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Sample records for controlling health care

  1. Controlling Health Care Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  2. Controlling Health Care Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  3. Prevention and control of health care-associated waterborne infections in health care facilities.

    PubMed

    Exner, M; Kramer, A; Lajoie, L; Gebel, J; Engelhart, S; Hartemann, P

    2005-06-01

    The current article is a review of the public health risks attributable to waterborne pathogens in health care. The consequences of health care-associated infections (HAIs) are discussed. Not only are Legionella spp involved in HAIs, but also Pseudomonas aeruginosa, other gram-negative microorganisms, fungi, and amoeba-associated bacteria. This is particularly noteworthy among immunocompromised patients. New prevention strategies and control measures brought about through advanced planning, facility remodelling and reconstruction, disinfection, and filtration have resulted in a significant reduction of the incidence of waterborne HAIs. The positive consequences of a comprehensive multibarrier approach including prevention and control programs in health care facilities are discussed. Environmental cultures are now integrated within the infection control program of some European countries. In high-risk areas, the application of disposable sterile point-of-use filters for faucets and shower heads appears to be the practice of choice to efficiently control waterborne pathogens and to prevent infections.

  4. Patient control over dying: responses of health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Kelner, M J; Bourgeault, I L

    1993-03-01

    Decisions concerning how, when and where patients should die have traditionally been the exclusive domain of health care professionals. More recently, patients and their families are demanding increasing control over these decisions. This paper reports on the responses of 20 physicians and 20 nurses in a major teaching hospital regarding the desire of patients to exert more control over the circumstances of their dying. The findings, based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews, suggest that while health care professionals are generally in favour of the principle of patient control over dying, they have reservations about accommodating patients' wishes in actual clinical situations. Key factors that underly their ambivalence on this point are: (1) specific patient circumstances, such as age, severity of illness and mental competence; (2) moral and legal concerns; and (3) the type of intervention requested by patient. The results indicate that patient control over dying represents a challenge to the clinical judgement of health care professionals; that it runs counter to their perception of their role as healers and supporters; that it raises crucial concerns about their personal ethics and legal liability and that it poses a challenge to their professional autonomy and power. It is likely that health care practitioners will increasingly be pressured to concede their autonomy and enter into a partnership with patients in the decision-making process.

  5. Tracking and controlling soft surface contamination in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Jonathan D; Wilson, Amanda M; Sassi, Hannah P; Reynolds, Kelly A

    2017-09-12

    Study objectives were to track the transfer of microbes on soft surfaces in health care environments and determine the efficiency of an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered soft surface sanitizer in the health care environment. Soft surfaces at 3 health care facilities were sampled for heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria, Staphylococcus spp, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Escherichia coli followed by a tracer study with a virus surrogate seeded onto volunteer hands and commonly touched surfaces. The occurrence of microbial contaminants was determined along with microbial reductions using the soft surface sanitizer. Soft surfaces were swabbed pre- and postintervention. Tracer viruses spread to 20%-64% and 13%-41% of surfaces in long-term health care facilities and physicians' offices, respectively. Only 1 pathogen, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, was recovered. The waiting room chairs had the highest concentration of HPC bacteria before disinfection (145.4 ± 443.3 colony forming units [cfu]/cm(2)), and the privacy curtains had the lowest (39.5 ± 84.2 cfu/cm(2)). Reductions of up to 98.5% were achieved with the sanitizer in health care settings and up to 99.99% under controlled laboratory conditions. Soft surfaces are involved in the spread of microbes throughout health care facilities. Routine application of an EPA-registered sanitizer for soft surfaces can help to reduce the microbial load and minimize exposure risks. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Attacking Soaring Health Care Costs: How One University Controls Health Care Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Susan S.

    1993-01-01

    Health care costs at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (New York) were projected to double between 1986 and 1990. The university has met cost-reduction goals through varied approaches, planned future cuts in overall costs by studying its employee population and is working toward a flexible plan for diverse health care needs. (MSE)

  7. Predicting Health Care Utilization among Latinos: Health Locus of Control Beliefs or Access Factors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jesus, Maria; Xiao, Chenyang

    2014-01-01

    There are two competing research explanations to account for Latinos' underutilization of health services relative to non-Latino Whites in the United States. One hypothesis examines the impact of health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs, while the other focuses on the role of access factors on health care use. To date, the relative strength of…

  8. Predicting Health Care Utilization among Latinos: Health Locus of Control Beliefs or Access Factors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jesus, Maria; Xiao, Chenyang

    2014-01-01

    There are two competing research explanations to account for Latinos' underutilization of health services relative to non-Latino Whites in the United States. One hypothesis examines the impact of health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs, while the other focuses on the role of access factors on health care use. To date, the relative strength of…

  9. Implementing Indigenous community control in health care: lessons from Canada.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Josée G; Dwyer, Judith

    2015-11-10

    Objective Over past decades, Australian and Canadian Indigenous primary healthcare policies have focused on supporting community controlled Indigenous health organisations. After more than 20 years of sustained effort, over 89% of eligible communities in Canada are currently engaged in the planning, management and provision of community controlled health services. In Australia, policy commitment to community control has also been in place for more than 25 years, but implementation has been complicated by unrealistic timelines, underdeveloped change management processes, inflexible funding agreements and distrust. This paper discusses the lessons from the Canadian experience to inform the continuing efforts to achieve the implementation of community control in Australia.Methods We reviewed Canadian policy and evaluation grey literature documents, and assessed lessons and recommendations for relevance to the Australian context.Results Our analysis yielded three broad lessons. First, implementing community control takes time. It took Canada 20 years to achieve 89% implementation. To succeed, Australia will need to make a firm long term commitment to this objective. Second, implementing community control is complex. Communities require adequate resources to support change management. And third, accountability frameworks must be tailored to the Indigenous primary health care context to be meaningful.Conclusions We conclude that although the Canadian experience is based on a different context, the processes and tools created to implement community control in Canada can help inform the Australian context.What is known about the topic? Although Australia has promoted Indigenous control over primary healthcare (PHC) services, implementation remains incomplete. Enduring barriers to the transfer of PHC services to community control have not been addressed in the largely sporadic attention to this challenge to date, despite significant recent efforts in some jurisdictions

  10. Emergency access authorization for personally controlled online health care data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tingting; Zhong, Sheng

    2012-02-01

    Personally controlled health records (PCHR) systems have emerged to allow patients to control their own medical data. In a PCHR system, all the access privileges to a patient's data are granted by the patient. However, in many emergency cases, it is impossible for the patient to participate in access authorization on site when immediate medical treatment is needed. To solve the emergency access authorization problem in the absence of patients, we consider two cases: a) the requester is already in the PCHR system but has not obtained the access privilege of the patient's health records, and b) the requester does not even have an account in the PCHR system to submit its request. For each of the two cases, we present a method for emergency access authorization, utilizing the weighted voting and source authentication cryptographic techniques. Our methods provide an effective, secure and private solution for emergency access authorization, that makes the existing PCHR system frameworks more practical and thus improves the patients' experiences of health care when using PCHR systems. We have implemented a prototype system as a proof of concept.

  11. A case-control study of home foreclosure, health conditions, and health care utilization.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Craig Evan; Kurd, Shanu K; Livshits, Alice; Weiner, Mark; Lynch, Julia

    2011-06-01

    Though rates of foreclosure are at a historic high, relatively little is known about the link between foreclosure and health. We performed a case-control study to examine health conditions and health care utilization in the time period prior to foreclosure. Homeowners who received a home foreclosure notice from 2005 to 2008 were matched (by name and address) to a university hospital system in Philadelphia and compared with controls who received care from the hospital system and who lived in the same zip code as cases. Outcome measures included prevalent health conditions and visit history in the 2 years prior to foreclosure. We found that people undergoing foreclosure were similar to controls with regard to age, gender, and insurance status but significantly more likely to be African American. Rates of hypertension and renal disease were significantly higher among cases after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics. In the 2 years prior to foreclosure, cases were more likely to visit the emergency department, have an outpatient visit, and have a no-show appointment. Cases were less likely to have a primary care physicians (PCP) visit in the 6 months immediately prior to the receipt of a foreclosure notice. The results suggest changes in health care utilization in the time period prior to foreclosure. Policies designed to decrease the incidence of home foreclosure and support people during the process should consider its association with poor health and changes in health care utilization.

  12. Correlates of Suicide among Home Health Care Utilizers Who Died by Suicide and Community Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Jennifer L.; Bruce, Martha L.; Conwell, Yeates

    2006-01-01

    Home health care patients often have several late-life risk factors for suicide and constitute a high risk group for suicidal behaviors. In this study, we examined the characteristics of 14 older adult home health care utilizers who died by suicide and four community controls who used similar services. Both groups of home health care utilizers had…

  13. Health care agents

    MedlinePlus

    Durable power of attorney for health care; Health care proxy; End-of-life - health care agent; Life support treatment - ... Respirator - health care agent; Ventilator - health care agent; Power of attorney - health care agent; POA - health care ...

  14. The Obama administration's options for health care cost control: hope versus reality.

    PubMed

    Marmor, Theodore; Oberlander, Jonathan; White, Joseph

    2009-04-07

    Controlling the costs of medical care has long been an elusive goal in U.S. health policy. This article examines the options for health care cost control under the Obama administration. The authors argue that the administration's approach to health reform offers some potential for cost control but also embraces many strategies that are not likely to be successful. Lessons the United States can learn from other countries' experiences in constraining medical care spending are then explored.

  15. Health Care and Consumer Control: Pittsburgh's Town Meeting for Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Fred H.; Black, Judith S.

    1992-01-01

    Two hospitals have conducted semiannual Town Meeting for Seniors to provide community-based health education, helping seniors make informed decisions about medical care, Medigap insurance, advance directives, and proper nutrition. Town Meeting has been enthusiastically received by consumers and has led to creation of several new community…

  16. Health Care and Consumer Control: Pittsburgh's Town Meeting for Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Fred H.; Black, Judith S.

    1992-01-01

    Two hospitals have conducted semiannual Town Meeting for Seniors to provide community-based health education, helping seniors make informed decisions about medical care, Medigap insurance, advance directives, and proper nutrition. Town Meeting has been enthusiastically received by consumers and has led to creation of several new community…

  17. A randomized controlled trial of intensive care management for disabled Medicaid beneficiaries with high health care costs.

    PubMed

    Bell, Janice F; Krupski, Antoinette; Joesch, Jutta M; West, Imara I; Atkins, David C; Court, Beverly; Mancuso, David; Roy-Byrne, Peter

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate outcomes of a registered nurse-led care management intervention for disabled Medicaid beneficiaries with high health care costs. Washington State Department of Social and Health Services Client Outcomes Database, 2008-2011. In a randomized controlled trial with intent-to-treat analysis, outcomes were compared for the intervention (n = 557) and control groups (n = 563). A quasi-experimental subanalysis compared outcomes for program participants (n = 251) and propensity score-matched controls (n = 251). Administrative data were linked to describe costs and use of health services, criminal activity, homelessness, and death. In the intent-to-treat analysis, the intervention group had higher odds of outpatient mental health service use and higher prescription drug costs than controls in the postperiod. In the subanalysis, participants had fewer unplanned hospital admissions and lower associated costs; higher prescription drug costs; higher odds of long-term care service use; higher drug/alcohol treatment costs; and lower odds of homelessness. We found no health care cost savings for disabled Medicaid beneficiaries randomized to intensive care management. Among participants, care management may have the potential to increase access to needed care, slow growth in the number and therefore cost of unplanned hospitalizations, and prevent homelessness. These findings apply to start-up care management programs targeted at high-cost, high-risk Medicaid populations. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  18. Health literacy, diabetes self-care, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Chandra Y; Bains, Sujeev S; Egede, Leonard E

    2010-11-01

    Although limited health literacy is a barrier to disease management and has been associated with poor glycemic control, the mechanisms underlying the relationships between health literacy and diabetes outcomes are unknown. We examined the relationships between health literacy, determinants of diabetes self-care, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Patients with diabetes were recruited from an outpatient primary care clinic. We collected information on demographics, health literacy, diabetes knowledge, diabetes fatalism, social support, and diabetes self-care, and hemoglobin A1c values were extracted from the medical record. Structural equation models tested the predicted pathways linking health literacy to diabetes self-care and glycemic control. No direct relationship was observed between health literacy and diabetes self-care or glycemic control. Health literacy had a direct effect on social support (r = -0.20, P < 0.05) and through social support had an indirect effect on diabetes self-care (r = -0.07) and on glycemic control (r = -0.01). More diabetes knowledge (r = 0.22, P < 0.05), less fatalism (r = -0.22, P < 0.05), and more social support (r = 0.27, P < 0.01) were independent, direct predictors of diabetes self-care and through self-care were related to glycemic control (r = -0.20, P < 0.05). Our findings suggest health literacy has an indirect effect on diabetes self-care and glycemic control through its association with social support. This suggests that for patients with limited health literacy, enhancing social support would facilitate diabetes self-care and improved glycemic control.

  19. Health Literacy, Diabetes Self-Care, and Glycemic Control in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Chandra Y.; Bains, Sujeev S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Although limited health literacy is a barrier to disease management and has been associated with poor glycemic control, the mechanisms underlying the relationships between health literacy and diabetes outcomes are unknown. We examined the relationships between health literacy, determinants of diabetes self-care, and glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients with diabetes were recruited from an outpatient primary care clinic. We collected information on demographics, health literacy, diabetes knowledge, diabetes fatalism, social support, and diabetes self-care, and hemoglobin A1c values were extracted from the medical record. Structural equation models tested the predicted pathways linking health literacy to diabetes self-care and glycemic control. Results No direct relationship was observed between health literacy and diabetes self-care or glycemic control. Health literacy had a direct effect on social support (r = −0.20, P < 0.05) and through social support had an indirect effect on diabetes self-care (r = −0.07) and on glycemic control (r = −0.01). More diabetes knowledge (r = 0.22, P < 0.05), less fatalism (r = −0.22, P < 0.05), and more social support (r = 0.27, P < 0.01) were independent, direct predictors of diabetes self-care and through self-care were related to glycemic control (r = −0.20, P < 0.05). Conclusions Our findings suggest health literacy has an indirect effect on diabetes self-care and glycemic control through its association with social support. This suggests that for patients with limited health literacy, enhancing social support would facilitate diabetes self-care and improved glycemic control. PMID:20879964

  20. Report to the Legislature on Controlling School Employee Health Care Costs (Chapter 303, Laws of 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    This document comprises the mandatory report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction to the Washington State legislature on proposed methods of controlling health care costs for school employees. It focuses on the costs to Washington's 296 school districts of providing health care coverage for approximately 80,000 employees. The introduction…

  1. Perceived control in health care: a conceptual model based on experiences of frail older adults.

    PubMed

    Claassens, L; Widdershoven, G A; Van Rhijn, S C; Van Nes, F; Broese van Groenou, M I; Deeg, D J H; Huisman, M

    2014-12-01

    Frail older adults are increasingly encouraged to be in control of their health care, in Western societies. However, little is known about how they themselves perceive control in health care. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the concept of health care-related perceived control from the viewpoint of frail older adults. A qualitative interview study was conducted following a Grounded Theory approach. Thirty-two Dutch frail older adults, aged 65 and over, participated in 20 in-depth interviews (n=20) and three focus group discussions (n=12). Data were analysed according to techniques of coding and constant comparison. From this analysis constituting factors of perceived control emerged, providing elements of a conceptual model. Perceived control reflects the feeling or belief that health care is under control, which is constituted by five, either internal or external, factors: (I) self-confidence in organising professional and/or informal care, (II) self-confidence in health management in the home setting, (III) perceived support from people in the social network, (IV) perceived support from health care professionals and organisations, and (V) perceived support from (health care) infrastructure and services. Therefore, the concept does not only consist of people's own perceived efforts, but also includes the influence of external sources. Our conceptual model points out what external factors should be taken into consideration by health care professionals and policy makers when enhancing older people's perceived control. Moreover, it can serve as the basis for the development of a measurement instrument, to enable future quantitative research on health care-related perceived control among older adults.

  2. Health locus of control and self-care behaviors in diabetic foot patients.

    PubMed

    Abredari, Hamid; Bolourchifard, Fariba; Rassouli, Maryam; Nasiri, Navideh; Taher, Mohammad; Abedi, Ahmadreza

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot affects more than 25% of diabetic patients and finally up to 20% of cases result in amputation. The most important factor resulting in severe complications or even death is lack of self-care. Health locus of control has been introduced as one of health factors and predicting factors of self-care. This research was performed for analyzing the correlation between self-care behaviors and health locus of control in diabetic foot patients. In this descriptive study, 120 patients with diabetic foot were chosen using convenience sampling from endocrine clinic and wards of endocrine and vascular surgery of Teleqani Hospital of Shahid Beheshti Medical University. The data were gathered by demographic, self-care behavior, and health locus of control questionnaires. The t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and spearman coefficient were used to analyze the data. RESULTS of this research showed that there is a direct and significant relation between selfcare behaviors and internal health locus of control (p<0.001), and also in contrast with chance health locus of control (p<0.001). We have to consider these factors' role in nursing interventions and patient-care education programs and plans. Probably, interventions and programs that will lead to the strengthening of internal health locus of control improve and strengthen patients' self-care behaviors and their involvement in treatment.

  3. Developing a broader approach to management of infection control breaches in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priti R; Srinivasan, Arjun; Perz, Joseph F

    2008-12-01

    Our experiences with health departments and health care facilities suggest that questions surrounding instrument reprocessing errors and other infection control breaches are becoming increasingly common. We describe an approach to management of these incidents that focuses on risk of bloodborne pathogen transmission and the role of public health and other stakeholders to inform patient notification and testing decisions.

  4. Corporate Control of Health Care: Impact on Medicine and Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailit, Howard L.; Bailit, Jennifer L.

    1988-01-01

    The impact of corporate ownership of hospitals and nursing homes on delivery systems for dental and medical care is discussed, including the growth of multihospital chains and alternative delivery systems, and the quality, accessibility, and costs of care. (MSE)

  5. Infection Prevention and Control for Ebola in Health Care Settings - West Africa and United States.

    PubMed

    Hageman, Jeffrey C; Hazim, Carmen; Wilson, Katie; Malpiedi, Paul; Gupta, Neil; Bennett, Sarah; Kolwaite, Amy; Tumpey, Abbigail; Brinsley-Rainisch, Kristin; Christensen, Bryan; Gould, Carolyn; Fisher, Angela; Jhung, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas; Moran, Kerri; Delaney, Lisa; Dowell, Chad; Bell, Michael; Srinivasan, Arjun; Schaefer, Melissa; Fagan, Ryan; Adrien, Nedghie; Chea, Nora; Park, Benjamin J

    2016-07-08

    The 2014-2016 Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa underscores the need for health care infection prevention and control (IPC) practices to be implemented properly and consistently to interrupt transmission of pathogens in health care settings to patients and health care workers. Training and assessing IPC practices in general health care facilities not designated as Ebola treatment units or centers became a priority for CDC as the number of Ebola virus transmissions among health care workers in West Africa began to affect the West African health care system and increasingly more persons became infected. CDC and partners developed policies, procedures, and training materials tailored to the affected countries. Safety training courses were also provided to U.S. health care workers intending to work with Ebola patients in West Africa. As the Ebola epidemic continued in West Africa, the possibility that patients with Ebola could be identified and treated in the United States became more realistic. In response, CDC, other federal components (e.g., Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response) and public health partners focused on health care worker training and preparedness for U.S. health care facilities. CDC used the input from these partners to develop guidelines on IPC for hospitalized patients with known or suspected Ebola, which was updated based on feedback from partners who provided care for Ebola patients in the United States. Strengthening and sustaining IPC helps health care systems be better prepared to prevent and respond to current and future infectious disease threats.The activities summarized in this report would not have been possible without collaboration with many U.S. and international partners (http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/2014-west-africa/partners.html).

  6. [Involvement of health primary care teams in the control of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Monroe, Aline Aparecida; Gonzales, Roxana Isabel Cardozo; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Sassaki, Cinthia Midori; Ruffino Netto, Antonio; Vendramini, Silvia Helena Figueiredo; Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena

    2008-06-01

    This study was aimed at analyzing the involvement of Health Primary Care teams in the tuberculosis control actions in the perception of the Tuberculosis Control Program coordinators of nine priority municipalities of the State of São Paulo. It is a qualitative research whose data were collected in June of 2005 through semistructured interviews with nine coordinators. The content thematic modality was used for the analysis of the data. The results pointed out to difficulties in the implementation of the tuberculosis control actions in primary care related to quantitative and qualitative deficiencies of human resources and to a centralized and fragmented view regarding the organization of these actions in the health system. The integration of tuberculosis control activities in primary care is possible provided the system is organized according to primary care principles and a policy of human resources that ensures continuous education and capacity-building of health teams is elaborated/implemented.

  7. Performance assessment questionnaire regarding TB control for use in primary health care clinics in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Villa, Tereza Cristina Scatena; Ruffino-Netto, Antônio

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to provide access to and disseminate a questionnaire used as an instrument to assess the organizational elements and the performance of primary health care clinics regarding TB control in Brazil, comparing selected organizational dimensions by health care clinic, by municipality and by actor (patients, health care workers and managers). The results show that municipalities where the coverage of supervised treatment was more extensive presented more favorable indicators regarding access to TB treatment. The organizational format of the health care clinics involved in TB treatment-family health programs and referral centers with specialized teams in TB Control Programs (TCPs)-was not a factor that expanded access to diagnosis. The TCPs involving a smaller number of patients presented better performance regarding health care professional-patient relationship. The majority of the patients faced economic and social difficulties, and most managers were unaware of the amount of resources allocated to TB control activities. The instrument proved to be viable and to have the potential to adequately assess the performance of health care clinics in the urban areas studied.

  8. Subglottic secretion drainage and continuous control of cuff pressure used together save health care costs.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Leonardo; Lecuona, María; Jiménez, Alejandro; Cabrera, Judith; Mora, María L

    2014-10-01

    Preventive strategies to reduce ventilator-associated respiratory infection (VARI) include the use of an endotracheal tube incorporating a lumen for subglottic secretion drainage (SSD) and a system for continuous control of endotracheal tube cuff pressure (CCCP). The health care costs associated with the combined use of these 2 measures aimed at preventing VARI are not known, however. The objective of this study was to determine whether the simultaneous use of these 2 preventive measures for VARI could save health care costs. We performed a prospective observational study of patients who needed mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit. The health care costs considered here included only the costs of the endotracheal tube, cuff control, and antimicrobials used to treat VARI. The study cohort comprised 656 patients, including 241 with intermittent control of cuff pressure and without SSD (standard group), 260 with CCCP and without SSD (CCCP group), 84 with intermittent control of cuff pressure and with SSD (SSD group), and 71 with CCCP and SSD (CCCP + SSD group). The incidence of VARI and health care costs were lower in the CCCP + SSD group compared with the standard, CCCP, and SSD groups. The combined use of SSD and CCCP reduced the incidence of VARI and saved health care costs. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Observations of infection prevention and control practices in primary health care, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Guadalupe; Dolinger, Amy; Rogo, Khama; Mwaura, Njeri; Wafula, Francis; Coarasa, Jorge; Goicoechea, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices in primary health care in Kenya. Methods We used an observational, patient-tracking tool to assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices by 1680 health-care workers during outpatient interactions with 14 328 patients at 935 health-care facilities in 2015. Compliance was assessed in five domains: hand hygiene; protective glove use; injections and blood sampling; disinfection of reusable equipment; and waste segregation. We calculated compliance by dividing the number of correct actions performed by the number of indications and evaluated associations between compliance and the health-care worker’s and facility’s characteristics. Findings Across 106 464 observed indications for an infection prevention and control practice, the mean compliance was 0.318 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.315 to 0.321). The compliance ranged from 0.023 (95% CI: 0.021 to 0.024) for hand hygiene to 0.871 (95% CI: 0.866 to 0.876) for injection and blood sampling safety. Compliance was weakly associated with the facility’s characteristics (e.g. public or private, or level of specialization) and the health-care worker’s knowledge of, and training in, infection prevention and control practices. Conclusion The observational tool was effective for assessing compliance with infection prevention and control practices across multiple domains in primary health care in a low-income country. Compliance varied widely across infection prevention and control domains. The weak associations observed between compliance and the characteristics of health-care workers and facilities, such as knowledge and the availability of supplies, suggest that a broader focus on behavioural change is required. PMID:28670015

  10. Observations of infection prevention and control practices in primary health care, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Guadalupe; Dolinger, Amy; Rogo, Khama; Mwaura, Njeri; Wafula, Francis; Coarasa, Jorge; Goicoechea, Ana; Das, Jishnu

    2017-07-01

    To assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices in primary health care in Kenya. We used an observational, patient-tracking tool to assess compliance with infection prevention and control practices by 1680 health-care workers during outpatient interactions with 14 328 patients at 935 health-care facilities in 2015. Compliance was assessed in five domains: hand hygiene; protective glove use; injections and blood sampling; disinfection of reusable equipment; and waste segregation. We calculated compliance by dividing the number of correct actions performed by the number of indications and evaluated associations between compliance and the health-care worker's and facility's characteristics. Across 106 464 observed indications for an infection prevention and control practice, the mean compliance was 0.318 (95% confidence interval, CI: 0.315 to 0.321). The compliance ranged from 0.023 (95% CI: 0.021 to 0.024) for hand hygiene to 0.871 (95% CI: 0.866 to 0.876) for injection and blood sampling safety. Compliance was weakly associated with the facility's characteristics (e.g. public or private, or level of specialization) and the health-care worker's knowledge of, and training in, infection prevention and control practices. The observational tool was effective for assessing compliance with infection prevention and control practices across multiple domains in primary health care in a low-income country. Compliance varied widely across infection prevention and control domains. The weak associations observed between compliance and the characteristics of health-care workers and facilities, such as knowledge and the availability of supplies, suggest that a broader focus on behavioural change is required.

  11. Ethics of the Physician's Role in Health-Care Cost Control: AOA Critical Issues.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Joseph; Iorio, Richard; Barber, Thomas; Barron, Chloe; Caplan, Arthur

    2016-07-20

    The United States health-care expenditure is rising precipitously. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that, in 2025, at our current rate of increased spending, 25% of the gross domestic product will be allocated to health care. Our per-capita spending on health care also far exceeds that of any other industrialized country. Health-care costs must be addressed if our country is to remain competitive in the global marketplace and to maintain its financial solvency. If unchecked, the uncontrolled rise in health-care expenditures will not only affect our capacity to provide our patients with high-quality care but also threaten the ability of our nation to compete economically on the global stage. This is not hyperbole but fiscal reality.As physicians, we are becoming increasingly familiar with the economics impacting health-care policy. Thus, we are in a unique position to control the cost of health care. This includes an increased reliance on creating and adhering to evidence-based guidelines. We can do this and still continue to respect the primacy of patient welfare and the right of patients to act in their own self-interest. However, as evidenced by the use of high-volume centers of excellence, each strategy adapted to control costs must be vetted and must be monitored for its unintended ethical consequences.The solution to this complex problem must involve the input of all of the health-care stakeholders, including the patients, payers, and providers. Physicians ought to play a role in designing and executing a remedy. After all, we are the ones who best understand medicine and whose moral obligation is to the welfare of our patients.

  12. Health care providers' perspectives for providing quality infection control measures at the neonatal intensive care unit, Cairo University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Salem, Marwa Rashad; Youssef, Meray Rene L

    2017-09-01

    Health care-associated infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). This study identified health care providers' perspectives for providing quality infection control measures at a NICU. A qualitative approach was adopted. Participants were selected via a purposive sampling technique. The study group was composed of 3 medical staff who held leadership positions and 10 nurses working in the NICU at Cairo University Hospital. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews. Responses were analyzed using a thematic content analysis. The priorities identified by thematic analysis were suggestions and barriers for providing quality infection control measures, from the perspectives of health care providers. All interviewees cited shortage in staffing, especially nurses, lack of time to apply infection control standards, limited opportunities for infection control training, and work overload as the main barriers. All interviewees recommended on-going training and the introduction of audiovisual aids and case study approaches. Lack of time to apply infection control standards, limited opportunities for infection control training, and work overload are the most commonly perceived barriers. The current infection control system in the NICU is likely to remain ineffective unless these underlying barriers are adequately addressed. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Actual aspects of state control of dietary, clinical and prophylactic nutrition in health care organizations].

    PubMed

    Sukhanov, B P; Kerimova, M G; Elizarova, E V

    2014-01-01

    A review is aimed to help professionals, who provide state sanitary control of dietary (clinical and prophylactic) nutrition in health care organizations. Taking into account the new modern legislative framework and the scientific and practical publications, the basic requirements for standardization, harmonization and individualization (personalization) of nutritional therapy and monitoring of their implementation in health care organizations by state sanitary authorities has been set out. The attention is focused on the optimization of clinical nutrition, as well as the methods of assessment of balance and nutritive value of the standard diets, their proper correction with dry protein composite blends and other specialized products of dietary clinical and prophylactic nutrition, including foods fortified with dietary and biologically active substances and food supplements (nutraceuticals). The paper describes ways to improve the organization of state sanitary and dietary nutritional care in health care organizations, outlines priority issues to be addressed to improve the nutritional care.

  14. The illusion of control and the importance of community in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Pitts, T

    1993-01-01

    The complexity of our health care environment and organizations requires a management style that moves beyond control to empowerment. Even though this complexity minimizes our ability to control events, many organizations are still preoccupied with the illusion of control. This restrains the performance of our health care organizations. Some of the contributing factors supporting this illusion are bureaucracy, scientific methodology, individualism, and our confusion of management with leadership. The concept of "community" is discussed from an organizational perspective. It is suggested that we can improve the performance of our organizations by rediscovering the values of community.

