodic cleaning, it is possible to keep the projection lens clean and to prevent particle generation from the immersion nozzle. The defect was evaluated with FPA-6000AS4i (NA0.85) that had the same type of immersion nozzle as that of FPA-7000AS7. The level of defect density was stable in a continuous exposure process of 25 wafers with a developer-soluble topcoat. The defect density was 0.030/cm2 with a topcoat-less resist.

  13. Hydrodynamic controls on particle transport through heterogeneous porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Silliman, S.E.

    1992-09-30

    The initial stages of this project have been focused on equipment development and preliminary experimental efforts. Among the accomplishments to date are the development of a successful flow cell design, proof of the utility of the UV resin, adjustment of the Laser Particle Counter to produce reliable readings, installation of a low particle content water supply, installation of a microscope for viewing discharge samples, development of a fiber/rod optic system for freezing the UV resin in situ and performance of initial experiments on layered and complex heterogeneities. The work is currently following very closely the original schedule for research efforts. Continuing efforts in year one will include continued efforts in simple and complex heterogeneity in two-dimensions, extension into three-dimensions, consideration of the most appropriate methods for creating geologically realistic structures in the laboratory, interaction with other SSP research programs and organization of the spring meeting on intermediate-scale experimentation to be held at Notre Dame. Efforts in year two will be focused on three-dimensional experiments in saturated media, extension of results into unsaturated media, development of techniques for unsaturated media characterization, and development of research ties with outside research interests.

  14. Simulating sterilization, vaccination, and test-and-remove as brucellosis control measures in bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebinger, M.; Cross, P.; Wallen, Rick; White, P.J.; Treanor, John

    2011-01-01

    Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, infects wildlife, cattle, and humans worldwide, but management of the disease is often hindered by the logistics of controlling its prevalence in wildlife reservoirs. We used an individually based epidemiological model to assess the relative efficacies of three management interventions (sterilization, vaccination, and test-and-remove). The model was parameterized with demographic and epidemiological data from bison in Yellowstone National Park, USA. Sterilization and test-and-remove were most successful at reducing seroprevalence when they were targeted at young seropositive animals, which are the most likely age and sex category to be infectious. However, these approaches also required the most effort to implement. Vaccination was less effective (even with a perfect vaccine) but also required less effort to implement. For the treatment efforts we explored (50–100 individuals per year or 2.5–5% of the female population), sterilization had little impact upon the bison population growth rate when selectively applied. The population growth rate usually increased by year 25 due to the reduced number of Brucella-induced abortions. Initial declines in seroprevalence followed by rapid increases (>15% increase in 5 years) occurred in 3–13% of simulations with sterilization and test-and-remove, but not vaccination. We believe this is due to the interaction of superspreading events and the loss of herd immunity in the later stages of control efforts as disease prevalence declines. Sterilization provided a mechanism for achieving large disease reductions while simultaneously limiting population growth, which may be advantageous in some management scenarios. However, the field effort required to find the small segment of the population that is infectious rather than susceptible or recovered will likely limit the utility of this approach in many free-ranging wildlife populations. Nevertheless, we encourage

  15. Minimizing nitrous oxide in biological nutrient removal from municipal wastewater by controlling copper ion concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Yinguang; Chen, Hong; Li, Xiang; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Shuying

    2013-02-01

    In this study, nitrous oxide (N(2)O) production during biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater was reported to be remarkably reduced by controlling copper ion (Cu(2+)) concentration. Firstly, it was observed that the addition of Cu(2+) (10-100 μg/L) reduced N(2)O generation by 54.5-73.2 % and improved total nitrogen removal when synthetic wastewater was treated in an anaerobic-aerobic (with low dissolved oxygen) BNR process. Then, the roles of Cu(2+) were investigated. The activities of nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases were increased by Cu(2+) addition, which accelerated the bio-reductions of both nitrite to nitric oxide (NO (2) (-)  → NO) and nitrous oxide to nitrogen gas (N(2)O → N(2)). The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay indicated that Cu(2+) addition increased the number of N(2)O reducing denitrifiers. Further investigation showed that more polyhydoxyalkanoates were utilized in the Cu(2+)-added system for denitrification. Finally, the feasibility of reducing N(2)O generation by controlling Cu(2+) was examined in two other BNR processes treating real municipal wastewater. As the Cu(2+) in municipal wastewater is usually below 10 μg/L, according to this study, the supplement of influent Cu(2+) to a concentration of 10-100 μg/L is beneficial to reduce N(2)O emission and improve nitrogen removal when sludge concentration in the BNR system is around 3,200 mg/L.

  16. Chronocoulometry for quantitative control of mass removal in micro-structures and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, B. K.; Smith, S. T.; Pratt, J. R.; Shaw, G. A.

    2012-10-01

    In this work, tungsten wires have been etched in a KOH electrolyte solution. Based on the oxidation state of the electrolytic dissolution reaction's product and time integration of the Faradaic current produced during the reaction, this method is capable of providing a direct measurement of the change in mass of a structure from anodic dissolution. To assess the application of this process for controlled mass removal spanning sub-micrograms to milligrams, two experimental studies and accompanying uncertainty analyses have been undertaken. In the first of these, 5 tungsten wires of length 30 mm were used to remove mass values ranging from 50 to 350 μg. Uncertainty estimates indicate relative combined standard uncertainties of less than 0.3% in the mass changes determined from the measurement of Faradaic current. Comparison of the mass change determined using the electrolytic method, and using a precision ultra-microbalance agreed within this uncertainty. The charge-based method was then applied to modify the dynamic characteristics of a quartz tuning fork oscillator. In these experiments, tungsten fiber attached to one tine of the oscillator was etched in 5 μg increments up to 120 μg of total removed mass. In general, frequency shifts of 2.8 Hz.μg-1 were observed, indicating sub-microgram resolution for the characterization of probes based on frequency shift and charge-based mass measurement. Taken together, this study provides the basis for a precision method for determining changes in mass based on electrical measurements from an electrochemical system. The utility of this technique is demonstrated through controlled modification of the dynamic properties of a mechanical oscillator.

  17. Chronocoulometry for quantitative control of mass removal in micro-structures and sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Nowakowski, B. K.; Smith, S. T.; Pratt, J. R.; Shaw, G. A.

    2012-10-15

    In this work, tungsten wires have been etched in a KOH electrolyte solution. Based on the oxidation state of the electrolytic dissolution reaction's product and time integration of the Faradaic current produced during the reaction, this method is capable of providing a direct measurement of the change in mass of a structure from anodic dissolution. To assess the application of this process for controlled mass removal spanning sub-micrograms to milligrams, two experimental studies and accompanying uncertainty analyses have been undertaken. In the first of these, 5 tungsten wires of length 30 mm were used to remove mass values ranging from 50 to 350 {mu}g. Uncertainty estimates indicate relative combined standard uncertainties of less than 0.3% in the mass changes determined from the measurement of Faradaic current. Comparison of the mass change determined using the electrolytic method, and using a precision ultra-microbalance agreed within this uncertainty. The charge-based method was then applied to modify the dynamic characteristics of a quartz tuning fork oscillator. In these experiments, tungsten fiber attached to one tine of the oscillator was etched in 5 {mu}g increments up to 120 {mu}g of total removed mass. In general, frequency shifts of 2.8 Hz{center_dot}{mu}g{sup -1} were observed, indicating sub-microgram resolution for the characterization of probes based on frequency shift and charge-based mass measurement. Taken together, this study provides the basis for a precision method for determining changes in mass based on electrical measurements from an electrochemical system. The utility of this technique is demonstrated through controlled modification of the dynamic properties of a mechanical oscillator.

  18. Tracking control of colloidal particles through non-homogeneous stationary flows.

    PubMed

    Híjar, Humberto

    2013-12-21

    We consider the problem of controlling the trajectory of a single colloidal particle in a fluid with steady non-homogeneous flow. We use a Langevin equation to describe the dynamics of this particle, where the friction term is assumed to be given by the Faxén's Theorem for the force on a sphere immersed in a stationary flow. We use this description to propose an explicit control force field to be applied on the particle such that it will follow asymptotically any given desired trajectory, starting from an arbitrary initial condition. We show that the dynamics of the controlled particle can be mapped into a set of stochastic harmonic oscillators and that the velocity gradient of the solvent induces an asymmetric coupling between them. We study the particular case of a Brownian particle controlled through a plane Couette flow and show explicitly that the velocity gradient of the solvent renders the dynamics non-stationary and non-reversible in time. We quantify this effect in terms of the correlation functions for the position of the controlled particle, which turn out to exhibit contributions depending exclusively on the non-equilibrium character of the state of the solvent. In order to test the validity of our model, we perform simulations of the controlled particle moving in a simple shear flow, using a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics and multi-particle collision dynamics. We confirm numerically that the proposed guiding force allows for controlling the trajectory of the micro-sized particle by obligating it to follow diverse specific trajectories in fluids with homogeneous shear rates of different strengths. In addition, we find that the non-equilibrium correlation functions in simulations exhibit the same qualitative behavior predicted by the model, thus revealing the presence of the asymmetric non-equilibrium coupling mechanism induced by the velocity gradient.

  19. Tracking control of colloidal particles through non-homogeneous stationary flows

    SciTech Connect

    Híjar, Humberto

    2013-12-21

    We consider the problem of controlling the trajectory of a single colloidal particle in a fluid with steady non-homogeneous flow. We use a Langevin equation to describe the dynamics of this particle, where the friction term is assumed to be given by the Faxén's Theorem for the force on a sphere immersed in a stationary flow. We use this description to propose an explicit control force field to be applied on the particle such that it will follow asymptotically any given desired trajectory, starting from an arbitrary initial condition. We show that the dynamics of the controlled particle can be mapped into a set of stochastic harmonic oscillators and that the velocity gradient of the solvent induces an asymmetric coupling between them. We study the particular case of a Brownian particle controlled through a plane Couette flow and show explicitly that the velocity gradient of the solvent renders the dynamics non-stationary and non-reversible in time. We quantify this effect in terms of the correlation functions for the position of the controlled particle, which turn out to exhibit contributions depending exclusively on the non-equilibrium character of the state of the solvent. In order to test the validity of our model, we perform simulations of the controlled particle moving in a simple shear flow, using a hybrid method combining molecular dynamics and multi-particle collision dynamics. We confirm numerically that the proposed guiding force allows for controlling the trajectory of the micro-sized particle by obligating it to follow diverse specific trajectories in fluids with homogeneous shear rates of different strengths. In addition, we find that the non-equilibrium correlation functions in simulations exhibit the same qualitative behavior predicted by the model, thus revealing the presence of the asymmetric non-equilibrium coupling mechanism induced by the velocity gradient.

  20. Facile biofunctionalization of silver nanoparticles for enhanced antibacterial properties, endotoxin removal, and biofilm control.

    PubMed

    Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Kumar, Piyush; Vasnani, Priyanka; Thalluri, Sitaramanjaneya Mouli; Bisht, Neha; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases cause a huge burden on healthcare systems worldwide. Pathogenic bacteria establish infection by developing antibiotic resistance and modulating the host's immune system, whereas opportunistic pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapt to adverse conditions owing to their ability to form biofilms. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were biofunctionalized with polymyxin B, an antibacterial peptide using a facile method. The biofunctionalized nanoparticles (polymyxin B-capped silver nanoparticles, PBSNPs) were assessed for antibacterial activity against multiple drug-resistant clinical strain Vibrio fluvialis and nosocomial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The results of antibacterial assay revealed that PBSNPs had an approximately 3-fold higher effect than the citrate-capped nanoparticles (CSNPs). Morphological damage to the cell membrane was followed by scanning electron microscopy, testifying PBSNPs to be more potent in controlling the bacterial growth as compared with CSNPs. The bactericidal effect of PBSNPs was further confirmed by Live/Dead staining assays. Apart from the antibacterial activity, the biofunctionalized nanoparticles were found to resist biofilm formation. Electroplating of PBSNPs onto stainless steel surgical blades retained the antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. Further, the affinity of polymyxin for endotoxin was exploited for its removal using PBSNPs. It was found that the prepared nanoparticles removed 97% of the endotoxin from the solution. Such multifarious uses of metal nanoparticles are an attractive means of enhancing the potency of antimicrobial agents to control infections.

  1. Facile biofunctionalization of silver nanoparticles for enhanced antibacterial properties, endotoxin removal, and biofilm control

    PubMed Central

    Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Kumar, Piyush; Vasnani, Priyanka; Thalluri, Sitaramanjaneya Mouli; Bisht, Neha; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases cause a huge burden on healthcare systems worldwide. Pathogenic bacteria establish infection by developing antibiotic resistance and modulating the host’s immune system, whereas opportunistic pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapt to adverse conditions owing to their ability to form biofilms. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were biofunctionalized with polymyxin B, an antibacterial peptide using a facile method. The biofunctionalized nanoparticles (polymyxin B-capped silver nanoparticles, PBSNPs) were assessed for antibacterial activity against multiple drug-resistant clinical strain Vibrio fluvialis and nosocomial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The results of antibacterial assay revealed that PBSNPs had an approximately 3-fold higher effect than the citrate-capped nanoparticles (CSNPs). Morphological damage to the cell membrane was followed by scanning electron microscopy, testifying PBSNPs to be more potent in controlling the bacterial growth as compared with CSNPs. The bactericidal effect of PBSNPs was further confirmed by Live/Dead staining assays. Apart from the antibacterial activity, the biofunctionalized nanoparticles were found to resist biofilm formation. Electroplating of PBSNPs onto stainless steel surgical blades retained the antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. Further, the affinity of polymyxin for endotoxin was exploited for its removal using PBSNPs. It was found that the prepared nanoparticles removed 97% of the endotoxin from the solution. Such multifarious uses of metal nanoparticles are an attractive means of enhancing the potency of antimicrobial agents to control infections. PMID:25834431

  2. Control of binder viscosity and hygroscopicity on particle aggregation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Jacob, Michael; Delmelle, Pierre; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    In the course of explosive volcanic eruptions, large amounts of ash are released into the atmosphere and may subsequently pose a threat to infrastructure, such as aviation industry. Ash plume forecasting is therefore a crucial tool for volcanic hazard mitigation but may be significantly affected by aggregation, altering the aerodynamic properties of particles. Models struggle with the implementation of aggregation since external conditions promoting aggregation have not been completely understood; in a previous study we have shown the rapid generation of ash aggregates through liquid bonding via the use of fluidization bed technology and further defined humidity and temperature ranges necessary to trigger aggregation. Salt (NaCl) was required for the recovery of stable aggregates, acting as a cementation agent and granting aggregate cohesion. A numerical model was used to explain the physics behind particle aggregation mechanisms and further predicted a dependency of aggregation efficiency on liquid binder viscosity. In this study we proof the effect of viscosity on particle aggregation. HCl and H2SO4 solutions were diluted to various concentrations resulting in viscosities between 1 and 2 mPas. Phonolitic and rhyolitic ash samples as well as soda-lime glass beads (serving as analogue material) were fluidized in the ProCell Lab® of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH and treated with the acids via a bottom-spray technique. Chemically driven interaction between acid liquids and surfaces of the three used materials led to crystal precipitation. Salt crystals (e.g. NaCl) have been confirmed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and leachate analysis. Both volcanic ash samples as well as the glass beads showed a clear dependency of aggregation efficiency on viscosity of the sprayed HCl solution. Spraying H2SO4 provoked a collapse of the fluidized bed and no aggregation has been observed. This is accounted by the high hygroscopicity of H2SO4. Dissolving CaCl2 (known to be

  3. A multifunctional role of trialkylbenzenes for the preparation of aqueous colloidal mesostructured/mesoporous silica nanoparticles with controlled pore size, particle diameter, and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hironori; Ujiie, Hiroto; Urata, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Eisuke; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2015-11-01

    Both the pore size and particle diameter of aqueous colloidal mesostructured/mesoporous silica nanoparticles (CMSS/CMPS) derived from tetrapropoxysilane were effectively and easily controlled by the addition of trialkylbenzenes (TAB). Aqueous highly dispersed CMPS with large pores were successfully obtained through removal of surfactants and TAB by a dialysis process. The pore size (from 4 nm to 8 nm) and particle diameter (from 50 nm to 380 nm) were more effectively enlarged by the addition of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB) than 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), and the enlargement did not cause the variation of the mesostructure and particle morphology. The larger molecular size and higher hydrophobicity of TIPB than TMB induce the incorporation of TIPB into micelles without the structural change. When TMB was used as TAB, the pore size of CMSS was also enlarged while the mesostructure and particle morphology were varied. Interestingly, when tetramethoxysilane and TIPB were used, CMSS with a very small particle diameter (20 nm) with concave surfaces and large mesopores were obtained, which may strongly be related to the initial nucleation of CMSS. A judicious choice of TAB and Si sources is quite important to control the mesostructure, size of mesopores, particle diameter, and morphology.Both the pore size and particle diameter of aqueous colloidal mesostructured/mesoporous silica nanoparticles (CMSS/CMPS) derived from tetrapropoxysilane were effectively and easily controlled by the addition of trialkylbenzenes (TAB). Aqueous highly dispersed CMPS with large pores were successfully obtained through removal of surfactants and TAB by a dialysis process. The pore size (from 4 nm to 8 nm) and particle diameter (from 50 nm to 380 nm) were more effectively enlarged by the addition of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB) than 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), and the enlargement did not cause the variation of the mesostructure and particle morphology. The larger molecular size

  4. Removal of antibiotics from water in the coexistence of suspended particles and natural organic matters using amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants: A combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuying; Yang, Zhen; Ren, Kexin; Tian, Ziqi; Dong, Chang; Ma, Ruixue; Yu, Ge; Yang, Weiben

    2016-11-01

    Contamination of trace antibiotics is widely found in surface water sources. This work delineates removal of trace antibiotics (norfloxacin (NOR), sulfadiazine (SDZ) or tylosin (TYL)) from synthetic surface water by flocculation, in the coexistence of inorganic suspended particles (kaolin) and natural organic matter (humic acid, HA). To avoid extra pollution caused by petrochemical products-based modification reagents, environmental-friendly amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants, Ctrp and Ctyr, with different functional aromatic-rings structures were employed. Jar tests at various pHs exhibited that, Ctyr, owning phenol groups as electron donors, was favored for elimination of cationic NOR (∼50% removal; optimal pH: 6; optimal dosage: 4mg/L) and TYL (∼60% removal; optimal pH: 7; optimal dosage: 7.5mg/L), due to π-π electron donator-acceptor (EDA) effect and unconventional H-bonds. Differently, Ctrp with indole groups as electron acceptor had better removal rate (∼50%) of SDZ anions (electron donator). According to correlation analysis, the coexisted kaolin and HA played positive roles in antibiotics' removal. Detailed pairwise interactions in molecular level among different components were clarified by spectral analysis and theoretical calculations (density functional theory), which are important for both the structural design of new flocculants aiming at targeted contaminants and understanding the environmental behaviors of antibiotics in water.

  5. Removal of antibiotics from water in the coexistence of suspended particles and natural organic matters using amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants: A combined experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shuying; Yang, Zhen; Ren, Kexin; Tian, Ziqi; Dong, Chang; Ma, Ruixue; Yu, Ge; Yang, Weiben

    2016-11-01

    Contamination of trace antibiotics is widely found in surface water sources. This work delineates removal of trace antibiotics (norfloxacin (NOR), sulfadiazine (SDZ) or tylosin (TYL)) from synthetic surface water by flocculation, in the coexistence of inorganic suspended particles (kaolin) and natural organic matter (humic acid, HA). To avoid extra pollution caused by petrochemical products-based modification reagents, environmental-friendly amino-acid-modified-chitosan flocculants, Ctrp and Ctyr, with different functional aromatic-rings structures were employed. Jar tests at various pHs exhibited that, Ctyr, owning phenol groups as electron donors, was favored for elimination of cationic NOR (∼50% removal; optimal pH: 6; optimal dosage: 4mg/L) and TYL (∼60% removal; optimal pH: 7; optimal dosage: 7.5mg/L), due to π-π electron donator-acceptor (EDA) effect and unconventional H-bonds. Differently, Ctrp with indole groups as electron acceptor had better removal rate (∼50%) of SDZ anions (electron donator). According to correlation analysis, the coexisted kaolin and HA played positive roles in antibiotics' removal. Detailed pairwise interactions in molecular level among different components were clarified by spectral analysis and theoretical calculations (density functional theory), which are important for both the structural design of new flocculants aiming at targeted contaminants and understanding the environmental behaviors of antibiotics in water. PMID:27348257

  6. SBA-15-incorporated nanoscale zero-valent iron particles for chromium(VI) removal from groundwater: mechanism, effect of pH, humic acid and sustained reactivity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xia; Yan, Yubo; Li, Jiansheng; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Lianjun

    2014-02-15

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (NZVIs) were incorporated inside the channels of SBA-15 rods by a "two solvents" reduction technique and used to remove Cr(VI) from groundwater. The resulting NZVIs/SBA-15 composites before and after reaction were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results helped to propose the mechanism of Cr(VI) removal by NZVIs/SBA-15, where Cr(VI) in aqueous was firstly impregnated into the channels of the silica, then adsorbed on the surfaces of the incorporated NZVIs and reduced to Cr(III) directly in the inner pores of the silica. Corrosion products included Fe2O3, FeO(OH), Fe3O4 and Cr2FeO4. Batch experiments revealed that Cr(VI) removal decreased from 99.7% to 92.8% when the initial solution pH increased from 5.5 to 9.0, accompanied by the decrease of the kobs from 0.600 to 0.024 min(-1). Humic acid (HA) had a little effect on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) by NZVIs/SBA-15 but could decrease the reduction rate. The stable reduction of NZVIs/SBA-15 was observed within six cycles. NZVIs/SBA-15 composites offer a promising alternative material to remove heavy metals from groundwater.

  7. Controllable fabrication and magnetic properties of double-shell cobalt oxides hollow particles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Zhu, Jianyu; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Tao; Chen, Limiao; Liu, Xiaohe; Ma, Renzhi; Zhang, Haitao; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2015-01-01

    Double-shell cobalt monoxide (CoO) hollow particles were successfully synthesized by a facile and effective one-pot solution-based synthetic route. The inner architecture and outer structure of the double-shell CoO hollow particles could be readily created through controlling experimental parameters. A possible formation mechanism was proposed based on the experimental results. The current synthetic strategy has good prospects for the future production of other transition-metal oxides particles with hollow interior. Furthermore, double-shell cobalt oxide (Co3O4) hollow particles could also be obtained through calcinating corresponding CoO hollow particles. The magnetic measurements revealed double-shell CoO and Co3O4 hollow particles exhibit ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic behaviour, respectively. PMID:25736824

  8. Field evaluation of an engineering control for respirable crystalline silica exposures during mortar removal.

    PubMed

    Collingwood, Scott; Heitbrink, William A

    2007-11-01

    During mortar removal with a right angle grinder, a building renovation process known as "tuck pointing," worker exposures to respirable crystalline silica can be as high as 5 mg/m(3), 100 times the recommended exposure limit developed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. To reduce the risk of silicosis among these workers, a vacuum cleaner can be used to exhaust 80 ft(3)/min (2.26 m(3)/min) from a hood mounted on the grinder. Field trials examined the ability of vacuum cleaners to maintain adequate exhaust ventilation rates and measure exposure outcomes when using this engineering control. These field trials involved task-based exposure measurement of respirable dust and crystalline silica exposures during mortar removal. These measurements were compared with published exposure data. Vacuum cleaner airflows were obtained by measuring and digitally logging vacuum cleaner static pressure at the inlet to the vacuum cleaner motor. Static pressures were converted to airflows based on experimentally determined fan curves. In two cases, video exposure monitoring was conducted to study the relationship between worker activities and dust exposure. Worker activities were video taped concurrent with aerosol photometer measurement of dust exposure and vacuum cleaner static pressure as a measure of airflow. During these field trials, respirable crystalline silica exposures for 22 samples had a geometric mean of 0.06 mg/m(3) and a range of less than 0.01 to 0.86 mg/m(3). For three other studies, respirable crystalline silica exposures during mortar removal have a geometric means of 1.1 to 0.35. Although this field study documented noticeably less exposure to crystalline silica, video exposure monitoring found that the local exhaust ventilation provided incomplete dust control due to low exhaust flow rates, certain work practices, and missing mortar. Vacuum cleaner airflow decrease had a range of 3 to 0.4 ft(3)/min (0.08 to 0.01 m(3)/sec(2)) over a range

  9. Gas-borne particles with tunable and highly controlled characteristics for nanotoxicology studies

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Christian R.; Pagels, Joakim; Meuller, Bengt O.; Deppert, Knut; Rissler, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    For nanotoxicology investigations of air-borne particles to provide relevant results it is ever so important that the particle exposure of, for example cells, closely resembles the “real” exposure situation, that the dosimetry is well defined, and that the characteristics of the deposited nanoparticles are known in detail. By synthesizing the particles in the gas-phase and directly depositing them on lung cells the particle deposition conditions in the lung is closely mimicked. In this work we present a setup for generation of gas-borne nanoparticles of a variety of different materials with highly controlled and tunable particle characteristics, and demonstrate the method by generation of gold particles. Particle size, number concentration and mass of individual particles of the population are measured on-line by means of differential mobility analyzers (DMA) and an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM), whereas primary particle size and internal structure are investigated by transmission electron microscopy. A method for estimating the surface area dose from the DMA-APM measurements is applied and we further demonstrate that for the setup used, a deposition time of around 1 h is needed for deposition onto cells in an air–liquid interface chamber, using electrostatic deposition, to reach a toxicological relevant surface area dose. PMID:22630037

  10. Modification of an Iranian clinoptilolite nano-particles by hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium cationic surfactant and dithizone for removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Anari-Anaraki, Mostafa; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2015-02-15

    Natural clinoptilolite tuff was mechanically converted to micro (MCP) and nano (NCP) particles. The MCP and NCP powders were respectively modified with hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA) and dithizone (DTZ). The raw and modified samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformation infra red (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and thermogravimetry (TG) and used for the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution. The results confirm that both ion exchange and complexation processes are responsible for removal of Pb(II) cations in the modified samples, while Pb(II) cations were only removed via an ion exchange process by the raw clinoptilolite. In this sorbent, the anionic removal property of surfactant modified zeolites (SMZs) changed to cationic removal property by an additional modification step. The best removal efficiency was observed by NCP-HDTMA-DTZ at the following experimental conditions: C(Pb(II)): 800 mg L(-1), HDTMA dosage: 0.2 mol L(-1), DTZ dosage: 5 mmol L(-1), contact time of DTZ with NCP-HDTMA: 1800 min and contact time of the sorbent with Pb(II): 360 min. The NCP-HDTMA-DTZ sorbent showed good efficiency for the removal of lead in the presence of different multivalent cations. Adsorption isotherms of Pb(II) ions obey the Langmuir equation that indicate the monolayer sorption of Pb(II). The adsorption kinetics based on the pseudo-second-order rate equation indicates that the rate limiting step involving a chemical reaction. The negative ΔH and ΔG indicate an exothermic and spontaneous process. PMID:25460715

  11. Modification of an Iranian clinoptilolite nano-particles by hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium cationic surfactant and dithizone for removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Anari-Anaraki, Mostafa; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2015-02-15

    Natural clinoptilolite tuff was mechanically converted to micro (MCP) and nano (NCP) particles. The MCP and NCP powders were respectively modified with hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA) and dithizone (DTZ). The raw and modified samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformation infra red (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and thermogravimetry (TG) and used for the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution. The results confirm that both ion exchange and complexation processes are responsible for removal of Pb(II) cations in the modified samples, while Pb(II) cations were only removed via an ion exchange process by the raw clinoptilolite. In this sorbent, the anionic removal property of surfactant modified zeolites (SMZs) changed to cationic removal property by an additional modification step. The best removal efficiency was observed by NCP-HDTMA-DTZ at the following experimental conditions: C(Pb(II)): 800 mg L(-1), HDTMA dosage: 0.2 mol L(-1), DTZ dosage: 5 mmol L(-1), contact time of DTZ with NCP-HDTMA: 1800 min and contact time of the sorbent with Pb(II): 360 min. The NCP-HDTMA-DTZ sorbent showed good efficiency for the removal of lead in the presence of different multivalent cations. Adsorption isotherms of Pb(II) ions obey the Langmuir equation that indicate the monolayer sorption of Pb(II). The adsorption kinetics based on the pseudo-second-order rate equation indicates that the rate limiting step involving a chemical reaction. The negative ΔH and ΔG indicate an exothermic and spontaneous process.