  15. Improving blood pressure control in a large multiethnic California population through changes in health care delivery, 2004-2012.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kate M; Handler, Joel; Wall, Hilary K; Kanter, Michael H

    2014-10-30

    The Kaiser Permanente Southern California (Kaiser) health care system succeeded in improving hypertension control in a multiethnic population by adopting a series of changes in health care delivery. Data from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) was used to assess blood pressure control from 2004 through 2012. Hypertension control increased overall from 54% to 86% during that period, and 80% or more in every subgroup, regardless of race/ethnicity, preferred language, or type of health insurance plan. Health care delivery changes improved hypertension control across a large multiethnic population, which indicates that health care systems can achieve a clinical target goal of 70% for hypertension control in their populations.

  16. Care coordinators: a controlled evaluation of an inpatient mental health service innovation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Malcolm W; Wilson, Michael; Bergquist, Karla; Thorburn, John

    2012-02-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the impact of introducing designated care coordinators into an acute mental health inpatient unit in terms of service delivery, clinical outcomes, and service user and significant other perceptions. A pre-post-controlled design was implemented with a consecutive sample of 292 service users admitted and staying more than 5 days in two wards, with care coordinators introduced in one ward. Data were obtained from clinical records, standard measures, and service user and significant other surveys. Care coordinator input was associated with significant improvements in service delivery and stronger involvement of significant others and community resources. Care-coordinated clients showed significantly better clinical outcomes, including the Health of Nations Outcome Scales behaviour subscale, less time in the intensive care subunit, less community crisis team input in the week following discharge, and lower rates of readmission in the month following discharge. Care-coordinated service users and their significant others gave higher ratings of service delivery, outcome, and satisfaction. The results indicate that designated care coordinators significantly improve care processes, outcomes, and service user experience in acute inpatient mental health settings. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Aboriginal community controlled health services: leading the way in primary care.

    PubMed

    Panaretto, Kathryn S; Wenitong, Mark; Button, Selwyn; Ring, Ian T

    2014-06-16

    The national Closing the Gap framework commits to reducing persisting disadvantage in the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia, with cross-government-sector initiatives and investment. Central to efforts to build healthier communities is the Aboriginal community controlled health service (ACCHS) sector; its focus on prevention, early intervention and comprehensive care has reduced barriers to access and unintentional racism, progressively improving individual health outcomes for Aboriginal people. There is now a broad range of primary health care data that provides a sound evidence base for comparing the health outcomes for Indigenous people in ACCHSs with the outcomes achieved through mainstream services, and these data show: models of comprehensive primary health care consistent with the patient-centred medical home model; coverage of the Aboriginal population higher than 60% outside major metropolitan centres; consistently improving performance in key performance on best-practice care indicators; and superior performance to mainstream general practice. ACCHSs play a significant role in training the medical workforce and employing Aboriginal people. ACCHSs have risen to the challenge of delivering best-practice care and there is a case for expanding ACCHSs into new areas. To achieve the best returns, the current mainstream Closing the Gap investment should be shifted to the community controlled health sector.

  18. Relationship between asthma control status, the Asthma Control Test™ and urgent health-care utilization in Asia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Christopher K W; Ko, Fanny W S; Bhome, Arvind; DE Guia, Teresita S; Wong, Gary W K; Zainudin, Bin M Z; Nang, An N; Boonsawat, Watchara; Cho, Sang H; Gunasekera, Kirthi D; Hong, Jian G; Hsu, Jeng-Yuan; Viet, Nhung N; Yunus, Faisal; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya

    2011-05-01

    Accurate assessment of control is an integral part of asthma management. We investigated the relationship between control status derived from the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA), the Asthma Control Test (ACT) and urgent health-care utilization. Asthma Insights and Reality in Asia-Pacific Phase 2 (AIRIAP 2) was a cross-sectional, community-based survey of 4805 subjects with asthma from urban centres across Asia. A symptom control index was derived from the AIRIAP 2 questionnaire using the GINA control criteria for day- and night-time symptoms, need for rescue medication, activity limitation and exacerbations; lung function was excluded. The main outcomes were asthma control, based on these GINA criteria and the ACT, and the relationship between control and self-reported urgent health-care utilization (hospitalization, emergency room visits or other unscheduled urgent visits) related to asthma over the previous 12months. Each of the symptom criteria was significantly associated with urgent health-care utilization, with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 2.25 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.94-2.61) for daytime symptoms to 2.57 (95% CI: 2.29-2.90) for nocturnal awakening. Similarly, control status was significantly associated with urgent health-care utilization, with ORs of 0.19 (95% CI: 0.13-0.28), 0.70 (95% CI: 0.65-0.76) and 1.00 for controlled, partly controlled and uncontrolled, respectively. The optimal ACT cut-off score for identifying uncontrolled asthma was ≤19 for subjects aged ≥12years. Urgent health-care utilization was reported by 57.2% versus 28.7% of patients scoring ≤19 versus >19 (P<0.001). The GINA control classification and the ACT are valid symptom-based measures that are significantly associated with urgent health-care utilization. © 2011 The Authors; Respirology © 2011 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  19. Patient participation in alternative perinatal care: impact on satisfaction and health locus of control.

    PubMed

    Littlefield, V M; Adams, B N

    1987-06-01

    Women's degree of participation, satisfaction, and change in health locus of control after giving birth in an alternative birthing unit was examined. A quasiexperimental two-group design of convenience samples (N = 99) was used to compare differences and evaluate the care given. An alternative birthing experience increased women's sense of participation and related to women's satisfaction, but did not change internal scores on the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales. Women's reliance on powerful others increased post delivery. Complications were negatively related to selected aspects of women's satisfaction in labor and delivery, but positively related to satisfaction with antepartal care.

  20. Compliance with infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Oosthuysen, Jeanné; Potgieter, Elsa; Fossey, Annabel

    2014-12-01

    Many publications are available on the topic of compliance with infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities all over the world. The approaches of developing and developed countries show wide variation, but the principles of infection prevention and control are the same globally. This study is a systematic review and global perspective of the available literature on infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities. Nine focus areas on compliance with infection-control measures were investigated: knowledge of infectious occupational hazards; personal hygiene and care of hands; correct application of personal protective equipment; use of environmental barriers and disposable items; sterilisation (recirculation) of instruments and handpieces; disinfection (surfaces) and housekeeping; management of waste disposal; quality control of dental unit waterlines, biofilms and water; and some special considerations. Various international studies from developed countries have reported highly scientific evidence-based information. In developed countries, the resources for infection prevention and control are freely available, which is not the case in developing countries. The studies in developing countries also indicate serious shortcomings with regard to infection prevention and control knowledge and education in oral health-care facilities. This review highlights the fact that availability of resources will always be a challenge, but more so in developing countries. This presents unique challenges and the opportunity for innovative thinking to promote infection prevention and control.

  1. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  2. Increasing preventive care by primary care nursing and allied health clinicians: a non-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McElwaine, Kathleen M; Freund, Megan; Campbell, Elizabeth M; Knight, Jenny; Bowman, Jennifer A; Wolfenden, Luke; McElduff, Patrick; Bartlem, Kate M; Gillham, Karen E; Wiggers, John H

    2014-10-01

    Although primary care nurse and allied health clinician consultations represent key opportunities for the provision of preventive care, it is provided suboptimally. To assess the effectiveness of a practice change intervention in increasing primary care nursing and allied health clinician provision of preventive care for four health risks. Two-group (intervention versus control), non-randomized controlled study assessing the effectiveness of the intervention in increasing clinician provision of preventive care. Randomly selected clients from 17 primary healthcare facilities participated in telephone surveys that assessed their receipt of preventive care prior to (September 2009-2010, n=876) and following intervention (October 2011-2012, n=1,113). The intervention involved local leadership and consensus processes, electronic medical record system modification, educational meetings and outreach, provision of practice change resources and support, and performance monitoring and feedback. The primary outcome was differential change in client-reported receipt of three elements of preventive care (assessment, brief advice, referral/follow-up) for each of four behavioral risks individually (smoking, inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption, alcohol overconsumption, physical inactivity) and combined. Logistic regression assessed intervention effectiveness. Analyses conducted in 2013 indicated significant improvements in preventive care delivery in the intervention compared to the control group from baseline to follow-up for assessment of fruit and vegetable consumption (+23.8% vs -1.5%); physical activity (+11.1% vs -0.3%); all four risks combined (+16.9% vs -1.0%) and for brief advice for inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption (+19.3% vs -2.0%); alcohol overconsumption (+14.5% vs -8.9%); and all four risks combined (+14.3% vs +2.2%). The intervention was ineffective in increasing the provision of the remaining forms of preventive care. The intervention's impact on

  3. [Correctional health care].

    PubMed

    Fix, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Court decisions taking away someone's freedom by requiring them to serve a jail sentence should not deny them access to the same health care available to free citizens in full compliance with patient confidentiality. Health institutions, responsible for administering somatic care, offer a comprehensive response to the medical needs of those under justice control, both in jails and conventional care units. For a physician, working in the correctional setting implies accepting its constraints, and violence, and protecting and enforcing fundamental rights, as well as rights to dignity, confidential care and freedom to accept or refuse a treatment.

  4. Preventing the Transmission of Tuberculosis in Health Care Settings: Administrative Control

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that health care workers (HCWs) have a considerably higher risk of occupationally acquired tuberculosis (TB). To reduce the transmission of TB to HCWs and patients, TB infection control programs should be implemented in health care settings. The first and most important level of all protection and control programs is administrative control. Its goals are to prevent HCWs, other staff, and patients from being exposed to TB, and to reduce the transmission of infection by ensuring rapid diagnosis and treatment of affected individuals. Administrative control measures recommended by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization include prompt identification of people with TB symptoms, isolation of infectious patients, control of the spread of the pathogen, and minimization of time spent in health care facilities. Another key component of measures undertaken is the baseline and serial screening for latent TB infection in HCWs who are at risk of exposure to TB. Although the interferon-gamma release assay has some advantages over the tuberculin skin test, the former has serious limitations, mostly due to its high conversion rate. PMID:28119743

  5. A revolutionary approach to health care cost control: leveraging the power of Web-enabled employee "consumerism".

    PubMed

    Rozzi, M V

    2001-09-01

    The confluence of two trends--health care "consumerism" and employee self-service benefits programs--offers employers a promising opportunity for health care cost control. To take advantage of this opportunity, employers must take a fresh look at the health care cost dilemma and find ways to simultaneously offer employees a new kind of benefit and implement more effective cost-control measures.

  6. Behavioral Health Care for Adolescents with Poorly Controlled Diabetes via Skype: Does Working Alliance Remain Intact?

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Kurt A.; Duke, Danny C.; Harris, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increasingly various technologies are being tested to deliver behavioral health care. Delivering services via videoconferencing shows promise. Given that the patient–provider relationship is a strong predictor of patient adherence to medical regimens, addressing relationship quality when services are not delivered face-to-face is critical. To that end, we compared the therapeutic alliance when behavioral health care was delivered to youth with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and their caregivers in-clinic with the same services delivered via Internet-based videoconferencing (i.e., Skype™). Methods: Seventy-one adolescents with poorly controlled T1DM (hemoglobin A1c ≥9%) and one of their caregivers received up to 10 sessions of a family-based behavioral health intervention previously shown to improve adherence to diabetes regimens and family functioning; 32 were randomized to the Skype condition. Youth and caregivers completed the working alliance inventory (WAI), a 36-item measure of therapeutic alliance, at the end of treatment. Additionally, the number of behavioral health sessions completed was tracked. Results: No significant differences in WAI scores were found for those receiving behavioral health care via Skype versus in-clinic. Youth WAI goal and total scores were significantly associated with the number of sessions completed for those in the clinic group. Conclusion: Behavioral health can be delivered to youth with T1DM via Internet-based videoconferencing without significantly impacting the therapeutic relationship. Thus, for those adolescents with T1DM who require specialized behavioral health care that targets T1DM management, Internet-based teleconferencing represents a viable alternative to clinic-based care. PMID:23759406

  7. Managed health care.

    PubMed

    Curtiss, F R

    1989-04-01

    The fundamental components of managed-care plans are described; the development of managed-care programs is discussed; and the impact of managed care on pharmacy services and the price, quality, and accessibility of health care are reviewed. Health care can be considered to be managed when at least one of the following fundamental components is present: prospective pricing, "UCR" (usual, customary, and reasonable) pricing of services, peer review, mandatory use review, benefit redesign, capitation payments, channeling, quality criteria, and health promotion. The managed-care industry consists of health maintenance organizations (HMOs), preferred provider organizations (PPOs), and managed fee-for-service plans. Managed-care reimbursement principles involve transferring some or all of the impetus for controlling use of services to the health-care provider. Means by which this is done include prospective pricing, services bundling, price discounts and negotiated fees, and capitation financing and reimbursement. Financial risk-sharing arrangements with providers--including hospitals, physicians, pharmacies, and home-care companies--are necessary for any managed-care plan to attain true control over its service costs. Use-review and use-management services are also fundamental to containing health-care spending. These include retrospective, concurrent, and prospective reviews of the necessity and appropriateness of medical services. Use management, like services bundling and prospective pricing, has been more effective in reducing costs of hospital inpatient services than costs associated with ambulatory care. Per case payments and services bundling have made individual charges for items irrelevant to hospital revenue. This has forced hospital pharmacy managers to become more sensitive to cost management. Drug formularies, improved productivity, and use of prescribing protocols are means by which hospital pharmacies have controlled costs. However, since shorter hospital

  8. Barriers and motivators affecting tuberculosis infection control practices of Russian health care workers.

    PubMed

    Woith, W; Volchenkov, G; Larson, J

    2012-08-01

    Five in-patient and out-patient tuberculosis (TB) care facilities in two regions of Russia. To identify barriers and motivators to the use of infection control measures among Russian TB health care workers. In this qualitative study, a convenience sample of 96 health care workers (HCWs) was used to generate 15 homogeneous focus groups, consisting of physicians, nurses, and laboratory or support staff. Barriers and motivators related to knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, and practices were identified. The three main barriers were 1) knowledge deficits, including the belief that TB was transmitted by dust, linens and eating utensils; 2) negative attitudes related to the discomfort of respirators; and 3) practices with respect to quality and care of respirators. Education and training, fear of infecting loved ones, and fear of punishment were the main motivators. Our results point to the need for evaluation of current educational programs. Positive health promotion messages that appeal to fear might also be successful in promoting TB infection control. Individualized rewards based on personal motivators or group rewards that build on collectivist theory could be explored.

  9. Innovative Training for Occupational Health and Infection Control Workplace Assessment in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Lyndsay; Bryce, Elizabeth Ann; Scharf, Sydney; Yassi, Annalee

    2012-01-01

    A user-friendly, high quality workplace assessment field guide and an accompanying worksheet are invaluable tools for recognizing hazards in the hospital environment. These tools ensure that both front line workers as well as health and safety and infection control professionals can systematically evaluate hazards and formulate recommendations.…

  10. Integration of trachoma control into primary health care: the Tanzanian experience.

    PubMed

    Mecaskey, Jeffrey W; Ngirwamungu, Edith; Kilima, Peter M

    2003-11-01

    Tanzania was among the first countries to launch a trachoma control program with support from the International Trachoma Initiative (ITI) using surgery, antibiotics, facial cleanliness, and environmental improvement (SAFE) strategy with azithromycin. More than one million children less than 10 years of age in Tanzania have active disease and an estimated 54,000 people have trichiasis. Since 2000, Tanzania has implemented major health sector reform that have been carried out in three phases in 114 districts. A key aspect of the reform process is the policy of developing locally distributed essential health packages that then serve as the basis of the comprehensive council health plan. In 2002, the Tanzania Ministry of Health in collaboration with the ITI, the World Bank, and the office of the President embarked on a program of information for districts where trachoma is endemic but where no control program has been launched. Clear goals for the trachoma control program have been reviewed and discussed by the districts and as a result trachoma control was integrated into the comprehensive council health plans for 2003. This is expected to expand in 2004 and 2005. This work is presented as a model for the support and integration of disease-specific control efforts into the primary health care system.

  11. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  12. Tobacco taxation: the importance of earmarking the revenue to health care and tobacco control.

    PubMed

    Vardavas, Constantine I; Filippidis, Filippos T; Agaku, Israel; Mytaras, Vasileios; Bertic, Monique; Connolly, Gregory N; Tountas, Yannis; Behrakis, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Increases in tobacco taxation are acknowledged to be one of the most effective tobacco control interventions. This study aimed at determining the mediating role of socioeconomical status (SES) and the earmarking of revenue to healthcare and tobacco control, in influencing population support for the adoption of a 2 Euro tobacco tax increase in Greece, amid the challenging economic environment and current austerity measures. Data was collected from two national household surveys, the "Hellas Health III" survey, conducted in October 2010 and the "Hellas Tobacco survey" conducted in September 2012. Data was analyzed from 694 and 1066 respondents aged 18 years or more, respectively. Logistic regression models were fitted to measure the adjusted relationship between socio-economic factors for the former, and support for increased taxation on tobacco products for the latter. In 2012 amidst the Greek financial crisis, population support for a flat two euro tax increase reached 72.1%, if earmarked for health care and tobacco control, a percentage high both among non-smokers (76%) and smokers (64%) alike. On the contrary, when not earmarked, only 43.6% of the population was in support of the equivalent increase. Women were more likely to change their mind and support a flat two-euro increase if the revenue was earmarked for health care and tobacco control (aOR = 1.70; 95% C.I: 1.22-2.38, p = 0.002). Furthermore, support for an increase in tobacco taxation was not associated with SES and income. Despite dire austerity measures in Greece, support for an increase in tobacco taxation was high among both smokers and non-smokers, however, only when specifically earmarked towards health care and tobacco control. This should be taken into account not only in Greece, but within all countries facing social and economic reform.

  13. Effectiveness of Dietetic Consultations in Primary Health Care: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lana J; Ball, Lauren E; Ross, Lynda J; Barnes, Katelyn A; Williams, Lauren T

    2017-08-19

    A dietetic consultation is a structured process aimed at supporting individual patients to modify their dietary behaviors to improve health outcomes. The body of evidence on the effectiveness of nutrition care provided by dietitians in primary health care settings has not previously been synthesized. This information is important to inform the role of dietitians in primary health care service delivery. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of individual consultations provided exclusively by dietitians in primary care to support adult patients to modify dietary intake and improve health outcomes. ProQuest Family Health, Scopus, PubMed Central, Medline, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and Cochrane databases were searched for English language systematic reviews or randomized controlled trials published before October 2016. The key terms used identified the provision of nutrition care exclusively by a dietitian in a primary health care setting aimed at supporting adult patients to modify dietary behaviors and/or improve biomarkers of health. Interventions delivered to patients aged younger than 18 years, in hospital, via telephone only, in a group or lecture setting, or by a multidisciplinary team were excluded. The methodologic quality of each study was appraised using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and the body of evidence was assessed using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Evidence Analysis Manual. Outcomes included the effectiveness of dietetic interventions in terms of anthropometry, clinical indicators, and dietary intake. A statistically significant between-group difference was used to indicate intervention effectiveness (P<0.05). Twenty-six randomized controlled studies met eligibility criteria, representing 5,500 adults receiving dietetic consultations in a primary care setting. Eighteen of 26 included studies showed statistically significant differences in dietary

  14. Individual music therapy for mental health care clients with low therapy motivation: multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gold, Christian; Mössler, Karin; Grocke, Denise; Heldal, Tor Olav; Tjemsland, Lars; Aarre, Trond; Aarø, Leif Edvard; Rittmannsberger, Hans; Stige, Brynjulf; Assmus, Jörg; Rolvsjord, Randi

    2013-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) has been shown to be efficacious for mental health care clients with various disorders such as schizophrenia, depression and substance abuse. Referral to MT in clinical practice is often based on other factors than diagnosis. We aimed to examine the effectiveness of resource-oriented MT for mental health care clients with low motivation for other therapies. This was a pragmatic parallel trial. In specialised centres in Norway, Austria and Australia, 144 adults with non-organic mental disorders and low therapy motivation were randomised to 3 months of biweekly individual, resource-oriented MT plus treatment as usual (TAU) or TAU alone. TAU was typically intensive (71% were inpatients) and included the best combination of therapies available for each participant, excluding MT. Blinded assessments of the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) and 15 secondary outcomes were collected before randomisation and after 1, 3 and 9 months. Changes were analysed on an intention-to-treat basis using generalised estimating equations in longitudinal linear models, controlling for diagnosis, site and time point. MT was superior to TAU for total negative symptoms (SANS, d = 0.54, p < 0.001) as well as functioning, clinical global impressions, social avoidance through music, and vitality (all p < 0.01). Individual MT as conducted in routine practice is an effective addition to usual care for mental health care clients with low motivation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. A tool to assess knowledge, attitude and behavior of Indonesian health care workers regarding infection control.

    PubMed

    Duerink, D O; Hadi, U; Lestari, E S; Roeshadi, Djoko; Wahyono, Hendro; Nagelkerke, N J D; Van der Meulen, R G; Van den Broek, P J

    2013-07-01

    to investigate knowledge, attitude and behaviour toward infection control in two teaching hospitals on the island of Java by means of a questionnaire and to evaluate the use of the questionnaire as a tool. we investigated knowledge, attitude and behaviour toward infection control in two teaching hospitals on the island of Java by means of a questionnaire to identify problem areas, barriers and facilitators. The target was to include at least 50% of all health care workers (physicians, nurses, assistant nurses and infection control nurses) in each hospital, department and profession. Differences between demographic variables and scores for individual questions and groups of questions were compared using the chi-square statistic and analysis of variance and Spearman's rho was used to test for correlations between knowledge, attitude, self-reported behaviour and perceived obstacles. more than half of the health care workers of the participating departments completed the questionnaire. Of the 1036 respondents (44% nurses, 37% physicians and 19% assistant nurses), 34% were vaccinated against hepatitis B, 77% had experienced needle stick accidents and 93% had been instructed about infection control. The mean of the correct answers to the knowledge questions was 44%; of the answers to the attitude questions 67% were in agreement with the correct attitude; obstacles to compliance with infection control guidelines were perceived in 30% of the questions and the mean self-reported compliance was 63%. Safe handling of sharps, hand hygiene and the use of personal protective equipment were identified as the most important aspects for interventions. Significant positive correlations were found between knowledge, attitude, self-reported behaviour and perceived obstacles. the questionnaire in conjunction with site visits and interviews was a valuable strategy to identify trouble spots in the hospitals and to determine barriers to facilitators of change that should be taken into

  16. Occupational Health for Health Care Providers

    MedlinePlus

    Health care workers are exposed to many job hazards. These can include Infections Needle injuries Back injuries ... prevention practices. They can reduce your risk of health problems. Use protective equipment, follow infection control guidelines, ...

  17. A randomized controlled study about the use of eHealth in the home health care of premature infants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background One area where the use of information and communication technology (ICT), or eHealth, could be developed is the home health care of premature infants. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to investigate whether the use of video conferencing or a web application improves parents’ satisfaction in taking care of a premature infant at home and decreases the need of home visits. In addition, nurses’ attitudes regarding the use of these tools were examined. Method Thirty-four families were randomized to one of three groups before their premature infant was discharged from the hospital to home health care: a control group receiving standard home health care (13 families); a web group receiving home health care supplemented with the use of a web application (12 families); a video group with home health care supplemented with video conferencing using Skype (9 families). Families and nursing staff answered questionnaires about the usefulness of ICT. In addition, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 families. Results All the parents in the web group found the web application easy to use. 83% of the families thought it was good to have access to their child’s data through the application. All the families in the video group found Skype easy to use and were satisfied with the video calls. 88% of the families thought that video calls were better than ordinary phone calls. 33% of the families in the web group and 75% of those in the video group thought the need for home visits was decreased by the web application or Skype. 50% of the families in the web group and 100% of those in the video group thought the web application or the video calls had helped them feel more confident in caring for their child. Most of the nurses were motivated to use ICT but some were reluctant and avoided using the web application and video conferencing. Conclusion The families were satisfied with both the web application and video conferencing. The families

  18. Iterative learning control with applications in energy generation, lasers and health care

    PubMed Central

    Tutty, O. R.

    2016-01-01

    Many physical systems make repeated executions of the same finite time duration task. One example is a robot in a factory or warehouse whose task is to collect an object in sequence from a location, transfer it over a finite duration, place it at a specified location or on a moving conveyor and then return for the next one and so on. Iterative learning control was especially developed for systems with this mode of operation and this paper gives an overview of this control design method using relatively recent relevant applications in wind turbines, free-electron lasers and health care, as exemplars to demonstrate its applicability. PMID:27713654

  19. Iterative learning control with applications in energy generation, lasers and health care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, E.; Tutty, O. R.

    2016-09-01

    Many physical systems make repeated executions of the same finite time duration task. One example is a robot in a factory or warehouse whose task is to collect an object in sequence from a location, transfer it over a finite duration, place it at a specified location or on a moving conveyor and then return for the next one and so on. Iterative learning control was especially developed for systems with this mode of operation and this paper gives an overview of this control design method using relatively recent relevant applications in wind turbines, free-electron lasers and health care, as exemplars to demonstrate its applicability.

  20. Community health workers in diabetes care: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Trump, Lisa J; Mendenhall, Tai J

    2017-09-01

    Maintaining optimal self-care in managing Type 2 diabetes is a common struggle for patients due to several barriers, including access to quality services, financial insecurity and/or lack of insurance, and emotional distress. Consequently, morbidity and mortality rates are high, alongside rising health care costs. Alternative approaches that address common barriers require further investigation. This systematic review of randomized controlled trials examines the effectiveness of using community health workers (CHWs) in Type 2 diabetes care. This effort is warranted to orient practitioners and researchers to the state of existing knowledge, and to direct clinical practice and future research. Data were extracted from 17 peer-reviewed articles; they were examined with respect to theory integration, CHW intervention design, outcome variables, and findings. Approximately one-third of articles explicitly integrated theory into their research conceptualization and design. There was great variation across intervention dosages, attrition rates, and methods of CHW training. Main foci across studies' findings suggest that a CHW intervention has significant impacts on physical health outcomes, diabetes knowledge, self-care behaviors, and emotional distress and well-being. Principal implications relate to the need for more research regarding CHW intervention types and methods, and further investigation about the mechanisms of change within a CHW-delivered intervention. Findings support the case for more CHWs in treatment teams to bridge patients with the medical system. This research will serve to better equip providers in the support of patients managing Type 2 diabetes and advance the Triple Aim of health care. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Health Care Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    at birth, obesity , and infant mortality, to name a few categories, should be much higher. Quality is not standard for all Americans, and there are...quality health care while controlling cost, slowing the obesity epidemic and the multiple chronic diseases associated with obesity through better...factors as adult and infant mortality rates and per capita health expenditure (WHO, 2000, p.155 and Clemmitt, 2006, p. 292). Given the fact that

  2. The Effect of Performance-Based Financial Incentives on Improving Health Care Provision in Burundi: A Controlled Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rudasingwa, Martin; Soeters, Robert; Bossuyt, Michel

    2015-01-01

    To strengthen the health care delivery, the Burundian Government in collaboration with international NGOs piloted performance-based financing (PBF) in 2006. The health facilities were assigned - by using a simple matching method - to begin PBF scheme or to continue with the traditional input-based funding. Our objective was to analyse the effect of that PBF scheme on the quality of health services between 2006 and 2008. We conducted the analysis in 16 health facilities with PBF scheme and 13 health facilities without PBF scheme. We analysed the PBF effect by using 58 composite quality indicators of eight health services: Care management, outpatient care, maternity care, prenatal care, family planning, laboratory services, medicines management and materials management. The differences in quality improvement in the two groups of health facilities were performed applying descriptive statistics, a paired non-parametric Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test and a simple difference-in-difference approach at a significance level of 5%. We found an improvement of the quality of care in the PBF group and a significant deterioration in the non-PBF group in the same four health services: care management, outpatient care, maternity care, and prenatal care. The findings suggest a PBF effect of between 38 and 66 percentage points (p<0.001) in the quality scores of care management, outpatient care, prenatal care, and maternal care. We found no PBF effect on clinical support services: laboratory services, medicines management, and material management. The PBF scheme in Burundi contributed to the improvement of the health services that were strongly under the control of medical personnel (physicians and nurses) in a short time of two years. The clinical support services that did not significantly improved were strongly under the control of laboratory technicians, pharmacists and non-medical personnel. PMID:25948432

  3. The effect of performance-based financial incentives on improving health care provision in Burundi: a controlled cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rudasingwa, Martin; Soeters, Robert; Bossuyt, Michel

    2014-10-29

    To strengthen the health care delivery, the Burundian Government in collaboration with international NGOs piloted performance-based financing (PBF) in 2006. The health facilities were assigned - by using a simple matching method - to begin PBF scheme or to continue with the traditional input-based funding. Our objective was to analyse the effect of that PBF scheme on the quality of health services between 2006 and 2008. We conducted the analysis in 16 health facilities with PBF scheme and 13 health facilities without PBF scheme. We analysed the PBF effect by using 58 composite quality indicators of eight health services: Care management, outpatient care, maternity care, prenatal care, family planning, laboratory services, medicines management and materials management. The differences in quality improvement in the two groups of health facilities were performed applying descriptive statistics, a paired non-parametric Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test and a simple difference-in-difference approach at a significance level of 5%. We found an improvement of the quality of care in the PBF group and a significant deterioration in the non-PBF group in the same four health services: care management, outpatient care, maternity care, and prenatal care. The findings suggest a PBF effect of between 38 and 66 percentage points (p<0.001) in the quality scores of care management, outpatient care, prenatal care, and maternal care. We found no PBF effect on clinical support services: laboratory services, medicines management, and material management. The PBF scheme in Burundi contributed to the improvement of the health services that were strongly under the control of medical personnel (physicians and nurses) in a short time of two years. The clinical support services that did not significantly improved were strongly under the control of laboratory technicians, pharmacists and non-medical personnel.

  4. Health care workers.

    PubMed

    Udasin, I G

    2000-12-01

    More people are employed in the health care sector than in any other industry in the United States. Health care workers are exposed to a wide variety of hazards, including biological, chemical, physical and psychological stressors. Concerns about exposure to contagious diseases such as HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and tuberculosis have influenced the career choices of many health professionals. Physical hazards, especially ergonomic ones, account for the majority of the disability faced by health care workers. Chemical exposure and psychosocial stresses are also present in health care institutions. The exposure encountered in health care facilities is potentially dangerous to health care workers as well as to their family members and unborn children.

  5. Systematic Review of Integrative Health Care Research: Randomized Control Trials, Clinical Controlled Trials, and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khorsan, Raheleh; Coulter, Ian D.; Crawford, Cindy; Hsiao, An-Fu

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to assess the level of evidence for integrative health care research. We searched PubMed, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), BIOSIS Previews, EMBASE, the entire Cochrane Library, MANTIS, Social SciSearch, SciSearch Cited Ref Sci, PsychInfo, CINAHL, and NCCAM grantee publications listings, from database inception to May 2009, as well as searches of the “gray literature.” Available studies published in English language were included. Three independent reviewers rated each article and assessed the methodological quality of studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN 50). Our search yielded 11,891 total citations but 6 clinical studies, including 4 randomized, met our inclusion criteria. There are no available systematic reviews/meta-analyses published that met our inclusion criteria. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed independently using quality checklists of the SIGN 50. Only a small number of RCTs and CCTs with a limited number of patients and lack of adequate control groups assessing integrative health care research are available. These studies provide limited evidence of effective integrative health care on some modalities. However, integrative health care regimen appears to be generally safe. PMID:20953383

  6. Depression and issues of control among elderly people in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Barder, L; Slimmer, L; LeSage, J

    1994-10-01

    This descriptive study investigated the relationship between both demographic characteristics and type of health care setting and elderly people's attributions for control, functional status, mood, type of helplessness, and perception of self-efficacy. Results of the study demonstrate that elderly people in long-term care settings are more vulnerable to experiencing learned helplessness and depression than elderly people in acute or rehabilitation settings. The findings indicate that the critical period for the development of learned helplessness and depression is for subjects with a length of stay of 7 weeks to 6 months. The study supports other research which concludes that depression in elderly people is better explained by the original learned helplessness theory rather than being related to attributions about the cause of loss of control.

  7. Effects of preventive home visits on health care costs for ambulatory frail elders: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kono, Ayumi; Kanaya, Yukiko; Tsumura, Chieko; Rubenstein, Laurence Z

    2013-10-01

    Reducing health care costs through preventive geriatric care has become a high priority in Japan. We analyzed data from a randomized controlled trial to examine the effects of a preventive home visit program on health care costs among ambulatory frail elders. Structured preventive home visits by nurses or care managers were provided to the visit group every 6 months over 2 years. The enrolled participants (N = 323) were randomly assigned to either the visit group (N = 161) or the control group (N = 162). We analyzed the health care costs, including the costs for hospitalizations and outpatient clinic utilization for participants who had health care insurance from the local government (N = 307). The visit group included 154 individuals in the visit group and 153 people in the control group. Total health care costs over the study period were not significantly different between groups, but at most monthly time points costs and those for outpatient clinic utilization in the visit group were lower than those in the control group. Hospitalizations, which accounted for more than ¥ 500,000 JPY per month, were less likely to occur more often among participants in the visit group (N = 71) than in the control group (N = 113) (OR = 0.63; p = 0.002). These results suggest that a preventive home visit program may reduce monthly health care costs, primarily by reducing hospitalization costs.

  8. Barriers and Facilitators Affecting Tuberculosis Infection Control Practices of Russian Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Woith, Wendy Mann; Volchenkov, Grigory; Larson, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Setting Five inpatient and outpatient tuberculosis care facilities in two regions of Russia. Objective: To identify barriers and motivators to use of infection control measures among Russian TB health care workers. Design In this qualitative study, a convenience sample of 96 HCWs was used to generate 15 homogeneous focus groups consisting of physicians, nurses, lab staff, or support staff. Results Barriers and motivators related to knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, and practices were identified. Three main barriers were a) knowledge deficits, including the belief that TB was transmitted by dust, linens, and eating utensils; b) negative attitudes related to the discomfort of respirators; and c) practices with respect to quality and care of respirators. Education and training, fear of infecting loved ones, and fear of punishment were the main motivators. Conclusions Our results point to the need for evaluation of current educational programs. Positive health promotion messages that appeal to fear might also be successful in promoting use of TB infection control. Individualized rewards based on personal motivators or group rewards that build on collectivist theory could be explored. PMID:22687261

  9. The association between asthma control, health care costs, and quality of life in France and Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current asthma management guidelines are based on the level of asthma control. The impact of asthma control on health care resources and quality of life (QoL) is insufficiently studied. EUCOAST study was designed to describe costs and QoL in adult patients according to level of asthma control in France and Spain. Methods An observational cost of illness study was conducted simultaneously in both countries among patients age greater or equal to 18 with a diagnosis of asthma for at least 12 months. Patients were recruited prospectively by GPs in 2010 in four waves to avoid a seasonal bias. Health care resources utilization of the three months before the inclusion was collected through physician questionnaires. Asthma control was evaluated using 2009 GINA criteria over a 3-month period. QoL was assessed using EQ-5D-3L®. Results 2,671 patients (France: 1,154; Spain: 1,517) were enrolled. Asthma was controlled in 40.6% [95% CI: 37.7% - 43.4%] and 29.9% [95% CI: 27.6% - 32.3%] of French and Spanish patients respectively. For all types of costs, the percentage of patients using health care resources varied significantly according to the level of asthma control. The average cost (euros/3-months/patient) of controlled asthma was €85.4 (SD: 153.5) in France compared with €314.0 (SD: 2,160.4) for partially controlled asthma and €537.9 (SD: 2,355.7) for uncontrolled asthma (p<0.0001). In Spain, the corresponding figures were €152.6 (SD: 162.1), €241.2 (SD: 266.8), and €556.8 (SD: 762.4). EQ-5D-3L® score was higher (p<0.0001) in patients with controlled asthma compared to partially controlled and uncontrolled asthma in both countries (respectively 0.88; 0.78; 0.63 in France and 0.89; 0.82; 0.69 in Spain). Conclusions In both countries, patients presenting with uncontrolled asthma had a significantly higher asthma costs and lower scores of Qol compared to the others. PMID:23517484

  10. Programming, budgeting, and control in health care organization: the state of the art.

    PubMed Central

    Vraciu, R A

    1979-01-01

    The planning, budgeting, and controlling processes (PBCP) largely subsume all of the planning and controlling activities of an organization. This paper discusses these activities within the context of a single management control system, focusing on three topics. First, a brief historical perspective of management concerns which relate to PBCP is presented and several important external pressures currently imposed on the health care industry are discussed. Second, normative models of the processes--programming, budgeting, and controlling--are presented. The discussion focuses on the elements and relationships of these processes, and numerous references to the literature are provided. Third, several issues related to the gap between the state of the art in PBCP for hospitals and the current state of practice are discussed. PMID:116990

  11. Effects of knowledge and internal locus of control in groups of health care workers judging likelihood of pathogen transfer.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Anne Collins; Walsh, Fran; Bryant, Michelle

    2013-08-01

    A study was conducted to measure the effects of attitudes and beliefs on the risk judgments of health care workers. Lack of hand hygiene compliance is a worldwide issue in health care, contributing to infections, fatalities, and increased health care costs. Human factors methods are a promising solution to the problem of compliance, although thus far, the concentration has been on process and engineering methods, such as the design of no-touch sinks. Factors internal to the health care worker, such as their attitudes and beliefs about hand hygiene, have received less attention. For this study, three groups of health care workers completed measures of attitudes, control beliefs, and hand hygiene knowledge. They then provided risk judgments of touching various surfaces via a factorial survey. Attitudes, knowledge, control beliefs, and surface type all predicted the risk judgments of the sample of health care workers, with differences between professional groups. Health care workers perceive less risk when touching surfaces,which may explain historically low rates of hand hygiene compliance after surface contact. Although more research is needed to directly connect risk judgments to failures of hand hygiene, the current results can inform interventions targeting the internal attitudes and beliefs of health care workers.

  12. Wireless-PDA-controlled image workflow from PACS: the next trend in the health care enterprise?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erberich, Stephan G.; Documet, Jorge; Zhou, Michael Z.; Cao, Fei; Liu, Brent J.; Mogel, Greg T.; Huang, H. K.

    2003-05-01

    Image workflow in today's Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) is controlled from fixed Display Workstations (DW) using proprietary control interfaces. A remote access to the Hospital Information System (HIS) and Radiology Information System (RIS) for urgent patient information retrieval does not exist or gradually become available. The lack for remote access and workflow control for HIS and RIS is especially true when it comes to medical images of a PACS on Department or Hospital level. As images become more complex and data sizes expand rapidly with new image techniques like functional MRI, Mammography or routine spiral CT to name a few, the access and manageability becomes an important issue. Long image downloads or incomplete work lists cannot be tolerated in a busy health care environment. In addition, the domain of the PACS is no longer limited to the imaging department and PACS is also being used in the ER and emergency care units. Thus a prompt and secure access and manageability not only by the radiologist, but also from the physician becomes crucial to optimally utilize the PACS in the health care enterprise of the new millennium. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a concept and its implementation of a remote access and workflow control of the PACS combining wireless, Internet and Internet2 technologies. A wireless device, the Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), is used to communicate to a PACS web server that acts as a gateway controlling the commands for which the user has access to the PACS server. The commands implemented for this test-bed are query/retrieve of the patient list and study list including modality, examination, series and image selection and pushing any list items to a selected DW on the PACS network.

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effectiveness of Traditional and Mobile Public Health Communications With Health Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Baseman, Janet; Revere, Debra; Painter, Ian; Oberle, Mark; Duchin, Jeffrey; Thiede, Hanne; Nett, Randall; MacEachern, Dorothy; Stergachis, Andy

    2016-02-01

    Health care providers play an essential role in public health emergency preparedness and response. We conducted a 4-year randomized controlled trial to systematically compare the effectiveness of traditional and mobile communication strategies for sending time-sensitive public health messages to providers. Subjects (N=848) included providers who might be leveraged to assist with emergency preparedness and response activities, such as physicians, pharmacists, nurse practitioners, physician's assistants, and veterinarians. Providers were randomly assigned to a group that received time-sensitive quarterly messages via e-mail, fax, or cell phone text messaging (SMS) or to a no-message control group. Follow-up phone interviews elicited information about message receipt, topic recall, and perceived credibility and trustworthiness of message and source. Our main outcome measures were awareness and recall of message content, which was compared across delivery methods. Per-protocol analysis revealed that e-mail messages were recalled at a higher rate than were messaged delivered by fax or SMS, whereas the as-treated analysis found that e-mail and fax groups had similar recall rates and both had higher recall rates than the SMS group. This is the first study to systematically evaluate the relative effectiveness of public health message delivery systems. Our findings provide guidance to improve public health agency communications with providers before, during, and after a public health emergency.

  14. [Water as a reservoir for nosocomial infections in health care facilities, prevention and control].

    PubMed

    Exner, M; Kramer, A; Kistemann, T; Gebel, J; Engelhart, S

    2007-03-01

    New epidemiological and microbiological investigations using molecular typing methods to link patient and environmental strains demonstrate a strong association between water-borne pathogens and nosocomial infections. Avoiding patient exposure to these pathogens results in a decreased incidence of water-borne nosocomial infections. There remains a tremendous potential to reduce hospital acquired infections previously viewed as inevitable and unavoidable through intervention and preventive measures. The characteristics of water application in health care facilities, the vulnerability of patients, the spectrum of relevant pathogens and their ecologic aspects, legal issues and important measures for prevention and control are discussed.

  15. Translating Infection Control Guidelines Into Practice: Implementation Process Within a Health Care Institution

    PubMed Central

    Raveis, Victoria H.; Conway, Laurie J.; Uchida, Mayuko; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Larson, Elaine L.; Stone, Patricia W.

    2014-01-01

    Health-care-associated infections (HAIs) remain a major patient safety problem even as policy and programmatic efforts designed to reduce HAIs have increased. Although information on implementing effective infection control (IC) efforts has steadily grown, knowledge gaps remain regarding the organizational elements that improve bedside practice and accommodate variations in clinical care settings. We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews in 11 hospitals across the United States with a range of hospital personnel involved in IC (n = 116). We examined the collective nature of IC and the organizational elements that can enable disparate groups to work together to prevent HAIs. Our content analysis of participants’ narratives yielded a rich description of the organizational process of implementing adherence to IC. Findings document the dynamic, fluid, interactional, and reactive nature of this process. Three themes emerged: implementing adherence efforts institution-wide, promoting an institutional culture to sustain adherence, and contending with opposition to the IC mandate. PMID:24598775

  16. Association of a Controlled Substance Scoring Algorithm with Health Care Costs and Hospitalizations: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Starner, Catherine I; Qiu, Yang; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar; Gleason, Patrick P

    2016-12-01

    Patients often misuse a combination of prescription drugs including opioids; however, the relationship between a controlled substance (CS) score and health outcomes is unknown. To examine the association between a CS scoring algorithm and health care use, specifically total cost of care, hospitalizations, and emergency room (ER) visits. This analysis was a retrospective cohort study using administrative claims data from a large U.S. health insurer. Included in the analysis were 999,852 members with a minimum CS score of 2.5 in the fourth quarter (4Q) of 2012, who were continuously enrolled from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013, and who were aged 18 years or older. A CS score was calculated using 4Q 2012 (3 months) prescription claims data and divided into 3 components: (1) number of CS claims, (2) number of unique pharmacies and unique prescribers, and (3) evidence of increasing CS use. The primary outcomes were total cost of care (pharmacy and medical costs), all-cause hospitalizations, and ER visits in 2013. We also quantified what a 1-point change in CS score meant for the primary outcomes. 47% of members had a CS score of 2.5, indicating a single CS claim, and 51% of members had a score between 3 and less than 12. The remaining 2% (20,858 members) had a score of 12 or more. There was a statistically significant and consistently increasing association between the 4Q 2012 CS score and hospitalizations, ER visits, and total costs of care in 2013. A 1-point change in CS score was associated with a $1,488 change in total cost of care, 0.9% change in the hospitalization rate, and 1.5% change in the ER visit rate. There is a linear association between increasing CS score and negative health outcomes. Insurers should consider interventions to lower member CS scores. This study was funded internally by Prime Therapeutics. Starner, Qiu, and Gleason are employees of Prime Therapeutics, a pharmacy benefits management company. Karaca-Mandic is an employee of the

  17. Unplanned health care tourism.

    PubMed

    Powell, Suzanne K

    2015-01-01

    Health care tourism is often a preplanned event carefully laying out all the details. Sometimes, when one least expects it, medical care is needed outside of the mainland. This Editorial speaks to an unplanned experience.

  18. Vacation health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001937.htm Vacation health care To use the sharing features on this page, ... and help you avoid problems. Talk to your health care provider or visit a travel clinic 4 to ...

  19. National Health Care Survey

    Cancer.gov

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  20. Biopsychosocial law, health care reform, and the control of medical inflation in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Daniel; Mueller, Kathryn; Warren, Pamela A

    2012-05-01

    A noteworthy attempt at health care reform was the 1992 Colorado workers' compensation reform bill, which led to the creation of what has been called "biopsychosocial laws." These laws mandated the use of treatment guidelines for patients with injury or chronic pain, which advocated a biopsychosocial model of rehabilitation, and aspired to use a "best practice" approach to controlling costs. The purpose of this study was to examine the financial impact of this health care reform process, and to test the hypothesis that this approach can be an effective strategy to contain costs while providing good care. This study utilized a dataset collected prospectively from 1992 to 2007 in 45 U.S. states for regulatory purposes. These data summarized the medical treatment and disability costs of 520,314 injured workers in Colorado, and an estimated 28.6 million injured workers nationally. As no other state passed a comparable bill, the Colorado worker compensation reform bill created a natural experiment, where a treatment group was created by legally enforceable medical treatment guidelines. In the 15 years following the implementation of the reform, the inflation of medical costs in Colorado workers' compensation was only one third that of the national average, saving an estimated $859 million on patients injured in 2007 alone. Although there were confounding variables, and causality could not be determined, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that Colorado's 1992 legislative efforts to reform workers compensation law using the biopsychosocial model worked as intended to provide good care while controlling costs. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Health Care and Distributive Justice.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    staggering cost of hospitalization and health care in general. Vast insurance pools that pay the bills encourage both the provider and consumer to utilize...incentives built into the system for either the consumer or the provider to encourage medical services cost control. 6 Massive, expensive and seemingly...1991.11 Ethical Considerations in Health Care Bioethical questions will prevail during any discussion of how to resolve America’s health care crisis. The

  2. Creonization of health care.

    PubMed

    Bulger, R J

    1990-01-01

    As prefigured in the Greek tragedy Antigone, one of the primary conflicts in contemporary health care is that between humane concern for the individual and concern for society at large and administrative rules. The computerization of the health care system and development of large data bases will create new forms of this conflict that will challenge the self-definition of health care and health care professionals.

  3. Who will get care? With health care costs spiraling out of control, it may be time to consider rationing.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jan

    2008-10-01

    Rationing occurs every day at some level of the health care system. Trustees need to step into the fray and take a hard look at the economic issues facing their institutions, deciding where and how limited funds will be spent.

  4. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration improves postural control in health care professionals: a worksite randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Elfering, Achim; Schade, Volker; Stoecklin, Lukas; Baur, Simone; Burger, Christian; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2014-05-01

    Slip, trip, and fall injuries are frequent among health care workers. Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training was tested to improve postural control. Participants included 124 employees of a Swiss university hospital. The randomized controlled trial included an experimental group given 8 weeks of training and a control group with no intervention. In both groups, postural control was assessed as mediolateral sway on a force plate before and after the 8-week trial. Mediolateral sway was significantly decreased by stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training in the experimental group but not in the control group that received no training (p < .05). Stochastic resonance whole-body vibration training is an option in the primary prevention of balance-related injury at work.

  5. Teamwork in health care.

    PubMed

    Landman, Natalie; Aannestad, Liv K; Smoldt, Robert K; Cortese, Denis A

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that maintaining and improving the health of the population, and doing so in a financially sustainable manner, requires the coordination of acute medical care with long-term care, and social support services, that is, team-based care. Despite a growing body of evidence on the benefits of team-based care, the health care ecosystem remains "resistant" to a broader implementation of such care models. This resistance is a function of both system-wide and organizational barriers, which result primarily from fragmentation in reimbursement for health care services, regulatory restrictions, and the siloed nature of health professional education. To promote the broader adoption of team-based care models, the health care system must transition to pay for value reimbursement, as well as break down the educational silos and move toward team-based and value-based education of health professionals.

  6. Burnout and Workload Among Health Care Workers: The Moderating Role of Job Control

    PubMed Central

    Portoghese, Igor; Galletta, Maura; Coppola, Rosa Cristina; Finco, Gabriele; Campagna, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Background As health care workers face a wide range of psychosocial stressors, they are at a high risk of developing burnout syndrome, which in turn may affect hospital outcomes such as the quality and safety of provided care. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the moderating effect of job control on the relationship between workload and burnout. Methods A total of 352 hospital workers from five Italian public hospitals completed a self-administered questionnaire that was used to measure exhaustion, cynicism, job control, and workload. Data were collected in 2013. Results In contrast to previous studies, the results of this study supported the moderation effect of job control on the relationship between workload and exhaustion. Furthermore, the results found support for the sequential link from exhaustion to cynicism. Conclusion This study showed the importance for hospital managers to carry out management practices that promote job control and provide employees with job resources, in order to reduce the burnout risk. PMID:25379330

  7. Perceived Barriers to Adherence to Tuberculosis Infection Control Measures among Health Care Workers in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Helena J; Veras-Estévez, Bienvenido A; Pomeranz, Jamie L; Pérez-Then, Eddy N; Marcelino, Belkys; Lauzardo, Michael

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Health care workers have an increased risk of infection due to occupational Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposure, including multidrug-resistant strains. Health care workers' risk of developing tuberculosis is greater than that of the general population, whether in low-, intermediate- or high-incidence countries. Adherence to infection control measures (administrative controls, environmental controls, and personal respiratory protection) is essential to reduce risk of disease transmission between suspected tuberculosis patients and health care workers, but for different reasons, both objective and subjective, adherence is low. Identifying the causes of low adherence is a prerequisite to effective programming to reduce risk. OBJECTIVE Identify perceived barriers to adherence to tuberculosis infection control measures among health care workers in the Dominican Republic. METHODS During August 2014, a qualitative study was conducted in two tertiary-level hospitals in different regions of the Dominican Republic. A semi-structured interview guide of nine questions was developed, based on the scientific literature and with consensus of clinical experts. Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of seven physicians (five men, two women) and two baccalaureate nurses (both women) working in the emergency medicine, internal medicine or nursing departments of those institutions. Question topics included clinical experience of M. tuberculosis infection and disease; knowledge of disease transmission and preventive practices; clinical management strategies; and perceptions of effectiveness of directly observed treatment, short-course, and disease coping strategies. RESULTS Perceived barriers were described as: 1) sense of invincibility of health care workers; 2) personal beliefs of health care workers related to direct patient communication; 3) low provider-to-patient ratios in hospitals; 4) absence of tuberculosis isolation units for

  8. [Blood pressure control in Spanish hypertensive patients in Primary Health Care Centres. PRESCAP 2002 Study].

    PubMed

    Llisterri Caro, José L; Rodríguez Roca, Gustavo C; Alonso Moreno, Francisco J; Lou Arnal, Salvador; Divisón Garrote, Juan A; Santos Rodríguez, José A; Raber Béjar, Anna; de Castellar Sansó, Rous; Ruilope Urioste, Luis M; Banegas Banegas, José R

    2004-02-14

    More information is needed on hypertension control in clinical practice, which includes taking at least two blood pressure (BP) readings and taking into account surgery times and previous antihypertensive drug intake. Our study aimed to assess the optimum degree of BP control in a broad sample of Spanish hypertensive patients in primary care and to determine factors associated with a poor control. Cross-sectional, multicenter study of hypertensive patients aged over 18 years and treated with drugs during the preceeding three months, who were recruited by general practitioners through consecutive sampling in primary care settings throughout Spain over 3 consecutive days. BP measurements were performed in surgery hours (morning and evening) following standardized methods and averaging two consecutive readings. An average BP lower than 140/90 mm Hg (values lower than 130/85 mm Hg in diabetics) was regarded as optimum BP control. 12 754 patients were included, mean age 63.3 years (10.8), 57.2% women. 36.1% (95% CI, 35.2-36.9) had good systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) controls, 39.1% (95% CI, 38.3-40.0) had good SBP control only, and 73.1% (95% CI, 72.3-73.9) had good DBP control only. BP control was significantly (*2, p < 0.001) better during evening than during morning measurements (43.6% vs 37.1%) and in patients who had taken antihypertensive treatment before measurement (37.2%) vs. those who had not taken it (21.0%). Factors such as alcohol consumption, sedentary lifestyle, obesity and age were all associated with poor BP control (Wald's (chi 2, p < 0.001). The results of the PRESCAP 2002 study indicate that approximately 4 out of 10 hypertensive patients treated pharmacologically by primary health care centers in Spain have optimal BP control. Significant differences were found in the degree of control depending on surgery hours and the previous intake of antihypertensive medication.

  9. Stepped care for depression and anxiety: from primary care to specialized mental health care: a randomised controlled trial testing the effectiveness of a stepped care program among primary care patients with mood or anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    Seekles, Wike; van Straten, Annemieke; Beekman, Aartjan; van Marwijk, Harm; Cuijpers, Pim

    2009-01-01

    Background Mood and anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and have a large impact on the lives of the affected individuals. Therefore, optimal treatment of these disorders is highly important. In this study we will examine the effectiveness of a stepped care program for primary care patients with mood and anxiety disorders. A stepped care program is characterized by different treatment steps that are arranged in order of increasing intensity. Methods This study is a randomised controlled trial with two conditions: stepped care and care as usual, whereby the latter forms the control group. The stepped care program consists of four evidence based interventions: (1) Watchful waiting, (2) Guided self-help, (3) Problem Solving Treatment and (4) Medication and/or specialized mental health care. The study population consists of primary care attendees aged 18–65 years. Screeners are sent to all patients of the participating general practitioners. Individuals with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental disorders (DSM) diagnosis of major depression, dysthymia, panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia), generalized anxiety disorder, or social phobia are included as well as individuals with minor depression and anxiety disorders. Primary focus is the reduction of depressive and anxiety symptoms. Both conditions are monitored at 8, 16 and 24 weeks. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a stepped care program for patients with depressive and anxiety disorder. If effective, a stepped care program can form a worthwhile alternative for care as usual. Strengths and limitations of this study are discussed. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trails: ISRCTN17831610. PMID:19500346

  10. Promoting advance planning for health care and research among older adults: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Family members are often required to act as substitute decision-makers when health care or research participation decisions must be made for an incapacitated relative. Yet most families are unable to accurately predict older adult preferences regarding future health care and willingness to engage in research studies. Discussion and documentation of preferences could improve proxies' abilities to decide for their loved ones. This trial assesses the efficacy of an advance planning intervention in improving the accuracy of substitute decision-making and increasing the frequency of documented preferences for health care and research. It also investigates the financial impact on the healthcare system of improving substitute decision-making. Methods/Design Dyads (n = 240) comprising an older adult and his/her self-selected proxy are randomly allocated to the experimental or control group, after stratification for type of designated proxy and self-report of prior documentation of healthcare preferences. At baseline, clinical and research vignettes are used to elicit older adult preferences and assess the ability of their proxy to predict those preferences. Responses are elicited under four health states, ranging from the subject's current health state to severe dementia. For each state, we estimated the public costs of the healthcare services that would typically be provided to a patient under these scenarios. Experimental dyads are visited at home, twice, by a specially trained facilitator who communicates the dyad-specific results of the concordance assessment, helps older adults convey their wishes to their proxies, and offers assistance in completing a guide entitled My Preferences that we designed specifically for that purpose. In between these meetings, experimental dyads attend a group information session about My Preferences. Control dyads attend three monthly workshops aimed at promoting healthy behaviors. Concordance assessments are repeated at the

  11. Promoting advance planning for health care and research among older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Gina; Arcand, Marcel; Blanchette, Danièle; Boire-Lavigne, Anne-Marie; Dubois, Marie-France; Guay, Maryse; Hottin, Paule; Lane, Julie; Lauzon, Judith; Bellemare, Suzanne

    2012-01-05

    Family members are often required to act as substitute decision-makers when health care or research participation decisions must be made for an incapacitated relative. Yet most families are unable to accurately predict older adult preferences regarding future health care and willingness to engage in research studies. Discussion and documentation of preferences could improve proxies' abilities to decide for their loved ones. This trial assesses the efficacy of an advance planning intervention in improving the accuracy of substitute decision-making and increasing the frequency of documented preferences for health care and research. It also investigates the financial impact on the healthcare system of improving substitute decision-making. Dyads (n = 240) comprising an older adult and his/her self-selected proxy are randomly allocated to the experimental or control group, after stratification for type of designated proxy and self-report of prior documentation of healthcare preferences. At baseline, clinical and research vignettes are used to elicit older adult preferences and assess the ability of their proxy to predict those preferences. Responses are elicited under four health states, ranging from the subject's current health state to severe dementia. For each state, we estimated the public costs of the healthcare services that would typically be provided to a patient under these scenarios. Experimental dyads are visited at home, twice, by a specially trained facilitator who communicates the dyad-specific results of the concordance assessment, helps older adults convey their wishes to their proxies, and offers assistance in completing a guide entitled My Preferences that we designed specifically for that purpose. In between these meetings, experimental dyads attend a group information session about My Preferences. Control dyads attend three monthly workshops aimed at promoting healthy behaviors. Concordance assessments are repeated at the end of the intervention and

  12. Selective primary health care: an interim strategy for disease control in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Walsh, J A; Warren, K S

    1979-11-01

    Priorities among the infectious diseases affecting the three billion people in the less developed world have been based on prevalence, morbidity, mortality and feasibility of control. With these priorities in mind a program of selective primary health care is compared with other approaches and suggested as the most cost-effective form of medical intervention in the least developed countries. A flexible program delivered by either fixed or mobile units might include measles and diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus vaccination, treatment for febrile malaria and oral rehydration for diarrhea in children, and tetanus toxoid and encouragement of breast feeding in mothers. Other interventions might be added on the basis of regional needs and new developments. For major diseases for which control measures are inadequate, research is an inexpensive approach on the basis of cost per infected person per year.