  12. Steric stabilization of nonaqueous silicon slips. I - Control of particle agglomeration and packing. II - Pressure casting of powder compacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerkar, Awdhoot V.; Henderson, Robert J. M.; Feke, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    The application of steric stabilization to control particle agglomeration and packing of silicon powder in benzene and trichloroethylene is reported. The results provide useful guidelines for controlling unfavorable particle-particle interactions during nonaqueous processing of silicon-based ceramic materials. The application of steric stabilization to the control and improvement of green processing of nonaqueous silicon slips in pressure consolidation is also demonstrated.

  13. Size- and shape-controlled synthesis and catalytic performance of iron-aluminum mixed oxide nanoparticles for NOX and SO₂ removal with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Zhong, Qin; Zhang, Shule; Cai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A novel, simple, reproducible and low-cost strategy is introduced for the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of iron-aluminum mixed oxide nanoparticles (NIAO(x/y)). The as-synthesized NIAO(x/y) catalyze decomposition of H2O2 yielding highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH) for NOX and SO2 removal. 100% SO2 removal is achieved. NIAO(x/y) with Fe/Al molar ratio of 7/3 (NIAO(7/3)) shows the highest NOX removal of nearly 80% at >170°C, whereas much lower NOX removal (<63%) is obtained for NIAO(3/7). The melting of aluminum oxides in NIAO(7/3) promotes the formation of lamellar products, thus improving the specific surface areas and mesoporous distribution, benefiting the production of OH radicals. Furthermore, the NIAO(7/3) leads to the minor increase of points of zero charges (PZC), apparent enhancement of FeOH content and high oxidizing ability of Fe(III), further improving the production of OH radicals. However, the NIAO(3/7) results in the formation of aluminum surface-enriched spherical particles, thus decreasing the surface atomic ratio of iron oxides, decreasing OH radical production. More importantly, the generation of FeOAl causes the decline of active sites. Finally, the catalytic decomposition of H2O2 on NIAO(x/y) is proposed. And the well catalytic stability of NIAO(7/3) is obtained for evaluation of 30 h.

  14. Size- and shape-controlled synthesis and catalytic performance of iron-aluminum mixed oxide nanoparticles for NOX and SO₂ removal with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Zhong, Qin; Zhang, Shule; Cai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A novel, simple, reproducible and low-cost strategy is introduced for the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of iron-aluminum mixed oxide nanoparticles (NIAO(x/y)). The as-synthesized NIAO(x/y) catalyze decomposition of H2O2 yielding highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH) for NOX and SO2 removal. 100% SO2 removal is achieved. NIAO(x/y) with Fe/Al molar ratio of 7/3 (NIAO(7/3)) shows the highest NOX removal of nearly 80% at >170°C, whereas much lower NOX removal (<63%) is obtained for NIAO(3/7). The melting of aluminum oxides in NIAO(7/3) promotes the formation of lamellar products, thus improving the specific surface areas and mesoporous distribution, benefiting the production of OH radicals. Furthermore, the NIAO(7/3) leads to the minor increase of points of zero charges (PZC), apparent enhancement of FeOH content and high oxidizing ability of Fe(III), further improving the production of OH radicals. However, the NIAO(3/7) results in the formation of aluminum surface-enriched spherical particles, thus decreasing the surface atomic ratio of iron oxides, decreasing OH radical production. More importantly, the generation of FeOAl causes the decline of active sites. Finally, the catalytic decomposition of H2O2 on NIAO(x/y) is proposed. And the well catalytic stability of NIAO(7/3) is obtained for evaluation of 30 h. PMID:25464305

  15. Mercury removals by existing pollutants control devices of four coal-fired power plants in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Wenhua; Xu, Wei; Wang, Xiaohao; Zhao, Song

    2011-01-01

    The mercury removals by existing pollution control devices and the mass balances of mercury in four coal-fired power plants of China were carried out based on a measurement method with the aluminum matrix sorbent. All the plants are equipped with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) in series. During the course of coal stream, the samples, such as coal, bottom ash, fly ash, gypsum and flue gas, were collected. The Hg concentrations in coals were measured by CVAAS after appropriate preparation and acid digestion. Other solid samples were measured by the RA-915+ Zeeman Mercury Spectrometer. The vapor phase Hg was collected by a sorbent trap from flue gas and then measured using CVAAS followed by acid leaching. The mercury mass balances were estimated in this study were 91.6%, 77.1%, 118% and 85.8% for the four power plants, respectively. The total Hg concentrations in the stack gas were ranged from 1.56-5.95 microg/m3. The relative distribution of Hg in bottom ash, ESP, WFGD and stack discharged were ranged between 0.110%-2.50%, 2.17%-23.4%, 2.21%-87.1%, and 21.8%-72.7%, respectively. The distribution profiles were varied with the coal type and the operation conditions. The Hg in flue gas could be removed by ESP and FGD systems with an average removal efficiency of 51.8%. The calculated average emission factor was 0.066 g/ton and much lower than the results obtained ten years ago.

  16. Mercury removals by existing pollutants control devices of four coal-fired power plants in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Wenhua; Xu, Wei; Wang, Xiaohao; Zhao, Song

    2011-01-01

    The mercury removals by existing pollution control devices and the mass balances of mercury in four coal-fired power plants of China were carried out based on a measurement method with the aluminum matrix sorbent. All the plants are equipped with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) in series. During the course of coal stream, the samples, such as coal, bottom ash, fly ash, gypsum and flue gas, were collected. The Hg concentrations in coals were measured by CVAAS after appropriate preparation and acid digestion. Other solid samples were measured by the RA-915+ Zeeman Mercury Spectrometer. The vapor phase Hg was collected by a sorbent trap from flue gas and then measured using CVAAS followed by acid leaching. The mercury mass balances were estimated in this study were 91.6%, 77.1%, 118% and 85.8% for the four power plants, respectively. The total Hg concentrations in the stack gas were ranged from 1.56-5.95 microg/m3. The relative distribution of Hg in bottom ash, ESP, WFGD and stack discharged were ranged between 0.110%-2.50%, 2.17%-23.4%, 2.21%-87.1%, and 21.8%-72.7%, respectively. The distribution profiles were varied with the coal type and the operation conditions. The Hg in flue gas could be removed by ESP and FGD systems with an average removal efficiency of 51.8%. The calculated average emission factor was 0.066 g/ton and much lower than the results obtained ten years ago. PMID:22432308

  17. Productivity control of fine particle transport to equatorial Pacific sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, E.; Turekian, K. K.; Wei, K.-Y.

    2000-09-01

    Accumulation rates of 3He (from cosmic dust), 230Th (produced in the water column), barite (produced in the water column during decay of organic matter), and Fe and Ti (arriving with wind-borne dust) all are positively correlated in an equatorial Pacific core (TT013-PC72; 01.1°N, 139.4°W; water depth 4298 m). These accumulation rates are also positively correlated with the accumulation rates of noncarbonate material. They are not significantly correlated to the mass accumulation rate of carbonate, which makes up the bulk of the sediment. The fluctuations in accumulation rates of these various components from different sources thus must result from variations in some process within the oceans and not from variations in their original sources. Sediment focusing by oceanic bottom currents has been proposed as this process [Marcantonio et al., 1996]. We argue that the variations in the accumulation rates of all these components are dominantly linked to changes in productivity and particle scavenging (3He, 230Th, Fe, Ti) by fresh phytoplankton detritus (which delivers Ba upon its decay) in the equatorial Pacific upwelling region. We speculate that as equatorial Pacific productivity is a major component of global oceanic productivity, its variations over time might be reflected in variations in atmospheric levels of methanesulfonic acid (an atmospheric reaction product of dimethyl sulfide, which is produced by oceanic phytoplankton) and recorded in Antarctic ice cores.

  18. Monodisperse, Uniformly-Shaped Particles for Controlled Respiratory Vaccine Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromen, Catherine Ann

    The majority of the world's most infectious diseases occur at the air-tissue interface called the mucosa, including HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, measles, and bacterial or viral gut and respiratory infections. Despite this, vaccines have generally been developed for the systemic immune system and fail to provide protection at the mucosal site. Vaccine delivery directly to the lung mucosa could provide superior lung protection for many infectious diseases, such as TB or influenza, as well as systemic and therapeutic vaccines for diseases such as Dengue fever, asthma, or cancer. Specifically, precision engineered biomaterials are believed to offer tremendous opportunities for a new generation of vaccines. The goal of this approach is to leverage naturally occurring processes of the immune system to produce memory responses capable of rapidly destroy virulent pathogens without harmful exposure. Considerable knowledge of biomaterial properties and their interaction with the immune system of the lung is required for successful translation. The overall goal of this work was to fabricate and characterize nano- and microparticles using the Particle Replication In Non-wetting Templates (PRINT) fabrication technique and optimize them as pulmonary vaccine carriers. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  19. Solar Particle Induced Upsets in the TDRS-1 Attitude Control System RAM During the October 1989 Solar Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croley, D. R.; Garrett, H. B.; Murphy, G. B.; Garrard,T. L.

    1995-01-01

    The three large solar particle events, beginning on October 19, 1989 and lasting approximately six days, were characterized by high fluences of solar protons and heavy ions at 1 AU. During these events, an abnormally large number of upsets (243) were observed in the random access memory of the attitude control system (ACS) control processing electronics (CPE) on-board the geosynchronous TDRS-1 (Telemetry and Data Relay Satellite). The RAM unit affected was composed of eight Fairchild 93L422 memory chips. The Galileo spacecraft, launched on October 18, 1989 (one day prior to the solar particle events) observed the fluxes of heavy ions experienced by TDRS-1. Two solid-state detector telescopes on-board Galileo, designed to measure heavy ion species and energy, were turned on during time periods within each of the three separate events. The heavy ion data have been modeled and the time history of the events reconstructed to estimate heavy ion fluences. These fluences were converted to effective LET spectra after transport through the estimated shielding distribution around the TDRS-1 ACS system. The number of single event upsets (SEU) expected was calculated by integrating the measured cross section for the Fairchild 93L422 memory chip with average effective LET spectrum. The expected number of heavy ion induced SEU's calculated was 176. GOES-7 proton data, observed during the solar particle events, were used to estimate the number of proton-induced SEU's by integrating the proton fluence spectrum incident on the memory chips, with the two-parameter Bendel cross section for proton SEU'S. The proton fluence spectrum at the device level was gotten by transporting the protons through the estimated shielding distribution. The number of calculated proton-induced SEU's was 72, yielding a total of 248 predicted SEU'S, very dose to the 243 observed SEU'S. These calculations uniquely demonstrate the roles that solar heavy ions and protons played in the production of SEU

  20. Ambient black carbon particle hygroscopic properties controlled by mixing state and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J.; Whitehead, J.; Young, D.; Flynn, M.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.; Fleming, Z. L.; Bandy, B.

    2013-02-01

    The wet removal of black carbon aerosol (BC) in the atmosphere is a crucial factor in determining its atmospheric lifetime and thereby the vertical and horizontal distributions, dispersion on local and regional scales, and the direct, semi-direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The in-cloud scavenging and wet deposition rate of freshly emitted hydrophobic BC will be increased on acquisition of more-hydrophilic components by coagulation or coating processes. The lifetime of BC is still subject to considerable uncertainty for most of the model inputs, which is largely due to the insufficient constraints on the BC hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion process from observational field data. This study was conducted at a site along UK North Norfolk coastline, where the BC particles were transported from different regions within Western Europe. A hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA) was coupled with a single particle soot photometer (SP2) to measure the hygroscopic properties of BC particles and associated mixing state in real time. In addition, a Soot Particle AMS (SP-AMS) measured the chemical compositions of additional material associated with BC particles. The ensemble of BC particles persistently contained a less-hygroscopic mode at a growth factor (gf) of around 1.05 at 90% RH (dry diameter 163 nm). Importantly, a more-hygroscopic mode of BC particles was observed throughout the experiment, the gf of these BC particles extended up to ~1.4-1.6 with the minimum between this and the less hygroscopic mode at a gf ~1.25, or equivalent effective hygroscopicity parameter κ ~0.1. The gf of BC particles (gfBC) was highly influenced by the composition of associated soluble material: increases of gfBC were associated with secondary inorganic components, and these increases were more pronounced when ammonium nitrate was in the BC particles; however the presence of secondary organic matter suppressed the gfBC below that of pure inorganics. The

  1. Ambient black carbon particle hygroscopic properties controlled by mixing state and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Allan, J.; Whitehead, J.; Young, D.; Flynn, M.; Coe, H.; McFiggans, G.; Fleming, Z.; Bandy, B.

    2012-11-01

    The wet removal of black carbon aerosol (BC) in the atmosphere is a crucial factor in determining its atmospheric lifetime and thereby the vertical and horizontal distributions, dispersion on local and regional scales, and the direct, semi-direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The in-cloud scavenging and wet deposition rate of freshly emitted hydrophobic BC will be increased on acquisition of more-hydrophilic components by coagulation or coating processes. The lifetime of BC is still subject to considerable uncertainty for most of the model inputs, which is largely due to the insufficient constraints on the BC hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic conversion process from observational field data. This study was conducted at a site along UK North Norfolk coastline, where the BC particles were transported from different regions within Western Europe. A hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA) was coupled with a single particle soot photometer (SP2) to measure the hygroscopic properties of BC particles and associated mixing state in real time. In addition, a Soot Particle AMS (SP-AMS) measured the chemical compositions of additional material associated with BC particles. The ensemble of BC particles persistently contained a less-hygroscopic mode at a growth factor (gf) of around 1.05 at 90% RH (dry diameter 163 nm). Importantly, a more-hygroscopic mode of BC particles was observed throughout the experiment, the gf of these BC particles extended up to ~1.4-1.6 with the minimum between this and the less hygroscopic mode at a gf ~1.25, or equivalent effective hygroscopicity parameter κ = ~0.1. The gf of BC particles (gfBC) was highly influenced by the composition of associated soluble material: increases of gfBC were associated with secondary inorganic components, and these increases were more pronounced when ammonium nitrate was in the BC particles; however the presence of secondary organic matter suppressed the gfBC below that of pure inorganics. The

  2. Auxiliary particle filter-model predictive control of the vacuum arc remelting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, F.; Beaman, J.; Williamson, R.

    2016-07-01

    Solidification control is required for the suppression of segregation defects in vacuum arc remelting of superalloys. In recent years, process controllers for the VAR process have been proposed based on linear models, which are known to be inaccurate in highly-dynamic conditions, e.g. start-up, hot-top and melt rate perturbations. A novel controller is proposed using auxiliary particle filter-model predictive control based on a nonlinear stochastic model. The auxiliary particle filter approximates the probability of the state, which is fed to a model predictive controller that returns an optimal control signal. For simplicity, the estimation and control problems are solved using Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods. The validity of this approach is verified for a 430 mm (17 in) diameter Alloy 718 electrode melted into a 510 mm (20 in) diameter ingot. Simulation shows a more accurate and smoother performance than the one obtained with an earlier version of the controller.

  3. Fine particle removal performance of a two-stage wet electrostatic precipitator using a nonmetallic pre-charger.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Joon; Han, Bangwoo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Hwang, Kyu-Dong; Oh, Won-Seek; Yoo, Seong-Yeon; Oda, Tetsuji

    2011-12-01

    A novel two-stage wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP) has been developed using a carbon brush pre-charger and collection plates with a thin water film. The electrical and particle collection performance was evaluated for submicrometer particles smaller than 0.01- 0.5 micrometer in diameter by varying the voltages applied to the pre-charger and collection plates as well as the polarity of the voltage. The collection efficiency was compared with that calculated by the theoretical models. The long-term performances of the ESP with and without water films were also compared in tests using Japanese Industrial Standards dust. The experimental results show that the carbon brush pre-charger of the two-stage wet ESP had approximately 10% particle capture, while producing ozone concentrations of less than 30 ppb. The produced amounts of ozone are significantly lower than the current limits set by international agencies. The ESP also achieved a high collection rate performance, averaging 90% for ultrafine particles, as based on the particle number concentration at an average velocity of 1 m/sec corresponding to a residence time of 0.17 sec. Higher particle collection efficiency for the ESP can be achieved by increasing the voltages applied to the pre-charger and the collection plates. The decreased collection efficiency that occurred during dust loading without water films was completely avoided by forming a thin water film on the collection plates at a water flow rate of 6.5 L/min/m(2).

  4. Controlled removal of amorphous Se capping layer from a topological insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Virwani, Kumar; Pushp, Aakash Topuria, Teya; Delenia, Eugene; Rice, Philip; Kellock, Andrew; Parkin, Stuart; Harrison, Sara E.; Collins-McIntyre, Liam; Hesjedal, Thorsten; Harris, James

    2014-12-15

    We report on the controlled removal of an amorphous Se capping layer from Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} topological insulators. We show that the Se coalesces into micron-sized islands before desorbing from the surface at a temperature of ∼150 °C. In situ Auger Electron Spectroscopy reveals that Se replaces a significant fraction of the Te near the top surface of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Transmission Electron Microscopy show that after heating, Se has been incorporated in the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} lattice down to ∼7 nm from its top surface while remaining iso-structural.

  5. Including Life Cycle Assessment for decision-making in controlling wastewater nutrient removal systems.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Lluís; Larsen, Henrik F; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2013-10-15

    This paper focuses on the use of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to evaluate the performance of seventeen control strategies in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). It tackles the importance of using site-specific factors for nutrient enrichment when decision-makers have to select best operating strategies. Therefore, the LCA evaluation is repeated for three different scenarios depending on the limitation of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or both, when evaluating the nutrient enrichment impact in water bodies. The LCA results indicate that for treated effluent discharged into N-deficient aquatic systems (e.g. open coastal areas) the most eco-friendly strategies differ from the ones dealing with discharging into P-deficient (e.g. lakes and rivers) and N&P-deficient systems (e.g. coastal zones). More particularly, the results suggest that strategies that promote increased nutrient removal and/or energy savings present an environmental benefit for N&P and P-deficient systems. This is not the case when addressing N-deficient systems for which the use of chemicals (even for improving N removal efficiencies) is not always beneficial for the environment. A sensitivity analysis on using weighting of the impact categories is conducted to assess how value choices (policy decisions) may affect the management of WWTPs. For the scenarios with only N-limitation, the LCA-based ranking of the control strategies is sensitive to the choice of weighting factors, whereas this is not the case for N&P or P-deficient aquatic systems.

  6. Including Life Cycle Assessment for decision-making in controlling wastewater nutrient removal systems.

    PubMed

    Corominas, Lluís; Larsen, Henrik F; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2013-10-15

    This paper focuses on the use of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to evaluate the performance of seventeen control strategies in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). It tackles the importance of using site-specific factors for nutrient enrichment when decision-makers have to select best operating strategies. Therefore, the LCA evaluation is repeated for three different scenarios depending on the limitation of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or both, when evaluating the nutrient enrichment impact in water bodies. The LCA results indicate that for treated effluent discharged into N-deficient aquatic systems (e.g. open coastal areas) the most eco-friendly strategies differ from the ones dealing with discharging into P-deficient (e.g. lakes and rivers) and N&P-deficient systems (e.g. coastal zones). More particularly, the results suggest that strategies that promote increased nutrient removal and/or energy savings present an environmental benefit for N&P and P-deficient systems. This is not the case when addressing N-deficient systems for which the use of chemicals (even for improving N removal efficiencies) is not always beneficial for the environment. A sensitivity analysis on using weighting of the impact categories is conducted to assess how value choices (policy decisions) may affect the management of WWTPs. For the scenarios with only N-limitation, the LCA-based ranking of the control strategies is sensitive to the choice of weighting factors, whereas this is not the case for N&P or P-deficient aquatic systems. PMID:23856224

  7. Analytical optimal controls for the state constrained addition and removal of cryoprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Chicone, Carmen C.; Critser, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Cryobiology is a field with enormous scientific, financial and even cultural impact. Successful cryopreservation of cells and tissues depends on the equilibration of these materials with high concentrations of permeating chemicals (CPAs) such as glycerol or 1,2 propylene glycol. Because cells and tissues are exposed to highly anisosmotic conditions, the resulting gradients cause large volume fluctuations that have been shown to damage cells and tissues. On the other hand, there is evidence that toxicity to these high levels of chemicals is time dependent, and therefore it is ideal to minimize exposure time as well. Because solute and solvent flux is governed by a system of ordinary differential equations, CPA addition and removal from cells is an ideal context for the application of optimal control theory. Recently, we presented a mathematical synthesis of the optimal controls for the ODE system commonly used in cryobiology in the absence of state constraints and showed that controls defined by this synthesis were optimal. Here we define the appropriate model, analytically extend the previous theory to one encompassing state constraints, and as an example apply this to the critical and clinically important cell type of human oocytes, where current methodologies are either difficult to implement or have very limited success rates. We show that an enormous increase in equilibration efficiency can be achieved under the new protocols when compared to classic protocols, potentially allowing a greatly increased survival rate for human oocytes, and pointing to a direction for the cryopreservation of many other cell types. PMID:22527943

  8. Laser trapping in anisotropic fluids and polarization-controlled particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Smalyukh, Ivan I; Kachynski, Aliaksandr V; Kuzmin, Andrey N; Prasad, Paras N

    2006-11-28

    Anisotropic fluids are widespread, ranging from liquid crystals used in displays to ordered states of a biological cell interior. Optical trapping is potentially a powerful technique in the fundamental studies and applications of anisotropic fluids. We demonstrate that laser beams in these fluids can generate anisotropic optical trapping forces, even for particles larger than the trapping beam wavelength. Immersed colloidal particles modify the fluid's ordered molecular structures and locally distort its optic axis. This distortion produces a refractive index "corona" around the particles that depends on their surface characteristics. The laser beam can trap such particles not only at their center but also at the high-index corona. Trapping forces in the beam's lateral plane mimic the corona and are polarization-controlled. This control allows the optical forces to be reversed and cause the particle to follow a prescribed trajectory. Anisotropic particle dynamics in the trap varies with laser power because of the anisotropy of both viscous drag and trapping forces. Using thermotropic liquid crystals and biological materials, we show that these phenomena are quite general for all anisotropic fluids and impinge broadly on their quantitative studies using laser tweezers. Potential applications include modeling thermodynamic systems with anisotropic polarization-controlled potential wells, producing optically tunable photonic crystals, and fabricating light-controlled nano- and micropumps.

  9. Particle and recycling control in translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossnickle, J. A.; Vlases, G. C.; Hoffman, A. L.; Melnik, P. A.; Milroy, R. D.; Tankut, A.; Velas, K. M.

    2010-03-01

    Previous work in the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) device [H. Y. Guo et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056101 (2008)] demonstrated improved plasma parameters; higher temperature, higher poloidal magnetic field, increased current drive, and increased energy confinement, for rotating magnetic field (RMF) driven field reversed configurations (FRC) relative to the earlier TCS device. This was accomplished by improving vacuum conditions and using moderate wall heating (˜100 °C) and glow discharge cleaning for wall conditioning. Two new wall conditioning techniques, siliconization and titanium gettering, have been employed to further reduce impurities and control recycling. Both techniques reduced oxygen line radiation by an order of magnitude, and total radiated power by 50%, but led to little change in overall FRC performance, reinforcing the earlier conclusion that TCSU FRCs are not radiation dominated. Titanium gettering substantially reduced deuterium recycling, requiring a new method of fueling to be developed. This is the first time a FRC has been operated without using wall recycling as the primary method of fueling. The low-recycling FRCs, maintained by enhanced puff fueling, performed similarly to standard recycling fueled FRCs in terms of a key current drive parameter Be/Bω, the ratio of maximum sustained poloidal field to applied RMF field, but better density control allowed for higher temperatures.

  10. Ultrasonically controlled particle size distribution of explosives: a safe method.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mohan Narayan; Gore, G M; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2008-03-01

    Size reduction of the high energy materials (HEM's) by conventional methods (mechanical means) is not safe as they are very sensitive to friction and impact. Modified crystallization techniques can be used for the same purpose. The solute is dissolved in the solvent and crystallized via cooling or is precipitated out using an antisolvent. The various crystallization parameters such as temperature, antisolvent addition rate and agitation are adjusted to get the required final crystal size and morphology. The solvent-antisolvent ratio, time of crystallization and yield of the product are the key factors for controlling antisolvent based precipitation process. The advantages of cavitationally induced nucleation can be coupled with the conventional crystallization process. This study includes the effect of the ultrasonically generated acoustic cavitation phenomenon on the solvent antisolvent based precipitation process. CL20, a high-energy explosive compound, is a polyazapolycyclic caged polynitramine. CL-20 has greater energy output than existing (in-use) energetic ingredients while having an acceptable level of insensitivity to shock and other external stimuli. The size control and size distribution manipulation of the high energy material (CL20) has been successfully carried out safely and quickly along with an increase in the final mass yield, compared to the conventional antisolvent based precipitation process. PMID:17532248

  11. Morphology Control of FeCo Alloy Particles Synthesized by Polyol Process

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, D.; Sato, Y.; Tohji, K.; Jeyadevan, B.; Shinoda, K.; Sato, K.

    2007-03-20

    FeCo alloy is a soft magnetic material that possesses the highest saturation magnetization of 2.4 T and crystallizes in bcc structure as in the case of {alpha}-Fe. However, the particles synthesized were highly agglomerated. Thus, in this paper, an attempt was made to control the morphology of the particles using different types and concentrations of surfactants such as oleic acid, oleyl amine, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), etc., during the synthesis of the particles. Though all the surfactant experimented partially prevented the agglomeration, products had larger size distribution except for PVP, which provided nearly monodispersed particles. Furthermore, the FeCo particles synthesized in the presence of PVP were either cubic or nearly spherical depending on the concentration of Fe.

  12. Coyote removal, understory cover, and survival of white-tailed deer neonates: Coyote Control and Fawn Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Kilgo, John C.; Vukovich, Mark; Ray, H. Scott; Shaw, Christopher E.; Ruth, Charles

    2014-09-01

    Predation by coyotes (Canis latrans) on white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) neonates has led to reduced recruitment in many deer populations in southeastern North America. This low recruitment combined with liberal antlerless deer harvest has resulted in declines in some deer populations, and consequently, increased interest in coyote population control. We investigated whether neonate survival increased after coyote removal, whether coyote predation on neonates was additive to other mortality sources, and whether understory vegetation density affected neonate survival. We monitored neonate survival for 4 years prior to (2006–2009) and 3 years during (2010–2012) intensive coyote removal on 3 32-km2 units on the United States Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site, South Carolina. We removed 474 coyotes (1.63 coyotes/km2 per unit per year), reducing coyote abundance by 78% from pre-removal levels. The best model (wi = 0.927) describing survival probability among 216 radio-collared neonates included a within-year quadratic time trend variable, date of birth, removal treatment, and a varying removal year effect. Under this model, survival differed between pre-treatment and removal periods and it differed among years during the removal period, being >100% greater than pre-treatment survival (0.228) during the first removal year (0.513), similar to pre-treatment survival during the second removal year (0.202), and intermediate during the third removal year (0.431). Despite an initial increase, the overall effect of coyote removal on neonate survival was modest. Mortality rate attributable to coyote predation was lowest during the first removal year (0.357) when survival was greatest, but the mortality rate from all other causes did not differ between the pretreatment period and any year during removals, indicating that coyote predation acted as an additive source of mortality. Survival probability was not related to

  13. PID controller design of nonlinear systems using an improved particle swarm optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wei-Der; Shih, Shun-Peng

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, an improved particle swarm optimization is presented to search for the optimal PID controller gains for a class of nonlinear systems. The proposed algorithm is to modify the velocity formula of the general PSO systems in order for improving the searching efficiency. In the improved PSO-based nonlinear PID control system design, three PID control gains, i.e., the proportional gain Kp, integral gain Ki, and derivative gain Kd are required to form a parameter vector which is called a particle. It is the basic component of PSO systems and many such particles further constitute a population. To derive the optimal PID gains for nonlinear systems, two principle equations, the modified velocity updating and position updating equations, are employed to move the positions of all particles in the population. In the meanwhile, an objective function defined for PID controller optimization problems may be minimized. To validate the control performance of the proposed method, a typical nonlinear system control, the inverted pendulum tracking control, is illustrated. The results testify that the improved PSO algorithm can perform well in the nonlinear PID control system design.