  13. Relating Health Locus of Control to Health Care Use, Adherence, and Transition Readiness Among Youths With Chronic Conditions, North Carolina, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Nazareth, Meaghan; Richards, Jordan; Javalkar, Karina; Haberman, Cara; Zhong, Yi; Rak, Eniko; Jain, Nina; Ferris, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Health locus of control refers to the belief that health is in one’s control (internal control) or is not in one’s control (external control). Among adults, external locus of control is associated with negative health outcomes, whereas internal locus of control is associated with favorable outcomes. Few studies examined these associations among youths. The objective of our study was to determine how locus of control relates to health care use, medication adherence, missed school, and readiness for transition to adult medical care for youths with chronic conditions. Methods Participants at a camp for youths aged 6 to 17 years with chronic health conditions completed a survey measuring locus of control, readiness for transition to adult care, and medication adherence. Their parents completed a separate part of the survey about health care use and missed school days in the past year. Results A total of 163 youths completed the survey (78.5% white; 52.1% female; mean age, 12.3 y). Internal locus of control (β = 0.196; P = .013) and external Doctor locus of control with doctors controlling disease (β = 0.181; P = .025) were positively associated with transition readiness. External control by chance or with others controlling disease was negatively associated with transition readiness (β = −0.248; P = .002) and positively associated with emergency department visits (β = 0.225; P = .004) and with number of hospital inpatient nights at hospital (β = 0.166; P = .04). Conclusion Adolescents with external control of their health by chance or by other people are at increased risk for negative health outcomes and may fail to develop the self-management skills needed for successful transitioning to adult care. Future studies should examine effects of changes in locus of control on health outcomes among youths. PMID:27442993

  14. Relating Health Locus of Control to Health Care Use, Adherence, and Transition Readiness Among Youths With Chronic Conditions, North Carolina, 2015.

    PubMed

    Nazareth, Meaghan; Richards, Jordan; Javalkar, Karina; Haberman, Cara; Zhong, Yi; Rak, Eniko; Jain, Nina; Ferris, Maria; van Tilburg, Miranda A L

    2016-07-21

    Health locus of control refers to the belief that health is in one's control (internal control) or is not in one's control (external control). Among adults, external locus of control is associated with negative health outcomes, whereas internal locus of control is associated with favorable outcomes. Few studies examined these associations among youths. The objective of our study was to determine how locus of control relates to health care use, medication adherence, missed school, and readiness for transition to adult medical care for youths with chronic conditions. Participants at a camp for youths aged 6 to 17 years with chronic health conditions completed a survey measuring locus of control, readiness for transition to adult care, and medication adherence. Their parents completed a separate part of the survey about health care use and missed school days in the past year. A total of 163 youths completed the survey (78.5% white; 52.1% female; mean age, 12.3 y). Internal locus of control (β = 0.196; P = .013) and external Doctor locus of control with doctors controlling disease (β = 0.181; P = .025) were positively associated with transition readiness. External control by chance or with others controlling disease was negatively associated with transition readiness (β = -0.248; P = .002) and positively associated with emergency department visits (β = 0.225; P = .004) and with number of hospital inpatient nights at hospital (β = 0.166; P = .04). Adolescents with external control of their health by chance or by other people are at increased risk for negative health outcomes and may fail to develop the self-management skills needed for successful transitioning to adult care. Future studies should examine effects of changes in locus of control on health outcomes among youths.

  15. Health Care in India.

    PubMed

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    Although a stated right for all Indians, equal access to health care in India is impeded by socioeconomic barriers. With its 3-tier system of public health care centers in villages, district hospitals, and tertiary care hospitals, government expenditure in India is inordinately low, with a disproportionate emphasis on private health spending. Accordingly, the poorest receive a minority of the available subsidies, whereas the richest obtain more than a third, fostering a divide in health care infrastructure across the rich and poor in urban and rural settings. This paradigm has implications for domestic Indian public health and global public health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Health Care in China.

    PubMed

    Younger, David S

    2016-11-01

    China has recently emerged as an important global partner. However, like other developing nations, China has experienced dramatic demographic and epidemiologic changes in the past few decades. Population discontent with the health care system has led to major reforms. China's distinctive health care system, including its unique history, vast infrastructure, the speed of health reform, and economic capacity to make important advances in health care, nonetheless, has incomplete insurance coverage for urban and rural dwellers, uneven access, mixed quality of health care, increasing costs, and risk of catastrophic health expenditures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele-behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    W81XWH-11-2-0118 TITLE: A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele-behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression ...behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0118 5c...unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT No current findings to report to date 15. SUBJECT TERMS Depression , Behavioral Activation

  18. Conundrums in childhood asthma severity, control, and health care use: Puerto Rico versus Rhode Island

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, Cynthia A.; Klein, Robert B.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Fritz, Gregory K.; Seifer, Ronald; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Santana, Jose Rodriguez; Colon, Angel; Alvarez, Maria; Koinis-Mitchell, Daphne; Ortega, Alexander N.; Martinez-Nieves, Brenda; Canino, Glorisa

    2012-01-01

    Background The lifetime prevalence of self-reported asthma among Puerto Ricans is very high, with increased asthma hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and mortality rates. Differences in asthma severity between the mainland and island, however, remain largely unknown. Objective We sought to characterize differences in asthma severity and control among 4 groups: (1) Island Puerto Ricans, (2) Rhode Island (RI) Puerto Ricans, (3) RI Dominicans, and (4) RI whites. Methods Eight hundred five children aged 7 to 15 years completed a diagnostic clinic session, including a formal interview, physical examination, spirometry, and allergy testing. Using a visual grid adapted from the Global Initiative for Asthma, asthma specialists practicing in each site determined an asthma severity rating. A corresponding level of asthma control was determined by using a computer algorithm. Results Island Puerto Ricans had significantly milder asthma severity compared with RI Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, and whites (P < .001). Island Puerto Ricans were not significantly different from RI whites in asthma control. RI Puerto Ricans showed a trend toward less control compared with island Puerto Ricans (P = .061). RI Dominicans had the lowest rate of controlled asthma. Paradoxically, island Puerto Ricans had more emergency department visits in the past 12 months (P < .001) compared with the 3 RI groups. Conclusions Potential explanations for the paradoxic finding of milder asthma in island Puerto Ricans in the face of high health care use are discussed. Difficulties in determining guideline-based composite ratings for severity versus control are explored in the context of disparate groups. PMID:19615729

  19. Barriers to implementing infection prevention and control guidelines during crises: experiences of health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Timen, Aura; Hulscher, Marlies E J L; Rust, Laura; van Steenbergen, Jim E; Akkermans, Reinier P; Grol, Richard P T M; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2010-11-01

    Communicable disease crises can endanger the health care system and often require special guidelines. Understanding reasons for nonadherence to crisis guidelines is needed to improve crisis management. We identified and measured barriers and conditions for optimal adherence as perceived by 4 categories of health care professionals. In-depth interviews were performed (n = 26) to develop a questionnaire for a cross-sectional survey of microbiologists (100% response), infection preventionists (74% response), public health physicians (96% response), and public health nurses (82% response). The groups were asked to appraise barriers encountered during 4 outbreaks (severe acute respiratory syndrome [SARS], Clostridium difficile ribotype 027, rubella, and avian influenza) according to a 5-point Likert scale. When at least 33% of the participants responded "strongly agree," "agree," or "rather agree than disagree," a barrier was defined as "often experienced." The common ("generic") barriers were included in a univariate and multivariate model. Barriers specific to the various groups were studied as well. Crisis guidelines were found to have 4 generic barriers to adherence: (1) lack of imperative or precise wording, (2) lack of easily identifiable instructions specific to each profession, (3) lack of concrete performance targets, and (4) lack of timely and adequate guidance on personal protective equipment and other safety measures. The cross-sectional study also yielded profession-specific sets of often-experienced barriers. To improve adherence to crisis guidelines, the generic barriers should be addressed when developing guidelines, irrespective of the infectious agent. Profession-specific barriers require profession-specific strategies to change attitudes, ensure organizational facilities, and provide an adequate setting for crisis management. Copyright © 2010 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  20. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Sensenig, Arthur L.

    1994-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10142373

  1. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Sensenig, Arthur L.; Heffler, Stephen K.

    1995-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10151891

  2. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Sensenig, Arthur L.; Heffler, Stephen K.

    1995-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a discussion of each of the following four topics community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they allow us to anticipate the direction and magnitude of health care cost changes prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10142578

  3. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.

    1991-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10114933

  4. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Cathy A.; Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Lazenby, Helen C.

    1992-01-01

    This regular feature of the journal includes a section on each of the following four topics: community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; health care prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10120177

  5. Health care in China.

    PubMed

    Brown, M S; Burns, C E; Hellings, P J

    1984-05-01

    Maternal-child nurses are part of a growing number of Americans who have had the opportunity to visit China. An increased understanding of the history and of the health care practices of the Chinese people lends itself to an examination of American values and health practices. The insight developed may aid us as we seek to understand our own health care practices for women and children and to plan for the future in health care.

  6. Personal Care in Learning Health Care Systems.

    PubMed

    Miller, Franklin G; Kim, Scott Y H

    2015-12-01

    The idea of a "learning health care system"--one that systematically integrates clinical research with medical care--has received considerable attention recently. Some commentators argue that under certain conditions pragmatic comparative effectiveness randomized trials can be conducted ethically within the context of a learning health care system without the informed consent of patients for research participation. In this article, we challenge this perspective and contend that conducting randomized trials of individual treatment options without consent is neither necessary nor desirable to promote and sustain learning health care systems. Our argument draws on the normative conception of personal care developed by Charles Fried in a landmark 1974 book on the ethics of randomized controlled trials.

  7. Supervised versus non-supervised implementation of an oral health care guideline in (residential) care homes: a cluster randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The increase of the proportion of elderly people has implications for health care services. Advances in oral health care and treatment have resulted in a reduced number of edentulous individuals. An increasing number of dentate elderly people have tooth wear, periodontal disease, oral implants, and sophisticated restorations and prostheses. Hence, they are in need of both preventive and curative oral health care continuously. Weakened oral health due to neglect of self care and professional care and due to reduced oral health care utilization is already present when elderly people are still community-dwelling. At the moment of (residential) care home admittance, many elderly people are in need of oral health care urgently. The key factor in realizing and maintaining good oral health is daily oral hygiene care. For proper daily oral hygiene care, many residents are dependent on nurses and nurse aides. In 2007, the Dutch guideline "Oral health care in (residential) care homes for elderly people" was developed. Previous implementation research studies have revealed that implementation of a guideline is very complicated. The overall aim of this study is to compare a supervised versus a non-supervised implementation of the guideline in The Netherlands and Flanders (Belgium). Methods/Design The study is a cluster randomized intervention trial with an institution as unit of randomization. A random sample of 12 (residential) care homes accommodating somatic as well as psycho-geriatric residents in The Netherlands as well as in Flanders (Belgium) are randomly allocated to an intervention or control group. Representative samples of 30 residents in each of the 24 (residential) care homes are monitored during a 6-months period. The intervention consists of supervised implementation of the guideline and a daily oral health care protocol. Primary outcome variable is the oral hygiene level of the participating residents. To determine the stimulating or inhibiting

  8. Improving Diabetes Care and Health Measures among Hispanics Using Community Health Workers: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babamoto, Kenneth S.; Sey, Kwa A.; Camilleri, Angela J.; Karlan, Vicki J.; Catalasan, Joana; Morisky, Donald E.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes and obesity, growing health disparities, and shortage of bilingual and culturally trained health care professionals underscore the role of trained community health workers (CHWs) to provide economically sustainable and culturally relevant services. This prospective randomized design evaluated the relative…

  9. Improving Diabetes Care and Health Measures among Hispanics Using Community Health Workers: Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babamoto, Kenneth S.; Sey, Kwa A.; Camilleri, Angela J.; Karlan, Vicki J.; Catalasan, Joana; Morisky, Donald E.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes and obesity, growing health disparities, and shortage of bilingual and culturally trained health care professionals underscore the role of trained community health workers (CHWs) to provide economically sustainable and culturally relevant services. This prospective randomized design evaluated the relative…

  10. Improving maternity care using a personal health record: study protocol for a stepped-wedge, randomised, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Groenen, Carola J M; Faber, Marjan J; Kremer, Jan A M; Vandenbussche, Frank P H A; van Duijnhoven, Noortje T L

    2016-04-16

    A personal health record (PHR) is an online application through which individuals can access, manage, and share their health information in a private, secure, and confidential environment. Personal health records empower patients, facilitate collaboration among healthcare professionals, and improve health outcomes. Given these anticipated positive effects, we want to implement a PHR, named MyPregn@ncy, in a Dutch maternity care setting and to evaluate its effects in routine care. This paper presents the study protocol. The effects of implementing a PHR in maternity care on patients and professionals will be identified in a stepped-wedge, cluster-randomised, controlled trial. The study will be performed in the region of Nijmegen, a Dutch area with an average of 4,500 births a year and more than 230 healthcare professionals involved in maternity care. Data analyses will describe the effects of MyPregn@ncy on health outcomes in maternity care, quality of care from the patients' perspectives, and collaboration among healthcare professionals. Additionally, a process evaluation of the implementation of MyPregn@ncy will be performed. Data will be collected using data from the Dutch perinatal registry, questionnaires, interviews, and log data. The study is expected to yield new information about the effects, strengths, possibilities, and challenges to the implementation and usage of a PHR in routine maternal care settings. Results may lead to new insights and improvements in the quality of maternal and perinatal care. Netherlands Trial Register: NTR4063.

  11. Health care in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, A

    1993-01-01

    Brazil has great geopolitical importance because of its size, environmental resources, and potential economic power. The organisation of its health care system reflects the schisms within Brazilian society. High technology private care is available to the rich and inadequate public care to the poor. Limited financial resources have been overconcentrated on health care in the hospital sector and health professionals are generally inappropriately trained to meet the needs of the community. However, recent changes in the organisation of health care are taking power away from federal government to state and local authorities. This should help the process of reform, but many vested interests remain to be overcome. A link programme between Britain and Brazil focusing on primary care has resulted in exchange of ideas and staff between the two countries. If primary care in Brazil can be improved it could help to narrow the health divide between rich and poor. Images p503-a p504-a p505-a PMID:8448465

  12. Helping High-Risk Youth Move through High-Risk Periods: Personally Controlled Health Records for Improving Social and Health Care Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Weitzman, Elissa R.; Kaci, Liljana; Quinn, Maryanne; Mandl, Kenneth D.

    2011-01-01

    Background New patient-centered information technologies are needed to address risks associated with health care transitions for adolescents and young adults with diabetes, including systems that support individual and structural impediments to self- and clinical-care. Methods We describe the personally controlled health record (PCHR) system platform and its key structural capabilities and assess its alignment with tenets of the chronic care model (CCM) and the social–behavioral and health care ecologies within which adolescents and young adults with diabetes mature. Results Configured as Web-based platforms, PCHRs can support a new class of patient-facing applications that serve as monitoring and support systems for adolescents navigating complex social, developmental, and health care transitions. The approach can enable supportive interventions tailored to individual patient needs to boost adherence, self-management, and monitoring. Conclusions The PCHR platform is a paradigm shift for the organization of health information systems and is consistent with the CCM and conceptualizations of patient- and family-centered care for diabetes. Advancing the approach augers well for improvement around health care transitions for youth and also requires that we address (i) structural barriers impacting diabetes care for maturing youth; (ii) challenges around health and technology literacy; (iii) privacy and confidentiality issues, including sharing of health information within family and institutional systems; and (iv) needs for evaluation around uptake, impacts, and outcomes. PMID:21303624

  13. Will Boeing Change Health Care?

    PubMed

    Stempniak, Marty

    2015-12-01

    Big employers like Boeing and Intel are directly contracting with hospitals in an effort to control health care prices. Some hospital CEOs see direct contracting as the future, while others wonder how they can participate.

  14. Improving Physical Health in Patients With Chronic Mental Disorders: Twelve-Month Results From a Randomized Controlled Collaborative Care Trial.

    PubMed

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Barbaresso, Michelle M; Lai, Zongshan; Nord, Kristina M; Bramlet, Margretta; Goodrich, David E; Post, Edward P; Almirall, Daniel; Bauer, Mark S

    2017-01-01

    Persons with chronic mental disorders are disproportionately burdened with physical health conditions. We determined whether Life Goals Collaborative Care compared to usual care improves physical health in patients with mental disorders within 12 months. This single-blind randomized controlled effectiveness study of a collaborative care model was conducted at a midwestern Veterans Affairs urban outpatient mental health clinic. Patients (N = 293 out of 474 eligible approached) with an ICD-9-CM diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder and at least 1 cardiovascular disease risk factor provided informed consent and were randomized (February 24, 2010, to April 29, 2015) to Life Goals (n = 146) or usual care (n = 147). A total of 287 completed baseline assessments, and 245 completed 12-month follow-up assessments. Life Goals included 5 weekly sessions that provided semistructured guidance on managing physical and mental health symptoms through healthy behavior changes, augmented by ongoing care coordination. The primary outcome was change in physical health-related quality of life score (Veterans RAND 12-item Short Form Health Survey [VR-12] physical health component score). Secondary outcomes included control of cardiovascular risk factors from baseline to 12 months (blood pressure, lipids, weight), mental health-related quality of life, and mental health symptoms. Among patients completing baseline and 12-month outcomes assessments (N = 245), the mean age was 55.3 years (SD = 10.8; range, 25-78 years), and 15.4% were female. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed that compared to those in usual care, patients randomized to Life Goals had slightly increased VR-12 physical health scores (coefficient = 3.21; P = .01). Patients with chronic mental disorders and cardiovascular disease risk who received Life Goals had improved physical health-related quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT01487668 and NCT01244854.

  15. Metabolic control in a nationally representative diabetic elderly sample in Costa Rica: patients at community health centers vs. patients at other health care settings

    PubMed Central

    Brenes-Camacho, Gilbert; Rosero-Bixby, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Background Costa Rica, like other developing countries, is experiencing an increasing burden of chronic conditions such as diabetes mellitus (DM), especially among its elderly population. This article has two goals: (1) to assess the level of metabolic control among the diabetic population age ≥ 60 years old in Costa Rica, and (2) to test whether diabetic elderly patients of community health centers differ from patients in other health care settings in terms of the level of metabolic control. Methods Data come from the project CRELES, a nationally representative study of people aged 60 and over in Costa Rica. This article analyzes a subsample of 542 participants in CRELES with self-reported diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Odds ratios of poor levels of metabolic control at different health care settings are computed using logistic regressions. Results Lack of metabolic control among elderly diabetic population in Costa Rica is described as follows: 37% have glycated hemoglobin ≥ 7%; 78% have systolic blood pressure ≥ 130 mmHg; 66% have diastolic blood pressure ≥ 80 mmHg; 48% have triglycerides ≥ 150 mg/dl; 78% have LDL ≥ 100 mg/dl; 70% have HDL ≤ 40 mg/dl. Elevated levels of triglycerides and LDL were higher in patients of community health centers than in patients of other clinical settings. There were no statistical differences in the other metabolic control indicators across health care settings. Conclusion Levels of metabolic control among elderly population with DM in Costa Rica are not that different from those observed in industrialized countries. Elevated levels of triglycerides and LDL at community health centers may indicate problems of dyslipidemia treatment among diabetic patients; these problems are not observed in other health care settings. The Costa Rican health care system should address this problem, given that community health centers constitute a means of democratizing access to primary health care to underserved and poor areas. PMID

  16. Improving Physical Health in Patients with Chronic Mental Disorders: 12-Month Results from a Randomized Controlled Collaborative Care Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kilbourne, Amy M.; Barbaresso, Michelle M.; Lai, Zongshan; Nord, Kristina M.; Bramlet, Margretta; Goodrich, David E.; Post, Edward P.; Almirall, Daniel; Bauer, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Persons with chronic mental disorders are disproportionately burdened with physical health conditions. We determined whether Life Goals Collaborative Care compared to usual care improves physical health in patients with mental disorders within 12 months. Method This single-blind randomized controlled effectiveness study of a collaborative care model was conducted at a mid-western Veterans Affairs urban outpatient mental health clinic. Patients (N=293 out of 474 eligible approached) with an ICD-9-CM diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder and at least one cardiovascular disease risk factor were consented and randomized (02/24/10 to 04/29/15) to Life Goals (N=146) or usual care (N=147). A total of 287 completed baseline assessments and 245 completed 12-month follow-up assessments. Life Goals included five weekly sessions that provided semi-structured guidance on managing physical and mental health symptoms through healthy behavior changes, augmented by ongoing care coordination. The primary outcome was change in physical health-related quality of life score (VR-12 physical health component score). Secondary outcomes included control of cardiovascular risk factors from baseline to 12 months (blood pressure, lipids, weight), mental health-related quality of life, and mental health symptoms. Results Among patients completing baseline and 12-month outcomes assessments (N=245), the mean age was 55.3 (SD=10.8; range 28-75 years) and 15.4% were female. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed that compared to those in usual care, patients randomized to Life Goals had slightly increased VR-12 physical health scores (coefficient=3.21;p=0.01). Conclusion Patients with chronic mental disorders and cardiovascular disease risk who received Life Goals had improved physical health-related quality of life. PMID:27780336

  17. Reducing HIV-Related Stigma in Health Care Settings: A Randomized Controlled Trial in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zunyou; Liang, Li-Jung; Guan, Jihui; Jia, Manhong; Rou, Keming; Yan, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of the intervention was to reduce service providers’ stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors toward people living with HIV. Methods. The randomized controlled trial was conducted in 40 county-level hospitals in 2 provinces of China between October 2008 and February 2010. Forty-four service providers were randomly selected from each hospital, yielding a total of 1760 study participants. We randomized the hospitals to either an intervention condition or a control condition. In the intervention hospitals, about 15% of the popular opinion leaders were identified and trained to disseminate stigma reduction messages. Results. We observed significant improvements for the intervention group in reducing prejudicial attitudes (P < .001), reducing avoidance intent towards people living with HIV (P < .001), and increasing institutional support in the hospitals (P = .003) at 6 months after controlling for service providers’ background factors and clinic-level characteristics. The intervention effects were sustained and strengthened at 12 months. Conclusions. The intervention reduced stigmatizing attitudes and behaviors among service providers. It has the potential to be integrated into the health care systems in China and other countries. PMID:23237175

  18. Medical yoga for patients with stress-related symptoms and diagnoses in primary health care: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Köhn, Monica; Persson Lundholm, Ulla; Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are suffering from stress-related symptoms and diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the medical yoga treatment in patients with stress-related symptoms and diagnoses in primary health care. A randomized controlled study was performed at a primary health care centre in Sweden from March to June, 2011. Patients were randomly allocated to a control group receiving standard care or a yoga group treated with medical yoga for 1 hour, once a week, over a 12-week period in addition to the standard care. A total of 37 men and women, mean age of 53 ± 12 years were included. General stress level (measured using Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)), burnout (Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ)), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)), insomnia severity (Insomnia Severity Index (ISI)), pain (visual analogue scale (VAS)), and overall health status (Euro Quality of Life VAS (EQ-VAS)) were measured before and after 12 weeks. Patients assigned to the Yoga group showed significantly greater improvements on measures of general stress level (P < 0.000), anxiety (P < 0.019), and overall health status (P < 0.018) compared to controls. Treatment with medical yoga is effective in reducing levels of stress and anxiety in patients with stress-related symptoms in primary health care.

  19. Medical Yoga for Patients with Stress-Related Symptoms and Diagnoses in Primary Health Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Köhn, Monica; Persson Lundholm, Ulla; Bryngelsson, Ing-Liss; Anderzén-Carlsson, Agneta; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of patients are suffering from stress-related symptoms and diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the medical yoga treatment in patients with stress-related symptoms and diagnoses in primary health care. A randomized controlled study was performed at a primary health care centre in Sweden from March to June, 2011. Patients were randomly allocated to a control group receiving standard care or a yoga group treated with medical yoga for 1 hour, once a week, over a 12-week period in addition to the standard care. A total of 37 men and women, mean age of 53 ± 12 years were included. General stress level (measured using Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)), burnout (Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire (SMBQ)), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)), insomnia severity (Insomnia Severity Index (ISI)), pain (visual analogue scale (VAS)), and overall health status (Euro Quality of Life VAS (EQ-VAS)) were measured before and after 12 weeks. Patients assigned to the Yoga group showed significantly greater improvements on measures of general stress level (P < 0.000), anxiety (P < 0.019), and overall health status (P < 0.018) compared to controls. Treatment with medical yoga is effective in reducing levels of stress and anxiety in patients with stress-related symptoms in primary health care. PMID:23533465

  20. Does maternal and fetal health locus of control predict self-care behaviors among women with gestational diabetes?

    PubMed

    Kordi, Masoumeh; Heravan, Mahsima Banaei; Asgharipour, Negar; Akhlaghi, Farideh; Mazloum, Seyed Reza

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes is the most common metabolic disorder in pregnancy, and lack of self-care is the most important reason for mortality in diabetic patients. Since the glycemic control is associated with physiological and psychological mechanisms, variables such as health locus of control can play a role in health behaviors of diabetic patients. Therefore, this study was aimed to predict self-care behaviors among women with gestational diabetes based on maternal health locus of control (MHLC) and fetal health locus of control (FHLC). This study is a descriptive, predictive correlational study that it is conducted on over 400 women with gestational diabetes attending the health centers and clinic of hospitals affiliated to Mashhad University of Medical Sciences in 2015. Data were collected using individual questionnaire, self-care derived from the summary of diabetes self-care activities, MHLC, and FHLC scale. The data were analyzed using Spearman's correlation coefficient test, linear regressions model, and multiple regression in SPSS software version 16. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results of Spearman's correlation coefficient test showed a significant direct linear relationship between self-care and internal MHLC (P = 0.027) and internal dimensions (P < 0.0001) and powerful others (P = 0.012) of FHLC. According to linear regressions model, internal MHLC (P = 0.027), internal dimensions (P < 0.0001), and powerful others (P = 0.012) of FHLC are considered as predictor variables of self-care. Midwives should perform interventions to increase internal locus of control and encourage more responsibility among women with gestational diabetes to achieve better self-care.

  1. [Hypertension Control at the Primary Health Care: A Comparison Among Portuguese Natives and Portuguese Speaking African Coutries Immigrants].

    PubMed

    Lopes, Elisa; Alarcão, Violeta; Simões, Rui; Fernandes, Milene; Gómez, Verónica; Souto, Diana; Nogueira, Paulo; J Nicola, Paulo J; Rocha, Evangelista

    2016-03-01

    In Portugal, the frequency of patient with treated and controlled hypertension is low. It is unknown the relation of socio-economic determinants with hypertension control, particularly in African immigrants. To compare frequency of control in treated hypertension and to identify characteristics associated with uncontrolled and treated hypertension between Portuguese natives (Caucasian) and Portuguese Speaking African Coutries immigrants (black). Cross-sectional study of patients with treated hypertension, 40-80 years old, randomized from Primary Health Care of Lisbon Region. We collected sociodemographic, clinical and health care data through structured interviews. We compared the frequency of patients with uncontrolled hypertension, and identified related factors through univariate and multivariate analysis. In this study participated 786 patients with treated hypertension (participation rate: 71%): 449 natives and 337 immigrants. Of these, 46% had controlled hypertension. Diastolic blood pressure was higher in younger immigrants. Were associated with no control, in natives, male sex, low education, going to emergency and / or nursing services and not looking for the family doctor; on immigrants, being single, using the pharmacist, the number of years of illness and intentional non-adherence. Treated hypertension control has been increasing for last years. Natives and immigrants differ, regarding blood pressure control, relatively to the frequency of family doctor consultation, and resorting to other services and health professionals. These differences didn't reflect in statistically different control rates. It is needed to define strategies to control hypertension in primary health care specific for ethnic groups.

  2. Equity in health care.

    PubMed

    La Rosa-Salas, Virginia; Tricas-Sauras, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    It has long been known that a segment of the population enjoys distinctly better health status and higher quality of health care than others. To solve this problem, prioritization is unavoidable, and the question is how priorities should be set. Rational priority setting would seek equity amongst the whole population, the extent to which people receive equal care for equal needs. Equity in health care is an ethical imperative not only because of the intrinsic worth of good health, or the value that society places on good health, but because, without good health, people would be unable to enjoy life's other sources of happiness. This paper also argues the importance of the health care's efficiency, but at the same time, it highlights how any innovation and rationalization undertaken in the provision of the health system should be achieved from the consideration of human dignity, making the person prevail over economic criteria. Therefore, the underlying principles on which this health care equity paper is based are fundamental human rights. The main aim is to ensure the implementation of these essential rights by those carrying out public duties. Viewed from this angle, equity in health care means equality: equality in access to services and treatment, and equality in the quality of care provided. As a result, this paper attempts to address both human dignity and efficiency through the context of equity to reconcile them in the middle ground.

  3. Spending controls cited as reasons for decline in health care cost hikes.

    PubMed

    2005-04-01

    Data Insight: Health care spending in the U.S. grew 7.7% in 2003, down from 9.3% in 2002, marking the first decline in costs in seven years, according to a report by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Office of the Actuary. CMS economists say spending declined because state Medicaid programs cut budgets and became more efficient through the use of managed care.

  4. Tuberculosis Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities: Environmental Control and Personal Protection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon

    2016-10-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis (TB) is a recognized risk to patients and healthcare workers in healthcare settings. The literature review suggests that implementation of combination control measures reduces the risk of TB transmission. Guidelines suggest a three-level hierarchy of controls including administrative, environmental, and respiratory protection. Among environmental controls, installation of ventilation systems is a priority because ventilation reduces the number of infectious particles in the air. Natural ventilation is cost-effective but depends on climatic conditions. Supplemented intervention such as air-cleaning methods including high efficiency particulate air filtration and ultraviolet germicidal irradiation should be considered in areas where adequate ventilation is difficult to achieve. Personal protective equipment including particulate respirators provides additional benefit when administrative and environmental controls cannot assure protection.

  5. Tuberculosis Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities: Environmental Control and Personal Protection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis (TB) is a recognized risk to patients and healthcare workers in healthcare settings. The literature review suggests that implementation of combination control measures reduces the risk of TB transmission. Guidelines suggest a three-level hierarchy of controls including administrative, environmental, and respiratory protection. Among environmental controls, installation of ventilation systems is a priority because ventilation reduces the number of infectious particles in the air. Natural ventilation is cost-effective but depends on climatic conditions. Supplemented intervention such as air-cleaning methods including high efficiency particulate air filtration and ultraviolet germicidal irradiation should be considered in areas where adequate ventilation is difficult to achieve. Personal protective equipment including particulate respirators provides additional benefit when administrative and environmental controls cannot assure protection. PMID:27790274

  6. Day Care Infection Control Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health, Seattle, WA.

    This day care infection control manual was assembled to provide technical guidance for the prevention and control of communicable diseases to child day care facilities in Seattle and King County, Washington. For each disease, the manual provides background information, public health control recommendations, and letters that can be used to…

  7. Day Care Infection Control Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health, Seattle, WA.

    This day care infection control manual was assembled to provide technical guidance for the prevention and control of communicable diseases to child day care facilities in Seattle and King County, Washington. For each disease, the manual provides background information, public health control recommendations, and letters that can be used to…

  8. [Guidelines for the prevention and control of tuberculosis in health care workers].

    PubMed

    Casas, Irma; Dominguez, Jose; Rodríguez, Soledad; Matllo, Joan; Altet, Neus

    2015-12-21

    Tuberculosis remains one of the communicable diseases that cause increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. With an incidence rate of 13,04 per 100,000 population, Spain ranks third among the most affected European countries. These data show a tendency to decrease meaning that it may go unnoticed with the potential to miss the appropriate preventive measures in a suspected case. In centers where patients are treated with tuberculosis, health care worker presents risk of transmission. This risk is higher in some areas or work units. The Occupational health physicians' services, which monitorize the health of health care workers, use different strategies in order to prevent and detect tuberculosis infection. The national guidelines include the tuberculin skin test as a screening test for tuberculosis infection with mention of new diagnostic tests based on the in vitro detection of gamma interferon (IGRA) for certain cases. The purpose of this guide is to establish common criteria for IGRA tests, as a supplementary aid to the tuberculin skin test in health care workers, from the evidence available today. Recommendations for its use have been adapted to the different situations faced by the professionals involved in monitoring the health of health workers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. [Health care networks].

    PubMed

    Mendes, Eugênio Vilaça

    2010-08-01

    The demographic and epidemiologic transition resulting from aging and the increase of life expectation means an increment related to chronic conditions. The healthcare systems contemporary crisis is characterized by the organization of the focus on fragmented systems turned to the acute conditions care, in spite of the chronic conditions prevalence, and by the hierarchical structure without communication flow among the different health care levels. Brazil health care situation profile is now presenting a triple burden of diseases, due to the concomitant presence of infectious diseases, external causes and chronic diseases. The solution is to restore the consistence between the triple burden of diseases on the health situation and the current system of healthcare practice, with the implantation of health care networks. The conclusion is that there are evidences in the international literature on health care networks that these networks may improve the clinical quality, the sanitation results and the user's satisfaction and the reduction of healthcare systems costs.

  10. CASALUD: an innovative health-care system to control and prevent non-communicable diseases in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Gallardo-Rincón, Héctor; Saucedo-Martinez, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    Mexico and other Latin American countries are currently facing a dramatic increase in the number of adults suffering from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), which require prolonged, continuous care. This epidemiological shift has created new challenges for health-care systems. Both the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations (UN) have recognised the growing human and economic costs of NCDs and outlined an action plan, recognising that NCDs are preventable, often with common preventable risk factors linked to risky health behaviours. In line with international best practices, Mexico has applied a number of approaches to tackle these diseases. However, challenges remain for the Mexican health-care system, and in planning a strategy for combating and preventing NCDs, it must consider how best to integrate these strategies with existing health-care infrastructure. Shifting the paradigm of care in Mexico from a curative, passive approach to a preventive, proactive model will require an innovative and replicable system that guarantees availability of medicines and services, strengthens human capital through ongoing professional education, expands early and continuous access to care through proactive prevention strategies and incorporates technological innovations in order to do so. Here, we describe CASALUD: an innovative model in health-care that leverages international best practices and uses innovative technology to deliver NCD care, control and prevention. In addition, we describe the lessons learned from the initial implementation of the model for its effective use in Mexico, as well as the plans for wider implementation throughout the country, in partnership with the Mexican Ministry of Health.

  11. Effect of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Training on Health Care Worker Safety: A Randomized Waitlist Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Valley, Morgan Anne; Stallones, Lorann

    2017-10-01

    The study assessed the impact of mindfulness training on occupational safety of hospital health care workers. The study used a randomized waitlist-controlled trial design to test the effect of an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) course on self-reported health care worker safety outcomes, measured at baseline, postintervention, and 6 months later. Twenty-three hospital health care workers participated in the study (11 in immediate intervention group; 12 in waitlist control group). The MBSR training decreased workplace cognitive failures (F [1, 20] = 7.44, P = 0.013, (Equation is included in full-text article.)) and increased safety compliance behaviors (F [1, 20] = 7.79, P = 0.011, (Equation is included in full-text article.)) among hospital health care workers. Effects were stable 6 months following the training. The MBSR intervention did not significantly affect participants' promotion of safety in the workplace (F [1, 20] = 0.40, P = 0.54, (Equation is included in full-text article.)). Mindfulness training may potentially decrease occupational injuries of health care workers.

  12. Tuberculosis infection control practices and associated factors among health care workers in health centers of West Gojjam zone, Northwest Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Kassahun; Wasie, Belaynew; Azage, Muluken

    2016-08-08

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem. The emerging epidemic of multi- and extensively drug-resistant (M/XDR) TB further imperils health workers, patients and public health. Health facilities with inadequate infection control are risky environments for the emergence and transmission of TB. There was no study that presented data on infection control practices of health care workers. This study aimed to assess tuberculosis infection control practices and associated factors among health care workers in West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia. Institution based quantitative cross-sectional study triangulated with qualitative observation and key informant interview was conducted. Six hundred sixty two health care workers were selected by multistage random sampling method. Self-administered structured questionnaire was used to collect quantitative data. Observation checklists and key informant interview guides were used to collect qualitative data. Quantitative data were entered in to Epi Info version 3.5.3 and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Odds ratio with 95 % confidence interval was used to identify factors associated with TB infection control practice of health care workers. Qualitative data were translated, transcribed, analyzed and triangulated with the quantitative findings. The proportion of proper TB infection control (TBIC) practices was 38 %. Qualitative data showed that administrative, environmental and personal respiratory protection control measures were not practiced well. Knowledge on the presence of TBIC plan [AOR = 4.25, 95 % CI: 2.46 - 7.35], knowledge on the presence of national guideline [AOR = 8.95, 95 % CI: 4.35 - 18.40] and working department of the health care workers were independent predictors of TBIC practices. The proportion of proper TBIC practices of health care workers was low. TBIC practices were determined by knowing the presence of TBIC plan and national guideline and working department. Hence, supportive

  13. [Tuberculosis control in health care facilities for the elderly, from the viewpoint of risk management].

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Masako; Wada, Masako; Mitarai, Satoshi; Yanai, Hideki; Ito, Kunihiko; Yamauchi, Yuko; Shishido, Shinji

    2006-02-01

    To discuss the optimal TB control system in health care facilities for the elderly where the periodic TB screening is currently not obligatory. A study was conducted in three health care facilities for the elderly in Tokyo during the period from 2002 to 2004, and 212 admitted elderly persons were enrolled in this study. Medical charts were analyzed to identify informations about mental and physical conditions and TB risk factors. Questionnaire-based interviews were conducted in 58 residents who had no dementia or no serious conditions. TB mass screening was carried out with a mobile vehicle equipped with computed radiography, financially supported by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government. Since this mobile vehicle is equipped with a special wheelchair for chest X-ray examination, most elderly persons were able to receive chest X-ray examination. Medical chart review and interview were conducted at around the time of TB mass screening. The screening results of 183 elderly residents who received X-ray examination were reviewed. Of the 212 persons admitted to the facilities, 73.1% were women. The mean ages of men and women were 80.7 and 84.2 years, respectively. Mental disorders were observed in 42.9% and dysfunction of extremities in 54.7%. At the time of admission, chest X-ray records were submitted by the attending doctors in 73.1% of the residents, but this proportion differed among facilities. From these records, old TB was found in 12.3%; however this proportion was 20.8% according to the TB mass screening results. A history of TB was more prevalent in the group interviewed than in the non-interview group (24.1% vs. 6.5%; p < 0.001). Two facilities had conducted TB screening for three consecutive years and comparative reading of chest X-ray films could be done in 35.8%. The remaining facility conducted TB screening for the first time, and comparative reading was not possible. The proportion of cases requiring further investigations was higher in the facility where

  14. Soviet health care and perestroika.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, D S; Rafferty, M P

    1990-01-01

    Health and health care in the Soviet Union are drawing special attention during these first years of perestroika, Mikhail Gorbachev's reform of Soviet political and economic life. This report briefly describes the current state of Soviet health and medical care, Gorbachev's plans for reform, and the prospects for success. In recent years the Soviet Union has experienced a rising infant mortality rate and declining life expectancy. The health care system has been increasingly criticized for its uncaring providers, low quality of care, and unequal access. The proposed measures will increase by 50 percent the state's contribution to health care financing, encourage private medicine on a small scale, and begin experimentation with capitation financing. It seems unlikely that the government will be able to finance its share of planned health improvements, or that private medicine, constrained by the government's tight control, will contribute much in the near term. Recovery of the Soviet economy in general as well as the ability of health care institutions to gain access to Western materials will largely determine the success of reform of the Soviet health care system. PMID:2297064

  15. Health Care Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Donham, Carolyn S.; Letsch, Suzanne W.; Maple, Brenda T.; Singer, Naphtale; Cowan, Cathy A.

    1991-01-01

    Contained in this regular feature of the journal is a section on each of the following four topics community hospital statistics; employment, hours, and earnings in the private health sector; prices; and national economic indicators. These statistics are valuable in their own right for understanding the relationship between the health care sector and the overall economy. In addition, they provide indicators of the direction and magnitude of health care costs prior to the availability of more comprehensive data. PMID:10112766

  16. Urgent Care Providers’ Knowledge and Attitude about Public Health Reporting and Pertussis Control Measures: Implications for Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Staes, Catherine J.; Gesteland, Per; Allison, Mandy; Mottice, Susan; Rubin, Michael; Shakib, Julie; Boulton, Rachelle; Wuthrich, Amyanne; Carter, Marjorie E; Leecaster, Molly; Samore, Matthew H; Byington, Carrie L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We assessed urgent care providers’ knowledge about public health reporting, guidelines, and actions for the prevention and control of pertussis; attitudes about public health reporting and population-based data; and perception of reporting practices in their clinic. Methods We identified the 106 providers (95% are physicians) employed in 28 urgent care clinics owned by Intermountain Healthcare located throughout Utah and southern Idaho. We performed a descriptive, cross-sectional survey and assessed providers’ knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors associated with population-based data and public health mandates and recommendations. The online survey was completed between 11/1/2007 and 2/29/2008. Results Among 63 practicing urgent care providers (60% response rate), 19% knew that clinically diagnosed pertussis was reportable, and only half (52%) the providers correctly responded about current pertussis vaccination recommendations. Most (35–78%) providers did not know the prevention and control measures performed by public health practitioners after reporting occurs, including contact tracing, testing, treatment, and prophylaxis. Half (48%) the providers did not know that health department personnel can prescribe antibiotics for contacts of a reported case, and only 22% knew that health department personnel may perform diagnostic testing on contacts. Attitudes about reporting are variable, and reporting responsibility is diffused. Conclusion To improve our ability to meet public health goals, systems need to be designed that engage urgent care providers in the public health process, improve their knowledge and attitude about reporting, and facilitate the flow of information between urgent care and public health settings. PMID:19823151

  17. Health Literacy and Weight Change in a Digital Health Intervention for Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Primary Care Practice

    PubMed Central

    Lanpher, Michele G.; Askew, Sandy; Bennett, Gary G.

    2016-01-01

    In the U.S., 90 million adults have low health literacy. An important public health challenge is developing obesity treatment interventions suitable for those with low health literacy. The objective of this study was to examine differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, as well as weight and intervention engagement outcomes by health literacy. We randomized 194 participants to usual care or to the Shape Program intervention, a 12 month digital health treatment aimed to prevent weight gain among overweight and class I obese black women in primary care practice. We administered the Newest Vital Sign instrument to assess health literacy. Over half (55%)of participants had low health literacy, which was more common for those with fewer years of educational attainment and lower income. There was no effect of health literacy on 12-month weight change or on intervention engagement outcomes (completion of coaching calls and interactive voice response self-monitoring calls). Low health literacy did not preclude successful weight gain prevention in the Shape Program intervention. Goal focused behavior change approaches like that used in Shape may be particularly helpful for treating and engaging populations with low health literacy. PMID:27043756

  18. Health Literacy and Weight Change in a Digital Health Intervention for Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Primary Care Practice.

    PubMed

    Lanpher, Michele G; Askew, Sandy; Bennett, Gary G

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, 90 million adults have low health literacy. An important public health challenge is developing obesity treatment interventions suitable for those with low health literacy. The objective of this study was to examine differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics as well as weight and intervention engagement outcomes by health literacy. We randomized 194 participants to usual care or to the Shape Program intervention, a 12-month digital health treatment aimed at preventing weight gain among overweight and Class I obese Black women in primary care practice. We administered the Newest Vital Sign instrument to assess health literacy. More than half (55%) of participants had low health literacy, which was more common among those with fewer years of education and lower income. There was no effect of health literacy on 12-month weight change or on intervention engagement outcomes (completion of coaching calls and interactive voice response self-monitoring calls). Low health literacy did not preclude successful weight gain prevention in the Shape Program intervention. Goal-focused behavior change approaches like that used in Shape may be particularly helpful for treating and engaging populations with low health literacy.

  19. Efficacy of 'Tailored Physical Activity’ in reducing sickness absence among health care workers: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Health care workers have high physical work demands, involving patient handling and manual work tasks. A strategy for prevention of work-related musculoskeletal disorders can enhance the physical capacity of the health care worker. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of 'Tailored Physical Activity’ for health care workers in the Sonderborg Municipality. Methods/Design This protocol describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to assess the efficacy of 'Tailored Physical Activity’ versus a reference group for health care workers in the Sonderborg Municipality. Inclusion criteria to be fulfilled: health care workers with daily work that includes manual work and with the experience of work-related musculoskeletal pain in the back or upper body. All participants will receive 'Health Guidance’, a (90-minute) individualised dialogue focusing on improving life style, based on assessments of risk behaviour, on motivation for change and on personal resources. In addition, the experimental groups will receive 'Tailored Physical Activity’ (three 50-minute sessions per week over 10 weeks). The reference group will receive only 'Health Guidance’. The primary outcome measure is the participants’ self-reported sickness absence during the last three months due to musculoskeletal troubles, measured 3 and 12 months after baseline. In addition, secondary outcomes include anthropometric measurements, functional capacity and self-reported number of sick days, musculoskeletal symptoms, self-reported health, work ability, work productivity, physical capacity, kinesiophobia and physical functional status. Discussion The results from this study will contribute to the knowledge about evidence-based interventions for prevention of sickness absence among health care workers. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01543984. PMID:24088419

  20. Control and performance of health care systems. A comparative analysis of 19 OECD countries.

    PubMed

    Kotzian, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper performs an empirical comparison of health systems. Health systems are seen as networks of delegation relationships among principals and agents, subject to agency problems. Following the institutional economics approach, a health system's efficiency is considered to be determined by the existence and treatment of agency problems. Agency problems can be controlled by mechanisms built into the health system, or can also be controlled by an external actor, for example, the government, either by using the instruments available or by conducting institutional reforms. To explain differences in the amenability of a country's health system to external governmental control, I combine the veto player approach and the incentives for societal actors to exert influence, into the concept of indirect veto players: the more indirect veto players exist, the less external control will be exercised.I derive indicators capturing both forms of control and perform a comparison of health systems based on institutional and performance data. Using data reducing methods, I identify two dimensions of control underlying the institutional setting of the health system and three dimensions of health system performance. The relationships found between control and performance confirm the hypotheses derived from the adopted theoretical approach.

  1. Pumped up prices? Advice on controlling scope creep in health care construction projects.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, J Kenneth; McLendon, Mary Huston

    2003-03-01

    Changes in the scope of any health care construction project are inevitable. They happen for a number of reasons, including pressure from doctors and staff. While some are justified by factors that influence space requirements, such as changing market needs, new physicians or new technology, others inflate the cost of a construction project without adding significant benefits.

  2. Lessons Learned from the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) Rack 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) Rack 1 and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for the ECLS equipment in this rack.

  3. APIC state-of-the-Art report: the role of infection control during construction in health care facilities.

    PubMed

    Bartley, J M

    2000-04-01

    The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc (APIC), is a multidisciplinary organization of more than 12,000 health care professionals who practice infection control and epidemiology within a variety of health care settings. This report reviews issues the infection control professional should consider related to construction and renovation projects in health care facilities. Preventing transmission of infectious agents to vulnerable patient populations, health care workers, and visitors remains an important component of infection control programs. Environmental dispersal of microorganisms during construction, resulting in nosocomial infections, has been described previously, and select examples are provided in Table I as a reminder that there is a solid, scientific basis for these concerns. Environmental airborne contaminants and infectious agents are closely related to water and moisture-related conditions and figure prominently in construction activity. Weems et al have established construction activity as an independent variable for infectious risks in such circumstances. Construction-related outbreak literature will not be revisited in detail; however, pertinent citations will identify resources as appropriate.

  4. Lessons Learned from the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) Rack 1 Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) design of the Crew Health Care System (CHeCS) Rack 1 and it will document some of the lessons that have been learned to date for the ECLS equipment in this rack.

  5. Community health workers improve diabetes care in remote Australian Indigenous communities: results of a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Robyn A; Schmidt, Barbara; Preece, Cilla; Owens, Vickie; Taylor, Sean; Li, Ming; Esterman, Adrian

    2015-02-19

    Health outcomes for Indigenous Australians with diabetes in remote areas remain poor, including high rates of avoidable complications which could be reduced with better primary level care. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based health-worker led case management approach to the care of Indigenous adults with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in primary care services in remote northern Australia. Two hundred and thirteen adults with poorly controlled diabetes (HbA1c > 8.5%) and significant comorbidities in 12 remote communities were randomly assigned by service cluster to receive chronic care co-ordination from a community-based health worker supported by a clinical outreach team, or to a waitlist control group which received usual care. At baseline, mean age of participants was 47.9 years, 62.4% were female, half were Aboriginal and half identified as Torres Strait Islander, 67% had less than 12 years of education, 39% were smokers, median income was $18,200 and 47% were unemployed. Mean HbA1c was 10.7% (93 mmol/mol) and BMI 32.5. At follow-up after 18 months, HbA1c reduction was significantly greater in the intervention group (-1.0% vs -0.2%, SE (diff) = 0.2, p = 0.02). There were no significant differences between the groups for blood pressure, lipid profile, BMI or renal function. Intervention group participants were more likely to receive nutrition and dental services according to scheduled care plans. Smoking rates were unchanged. A culturally safe, community level health-worker led model of diabetes care for high risk patients can be effective in improving diabetes control in remote Indigenous Australian communities where there is poor access to mainstream services. This approach can be effective in other remote settings, but requires longer term evaluation to capture accrued benefits. ANZCTR 12610000812099, Registered 29 September 2010.

  6. Malaria-related health-seeking behaviour and challenges for care providers in rural Ethiopia: implications for control.

    PubMed

    Deressa, Wakgari; Ali, Ahmed; Hailemariam, Damen

    2008-01-01

    A range of activities are currently underway to improve access to malaria prevention and control interventions. As disease control strategies change over time, it is crucial to understand the health-seeking behaviour and the local socio-cultural context in which the changes in interventions operate. This paper reflects on how people in an area of seasonal malaria perceive the causes and transmission of the disease, and what prevention and treatment measures they practise to cope with the disease. It also highlights some of the challenges of malaria treatment for health care providers. The study was undertaken in 2003 in Adami Tulu District in south-central Ethiopia, where malaria is a major health problem. Pre-tested structured questionnaires and focus group discussions were conducted among men and women. Malaria, locally known as busa, was perceived as the most important cause of ill health in the area. Respondent's perception and knowledge about the cause and transmission of the disease were relatively high. The newly introduced insecticide-treated nets were not popular in the area, and only 6.4% of households possessed at least one. The results showed that patients use multiple sources of health care for malaria treatment. Public health facilities, private clinics and community health workers were the main providers of malaria treatment. Despite higher treatment costs, people preferred to use private health care providers for malaria treatment due to the higher perceived quality of care they offer. In conclusion, effort in the prevention and control of malaria should be intensified through addressing not only public facilities, but also the private sector and community-based control interventions. Appropriate and relevant information on malaria should be disseminated to the local community. The authors propose the provision of effective antimalarial drugs and malaria prevention tools such as subsidized or free insecticide-treated nets.

  7. [Polish health care system].

    PubMed

    Piontkovski, V; Novakovska, L; Pasternak, V

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the discussion is to evaluate certain aspects of the Polish health care system - its ability to respond to contemporary dynamic social, economic and epidemiological changes (including the spread of chronic diseases, aging population or family crisis - its possibilities for providing care of the sick). The analysis of such a problem was based on a critically-oriented perspective that is developed in the field of the sociology of health and illness. The text pays particular attention to the problem of deepening social inequalities, which can be considered as one of the major factors that hinder access to health care and influence poorer health condition: In this context the mechanism of "saving health" and borrowing in order to satisfy the health needs in the face of financial difficulties was mentioned. Moreover, the text includes the attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of health promo- tion programs in our country as potentially the most effective way of raising the level of public health. There is also the issue of public confidence in health care institutions and the approval of attempts towards reforming the medical system in our country. A separate part of the discussion was devoted to criticism of the idea of reducing the role of the state in the health care sector.

  8. Web-based weight management programs in an integrated health care setting: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rothert, Kendra; Strecher, Victor J; Doyle, Laurie A; Caplan, William M; Joyce, Jodi S; Jimison, Holly B; Karm, Lya M; Mims, Adrienne D; Roth, Mark A

    2006-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of a Web-based tailored behavioral weight management program compared with Web-based information-only weight management materials. Participants, 2862 eligible overweight and obese (BMI = 27 to 40 kg/m2) members from four regions of Kaiser Permanente's integrated health care delivery system, were randomized to receive either a tailored expert system or information-only Web-based weight management materials. Weight change and program satisfaction were assessed by self-report through an Internet-based survey at 3- and 6-month follow-up periods. Significantly greater weight loss at follow-up was found among participants assigned to the tailored expert system than among those assigned to the information-only condition. Subjects in the tailored expert system lost a mean of 3 +/- 0.3% of their baseline weight, whereas subjects in the information-only condition lost a mean of 1.2 +/- 0.4% (p < 0.0004). Participants were also more likely to report that the tailored expert system was personally relevant, helpful, and easy to understand. Notably, 36% of enrollees were African-American, with enrollment rates higher than the general proportion of African Americans in any of the study regions. The results of this large, randomized control trial show the potential benefit of the Web-based tailored expert system for weight management compared with a Web-based information-only weight management program.

  9. Competition versus planning in health care: implications for corporate and individual incentives, efficiency & control.

    PubMed

    Lee, K

    1991-01-01

    This paper is about the management of change; and, most especially, about the changing tides of thinking that health planning and, more latterly, competition could bring about desired change in the health industry towards cost containment, efficiency and control. Looking back over the decade of the 1980s, it was characterised, for many countries, as a real questioning of the role of the public sector in people's life, and--in terms of public/private provision--a re-examination of what is public and should be. Coupled with this inquiry was a growing belief that comprehensive health planning was too lofty a goal, and that however elegant in theory, its delivery in practice fell far short of its ideals. Attention has therefore focused on the workings of competitive markets, and the extent to which objectives of cost containment and economic efficiency can be better addressed through competition and internal markets. In reality, the mixed economy is the only policy option available to developed countries today. Public and private monopolies are frowned upon, and the search is on for intermediate possibilities that capture some of the advantages of markets without their disadvantages, and arrangements that motivate consumer choice and simultaneously yield efficiency in the production and distribution of health care. By way of illustration, this paper looks at a number of innovations taking place to address these issues; and, in the context of the UK, at the most recent government proposals in respect of self-governing trusts and GP budget holders, as illustrations of the move towards the internal market, or to managed competition. Not surprisingly, the two areas that feature large on the agenda are hospital (and community) information systems; and, the motivations, rewards and penalties of the provider institutions that deliver services, and the consumers and purchasers who will "buy" them. Whether the mould can and should be broken is left tantalisingly open in the

  10. Health-Care Hub

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    The Broad Acres clinic is one of 1,500 school-based health centers nationwide that bring a wide range of medical, nutritional, and mental-health care to millions of students and their families. The centers provide an important safety net for children and adolescents--particularly the more than 10 million today who lack health insurance, according…

  11. Health-Care Hub

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    The Broad Acres clinic is one of 1,500 school-based health centers nationwide that bring a wide range of medical, nutritional, and mental-health care to millions of students and their families. The centers provide an important safety net for children and adolescents--particularly the more than 10 million today who lack health insurance, according…

  12. Health Care Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1986

    1986-01-01

    The article on health care options for children with disabilities includes a review of the changes in hospital and doctor coverage and newer types of health insurance, including Health Maintenance Organizations and Independent Practice Associations. Suggestions for parents of disabled children are offered. (CL)

  13. The Effects of a Locally Developed mHealth Intervention on Delivery and Postnatal Care Utilization; A Prospective Controlled Evaluation among Health Centres in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Shiferaw, Solomon; Spigt, Mark; Tekie, Michael; Abdullah, Muna; Fantahun, Mesganaw; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Although there are studies showing that mobile phone solutions can improve health service delivery outcomes in the developed world, there is little empirical evidence that demonstrates the impact of mHealth interventions on key maternal health outcomes in low income settings. A non-randomized controlled study was conducted in the Amhara region, Ethiopia in 10 health facilities (5 intervention, 5 control) together serving around 250,000 people. Health workers in the intervention group received an android phone (3 phones per facility) loaded with an application that sends reminders for scheduled visits during antenatal care (ANC), delivery and postnatal care (PNC), and educational messages on dangers signs and common complaints during pregnancy. The intervention was developed at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. Primary outcomes were the percentage of women who had at least 4 ANC visits, institutional delivery and PNC visits at the health center after 12 months of implementation of the intervention. Overall 933 and 1037 women were included in the cross-sectional surveys at baseline and at follow-up respectively. In addition, the medical records of 1224 women who had at least one antenatal care visit were followed in the longitudinal study. Women who had their ANC visit in the intervention health centers were significantly more likely to deliver their baby in the same health center compared to the control group (43.1% versus 28.4%; Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 1.98 (95%CI 1.53-2.55)). A significantly higher percentage of women who had ANC in the intervention group had PNC in the same health center compared to the control health centers (41.2% versus 21.1%: AOR: 2.77 (95%CI 2.12-3.61)). Our findings demonstrated that a locally customized mHealth application during ANC can significantly improve delivery and postnatal care service utilization possibly through positively influencing the behavior of health workers and their clients.

  14. Household spending on health care.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, R; Earl, L

    2000-10-01

    This article examines changes in household spending on health care between 1978 and 1998. It also provides a detailed look at household spending on health care in 1998. Data on household spending are from Statistics Canada's Family Expenditure Survey for survey years between 1978 and 1996, and from the annual Survey of Household Spending for 1997 and 1998. Proportion of after-tax spending was calculated by subtracting average personal income taxes from average total expenditures and then dividing health care expenditures by this figure. Per capita spending was calculated by dividing average household spending by average household size. Constant dollar figures and adjustments for inflation were calculated using the Consumer Price Index (1998 = 100) to control for the effect of inflation over time. Almost every Canadian household (98.2%) reported health care expenditures in 1998, spending an average of close to $1,200, up from around $900 in 1978. In 1998, households dedicated a larger share of their average after-tax spending (2.9%) to health care than they did 20 years earlier (2.3%). Health insurance premiums claimed the largest share (29.8%) of average health care expenditures, followed by dental care, then prescription medications and pharmaceutical products.

  15. Health care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Brown, M S

    1984-07-01

    This is the third and last article reporting professional exchange tours between American nurses and nurses of other countries. In this article, the health care system of Kenya is discussed and comparisons made between this system and our own. Out of this comparison come several insights into our own way of doing things and possibilities for improving them. "Health Care in the Soviet Union" appeared in the April 1984 issue of The Nurse Practitioner. "Health Care in China" appeared in the May 1984 issue of the journal.

  16. Racial comparisons of health care and glycemic control for African American and white diabetic adults in an urban managed care organization.