  14. Biogeochemical Mechanisms Controlling Reduced Radionuclide Particle Properties and Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Jim K. Fredrickson; John M. Zachara; Matthew J. Marshall; Alex S. Beliaev

    2006-06-01

    Uranium and Technetium are the major risk-driving contaminants at Hanford and other DOE sites. These radionuclides have been shown to be reduced by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) under anoxic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that reduction results in the formation of poorly soluble hydrous oxides, UO2(s) and TcO2n?H2O(s), that are believed to limit mobility in the environment. The mechanisms of microbial reduction of U and Tc have been the focus of considerable research in the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP). In spite of equal or greater importance in terms of controlling the environmental fate of the contaminants relatively little is known regarding the precipitation mechanism(s), reactivity, persistence, and transport of biogenic UO2(s) and TcO2(s).

  15. Mechanism insights into enhanced trichloroethylene removal using xanthan gum-modified microscale zero-valent iron particles.

    PubMed

    Xin, Jia; Han, Jun; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-03-01

    This report focuses on the enhancement in trichloroethylene (TCE) removal from contaminated groundwater using xanthan gum (XG)-modified, microscale, zero-valent iron (mZVI). Compared with bare mZVI, XG-coated mZVI increased the TCE removal efficiency by 30.37% over a 480-h experimental period. Because the TCE removal is attributed to both sorption and reduction processes, the contributions from sorption and reduction were separately investigated to determine the mechanism of XG on TCE removal using mZVI. The results showed that the TCE sorption capacity of mZVI was lower in the presence of XG, whereas the TCE reduction capacity was significantly increased. The FTIR spectra confirmed that XG, which is rich in hydrophilic functional groups, was adsorbed onto the iron surface through intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which competitively repelled the sorption and mass transfer of TCE toward reactive sites. The variations in the pH, Eh, and Fe(2+) concentration as functions of the reaction time were recorded and indicated that XG buffered the solution pH, inhibited surface passivation, and promoted TCE reduction by mZVI. Overall, the XG-modified mZVI was considered to be potentially effective for the in-situ remediation of TCE contaminated groundwater due to its high stability and dechlorination reactivity. PMID:25556871

  16. Mechanism insights into enhanced trichloroethylene removal using xanthan gum-modified microscale zero-valent iron particles.

    PubMed

    Xin, Jia; Han, Jun; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-03-01

    This report focuses on the enhancement in trichloroethylene (TCE) removal from contaminated groundwater using xanthan gum (XG)-modified, microscale, zero-valent iron (mZVI). Compared with bare mZVI, XG-coated mZVI increased the TCE removal efficiency by 30.37% over a 480-h experimental period. Because the TCE removal is attributed to both sorption and reduction processes, the contributions from sorption and reduction were separately investigated to determine the mechanism of XG on TCE removal using mZVI. The results showed that the TCE sorption capacity of mZVI was lower in the presence of XG, whereas the TCE reduction capacity was significantly increased. The FTIR spectra confirmed that XG, which is rich in hydrophilic functional groups, was adsorbed onto the iron surface through intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which competitively repelled the sorption and mass transfer of TCE toward reactive sites. The variations in the pH, Eh, and Fe(2+) concentration as functions of the reaction time were recorded and indicated that XG buffered the solution pH, inhibited surface passivation, and promoted TCE reduction by mZVI. Overall, the XG-modified mZVI was considered to be potentially effective for the in-situ remediation of TCE contaminated groundwater due to its high stability and dechlorination reactivity.

  17. Membrane flux dynamics in the submerged ultrafiltration hybrid treatment process during particle and natural organic matter removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaojian; Li, Yonghong; Wang, Jun; Chen, Chao

    2011-01-01

    Particles and natural organic matter (NOM) are two major concerns in surface water, which greatly influence the membrane filtration process. The objective of this article is to investigate the effect of particles, NOM and their interaction on the submerged ultrafiltration (UF) membrane flux under conditions of solo UF and coagulation and PAC adsorption as the pretreatment of UF. Particles, NOM and their mixture were spiked in tap water to simulate raw water. Exponential relationship, (J(P)/J(P0) = a x exp{-k[t-(n-1)T]}), was developed to quantify the normalized membrane flux dynamics during the filtration period and fitted the results well. In this equation, coefficient a was determined by the value of J(P)/J(P0) at the beginning of a filtration cycle, reflecting the flux recovery after backwashing, that is, the irreversible fouling. The coefficient k reflected the trend of flux dynamics. Integrated total permeability (SigmaJ(P)) in one filtration period could be used as a quantified indicator for comparison of different hybrid membrane processes or under different scenarios. According to the results, there was an additive effect on membrane flux by NOM and particles during solo UF process. This additive fouling could be alleviated by coagulation pretreatment since particles helped the formation of flocs with coagulant, which further delayed the decrease of membrane flux and benefited flux recovery by backwashing. The addition of PAC also increased membrane flux by adsorbing NOM and improved flux recovery through backwashing. PMID:22432326

  18. Extraluminal laser angioplasty (ELAN): laser tissue removal of arterial wall for restoration of wall flexibility and methods for therapy control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Fabian G.; Singh, Ajoy I.; Sharabrin, Evgeny; Sapozhnikova, Veronika; Kuranov, Roman; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Lubatschowski, Holger

    2003-10-01

    ELAN is a new method for treating atherosclerotic vessels. Its purpose is to restore wall flexibility by removing arterial wall tissue from the outer arterial layer. This leads to expansion of the narrowed vessel resulting in increased blood flow. We present results of treatment of arteries in vitro. Tissue removal was done by excimer-laser ablation using ns-pulses of 193nm wavelength. We also discuss therapy control. OCT images and light diffusion measurements are presented.

  19. 40 CFR 63.4965 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dioxide, and carbon monoxide content of exhaust gas in ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981, “Flue and Exhaust Gas... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4965 Section 63.4965 Protection of Environment... Controls Option § 63.4965 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or...

  20. 40 CFR 63.4166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide content of exhaust gas in ANSI/ASME, PTC 19.10-1981, “Flue and... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4166 Section 63.4166 Protection of Environment... Controls Option § 63.4166 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or...

  1. 40 CFR 63.4166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide content of exhaust gas in ANSI/ASME, PTC 19.10-1981, “Flue and... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4166 Section 63.4166 Protection of Environment... Controls Option § 63.4166 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or...

  2. 40 CFR 63.4166 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide content of exhaust gas in ANSI/ASME, PTC 19.10-1981, “Flue and... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4166 Section 63.4166 Protection of Environment... Controls Option § 63.4166 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or...

  3. 40 CFR 63.4965 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dioxide, and carbon monoxide content of exhaust gas in ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981, “Flue and Exhaust Gas... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4965 Section 63.4965 Protection of Environment... Controls Option § 63.4965 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or...

  4. 40 CFR 63.4965 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dioxide, and carbon monoxide content of exhaust gas in ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981, “Flue and Exhaust Gas... device emission destruction or removal efficiency? 63.4965 Section 63.4965 Protection of Environment... Controls Option § 63.4965 How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or...

  5. Size controllable synthesis of ultrafine spherical gold particles and their simulation of plasmonic and SERS behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zao; Xu, Xibin; Luo, Jiangshan; Li, Xibo; Yi, Yong; Jiang, Xiaodong; Yi, Yougen; Tang, Yongjian

    2014-04-01

    A simple and reproducible way was explored to synthesize quasi-spherical gold particles with different size distributions in water by rapidly adding a mixture solution of HAuCl4, sodium citrate, and a trace amount of silver nitrate. By careful tuning of the reaction parameters, mono-disperse gold particles with the diameter of 5-220 nm can be obtained controllably. The particle size of 130 nm for the particles film showed the highest SERS activity with the 632.8 nm excitation. The theoretical calculations of the UV-vis extinction spectra can be directly compared with experiments by using the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA). Control of nanostructure shape allows optimization of plasmon resonance for molecular detection and spectroscopy.

  6. Carbonized medlar-core particles as a new biosorbent for removal of Cu(2+) from aqueous solution and study of its surface morphology.

    PubMed

    Samadani Langeroodi, Narges; Safaei, Elaheh

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the use of carbonized medlar-core particles as a new biosorbent to remove Cu(2+) from aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the biosorbent. This paper reports the effects of adsorbent dose, pH, temperature and concentration of adsorbate. Batch isotherm studies were also performed to understand the ability of the adsorbent. The adsorption behavior of the Cu(2+) was studied using Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity determined from the Langmuir adsorption equation has been found as 43.478 mg.g(-1) at 298.15 K. The adsorption of Cu(2+) by medlar core in carbonized form was spontaneous and endothermic. It was also found that the biosorption of Cu(2+) followed second-order kinetics. Carbonized medlar-core particles showed great potential in aqueous solution due to the high adsorption capacity. PMID:27387002

  7. Fine particle removal performance of a two-stage wet electrostatic precipitator using a nonmetallic pre-charger.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Joon; Han, Bangwoo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Hwang, Kyu-Dong; Oh, Won-Seek; Yoo, Seong-Yeon; Oda, Tetsuji

    2011-12-01

    A novel two-stage wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP) has been developed using a carbon brush pre-charger and collection plates with a thin water film. The electrical and particle collection performance was evaluated for submicrometer particles smaller than 0.01- 0.5 micrometer in diameter by varying the voltages applied to the pre-charger and collection plates as well as the polarity of the voltage. The collection efficiency was compared with that calculated by the theoretical models. The long-term performances of the ESP with and without water films were also compared in tests using Japanese Industrial Standards dust. The experimental results show that the carbon brush pre-charger of the two-stage wet ESP had approximately 10% particle capture, while producing ozone concentrations of less than 30 ppb. The produced amounts of ozone are significantly lower than the current limits set by international agencies. The ESP also achieved a high collection rate performance, averaging 90% for ultrafine particles, as based on the particle number concentration at an average velocity of 1 m/sec corresponding to a residence time of 0.17 sec. Higher particle collection efficiency for the ESP can be achieved by increasing the voltages applied to the pre-charger and the collection plates. The decreased collection efficiency that occurred during dust loading without water films was completely avoided by forming a thin water film on the collection plates at a water flow rate of 6.5 L/min/m(2). PMID:22263421

  8. Biodistribution of doxorubicin and nanostructured ferrocarbon carrier particles in organism during magnetically controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Nikolskaya, Tatiana A.; Budko, Andrei P.; Kovarskii, Alexander L.; Zontov, Sergei V.; Kogan, Boris Ya.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.

    2009-05-01

    Biodistribution of doxorubicin and ferrocarbon carrier particles in organism during and after magnetically controlled anti-tumor drug delivery and deposition was studied. Animal tests show high concentration of the cytostatic drug in the target zone, while its concentration is three orders of magnitude lower in bloodstream and other organs. A significant depot of the drug remains on the deposited particles days after the procedure. Macrophages actively phagocytose the ferrocarbon (FeC) particles and remain viable long enough to carry them to the lymph nodes.

  9. Particle Control in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.D.; Hill, D.N.; Hooper, E.B.; Buchenauer, D.; McLean, H.; Wang, Z.; Woodruff, S.; Wurden, G.

    2000-05-01

    In this paper we report on density and impurity measurements in the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) which has recently started operation. The SSPX spheromak plasma is sustained by coaxial helicity injection for a duration of 2msec with peak toroidal currents of up to 0.5MA. The plasma-facing components consist of tungsten-coated copper to minimize sputtering. The surfaces are conditioned by a combination of baking at 150 C, glow discharge cleaning, Titanium gettering, and pulse-discharge cleaning with helium plasmas. In this way we can achieve density control so that the plasma density ({approx} 1-4 x 10{sup 20}m{sup -3}) matches the gas input. Low-density operation is presently limited by breakdown requirements, but we hope that new gas valves with supersonic nozzles will allow for a further reduction in density. We find that the conditioning reduces the impurity radiation to the point where it is no longer important to the energy balance, and long-lived spheromak plasmas are obtained (decay times of 1.5msec).

  10. Shape control of self-organized porous silica submicron particles and their strength evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyohara, Keita; Inoue, Keita; Inoue, Shozo; Namazu, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, precise control of the shape, size, and porosity of porous silica submicron particles and their strength evaluation are described. Self-organization phenomenon of silica nanopowders and submicron polystyrene latex (PSL) balls in an atomized mist is used for the fabrication of the particles. When temperatures of lower- and upper-zone heaters are 100 and 600 °C, and N2 gas flow rate is 0.4 l/min, spherical particles are produced. When PSL concentration increases, the number of pores increases. Particles with uniformly-arranged pores are produced at the PSL concentration of around 3 wt %. By using the PSL balls of different diameters, porous silica particles including different size pores are made. Also, compressive fracture test is conducted to check the effect of vacuum annealing on the strength of particles. The annealed particle shows higher fracture force than the unannealed particle, which indicates that the annealing would be effective for improving the mechanical reliability.

  11. Integration of a nonmetallic electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber for improved removal of particles and corrosive gas cleaning in semiconductor manufacturing industries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Joon; Han, Bangwoo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Yoa, Seok-Jun; Oda, Tetsuji

    2012-08-01

    To remove particles in corrosive gases generated by semiconductor industries, we have developed a novel non-metallic, two-stage electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Carbon brush electrodes and grounded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) form the ionization stage, and polyvinyl chloride collection plates are used in the collection stage of the ESP The collection performance of the ESP downstream of a wet scrubber was evaluated with KC1, silica, and mist particles (0.01-10 pm), changing design and operation parameters such as the ESP length, voltage, and flow rate. A long-term and regeneration performance (12-hr) test was conducted at the maximum operation conditions of the scrubber and ESP and the performance was then demonstrated for 1 month with exhaust gases from wet scrubbers at the rooftop of a semiconductor manufacturing plant in Korea. The results showed that the electrical and collection performance of the ESP (16 channels, 400x400 mm2) was maintained with different grounded plate materials (stainless steel and CFRP) and different lengths of the ionization stage. The collection efficiency of the ESP at high air velocity was enhanced with increases in applied voltages and collection plate lengths. The ESP (16 channels with 100 mm length, 400x400 mm2x540 mm with a 10-mm gap) removed more than 90% of silica and mistparticles with 10 and 12 kV applied to the ESPat the air velocity of 2 m/s and liquid-to-gas ratio of 3.6 L/m3. Decreased performance after 13 hours ofcontinuous operation was recovered to the initial performance level by 5 min of water washing. Moreover during the 1-month operation at the demonstration site, the ESP showed average collection efficiencies of 97% based on particle number and 92% based on total particle mass, which were achieved with a much smaller specific corona power of 0.28 W/m3/hr compared with conventional ESPs. PMID:22916438

  12. Integration of a nonmetallic electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber for improved removal of particles and corrosive gas cleaning in semiconductor manufacturing industries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Joon; Han, Bangwoo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Yoa, Seok-Jun; Oda, Tetsuji

    2012-08-01

    To remove particles in corrosive gases generated by semiconductor industries, we have developed a novel non-metallic, two-stage electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Carbon brush electrodes and grounded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) form the ionization stage, and polyvinyl chloride collection plates are used in the collection stage of the ESP The collection performance of the ESP downstream of a wet scrubber was evaluated with KC1, silica, and mist particles (0.01-10 pm), changing design and operation parameters such as the ESP length, voltage, and flow rate. A long-term and regeneration performance (12-hr) test was conducted at the maximum operation conditions of the scrubber and ESP and the performance was then demonstrated for 1 month with exhaust gases from wet scrubbers at the rooftop of a semiconductor manufacturing plant in Korea. The results showed that the electrical and collection performance of the ESP (16 channels, 400x400 mm2) was maintained with different grounded plate materials (stainless steel and CFRP) and different lengths of the ionization stage. The collection efficiency of the ESP at high air velocity was enhanced with increases in applied voltages and collection plate lengths. The ESP (16 channels with 100 mm length, 400x400 mm2x540 mm with a 10-mm gap) removed more than 90% of silica and mistparticles with 10 and 12 kV applied to the ESPat the air velocity of 2 m/s and liquid-to-gas ratio of 3.6 L/m3. Decreased performance after 13 hours ofcontinuous operation was recovered to the initial performance level by 5 min of water washing. Moreover during the 1-month operation at the demonstration site, the ESP showed average collection efficiencies of 97% based on particle number and 92% based on total particle mass, which were achieved with a much smaller specific corona power of 0.28 W/m3/hr compared with conventional ESPs.

  13. Space Shuttle reaction control system thruster metal nitrate removal and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, R. L.; Mccartney, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle hypergolic primary reaction control system (PRCS) thrusters continue to fail-leak or fail-off at a rate of approximately 1.5 per flight, attributed primarily to metal nitrate formation in the nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) pilot operated valves (POV's). The failures have continued despite ground support equipment (GSE) and subsystem operational improvements. As a result, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed a study to characterize the contamination in the N204 valves. This study prompted the development and implementation of a highly successful flushing technique using deionized (DI) water and gaseous nitrogen (GN2) to remove the contamination while minimizing Teflon seat damage. Following flushing a comprehensive acceptance test is performed before the thruster is deemed recovered. Between the time WSTF was certified to process flight thrusters (March 1992) and September 1993, a 68 percent thruster recovery rate was achieved. The contamination flushed from these thrusters was analyzed and has provided insight into the corrosion process, which is reported in this publication. Additionally, the long-term performance of 24 flushed thrusters installed in the WSTF Fleet Leader Shuttle reaction control subsystem (RCS) test articles is being assessed. WSTF continues to flush flight and test article thrusters and compile data to investigate metal nitrate formation characteristics in leaking and nonleaking valves.

  14. Method of removing SO.sub.2, NO.sub.X and particles from gas mixtures using streamer corona

    DOEpatents

    Mizuno, Akira; Clements, Judson S.

    1987-01-01

    A method for converting sulfur dioxide and/or nitrogen oxide gases to acid mist and or particle aerosols is disclosed in which the gases are passed through a streamer corona discharge zone having electrodes of a wire-cylinder or wire-plate geometry.

  15. PARTICLE REMOVAL RATES BY THE MUD SHRIMP UPOGEBIA PUGETTENSIS, ITS BURROW, AND A COMMENSAL CLAM: EFFECTS ON ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The burrowing shrimp Upogebia pugettensis is an abundant intertidal inhabitant of Pacific Northwest bays and estuaries where it lives commensally with the bivalve Cryptomya californica. Suspension-feeding activities by the shrimp and by its commensal clam, as well as particle se...

  16. The effects of polymer characteristics on nano particle separation in humic substances removal by cationic polymer coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kvinnesland, T; Odegaard, H

    2004-01-01

    Removal of humic substances by coagulation involves nano- and microparticle transport processes. The objective of this paper has been to describe the effects of polymer characteristics on the initial coagulation of nano-sized humic substances and on the aggregates' ability to form larger flocs. The study offers a direct comparison of four different low molecular weight polycations, with charge densities ranging from 4.0 to 7.0 meq/g, as well as of a low and medium molecular weight cationic polyacrylamide with practically equal charge densities. The extent of coagulation of humic substances, determined as the percentage removal of humic substances after filtration through 0.1 microm, could, regardless of the polymer type, be explained by the amount of cationic charge equivalents added per mg TOC of humic substances. The optimal polymer dosage with respect to the extent of flocculation, determined as the percentage removal after filtration through 11 microm could not be explained by this, but the maximum extent of flocculation obtained with each polymer type increased with increasing polyelectrolyte charge density. However, the weak polycation chitosan showed a significantly higher maximum extent of flocculation than would be predicted from its charge density. Polyelectrolyte molecular weight did not show any significant effect on the coagulation of humic substances, nor did it increase the extent of floc separability at 11 microm.

  17. Stable Carbon Fractionation In Size Segregated Aerosol Particles Produced By Controlled Biomass Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalaite, Agne; Garbaras, Andrius; Garbariene, Inga; Ceburnis, Darius; Martuzevicius, Dainius; Puida, Egidijus; Kvietkus, Kestutis; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2014-05-01

    Biomass burning is the largest source of primary fine fraction carbonaceous particles and the second largest source of trace gases in the global atmosphere with a strong effect not only on the regional scale but also in areas distant from the source . Many studies have often assumed no significant carbon isotope fractionation occurring between black carbon and the original vegetation during combustion. However, other studies suggested that stable carbon isotope ratios of char or BC may not reliably reflect carbon isotopic signatures of the source vegetation. Overall, the apparently conflicting results throughout the literature regarding the observed fractionation suggest that combustion conditions may be responsible for the observed effects. The purpose of the present study was to gather more quantitative information on carbonaceous aerosols produced in controlled biomass burning, thereby having a potential impact on interpreting ambient atmospheric observations. Seven different biomass fuel types were burned under controlled conditions to determine the effect of the biomass type on the emitted particulate matter mass and stable carbon isotope composition of bulk and size segregated particles. Size segregated aerosol particles were collected using the total suspended particle (TSP) sampler and a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). The results demonstrated that particle emissions were dominated by the submicron particles in all biomass types. However, significant differences in emissions of submicron particles and their dominant sizes were found between different biomass fuels. The largest negative fractionation was obtained for the wood pellet fuel type while the largest positive isotopic fractionation was observed during the buckwheat shells combustion. The carbon isotope composition of MOUDI samples compared very well with isotope composition of TSP samples indicating consistency of the results. The measurements of the stable carbon isotope ratio in

  18. Controllable synthesis of hollow mesoporous silica particles by a facile one-pot sol-gel method.

    PubMed

    Song, Jing-Chuan; Xue, Fei-Fei; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2015-07-01

    A simple and facile one-pot sol-gel method is proposed for the fabrication of hollow mesoporous silica particles. Both the particle size and the shell thickness can be well controlled by moderately tuning some experimental parameters.

  19. Aqueous biphasic extraction process with pH and particle control

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.; Mensah-Biney, R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for aqueous biphasic extraction of metallic oxides and the like from substances containing silica. Control of media pH enables efficient and effective partition of mixture components. The inventive method may be employed to remove excess silica from kaolin clay.

  20. Aqueous biphasic extraction process with pH and particle control

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mensah-Biney, R.

    1995-05-02

    A process for aqueous biphasic extraction of metallic oxides and the like from substances containing silica. Control of media pH enables efficient and effective partition of mixture components. The inventive method may be employed to remove excess silica from kaolin clay. 2 figs.

  1. Benthic biofilm structure controls the deposition-resuspension dynamics of fine clay particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, W. R.; Roche, K. R.; Drummond, J. D.; Boano, F.; Packman, A. I.; Battin, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    In fluvial ecosystems the alternation of deposition and resuspension of particles represents an important pathway for the downstream translocation of microbes and organic matter. Such particles can originate from algae and microbes, the spontaneous auto-aggregation of organic macromolecules (e.g., "river sown"), terrestrial detritus (traditionally classified as "particulate organic matter"), and erosive mineral and organo-mineral particles. The transport and retention of particles in headwater streams is associated with biofilms, which are surface-attached microbial communities. Whilst biofilm-particle interactions have been studied in bulk, a mechanistic understanding of these processes is lacking. Parallel macroscale/microscale observations are required to unravel the complex feedbacks between biofilm structure, coverage and the dynamics of deposition and resuspension. We used recirculating flume mesocosms to test how changes in biofilm structure affected the deposition and resuspension of clay-sized (< 10 μm) particles. Biofilms were grown in replicate 3-m-long recirculating flumes over variable lengths of time (0, 14, 21, 28, and 35) days. Fixed doses of fluorescent clay-sized particles were introduced to each flume and their deposition was traced over 30 minutes. A flood event was then simulated via a step increase in flowrate to quantify particle resuspension. 3D Optical Coherence Tomography was used to determine roughness, areal coverage and height of biofilms in each flume. From these measurements we characterised particle deposition and resuspension rates, using continuous time random walk modelling techniques, which we then tested as responses to changes in biofilm coverage and structure under both base-flow and flood-flow scenarios. Our results suggest that biofilm structural complexity is a primary control upon the retention and downstream transport of fine particles in stream mesocosms.

  2. Thrust Removal Scheme for the FAST-MAC Circulation Control Model Tested in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, David T.; Milholen, William E., II; Jones, Gregory S.; Goodliff, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    A second wind tunnel test of the FAST-MAC circulation control semi-span model was recently completed in the National Transonic Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The model allowed independent control of four circulation control plenums producing a high momentum jet from a blowing slot near the wing trailing edge that was directed over a 15% chord simple-hinged flap. The model was configured for transonic testing of the cruise configuration with 0deg flap deflection to determine the potential for drag reduction with the circulation control blowing. Encouraging results from analysis of wing surface pressures suggested that the circulation control blowing was effective in reducing the transonic drag on the configuration, however this could not be quantified until the thrust generated by the blowing slot was correctly removed from the force and moment balance data. This paper will present the thrust removal methodology used for the FAST-MAC circulation control model and describe the experimental measurements and techniques used to develop the methodology. A discussion on the impact to the force and moment data as a result of removing the thrust from the blowing slot will also be presented for the cruise configuration, where at some Mach and Reynolds number conditions, the thrust-removed corrected data showed that a drag reduction was realized as a consequence of the blowing.

  3. Reexamining the Security of Controlled Quantum Secure Direct Communication by Using Four Particle Cluster States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Su-Juan

    2012-09-01

    A controlled quantum secure direct communication protocol (Zhang et al. in Int. J. Theor. Phys. 48:2971-2976, 2009) by using four particle cluster states was proposed recently. Yang et al. presented an attack with fake entangled particles (FEP attack) and gave an improvement (Yang et al. in Int. J. Theor. Phys. 50:395-400, 2010). In this paper, we reexamine the protocol's security and discover that, Bob can also take a different attack, disentanglement attack, to obtain Alice's secret message without controller's permission. Moreover, our attack strategy also works for Yang's improvement.

  4. Control of both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium alloy powders

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Christopher G.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Stavila, Vitalie; Robinson, David B.

    2014-07-15

    Energy storage materials often involve chemical reactions with bulk solids. Porosity within the solids can enhance reaction rates. The porosity can be either within or between individual particles of the material. Greater control of the size and uniformity of both types of pore should lead to enhancements of charging and discharging rates in energy storage systems. Furthermore, to control both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium (Pd)-based hydrogen storage materials, first we created uniformly sized copper particles of about 1 μm diameter by the reduction of copper sulfate with ascorbic acid. In turn, these were used as reducing agents for tetrachloropalladate in the presence of a block copolymer surfactant. The copper reductant particles are geometrically self-limiting, so the resulting Pd particles are of similar size. The surfactant induces formation of 10 nm-scale pores within the particles. Some residual copper is alloyed with the Pd, reducing hydrogen storage capacity; use of a more reactive Pd salt can mitigate this. The reaction is conveniently performed in gram-scale batches.

  5. Control of both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium alloy powders

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jones, Christopher G.; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Stavila, Vitalie; Robinson, David B.