    PubMed

    Gary, Tiffany L; McGuire, Maura; McCauley, Jeanne; Brancati, Frederick L

    2004-01-01

    The excess risk of diabetic complications in African Americans may be due to poor glycemic control arising from suboptimal use and/or quality of diabetes-related health care. However, little is known about racial differences in these factors, particularly in urban populations. We conducted a cross-sectional study using medical claims and encounter data on 1,106 adults with diabetes aged > or =30 years who were members of an urban managed care organization in capitated health plans. We examined health care and routine hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) testing in a biracial cohort for 12 months. We then followed individuals for an additional 12 months, using a retrospective cohort design, to determine how this health care predicted subsequent emergency room visits. On average, compared with their white counterparts, African Americans had fewer primary care visits (85% vs. 91% with four or more visits) and fewer HbA(1c) tests (56% vs. 68% with two or more HbA(1c) tests) (all P < 0.05). Likewise, in the subset who underwent one or more HbA(1c) measurement (n = 855), African Americans displayed poorer glycemic control (HbA(1c) 9.1 +/- 2.9%) than whites (8.5 +/- 2.2%; P = 0.001). In multivariate analyses, racial differences in visit frequency and HbA(1c) testing were attenuated by adjustment for age, sex, and type of capitated plan and did not remain statistically significant. The relationship of health care to subsequent emergency room visits differed by race; in African Americans, fewer primary care visits and HbA(1c) tests predicted greater risk of emergency room visits. Even in a capitated, managed care setting, urban African Americans with diabetes are less likely than their white counterparts to undergo routine primary care visits and laboratory testing and are more likely to have suboptimal glycemic control. Differences in age, sex, and insurance type seemed to explain some of the disparities. Future research should determine the individual contributions of physician

  17. Effectiveness and efficiency of integrated mental health care programmes in Germany: study protocol of an observational controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stierlin, Annabel Sandra; Herder, Katrin; Helmbrecht, Marina Julia; Prinz, Stefanie; Walendzik, Julia; Holzmann, Marco; Becker, Thomas; Schützwohl, Matthias; Kilian, Reinhold

    2014-06-04

    Since 2009 some German health insurance companies have implemented integrated mental health care services along the principles of assertive community treatment in collaboration with local mental health service providers across Germany. Focus of this study is the analysis of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this integrated care programme compared to care as usual in routine care surroundings in five regions in Germany. In this 18-month multi-centre observational trial 250 patients enrolled in an integrated mental health care programme and 250 patients who receive treatment as usual from five catchment areas will be included. In addition, in each group about 125 relatives of the participating patients will be included. The primary outcome criterion is the improvement of empowerment; secondary outcomes are subjective quality of life, functional impairment and costs of illness. Data will be collected at baseline and three follow-ups after 6, 12 and 18 months. Data will be analysed by means of mixed effects regression models. Propensity score methods are used for selection bias control. Study results are expected to provide information about how integrated care programmes in their present form contribute to the improvement of mental health care. In addition, the study will provide hints to weaknesses of the current integrated care programme and options to overcome them. The major strengths of this study are the real-world character of the study intervention with a simultaneous high level of academic rigour. However, the fact that patients are not randomised to study groups and that there is no blinding might limit the study. German Clinical Trial Register DRKS00005111.

  18. Health care automation companies.

    PubMed

    1995-12-01

    Health care automation companies: card transaction processing/EFT/EDI-capable banks; claims auditing/analysis; claims processors/clearinghouses; coding products/services; computer hardware; computer networking/LAN/WAN; consultants; data processing/outsourcing; digital dictation/transcription; document imaging/optical disk storage; executive information systems; health information networks; hospital/health care information systems; interface engines; laboratory information systems; managed care information systems; patient identification/credit cards; pharmacy information systems; POS terminals; radiology information systems; software--claims related/computer-based patient records/home health care/materials management/supply ordering/physician practice management/translation/utilization review/outcomes; telecommunications products/services; telemedicine/teleradiology; value-added networks.

  19. Beyond "health care reform".

    PubMed

    Heyssel, R M

    1993-03-01

    The author discusses the need to make corrections in the U.S. health care system, describes the simplistic and money-oriented definition that many persons have of "health care reform," and discusses the issues he thinks will and will not be dealt with in the coming reforms of the health care system. He maintains that true reform would deal with matters such as restraining expansion of the health care industry, setting reasonable fees, and confronting the harmful social and environmental conditions that result in high "medical" care costs and poor health statistics. The medical profession--including academic medical centers--has a large role to play in true health care reform, which will involve facing the major barriers (which he outlines) that are now impeding important reforms (e.g., increasing the number of generalist physicians; finding better ways to pay for medical students' and residents' education). The profession cannot make progress in true reform without developing a vision of what the U.S. health care system should be and becoming active in moving toward that vision, acting in the interests of both the individual patient and the community as a whole. The author outlines some of the barriers to finding that vision (such as the influence of third-party payers on the doctor-patient relationship and the fragmentation of medicine and medical education by specialties and subspecialties) and proposes the characteristics and values of the kind of medical education and community involvement of academic medical centers that can help create the needed vision, regain the trust of the public, and thereby reform health care in the interests of both the community and the profession.

  20. Health care engineering management.

    PubMed

    Jarzembski, W B

    1980-01-01

    Today, health care engineering management is merely a concept of dreamers, with most engineering decisions in health care being made by nonengineers. It is the purpose of this paper to present a rationale for an integrated hospital engineering group, and to acquaint the clinical engineer with some of the salient features of management concepts. Included are general management concepts, organization, personnel management, and hospital engineering systems.

  1. Mercury and health care

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries’ health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now. PMID:21120080

  2. Outcomes and Lessons Learned From a Randomized Controlled Trial to Reduce Health Care Utilization During the First Year After Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation: Telephone Counseling Versus Usual Care.

    PubMed

    Mackelprang, Jessica L; Hoffman, Jeanne M; Garbaccio, Chris; Bombardier, Charles H

    2016-10-01

    To describe the outcomes and lessons learned from a trial of telephone counseling (TC) to reduce medical complications and health care utilization and to improve psychosocial outcomes during the first year after spinal cord injury rehabilitation. Single-site, single-blind, randomized (1:1) controlled trial comparing usual care plus TC with usual care (UC). Two inpatient rehabilitation programs. Adult patients (N=168) discharged between 2007 and 2010. The TC group (n=85, 51%) received up to eleven 30- to 45-minute scheduled telephone calls to provide education, resources, and support. The UC group (n=83, 49%) received indicated referrals and treatment. The primary outcome was a composite of self-reported health care utilization and medical complications. Secondary outcomes were depression severity, current health state, subjective health, and community participation. No significant differences were observed between TC and UC groups in the primary or secondary psychosocial outcomes. This study had a number of strengths, but included potential design weaknesses. Intervention studies would benefit from prescreening participants to identify those with treatable problems, those at high risk for poor outcomes, or those with intentions to change target behaviors. Interventions focused on treatment goals and designed to work in collaboration with the participant's medical care system may lead to improved outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Longitudinal trajectories of metabolic control across adolescence: associations with parental involvement, adolescents' psychosocial maturity, and health care utilization.

    PubMed

    King, Pamela S; Berg, Cynthia A; Butner, Jonathan; Drew, Linda M; Foster, Carol; Donaldson, David; Murray, Mary; Swinyard, Michael; Wiebe, Deborah J

    2012-05-01

    To predict trajectories of metabolic control across adolescence from parental involvement and adolescent psychosocial maturity, and to link metabolic control trajectories to health care utilization. Two hundred fifty-two adolescents (M age at study initiation = 12.5 years, SD = 1.5, range = 10-14 years) with type 1 diabetes (54.4% female, 92.8% Caucasian, length of diagnosis M = 4.7 years, SD = 3.0, range = 1-12 years) participated in a 2-year longitudinal study. Metabolic control was gathered from medical records every 3 months. Adolescents completed measures of self-reliance (functional autonomy and extreme peer orientation), self-control (self-control and externalizing behavior), and parental involvement in diabetes care (acceptance, monitoring, and frequency of help). At the end of the study, mothers reported health care utilization (diabetes-related emergency room visits and hospitalizations) over the past 6 months. Latent class growth analyses indicated two distinct trajectories of metabolic control across adolescence: moderate control with slight deterioration (92% of the sample; average HbA1c = 8.18%) and poor control with rapid deterioration (8% of the sample; average HbA1c of 12.09%). Adolescents with poor and rapidly deteriorating metabolic control reported lower paternal monitoring and frequency of help with diabetes management, lower functional autonomy, and lower self-control than others. Those with poor and rapidly deteriorating metabolic control were 6.4 times more likely to report diabetes-related emergency room visits, and 9.3 times more likely to report diabetes-related hospitalizations near the end of the study. Parental involvement and adolescents' psychosocial maturity predict patterns of deteriorating metabolic control across adolescence and could be targeted for intervention. Copyright © 2012 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Training intervention for health care staff in the provision of existential support to patients with cancer: a randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Henoch, Ingela; Danielson, Ella; Strang, Susann; Browall, Maria; Melin-Johansson, Christina

    2013-12-01

    When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, existential issues become more compelling. Throughout the illness trajectory, patients with cancer are cared for in oncology wards, by home care teams or in hospices. Nurses working with these patients are sometimes aware of the patients' existential needs but do not feel confident when discussing these issues. To determine the effects of a training intervention, where the focus is on existential issues and nurses' perceived confidence in communication and their attitude toward caring for dying patients. This was a randomized, controlled trial with a training intervention comprising theoretical training in existential issues combined with individual and group reflection. In total, 102 nurses in oncology and hospice wards and in palliative home care teams were randomized to a training or non-training group. Primary outcomes, confidence in communication, and attitude toward the care of dying patients were measured at baseline, immediately after the training, and five to six months later. Confidence in communication improved significantly in the training group from baseline (before the training) to both the first and second follow-up, that is, immediately after the training and five months later. The attitude toward caring for the dying did not improve in the training group. This study shows that short-term training with reflection improves the confidence of health care staff when communicating, which is important for health care managers with limited resources. Further studies are needed to explore how patients experience the communication skills of health care staff after such training. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A health center controlled network's experience in ambulatory care EHR implementation.

    PubMed

    Egleson, Nick; Kang, Jennifer H; Collymore, David; Esmond, Warria; Gonzalez, Lydia; Pong, Perry; Sherman, Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Implementing a full-featured EHR at a community health center is a daunting undertaking. Stakeholder buy-in, contract negotiation, workflow redesign, equipment purchases, preloading charts and trainings are just some of the necessary tasks in managing an implementation. METCHIT, a health center controlled network, used a collaborative approach to implement electronic medical records. This article will cover the experience, benefits and lessons learned by a group of four FQHCs that took a cooperative, mentorship approach to implementation. Since 2005, the four community health centers, Charles B. Wang Community Health Center, Morris Heights Health Center, Settlement Health, and Comprehensive Community Development Corporation, have implemented EHRs at four organizations with multiple sites in diverse neighborhoods in New York City. The collaboration began and grew during this period, aided by a technology grant from HRSA.

  6. Effectiveness of a new health care organization model in primary care for chronic cardiovascular disease patients based on a multifactorial intervention: the PROPRESE randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effectiveness of a new multifactorial intervention to improve health care for chronic ischemic heart disease patients in primary care. The strategy has two components: a) organizational for the patient/professional relationship and b) training for professionals. Methods/design Experimental study. Randomized clinical trial. Follow-up period: one year. Study setting: primary care, multicenter (15 health centers). For the intervention group 15 health centers are selected from those participating in ESCARVAL study. Once the center agreed to participate patients are randomly selected from the total amount of patients with ischemic heart disease registered in the electronic health records. For the control group a random sample of patients with ischemic heart disease is selected from all 72 health centers electronic records. Intervention components: a) Organizational intervention on the patient/professional relationship. Centered on the Chronic Care Model, the Stanford Expert Patient Program and the Kaiser Permanente model: Teamwork, informed and active patient, decision making shared with the patient, recommendations based on clinical guidelines, single electronic medical history per patient that allows the use of indicators for risk monitoring and stratification. b) Formative strategy for professionals: 4 face-to-face training workshops (one every 3 months), monthly update clinical sessions, online tutorial by a cardiologist, availability through the intranet of the action protocol and related documents. Measurements: Blood pressure, blood glucose, HbA1c, lipid profile and smoking. Frequent health care visits. Number of hospitalizations related to vascular disease. Therapeutic compliance. Drug use. Discussion This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a multifactorial intervention strategy involving patients with ischemic heart disease for the improvement of the degree of control of the cardiovascular risk factors and of the quality of life

  7. Strengthening the delivery of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease care at primary health-care facilities: study design of a cluster randomized controlled trial in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Amir; Ahmed, Maqsood; Anil, Shirin; Walley, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory diseases, namely asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), account for one-fourth of the patients at the primary health-care (PHC) facilities in Pakistan. Standard care practices to manage these diseases are necessary to reduce the morbidity and mortality rate associated with non-communicable diseases in developing countries. Objective To develop and measure the effectiveness of operational guidelines and implementation materials, with sound scientific evidence, for expanding lung health care, especially asthma and COPD through PHC facilities already strengthened for tuberculosis (TB) care in Pakistan. Design A cluster randomized controlled trial with two arms (intervention and control), with qualitative and costing study components, is being conducted in 34 clusters; 17 clusters per arm (428 asthma and 306 COPD patients), in three districts in Pakistan from October 2014 to December 2016. The intervention consists of enhanced case management of asthma and COPD patients through strengthening of PHC facilities. The main outcomes to be measured are asthma and COPD control among the registered cases at 6 months. Cluster- and individual-level analyses will be done according to intention to treat. Residual confounding will be addressed by multivariable logistic and linear regression models for asthma and COPD control, respectively. The trial is registered with ISRCTN registry (ISRCTN 17409338). Conclusions Currently, only about 20% of the estimated prevalent asthma and COPD cases are being identified and reported through the respective PHC network. Lung health care and prevention has not been effectively integrated into the core PHC package, although a very well-functioning TB program exists at the PHC level. Inclusion of these diseases in the already existent TB program is expected to increase detection rates and care for asthma and COPD. PMID:26578109

  8. Crisis in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Solomon J.

    1990-01-01

    The health care crisis faced by African Americans must be addressed by the nation as a whole with the same energy that erupts when a natural disaster occurs. On an individual basis, blacks can improve their own health with attention to child nurturing and personal nutrition. (SLD)

  9. [Group health care].

    PubMed

    Hermida, C

    1986-01-01

    The transition from individual to group health care entails a response to multidisciplinary scientific systems, the enlistment of community participation, and an effort to make the professionals aware of the need to work as a team. The author points to the need to change the information system so that the professional-to-be will acquire a mentality and method of work appropriate for group care. In the architecture of service facilities structural changes must also be provided for the care of groups rather than individuals. In short, the change entails a review of all the elements of care.

  10. Health Care in Modern Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Outcalt, Douglas; Janoff, Edward

    1980-01-01

    An extensively organized, centrally controlled system, aimed at equalizing and improving the distribution and quality of medical services according to population and geography, characterizes the modern Cuban health care complex. Facilities of increasing sophistication are located in urban areas while an expanding series of ambulatory, multipotential polyclinics attempts to provide most health services in both urban and rural settings. Maternal and child care, immunization programs and other forms of preventive medicine represent major priorities for expenditures. Occupational health is increasingly understood as a valuable resource, and medical professionals on all levels are being trained in significant numbers for Cuba and its allies. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:7376666

  11. Strategic Planning for Health Care Cost Controls in a Constantly Changing Environment.

    PubMed

    Hembree, William E

    2015-01-01

    Health care cost increases are showing a resurgence. Despite recent years' comparatively modest increases, the projections for 2015 cost increases range from 6.6% to 7%--three to four times larger than 2015's expected underlying inflation. This resurgence is just one of many rapidly changing external and internal challenges health plan sponsors must overcome (and this resurgence advances the date when the majority of employers will trigger the "Cadillac tax"). What's needed is a planning approach that is effective in overcoming all known and yet-to-be-discovered challenges, not just affordability. This article provides detailed guidance in adopting six proven strategic planning steps. Following these steps will proactively and effectively create a flexible strategic plan for the present and future of employers' health plans that will withstand all internal and external challenges.

  12. Organising health care services for people with an acquired brain injury: an overview of systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Laver, Kate; Lannin, Natasha A; Bragge, Peter; Hunter, Peter; Holland, Anne E; Tavender, Emma; O'Connor, Denise; Khan, Fary; Teasell, Robert; Gruen, Russell

    2014-09-17

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is the leading cause of disability worldwide yet there is little information regarding the most effective way to organise ABI health care services. The aim of this review was to identify the most up-to-date high quality evidence to answer specific questions regarding the organisation of health care services for people with an ABI. We conducted a systematic review of English papers using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library. We included the most recently published high quality systematic reviews and any randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials, controlled before after studies or interrupted time series studies published subsequent to the systematic review. We searched for papers that evaluated pre-defined organisational interventions for adults with an ABI. Organisational interventions of interest included fee-for-service care, integrated care, integrated care pathways, continuity of care, consumer engagement in governance and quality monitoring interventions. Data extraction and appraisal of included reviews and studies was completed independently by two reviewers. A total of five systematic reviews and 21 studies were included in the review; eight of the papers (31%) included people with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or ABI and the remaining papers (69%) included only participants with a diagnosis of stroke. We found evidence supporting the use of integrated care to improve functional outcome and reduce length of stay and evidence supporting early supported discharge teams for reducing morbidity and mortality and reducing length of stay for stroke survivors. There was little evidence to support case management or the use of integrated care pathways for people with ABI. We found evidence that a quality monitoring intervention can lead to improvements in process outcomes in acute and rehabilitation settings. We were unable to find any studies meeting our inclusion criteria regarding fee

  13. Health care technology assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Clifford

    1994-12-01

    The role of technology in the cost of health care is a primary issue in current debates concerning national health care reform. The broad scope of studies for understanding technological impacts is known as technology assessment. Technology policy makers can improve their decision making by becoming more aware, and taking greater advantage, of key trends in health care technology assessment (HCTA). HCTA is the systematic evaluation of the properties, impacts, and other attributes of health care technologies, including: technical performance; clinical safety and efficacy/effectiveness; cost-effectiveness and other economic attributes; appropriate circumstances/indications for use; and social, legal, ethical, and political impacts. The main purpose of HCTA is to inform technology-related policy making in health care. Among the important trends in HCTA are: (1) proliferation of HCTA groups in the public and private sectors; (2) higher standards for scientific evidence concerning technologies; (3) methodological development in cost analyses, health-related quality of life measurement, and consolidation of available scientific evidence (e.g., meta-analysis); (4) emphasis on improved data on how well technologies work in routine practice and for traditionally under-represented patient groups; (5) development of priority-setting methods; (6) greater reliance on medical informatics to support and disseminate HCTA findings.

  14. Enhancing transgender health care.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, E

    2001-01-01

    As awareness of transgender men and women grows among health care educators, researchers, policymakers, and clinicians of all types, the need to create more inclusive settings also grows. Greater sensitivity and relevant information and services are required in dealing with transgender men and women. These individuals need their identities to be recognized as authentic, they need better access to health care resources, and they need education and prevention material appropriate to their experience. In addition, a need exists for activities designed to enhance understanding of transgender health issues and to spur innovation. PMID:11392924

  15. Effectiveness of a new health care organization model in primary care for chronic cardiovascular disease patients based on a multifactorial intervention: the PROPRESE randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Beltran, Domingo; Ruescas-Escolano, Esther; Navarro-Palazón, Ana Isabel; Cordero, Alberto; Gaubert-Tortosa, María; Navarro-Perez, Jorge; Carratalá-Munuera, Concepción; Pertusa-Martínez, Salvador; Soler-Bahilo, Enrique; Brotons-Muntó, Francisco; Bort-Cubero, Jose; Nuñez-Martinez, Miguel Angel; Bertomeu-Martinez, Vicente; Gil-Guillen, Vicente Francisco

    2013-08-02

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a new multifactorial intervention to improve health care for chronic ischemic heart disease patients in primary care. The strategy has two components: a) organizational for the patient/professional relationship and b) training for professionals. Experimental study. Randomized clinical trial. Follow-up period: one year. primary care, multicenter (15 health centers). For the intervention group 15 health centers are selected from those participating in ESCARVAL study. Once the center agreed to participate patients are randomly selected from the total amount of patients with ischemic heart disease registered in the electronic health records. For the control group a random sample of patients with ischemic heart disease is selected from all 72 health centers electronic records. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a multifactorial intervention strategy involving patients with ischemic heart disease for the improvement of the degree of control of the cardiovascular risk factors and of the quality of life, number of visits, and number of hospitalizations. NCT01826929.

  16. Primary health care.

    PubMed

    Kitai, A

    1986-07-01

    Development of primary care in Japan in still relatively unorganized and unstructured. As mentioned above, the author describes some strengths and weaknesses of the Japanese primary care system. In addressing the weaknesses the following suggestions are offered for the Japanese primary care delivery system: Increase the number of emergency rooms for all day, especially on holidays and at night. Introduce an appointment system. Introduce an open system of hospitals. Coordinate with public hospitals and primary care clinics. Organize the referral system between private practitioners and community hospitals. Increase the number of paramedical staff. Strengthen group practice among primary care physicians. Increase the establishment of departments of primary care practice with government financial incentives to medical schools and teaching hospitals. Develop a more active and direct teaching role for primary care practice or family practice at undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate levels. Improve and maintain present health insurance payment method, shifting from quantity of care to quality and continuity of care. Introduce formal continuing education. Introduce formal training programs of primary care and strengthen ambulatory care teaching programs.

  17. Containing Health Care Costs

    PubMed Central

    Derzon, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    As the federal government shifted from its traditional roles in health to the payment for personal health care, the relationship between public and private sectors has deteriorated. Today federal and state revenue funds and trusts are the largest purchasers of services from a predominantly private health system. This financing or “gap-filling” role is essential; so too is the purchaser's concern for the costs and prices it must meet. The cost per person for personal health care in 1980 is expected to average $950, triple for the aged. Hospital costs vary considerably and inexplicably among states; California residents, for example, spend 50 percent more per year for hospital care than do state of Washington residents. The failure of each sector to understand the other is potentially damaging to the parties and to patients. First, and most important, differences can and must be moderated through definite changes in the attitudes of the protagonists. PMID:6770551

  18. Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Laurel K.; Mehus, Christopher J.; Hawkins, J. David; Boat, Thomas; McCabe, Mary Ann; Barkin, Shari; Perrin, Ellen C.; Metzler, Carol W.; Prado, Guillermo; Tait, V. Fan; Brown, Randall; Beardslee, William

    2017-01-01

    Family-focused prevention programs have been shown to effectively reduce a range of negative behavioral health outcomes but have had limited reach. Three key barriers must be overcome to expand the reach of family-focused prevention programs and thereby achieve a significant public health impact. These barriers are: (1) current social norms and perceptions of parenting programs; (2) concerns about the expertise and legitimacy of sponsoring organizations to offer parenting advice; and (3) a paucity of stable, sustainable funding mechanisms. Primary healthcare settings are well positioned to overcome these barriers. Recent changes within health care make primary care settings an increasingly favorable home for family-focused prevention and suggest possibilities for sustainable funding of family-focused prevention programs. This paper discusses the existing advantages of primary care settings and lays out a plan to move toward realizing the potential public health impact of family-focused prevention through widespread implementation in primary healthcare settings. PMID:27498167

  19. Systematic Review of Integrative Health Care Research: Randomized Control Trials, Clinical Controlled Trials, and Meta-Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    to usual care (control). Also, in the pilot study of the 4 individual Noetic therapies, off-site prayer was associated with the lowest absolute...mortality in-hospital and at 6 months [16]. The parallel randomization to 4 different Noetic therapies across 5 study arms limited the assessment of...interventional cardiac care: the Monitoring and Actualisation of Noetic Trainings (MANTRA) II randomised study ,” Lancet, vol. 366, no. 9481, pp. 211–217, 2005. [18

  20. Perceptions, health care seeking behaviour and implementation of a tuberculosis control programme in Lambaréné, Gabon.

    PubMed

    Cremers, A L; Janssen, S; Huson, M A M; Bikene, G; Bélard, S; Gerrets, R P M; Grobusch, M P

    2013-12-21

    Lambaréné, Gabon. To describe patient perceptions of tuberculosis (TB) and to determine factors that influence health care seeking behaviour to gain insight into the management of multidrug-resistant TB. Participant observation, in-depth semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 30 TB patients, 36 relatives, 11 health care providers and 18 traditional/spiritual healers. Recruitment of patients was linked to the PanEpi study and took place at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, the General Hospital and the TB-HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) clinic. Patients generally described TB as a natural and/or magical disease. The majority of the patients combined treatment at the hospital with (herbal) self-treatment and traditional/spiritual healing. Despite the free availability of anti-tuberculosis treatment in principle, patient adherence was problematic, hindering effective TB control. Most patients delayed or defaulted from treatment due to financial constraints, stigmatisation, ignorance about treatment, change of health care service or use of non-prescribed antibiotics. The situation was occasionally complicated by drug stockouts. There is an urgent need to bridge the gap between patients and the hospital by avoiding drug shortages, intensifying culturally sensitive TB health education, embedding TB care into the cultural context and enhancing cooperation between hospitals, patients, traditional healers and communities.

  1. Perceptions, health care seeking behaviour and implementation of a tuberculosis control programme in Lambaréné, Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, A. L.; Janssen, S.; Huson, M. A. M.; Bikene, G.; Bélard, S.; Gerrets, R. P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Setting: Lambaréné, Gabon. Objectives: To describe patient perceptions of tuberculosis (TB) and to determine factors that influence health care seeking behaviour to gain insight into the management of multidrug-resistant TB. Design: Participant observation, in-depth semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with 30 TB patients, 36 relatives, 11 health care providers and 18 traditional/spiritual healers. Recruitment of patients was linked to the PanEpi study and took place at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, the General Hospital and the TB-HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) clinic. Results: Patients generally described TB as a natural and/or magical disease. The majority of the patients combined treatment at the hospital with (herbal) self-treatment and traditional/spiritual healing. Despite the free availability of anti-tuberculosis treatment in principle, patient adherence was problematic, hindering effective TB control. Most patients delayed or defaulted from treatment due to financial constraints, stigmatisation, ignorance about treatment, change of health care service or use of non-prescribed antibiotics. The situation was occasionally complicated by drug stockouts. Conclusion: There is an urgent need to bridge the gap between patients and the hospital by avoiding drug shortages, intensifying culturally sensitive TB health education, embedding TB care into the cultural context and enhancing cooperation between hospitals, patients, traditional healers and communities. PMID:26393056

  2. Primary health care utilization prior to suicide: a retrospective case-control study among active-duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Eldar; Shelef, Leah; Mann, J John; Portugese, Shirly; Krivoy, Amir; Shoval, Gal; Weiser, Mark; Fruchter, Eyal

    2014-08-01

    About 45% of civilians who died by suicide had contact with a doctor within 1 month of death. Thus, educating primary care physicians (PCP) to detect and mitigate depression is an important suicide-prevention strategy. However, the PCP consulting rate before suicide has not been examined in a military population. We investigated the utilization of primary health care and mental health services by active-duty military personnel suicide cases prior to death in comparison to matched military controls. All suicides (N = 170) were extracted from a cohort of all active-duty Israeli military male personnel between 2002 and 2012. Applying a retrospective, nested case-control design, we compared primary care services utilization by suicide cases with demographic and occupationally matched military controls (N = 500). Whereas 38.3% of suicide cases contacted a PCP within the last month before death, only 27.6% of suicide cases contacted a mental health specialist during their entire service time. The PCP contact rate within 1 month before death or index day did not differ between suicide cases and military controls (38.3% vs. 33.8%, χ²₁ = 1.05, P = .3). More suicide cases contacted a mental health specialist within service time than did military controls (27.6% vs. 13.6%, χ²₁ = 10.85, P = .001). Even though PCP contact rate by military personnel who died by suicide is slightly lower than that reported for civilians who died by suicide prior to their death, it is higher than mental health specialist contact rate and higher than that by age-matched civilians who died by suicide. These results imply that PCPs education is a viable approach to suicide prevention in a military setting. © Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  3. Universal health care.

    PubMed

    Meades, Karen; Roberts, Robert

    2007-01-01

    To inaugurate its fifth year of publication, The American Heart Hospital Journal (AHHJ) focused its Winter 2007 issue on health care systems from around the world, with 8 articles contributed by national leaders in their respective countries. Due to the interest and wide range of expertise in the international cardiac community, we continued to publish Special Reports throughout 2007 on this topic. In this issue we present the final two international perspectives, for a total of 12 individual international perspectives plus a final report from Robert Roberts, MD, that surveys the health care systems of an additional 4 countries, including his own, Canada. Our goal in publishing the series: to highlight the variety of systems currently employed worldwide, in the hope that such an international exchange of commentaries would result in debate and reforms where needed. We welcome your comments on the series, as well as your aspirations and ideas for the future of our national system of health care.

  4. Health care reforms.

    PubMed

    Marušič, Dorjan; Prevolnik Rupel, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country.

  5. Health care reforms

    PubMed Central

    Prevolnik Rupel, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In large systems, such as health care, reforms are underway constantly. The article presents a definition of health care reform and factors that influence its success. The factors being discussed range from knowledgeable personnel, the role of involvement of international experts and all stakeholders in the country, the importance of electoral mandate and governmental support, leadership and clear and transparent communication. The goals set need to be clear, and it is helpful to have good data and analytical support in the process. Despite all debates and experiences, it is impossible to clearly define the best approach to tackle health care reform due to a different configuration of governance structure, political will and state of the economy in a country. PMID:27703543

  6. Catastrophic Health Care Bill.

    PubMed

    Reasoner, Susan H; Mercer, Susan O

    1992-06-01

    This report provides a brief historical accounting of the ill-fated Medicare Catastrophic Coverage Act of 1988. Also included is a summary of the bill's major provisions, followed by a policy analysis wherein such questions as fairness and the issue of long term care are addressed. The analysis examines the adequacy of current health care legislation. In addition, speculation of future options is explored.