    2014-07-15

    Energy storage materials often involve chemical reactions with bulk solids. Porosity within the solids can enhance reaction rates. The porosity can be either within or between individual particles of the material. Greater control of the size and uniformity of both types of pore should lead to enhancements of charging and discharging rates in energy storage systems. Furthermore, to control both particle and pore size in nanoporous palladium (Pd)-based hydrogen storage materials, first we created uniformly sized copper particles of about 1 μm diameter by the reduction of copper sulfate with ascorbic acid. In turn, these were used as reducing agentsmore » for tetrachloropalladate in the presence of a block copolymer surfactant. The copper reductant particles are geometrically self-limiting, so the resulting Pd particles are of similar size. The surfactant induces formation of 10 nm-scale pores within the particles. Some residual copper is alloyed with the Pd, reducing hydrogen storage capacity; use of a more reactive Pd salt can mitigate this. The reaction is conveniently performed in gram-scale batches.« less

  6. Controlled endolysosomal release of agents by pH-responsive polymer blend particles

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xi; Tran, Kenny K.; Wang, Liguo; Shen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A key step of delivering extracellular agents to its intracellular target is to escape from endosomal/lysosomal compartments, while minimizing the release of digestive enzymes that may compromise cellular functions. In this study, we examined the intracellular distribution of both fluorecent cargoes and enzymes by a particle delivery platform made from the controlled blending of poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and a random pH-sensitive copolymer. Methods We utilized both microscopic and biochemical methods to semi-quantitatively assess how the composition of blend particles affects the level of endosomal escape of cargos of various sizes and enzymes into the cytosolic space. Results We demonstrated that these polymeric particles enabled the controlled delivery of cargos into the cytosolic space that was more dependent on the cargo size and less on the composition of blend particles. Blend particles did not induce the rupture of endosomal/lysosomal compartments and released less than 20% of endosomal/lysosomal enzymes. Conclusions This study provides insight into understanding the efficacy and safety of a delivery system for intracellular delivery of biologics and drugs. Blend particles offer a potential platform to target intracellular compartments while potentially minimizing cellular toxicity. PMID:25592550

  7. Lotus-like effect for metal filings recovery and particle removal on heated metal surfaces using Leidenfrost water droplets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cher Lin Clara; Sapiha, Kostantyn; Leong, Yoke Fun Hannah; Choi, Siwon; Anariba, Franklin; Thio, Beng Joo Reginald

    2015-07-21

    A "lotus-like" effect is applied to demonstrate the ability of the Leidenfrost water droplets to recover Cu particles on a heated Al substrate. Cu particles on the heated surface adhere to the rim of the Leidenfrost droplets and eventually coat the droplets' surface to form an aggregation. When Fe filings are added to the Cu particles, the aggregated mixture can then be collected using a strong rare earth magnet (NdFeB) upon evaporation of the water. We also show that the Leidenfrost effect can be effectively utilized to recover both hydrophobic (dust and activated carbon) and hydrophilic (SiO2 and MgO) particles from heated Al surfaces without any topographical modification or surfactant addition. Our results show that hydrophobic and hydrophilic materials can be collected with >92% and >96% effectiveness on grooved and smooth Al surfaces, respectively. Furthermore, we observed no significant differences in the amount of material collected above the Leidenfrost point within the tested temperature range (240 °C vs. 340 °C) as well as when the Al sheet was replaced with a Cu sheet as the substrate. However, we did observe that the Leidenfrost droplets were able to collect a greater amount of material when the working liquid was water than when it was ethanol. Our findings show promise in the development of an effective precious coinage metal filings recovery technology for application in the mint industry, as well as the self-cleaning of metallic and semiconductor surfaces where manual cleaning is not amenable. PMID:26053932

  8. Surface morphology control of cross-linked polymer particles via dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Imhof, Arnout

    2015-05-14

    Cross-linked polymer colloids (poly(methyl methacrylate) and polystyrene) with diverse shapes were prepared in polar solvents (ethanol, methanol and water) via dispersion polymerization, in which a linear addition of the cross-linker was used during reaction. Apart from spherical particles we found dented spheres or particles covered with nodules, or a combination of both. A comprehensive investigation was carried out, mainly concentrating on the effect of the experimental conditions (e.g., the addition start time and total addition time, cross-linker density and the solvency of the solvents) on particle morphologies. Consequently, we suggest a number of effective ways for the synthesis of regular (spherical) colloidal particles through maintaining a relatively low concentration of the cross-linker during the entire reaction, or forcing the co-polymerization (of monomer and cross-linker) locus to the continuous medium, or using a high quality or quantity of the stabilizer. Moreover, the size of the particles was also precisely manipulated by varying the polarity of the solvents, the concentration of the cross-linker, and the amount and average molecular weight of the stabilizer. In addition, the formation of the heavily dented particles with a very rough surface prepared under a pure or oxygen-'contaminated' nitrogen environment was monitored over time. The results accumulated in this article are of use for a better understanding of the mechanism of the polymerization and control over the structure and property of polymer particles.

  9. Role of Polymer Segment-Particle Surface Interactions in Controlling Nanoparticle Dispersions in Concentrated Polymer Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2014-09-24

    The microstructure of particles suspended in concentrated polymer solutions is examined with small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. Of interest are changes to long wavelength particle density fluctuations in ternary mixtures of silica nanoparticles suspended in concentrated solutions of poly(ethylene glycol). The results are understood in terms of application of the pseudo-two-component polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) theory modified to account for solvent addition via effective contact strength of interfacial attraction, εpc, in an implicit manner. The combined experimental-theoretical study emphasizes the complex interactions between solvent, polymer, and particle surface that control particle miscibility but also demonstrate that these factors can all be understood in terms of variations of εpc.

  10. Air flow and particle control with different ventilation systems in a classroom.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, S; Chen, Q

    2003-06-01

    Most ventilation and air conditioning systems are designed without much concern about how settling particles behave in ventilation air flows. For displacement ventilation systems, designers normally assume that all pollutants follow the buoyant air flow into an upper zone, where they are evacuated. This is, however, not always true. Previous studies show that high concentrations of settling respirable particles can be found in the breathing zone, and that the exposure rates can be a health hazard to occupants. The emphasis here is on how ventilation systems should be designed to minimize respirable airborne particles in the breathing zone. The supply and exhaust conditions of the ventilation air flow are shown to play an important role in the control of air quality. Computer simulation programs of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) type are used. Particle concentrations, thermal conditions and modified ventilation system solutions are reported.

  11. Photocatalytic/Magnetic Composite Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Chang-Yu; Goswami, Yogi; Garretson, Charles; Andino, Jean; Mazyck, David

    2007-01-01

    Photocatalytic/magnetic composite particles have been invented as improved means of exploiting established methods of photocatalysis for removal of chemical and biological pollutants from air and water. The photocatalytic components of the composite particles are formulated for high levels of photocatalytic activity, while the magnetic components make it possible to control the movements of the particles through the application of magnetic fields. The combination of photocatalytic and magnetic properties can be exploited in designing improved air- and water treatment reactors.

  12. Synergistic mercury removal by conventional pollutant control strategies for coal-fired power plants in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuxiao; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Ye; Ancora, Maria Pia; Zhao, Yu; Hao, Jiming

    2010-06-01

    China's 11th 5-yr plan has regulated total sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions by installing flue gas desulfurization (FGD) devices and shutting down small thermal power units. These control measures will not only significantly reduce the emission of conventional pollutants but also benefit the reduction of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. This paper uses the emission factor method to estimate the efficiencies of these measures on mercury emission abatement. From 2005 to 2010, coal consumption in power plants will increase by 59%; however, the mercury emission will only rise from 141 to 155 t, with an increase of 10%. The average emission rate of mercury from coal burning will decrease from 126 mg Hg/t of coal to 87 mg Hg/t of coal. The effects of the three desulfurization measures were assessed and show that wet FGD will play an important role in mercury removal. Mercury emissions in 2015 and 2020 are also projected under different policy scenarios. Under the most probable scenario, the total mercury emission in coal-fired power plants in China will decrease to 130 t by 2020, which will benefit from the rapid installation of fabric filters and selective catalytic reduction.

  13. Silica coated magnetic particles using microwave synthesis for removal of dyes from natural water samples: Synthesis, characterization, equilibrium, isotherm and kinetics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Salwa A.; Soliman, Ezzat M.

    2013-11-01

    Monitoring pollutants in water samples is a challenge to analysts. So, the removal of Napthol blue black (NBB) and Erichrome blue black R (EBBR) from aqueous solutions was investigated using magnetic chelated silica particles. Magnetic solids are widely used in detection and analytical systems because of the performance advantages they offer compared to similar solids that lack magnetic properties. In this context, a fast, simple and clean method for modification of magnetic particles (Fe3O4) with silica gel was developed using microwave technique to introduce silica gel coated magnetic particles (SG-MPs) sorbent. The magnetic sorbent was characterized by the FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scan electron microscope (SEM) analyses. The effects of pH, time, weight of sorbent and initial concentration of dye were evaluated. It was interesting to find from results that SG-MPs exhibits high percentage extraction of the studied dyes (100% for NBB and 98.75% for EBBR) from aqueous solutions. The Freundlich isotherm with r2 = 0.973 and 0.962 and Langmuir isotherms with r2 = 0.993 and 0.988 for NBB and EBBR, respectively were used to describe adsorption equilibrium. Also, adsorption kinetic experiments have been carried out and the data have been well fitted by a pseudo-second-order equation r2 = 1.0 for NBB and 0.999 for EBBR. The prepared sorbent with rapid adsorption rate and separation convenience was applied for removal of NBB and EBBR pollutants from natural water samples with good precision (RSD% = 0.05-0.3%).

  14. N-doped porous carbon with magnetic particles formed in situ for enhanced Cr(VI) removal.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Zhu, Shenmin; Liu, Qinglei; Chen, Zhixin; Gu, Jiajun; Zhu, Chengling; Lu, Tao; Zhang, Di; Ma, Jun

    2013-08-01

    A newly designed N-doped porous carbon with magnetic nanoparticles formed in situ (RHC-mag-CN) was fabricated through simple impregnation then polymerization and calcination. The doped nitrogen in RHC-mag-CN was in the form of graphite-type layers with the composition of CN. The resultant nanocomposite maintained a high surface area of 1136 m(2) g(-1) with 18.5 wt% magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4 and Fe) inside, which showed a saturation magnetization (Ms) of 22 emu/g. When used as an adsorbent, the RHC-mag-CN demonstrated a very quick adsorption property for the removal of Cr(VI), during which 92% of Cr(VI) could be removed within 10 min for dilute solutions at 2 g L(-1) adsorbent dose. The high adsorption capacity (16 mg g(-1)) is related to the synergetic effects of physical adsorption from the surface area and chemical adsorption from complexation reactions between Cr(VI) and Fe3O4. Importantly, the basic CNs in RHC-mag-CN increase its negative charge density and simultaneously increase the adsorption of metallic cations, such as Cr(3+) formed in the acid solution from the reduction of Cr(VI). The formation of magnetic nanoparticles inside not only supplies complexing sites for the adsorption of Cr(VI), but also shows perfect magnetic separation performance from aqueous solution. PMID:23561506

  15. Methods and apparatus for removal and control of material in laser drilling of a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-01-28

    The removal of material from the path of a high power laser beam during down hole laser operations including drilling of a borehole and removal of displaced laser effected borehole material from the borehole during laser operations. In particular, paths, dynamics and parameters of fluid flows for use in conjunction with a laser bottom hole assembly.

  16. Digital atom interferometer with single particle control on a discretized space-time geometry

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Andreas; Alberti, Andrea; Alt, Wolfgang; Belmechri, Noomen; Hild, Sebastian; Karski, Michał; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Engineering quantum particle systems, such as quantum simulators and quantum cellular automata, relies on full coherent control of quantum paths at the single particle level. Here we present an atom interferometer operating with single trapped atoms, where single particle wave packets are controlled through spin-dependent potentials. The interferometer is constructed from a sequence of discrete operations based on a set of elementary building blocks, which permit composing arbitrary interferometer geometries in a digital manner. We use this modularity to devise a space-time analogue of the well-known spin echo technique, yielding insight into decoherence mechanisms. We also demonstrate mesoscopic delocalization of single atoms with a separation-to-localization ratio exceeding 500; this result suggests their utilization beyond quantum logic applications as nano-resolution quantum probes in precision measurements, being able to measure potential gradients with precision 5 × 10-4 in units of gravitational acceleration g. PMID:22665771

  17. Particle and Kalman filtering for state estimation and control of DC motors.

    PubMed

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G

    2009-01-01

    State estimation is a major problem in industrial systems. To this end, Gaussian and nonparametric filters have been developed. In this paper the Kalman Filter, which assumes Gaussian measurement noise, is compared to the Particle Filter, which does not make any assumption on the measurement noise distribution. As a case study the estimation of the state vector of a DC motor is used. The reconstructed state vector is used in a feedback control loop to generate the control input of the DC motor. In simulation tests it was observed that for a large number of particles the Particle Filter could succeed in accurately estimating the motor's state vector, but at the same time it required higher computational effort.

  18. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Georges; Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Scheffold, Frank; José Sáenz, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with optical tweezers as well as to induce significant optical binding forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir–Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as a gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light-induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems. PMID:26096622

  19. Computer simulation of wolf-removal strategies for animal-damage control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haight, R.G.; Travis, L.E.; Nimerfro, K.; Mech, L.D.

    2002-01-01

    Because of the sustained growth of the gray wolf (Canis lupus) population in the western Great Lakes region of the United States, management agencies are anticipating gray wolf removal from the federal endangered species list and are proposing strategies for wolf management. Strategies are needed that would balance public demand for wolf conservation with demand for protection against wolf depredation on livestock, poultry, and pets. We used a stochastic, spatially structured, individually based simulation model of a hypothetical wolf population, representing a small subset of the western Great Lakes wolves, to predict the relative performance of 3 wolf-removal strategies. Those strategies included reactive management (wolf removal occurred in summer after depredation), preventive management (wolves removed in winter from territories with occasional depredation), and population-size management (wolves removed annually in winter from all territories near farms). Performance measures included number of depredating packs and wolves removed, cost, and population size after 20 years. We evaluated various scenarios about immigration, trapping success, and likelihood of packs engaging in depredation. Four robust results emerged from the simulations: 1) each strategy reduced depredation by at least 40% compared with no action, 2) preventive and population-size management removed fewer wolves than reactive management because wolves were removed in winter before pups were born, 3)population-size management was least expensive because repeated annual removal kept most territories near farms free of wolves, and 4) none of the strategies threatened wolf populations unless they were isolated because wolf removal took place near farms and not in wild areas. For isolated populations, reactive management alone ensured conservation and reduced depredation. Such results can assist decision makers in managing gray wolves in the western Great Lakes states.

  20. 40 CFR 52.131 - Control Strategy and regulations: Fine Particle Matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control Strategy and regulations: Fine Particle Matter. 52.131 Section 52.131 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.131...

  1. 40 CFR 52.131 - Control Strategy and regulations: Fine Particle Matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control Strategy and regulations: Fine Particle Matter. 52.131 Section 52.131 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.131...

  2. Examination of commercially available copper oxide wire particles for control of Haemonchus contorus in lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternatives to synthetic anthelmintics remain critical due to the prevalence of anthelmintic resistance. The objective of the experiment was to determine the efficacy of copper oxide wire particles (COWP) from three commercial sources to control Haemonchus contortus in lambs. Naturally infected Ka...

  3. MERCURY REMOVAL IN A NON-THERMAL, PLASMA-BASED MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR UTILITY BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher R. McLaron

    2004-12-01

    Powerspan has conducted pilot scale testing of a multi-pollutant control technology at FirstEnergy's Burger Power Plant under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. The technology, Electro-Catalytic Oxidation (ECO), simultaneously removes sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), fine particulate matter (PM{sub 2.5}) and mercury (Hg) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Powerspan's ECO{reg_sign} pilot test program focused on optimization of Hg removal in a 1-MWe slipstream pilot while maintaining greater than 90% removal of NO{sub x} and 98% removal of SO{sub 2}. This Final Technical Report discusses pilot operations, installation and maintenance of the Hg SCEMS instrumentation, and performance results including component and overall removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, PM and Hg from the flue gas and removal of captured Hg from the co-product fertilizer stream.

  4. Particle analyzing method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Griffin, C. E.; Norris, D. D.; Friedlander, S. K. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The rapid chemical analysis of particles in aerosols can be accomplished using an apparatus which produces a controlled stream of individual particles from an environment, and another apparatus which vaporizes and ionizes the particles moving in free flight, for analysis by a mass spectrometer. The device for producing the stream of particles includes a capillary tube through which the air with suspended particles moves, a skimmer with a small opening spaced from an end of the capillary tube to receive particles passing through the tube, and a vacuum pump which removes air from between the tube and skimmer and creates an inflow of air and particles through the tube. The particles passing through the skimmer opening can be simultaneously vaporized and ionized while in free flight, by a laser beam of sufficient intensity that is directed across the path of the free flying particles.

  5. Transport of Ions and Particles Through Single Pores of Controlled Geometry and Surface Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevarnik, Matthew A.

    Synthetic nanopores are a powerful tool to control the transport of ions, molecules, and water at the molecular level, mimicking biological systems. In this research, polymer pores are prepared of different geometries, sizes, and surface chemistry to utilize features seen in naturally occurring systems. Specifically, it was one of the goals of this research to prepare and characterize single polymer pores that rectify the current due to a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, similar to naturally occurring ion channels. Prior to modification, aqueous electrolytic solutions are able to conduct readily through the single polymer pores, but after the chemisorption of hydrophobic chemical groups, the pore demonstrates open and closed states. This behavior is also observed to be voltage dependent. Increasing voltage increases the probability of the pore to be in the open states. There is also a voltage range where the pore does not conduct at all. The hydrophobic gating was studied as a function of pore diameter and charge of the residual groups and could be used for an on demand drug delivery system. Another technique that was utilized in this research is the resistive-pulse technique, which is a powerful approach to detect single molecules and particles. A single particle passing through a pore can be observed as a transient drop of the transmembrane current. This research focuses on resistive-pulse sensing experiments performed with track-etched polymer pores characterized by an undulating diameter along the pore length. The resistive pulses generated by spherical beads passing through these pores have a repeatable pattern of large variations corresponding to these diameter changes. We show that this pattern of variations enables the unambiguous resolution of multiple particles simultaneously in the pore, the detection of transient sticking of particles within the pore, and confirmation whether any individual particle completely translocates the

  6. Randomized controlled clinical trial of long-term chemo-mechanical caries removal using PapacarieTM gel

    PubMed Central

    MOTTA, Lara Jansiski; BUSSADORI, Sandra Kalil; CAMPANELLI, Ana Paula; da SILVA, André Luis; ALFAYA, Thays Almeida; de GODOY, Camila Haddad Leal; NAVARRO, Maria Fidela de Lima

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Compare the effectiveness of PapacarieTM gel for the chemo-mechanical removal of carious lesions on primary teeth to conventional caries removal with a low-speed bur with regard to execution time, clinical aspects and radiographic findings. Material and Methods A randomized controlled clinical trial with a split-mouth design was carried out. The sample was composed of 20 children aged four to seven years, in whom 40 deciduous teeth were randomly divided into two groups: chemo-mechanical caries removal with PapacarieTM and removal of carious dentin with a low-speed bur. Each child underwent both procedures and served as his/her own control. Restorations were performed with glass ionomer cement. The time required to perform the procedure was also analyzed. The patients underwent longitudinal clinical and radiographic follow-up of the restorations. Results No statistically significant difference between groups was found regarding the time required to perform the procedures and the radiographic follow up. Statistically significant differences between groups were found in the clinical evaluation at 6 and 18 months after treatment. Conclusion PapacarieTM is as effective as the traditional method for the removal of carious dentin on deciduous teeth, but offers the advantages of the preservation of sound dental tissue as well as the avoidance of sharp rotary instruments and local anesthesia. PMID:25141203

  7. Particle Size Controls on Water Adsorption and Condensation Regimes at Mineral Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric water vapour interacting with hydrophilic mineral surfaces can produce water films of various thicknesses and structures. In this work we show that mineral particle size controls water loadings achieved by water vapour deposition on 21 contrasting mineral samples exposed to atmospheres of up to ~16 Torr water (70% relative humidity at 25 °C). Submicrometer-sized particles hosted up to ~5 monolayers of water, while micrometer-sized particles up to several thousand monolayers. All films exhibited vibrational spectroscopic signals akin to liquid water, yet with a disrupted network of hydrogen bonds. Water adsorption isotherms were predicted using models (1- or 2- term Freundlich and Do-Do models) describing an adsorption and a condensation regime, respectively pertaining to the binding of water onto mineral surfaces and water film growth by water-water interactions. The Hygroscopic Growth Theory could also account for the particle size dependence on condensable water loadings under the premise that larger particles have a greater propensity of exhibiting of surface regions and interparticle spacings facilitating water condensation reactions. Our work should impact our ability to predict water film formation at mineral surfaces of contrasting particle sizes, and should thus contribute to our understanding of water adsorption and condensation reactions occuring in nature. PMID:27561325

  8. Particle Size Controls on Water Adsorption and Condensation Regimes at Mineral Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric water vapour interacting with hydrophilic mineral surfaces can produce water films of various thicknesses and structures. In this work we show that mineral particle size controls water loadings achieved by water vapour deposition on 21 contrasting mineral samples exposed to atmospheres of up to ~16 Torr water (70% relative humidity at 25 °C). Submicrometer-sized particles hosted up to ~5 monolayers of water, while micrometer-sized particles up to several thousand monolayers. All films exhibited vibrational spectroscopic signals akin to liquid water, yet with a disrupted network of hydrogen bonds. Water adsorption isotherms were predicted using models (1- or 2- term Freundlich and Do-Do models) describing an adsorption and a condensation regime, respectively pertaining to the binding of water onto mineral surfaces and water film growth by water-water interactions. The Hygroscopic Growth Theory could also account for the particle size dependence on condensable water loadings under the premise that larger particles have a greater propensity of exhibiting of surface regions and interparticle spacings facilitating water condensation reactions. Our work should impact our ability to predict water film formation at mineral surfaces of contrasting particle sizes, and should thus contribute to our understanding of water adsorption and condensation reactions occuring in nature. PMID:27561325

  9. Particle Size Controls on Water Adsorption and Condensation Regimes at Mineral Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeşilbaş, Merve; Boily, Jean-François

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric water vapour interacting with hydrophilic mineral surfaces can produce water films of various thicknesses and structures. In this work we show that mineral particle size controls water loadings achieved by water vapour deposition on 21 contrasting mineral samples exposed to atmospheres of up to ~16 Torr water (70% relative humidity at 25 °C). Submicrometer-sized particles hosted up to ~5 monolayers of water, while micrometer-sized particles up to several thousand monolayers. All films exhibited vibrational spectroscopic signals akin to liquid water, yet with a disrupted network of hydrogen bonds. Water adsorption isotherms were predicted using models (1- or 2- term Freundlich and Do-Do models) describing an adsorption and a condensation regime, respectively pertaining to the binding of water onto mineral surfaces and water film growth by water-water interactions. The Hygroscopic Growth Theory could also account for the particle size dependence on condensable water loadings under the premise that larger particles have a greater propensity of exhibiting of surface regions and interparticle spacings facilitating water condensation reactions. Our work should impact our ability to predict water film formation at mineral surfaces of contrasting particle sizes, and should thus contribute to our understanding of water adsorption and condensation reactions occuring in nature.

  10. Immersion defect performance and particle control method for 45nm mass production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibana, Takahito; Kobayashi, Masamichi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Arakawa, Mikio; Matsuoka, Yoichi; Kawasaki, Youji; Tanabe, Masayuki; Oda, Hirohisa

    2008-03-01

    Water-based immersion technology has overcome various challenges and is starting to be used for the 45nm-node mass production. However, even though immersion technology is being used in memory device production, significant improvement in defect performance is needed before the technology can be used for logic devices. Canon has developed an immersion exposure system, the FPA-7000AS7, with numerical aperture of 1.35. In the AS7 immersion tool, there is little influence of vibration and evaporative cooling. The AS7 has an in-situ cleaning system in order to remove particles carried into the exposure tool. We evaluated the contamination of the projection lens and immersion nozzle due to photoacid generator (PAG) leaching from resist to water. We evaluated the cleaning effects of various cleaning processes and found the suitable processes for cleaning the projection lens and immersion nozzle from the view that it does not adversely affect the exposure tool: damage-free and easy drainage treatment. In addition, we evaluated the influence of particles on the wafer stage, since there is a major concern that particles entering the water may increase the defects. The number of particles adhering on the wafer during an exposure sequence can be reduced with the wafer stage cleaning. Periodical cleaning keeps the wafer stage clean, thus preventing the increase of exposure defects caused by particles. We performed a defect evaluation with the AS7. The average defect density was 0.042/cm2 in the continuous exposure process of 25 wafers with a developer-soluble topcoat. Circle defects and bubble defects were not observed.

  11. Microfluidic synthesis of monodisperse nanoporous oxide particles and control of hierarchical pore structure.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Nick J; Crowder, Peter F; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Patterson, Wendy; Ratnaweera, Dilru R; Perahia, Dvora; Atanassov, Plamen; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2013-05-01

    Particles with hierarchical porosity can be formed by templating silica microparticles with a specially designed surfactant micelle/oil nanoemulsion mixture. The nanoemulsion oil droplet and micellar dimensions determine the pore size distribution: one set of pores with diameters of tens of nanometers coexisting with a second subset of pores with diameters of single nanometers. Further practical utility of these nanoporous particles requires precise tailoring of the hierarchical pore structure. In this synthesis study, the particle nanostructure is tuned by adjusting the oil, water, and surfactant mixture composition for the controlled design of nanoemulsion-templated features. We also demonstrate control of the size distribution and surface area of the smaller micelle-templated pores as a consequence of altering the hydrophobic chain length of the molecular surfactant template. Moreover, a microfluidic system is designed to process the low interfacial system for fabrication of monodisperse porous particles. The ability to direct the assembly of template nanoemulsion and micelle structures creates new opportunities to engineer hierarchically porous particles for utility as electrocatalysts for fuel cells, chromatography separations, drug delivery vehicles, and other applications. PMID:23387998

  12. A frequency-control particle separation device based on resultant effects of electroosmosis and dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiang-Chi; Tung, Yi-Chung; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2016-08-01

    Particle separation plays an important role in microfluidic sample preparation for various biomedical applications. In this paper, we report a particle manipulation and separation scheme using a microfluidic device based on low-volume/low-voltage electrokinetic frequency modulation. Utilizing a circular micro-electrode array, both electroosmosis and dielectrophoresis can be contributed to manipulate particles in the device by controlling the frequency of applied sinusoidal travelling wave signals. Theoretical simulations based on finite-element methods are employed to establish fundamental understanding of the developed scheme. For experimental demonstration, polystyrene beads (6 μm in diameter) and human promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) are used to validate the frequency-modulation effect. Furthermore, different diameter polystyrene beads (6 μm and 10 μm in diameter) are mixed to show potentials of precise particle separations (˜90% efficiency) by the reported frequency-controlled electrokinetic device. The developed technique can be exploited as an actuation scheme and particle manipulation method for microfluidic sample preparations of low ionic concentration samples.

  13. Noninvasive control of dental calculus removal: qualification of two fluorescence methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Biryukova, T.

    2013-02-01

    The main condition of periodontitis prevention is the full calculus removal from the teeth surface. This procedure should be fulfilled without harming adjacent unaffected tooth tissues. Nevertheless the problem of sensitive and precise estimating of tooth-calculus interface exists and potential risk of hard tissue damage remains. In this work it was shown that fluorescence diagnostics during calculus removal can be successfully used for precise noninvasive detection of calculus-tooth interface. In so doing the simple implementation of this method free from the necessity of spectrometer using can be employed. Such a simple implementation of calculus detection set-up can be aggregated with the devices of calculus removing.

  14. Controlled release of NELL-1 protein from chitosan/hydroxyapatite-modified TCP particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yulong; Dong, Rui; Park, Yujin; Bohner, Marc; Zhang, Xinli; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia; Wu, Benjamin M

    2016-09-10

    NEL-like molecule-1 (NELL-1) is a novel osteogenic protein that showing high specificity to osteochondral cells. It was widely used in bone regeneration research by loading onto carriers such as tricalcium phosphate (TCP) particles. However, there has been little research on protein controlled release from this material and its potential application. In this study, TCP was first modified with a hydroxyapatite coating followed by a chitosan coating to prepare chitosan/hydroxyapatite-coated TCP particles (Chi/HA-TCP). The preparation was characterized by SEM, EDX, FTIR, XRD, FM and Zeta potential measurements. The NELL-1 loaded Chi/HA-TCP particles and the release kinetics were investigated in vitro. It was observed that the Chi/HA-TCP particles prepared with the 0.3% (wt/wt) chitosan solution were able to successfully control the release of NELL-1 and maintain a slow, steady release for up to 28 days. Furthermore, more than 78% of the loaded protein's bioactivity was preserved in Chi/HA-TCP particles over the period of the investigation, which was significantly higher than that of the protein released from hydroxyapatite coated TCP (HA-TCP) particles. Collectively, this study suggests that the osteogenic protein NELL-1 showed a sustained release pattern after being encapsulated into the modified Chi/HA-TCP particles, and the NELL-1 integrated composite of Chi/HA-TCP showed a potential to function as a protein delivery carrier and as an improved bone matrix for use in bone regeneration research. PMID:27349789

  15. Observation and Control of Hamiltonian Chaos in Wave-particle Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Doveil, F.; Ruzzon, A.; Elskens, Y.

    2010-11-23

    Wave-particle interactions are central in plasma physics. The paradigm beam-plasma system can be advantageously replaced by a traveling wave tube (TWT) to allow their study in a much less noisy environment. This led to detailed analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and an either cold or warm electron beam. More recently a test cold beam has been used to observe its interaction with externally excited wave(s). This allowed observing the main features of Hamiltonian chaos and testing a new method to efficiently channel chaotic transport in phase space. To simulate accurately and efficiently the particle dynamics in the TWT and other 1D particle-wave systems, a new symplectic, symmetric, second order numerical algorithm is developed, using particle position as the independent variable, with a fixed spatial step.This contribution reviews: presentation of the TWT and its connection to plasma physics, resonant interaction of a charged particle in electrostatic waves, observation of particle trapping and transition to chaos, test of control of chaos, and description of the simulation algorithm.The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is recorded with a trochoidal energy analyzer at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the 4m long helix of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave, responsible for Landau damping, is observed. We explore the resonant velocity domain associated with a single wave as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a devil's staircase behavior when increasing the excitation level in agreement with numerical simulation.A new strategy for control of chaos by building barriers of transport in phase space as well as its robustness is successfully tested. The underlying concepts extend far beyond the field of

  16. Observation and Control of Hamiltonian Chaos in Wave-particle Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doveil, F.; Elskens, Y.; Ruzzon, A.

    2010-11-01

    Wave-particle interactions are central in plasma physics. The paradigm beam-plasma system can be advantageously replaced by a traveling wave tube (TWT) to allow their study in a much less noisy environment. This led to detailed analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and an either cold or warm electron beam. More recently a test cold beam has been used to observe its interaction with externally excited wave(s). This allowed observing the main features of Hamiltonian chaos and testing a new method to efficiently channel chaotic transport in phase space. To simulate accurately and efficiently the particle dynamics in the TWT and other 1D particle-wave systems, a new symplectic, symmetric, second order numerical algorithm is developed, using particle position as the independent variable, with a fixed spatial step. This contribution reviews : presentation of the TWT and its connection to plasma physics, resonant interaction of a charged particle in electrostatic waves, observation of particle trapping and transition to chaos, test of control of chaos, and description of the simulation algorithm. The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is recorded with a trochoidal energy analyzer at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the 4m long helix of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave, responsible for Landau damping, is observed. We explore the resonant velocity domain associated with a single wave as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a devil's staircase behavior when increasing the excitation level in agreement with numerical simulation. A new strategy for control of chaos by building barriers of transport in phase space as well as its robustness is successfully tested. The underlying concepts extend far beyond the

  17. Mutation particle swarm optimization of the BP-PID controller for piezoelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huaqing; Jiang, Minlan

    2016-01-01

    PID control is the most common used method in industrial control because its structure is simple and it is easy to implement. PID controller has good control effect, now it has been widely used. However, PID method has a few limitations. The overshoot of the PID controller is very big. The adjustment time is long. When the parameters of controlled plant are changing over time, the parameters of controller could hardly change automatically to adjust to changing environment. Thus, it can't meet the demand of control quality in the process of controlling piezoelectric ceramic. In order to effectively control the piezoelectric ceramic and improve the control accuracy, this paper replaced the learning algorithm of the BP with the mutation particle swarm optimization algorithm(MPSO) on the process of the parameters setting of BP-PID. That designed a better self-adaptive controller which is combing the BP neural network based on mutation particle swarm optimization with the conventional PID control theory. This combination is called the MPSO-BP-PID. In the mechanism of the MPSO, the mutation operation is carried out with the fitness variance and the global best fitness value as the standard. That can overcome the precocious of the PSO and strengthen its global search ability. As a result, the MPSO-BP-PID can complete controlling the controlled plant with higher speed and accuracy. Therefore, the MPSO-BP-PID is applied to the piezoelectric ceramic. It can effectively overcome the hysteresis, nonlinearity of the piezoelectric ceramic. In the experiment, compared with BP-PID and PSO-BP-PID, it proved that MPSO is effective and the MPSO-BP-PID has stronger adaptability and robustness.

  18. Characterization and control of airborne particles emitted during production of epoxy/carbon nanotube nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Cena, Lorenzo G; Peters, Thomas M

    2011-02-01

    This work characterized airborne particles generated from the weighing of bulk, multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the manual sanding of epoxy test samples reinforced with CNTs. It also evaluated the effectiveness of three local exhaust ventilation (LEV) conditions (no LEV, custom fume hood, and biosafety cabinet) for control of particles generated during sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites. Particle number and respirable mass concentrations were measured using an optical particle counter (OPC) and a condensation particle counter (CPC), and particle morphology was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The ratios of the geometric mean (GM) concentrations measured during the process to that measured in the background (P/B ratios) were used as indices of the impact of the process and the LEVs on observed concentrations. Processing CNT-epoxy nanocomposites materials released respirable size airborne particles (P/B ratio: weighing = 1.79; sanding = 5.90) but generally no nanoparticles (P/B ratio ∼1). The particles generated during sanding were predominantly micron sized with protruding CNTs and very different from bulk CNTs that tended to remain in large (>1 μm) tangled clusters. Respirable mass concentrations in the operator's breathing zone were lower when sanding was performed in the biological safety cabinet (GM = 0.20 μg/m(3) compared with those with no LEV (GM = 2.68 μg/m(3) or those when sanding was performed inside the fume hood (GM = 21.4 μg/m(3); p-value < 0.0001). The poor performance of the custom fume hood used in this study may have been exacerbated by its lack of a front sash and rear baffles and its low face velocity (0.39 m/sec). PMID:21253981

  19. Particle size tailoring of ursolic acid nanosuspensions for improved anticancer activity by controlled antisolvent precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yancai; Song, Ju; Chow, Shing Fung; Chow, Albert H L; Zheng, Ying

    2015-10-15

    The present study was aimed at tailoring the particle size of ursolic acid (UA) nanosuspension for improved anticancer activity. UA nanosuspensions were prepared by antisolvent precipitation using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) under defined conditions of varying solvent composition, drug feeding concentration or stream flow rate. The resulting products were characterized for particle size and polydispersity. Two of the UA nanosuspensions with mean particle sizes of 100 and 300 nm were further assessed for their in-vitro activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells using fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, as well as flow cytometry with propidium (PI) staining and with double staining by fluorescein isothiocyanate. It was revealed that the solvent composition, drug feeding concentration and stream flow rate were critical parameters for particle size control of the UA nanosuspensions generated with the MIVM. Specifically, decreasing the UA feeding concentration or increasing the stream flow rate or ethanol content resulted in a reduction of particle size. Excellent reproducibility for nanosuspension production was demonstrated for the 100 and 300 nm UA preparations with a deviation of not more than 5% in particle size from the mean value of three independent batches. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that these two different sized UA nanosuspensions, particularly the 300 nm sample, exhibited a higher anti-proliferation activity against the MCF-7 cells and afforded a larger population of these cells in both early and late apoptotic phases. In conclusion, MIVM is a robust and pragmatic tool for tailoring the particle size of the UA nanosuspension. Particle size appears to be a critical determinant of the anticancer activity of the UA nanoparticles.

  20. Particle size tailoring of ursolic acid nanosuspensions for improved anticancer activity by controlled antisolvent precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yancai; Song, Ju; Chow, Shing Fung; Chow, Albert H L; Zheng, Ying

    2015-10-15

    The present study was aimed at tailoring the particle size of ursolic acid (UA) nanosuspension for improved anticancer activity. UA nanosuspensions were prepared by antisolvent precipitation using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) under defined conditions of varying solvent composition, drug feeding concentration or stream flow rate. The resulting products were characterized for particle size and polydispersity. Two of the UA nanosuspensions with mean particle sizes of 100 and 300 nm were further assessed for their in-vitro activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells using fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, as well as flow cytometry with propidium (PI) staining and with double staining by fluorescein isothiocyanate. It was revealed that the solvent composition, drug feeding concentration and stream flow rate were critical parameters for particle size control of the UA nanosuspensions generated with the MIVM. Specifically, decreasing the UA feeding concentration or increasing the stream flow rate or ethanol content resulted in a reduction of particle size. Excellent reproducibility for nanosuspension production was demonstrated for the 100 and 300 nm UA preparations with a deviation of not more than 5% in particle size from the mean value of three independent batches. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that these two different sized UA nanosuspensions, particularly the 300 nm sample, exhibited a higher anti-proliferation activity against the MCF-7 cells and afforded a larger population of these cells in both early and late apoptotic phases. In conclusion, MIVM is a robust and pragmatic tool for tailoring the particle size of the UA nanosuspension. Particle size appears to be a critical determinant of the anticancer activity of the UA nanoparticles. PMID:26302857

  1. Particle-Scale Controls on Entrainment and Deposition due to Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K. M.; Maki, L.; Kaitna, R.

    2013-12-01

    When a debris flow - a large flow of boulders, gravels, sands, and mud - course down mountains, it can entrain materials many times the initial mass of the debris flow. The material is deposited at lower slopes. The amount of material they entrain and deposit can influence both the potential damage they do to habitat and communities in their paths and the landscape along the way. There is little quantitative understanding of the controls of entrainment and deposition along a debris flow path. We present experiments in a novel laboratory flume developed at the University of Minnesota to study particle-scale controls on entrainment and deposition due to debris flows. We control particle size distribution and water content in the flow itself and in an erodible bed over which the mixture flows, independently. Particle velocities, pore pressures, and local particle size distributions can be monitored, as can total erosion and deposition. Here, we first demonstrate how subtle differences in the bed structure or 'fabric' induced by the bed preparation can have dramatic differences on the entrainment rate of bed particles by the flowing mixture. Then we demonstrate the dependence of entrainment on particle size distribution in the flow and in the bed itself as it varies with angle of inclination of the bed. In all cases, we find that the erosion increases (or at lower angles, deposition decreases) with increasing angle of inclination of the bed. When the particles in the flow are uniform and the same size as those in the bed, we find the dependence of erosion on angle of inclination is linear. We find that single-sized systems exhibit more erosion and less deposition under the same conditions as their mixed counterparts. When the flow has a larger or smaller average particle size than that in the bed, the dependence of erosion on angle is somewhat more complicated. We model the variability by considering granular temperature in the flow, average stress on the bed, and the

  2. Particle-Scale Controls on Entrainment and Deposition due to Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, M. D.; Mudd, S. M.; Walcott, R.; Attal, M.; Yoo, K.; Weinman, B. A.

    2011-12-01

    When a debris flow - a large flow of boulders, gravels, sands, and mud - course down mountains, it can entrain materials many times the initial mass of the debris flow. The material is deposited at lower slopes. The amount of material they entrain and deposit can influence both the potential damage they do to habitat and communities in their paths and the landscape along the way. There is little quantitative understanding of the controls of entrainment and deposition along a debris flow path. We present experiments in a novel laboratory flume developed at the University of Minnesota to study particle-scale controls on entrainment and deposition due to debris flows. We control particle size distribution and water content in the flow itself and in an erodible bed over which the mixture flows, independently. Particle velocities, pore pressures, and local particle size distributions can be monitored, as can total erosion and deposition. Here, we first demonstrate how subtle differences in the bed structure or 'fabric' induced by the bed preparation can have dramatic differences on the entrainment rate of bed particles by the flowing mixture. Then we demonstrate the dependence of entrainment on particle size distribution in the flow and in the bed itself as it varies with angle of inclination of the bed. In all cases, we find that the erosion increases (or at lower angles, deposition decreases) with increasing angle of inclination of the bed. When the particles in the flow are uniform and the same size as those in the bed, we find the dependence of erosion on angle of inclination is linear. We find that single-sized systems exhibit more erosion and less deposition under the same conditions as their mixed counterparts. When the flow has a larger or smaller average particle size than that in the bed, the dependence of erosion on angle is somewhat more complicated. We model the variability by considering granular temperature in the flow, average stress on the bed, and the

  3. A critical appraisal of the misoprostol removable, controlled-release vaginal delivery system of labor induction

    PubMed Central

    Patte, Charlotte; Deruelle, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Induction of labor is a major issue in pregnancy management. Finding strategies to increase rate and decrease time to vaginal delivery is an important goal, but maternal or neonatal safety must remain the primary objective. Misoprostol is a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin used off label to ripen the cervix and induce labor. The misoprostol vaginal insert (MVI) was designed to allow a controlled-release delivery of misoprostol (from 50 to 200 μg) with a removal tape. The objective of this review was to make a critical appraisal of this device referring to the literature. Methods A literature search was performed in the PubMed and Cochrane databases using the keywords “vaginal misoprostol insert”. Results Several studies compared different doses of MVI (50, 100, 150, and 200 μg) with the 10 mg dinoprostone insert. The 100 μg MVI compared with the dinoprostone vaginal insert (DVI) showed similar efficacy and no significant differences in cesarean delivery rate. MVI 200 μg compared with DVI showed a reduced time to vaginal delivery and oxytocin need but had an increased risk of uterine hyperstimulation. The rate of hyperstimulation syndrome was two to three times more frequent with the 200 μg MVI than the 100 μg. Conclusion Current data suggest that the 100 μg MVI would provide the best balance between efficacy and safety. Further studies should be performed to evaluate this dose, especially in high-risk situations needing induction of labor. PMID:26648758

  4. Simulation and control of morphological changes due to dam removal in the Sandy River, Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Y.; Altinakar, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    A one-dimensional channel evolution simulation model (CCHE1D) is applied to assess morphological changes in a reach of the Sandy River, Oregon, USA, due to the Marmot Dam removal in 2007. Sediment transport model parameters (e.g. sediment transport capacity, bed roughness coefficient) were calibrated using observed bed changes after the dam removal. The validated model is then applied to assess long-term morphological changes in response to a 10-year hydrograph selected from historical storm water records. The long-term assessment of sedimentation gives a reasonable prediction of morphological changes, expanding erosion in reservoir and growing deposition immediately downstream of the dam site. This prediction result can be used for managing and planning river sedimentation after dam removal. A simulation-based optimization model is also applied to determine the optimal sediment release rates during dam-removal that will minimize the morphological changes in the downstream reaches.

  5. Controlled drug delivery attributes of co-polymer micelles and xanthan-O-carboxymethyl hydrogel particles.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sabyasachi; Mukherjee, Susweta

    2014-09-01

    Herein, C16 alkyl chain-grafted-xanthan copolymer was synthesized and characterized. The copolymer self-assembled into nanometer-size spherical micellar structures in water and incorporated ∼100% glibenclamide into its deeper lipophilic confines. The micellar dispersion exhibited negative zeta potential value (-27.6 mV). The copolymer micelles controlled the drug release rate in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8) for an extended period. Further incorporation of drug-loaded copolymer micelles into O-carboxymethyl xanthan hydrogel particles slowed the drug release rate in HCl solution (pH 1.2) as well as in phosphate-buffered solution (pH 6.8) (releasing only ∼8% drug in 2 h). The drug release data correlated well with the degree of swelling of the hydrogel particles in different drug release media. Scanning electron microscopy revealed spherical shape of the hydrogel particles (600 μm). X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses suggested amorphous encapsulation of the drug and its chemical compatibility with the polymers, respectively. Pharmacodynamic evaluation suggested that the formulations had an immense potential in controlling blood glucose level in animal model over a longer duration. In summary, it was pointed out that the copolymer micelles of glibenclamide, a poor water-soluble anti-diabetic, and their subsequent entrapment into hydrogel particles could be a promising approach in the controlled and effective management of diabetes. PMID:24954271

  6. Removal of drone brood from Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies to control Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) and retain adult drones.

    PubMed

    Wantuch, Holly A; Tarpy, David R

    2009-12-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Acari: Varroidae) has plagued European honey bees, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), in the Americas since its introduction in the 1980s. For many years, these mites were sufficiently controlled using synthetic acaricides. Recently, however, beekeepers have experienced increased resistance by mites to chemical pesticides, which are also known to leave residues in hive products such as wax and honey. Thus there has been increased emphasis on nonchemical integrated pest management control tactics for Varroa. Because mites preferentially reproduce in drone brood (pupal males), we developed a treatment strategy focusing on salvaging parasitized drones while removing mites from them. We removed drone brood from colonies in which there was no acaricidal application and banked them in separate "drone-brood receiving" colonies treated with pesticides to kill mites emerging with drones. We tested 20 colonies divided into three groups: 1) negative control (no mite treatment), 2) positive control (treatment with acaricides), and 3) drone-brood removal and placement into drone-brood receiving colonies. We found that drone-brood trapping significantly lowered mite numbers during the early months of the season, eliminating the need for additional control measures in the spring. However, mite levels in the drone-brood removal group increased later in the summer, suggesting that this benefit does not persist throughout the entire season. Our results suggest that this method of drone-brood trapping can be used as an element of an integrated control strategy to control varroa mites, eliminating a large portion of the Varroa population with limited chemical treatments while retaining the benefits of maintaining adult drones in the population.

  7. Removal of drone brood from Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies to control Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) and retain adult drones.

    PubMed

    Wantuch, Holly A; Tarpy, David R

    2009-12-01

    The parasitic mite Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman (Acari: Varroidae) has plagued European honey bees, Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), in the Americas since its introduction in the 1980s. For many years, these mites were sufficiently controlled using synthetic acaricides. Recently, however, beekeepers have experienced increased resistance by mites to chemical pesticides, which are also known to leave residues in hive products such as wax and honey. Thus there has been increased emphasis on nonchemical integrated pest management control tactics for Varroa. Because mites preferentially reproduce in drone brood (pupal males), we developed a treatment strategy focusing on salvaging parasitized drones while removing mites from them. We removed drone brood from colonies in which there was no acaricidal application and banked them in separate "drone-brood receiving" colonies treated with pesticides to kill mites emerging with drones. We tested 20 colonies divided into three groups: 1) negative control (no mite treatment), 2) positive control (treatment with acaricides), and 3) drone-brood removal and placement into drone-brood receiving colonies. We found that drone-brood trapping significantly lowered mite numbers during the early months of the season, eliminating the need for additional control measures in the spring. However, mite levels in the drone-brood removal group increased later in the summer, suggesting that this benefit does not persist throughout the entire season. Our results suggest that this method of drone-brood trapping can be used as an element of an integrated control strategy to control varroa mites, eliminating a large portion of the Varroa population with limited chemical treatments while retaining the benefits of maintaining adult drones in the population. PMID:20069828

  8. Ultraphosphate, a potent stain control agent that is effective for both stain removal and prevention of stain deposition.

    PubMed

    Koyasu, Masahiro; Shiba, Toshikazu; Kawazoe, Yumi; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate is a phosphate polymer which is effective for stain removal and prevention of stain deposition. Ultraphosphate belongs to the polyphosphate group and has a highly branched mesh-like structure. To evaluate stain control ability of ultraphosphate, we used HAP powder, glass-ionomer cement and detached human teeth for models of in vitro stain control experiments. When using HAP powder, the stain removal ability of ultraphosphate was the highest among common chelating agents. In addition, ultraphosphate efficiently removed stain and prevented stain deposition on glass-ionomer cement at 20°C and 37°C. Finally, ultraphosphate removed coffee stain from human teeth surface efficiently and the color difference (ΔE*ab) before and after ultraphosphate treatment was changed dramatically from 59.4 to 8.3. Similarly, the ΔE*ab value of human teeth treated with ultraphosphate before coffee treatment was only 9.9, while the value without ultraphosphate pre-treatment was 21.2. These results indicate that ultraphosphate is a potent agent for stain control.

  9. Integration of a particle monitor into the control system for an ion implanter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Steven; McCarron, David; Blake, Julian

    1993-04-01

    The value of in situ particle monitors for both manufacturing process control and process development in the semiconductor industry is receiving considerable recognition. This paper discusses the integration of a high yield technology (HYT) sensor into the control system of an Baton high current ion implanter. The automatic triggering of the particle monitor during the various phases of the implant process and the autoclean cycle provides a definite representation of the machine state and the effect of processing over time. Utilizing existing features of the control system, specific thresholds can be associated with each implant process through its process recipe. By regular monitoring of the particle counter, these thresholds are used to anticipate the need for cleaning the process chamber, or if indicated, gracefully bring the current process to an immediate halt. A dedicated history log preserves detailed data for generating summary statistics and the complete data set of a particular process or overall machine performance. Future uses of this tool with the control system point toward statistical process control applications and intelligent self modifying process cycles. The presentation will include data from a system on which an HYT sensor was employed as a full time process monitor using modified SPC techniques for analysis.

  10. Laser-induced removal of co-deposits from graphitic plasma-facing components: Characterization of irradiated surfaces and dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gąsior, P.; Irrek, F.; Petersson, P.; Penkalla, H. J.; Rubel, M.; Schweer, B.; Sundelin, P.; Wessel, E.; Linke, J.; Philipps, V.; Emmoth, B.; Wolowski, J.; Hirai, T.

    2009-06-01

    Laser-induced fuel desorption and ablation of co-deposited layers on limiter plates from the TEXTOR tokamak have been studied. Gas phase composition was monitored in situ, whereas the ex situ studies have been focused on the examination of irradiated surfaces and broad analysis of dust generated by ablation of co-deposits. The size of the dust grains is in the range of few nanometers to hundreds of micrometers. These are fuel-rich dust particles, as determined by nuclear reaction analysis. The presence of deuterium in dust indicates that not all fuel species are transferred to the gas phase during irradiation. This also suggests that photonic removal of fuel and the ablation of co-deposit from plasma-facing components may lead to the redistribution of fuel-containing dust to surrounding areas.

  11. Characterizing and controlling industrial dust: a case study in small particle measurement.

    PubMed

    Combes, Richard S; Warren, D Alan

    2005-07-01

    Instrumentation used to measure characteristics of fine particles entrained in gas or suspended in aerosols provides information needed to develop valid regulations for emission sources and to support the design of control technologies. This case study offers a brief history of "micromeritics," a term used by early researchers to describe the science of small particles, and the related invention of laboratory instruments for characterizing very fine particles. The historical view provides insights into the role that Progressive Era government agencies played in advancing esoteric science and applying this knowledge to the regulation of workplace air pollution. Micromeritics instrumentation developed in conjunction with federal research now has many commercial applications worldwide, with characterizing airborne pollutants only a minor one. However, the continuing advances in the micromeritics field provide important laboratory measurement capabilities to environmental research organizations, such as the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).

  12. Controllable surface-plasmon resonance in engineered nanometer epitaxial silicide particles embedded in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Ksendzov, A.; Iannelli, J. M.; George, T.

    1991-01-01

    Epitaxial CoSi2 particles in a single-crystal silicon matrix are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy using a technique that allows nanometer control over particle size in three dimensions. These composite layers exhibit resonant absorption predicted by effective-medium theory. Selection of the height and diameter of disklike particles through a choice of growth conditions allows tailoring of the depolarization factor and hence of the surface-plasmon resonance energy. Resonant absorption from 0.49 to 1.04 eV (2.5 to 1.2 micron) is demonstrated and shown to agree well with values predicted by the Garnett (1904, 1906) theory using the bulk dielectric constants for CoSi2 and Si.

  13. A computer controlled television detector for light, X-rays and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalata, K.

    1981-01-01

    A versatile, high resolution, software configurable, two-dimensional intensified vidicon quantum detector system has been developed for multiple research applications. A thin phosphor convertor allows the detection of X-rays below 20 keV and non-relativistic particles in addition to visible light, and a thicker scintillator can be used to detect X-rays up to 100 keV and relativistic particles. Faceplates may be changed to allow any active area from 1 to 40 mm square, and active areas up to 200 mm square are possible. The image is integrated in a digital memory on any software specified array size up to 4000 x 4000. The array size is selected to match the spatial resolution, which ranges from 10 to 100 microns depending on the operating mode, the active area, and the photon or particle energy. All scan and data acquisition parameters are under software control to allow optimal data collection for each application.

  14. Proposed method for controlling turbid particles in solid-phase bioluminescent toxicity measurement.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Seul-Ki; Park, Jun-Boum; Ahn, Joo-Sung; Han, Young-Soo

    2015-06-01

    In the recent half century, numerous methods have been developed to assess ecological toxicity. However, the presence of solid-particle turbidity sometimes causes such tests to end with questionable results. Many researchers focused on controlling this arbitrary turbidity effect when using the Microtox® solid-phase toxicity system, but there is not yet a standard method. In this study, we examined four solid-phase sample test methods recommended in the Microtox® manual, or proposed from the literature, and compared the existing methods with our proposed method (centrifuged basic solid-phase test, c-BSPT). Four existing methods use the following strategies to control turbid particles: complete separation of liquid and solid using 0.45-μm filtration before contacting solid samples and bacteria, natural settlement, moderate separation of large particles using coarser pore size filtration, and exclusion of light loss in the toxicity calculation caused by turbidity after full disturbance of samples. Our proposed method uses moderate centrifugation to separate out the heavier soil particles from the lighter bacteria after direct contact between them. Among the solid-phase methods tested, in which the bacteria and solid particles were in direct contact (i.e., the three existing methods and the newly proposed one, c-BSPT), no single method could be recommended as optimal for samples over a range of turbidity. Instead, a simple screening strategy for selecting a sample-dependent solid-phase test method was suggested, depending on the turbidity of the solid suspension. The results of this study highlight the importance of considering solid particles, and the necessity for optimal selection of test method to reduce errors in the measurement of solid-phase toxicity.

  15. A sandwiched flexible polymer mold for control of particle-induced defects in nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Jizong; Ge, Haixiong

    2013-01-01

    Particle related defects are one of the key concerns for nanoimprint lithography, since the particle can amplify the defect to become much larger than the particle itself. We developed a flexible tri-layer mold for control of particle-induced defects. The mold was composed of a PDMS cushion layer sandwiched between a rigid imprint pattern layer and a plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET) backplane. The PET foil was used as the backplane of the mold to protect the sticky PDMS surface. The PDMS as a cushion layer could locally deform to conform the shape of substrate due to its high elasticity. The multifunctional epoxysiloxane was used for the formation of an imprint layer because of its insensitivity toward oxygen during curing, high transparency, excellent mechanical strength and high resistance to oxygen plasma after cross-linking. Nanostructures with different geometries and sizes were faithfully duplicated by this mold through a UV-curing imprint process. The particle-induced defectivity was dramatically improved by the deformation of the PDMS cushion layer with a slight external pressure. 500 nm pitch grating structures were successfully imprinted on a microposts array surface, both the top and the intervening bottom portions between the microposts.

  16. Surface-Engineered Graphene Quantum Dots for Shape Control of Block Copolymer Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyunseung; Ku, Kang Hee; Shin, Jae Man; Lee, Junhyuk; Park, Chan Ho; Cho, Han-Hee; Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Bumjoon; KIST Collaboration

    Surface-engineered, 10 nm-sized graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are shown to be efficient surfactants for producing poly(styrene-b-4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) particles that feature tunable shapes and internal morphologies. The surface properties of GQDs were modified by grafting different alkyl ligands, such as hexylamine and oleylamine, to generate the surfactant behavior of the GQDs. In stark contrast to the behavior of the unmodified GQDs, hexylamine-grafted GQDs and oleylamine-grafted GQD surfactants were selectively positioned on the PS and P4VP domains, respectively, at the surface of the particles. This positioning effectively tuned the interfacial interaction between two different PS/P4VP domains of the particles and the surrounding water during emulsification and induced a dramatic morphological transition to an unconventional convex lens-shaped particles. Precise and systematic control of interfacial activity of GQD surfactants was also demonstrated by varying the density of the alkyl ligands on the GQDs. The excellent surface tunability of 10 nm-sized GQDs combined with their significant optical and electrical properties highlight their importance as surfactants for producing colloidal particles with novel functions.

  17. Optimal control of two coupled spinning particles in the Euler-Lagrange picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Téllez, M.; Ibort, A.; Rodríguez de la Peña, T.; Salmoni, R.

    2016-01-01

    A family of optimal control problems for a single and two coupled spinning particles in the Euler-Lagrange formalism is discussed. A characteristic of such problems is that the equations controlling the system are implicit and a reduction procedure to deal with them must be carried out. The reduction of the implicit control equations arising in these problems will be discussed in the slightly more general setting of implicit equations defined by invariant one-forms on Lie groups. As an example the first order differential equations describing the extremal solutions of an optimal control problem for a single spinning particle, obtained by using Pontryagin’s Maximum Principle (PMP), will be found and shown to be completely integrable. Then, again using PMP, solutions for the problem of two coupled spinning particles will be characterized as solutions of a system of coupled non-linear matrix differential equations. The reduction of the implicit system will show that the reduced space for them is the product of the space of states for the independent systems, implying the absence of ‘entanglement’ in this instance. Finally, it will be shown that, in the case of identical systems, the degree three matrix polynomial differential equations determined by the optimal feedback law, constitute a completely integrable Hamiltonian system and some of its solutions are described explicitly.

  18. "Nanogold detoxifying machine" to remove idle nanogold particles from blood stream of cancer patients treated with antibody-nanogold therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bonjar, Leyla Shahidi

    2013-05-01

    This hypothesis would help to elevate safety in nanogold-therapy of some cancers. It has no previous record in published media and there is no existing protocol for what is expressed in this paper. The hypothesis makes some experimental recommendations for future research at the interface of nanotechnology and biological systems. It is about reducing toxicity and side effects of nanogold particles (NGPs) in cancer patients treated with antibody-nanogold therapeutics. The hypothesis expresses that how to eliminate idle NGPs from blood stream of treated cancer patients in order to reduce undesirable deposition and accumulation of NGPs in non-target tissues and organs in post therapy. In this regard, at the end of therapy period, blood of treated cancer patient which contains idle nanogold-antibodies is passed through a machine named "Nanogold detoxifying machine" (NDM). This machine behaves like "hemodialysis machine" used for patients with lost kidney function but, instead of dialysis membrane, NDM is equipped with impermeable membrane containing nanotubes to which cancer specific-antigens (CSAs) are attached. While blood circulates in NDM, CSAs attract and immobilize the idle nanogold-antibodies. Implementation of NDM clears patient's blood from idle nanogold-antibodies which were not attached to their targets, the cancer cells. Elimination of idle NGPs from blood would minimize side effects resulting from their deposition or accumulation on non-target cells or tissues. Since NDM reduces anxieties about side effects, it would provide patients with better feelings too. NDM would enhance efficacy of NGPs targeted toward specific cancers. Before using it for clinical trials in human cases, NDM should pass animal evaluations; however, research works should optimize its implementation. I think NDM method holds great promise to reduce the time, effort, and expense in cancer research, screening, detection, and therapy.