  7. Childbearing, reproductive control, aging women, and health care: the projected ethical debates.

    PubMed

    Freda, M C

    1994-02-01

    Of the many social trends that will have an impact on the ethical debates surrounding women's health in the 21st century, three are discussed: the shifting demographics of age and race in the United States; the fundamental change in the health care system to a community-based, preventive model; and the equal voice of women in the government. Using these trends as a framework, this article hypothesizes the ethical debates that will occur in the 21st century concerning such issues as fetal viability, abortion, contraception, infertility, genetic engineering, aggressive versus nonaggressive treatment of aging women, scarce resources, menopause, organ transplants, sexism in biomedical research, fertility in postmenopausal women, birthing centers, fetal surgery, and fetal therapy.

  8. Ethnic differences in blood pressure control among men at Veterans Affairs clinics and other health care sites.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Shakaib U; Hutchison, Florence N; Hendrix, Katharine; Okonofua, Eni C; Egan, Brent M

    2005-05-09

    Differential access to health care may contribute to lower blood pressure (BP) control rates to under 140/90 mm Hg in African American compared with white hypertensive patients, especially men (26.5% vs 36.5% of all hypertensive patients in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2000). The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) system, which provides access to health care and medications across ethnic and economic boundaries, may reduce disparities in BP control. To test this hypothesis, BP treatment and control groups were compared between African American (VA, n = 4379; non-VA, n = 2754) and white (VA, n = 7987; non-VA, n = 4980) hypertensive men. In both groups, whites were older than African Americans (P<.05), had lower BP (P<.001), and had BP controlled to below 140/90 mm Hg more often on their last visit (P<.01). Blood pressure control to below 140/90 mm Hg was comparable among white hypertensive men at VA (55.6%) and non-VA (54.2%) settings (P = .12). In contrast, BP control was higher among African American hypertensive men at VA (49.4%) compared with non-VA (44.0%) settings (P<.01), even after controlling for age, numerous comorbid conditions, and rural-urban classification. African American hypertensive men received a comparable number of prescriptions for BP medications at VA sites (P = .18) and more prescriptions at non-VA sites than did whites (P<.001). African Americans had more visits in the previous year at VA sites (P<.001) and fewer visits at non-VA sites (P<.001) compared with whites. The ethnic disparity in BP control between African Americans and whites was approximately 40% less at VA than at non-VA health care sites (6.2% vs 10.2%; P<.01). Ensuring access to health care could constitute one constructive component of a national initiative to reduce ethnic disparities in BP control and cardiovascular risk.

  9. Long-term success of oral health intervention among care-dependent institutionalized seniors: Findings from a controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Krisam, Johannes; Hassel, Alexander J; Rammelsberg, Peter; Zenthöfer, Andreas

    2017-09-20

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the long-term effectiveness of oral health education of caregivers in nursing homes with care-dependent and cognitively impaired residents. Fourteen nursing homes with a total of 269 residents were allocated to a control group, with continued normal care, or to an intervention group. Allocation was performed at nursing home level. In the intervention group, caregivers were given oral health education, and ultrasonic cleaning devices were provided to clean removable prostheses. Oral health was assessed at baseline and after 6 and 12 months by use of the Plaque Control Record (PCR), Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI), Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) and Denture Hygiene Index (DHI). Mixed models for repeated measures were performed for each target variable, with possible confounding factors (intervention/control group, age, sex, residence location and care-dependence). In the control group, no changes of target variables were observed between baseline and the 6- and 12-month follow-ups. After 6 and 12 months, PCR and DHI were significantly improved in the intervention group. For PCR, the intergroup difference of improvements was -14.4 (95% CI: -21.8; -6.9) after 6 months. After 12 months, the difference was -16.2 (95% CI: -27.7; -4.7). For DHI, the intergroup difference compared to baseline was -15 (95% CI: -23.6; -6.5) after 6 months and -13.3 (95% CI: -24.9; -1.8) after 12 months. There was neither a statistically significant effect on GBI nor on CPITN. Care-dependency showed a substantial trend to smaller improvements in PCR (P = .074), while an inverse effect was apparent for DHI (P < .001). Education of caregivers improves and maintains the oral health of care-dependent nursing home residents over longer periods. Use of ultrasonic devices is a promising means of improving denture hygiene among the severely care-dependent. Such interventions can be easily and cheaply implemented in routine daily care.

  10. In the shadow of a new smoke free policy: A discourse analysis of health care providers' engagement in tobacco control in community mental health

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence of tobacco use among individuals with mental illness remains a serious public health concern. Tobacco control has received little attention in community mental health despite the fact that many individuals with mental illness are heavy smokers and experience undue tobacco-related health consequences. Methods This qualitative study used methods of discourse analysis to examine the perceptions of health care providers, both professionals and paraprofessionals, in relation to their roles in tobacco control in the community mental health system. Tobacco control is best conceptualised as a suite of policies and practices directed at supporting smoke free premises, smoking cessation counselling and limiting access to tobacco products. The study took place following the establishment of a new policy that restricted tobacco smoking inside all mental health facilities and on their grounds. Ninety one health care providers participated in open-ended interviews in which they described their role in tobacco control. The interview data were analyzed discursively by asking questions such as: what assumptions underlie what is being said about tobacco? Results Five separate yet overlapping discursive frames were identified in which providers described their roles. Managing a smoke free environment emphasised the need to police and monitor the smoke free environment. Tobacco is therapeutic was a discourse that underscored the putative value of smoking for clients. Tobacco use is an individual choice located the decision to smoke with individual clients thereby negating a role in tobacco control for providers. It's someone else's role was a discourse that placed responsibility for tobacco control with others. Finally, the discourse of tobacco control as health promotion located tobacco control in a range of activities that are used to support the health of clients. Conclusions This study provides insights into the complex factors that shape tobacco control

  11. Hospital health care: pricing and quality control in a spatial model with asymmetry of information.

    PubMed

    Levaggi, Rosella

    2005-12-01

    The cost of hospital care depends on the quality of the service, on the personal characteristics of the patient, on the effort of the medical staff and on information asymmetry. In this article the cost minimizing properties of alternative payment systems will be discussed in a context where hospitals can observe patient severity and compete according to the rules of Hotelling's spatial competition. The scheme is designed from the standpoint of a purchaser that sets up a contract with several providers for services of a given quality at the least possible cost. Patients' severity cannot be observed and quality cannot be verified, but the latter can be inferred through the choice of patients. The model shows that in the health care market, prospective payments and yardstick competition are weak instruments for cost containment; incentive compatible schemes are, at least from a theoretical point of view, better instruments especially in a context where the purchaser can use signals relating to the variables it cannot observe. Cost inflation has two components: the information rent paid to the provider and inefficiency. In our model the information rent is used by the provider to get more patients to his hospital; spatial competition can then be used to curb the cost of providing hospital care.

  12. Health-related quality of life and metabolic control in adolescents with diabetes: the role of parental care, control, and involvement.

    PubMed

    Graue, Marit; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Hanestad, Berit Rokne; Søvik, Oddmund

    2005-10-01

    This questionnaire-based study explored the role of parenting in health-related quality of life in a population of 115 adolescents with type 1 diabetes (aged 11-18 years, 48% girls). Healthy adolescents (n = 9,345) and physically disabled adolescents (n = 291) were included as controls. The adolescents with diabetes reported their parents as being more controlling and involved than did adolescents in the 2 other groups. In multiple regression analyses, age, gender, and a higher degree of parental care and involvement explained 46% of the variation in mental health. Age, gender, a higher degree of parental care and involvement, and a lower perception of parental control explained 52% of the variation in diabetes life-satisfaction. Neither glycosylated hemoglobin nor the other clinical variables studied were significantly related to the perception of health-related quality of life. Family support should be provided to facilitate coping with everyday management and demands of diabetes.

  13. Burnout and health care utilization.

    PubMed

    Jackson, C N; Manning, M R

    1995-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between burnout and health care utilization of 238 employed adults. Burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory and health care utilization by insurance company records regarding these employees' health care costs and number of times they accessed health care services over a one year period. ANOVAs were conducted using Golembiewski and Munzenrider's approach to define the burnout phase. Significant differences in health care costs were found.

  14. Values in health care.

    PubMed

    Gish, O

    1984-01-01

    The first part of the paper is concerned with the health care values of various groups; namely, those which are resource oriented, disease oriented, political decision-makers, organized sellers and purchasers of health care and patients. These groups are further divided according to selected political/ideological and socio-economic characteristics, essentially along capitalist and socialist lines. Some of the ways in which the values held by these groups are determined, formulated and, by implication at least, changed and the political, economic and other bases for some of their practical applications are identified. The second part of the paper focuses upon values in public health education and related practice. It is argued that to become more useful to the 'health of the public' the new public health worker will have to become more activist, assuming an adversarial stance toward the market economy in capitalist countries and oppressive governmental structures everywhere. A wider integration of knowledge concerning the effects of health of all types of economic, social and political practices is required; this, in turn, would contribute to the emergence of alternative forms of public health analysis and practice. The recognition of wider forms of public health leadership should follow, coupled with organizational changes directed at the greater participation of popular groupings in all types of public health activities.

  15. A cluster randomised controlled trial and process evaluation of a training programme for mental health professionals to enhance user involvement in care planning in service users with severe mental health issues (EQUIP): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bower, Peter; Roberts, Chris; O'Leary, Neil; Callaghan, Patrick; Bee, Penny; Fraser, Claire; Gibbons, Chris; Olleveant, Nicola; Rogers, Anne; Davies, Linda; Drake, Richard; Sanders, Caroline; Meade, Oonagh; Grundy, Andrew; Walker, Lauren; Cree, Lindsey; Berzins, Kathryn; Brooks, Helen; Beatty, Susan; Cahoon, Patrick; Rolfe, Anita; Lovell, Karina

    2015-08-13

    Involving service users in planning their care is at the centre of policy initiatives to improve mental health care quality in England. Whilst users value care planning and want to be more involved in their own care, there is substantial empirical evidence that the majority of users are not fully involved in the care planning process. Our aim is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of training for mental health professionals in improving user involvement with the care planning processes. This is a cluster randomised controlled trial of community mental health teams in NHS Trusts in England allocated either to a training intervention to improve user and carer involvement in care planning or control (no training and care planning as usual). We will evaluate the effectiveness of the training intervention using a mixed design, including a 'cluster cohort' sample, a 'cluster cross-sectional' sample and process evaluation. Service users will be recruited from the caseloads of care co-ordinators. The primary outcome will be change in self-reported involvement in care planning as measured by the validated Health Care Climate Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include involvement in care planning, satisfaction with services, medication side-effects, recovery and hope, mental health symptoms, alliance/engagement, well-being and quality of life. Cost- effectiveness will also be measured. A process evaluation informed by implementation theory will be undertaken to assess the extent to which the training was implemented and to gauge sustainability beyond the time-frame of the trial. It is hoped that the trial will generate data to inform mental health care policy and practice on care planning. ISRCTN16488358 (14 May 2014).

  16. Controlling health care costs in the military: the case for using financial incentives to improve beneficiary personal health indicators.

    PubMed

    Naito, Neal A; Higgins, Stephen T

    2012-11-01

    To provide insight on the feasibility and utility of implementing a broad based incentive program for health within the Military Health System (MHS). Published studies, articles, and information on the use of financial incentives in the military setting and to promote healthy behaviors were reviewed. Health care costs in the MHS have more than doubled over the past decade. The high prevalence of modifiable risk behaviors such as tobacco abuse, physical inactivity and obesity and their associated chronic diseases are accounting for a significant percentage of the growth. One evidence-based approach to address this issue would be the implementation of a broad based incentive program for health whereby all MHS beneficiaries would be eligible to receive some type of financial remuneration for meeting positive personal health metrics (e.g. not smoking or a normal body mass index). This approach if designed appropriately has the potential to have a high level of acceptance within the current beneficiary population since financial incentives are already used widely in the military to help meet overall manpower requirements. The use of a MHS wide financial incentives program to instill healthy behaviors in beneficiaries' may be an effective means to curb rising healthcare cost. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of Group Prenatal Care: Perinatal Outcomes Among Adolescents in New York City Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Earnshaw, Valerie; Lewis, Jessica B.; Kershaw, Trace S.; Magriples, Urania; Stasko, Emily; Rising, Sharon Schindler; Cassells, Andrea; Cunningham, Shayna; Bernstein, Peter; Tobin, Jonathan N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We compared an evidence-based model of group prenatal care to traditional individual prenatal care on birth, neonatal, and reproductive health outcomes. Methods. We performed a multisite cluster randomized controlled trial in 14 health centers in New York City (2008–2012). We analyzed 1148 pregnant women aged 14 to 21 years, at less than 24 weeks of gestation, and not at high obstetrical risk. We assessed outcomes via medical records and surveys. Results. In intention-to-treat analyses, women at intervention sites were significantly less likely to have infants small for gestational age (< 10th percentile; 11.0% vs 15.8%; odds ratio = 0.66; 95% confidence interval = 0.44, 0.99). In as-treated analyses, women with more group visits had better outcomes, including small for gestational age, gestational age, birth weight, days in neonatal intensive care unit, rapid repeat pregnancy, condom use, and unprotected sex (P = .030 to < .001). There were no associated risks. Conclusions. CenteringPregnancy Plus group prenatal care resulted in more favorable birth, neonatal, and reproductive outcomes. Successful translation of clinical innovations to enhance care, improve outcomes, and reduce cost requires strategies that facilitate patient adherence and support organizational change. PMID:26691105

  18. Sepsis survivors monitoring and coordination in outpatient health care (SMOOTH): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Konrad; Thiel, Paul; Mueller, Friederike; Schmuecker, Katja; Worrack, Susanne; Mehlhorn, Juliane; Engel, Christoph; Brenk-Franz, Katja; Kausche, Stephan; Jakobi, Ursula; Bindara-Klippel, Anne; Schneider, Nico; Freytag, Antje; Davydow, Dimitry; Wensing, Michel; Brunkhorst, Frank Martin; Gensichen, Jochen

    2014-07-11

    Sepsis sequelae include critical illness polyneuropathy, myopathy, wasting, neurocognitive deficits, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and chronic pain. Little is known howlong-term sequelae following hospital discharge are treated. The aim of our study is to determine the effect of a primary care-based, long-term program on health-related quality of life in sepsis survivors. In a two-armed randomized multicenter interventional study, patients after sepsis (n = 290) will be assessed at 6, 12 and 24 months. Patients are eligible if severe sepsis or septic shock (ICD-10), at least two criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), at least one organ dysfunction and sufficient cognitive capacity are present. The intervention comprises 1) discharge management, 2) training of general practitioners and patients in evidence-based care for sepsis sequelae and 3) telephone monitoring of patients. At six months, we expect an improved primary outcome (health-related quality of life/SF-36) and improved secondary outcomes such as costs, mortality, clinical-, psycho-social- and process-of-care measures in the intervention group compared to the control group. This study evaluates a primary care-based, long-term program for patients after severe sepsis. Study results may add evidence for improved sepsis care management. General practitioners may contribute efficiently to sepsis aftercare. U1111-1119-6345. DRKS00000741, CCT-NAPN-20875 (25 February 2011).

  19. Sepsis survivors monitoring and coordination in outpatient health care (SMOOTH): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sepsis sequelae include critical illness polyneuropathy, myopathy, wasting, neurocognitive deficits, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and chronic pain. Little is known howlong-term sequelae following hospital discharge are treated. The aim of our study is to determine the effect of a primary care-based, long-term program on health-related quality of life in sepsis survivors. Methods/Design In a two-armed randomized multicenter interventional study, patients after sepsis (n = 290) will be assessed at 6, 12 and 24 months. Patients are eligible if severe sepsis or septic shock (ICD-10), at least two criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), at least one organ dysfunction and sufficient cognitive capacity are present. The intervention comprises 1) discharge management, 2) training of general practitioners and patients in evidence-based care for sepsis sequelae and 3) telephone monitoring of patients. At six months, we expect an improved primary outcome (health-related quality of life/SF-36) and improved secondary outcomes such as costs, mortality, clinical-, psycho-social- and process-of-care measures in the intervention group compared to the control group. Discussion This study evaluates a primary care-based, long-term program for patients after severe sepsis. Study results may add evidence for improved sepsis care management. General practitioners may contribute efficiently to sepsis aftercare. Trial registration U1111-1119-6345. DRKS00000741, CCT-NAPN-20875 (25 February 2011). PMID:25015838

  20. Guidelines for environmental infection control in health-care facilities. Recommendations of CDC and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC).

    PubMed

    Sehulster, Lynne; Chinn, Raymond Y W

    2003-06-06

    The health-care facility environment is rarely implicated in disease transmission, except among patients who are immunocompromised. Nonetheless, inadvertent exposures to environmental pathogens (e.g., Aspergillus spp. and Legionella spp.) or airborne pathogens (e.g., Mycobacterium tuberculosis and varicella-zoster virus) can result in adverse patient outcomes and cause illness among health-care workers. Environmental infection-control strategies and engineering controls can effectively prevent these infections. The incidence of health-care--associated infections and pseudo-outbreaks can be minimized by 1) appropriate use of cleaners and disinfectants; 2) appropriate maintenance of medical equipment (e.g., automated endoscope reprocessors or hydrotherapy equipment); 3) adherence to water-quality standards for hemodialysis, and to ventilation standards for specialized care environments (e.g., airborne infection isolation rooms, protective environments, or operating rooms); and 4) prompt management of water intrusion into the facility. Routine environmental sampling is not usually advised, except for water quality determinations in hemodialysis settings and other situations where sampling is directed by epidemiologic principles, and results can be applied directly to infection-control decisions. This report reviews previous guidelines and strategies for preventing environment-associated infections in health-care facilities and offers recommendations. These include 1) evidence-based recommendations supported by studies; 2) requirements of federal agencies (e.g., Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and U.S. Department of Justice); 3) guidelines and standards from building and equipment professional organizations (e.g., American Institute of Architects, Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation, and American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air

  1. Effectiveness of involving pharmacists in the process of ambulatory health care to improve drug treatment adherence and disease control.

    PubMed

    Mino-León, Dolores; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Flores-Hernández, Sergio

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating the pharmacist into the ambulatory health care team to increase the proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and/or hypertension who adhere to their drug regimen and to improve disease control. A non-randomized clinical trial was carried out in patients with T2DM and/or hypertension from two primary care clinics. Patients from one of the clinics comprised the intervention group (IG) who received 'counselling' from the pharmacist. The control group (CG) was comprised of patients who attended another clinic and received the usual care. Adherence was measured by counting pills; hypertension control was evaluated by blood pressure and diabetes control by blood glucose. Statistical analysis was carried out by intention to treat using generalized linear models. There were 440 patients included. There was no difference in the proportion of IG and CG patients who adhered to treatment according to baseline measurements. An increase in the proportion of adherence at baseline and final determination was observed in both groups (IG 71-80%, P=0.006 and CG 72-87%, P=0.000). Generalized linear models showed a 55% or higher probability of IG patients achieving control of hypertension in comparison with the CG. Patients from the IG with T2DM have 13% more possibility of achieving glycaemic control than those of the CG. Counselling offered by the pharmacist proved to be effective for improving drug adherence of diabetic and hypertensive patients in ambulatory health care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. [Investigation on the current status of oral health care in the disease controls system in Sichuan Province].

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Wang; Ying, Deng; Wei, Yin; Xiaoxia, Liu; Yujin, He; Jun, He

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the status and characteristics of dental manpower in the center for disease controls (CDC) in Sichuan Province and to provide more evidence for strengthening the oral healthcare workforce in the CDC system. A mass survey on dental manpower was made in CDCs in Sichuan Province through questionnaire investigation. Data were collected and entered with the Epidemiological Dynamic Data Collection (EDDC) platform and analyzed with SPSS 13.0 software. Sichuan Province had 0.15 hospitals providing oral health services and 0.38 dentists on average per 10,000 people. About 65.53% (135/206) of the CDCs had one department responsible for the oral health service. However, oral health care personnel comprised only 2.23% (237/10,624) of the personnel of the whole CDC system. About 64.67% (119/184) of county CDCs and 47.62% (10/21) of city CDCs knew well the dental health status of local residents. Less than 5% of the CDCs used the data and assisted in the policy making of public health administrators. The dental care personal deficit exists in the CDC system in Sichuan Province. The distribution and composition of dental manpower are not reasonable. The oral health service ability of CDCs in Sichuan Province should be strengthened and improved.

  3. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an educational intervention for general practitioners in adolescent health care: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sanci, L A; Coffey, C M M; Veit, F C M; Carr-Gregg, M; Patton, G C; Day, N; Bowes, G

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention in adolescent health designed for general practitioners in accordance with evidence based practice in continuing medical education. Design Randomised controlled trial with baseline testing and follow up at seven and 13 months. Setting Local communities in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Participants 108 self selected general practitioners. Intervention A multifaceted educational programme for 2.5 hours a week over six weeks on the principles of adolescent health care followed six weeks later by a two hour session of case discussion and debriefing. Outcome measures Objective ratings of consultations with standardised adolescent patients recorded on videotape. Questionnaires completed by the general practitioners were used to measure their knowledge, skill, and self perceived competency, satisfaction with the programme, and self reported change in practice. Results 103 of 108 (95%) doctors completed all phases of the intervention and evaluation protocol. The intervention group showed significantly greater improvements in all outcomes than the control group at the seven month follow up except for the rapport and satisfaction rating by the standardised patients. 104 (96%) participants found the programme appropriate and relevant. At the 13 month follow up most improvements were sustained, the confidentiality rating by the standardised patients decreased slightly, and the objective assessment of competence further improved. 106 (98%) participants reported a change in practice attributable to the intervention. Conclusions General practitioners were willing to complete continuing medical education in adolescent health care and its evaluation. The design of the intervention using evidence based educational strategies proved an effective and quick way to achieve sustainable and large improvements in knowledge, skill, and self perceived competency. Key messagesFirm evidence shows that the confidence

  4. The Effects of a Locally Developed mHealth Intervention on Delivery and Postnatal Care Utilization; A Prospective Controlled Evaluation among Health Centres in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Shiferaw, Solomon; Spigt, Mark; Tekie, Michael; Abdullah, Muna; Fantahun, Mesganaw; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Although there are studies showing that mobile phone solutions can improve health service delivery outcomes in the developed world, there is little empirical evidence that demonstrates the impact of mHealth interventions on key maternal health outcomes in low income settings. Methods A non-randomized controlled study was conducted in the Amhara region, Ethiopia in 10 health facilities (5 intervention, 5 control) together serving around 250,000 people. Health workers in the intervention group received an android phone (3 phones per facility) loaded with an application that sends reminders for scheduled visits during antenatal care (ANC), delivery and postnatal care (PNC), and educational messages on dangers signs and common complaints during pregnancy. The intervention was developed at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. Primary outcomes were the percentage of women who had at least 4 ANC visits, institutional delivery and PNC visits at the health center after 12 months of implementation of the intervention. Findings Overall 933 and 1037 women were included in the cross-sectional surveys at baseline and at follow-up respectively. In addition, the medical records of 1224 women who had at least one antenatal care visit were followed in the longitudinal study. Women who had their ANC visit in the intervention health centers were significantly more likely to deliver their baby in the same health center compared to the control group (43.1% versus 28.4%; Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 1.98 (95%CI 1.53–2.55)). A significantly higher percentage of women who had ANC in the intervention group had PNC in the same health center compared to the control health centers (41.2% versus 21.1%: AOR: 2.77 (95%CI 2.12–3.61)). Conclusions Our findings demonstrated that a locally customized mHealth application during ANC can significantly improve delivery and postnatal care service utilization possibly through positively influencing the behavior of health workers and their

  5. The challenges of mental health care reform for contemporary mental health nursing practice: relationships, power and control.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle

    2003-06-01

    This ethnographic investigation was concerned with the way mental health nurses' construct their practice in an acute inpatient psychiatric unit in light of the current challenges, demands and influences brought about by service reforms of the 1990s. The setting for this study was a 22-bed acute inpatient mental health facility. Over a 5-month period, data were collected through fieldwork observations, focused interviews and discussion groups. In this article, common cultural practices in relation to the imperatives of relationships, power, restrictions and safety are discussed. The findings demonstrate how the client stabilization role of the unit locates these imperatives as central to the delivery of nursing care. The discussion reveals nurses negotiating relationships that are contradictory and challenging in ordinary and everyday ways within the exigencies of daily practice.

  6. A brief eHealth tool delivered in primary care to help parents prevent childhood obesity: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Byrne, J L S; Cameron Wild, T; Maximova, K; Browne, N E; Holt, N L; Cave, A J; Martz, P; Ellendt, C; Ball, G D C

    2016-11-10

    To determine the feasibility and preliminary impact of an electronic health (eHealth) screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) delivered in primary care to help parents prevent childhood obesity. Parents of children (5-17 years) were recruited from a primary care clinic. Children's measured height and weight were entered into the SBIRT on a study-designated tablet. The SBIRT screened for children's weight status, block randomized parents to one of four brief interventions or an eHealth control and provided parents with a menu of optional obesity prevention resources. Feasibility was determined by parents' interest in, and uptake of, the SBIRT. Preliminary impact was based on parents' concern about children's weight status and intention to change lifestyle behaviours post-SBIRT. Parents (n = 226) of children (9.9 ± 3.4 years) were primarily biological mothers (87.6%) and Caucasian (70.4%). The proportion of participants recruited (84.3%) along with parents who selected optional resources within the SBIRT (85.8%) supported feasibility. Secondary outcomes did not vary across groups, but non-Caucasian parents classified as inaccurate estimators of children's weight status reported higher levels of concern and intention to change post-SBIRT. Our innovative, eHealth SBIRT was feasible in primary care and has the potential to encourage parents of unhealthy weight children towards preventative action. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  7. Integration of control of neglected tropical diseases into health-care systems: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gyapong, John O; Gyapong, Margaret; Yellu, Nathaniel; Anakwah, Kwadwo; Amofah, George; Bockarie, Moses; Adjei, Sam

    2010-01-09

    Although progress has been made in the fight against neglected tropical diseases, current financial resources and global political commitments are insufficient to reach the World Health Assembly's ambitious goals. Increased efforts are needed to expand global coverage. These efforts will involve national and international harmonisation and coordination of the activities of partnerships devoted to control or elimination of these diseases. Rational planning and integration into regular health systems is essential to scale up these interventions to achieve complete eradication of these diseases. Programmes with similar delivery strategies and interventions-such as those for onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, and soil-transmitted helminthiasis-could be managed on the same platform and together. Furthermore, better-resourced programmes-such as those for malaria, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis-could work closely with those for neglected tropical diseases to their mutual benefit and the benefit of the entire health system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Provider responses to patients controlling access to their electronic health records: a prospective cohort study in primary care.

    PubMed

    Tierney, William M; Alpert, Sheri A; Byrket, Amy; Caine, Kelly; Leventhal, Jeremy C; Meslin, Eric M; Schwartz, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Applying Fair Information Practice principles to electronic health records (EHRs) requires allowing patient control over who views their data. We designed a program that captures patients' preferences for provider access to an urban health system's EHR. Patients could allow or restrict providers' access to all data (diagnoses, medications, test results, reports, etc.) or only highly sensitive data (sexually transmitted infections, HIV/AIDS, drugs/alcohol, mental or reproductive health). Except for information in free-text reports, we redacted EHR data shown to providers according to patients' preferences. Providers could "break the glass" to display redacted information. We prospectively studied this system in one primary care clinic, noting redactions and when users "broke the glass," and surveyed providers about their experiences and opinions. Eight of nine eligible clinic physicians and all 23 clinic staff participated. All 105 patients who enrolled completed the preference program. Providers did not know which of their patients were enrolled, nor their preferences for accessing their EHRs. During the 6-month prospective study, 92 study patients (88 %) returned 261 times, during which providers viewed their EHRs 126 times (48 %). Providers "broke the glass" 102 times, 92 times for patients not in the study and ten times for six returning study patients, all of whom had restricted EHR access. Providers "broke the glass" for six (14 %) of 43 returning study patients with redacted data vs. zero among 49 study patients without redactions (p = 0.01). Although 54 % of providers agreed that patients should have control over who sees their EHR information, 58 % believed restricting EHR access could harm provider-patient relationships and 71 % felt quality of care would suffer. Patients frequently preferred restricting provider access to their EHRs. Providers infrequently overrode patients' preferences to view hidden data. Providers believed that restricting EHR access

  9. Health care lessons from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S

    1993-01-01

    Thailand's health care system incorporates the private and public sectors. The government regulates health care through a system of capping, which protects its interests while providing a climate for competition. As a result, the private sector has developed and implemented some interesting concepts in health care as it turned to prevention, hospital care alternatives, neighbourhood-based ambulatory care and home care. The author suggests that Canada could benefit by examining some of Thailand's innovations.

  10. Quality control in QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube for screening latent tuberculosis infection in health care workers.