  19. Size Control and Growth Process Study of Au@Cu2O Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuyuan; Zheng, Min; Liu, Shengnan; Wang, Zuoshan

    2016-09-01

    Au@Cu2O cuboctahedron with gold triangular nanoplate core and Cu2O shell was synthesized by a chemical method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests demonstrated that the as-synthesis samples were consisted of gold triangular nanoplate core and Cu2O shell, and both of them were in good crystallization. The effective size control of the particles could be realized by controlling the amount of Au cores added in the synthetic process and Au@Cu2O particles with different shell thickness could be synthesized. The decrease of Cu2O shell thickness had a great difference in the optical performance, including blue shift of the resonant peaks and enhanced absorption intensity. The growth process from rough sheet structure to cuboctahedron was also explored. The results of photocatalytic degradation experiment showed that Au@Cu2O particles showed much better photocatalytic performance than that of pure Cu2O. The improved photocatalytic property of the Au@Cu2O particles was attributed to the comprehensive effect of the enhanced visible-light absorption and high separation rate of electron-hole pairs.

  20. Size Control and Growth Process Study of Au@Cu2O Particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuyuan; Zheng, Min; Liu, Shengnan; Wang, Zuoshan

    2016-12-01

    Au@Cu2O cuboctahedron with gold triangular nanoplate core and Cu2O shell was synthesized by a chemical method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests demonstrated that the as-synthesis samples were consisted of gold triangular nanoplate core and Cu2O shell, and both of them were in good crystallization. The effective size control of the particles could be realized by controlling the amount of Au cores added in the synthetic process and Au@Cu2O particles with different shell thickness could be synthesized. The decrease of Cu2O shell thickness had a great difference in the optical performance, including blue shift of the resonant peaks and enhanced absorption intensity. The growth process from rough sheet structure to cuboctahedron was also explored. The results of photocatalytic degradation experiment showed that Au@Cu2O particles showed much better photocatalytic performance than that of pure Cu2O. The improved photocatalytic property of the Au@Cu2O particles was attributed to the comprehensive effect of the enhanced visible-light absorption and high separation rate of electron-hole pairs. PMID:27613067

  1. How the novel integration of electrolysis in tidal flow constructed wetlands intensifies nutrient removal and odor control.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xinxin; Wu, Shubiao; Huang, Xu; Zhang, Yansheng; Dong, Renjie

    2014-10-01

    Intensified nutrient removal and odor control in a novel electrolysis-integrated tidal flow constructed wetland were evaluated. The average removal efficiencies of COD and NH4(+)-N were above 85% and 80% in the two experimental wetlands at influent COD concentration of 300 mg/L and ammonium nitrogen concentration of 60 mg/L regardless of electrolysis integration. Effluent nitrate concentration decreased from 2.5mg/L to 0.5mg/L with the reduction in current intensity from 1.5 mA/cm(2) to 0.57 mA/cm(2). This result reveals the important role of current intensity in nitrogen transformation. Owing to the ferrous and ferric iron coagulant formed through the electro-dissolution of the iron anode, electrolysis integration not only exerted a positive effect on phosphorus removal but also effectively inhibited sulfide accumulation for odor control. Although electrolysis operation enhanced nutrient removal and promoted the emission of CH4, no significant difference was observed in the microbial communities and abundance of the two experimental wetlands. PMID:25103037

  2. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel Experiencing a Fast Control Rod Ejection Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Ortensi, J.; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    A rapid increase of the temperature and the mechanical stress is expected in TRISO coated particle fuel that experiences a fast Total Control Rod Ejection (CRE) transient event. During this event the reactor power in the pebble bed core increases significantly for a short time interval. The power is deposited instantly and locally in the fuel kernel. This could result in a rapid increase of the pressure in the buffer layer of the coated fuel particle and, consequently, in an increase of the coating stresses. These stresses determine the mechanical failure probability of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). A new calculation procedure has been implemented at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), which analyzes the transient fuel performance behavior of TRISO fuel particles in PBRs. This early capability can easily be extended to prismatic designs, given the availability of neutronic and thermal-fluid solvers. The full-core coupled neutronic and thermal-fluid analysis has been modeled with CYNOD-THERMIX. The temperature fields for the fuel kernel and the particle coatings, as well as the gas pressures in the buffer layer, are calculated with the THETRIS module explicitly during the transient calculation. Results from this module are part of the feedback loop within the neutronic-thermal fluid iterations performed for each time step. The temperature and internal pressure values for each pebble type in each region of the core are then input to the PArticle STress Analysis (PASTA) code, which determines the particle coating stresses and the fraction of failed particles. This paper presents an investigation of a Total Control Rod Ejection (TCRE) incident in the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular reactor design using the above described calculation procedure. The transient corresponds to a reactivity insertion of $3 (~2000 pcm) reaching 35 times the nominal power in 0.5 seconds. For each position in the core

  3. Solution combustion synthesis of calcium phosphate particles for controlled release of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junfeng; Zhao, Junjie; Qian, Yu; Zhang, Xiali; Zhou, Feifei; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Hongbin; Chen, JianHua; Wang, XuHong; Yu, Wencong

    2015-05-01

    Four different phase compositions of calcium phosphate (CaP) particles were prepared via a solution combustion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld analysis results revealed that the variations in the nominal Ca/P (molar) ratios were found to provide a favorable control in the different proportions of CaP materials. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein to study the loading and release behavior. The release profile indicated that the BSA release rates depended on the phase compositions of the CaP particles, and showed an order of TCP-BSA>BCP-1-BSA>BCP-2-BSA>HA-BSA. The results suggested that the BSA protein release rate can be controlled by varying the phase compositions of CaP carriers. Moreover, the release process involved two stages: firstly surface diffusion via ion exchange and secondly intraparticle diffusion.

  4. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged particle current flow

    DOEpatents

    Pollock, G.G.

    1997-01-28

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved. 5 figs.

  5. Controlling the Growth of Future LEO Debris Populations with Active Debris Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Johnson, N. L.; Hill, N. M.

    2008-01-01

    Active debris removal (ADR) was suggested as a potential means to remediate the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment as early as the 1980s. The reasons ADR has not become practical are due to its technical difficulties and the high cost associated with the approach. However, as the LEO debris populations continue to increase, ADR may be the only option to preserve the near-Earth environment for future generations. An initial study was completed in 2007 to demonstrate that a simple ADR target selection criterion could be developed to reduce the future debris population growth. The present paper summarizes a comprehensive study based on more realistic simulation scenarios, including fragments generated from the 2007 Fengyun-1C event, mitigation measures, and other target selection options. The simulations were based on the NASA long-term orbital debris projection model, LEGEND. A scenario, where at the end of mission lifetimes, spacecraft and upper stages were moved to 25-year decay orbits, was adopted as the baseline environment for comparison. Different annual removal rates and different ADR target selection criteria were tested, and the resulting 200-year future environment projections were compared with the baseline scenario. Results of this parametric study indicate that (1) an effective removal strategy can be developed based on the mass and collision probability of each object as the selection criterion, and (2) the LEO environment can be stabilized in the next 200 years with an ADR removal rate of five objects per year.

  6. Simulation of sediment transport due to dam removal and control of morphological changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents two case studies of post dam removal sedimentation in the United States. Two different one-dimensional channel evolution simulation models were used: CCHE1D and CONCEPTS, respectively. The first case is the application of CCHE1D to assess the long-term (up to 10 years) morphologi...

  7. Quality control of semi-continuous mobility size-fractionated particle number concentration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rong Chun; Teh, Hee Wen; Jaques, Peter A.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Froines, John R.

    Fine and ultrafine particles have been postulated to play an important role in the association between ambient particulate matters and adverse health effects. As part of the EPA Supersite Program, the Southern California Particle Center & Supersite has conducted a series of monitoring campaigns that contribute to a better understanding of the sources, chemical composition and physical state of ambient aerosols. The Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) was deployed to semi-continuously measure mobility size-fractioned particle number concentrations. As part of the quality control efforts, we developed a two-stage graphic and statistical procedure to label and identify potentially discordant observations. The first stage considered the entire size-fractionated data by date-time as a whole to plot total concentration (TC) vs. coefficient of variation (CV), both in log scale. TC represents the magnitude of overall concentration for a size distribution; while CV represents the relative variability. This plot was used to partition all size distributions into four to five distinct regions. In each region, a generalized extreme studentized deviate (ESD) and a modified Z-score procedure were applied to identify potential discordant outliers. We have found that the majority of particle size distributions are concentrated within a 'normal' region, with TC ranging from 10 2 to 10 5 cm -3 and CV varying between 20% and 200%. Size distributions that are contaminated with discordant outliers are displayed distinctly from the 'normal' region and form four to five clusters in the Log TC-Log CV plot. The pattern of clusters in the plot is consistent among the four sampling sites in this study, suggesting the robustness of this technique. The generalized ESD and modified Z-score effectively identify discordant outliers and reveal that the pattern of clustering outliers are consistent within each distinct region. It has, thus, been concluded that the new approach is a useful

  8. Biological nitrogen removal in a step-feed CAST with real-time control treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Juan, Ma; Chengyao, Peng; Li, Wang; Shuying, Wang; Yang, Liu; Ningping, Ma; Xia, Yu; Yongzhen, Peng

    2010-01-01

    The performance of a 18 L step-feed cyclic activated sludge technology (CAST) combined with real-time control treating real municipal wastewater was evaluated. The operation strategies employed pH and oxidation reduction potential (ORP) as on-line control parameters, which can control the durations of oxic and anoxic phases flexibly. The obtained results showed that the studied process had achieved advanced and enhanced nitrogen removal by several phases of consecutive oxic/anoxic periods. Total nitrogen in effluent was lower than 2 mg/L and the average TN removal efficiency was higher than 98%, while only requiring small amount of external carbon source. Unexpected characteristic points in pH and ORP profiles denoting the depletion of nitrate were also observed during the last anoxic phase. Denitrification rate was found to be more dependent on the system temperature compared to nitrification rate. Moreover, a stable and efficient phosphorus removal rate above 90% was achieved by using step-feed strategy which enabled the influent carbon source to be fully used and the favourable condition for phosphorus releasing to be created during the anoxic phases.

  9. Dissipative dynamics of a particle in a vibrating periodic potential: Chaos and control.

    PubMed

    Chacón, R; Martínez, P J; Martínez, J A

    2015-12-01

    The dissipative chaotic dynamics of a particle subjected to a horizontally vibrating periodic potential is characterized theoretically and confirmed numerically in the case of an external chaos-controlling periodic excitation also acting on the particle. Theoretical predictions concerning the chaotic threshold in parameter space are deduced from the application of Melnikov's method that fully determine the chaos-control scenario. Also, the structure of diverse regularization regions in parameter space is explained theoretically with the aid of an energy analysis. It was found that the phase difference between the two periodic excitations involved plays a crucial role in the chaos-control scenario, with the particular feature that its optimal value depends upon the ratio between the damping coefficient and the excitation frequency. This constitutes a genuine feature of the chaos-control scenario associated with nonsteady potentials which is in contrast to the case of steady potentials. Additionally, we demonstrate the robustness of the chaos-control scenario against the presence of low-intensity Gaussian noise and reshaping of chaos-suppressing excitations. PMID:26764788

  10. Dissipative dynamics of a particle in a vibrating periodic potential: Chaos and control.

    PubMed

    Chacón, R; Martínez, P J; Martínez, J A

    2015-12-01

    The dissipative chaotic dynamics of a particle subjected to a horizontally vibrating periodic potential is characterized theoretically and confirmed numerically in the case of an external chaos-controlling periodic excitation also acting on the particle. Theoretical predictions concerning the chaotic threshold in parameter space are deduced from the application of Melnikov's method that fully determine the chaos-control scenario. Also, the structure of diverse regularization regions in parameter space is explained theoretically with the aid of an energy analysis. It was found that the phase difference between the two periodic excitations involved plays a crucial role in the chaos-control scenario, with the particular feature that its optimal value depends upon the ratio between the damping coefficient and the excitation frequency. This constitutes a genuine feature of the chaos-control scenario associated with nonsteady potentials which is in contrast to the case of steady potentials. Additionally, we demonstrate the robustness of the chaos-control scenario against the presence of low-intensity Gaussian noise and reshaping of chaos-suppressing excitations.

  11. Controlling the structure and dynamics of magnetoresponsive particle suspensions for enhanced transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, Kyle J.

    The work contained herein describes the use of various magnetic fields to control the structure and dynamics of magnetic particle suspensions, with the practical aim of enhancing momentum, heat, and mass transport. The magnetic fields are often multiaxial and can consist of up to three orthogonal components that may be either static (dc), time-dependent (ac), or some combination thereof. The magnetic particles are composed of a ferromagnetic material---such as iron, nickel, cobalt, or Permalloy---and can exist in a variety of shapes, including spheres, platelets, and rods. The shape of the particles is particularly important, as this can determine the type of behavior the suspension exhibits and can strongly affect the efficacy of various transport properties. The continuous phase can be almost any fluid so long as it possesses a viscosity that allows the particles to orient and aggregate in response to the applied field. Additionally, if the liquid is polymerizable (e.g., an epoxy system), then composite materials with particular, field-directed particle assemblies can be created. Given the many combinations of various particles, suspending fluids, and magnetic fields, a vast array of behavior is possible: the formation of anisotropic particle structures for directed heat transport for use as advanced thermal interface materials; the stimulation of emergent dynamics in platelet suspensions, which give rise to field-controllable flow lattices; and the creation of vortex fluids that possess a uniform torque density, enabling such strange behaviors as active wetting, a negative viscosity and striking biomimetic dynamics. Because the applied fields used to produce many of these phenomena are uniform and modest in strength, such adaptive fluids open up the possibility of tuning the degree of mixing or heat/mass transfer for specific operating conditions in a number of processes, ranging from the microscale to the industrial scale. Moreover, the very nature of magnetism

  12. Potential of kaolin-based particle film barriers for Formosan subterranean termite (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiltz, B.A.; Woodson, W.D.; Puterka, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Effects of three particle film products on Formosan subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, were evaluated in feeding, tunneling, and contact assays. The particle films, hydrophobic M96-018 and hydrophilic Surround and Surround WP are based on the inert clay mineral kaolin. In 2-week long no-choice feeding tests, significant mortality occurred only with M96-018-coated wood. When a choice was provided, M96-018 and Surround were consumed at higher rates than untreated wood. Surround WP did not differ from controls in either test. In the tunneling assay termites were given the option of crossing a kaolin-sand mixture to reach an alternate food source. After 3-weeks, rates of 1% and 5% M96-018 provided an effective barrier to Formosan termite tunneling, while termites were not stopped by rates as high as 20% Surround and Surround WP. Dust treatments of all three formulations caused significant increases in mortality within 24 h, with mortality rates ranging from 72.0 - 97.3% within 72 h of treatment. The particle films were most effective when moisture levels were low, suggesting that desiccation was the mechanism for mortality. All particle films showed potential for use in above ground applications while hydrophobic M06-018 has the most potential as a soil barrier to subterranean termites.

  13. Optimal Control for a Parallel Hybrid Hydraulic Excavator Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong-yun; Guan, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Optimal control using particle swarm optimization (PSO) is put forward in a parallel hybrid hydraulic excavator (PHHE). A power-train mathematical model of PHHE is illustrated along with the analysis of components' parameters. Then, the optimal control problem is addressed, and PSO algorithm is introduced to deal with this nonlinear optimal problem which contains lots of inequality/equality constraints. Then, the comparisons between the optimal control and rule-based one are made, and the results show that hybrids with the optimal control would increase fuel economy. Although PSO algorithm is off-line optimization, still it would bring performance benchmark for PHHE and also help have a deep insight into hybrid excavators. PMID:23818832

  14. Nondestructive and Destructive Examination Studies on Removed-from-Service Control Rod Drive Mechanism Penetrations

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Crawford, Susan L.; Doctor, Steven R.; Seffens, Rob J.; Schuster, George J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Harris, Robert V.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2007-06-07

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, focused on assessing the effectiveness of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for inspecting control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objectives of this work are to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of NDE methods as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. Two CRDM assemblies were removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE and destructive examination (DE) measurements; this report addresses the following questions: 1) What did each NDE technique detect? 2) What did each NDE technique miss? 3) How accurately did each NDE technique characterize the detected flaws? 4) Why did the NDE techniques perform or not perform? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. This report focuses on a CRDM assembly that contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data and through-wall leakage. The NDE measurements used to examine the CRDM assembly followed standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. These techniques included eddy current testing (ET), time-of-flight diffraction ultrasound, and penetrant testing. In addition, laboratory-based NDE methods were employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assembly with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. These techniques included volumetric ultrasonic inspection of the J-groove weld metal and visual testing via replicant material of the J-groove weld. The results from these NDE studies were used to

  15. IMPLICIT DUAL CONTROL BASED ON PARTICLE FILTERING AND FORWARD DYNAMIC PROGRAMMING

    PubMed Central

    Bayard, David S.; Schumitzky, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a sampling-based approach to implicit dual control. Implicit dual control methods synthesize stochastic control policies by systematically approximating the stochastic dynamic programming equations of Bellman, in contrast to explicit dual control methods that artificially induce probing into the control law by modifying the cost function to include a term that rewards learning. The proposed implicit dual control approach is novel in that it combines a particle filter with a policy-iteration method for forward dynamic programming. The integration of the two methods provides a complete sampling-based approach to the problem. Implementation of the approach is simplified by making use of a specific architecture denoted as an H-block. Practical suggestions are given for reducing computational loads within the H-block for real-time applications. As an example, the method is applied to the control of a stochastic pendulum model having unknown mass, length, initial position and velocity, and unknown sign of its dc gain. Simulation results indicate that active controllers based on the described method can systematically improve closed-loop performance with respect to other more common stochastic control approaches. PMID:21132112

  16. A Quality-Control Mechanism Removes Unfit Cells from a Population of Sporulating Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tan, Irene S; Weiss, Cordelia A; Popham, David L; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S

    2015-09-28

    Recent discoveries of regulated cell death in bacteria have led to speculation about possible benefits that apoptosis-like pathways may confer to single-celled organisms. However, establishing how these pathways provide increased ecological fitness has remained difficult to determine. Here, we report a pathway in Bacillus subtilis in which regulated cell death maintains the fidelity of sporulation through selective removal of cells that misassemble the spore envelope. The spore envelope, which protects the dormant spore's genome from environmental insults, uses the protein SpoIVA as a scaffold for assembly. We found that disrupting envelope assembly activates a cell death pathway wherein the small protein CmpA acts as an adaptor to the AAA+ ClpXP protease to degrade SpoIVA, thereby halting sporulation and resulting in lysis of defective sporulating cells. We propose that removal of unfit cells from a population of terminally differentiating cells protects against evolutionary deterioration and ultimately loss of the sporulation program.

  17. NEW ASPECTS OF A LID-REMOVAL MECHANISM IN THE ONSET OF AN ERUPTION SEQUENCE THAT PRODUCED A LARGE SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE (SEP) EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Knox, Javon M. E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov

    2014-06-20

    We examine a sequence of two ejective eruptions from a single active region on 2012 January 23, using magnetograms and EUV images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's (SDO) Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and Atmospheric and Imaging Assembly (AIA), and EUV images from STEREO/EUVI. This sequence produced two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and a strong solar energetic particle event (SEP); here we focus on the magnetic onset of this important space weather episode. Cheng et al. showed that the first eruption's ({sup E}ruption 1{sup )} flux rope was apparent only in ''hotter'' AIA channels, and that it removed overlying field that allowed the second eruption ({sup E}ruption 2{sup )} to begin via ideal MHD instability; here we say that Eruption 2 began via a ''lid removal'' mechanism. We show that during Eruption 1's onset, its flux rope underwent a ''tether weakening'' (TW) reconnection with field that arched from the eruption-source active region to an adjacent active region. Standard flare loops from Eruption 1 developed over Eruption 2's flux rope and enclosed filament, but these overarching new loops were unable to confine that flux rope/filament. Eruption 1's flare loops, from both TW reconnection and standard-flare-model internal reconnection, were much cooler than Eruption 2's flare loops (GOES thermal temperatures of ∼7.5 MK and 9 MK, compared to ∼14 MK). The corresponding three sequential GOES flares were, respectively, due to TW reconnection plus earlier phase Eruption 1 tether-cutting reconnection, Eruption 1 later-phase tether-cutting reconnection, and Eruption 2 tether-cutting reconnection.

  18. Preparation of aqueous colloidal mesostructured and mesoporous silica nanoparticles with controlled particle size in a very wide range from 20 nm to 700 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hironori; Urata, Chihiro; Ujiie, Hiroto; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2013-06-01

    Particle size control of colloidal mesoporous silica nanoparticles (CMPS) in a very wide range is quite significant for the design of CMPS toward various applications, such as catalysis and drug delivery. Various types of CMPS and their precursors (colloidal mesostructured silica nanoparticles (CMSS)) with different particle sizes (ca. 20-700 nm) were newly prepared from tetraalkoxysilanes with different alkoxy groups (Si(OR)4, R = Me, Et, Pr, and Bu) in the presence of alcohols (R'OH, R' = Me, Et, Pr, and Bu) as additives. CMSS with larger particle size were obtained by using tetrabutoxysilane (TBOS) and by increasing the amount of BuOH, which is explained by both the difference in the hydrolysis rates of tetraalkoxysilanes themselves and the effect of added alcohols on the hydrolysis rates of tetraalkoxysilanes. Larger amounts of alcohols with longer alkyl chains decrease the hydrolysis rates of tetraalkoxysilanes and the subsequent formation rates of silica species. Thus, the preferential particle growth of CMSS to nucleation occurs, and larger CMSS are formed. Highly dispersed CMPS were prepared by the removal of surfactants of CMSS by dialysis which can lead to the preparation of CMPS without aggregation. Therefore, the particle size control through the tuning of the hydrolysis rate of tetraalkoxysilanes can be conducted by a one-pot and easy approach. Even larger CMPS (ca. 700 nm in size) show relatively high dispersibility. This dispersibility will surely contribute to the design of materials both retaining nanoscale characteristics and avoiding various nanorisks.Particle size control of colloidal mesoporous silica nanoparticles (CMPS) in a very wide range is quite significant for the design of CMPS toward various applications, such as catalysis and drug delivery. Various types of CMPS and their precursors (colloidal mesostructured silica nanoparticles (CMSS)) with different particle sizes (ca. 20-700 nm) were newly prepared from tetraalkoxysilanes with

  19. Legal requirements and guidelines for the control of harmful laser generated particles, vapours and gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsey, John

    2015-07-01

    This paper is a review of the Health and Safety laws and guidelines relating to laser generated emissions into the workplace and outside environment with emphasis on the differences between legal requirements and guideline advice. The types and nature of contaminants released by various laser processes (i.e. cutting, coding, engraving, marking etc) are discussed, together with the best methods for controlling them to within legal exposure limits. A brief description of the main extract air filtration techniques, including the principles of particulate removal and the action of activated carbon for gas/vapour/odour filtration, is given.

  20. Tunning PID controller using particle swarm optimization algorithm on automatic voltage regulator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranza, M. F.; Kustija, J.; Trisno, B.; Hakim, D. L.

    2016-04-01

    PID Controller (Proportional Integral Derivative) was invented since 1910, but till today still is used in industries, even though there are many kind of modern controllers like fuzz controller and neural network controller are being developed. Performance of PID controller is depend on on Proportional Gain (Kp), Integral Gain (Ki) and Derivative Gain (Kd). These gains can be got by using method Ziegler-Nichols (ZN), gain-phase margin, Root Locus, Minimum Variance dan Gain Scheduling however these methods are not optimal to control systems that nonlinear and have high-orde, in addition, some methods relative hard. To solve those obstacles, particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is proposed to get optimal Kp, Ki and Kd. PSO is proposed because PSO has convergent result and not require many iterations. On this research, PID controller is applied on AVR (Automatic Voltage Regulator). Based on result of analyzing transient, stability Root Locus and frequency response, performance of PID controller is better than Ziegler-Nichols.

  1. Basis function repetitive and feedback control with application to a particle accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akogyeram, Raphael Akuete

    2002-09-01

    The thesis addresses three problem areas within repetitive control. Firstly, it addresses issues concerning the ability of repetitive control and feedback control systems to eliminate periodic disturbances occurring above the Nyquist frequency of the hardware. Methods are developed for decomposing and unfolding notch filter or comb filter feedback control so that disturbances above Nyquist frequency can be canceled. Phenomena affecting final error levels are discussed, including error in unfolding, coarseness of zero-order hold cancellation, and waterbed effects in the feedback control system frequency response for different sample rates. Secondly, matched basis function repetitive control laws are developed for batch mode and real time implementation to converge to zero tracking error in the presence of periodic disturbances. For both control methods, conditions are given that guarantee asymptotic and monotonic convergence. Stability tests are formulated to examine stability when the period of a disturbance is not an integer number of sample times, and when there are multiple unrelated periods whose common period is too long to use. Thirdly, an understanding is developed of the optimum division of labor between the objectives accomplished by feedback and the objectives accomplished by repetitive control action. Some experimental results of the particle accelerator testbed at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia, are reported.

  2. Adaptive impedance control of a hydraulic suspension system using particle swarm optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateh, Mohammad Mehdi; Moradi Zirkohi, Majid

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a novel active control approach for a hydraulic suspension system subject to road disturbances. A novel impedance model is used as a model reference in a particular robust adaptive control which is applied for the first time to the hydraulic suspension system. A scheme is introduced for selecting the impedance parameters. The impedance model prescribes a desired behaviour of the active suspension system in a wide range of different road conditions. Moreover, performance of the control system is improved by applying a particle swarm optimisation algorithm for optimising control design parameters. Design of the control system consists of two interior loops. The inner loop is a force control of the hydraulic actuator, while the outer loop is a robust model reference adaptive control (MRAC). This type of MRAC has been applied for uncertain linear systems. As another novelty, despite nonlinearity of the hydraulic actuator, the suspension system and the force loop together are presented as an uncertain linear system to the MRAC. The proposed control method is simulated on a quarter-car model. Simulation results show effectiveness of the method.

  3. Controlled isotropic or anisotropic nanoscale growth of coordination polymers: formation of hybrid coordination polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Jung; Cho, Yea Jin; Cho, Won; Oh, Moonhyun

    2013-01-22

    The ability to fabricate multicompositional hybrid materials in a precise and controlled manner is one of the primary goals of modern materials science research. In addition, an understanding of the phenomena associated with the systematic growth of one material on another can facilitate the evolution of multifunctional hybrid materials. Here, we demonstrate precise manipulation of the isotropic and/or anisotropic nanoscale growth of various coordination polymers (CPs) to obtain heterocompositional hybrid coordination polymer particles. Chemical composition analyses conducted at every growth step reveal the formation of accurately assembled hybrid nanoscale CPs, and microscopy images are used to examine the morphology of the particles and visualize the hybrid structures. The dissimilar growth behavior, that is, growth in an isotropic or anisotropic fashion, is found to be dependent on the size of the metal ions involved within the CPs.

  4. Removal of proprioception by BCI raises a stronger body ownership illusion in control of a humanlike robot

    PubMed Central

    Alimardani, Maryam; Nishio, Shuichi; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Body ownership illusions provide evidence that our sense of self is not coherent and can be extended to non-body objects. Studying about these illusions gives us practical tools to understand the brain mechanisms that underlie body recognition and the experience of self. We previously introduced an illusion of body ownership transfer (BOT) for operators of a very humanlike robot. This sensation of owning the robot’s body was confirmed when operators controlled the robot either by performing the desired motion with their body (motion-control) or by employing a brain-computer interface (BCI) that translated motor imagery commands to robot movement (BCI-control). The interesting observation during BCI-control was that the illusion could be induced even with a noticeable delay in the BCI system. Temporal discrepancy has always shown critical weakening effects on body ownership illusions. However the delay-robustness of BOT during BCI-control raised a question about the interaction between the proprioceptive inputs and delayed visual feedback in agency-driven illusions. In this work, we compared the intensity of BOT illusion for operators in two conditions; motion-control and BCI-control. Our results revealed a significantly stronger BOT illusion for the case of BCI-control. This finding highlights BCI’s potential in inducing stronger agency-driven illusions by building a direct communication between the brain and controlled body, and therefore removing awareness from the subject’s own body. PMID:27654174

  5. Remote control radioactive-waste removal system uses modulated laser transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcher, E. E.; Kopia, L. P.; Rowland, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Laser remote control system consists of transmitter, auto tracker, and receiver. Transmitter and tracker, packaged together and bore sighted, constitute control station, receiver is slave station. Model has five command channels and optical link operating range of 110 m.

  6. Factors controlling aquatic dissolved inorganic nitrogen removal and export in suburban watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineau, M.; Wollheim, W. M.; Stewart, R.; Daley, M.; McDowell, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    Human activity has accelerated the nitrogen (N) cycle and enriched the landscape with N which can result in eutrophication, especially in coastal zones where N is typically limiting. N exported to coastal zones is a function of both N loading to aquatic systems and N removal in transit through the river network. To determine drivers of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) removal and export from suburban river networks, we compared 2 well-studied suburban New-England watersheds. The Lamprey River watershed (474 km2) in NH has a mean population density of 53 inhabitants per km2 and feeds into the Great Bay estuary which is designated as N impaired. The Ipswich River (400 km2) in MA has a much higher population density with 302 inhabitants per km2 and feeds into the Plum Island estuary, which is not N impaired. Median (2000 - 2009) watershed DIN export was 171 kg km-2 y-1 for the Ipswich and 77 kg km-2 y-1 for the Lamprey. We used the Framework for Aquatic Modeling in the Earth System (FrAMES) to evaluate the relative importance of anthropogenic N loading and river network DIN processing in determining N export from these watersheds. FrAMES is a spatially distributed and time varying coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical model for river networks. We hypothesized that greater N export relative to population density in the Lamprey watershed was due in part to less aquatic N processing caused by interactions among: 1. The distribution of development/sources in the watershed (i.e. mean flow path length N has to travel), and 2. The area and distribution of intact fluvial wetlands in the watershed. We conducted a sensitivity analysis to determine the relative importance of these factors in limiting aquatic N removal in the Lamprey river watershed. Our results suggest that the distribution of loading within a river system has important influence on nutrient export to coastal zones.

  7. Divertor heat and particle control experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdavi, M.A; Baker, D.R.; Allen, S.L.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper we present a summary of recent DIII-D divertor physics activity and plans for future divertor upgrades. During the past year, DIII-D experimental effort was focused on areas of active heat and particle control and divertor target erosion studies. Using the DIII-D Advanced Divertor system we have succeeded for the first time to control the plasma density and demonstrate helium exhaust in H-mode plasmas. Divertor heat flux control by means of D{sub 2} gas puffing and impurity injection were studied separately and in, both cases up to a factor of five reduction of the divertor peak heat flux was observed. Using the DiMES sample transfer system we have obtained erosion data on various material samples in well diagnosed plasmas and compared the results with predictions of numerical models.

  8. Particle swarm optimization method for the control of a fleet of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkadi, A.; Ciarletta, L.; Theilliol, D.

    2015-11-01

    This paper concerns a control approach of a fleet of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) based on virtual leader. Among others, optimization methods are used to develop the virtual leader control approach, particularly the particle swarm optimization method (PSO). The goal is to find optimal positions at each instant of each UAV to guarantee the best performance of a given task by minimizing a predefined objective function. The UAVs are able to organize themselves on a 2D plane in a predefined architecture, following a mission led by a virtual leader and simultaneously avoiding collisions between various vehicles of the group. The global proposed method is independent from the model or the control of a particular UAV. The method is tested in simulation on a group of UAVs whose model is treated as a double integrator. Test results for the different cases are presented.

  9. An In-situ materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) diagnostic to study particle density control and hydrogenic fuel retention in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Allain, Jean-Paul

    2014-09-05

    A new materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) was designed, constructed and tested to develop understanding of particle control and hydrogenic fuel retention in lithium-based plasma-facing surfaces in NSTX. The novel feature of MAPP is an in-situ tool to probe the divertor NSTX floor during LLD and lithium-coating shots with subsequent transport to a post-exposure in-vacuo surface analysis chamber to measure D retention. In addition, the implications of a lithiated graphite-dominated plasma-surface environment in NSTX on LLD performance, operation and ultimately hydrogenic pumping and particle control capability are investigated in this proposal. MAPP will be an invaluable tool for erosion/redeposition simulation code validation.

  10. Performance analysis of a semiactive suspension system with particle swarm optimization and fuzzy logic control.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Abroon Jamal; de Silva, Clarence W; Khan, Afzal; Khan, Muhammad Tahir

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a quarter model of an automobile having passive and semiactive suspension systems to develop a scheme for an optimal suspension controller. Semi-active suspension is preferred over passive and active suspensions with regard to optimum performance within the constraints of weight and operational cost. A fuzzy logic controller is incorporated into the semi-active suspension system. It is able to handle nonlinearities through the use of heuristic rules. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is applied to determine the optimal gain parameters for the fuzzy logic controller, while maintaining within the normalized ranges of the controller inputs and output. The performance of resulting optimized system is compared with different systems that use various control algorithms, including a conventional passive system, choice options of feedback signals, and damping coefficient limits. Also, the optimized semi-active suspension system is evaluated for its performance in relation to variation in payload. Furthermore, the systems are compared with respect to the attributes of road handling and ride comfort. In all the simulation studies it is found that the optimized fuzzy logic controller surpasses the other types of control.

  11. Performance Analysis of a Semiactive Suspension System with Particle Swarm Optimization and Fuzzy Logic Control

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Abroon Jamal; de Silva, Clarence W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses a quarter model of an automobile having passive and semiactive suspension systems to develop a scheme for an optimal suspension controller. Semi-active suspension is preferred over passive and active suspensions with regard to optimum performance within the constraints of weight and operational cost. A fuzzy logic controller is incorporated into the semi-active suspension system. It is able to handle nonlinearities through the use of heuristic rules. Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is applied to determine the optimal gain parameters for the fuzzy logic controller, while maintaining within the normalized ranges of the controller inputs and output. The performance of resulting optimized system is compared with different systems that use various control algorithms, including a conventional passive system, choice options of feedback signals, and damping coefficient limits. Also, the optimized semi-active suspension system is evaluated for its performance in relation to variation in payload. Furthermore, the systems are compared with respect to the attributes of road handling and ride comfort. In all the simulation studies it is found that the optimized fuzzy logic controller surpasses the other types of control. PMID:24574868

  12. Silver ion mediated shape control of platinum nanoparticles: Removal of silver by selective etching leads to increased catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Grass, Michael E.; Yue, Yao; Habas, Susan E.; Rioux, Robert M.; Teall, Chelsea I.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-01-09

    A procedure has been developed for the selective etching of Ag from Pt nanoparticles of well-defined shape, resulting in the formation of elementally-pure Pt cubes, cuboctahedra, or octahedra, with a largest vertex-to-vertex distance of {approx}9.5 nm from Ag-modified Pt nanoparticles. A nitric acid etching process was applied Pt nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica, as well as nanoparticles dispersed in aqueous solution. The characterization of the silica-supported particles by XRD, TEM, and N{sub 2} adsorption measurements demonstrated that the structure of the nanoparticles and the mesoporous support remained conserved during etching in concentrated nitric acid. Both elemental analysis and ethylene hydrogenation indicated etching of Ag is only effective when [HNO{sub 3}] {ge} 7 M; below this concentration, the removal of Ag is only {approx}10%. Ethylene hydrogenation activity increased by four orders of magnitude after the etching of Pt octahedra that contained the highest fraction of silver. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the unsupported particles after etching demonstrated that etching does not alter the surface structure of the Pt nanoparticles. High [HNO{sub 3}] led to the decomposition of the capping agent, polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP); infrared spectroscopy confirmed that many decomposition products were present on the surface during etching, including carbon monoxide.

  13. Mathematical model for internal pH control in immobilized enzyme particles

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, J.K.; Rousseau, I.

    1986-10-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for the internal pH control in immobilized enzyme particles. This model describes the kinetics of a coupled system of two enzymes, immobilized in particles of either planar, cylindrical, or spherical shape. The enzyme kinetics are assumed to be of a mixed type, including Michaelis-Menten kinetics, uncompetitive substrate inhibition, and competitive and noncompetitive product inhibition. In a case study we have considered the enzyme combination urease and penicillin acylase, whose kinetics are coupled through the pH dependence of the kinetic parameters. The hydrolysis of urea by urease yields ammonia and carbon dioxide, whereas benzylpenicillin (Pen-G) is converted to 6-animo penicillanic acid and phenyl acetic acid by penicillin acylase. The production of acids by the latter enzyme will cause a decrease in pH. Because of the presence of the ammonia-carbon dioxide system, however, the pH may be kept under control. In order to obtain information about the optimum performance of this enzymatic pH controller, we have computed the effectiveness factor and the conversion in a CSTR at different enzyme loadings. The results of the computer simulations indicate that a high conversion of Pen-G may be achieved (80-90%) at bulk pH values of about 7.5 - 8. 27 references.

  14. MIMO regulation control design for magnetic steering of a ferromagnetic particle inside a fluidic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, Sepideh; Behrad Khamesee, Mir; Khajepour, Amir

    2015-10-01

    As an important development of medical instrumentation, minimally invasive therapeutic operations have been recently introduced. The foremost element of minimally invasive techniques is navigating a micro-device through human body, especially inside blood vessels. A remote actuation over the micro-device is normally provided by electromagnetic actuators. In most applications, a control scheme is also required to initiate the actuation force, the magnetic propulsion, such that at every time step, the micro-device moves towards or along a given path. This paper contributes in development of the electromagnetic system model mostly used in magnetic navigation systems to be representable in control affine form. Next, a multi-input multi-output (MIMO) trajectory tracking controller is designed to conduct the auto-navigation of the device along a given path. This method is a generalised version of a 'semi-global nonlinear output regulation' introduced for single-input single-output (SISO) systems. Finally, the proposed scheme is examined for an iron particle moving in a fluidic environment. The simulation results show fast decay in deviation of the particle position from the reference path under some assumptions. This shows that the proposed scheme can be offered for medical applications.

  15. Controlled removal of ceramic surfaces with combination of ions implantation and ultrasonic energy

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Rankin, Janet; Thevenard, Paul; Romana, Laurence J.

    1995-01-01

    A method for tailoring or patterning the surface of ceramic articles is provided by implanting ions to predetermined depth into the ceramic material at a selected surface location with the ions being implanted at a fluence and energy adequate to damage the lattice structure of the ceramic material for bi-axially straining near-surface regions of the ceramic material to the predetermined depth. The resulting metastable near-surface regions of the ceramic material are then contacted with energy pulses from collapsing, ultrasonically-generated cavitation bubbles in a liquid medium for removing to a selected depth the ion-damaged near-surface regions containing the bi-axially strained lattice structure from the ceramic body. Additional patterning of the selected surface location on the ceramic body is provided by implanting a high fluence of high-energy, relatively-light ions at selected surface sites for relaxing the bi-axial strain in the near-surface regions defined by these sites and thereby preventing the removal of such ion-implanted sites by the energy pulses from the collapsing ultrasonic cavitation bubbles.

  16. Controlled Contamination of Epoxy Composites with PDMS and Removal by Laser Ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmieri, Frank; Ledesma, Rodolfo; Cataldo, Daniel; Lin, Yi; Wohl, Christopher; Gupta, Mool; Connell, John

    2016-01-01

    Surface preparation is critical to the performance of adhesively bonded composites. During manufacturing, minute quantities of mold release compounds are inevitably deposited on faying surfaces and may compromise bond performance. To ensure safety, mechanical fasteners and other crack arrest features must be installed in the bondlines of primary structures, which negates some advantages of adhesively bonded construction. Laser ablation is an automated, repeatable, and scalable process with high potential for the surface preparation of metals and composites in critical applications such as primary airframe structures. In this study, laser ablation is evaluated on composite surfaces for the removal of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a common mold release material. Composite panels were contaminated uniformly with PDMS film thicknesses as low as 6.0 nm as measured by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. Bond performance was assessed by mechanical testing using a 250 F cure, epoxy adhesive and compared with pre-bond surface inspection results. Water contact angle, optically stimulated electron emission, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy were used to characterize contaminated and laser ablated surfaces. The failure mode obtained from double cantilever beam tests correlated well with surface characterization data. The test results indicated that even low levels of PDMS were not completely removed by laser ablation.

  17. Optimal control of switched linear systems based on Migrant Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fuqiang; Wang, Yongji; Zheng, Zongzhun; Li, Chuanfeng

    2009-10-01

    The optimal control problem for switched linear systems with internally forced switching has more constraints than with externally forced switching. Heavy computations and slow convergence in solving this problem is a major obstacle. In this paper we describe a new approach for solving this problem, which is called Migrant Particle Swarm Optimization (Migrant PSO). Imitating the behavior of a flock of migrant birds, the Migrant PSO applies naturally to both continuous and discrete spaces, in which definitive optimization algorithm and stochastic search method are combined. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is illustrated via a numerical example.

  18. Nonaqueous magnetic nanoparticle suspensions with controlled particle size and nuclear magnetic resonance properties.

    PubMed

    Meledandri, Carla J; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Brougham, Dermot F

    2008-12-16

    We report the preparation of monodisperse maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticle suspensions in heptane, by thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine surfactants. By varying the surfactant/Fe precursor mole ratio during synthesis, control was exerted both over the nanocrystal core size, in the range from 3 to 6 nm, and over the magnetic properties of the resulting nanoparticle dispersions. We report field-cycling 1H NMR relaxation analysis of the superparamagnetic relaxation rate enhancement of nonaqueous suspensions for the first time. This approach permits measurement of the relaxivity and provides information on the saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy energy of the suspended particles. The saturation magnetization was found to be in the expected range for maghemite particles of this size. The anisotropy energy was found to increase significantly with decreasing particle size, which we attribute to increased shape anisotropy. This study can be used as a guide for the synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles with selected magnetic properties for a given application.

  19. Effect of initial pH control on biological phosphorus removal induced by the aerobic/extended-idle regime.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Zheng, Wei; Liao, Dexiang; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guangming

    2013-02-01

    Recently, it has been reported that biological phosphorus removal (BPR) can be induced by an aerobic/extended-idle (AEI) regime. This study further investigated the effect of initial pH ranging from 6.6 to 8.2 on BPR in the AEI process, and compared the BPR performance between the AEI and the anaerobic/oxic (A/O) regimes under their optimal initial pH value. Experimental results firstly showed that phosphorus removal linearly increased with initial pH increasing from 6.6 to 7.8, but slightly decreased when initial pH increased from 7.8 to 8.2. The optimal initial pH should be controlled at 7.8, and the phosphorus removal at initial pH 7.8 was approximately 1.7-time than that at initial pH 6.6. The mechanism studies showed that the biomass cultured at initial pH 7.8 contained more polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs), lower glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs), and had higher activities of exopolyphosphatase and polyphosphate kinase than that cultured at initial pH 6.6. Cyclic studies revealed that initial pH control affected the transformations of intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoates and glycogen, which might thereby influence microbial competition between PAOs and GAOs. Then, BPR performance between the AEI and the A/O regimes by adjusting initial pH at 7.8 was also compared. The results showed the AEI regime could drive a better BPR than the generally accepted A/O regime (98% vs 88%). Finally, controlling initial pH at 7.8 to promote BPR in the AEI process was confirmed for a municipal wastewater.

  20. UV254 absorbance as real-time monitoring and control parameter for micropollutant removal in advanced wastewater treatment with powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Johannes; Massa, Lukas; Sperlich, Alexander; Gnirss, Regina; Jekel, Martin

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the applicability of UV absorbance measurements at 254 nm (UVA254) to serve as a simple and reliable surrogate parameter to monitor and control the removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) in advanced wastewater treatment applying powdered activated carbon (PAC). Correlations between OMP removal and corresponding UVA254 reduction were determined in lab-scale adsorption batch tests and successfully applied to a pilot-scale PAC treatment stage to predict OMP removals in aggregate samples with good accuracy. Real-time UVA254 measurements were utilized to evaluate adapted PAC dosing strategies and proved to be effective for online monitoring of OMP removal. Furthermore, active PAC dosing control according to differential UVA254 measurements was implemented and tested. While precise removal predictions based on real-time measurements were not accurate for all OMPs, UVA254-controlled dynamic PAC dosing was capable of achieving stable OMP removals. UVA254 can serve as an effective surrogate parameter for OMP removal in technical PAC applications. Even though the applicability as control parameter to adjust PAC dosing to water quality changes might be limited to applications with fast response between PAC adjustment and adsorptive removal (e.g. direct filtration), UVA254 measurements can also be used to monitor the adsorption efficiency in more complex PAC applications. PMID:26963606

  1. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  2. Particle-wave duality and coherent instability control in dense gas-solid flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Liu, Y. Y.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-02-01

    The collective effect of transport behaviors in a multibody system can either drastically enhance or deteriorate system performance depending on the nature of the internal interactions (i.e., constructive or deconstructive) and the structure established. For most powder processes, flow instability leads to poor performance. Control strategies have been attempted previously, but with limited success. The ability to drive such a system that is far from equilibrium into its 'ordered' state by tuning the interactions can effectively reduce internal energy dissipation, which may lead to a technological breakthrough. By using a hybrid dynamics simulation and multiphase flow experiments, we will first elucidate two fundamental mechanisms underlying flow instabilities in a dense gas-solid flow: nonlinear drag and collisional dissipation. Then we clarify how gas-fluidized particles exhibit 'particle-wave' duality (e.g., exhibit standing waves in a thin layer of granular bed that are driven by superimposed oscillating air, when the exciting frequencies of the oscillating air match the system's natural frequency). On this basis, we show experimentally that dense gas-fluidized granules can be synchronized into 'ordered' structures by developing an adaptively exciting fluid wave. The introduction of an additional fluid wave enables the flow structures to be fine-tuned. Our method results in remarkably improved fluidization: highly expanded particulate beds with significantly suppressed gas bubble formation (for coarse particles) and channel formation (for ultra-fine powders), as has always prevailed in conventional dense gas-particle systems. By applying our methodology to several systems that are normally difficult to fluidize, we achieve unprecedented, well-controlled suspension of solids in gas flow. A scientific understanding of complex, dense gas-solid flows should enable the dispersion of solids in the gas flow to be controlled effectively. This work contributes to the

  3. Configurations and control of magnetic fields for manipulating magnetic particles in microfluidic applications: magnet systems and manipulation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Quanliang; Han, Xiaotao; Li, Liang

    2014-08-01

    The use of a magnetic field for manipulating the motion of magnetic particles in microchannels has attracted increasing attention in microfluidic applications. Generation of a flexible and controllable magnetic field plays a crucial role in making better use of the particle manipulation technology. Recent advances in the development of magnet systems and magnetic field control methods have shown that it has great potential for effective and accurate manipulation of particles in microfluidic systems. Starting with the analysis of magnetic forces acting on the particles, this review gives the configurations and evaluations of three main types of magnet system proposed in microfluidic applications. The interaction mechanisms of magnetic particles with magnetic fields are also discussed.

  4. Control of degreening in postharvest green sour citrus fruit by electrostatic atomized water particles.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Naoki; Takamura, Kohtaro; Shigyo, Masayoshi; Migita, Catharina Taiko; Masuda, Yukihiro; Maekawa, Tetsuya

    2014-08-01

    The effect of electrostatic atomized water particles (EAWP) on degreening of green sour citrus fruit during storage was determined. Superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals included in EAWP were present on the surface of the fruit peel after the treatment. Hydrogen peroxide was formed from EAWP in an aqueous solution, which could indicate that a hydroxyl radical of EAWP turns to hydrogen peroxide in the fruit flavedo as well as in the aqueous solution. EAWP treatment effectively suppressed the degreening of green yuzu and Nagato-yuzukichi fruits during storage at 20°C. The enhancement in K+ ion leakage of both EAWP-treated fruits reduced in comparison with the control. In spite of EAWP treatment, total peroxide level in both fruits showed almost no changes during storage, suggesting that hydrogen peroxide formed by EAWP treatment could stimulate the activation of hydrogen peroxide scavenging system and control degreening of these fruits during storage. PMID:24629952

  5. LETTER: Self-organized pattern formation and noise-induced control based on particle computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohlf, Thimo; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2005-12-01

    We propose a new non-equilibrium model for spatial pattern formation based on local information transfer. Unlike most standard models of pattern formation it is not based on the Turing instability or initially laid down morphogen gradients. Information is transmitted through the system via particle-like excitations whose collective dynamics results in pattern formation and control. Here, a simple problem of domain formation is addressed by means of this model in an implementation as stochastic cellular automata, and then generalized to a system of coupled dynamical networks. One observes stable pattern formation, even in the presence of noise and cell flow. Noise contributes through the production of quasi-particles to de novo pattern formation as well as to robust control of the domain boundary position. Pattern proportions are scale independent as regards system size. The dynamics of pattern formation is stable over large parameter ranges, with a discontinuity at vanishing noise and a second-order phase transition at increased cell flow.

  6. Removal of electrostatic artifacts in magnetic force microscopy by controlled magnetization of the tip: application to superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Angeloni, Livia; Passeri, Daniele; Reggente, Melania; Mantovani, Diego; Rossi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been demonstrated as valuable technique for the characterization of magnetic nanomaterials. To be analyzed by MFM techniques, nanomaterials are generally deposited on flat substrates, resulting in an additional contrast in MFM images due to unavoidable heterogeneous electrostatic tip-sample interactions, which cannot be easily distinguished from the magnetic one. In order to correctly interpret MFM data, a method to remove the electrostatic contributions from MFM images is needed. In this work, we propose a new MFM technique, called controlled magnetization MFM (CM-MFM), based on the in situ control of the probe magnetization state, which allows the evaluation and the elimination of electrostatic contribution in MFM images. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated through a challenging case study, i.e., the analysis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in absence of applied external magnetic field. Our CM-MFM technique allowed us to acquire magnetic images depurated of the electrostatic contributions, which revealed that the magnetic field generated by the tip is sufficient to completely orient the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and that the magnetic tip-sample interaction is describable through simple models once the electrostatic artifacts are removed. PMID:27194591

  7. Removal of electrostatic artifacts in magnetic force microscopy by controlled magnetization of the tip: application to superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Livia; Passeri, Daniele; Reggente, Melania; Mantovani, Diego; Rossi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been demonstrated as valuable technique for the characterization of magnetic nanomaterials. To be analyzed by MFM techniques, nanomaterials are generally deposited on flat substrates, resulting in an additional contrast in MFM images due to unavoidable heterogeneous electrostatic tip-sample interactions, which cannot be easily distinguished from the magnetic one. In order to correctly interpret MFM data, a method to remove the electrostatic contributions from MFM images is needed. In this work, we propose a new MFM technique, called controlled magnetization MFM (CM-MFM), based on the in situ control of the probe magnetization state, which allows the evaluation and the elimination of electrostatic contribution in MFM images. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated through a challenging case study, i.e., the analysis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in absence of applied external magnetic field. Our CM-MFM technique allowed us to acquire magnetic images depurated of the electrostatic contributions, which revealed that the magnetic field generated by the tip is sufficient to completely orient the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and that the magnetic tip-sample interaction is describable through simple models once the electrostatic artifacts are removed. PMID:27194591

  8. TIM-4, a Receptor for Phosphatidylserine, Controls Adaptive Immunity by Regulating the Removal of Antigen-Specific T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Albacker, Lee A.; Karisola, Piia; Chang, Ya-Jen; Umetsu, Sarah E.; Zhou, Meixia; Akbari, Omid; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Baumgarth, Nicole; Freeman, Gordon J.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is characterized by the expansion of an Ag-specific T cell population following Ag exposure. The precise mechanisms, however, that control the expansion and subsequent contraction in the number of Ag-specific T cells are not fully understood. We show that T cell/transmembrane, Ig, and mucin (TIM)-4, a receptor for phosphatidylserine, a marker of apoptotic cells, regulates adaptive immunity in part by mediating the removal of Ag-specific T cells during the contraction phase of the response. During Ag immunization or during infection with influenza A virus, blockade of TIM-4 on APCs increased the expansion of Ag-specific T cells, resulting in an increase in secondary immune responses. Conversely, overexpression of TIM-4 on APCs in transgenic mice reduced the number of Ag-specific T cells that remained after immunization, resulting in reduced secondary T cell responses. There was no change in the total number of cell divisions that T cells completed, no change in the per cell proliferative capacity of the remaining Ag-specific T cells, and no increase in the development of Ag-specific regulatory T cells in TIM-4 transgenic mice. Thus, TIM-4–expressing cells regulate adaptive immunity by mediating the removal of phosphatidylserine-expressing apoptotic, Ag-specific T cells, thereby controlling the number of Ag-specific T cells that remain after the clearance of Ag or infection. PMID:21037090

  9. Removal of electrostatic artifacts in magnetic force microscopy by controlled magnetization of the tip: application to superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeloni, Livia; Passeri, Daniele; Reggente, Melania; Mantovani, Diego; Rossi, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been demonstrated as valuable technique for the characterization of magnetic nanomaterials. To be analyzed by MFM techniques, nanomaterials are generally deposited on flat substrates, resulting in an additional contrast in MFM images due to unavoidable heterogeneous electrostatic tip-sample interactions, which cannot be easily distinguished from the magnetic one. In order to correctly interpret MFM data, a method to remove the electrostatic contributions from MFM images is needed. In this work, we propose a new MFM technique, called controlled magnetization MFM (CM-MFM), based on the in situ control of the probe magnetization state, which allows the evaluation and the elimination of electrostatic contribution in MFM images. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated through a challenging case study, i.e., the analysis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in absence of applied external magnetic field. Our CM-MFM technique allowed us to acquire magnetic images depurated of the electrostatic contributions, which revealed that the magnetic field generated by the tip is sufficient to completely orient the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and that the magnetic tip-sample interaction is describable through simple models once the electrostatic artifacts are removed.

  10. Removal of electrostatic artifacts in magnetic force microscopy by controlled magnetization of the tip: application to superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Angeloni, Livia; Passeri, Daniele; Reggente, Melania; Mantovani, Diego; Rossi, Marco

    2016-05-19

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has been demonstrated as valuable technique for the characterization of magnetic nanomaterials. To be analyzed by MFM techniques, nanomaterials are generally deposited on flat substrates, resulting in an additional contrast in MFM images due to unavoidable heterogeneous electrostatic tip-sample interactions, which cannot be easily distinguished from the magnetic one. In order to correctly interpret MFM data, a method to remove the electrostatic contributions from MFM images is needed. In this work, we propose a new MFM technique, called controlled magnetization MFM (CM-MFM), based on the in situ control of the probe magnetization state, which allows the evaluation and the elimination of electrostatic contribution in MFM images. The effectiveness of the technique is demonstrated through a challenging case study, i.e., the analysis of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in absence of applied external magnetic field. Our CM-MFM technique allowed us to acquire magnetic images depurated of the electrostatic contributions, which revealed that the magnetic field generated by the tip is sufficient to completely orient the superparamagnetic nanoparticles and that the magnetic tip-sample interaction is describable through simple models once the electrostatic artifacts are removed.

  11. Spatial control of chromosomal location in a live cell with functionalized magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Juhee; Purwar, Prashant; Cha, Misun; Lee, Junghoon

    2015-11-01

    Long-range chromosomal travel is a phenomenon unique to cell division. Methods for non-invasive, artificial manipulation of chromosomes, such as optical or magnetic tweezers, have difficulty in producing the motion of whole chromosomes in live cells. Here, we report the spatial control of chromosomes over 10 μm in a live mouse oocyte using magnetic particles driven by an external magnetic field. Selective capture of the chromosomes was achieved using antibodies specific for histone H1 in the chromosome that were conjugated to magnetic particles (H1-BMPs). When an external magnetic field was applied, the chromosomes captured by the H1-BMPs traveled through the cytosol and accumulated near the cell membrane though the movement of the chromosomes captured by H1-BMPs was strongly disturbed by the distribution of the cytoskeleton (e.g. actin filaments). Being non-invasive in nature, our approach will enable new opportunities in the remote manipulation of subcellular elements.Long-range chromosomal travel is a phenomenon unique to cell division. Methods for non-invasive, artificial manipulation of chromosomes, such as optical or magnetic tweezers, have difficulty in producing the motion of whole chromosomes in live cells. Here, we report the spatial control of chromosomes over 10 μm in a live mouse oocyte using magnetic particles driven by an external magnetic field. Selective capture of the chromosomes was achieved using antibodies specific for histone H1 in the chromosome that were conjugated to magnetic particles (H1-BMPs). When an external magnetic field was applied, the chromosomes captured by the H1-BMPs traveled through the cytosol and accumulated near the cell membrane though the movement of the chromosomes captured by H1-BMPs was strongly disturbed by the distribution of the cytoskeleton (e.g. actin filaments). Being non-invasive in nature, our approach will enable new opportunities in the remote manipulation of subcellular elements. Electronic supplementary

  12. The effect of electrical properties for InGaN and InN by high-energy particle irradiation (notice of removal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shao-guang; Fan, Guang-han

    2008-03-01

    This paper (SPIE Paper 68411H) was removed from the SPIE Digital Library on 8 August 2008 upon discovery that the paper has substantially plagiarized the following two papers: R.E. Jones, S.X. Li, L. Hsu, K.M. Yu, W. Walukiewicz, Z. Liliental-Weber, J.W. Ager III, E.E. Haller, H. Lu, and W.J. Schaff, "Native-defect-controlled n-type conductivity in InN," Physica B 376-377 (2006) 436-439 and S.X. Li, K.M. Yu, J. Wu, R.E. Jones, W. Walukiewicz, J.W. Ager III, W. Shan, E.E. Haller, Hai Lu, and William J. Schaff, "Native defects in InxGa1-xN alloys," Physica B 376-377 (2006) 432-435. As stated in the SPIE Publication Ethics Guidelines, "SPIE defines plagiarism as the reuse of someone else's prior ideas, processes, results, or words without explicit attribution of the original author and source, or falsely representing someone else's work as one's own. Unauthorized use of another researcher's unpublished data or findings without permission is considered to be a form of plagiarism even if the source is attributed. SPIE considers plagiarism in any form, at any level, to be unacceptable and a serious breach of professional conduct." It is SPIE policy to remove such papers and to provide citations to original sources so that interested readers can obtain the information directly from those sources. One of the authors, Shao-guang Dong, accepts full responsibility and apologizes for this plagiarism and has absolved the second author, Guang-han Fan, of any prior knowledge of or professional misconduct in this matter. Guang-han Fan also states that he had not previously seen the paper or given permission to include his name as an author.

  13. Dynamic axial control over optically levitating particles in air with an electrically-tunable variable-focus lens.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenguo; Eckerskorn, Niko; Upadhya, Avinash; Li, Li; Rode, Andrei V; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-07-01

    Efficient delivery of viruses, proteins and biological macromelecules into a micrometer-sized focal spot of an XFEL beam for coherent diffraction imaging inspired new development in touch-free particle injection methods in gaseous and vacuum environments. This paper lays out our ongoing effort in constructing an all-optical particle delivery approach that uses piconewton photophoretic and femtonewton light-pressure forces to control particle delivery into the XFEL beam. We combine a spatial light modulator (SLM) and an electrically tunable lens (ETL) to construct a variable-divergence vortex beam providing dynamic and stable positioning of levitated micrometer-size particles, under normal atmospheric pressure. A sensorless wavefront correction approach is used to reduce optical aberrations to generate a high quality vortex beam for particle manipulation. As a proof of concept, stable manipulation of optically-controlled axial motion of trapped particles is demonstrated with a response time of 100ms. In addition, modulation of trapping intensity provides a measure of the mass of a single, isolated particle. The driving signal of this oscillatory motion can potentially be phase-locked to an external timing signal enabling synchronization of particle delivery into the x-ray focus with XFEL pulse train. PMID:27446715

  14. Dynamic axial control over optically levitating particles in air with an electrically-tunable variable-focus lens

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenguo; Eckerskorn, Niko; Upadhya, Avinash; Li, Li; Rode, Andrei V.; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-01-01

    Efficient delivery of viruses, proteins and biological macromelecules into a micrometer-sized focal spot of an XFEL beam for coherent diffraction imaging inspired new development in touch-free particle injection methods in gaseous and vacuum environments. This paper lays out our ongoing effort in constructing an all-optical particle delivery approach that uses piconewton photophoretic and femtonewton light-pressure forces to control particle delivery into the XFEL beam. We combine a spatial light modulator (SLM) and an electrically tunable lens (ETL) to construct a variable-divergence vortex beam providing dynamic and stable positioning of levitated micrometer-size particles, under normal atmospheric pressure. A sensorless wavefront correction approach is used to reduce optical aberrations to generate a high quality vortex beam for particle manipulation. As a proof of concept, stable manipulation of optically-controlled axial motion of trapped particles is demonstrated with a response time of 100ms. In addition, modulation of trapping intensity provides a measure of the mass of a single, isolated particle. The driving signal of this oscillatory motion can potentially be phase-locked to an external timing signal enabling synchronization of particle delivery into the x-ray focus with XFEL pulse train. PMID:27446715

  15. The ``coffee-ring effect'' as a way to remove pollutants and control drying rate in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keita, Emmanuel; Faure, Paméla; Rodts, Stéphane; Weitz, David A.; Coussot, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Due to the transport of elements they induce imbibition-drying cycles are known to play a major role in the colloid-facilitated transport in soils and building materials. We study the drying of a colloidal suspension in a porous media. The critical physical phenomenon at work here is the displacement and redistribution of colloidal particles or ions induced by evaporation of the liquid phase from the porous medium. This can be clearly seen by filling a bead packing with coffee. Indeed after full drying the sample has shaded tones with darker regions around the sample free surface and white regions almost free of particles around the bottom. The mechanisms are not yet fully understood and there is no straightforward observation and simple quantification of the spreading of the elements. Using a new MRI technique to look at a complex porous media with colloidal particles in suspension in water we show that the drying of a porous medium filled with elements in the advection regime develops a specific coffee-ring effect. We can quantify how the elements migrate towards the free surface of the sample and accumulate in the remaining liquid films. Our complete understanding of the process makes it possible to establish a simple model predicting the drying rate and the concentration distribution. This opens the way to a control of salt or colloid transport and drying rate of soils and building materials.

  16. Optimal control system design of an acid gas removal unit for an IGCC power plants with CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Turton, R.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01

    Future IGCC plants with CO{sub 2} capture should be operated optimally in the face of disturbances without violating operational and environmental constraints. To achieve this goal, a systematic approach is taken in this work to design the control system of a selective, dual-stage Selexol-based acid gas removal (AGR) unit for a commercial-scale integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The control system design is performed in two stages with the objective of minimizing the auxiliary power while satisfying operational and environmental constraints in the presence of measured and unmeasured disturbances. In the first stage of the control system design, a top-down analysis is used to analyze degrees of freedom, define an operational objective, identify important disturbances and operational/environmental constraints, and select the control variables. With the degrees of freedom, the process is optimized with relation to the operational objective at nominal operation as well as under the disturbances identified. Operational and environmental constraints active at all operations are chosen as control variables. From the results of the optimization studies, self-optimizing control variables are identified for further examination. Several methods are explored in this work for the selection of these self-optimizing control variables. Modifications made to the existing methods will be discussed in this presentation. Due to the very large number of candidate sets available for control variables and due to the complexity of the underlying optimization problem, solution of this problem is computationally expensive. For reducing the computation time, parallel computing is performed using the Distributed Computing Server (DCS®) and the Parallel Computing® toolbox from Mathworks®. The second stage is a bottom-up design of the control layers used for the operation of the process. First, the regulatory control layer is

  17. Trophic cascades in a cranberry marsh: Can detritus-removal improve biological control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological pest control is predicated on the concept that plants are protected when carnivores suppress herbivore populations. However, many factors, including detritus-based food-chains, may re-shape the effectiveness of predators in a given agro ecosystem. The addition of detrital subsidies, such ...

  18. Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein N.

    1988-01-01

    An improved reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for a sodium cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The sodium cooled nuclear reactor is of the type having a reactor vessel liner separating the reactor hot pool on the upstream side of an intermediate heat exchanger and the reactor cold pool on the downstream side of the intermediate heat exchanger. The improvement includes a flow path across the reactor vessel liner flow gap which dissipates core heat across the reactor vessel and containment vessel responsive to a casualty including the loss of normal heat removal paths and associated shutdown of the main coolant liquid sodium pumps. In normal operation, the reactor vessel cold pool is inlet to the suction side of coolant liquid sodium pumps, these pumps being of the electromagnetic variety. The pumps discharge through the core into the reactor hot pool and then through an intermediate heat exchanger where the heat generated in the reactor core is discharged. Upon outlet from the heat exchanger, the sodium is returned to the reactor cold pool. The improvement includes placing a jet pump across the reactor vessel liner flow gap, pumping a small flow of liquid sodium from the lower pressure cold pool into the hot pool. The jet pump has a small high pressure driving stream diverted from the high pressure side of the reactor pumps. During normal operation, the jet pumps supplement the normal reactor pressure differential from the lower pressure cold pool to the hot pool. Upon the occurrence of a casualty involving loss of coolant pump pressure, and immediate cooling circuit is established by the back flow of sodium through the jet pumps from the reactor vessel hot pool to the reactor vessel cold pool. The cooling circuit includes flow into the reactor vessel liner flow gap immediate the reactor vessel wall and containment vessel where optimum and immediate discharge of residual reactor heat occurs.

  19. Lessons learnt from the application of a multi-variable controller for nitrogen removal in the Mekolalde wastewater treatment plant: good simulation practices in control.

    PubMed

    Irizar, I; Beltrán, S; Urchegui, G; Izko, G; Fernández, O; Maiza, M

    2014-01-01

    Although often perceived as tools for use by scientists, mathematical modelling and simulation become indispensable when control engineers have to design controllers for real-life wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Nonetheless, the design of effective controllers in the wastewater domain using simulations requires effects, such as the nonlinearity of actuators, the time response of sensors, plant model uncertainties, etc. to have been reproduced beforehand. Otherwise, control solutions verified by simulation can completely underperform under real conditions. This study demonstrates that, when all the above effects are included at the outset, a systematic use of simulations guarantees high quality controllers in a relatively short period of time. The above is exemplified through the Mekolalde WWTP, where a comprehensive simulation study was conducted in order to develop a control product for nitrogen removal. Since its activation in May 2011, the designed controller has been permanently working in the plant which, from this time onwards, has experienced significant improvements in the quality of water discharges combined with a lower utilization of electricity for wastewater treatment. PMID:24647196

  20. Observation of Hamiltonian chaos and its control in wave particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doveil, F.; Macor, A.; Aïssi, A.

    2007-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions are central in plasma physics. They can be studied in a traveling wave tube (TWT) to avoid intrinsic plasma noise. This led to detailed experimental analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and an either cold or warm beam. More recently a test cold electron beam has been used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s). The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is recorded with a trochoidal energy analyzer at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave responsible for Landau damping is observed. The resonant velocity domain associated with a single wave is also observed, as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a 'devil's staircase' behavior when increasing the excitation amplitude in agreement with numerical simulation. A new strategy for control of chaos by building barriers of transport which prevent electrons from escaping from a given velocity region as well as its robustness are successfully tested. The underlying concepts extend far beyond the field of electron devices and plasma physics.

  1. Surfactant-Assisted Nanocrystalline Zinc Coordination Polymers: Controlled Particle Sizes and Synergistic Effects in Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Wang, Huarui; Wang, Xiaolu; Gao, Kuan; Wu, Jie; Hou, Hongwei; Fan, Yaoting

    2016-04-25

    Different morphologies and particle sizes of two crystalline zinc-based coordination polymers (CPs), [Zn(pytz)H2 O]n (1; H2 pytz=2,6-bis(tetrazole)pyridine) and [Zn2 (pytz)2 4 H2 O] (2), from the bulk scale to the nanoscale, could be obtained under solvothermal conditions with different surfactants (polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) 2000) as templates. PVP and PEG 2000 could act as capping and structure-directing agents, respectively, to influence the growth of crystalline particles and control their sizes. CP 1 exhibits a two-dimensional framework with window-like units and 2 shows a bimetallic structure. Nanocrystalline 1 and 2 were used as heterogeneous catalysts to study how adjacent catalytic active sites synergistically effected their catalytic reactivities in the direct catalytic conversion of aromatic dinitriles into oxazolines. The results showed that 1 produced bis-oxazolines as the sole products, whereas 2 gave the mono-oxazolines as the major products under the same reaction conditions. PMID:26997347

  2. Particle designs for the stabilization and controlled-delivery of protein drugs by biopolymers: a case study on insulin.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hui-Peng; Tey, Beng-Ti; Chan, Eng-Seng

    2014-07-28

    Natural biopolymers have attracted considerable interest for the development of delivery systems for protein drugs owing to their biocompatibility, non-toxicity, renewability and mild processing conditions. This paper offers an overview of the current status and future perspectives of particle designs using biopolymers for the stabilization and controlled-delivery of a model protein drug--insulin. We first describe the design criteria for polymeric encapsulation and subsequently classify the basic principles of particle fabrication as well as the existing particle designs for oral insulin encapsulation. The performances of these existing particle designs in terms of insulin stability and in vitro release behavior in acidic and alkaline media, as well as their in vivo performance are compared and reviewed. This review forms the basis for future works on the optimization of particle design and material formulation for the development of an improved oral delivery system for protein drugs.

  3. Stimuli-responsive controlled growth of mono- and bidimensional particles from basic zirconium sulfate hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Alves Rosa, M A; Sanhueza, C S S; Santilli, C V; Pulcinelli, S H; Briois, V

    2008-07-31

    A thermostimulated sol-gel transition in a system prepared by mixing a ZrOCl(2) acidified solution to a hot H(2)SO(4) aqueous solution was studied by dynamic rheological measurements and quasi-elastic light scattering. The effect of temperature and of molar ratio R(S) = [Zr]/[SO(4)] on the gelation kinetics was analyzed using the mass fractal aggregate growth model. This study shows that the linear growth of aggregates occurs at the early period of transformation, while bidimensional growth occurs at the advanced stage. The bidimensional growth can be shifted toward monodimensional growth by decreasing the aggregation rate by controlling the temperature and/or molar ratio R(S). EXAFS and Raman results gave evidence that the linear chain growth is supported by covalent sulfate bonding between primary building blocks. At the advanced stage of aggregation, the assembly of linear chains through hydrogen bonding gave rise to the growth of bidimensional particles.

  4. Controlled collisions for multi-particle entanglement of optically trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Mandel, Olaf; Greiner, Markus; Widera, Artur; Rom, Tim; Hänsch, Theodor W; Bloch, Immanuel

    2003-10-30

    Entanglement lies at the heart of quantum mechanics, and in recent years has been identified as an essential resource for quantum information processing and computation. The experimentally challenging production of highly entangled multi-particle states is therefore important for investigating both fundamental physics and practical applications. Here we report the creation of highly entangled states of neutral atoms trapped in the periodic potential of an optical lattice. Controlled collisions between individual neighbouring atoms are used to realize an array of quantum gates, with massively parallel operation. We observe a coherent entangling-disentangling evolution in the many-body system, depending on the phase shift acquired during the collision between neighbouring atoms. Such dynamics are indicative of highly entangled many-body states; moreover, these are formed in a single operational step, independent of the size of the system.

  5. Enzymatically controlled material design with casein--from defined films to localized deposition of particles.

    PubMed

    Strube, Oliver I; Rüdiger, Arne A; Bremser, Wolfgang

    2015-05-10

    A new concept for deposition and material design of coatings from biological compounds is presented. An enzymatic reaction triggers the specific coagulation of particles on a support surface. The first examined model system is casein and is based on the natural rennet reaction as applied in the process of cheese-making. The aspartic protease chymosin is immobilized on a support surface and cleaves the hydrophilic parts of the casein micelles, inducing deposition. The concept allows for a high level of control over film characteristics and enables the formation of site-specific film structures. The variability rages from formation of casein films with several micrometers film thickness to the targeted deposition of casein micelles. PMID:25456052

  6. Energy conservation potential of Portland cement particle size distribution control, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Helmuth, R.A; Whiting, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The main objectives of Phase 2 are to determine the feasibility of using cements with controlled particle size distributions (CPSD cements) in practical concrete applications, and to refine our estimates of the potential energy savings that may ensue from such use. The work in Phase 2 is divided into two main tasks, some parts of which will be carried out simultaneously: Task 1 will continue cement paste studies to optimize cement performance similar to those of Phase 1, but with particular emphasis on gypsum requirements, blended cements, and water-reducing admixtures. This task will also include preparation of sufficient CPSD cements for use in all Phase 2 work. Task 2 will be a comprehensive examination of the properties of concretes made with CPSD cements. This will include optimization of concrete mix designs to obtain the best possible performance for practical applications of both portland and blended cements. The effects of chemical admixtures and curing temperature variations will also be determined.

  7. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total forcemore » on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.« less

  8. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.

  9. Control and removal of modulational instabilities in low-dispersion photonic crystal fiber cavities.

    PubMed

    Tlidi, M; Mussot, A; Louvergneaux, E; Kozyreff, G; Vladimirov, A G; Taki, M

    2007-03-15

    Taking up to fourth-order dispersion effects into account, we show that fiber resonators become stable for a large intensity regime. The range of pump intensities leading to modulational instability becomes finite and controllable. Moreover, by computing analytically the thresholds and frequencies of these instabilities, we demonstrate the existence of a new unstable frequency at the primary threshold. This frequency exists for an arbitrary small but nonzero fourth-order dispersion coefficient. Numerical simulations for a low and flattened dispersion photonic crystal fiber resonator confirm analytical predictions and open the way to experimental implementation. PMID:17308594

  10. Control of particle size by feed composition in the nanolatexes produced via monomer-starved semicontinuous emulsion copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Shahriar

    2015-05-01

    Conventional batch and semicontinuous emulsion copolymerizations often produce large particles whose size cannot be easily correlated with the comonomer feed compositions, and are to some degree susceptible to composition drift. In contrast, we found that copolymer nanolatexes made via semicontinuous monomer-starved emulsion copolymerizations are featured with an average nanoparticle size being controlled by the feed composition, a high conversion achieved, and a high degree of particle composition uniformity. This was achieved because the rate of particle growth, during nucleation, was controlled by the rate of comonomer addition, and the copolymer composition, surfactant parking area on the particles, and nucleation efficiency determined by the comonomer feed composition. Two model systems, methyl methacrylate/styrene and vinyl acetate/butyl acrylate, with significant differences in water solubility were studied. Monomers were added to the aqueous solution of sodium dodecylsulfate and potassium persulfate at a low rate to achieve high instantaneous conversions. PMID:25617612

  11. Strategies for pH control in a biofilter packed with sugarcane bagasse for hydrogen sulfide removal.

    PubMed

    Jover, Josefina; Ramírez, Martín; Rodríguez, Iván; Gómez, José M; Cantero, Domingo

    2012-01-01

    The biological removal of hydrogen sulfide at low concentration (<120 ppmv) was studied in a laboratory-scale biofilter packed with sugarcane bagasse and inoculated with a sulfur-oxidizing bacterial consortium isolated from activated sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Inlet loads from 1.31 to 20.2 g Sm(-3) h(-1) were supplied to the biofilter, and empty bed residence times (EBRTs) of 30, 20 and 10 s were tested. In all cases, the removal efficiency was greater than 99%. Two methods for the pH control were tested: increasing the phosphate buffer capacity of the mineral medium (method I), and a new method, which involves the addition of solid CaCO(3) to the bagasse at the upper inlet of the biofilter (method II). For method I, pH increased gradually along the bed (from the bottom to the top), from a constant value of 3.0 to 7.0. For method II, pH was constant (2.4 ± 0.8) along the bed, and then a steep increase of pH was observed at the top to 7.1. We suggest the use of CaCO(3) instead of phosphate buffer because the former is less expensive, it is a simple method and the results obtained with the two methods are similar.

  12. Reducing prospective memory error and costs in simulated air traffic control: External aids, extending practice, and removing perceived memory requirements.

    PubMed

    Loft, Shayne; Chapman, Melissa; Smith, Rebekah E

    2016-09-01

    In air traffic control (ATC), forgetting to perform deferred actions-prospective memory (PM) errors-can have severe consequences. PM demands can also interfere with ongoing tasks (costs). We examined the extent to which PM errors and costs were reduced in simulated ATC by providing extended practice, or by providing external aids combined with extended practice, or by providing external aids combined with instructions that removed perceived memory requirements. Participants accepted/handed-off aircraft and detected conflicts. For the PM task, participants were required to substitute alternative actions for routine actions when accepting aircraft. In Experiment 1, when no aids were provided, PM errors and costs were not reduced by practice. When aids were provided, costs observed early in practice were eliminated with practice, but residual PM errors remained. Experiment 2 provided more limited practice with aids, but instructions that did not frame the PM task as a "memory" task led to high PM accuracy without costs. Attention-allocation policies that participants set based on expected PM demands were modified as individuals were increasingly exposed to reliable aids, or were given instructions that removed perceived memory requirements. These findings have implications for the design of aids for individuals who monitor multi-item dynamic displays. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27608067

  13. Lessons from the removal of lead from gasoline for controlling other environmental pollutants: A case study from New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nick; Horrocks, John

    2008-01-01

    Background It took over two decades to achieve the removal of leaded gasoline in this country. This was despite international evidence and original research conducted in New Zealand on the harm to child cognitive function and behaviour from lead exposure. Objective To identify lessons from the New Zealand experience of removing leaded gasoline that are potentially relevant to the control of other environmental pollutants. Discussion From the available documentation, we suggest a number of reasons for the slow policy response to the leaded gasoline hazard. These include: (1) industry power in the form of successful lobbying by the lead additive supplier, Associated Octel; (2) the absence of the precautionary principle as part of risk management policy; and (3) weak policymaking machinery that included: (a) the poor use of health research evidence (from both NZ and internationally), as well as limited use of expertise in academic and non-governmental organisations; (b) lack of personnel competent in addressing technically complex issues; and (c) diffusion of responsibility among government agencies. Conclusion There is a need for a stronger precautionary approach by policymakers when considering environmental pollutants. Politicians, officials and health workers need to strengthen policymaking processes and effectively counter the industry tactics used to delay regulatory responses. PMID:18179712

  14. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  15. Control over Particle Size Distribution by Autoclaving Poloxamer-Stabilized Trimyristin Nanodispersions.

    PubMed

    Göke, Katrin; Roese, Elin; Arnold, Andreas; Kuntsche, Judith; Bunjes, Heike

    2016-09-01

    Lipid nanoparticles are under investigation as delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drugs. The particle size in these dispersions strongly influences important pharmaceutical properties like biodistribution and drug loading capacity; it should be below 500 nm for direct injection into the bloodstream. Consequently, small particles with a narrow particle size distribution are desired. Hitherto, there are, however, only limited possibilities for the preparation of monodisperse, pharmaceutically relevant dispersions. In this work, the effect of autoclaving at 121 °C on the particle size distribution of lipid nanoemulsions and -suspensions consisting of the pharmaceutically relevant components trimyristin and poloxamer 188 was studied. Additionally, the amount of emulsifier needed to stabilize both untreated and autoclaved particles was assessed. In our study, four dispersions of mean particle sizes from 45 to 150 nm were prepared by high-pressure melt homogenization. The particle size distribution before and after autoclaving was characterized using static and dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, and transmission electron microscopy. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation was used for particle size distribution analyses and for the determination of free poloxamer 188. Upon autoclaving, the mean particle size increased to up to 200 nm, but not proportionally to the initial size. At the same time, the particle size distribution width decreased remarkably. Heat treatment thus seems to be a promising approach to achieve the desired narrow particle size distribution of such dispersions. Related to the lipid content, suspension particles needed more emulsifier for stabilization than emulsion droplets, and smaller particles more than larger ones.

  16. A simple route to synthesize conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole nanocomposite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties and their performance for removal of hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Hasan; Rahman, Mohammad Mostafizar; Ali, Mohammad Azgar; Minami, Hideto; Tauer, Klaus; Gafur, Mohammad Abdul; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubor

    2016-08-01

    A combination of maghemite polypyrrole (PPy/γ-Fe2O3) and stimuli-responsive properties in the same hydrogel microspheres is expected to enhance their application potential in various fields such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, biosensors, biomedical applications and removal of heavy metals from waste water, catalysis etc. In this investigation a simple two step process is used to prepare conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole (PPy) composite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties. Poly(styrene-methacrylic acid-N-isopropylacrylamide-polyethelene glycol methacrylate) or P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles are first prepared by soap-free precipitation copolymerization. The copolymer hydrogel particles exhibited both temperature- and pH-responsive volume phase transition. Conductive P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe2O3 nanocomposite hydrogel particles are then prepared by seeded chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole in the presence of P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles using FeCl3 as a oxidant and p-toluene sulfonic acid (p-TSA) as a dopant. In the reaction system FeCl3 functioned as a source of Fe(III) for the formation of γ-Fe2O3. This reaction also requires the initial presence of Fe(II) provided by the addition of FeCl2. The size and size distribution, surface structure, and morphology of the prepared conductive composite hydrogel particles are confirmed by FTIR, electron micrographs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-visible spectroscopy. The performance of nanocomposite hydrogel particles has been evaluated for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr) ions from water.

  17. Critical roles of cationic surfactants in the preparation of colloidal mesostructured silica nanoparticles: control of mesostructure, particle size, and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hironori; Urata, Chihiro; Higashitamori, Sayuri; Aoyama, Yuko; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-12

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles are promising materials for various applications, such as drug delivery and catalysis, but the functional roles of surfactants in the formation and preparation of mesostructured silica nanoparticles (MSN-as) remain to be seen. It was confirmed that the molar ratio of cationic surfactants to Si of alkoxysilanes (Surf/Si) can affect the degree of mesostructure formation (i.e., whether the mesochannels formed inside the nanoparticles actually pass through the outer surface of the particles), the particle diameter, and the dispersibility of MSN-as. Wormhole-like mesostructures formed with low Surf/Si ratios; however, the mesopores did not pass through the outer surface of the particles completely. At high Surf/Si ratios, the mesostructures extended. The particle diameter was 100 nm or larger at low Surf/Si ratios, and the primary particle diameter decreased as the Surf/Si ratio increased. This was because the surfactants enhanced the dispersity of the alkoxysilanes in water and the hydrolysis rate of the alkoxysilanes became faster, leading to an increased nucleation as compared to the particle growth. Moreover, primary particles aggregated at low Surf/Si ratios because of the hydrophobic interactions among the surfactants that were not involved in the mesostructure formation but were adsorbed onto the nanoparticles. At high Surf/Si ratios, the surfactant micelles were adsorbed on the surface of primary particles (admicelles), resulting in the dispersion of the particles due to electrostatic repulsion. In particular, molar ratios of 0.13 or higher were quite effective for the preparation of highly dispersed MSN-as. Surfactants played important roles in the mesostructure formation, decreasing the particle diameters, and the dispersibility of the particles. All of these factors were considerably affected by the Surf/Si ratio. The results suggested novel opportunities to control various colloidal mesostructured nanoparticles from the

  18. Novel Wire-on-Plate Electrostatic Precipitator (WOP-EP) for Controlling Fine Particle and Nanoparticle Pollution.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyi; Liu, Yingshu; Xing, Yi; Tran, Thi-Minh-Phuong; Le, Thi-Cuc; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2015-07-21

    A new wire-on-plate electrostatic precipitator (WOP-EP), where discharge wires are attached directly on the surface of a dielectric plate, was developed to ease the installation of the wires, minimize particle deposition on the wires, and lower ozone emission while maintaining a high particle collection efficiency. For a lab-scale WOP-EP (width, 50 mm; height, 20 mm; length, 180 mm) tested at the applied voltage of 18 kV, experimental total particle collection efficiencies were found as high as 90.9-99.7 and 98.8-99.9% in the particle size range of 30-1870 nm at the average air velocities of 0.50 m/s (flow rate, 30 L/min; residence time, 0.36 s) and 0.25 m/s (flow rate, 15 L/min; residence time, 0.72 s), respectively. Particle collection efficiencies calculated by numerical models agreed well with the experimental results. The comparison to the traditional wire-in-plate EP showed that, at the same applied voltage, the current WOP-EP emitted 1-2 orders of magnitude lower ozone concentration, had cleaner discharge wires after heavy particle loading in the EP, and recovered high particle collection efficiency after the grounded collectio