    PubMed

    Igari, Hidetoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Ichimura, Yasunori; Sakurai, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Toshibumi; Ishiwada, Naruhiko

    2017-04-01

    QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube has been used for screening latent tuberculosis infection in newly employed health care workers in Japan. There have been a few studies concerning quality control. We retrospectively analysed QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube results in a hospital in Japan. Interferon-γ values in three blood collection tubes for QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube were analysed in association with the positivity rate. The data set consisted of health care workers aged 20-29 years during the 7 years between 2010 and 2016. The yearly QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube positivity rate was 0.9%, 16.4%, 3.0%, 39.3%, 2.8%, 0.9% and 1.5%, and was extremely high in 2011 and 2013. The interferon-γ values in the tuberculosis antigen tube were elevated in these two years, as indicated by higher median and wider interquartile range. The interferon-γ value in the negative control tube was also higher in 2011. The higher interferon-γ values in collection tubes (tuberculosis antigen tube and/or negative control tube) resulted in higher QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube positivity rate. The distribution of interferon-γ in tuberculosis antigen tube and negative control tube, as evaluated by median and interquartile range, proved to be an effective index for the quality control of QuantiFERON-TB gold in-tube.

  11. Urban–Rural Differences in Health-Care-Seeking Pattern of Residents of Abia State, Nigeria, and the Implication in the Control of NCDs

    PubMed Central

    Onyeonoro, Ugochukwu U.; Ogah, Okechukwu S.; Ukegbu, Andrew U.; Chukwuonye, Innocent I.; Madukwe, Okechukwu O.; Moses, Akhimiem O.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding the differences in care-seeking pattern is key in designing interventions aimed at improving health-care service delivery, including prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases. The aim of this study was to identify the differences and determinants of care-seeking patterns of urban and rural residents in Abia State in southeast Nigeria. METHODS This was a cross-sectional, community-based, study involving 2999 respondents aged 18 years and above. Data were collected using the modified World Health Organization’s STEPS questionnaire, including data on care seeking following the onset of illness. Descriptive statistics and logistic regressions were used to analyze care-seeking behavior and to identify differences among those seeking care in urban and rural areas. RESULTS In both urban and rural areas, patent medicine vendors (73.0%) were the most common sources of primary care following the onset of illness, while only 20.0% of the participants used formal care. Significant predictors of difference in care-seeking practices between residents in urban and rural communities were educational status, income, occupation, and body mass index. CONCLUSIONS Efforts should be made to reduce barriers to formal health-care service utilization in the state by increasing health insurance coverage, strengthening the health-care system, and increasing the role of patent medicine vendors in the formal health-care delivery system. PMID:27721654

  12. [Health care reform, decentralization, prevention and control of vector-borne diseases].

    PubMed

    Schmunis, G A; Dias, J C

    2000-01-01

    Economic policies are changing Latin American health programs, particularly promoting decentralization. Numerous difficulties thus arise for the control of endemic diseases, since such activities traditionally depend on vertical, and centralized structures. Theoretical arguments in favor of decentralization notwithstanding, no such tradition exists at the county level. The lack of program expertise at peripheral levels, intensive staff turnover, and even corruption are additional difficulties. Hence, the simple bureaucratic transfer of activities from the Federal to county level is often irresponsible. The loss of priority for control of endemic diseases in Latin America may mean the inexorable extinction of traditional control services. Malaria, dengue fever, and Chagas disease programs are examples of the loss of expertise and effectiveness in Latin America. A better strategy for responsible decentralization is required. In particular, a shared transition involving all governmental levels is desirable to effectively modernize programs. Maintenance of regional reference centers to ensure supervision, surveillance, and training is suggested.

  13. Women's health and behavioral health issues in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jean Lau; Yee, Barbara W K; Banks, Martha E

    2014-01-01

    As health care reform promises to change the landscape of health care delivery, its potential impact on women's health looms large. Whereas health and mental health systems have historically been fragmented, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) mandates integrated health care as the strategy for reform. Current systems fragment women's health not only in their primary care, mental health, obstetrical, and gynecological needs, but also in their roles as the primary caregivers for parents, spouses, and children. Changes in reimbursement, and in restructuring financing and care coordination systems through accountable care organizations and medical homes, will potentially improve women's health care.

  14. Two short interventions to reduce health care requirements in asthma patients. A multicentre controlled study (ASTHMACAP II).

    PubMed

    Morell, Ferran; Ojanguren, Iñigo; Cordovilla, Rosa; Urrutia, Isabel; Agüero, Ramón; Guerra, Javier; Genover, Teresa; Ramon, Maria Antonia

    2014-04-22

    Asthma control is suboptimal. The objective of this study was to reduce health care requirements and work absenteeism. Multicenter randomized controlled study investigating asthma control, educational parameters, health service use, and absenteeism. After adjusting treatment according to GINA recommendations, control group patients (CG) followed their physician's recommendations, while intervention group (IG) patients additionally underwent a 5-minute educational intervention. This protocol was repeated at 3 months, and a final assessment was carried out at 6 months. 479 patients (mean age 40 (SD 17) years) were recruited from primary care, and 334 completed the study. Comparatively, IG patients showed an improvement at the 3- and 6-month evaluations in the six educational parameters (P<0.001) and required fewer urgent visits to the GP for exacerbations [RR=0.49 (95% CI 0.26-0.90); P<0.04], and before the third evaluation, also in urgent GP visits [RR=0.25 (95% CI 0.12-0.52); P<0.001]. Before this third evaluation, IG had fewer scheduled visits to the GP [RR=0.48 (95% CI 0.28-0.82); P<0.003], and fewer visits to the primary care [RR=0.40 (95% CI 0.18-0.87); P<0.05], and to hospital emergency rooms [RR=0.13 (95% CI 0.04-0.42); P<0.001]. In addition, before the third evaluation, IG patients were less often absent from work [RR=0.22 (95% CI 0.05-0.98); P<0.03] or unable to work at home [RR=0.31 (95% CI 0.12-0.82); P<0.02]. Two short educational interventions improved asthma education and decreased the use of health resources and work absenteeism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Newborn Infection Control and Care Initiative for health facilities to accelerate reduction of newborn mortality (NICCI): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Var, Chivorn; Bazzano, Alessandra N; Srivastav, Sudesh K; Welty, James C; Ek, Navapol Iv; Oberhelman, Richard A

    2015-06-05

    Newborn health is a key issue in addressing the survival of children under five years old, particularly in low and middle income countries, and the evidence base for newborn health interventions continues to evolve. Over the last decade, maternal and under five-year-old mortality and morbidity rates have been successfully reduced in Cambodia, but newborn health has lagged behind. Evidence suggests that an important proportion of newborn mortality both globally and in Cambodia is attributable to infections and sepsis. While initiatives are being implemented to address some causes of newborn illness (related to pre-term birth and asphyxia), a country-level approach to reducing infections has not been formulated. The Newborn Infection Control and Care Initiative (NICCI) is a community and health facility linked intervention to improve health outcomes for newborns. The present study applies a cluster randomized trial, using a stepped wedge design, to assess the impact of a package intervention on newborn health. The intervention components include addressing infection control in the perinatal period in health facilities, promoting infection prevention and control practices in health center and home environments, and improving the timeliness of referrals for newborns with suspected infections to appropriate health facilities, by linking families to the medical system through a network of community based volunteers who will make home visits to families in the first week of a newborn's life. The NICCI trial is designed to complement and enhance the Cambodian Ministry of Health strategies and objectives for maternal and newborn care. Results of the study will help to inform policy and the possible scale-up of newborn health interventions in the country. This trial was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov (identifier: NCT02271737) on 5 October 2014.

  16. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections in Iran: A qualitative study to explore challenges and barriers.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, Atefeh; Rashidian, Arash; Masoumi Asl, Hossein; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Salari, Hedayat; Akbari Sari, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Globally, the health and economic burden posed by health care-associated infections (HAIs) remains wide and severe. To curb the burden associated with HAIs, countries, including Iran, aim at HAI prevention and control. This study explores the challenges faced by the Iranian health system in addressing the issues associated with the prevention and control of HAIs. A qualitative research method was adopted in exploring the phenomenon. We used the purposive sampling approach in reaching 24 key informants at the national and subnational levels. The thematic framework analysis was conducted for analyzing the interviews. Five main themes emerged from our study demonstrating the obstacles toward the prevention and control of HAIs. They include governance and stewardship, resources, safety culture, monitoring and surveillance systems, and inappropriate prescription of antibiotics. Strengthening of reporting and surveillance systems for HAIs coupled with proper governance and stewardship are crucial in order to improve the health and safety of patients. However, the availability of resources, through an intersectoral approach, is essential to achieve sustained output. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Improving paediatric asthma outcomes in primary health care: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shah, Smita; Sawyer, Susan M; Toelle, Brett G; Mellis, Craig M; Peat, Jennifer K; Lagleva, Marivic; Usherwood, Timothy P; Jenkins, Christine R

    2011-10-03

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the Practitioner Asthma Communication and Education (PACE) Australia program, an innovative communication and paediatric asthma management program for general practitioners. Randomised controlled trial. General practices from two regions in metropolitan Sydney. 150 GPs, who were recruited between 2006 and 2008, and 221 children with asthma in their care. GPs in the intervention group participated in two 3-hour workshops, focusing on communication and education strategies to facilitate quality asthma care. Patient outcomes included receipt of a written asthma action plan (WAAP), appropriate medication use, parent days away from work, and child days away from school or child care. GP outcomes included frequency of providing a WAAP and patient education, communication and teaching behaviour, and adherence to national asthma guidelines regarding medication use. More patients of GPs in the intervention group reported receipt of a WAAP (difference, 15%; 95% CI, 2% to 28%; adjusted P=0.046). In the intervention group, children with infrequent intermittent asthma symptoms had lower use of inhaled corticosteroids (difference, 24%; 95% CI, -43% to -5%; P=0.03) and long-acting bronchodilators (difference, 19%; 95% CI, -34% to -5%; P=0.02). GPs in the intervention group were more confident when communicating with patients (difference 22%; 95% CI, 3% to 40%; P=0.03). A higher proportion of GPs in the intervention group reported providing a WAAP more than 70% of the time (difference, 23%; 95% CI, 11% to 36%; adjusted P=0.002) and prescribing spacer devices more than 90% of the time (difference, 29%; 95% CI, 16% to 42%; adjusted P=0.02). The PACE Australia program improved GPs' asthma management practices and led to improvements in some important patient outcomes. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12607000067471.

  18. Children's rights to health care.

    PubMed

    Brock, D W

    2001-04-01

    This paper will explore the application of an account of justice in health and health care to the special case of children. It is tempting to hold that children require no special treatment in an account of just health care; justice requires guaranteeing access to at least basic health care services to all persons, whatever their age group, within the constraints of a society's resources. However, I will argue that for a number of reasons we need to address what justice requires specifically for children from the health care system, even if the answer must be embedded within a general account of justice in health and health care.

  19. Track: A randomized controlled trial of a digital health obesity treatment intervention for medically vulnerable primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Foley, Perry; Steinberg, Dori; Levine, Erica; Askew, Sandy; Batch, Bryan C; Puleo, Elaine M; Svetkey, Laura P; Bosworth, Hayden B; DeVries, Abigail; Miranda, Heather; Bennett, Gary G

    2016-05-01

    Obesity continues to disproportionately affect medically vulnerable populations. Digital health interventions may be effective for delivering obesity treatment in low-resource primary care settings. Track is a 12-month randomized controlled trial of a digital health weight loss intervention in a community health center system. Participants are 351 obese men and women aged 21 to 65years with an obesity-related comorbidity. Track participants are randomized to usual primary care or to a 12-month intervention consisting of algorithm-generated tailored behavior change goals, self-monitoring via mobile technologies, daily self-weighing using a network-connected scale, skills training materials, 18 counseling phone calls with a Track coach, and primary care provider counseling. Participants are followed over 12months, with study visits at baseline, 6, and 12months. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, fasting lipids, glucose and HbA1C and self-administered surveys are collected. Follow-up data will be collected from the medical record at 24months. Participants are 68% female and on average 50.7years old with a mean BMI of 35.9kg/m(2). Participants are mainly black (54%) or white (33%); 12.5% are Hispanic. Participants are mostly employed and low-income. Over 20% of the sample has hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Almost 27% of participants currently smoke and almost 20% score above the clinical threshold for depression. Track utilizes an innovative, digital health approach to reduce obesity and chronic disease risk among medically vulnerable adults in the primary care setting. Baseline characteristics reflect a socioeconomically disadvantaged, high-risk patient population in need of evidence-based obesity treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Track: A randomized controlled trial of a digital health obesity treatment intervention for medically vulnerable primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Perry; Steinberg, Dori; Levine, Erica; Askew, Sandy; Batch, Bryan C.; Puleo, Elaine M.; Svetkey, Laura P.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; DeVries, Abigail; Miranda, Heather; Bennett, Gary G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obesity continues to disproportionately affect medically vulnerable populations. Digital health interventions may be effective for delivering obesity treatment in low-resource primary care settings. Methods Track is a 12-month randomized controlled trial of a digital health weight loss intervention in a community health center system. Participants are 351 obese men and women aged 21 to 65 years with an obesity-related comorbidity. Track participants are randomized to usual primary care or to a 12-month intervention consisting of algorithm-generated tailored behavior change goals, self-monitoring via mobile technologies, daily self-weighing using a network-connected scale, skills training materials, 18 counseling phone calls with a Track coach, and primary care provider counseling. Participants are followed over 12 months, with study visits at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, fasting lipids, glucose and HbA1C and self-administered surveys are collected. Follow-up data will be collected from the medical record at 24 months. Results Participants are 68% female and on average 50.7 years old with a mean BMI of 35.9 kg/m2. Participants are mainly black (54%) or white (33%); 12.5% are Hispanic. Participants are mostly employed and low-income. Over 20% of the sample has hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia. Almost 27% of participants currently smoke and almost 20% score above the clinical threshold for depression. Conclusions Track utilizes an innovative, digital health approach to reduce obesity and chronic disease risk among medically vulnerable adults in the primary care setting. Baseline characteristics reflect a socioeconomically disadvantaged, high-risk patient population in need of evidence-based obesity treatment. PMID:26995281

  1. Impact of pharmaceutical care interventions on glycemic control and other health-related clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes: Randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wishah, Ruba A; Al-Khawaldeh, Omar A; Albsoul, Abla M

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pharmaceutical care interventions on glycemic control and other health-related clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes patients in Jordan. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 106 patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes seeking care in the diabetes clinics at Jordan University Hospital. Patients were randomly allocated into control and intervention group. The intervention group patients received pharmaceutical care interventions developed by the clinical pharmacist in collaboration with the physician while the control group patients received usual care without clinical pharmacist's input. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c were measured at the baseline, at three months, and six months intervals for both intervention and control groups. After the six months follow-up, mean of HbA1c and FBS of the patients in the intervention group decreased significantly compared to the control group patients (P<0.05). Also, the results indicated that mean scores of patients' knowledge about medications, knowledge about diabetes and adherence to medications and diabetes self-care activities of the patients in the intervention group increased significantly compared to the control group (P<0.05). This study demonstrated an improvement in HbA1c, FBS, and lipid profile, in addition to self-reported medication adherence, diabetes knowledge, and diabetes self-care activities in patients with type 2 diabetes who received pharmaceutical care interventions. The results suggest the benefits of integrating clinical pharmacist services in multidisciplinary healthcare team and diabetes management in Jordan. Copyright © 2014 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Level of asthma control and health care utilization in Asia-Pacific countries.

    PubMed

    Gold, Laura S; Thompson, Phillip; Salvi, Sundeep; Faruqi, Rab A; Sullivan, Sean D

    2014-02-01

    Data on the impact of asthma in many countries in the Asia-Pacific region is limited. This study investigated whether partly- and uncontrolled asthma were associated with increased medication use/healthcare utilization and productivity loss among a population of asthma patients from nine Asia-Pacific countries. We used cross-sectional data from 3630 asthma patients ≥12 years from the 2011 Asia-Pacific Asthma Insights and Management (AP-AIM) survey. Using Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines, patients were categorized as having well-controlled, partly- controlled, or uncontrolled asthma. Chi-square tests were used to assess the relation of degree of asthma control with utilization of asthma medications, health services, productivity, and mood. Overall, 7.6% of the patients surveyed had asthma that was well-controlled, with the highest proportions in Singapore (14%) and the lowest in India (0%) and China (2%). Patients whose asthma was not well-controlled reported greater use of asthma medications, more emergency healthcare visits or hospitalizations for their asthma, and more interference of their mood due to asthma. They also reported significant decreases in productivity due to asthma. Patients who did not have well-controlled asthma had greater utilization rates of asthma medications and healthcare services and were more likely to report missing multiple days of work/school compared to patients whose asthma was well-controlled. These associations suggest that emphasis on improving asthma control could have dramatic effects on patient well-being and utilization of healthcare resources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Health-Care Costs, Glycemic Control and Nutritional Status in Malnourished Older Diabetics Treated with a Hypercaloric Diabetes-Specific Enteral Nutritional Formula

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Paris, Alejandro; Boj-Carceller, Diana; Lardies-Sanchez, Beatriz; Perez-Fernandez, Leticia; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes-specific formulas are an effective alternative for providing nutrients and maintaining glycemic control. This study assesses the effect of treatment with an oral enteral nutrition with a hypercaloric diabetes-specific formula (HDSF) for one year, on health-care resources use, health-care costs, glucose control and nutritional status, in 93 type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) malnourished patients. Changes in health-care resources use and health-care costs were collected the year before and during the year of intervention. Glucose status and nutritional laboratory parameters were analyzed at baseline and one-year after the administration of HDSF. The administration of HDSF was significantly associated with a reduced use of health-care resources, fewer hospital admissions (54.7%; p < 0.001), days spent at hospital (64.1%; p < 0.001) and emergency visits (57.7%; p < 0.001). Health-care costs were reduced by 65.6% (p < 0.001) during the intervention. Glycemic control (short- and long-term) and the need of pharmacological treatment did not change, while some nutritional parameters were improved at one year (albumin: +10.6%, p < 0.001; hemoglobin: +6.4%, p = 0.026). In conclusion, using HDSF in malnourished older type-2 diabetic patients may allow increasing energy intake while maintaining glucose control and improving nutritional parameters. The use of health-care resources and costs were significantly reduced during the nutritional intervention. PMID:27005661

  4. Health-Care Costs, Glycemic Control and Nutritional Status in Malnourished Older Diabetics Treated with a Hypercaloric Diabetes-Specific Enteral Nutritional Formula.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Paris, Alejandro; Boj-Carceller, Diana; Lardies-Sanchez, Beatriz; Perez-Fernandez, Leticia; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2016-03-09

    Diabetes-specific formulas are an effective alternative for providing nutrients and maintaining glycemic control. This study assesses the effect of treatment with an oral enteral nutrition with a hypercaloric diabetes-specific formula (HDSF) for one year, on health-care resources use, health-care costs, glucose control and nutritional status, in 93 type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) malnourished patients. Changes in health-care resources use and health-care costs were collected the year before and during the year of intervention. Glucose status and nutritional laboratory parameters were analyzed at baseline and one-year after the administration of HDSF. The administration of HDSF was significantly associated with a reduced use of health-care resources, fewer hospital admissions (54.7%; p < 0.001), days spent at hospital (64.1%; p < 0.001) and emergency visits (57.7%; p < 0.001). Health-care costs were reduced by 65.6% (p < 0.001) during the intervention. Glycemic control (short- and long-term) and the need of pharmacological treatment did not change, while some nutritional parameters were improved at one year (albumin: +10.6%, p < 0.001; hemoglobin: +6.4%, p = 0.026). In conclusion, using HDSF in malnourished older type-2 diabetic patients may allow increasing energy intake while maintaining glucose control and improving nutritional parameters. The use of health-care resources and costs were significantly reduced during the nutritional intervention.

  5. A mobile phone application for the assessment and management of youth mental health problems in primary care: health service outcomes from a randomised controlled trial of mobiletype.

    PubMed

    Reid, Sophie C; Kauer, Sylvia D; Hearps, Stephen J C; Crooke, Alexander H D; Khor, Angela S; Sanci, Lena A; Patton, George C

    2013-06-19

    GPs detect at best 50c of mental health problems in young people. Barriers to detecting mental health problems include lack of screening tools, limited appointment times and young people's reluctance to report mental health symptoms to GPs. The mobiletype program is a mobile phone mental health assessment and management application which monitors mood, stress and everyday activities then transmits this information to general practitioners (GPs) via a secure website in summary format for medical review. The current aims were to examine: (i) mobiletype as a clinical assistance tool, ii) doctor-patient rapport and, iii) pathways to care. We conducted a randomised controlled trial in primary care with patients aged 14 to 24 years recruited from rural and metropolitan general practices. GPs identified and referred eligible participants (those with mild or more mental health concerns) who were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (where mood, stress and daily activities were monitored) or the attention-comparison group (where only daily activities were monitored). Both groups self-monitored for 2 to 4 weeks and reviewed the monitoring data with their GP. GPs, participants and researchers were blind to group allocation at randomisation. GPs assessed the mobiletype program as a clinical assistant tool. Doctor-patient rapport was assessed using the General Practice Assessment Questionnaire Communication and Enablement subscales, and the Trust in Physician Scale (TPS). Pathways to care was measured using The Party Project's Exit Interview. Of the 163 participants assessed for eligibility, 118 were randomised and 114 participants were included in analyses (intervention n = 68, attention-comparison n = 46). T-tests showed that the intervention program increased understanding of patient mental health, assisted in decisions about medication/referral and helped in diagnosis when compared to the attention-comparison program. Mixed model analysis showed no

  6. A mobile phone application for the assessment and management of youth mental health problems in primary care: health service outcomes from a randomised controlled trial of mobiletype

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background GPs detect at best 50c of mental health problems in young people. Barriers to detecting mental health problems include lack of screening tools, limited appointment times and young people’s reluctance to report mental health symptoms to GPs. The mobiletype program is a mobile phone mental health assessment and management application which monitors mood, stress and everyday activities then transmits this information to general practitioners (GPs) via a secure website in summary format for medical review. The current aims were to examine: (i) mobiletype as a clinical assistance tool, ii) doctor-patient rapport and, iii) pathways to care. Methods We conducted a randomised controlled trial in primary care with patients aged 14 to 24 years recruited from rural and metropolitan general practices. GPs identified and referred eligible participants (those with mild or more mental health concerns) who were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (where mood, stress and daily activities were monitored) or the attention-comparison group (where only daily activities were monitored). Both groups self-monitored for 2 to 4 weeks and reviewed the monitoring data with their GP. GPs, participants and researchers were blind to group allocation at randomisation. GPs assessed the mobiletype program as a clinical assistant tool. Doctor-patient rapport was assessed using the General Practice Assessment Questionnaire Communication and Enablement subscales, and the Trust in Physician Scale (TPS). Pathways to care was measured using The Party Project’s Exit Interview. Results Of the 163 participants assessed for eligibility, 118 were randomised and 114 participants were included in analyses (intervention n = 68, attention-comparison n = 46). T-tests showed that the intervention program increased understanding of patient mental health, assisted in decisions about medication/referral and helped in diagnosis when compared to the attention-comparison program

  7. Understanding your health care costs

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000878.htm Understanding your health care costs To use the sharing features on this ... This is the payment you make for certain health care provider visits and prescriptions. It is a set ...

  8. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  9. Environmental Health: Health Care Reform's Missing Pieces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadope, Cece Modupe; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A series of articles that examine environmental health and discuss health care reform; connections between chlorine, chlorinated pesticides, and dioxins and reproductive disorders and cancers; the rise in asthma; connections between poverty and environmental health problems; and organizations for health care professionals who want to address…

  10. Care for the Health Care Provider.

    PubMed

    Kunin, Sharon Brown; Kanze, David Mitchell

    2016-03-01

    Pretravel care for the health care provider begins with an inventory, including the destination, length of stay, logistical arrangements, type of lodging, food and water supply, team members, personal medical needs, and the needs of the community to be treated. This inventory should be created and processed well in advance of the planned medical excursion. The key thing to remember in one's planning is to be a health care provider during one's global health care travel and not to become a patient oneself. This article will help demonstrate the medical requirements and recommendations for such planning.

  11. Associations between health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care behaviors, and glycemic control in a low income population with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bains, Sujeev S; Egede, Leonard E

    2011-03-01

    This study assessed associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care, and glycemic control in a low income, predominately minority population with type 2 diabetes. One hundred twenty-five adults with diabetes were recruited from a primary care clinic. Subjects completed validated surveys to measure health literacy, diabetes knowledge, and self-care (medication adherence, diet, exercise, blood sugar testing, and foot care). Hemoglobin A1c values were extracted from the medical record. Spearman's correlation and multiple linear regression were used to assess the relationship among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care, and glycemic control controlling for covariates. Cronbach's α was 0.95 for the Revised Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine. The majority of the sample was <65 years old (50.7%), female (72.5%), and African American (71.4%), had less than a high school education (68.2%) and a household income < $15,000 (64.2%), and reported their health status as worse than last year (73.9%). In adjusted models that examined the associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, medication adherence, and self-care, health literacy was only significantly associated with diabetes knowledge (β = 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29, 0.82). In the final adjusted model for independent factors associated with glycemic control, both diabetes knowledge (β = 0.12; 95% CI 0.01, 0.23) and perceived health status (β = 1.14; 95% CI 0.13, 2.16) were significantly associated with glycemic control, whereas health literacy was not associated with glycemic control (β = -0.03; 95% CI -0.19, 0.13). Diabetes knowledge and perceived health status are the most important factors associated with glycemic control in this population. Health literacy appears to exert its influence through diabetes knowledge and is not directly related to self-care or medication adherence.

  12. Impact of a Reference Center on Leprosy Control under a Decentralized Public Health Care Policy in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Raquel Rodrigues; Sales, Anna Maria; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Duppre, Nádia Cristina; Machado, Alice de Miranda; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2016-01-01

    Reorientation of the public health policies in Brazil over the last 20 years in association with a stable rate of new-case detection prompted the establishment of a decentralized leprosy control strategy. The aim was to move from a vertical model associated with general dermatological services to one in which the diagnosis and treatment of the disease would be integrated into the primary care level of the national health care facilities. Once patients demand for leprosy reference centers began to be affected by the process of integrating leprosy diagnosis into the basic health care services, it was necessary to determine the profile of all our referrals in light of the new decentralization policy. Objective We evaluated the profile of patients referred to the Fiocruz Outpatient Clinic, a reference center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, and analyzed the origins and outcomes of these referrals. Methods This is an observational retrospective study based on information collected from the Leprosy Laboratory database at Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. A total of 1,845 suspected leprosy cases examined at the reference center between 2010 and 2014 were included. The originating health service referrals and diagnostic outcomes were analyzed as well as the clinical and epidemiological data of patients diagnosed with leprosy. Result Our data show that the profile of the patients treated at the Clinic has changed in recent years. There was an increase in both the proportion of patients with other skin diseases and those who had visited only one health service prior to our Clinic. Among the total 1,845 cases analyzed, the outcomes of 1,380 were linked to other diseases and, in 74% of these cases, a biopsy was not necessary to reach a diagnostic conclusion. A decrease in new leprosy case detection among our patients was also observed. Yet, among the leprosy patients, 40% had some degree of disability at diagnosis. Conclusion The results of

  13. Utility of a thematic network in primary health care: a controlled interventional study in a rural area

    PubMed Central

    Coma del Corral, Maria Jesús; Abaigar Luquín, Pedro; Cordero Guevara, José; Olea Movilla, Angel; Torres Torres, Gerardo; Lozano Garcia, Javier

    2005-01-01

    Background UniNet is an Internet-based thematic network for a virtual community of users (VCU). It supports a virtual multidisciplinary community for physicians, focused on the improvement of clinical practice. This is a study of the effects of a thematic network such as UniNet on primary care medicine in a rural area, specifically as a platform of communication between specialists at the hospital and doctors in the rural area. Methods In order to study the effects of a thematic network such as UniNet on primary care medicine in a rural area, we designed an interventional study that included a control group. The measurements included the number of patient displacements due to disease, number of patient hospital stays and the number of prescriptions of drugs of low therapeutic utility and generic drug prescriptions by doctors. These data were analysed and compared with those of the control center. Results Our study showed positive changes in medical practice, reflected in the improvement of the evaluated parameters in the rural health area where the interventional study was carried out, compared with the control area. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of UniNet as a potential medium to improve the quality of medical care in rural areas. Conclusion The rural doctors had an effective, useful, user-friendly and cheap source of medical information that may have contributed to the improvement observed in the medical quality indices. PMID:16042778

  14. A case-control study of maternal knowledge of malnutrition and health-care-seeking attitudes in rural South India.

    PubMed

    Saito, K; Korzenik, J R; Jekel, J F; Bhattacharji, S

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of maternal nutritional knowledge and attitudes to children's nutritional status was investigated in a case-control study conducted in a rural area in Tamil Nadu, India. 34 cases (mothers of a severely malnourished child under 4 years of age) and 34 controls (mothers of a well-nourished age- and location-matched child) were selected from the Christian Medical Center and Hospital registry. The 68 mothers interviewed were predominantly young (mean age, 25 years), poor, and illiterate (67.6%). Severe malnutrition, defined as less than 60% of expected weight-for-age, was significantly associated with female gender (odds ratio (OR), 3.44) and father's occupation as a laborer (OR, 2.98), as opposed to a civil servant or private sector professional. Knowledge of the role of lack of food or nutrition in mild marasmus-kwashiorkor mixed malnutrition was significantly higher among controls (59%) than cases (35%), but there were no significant differences in health-seeking behaviors. In general, mothers from this area did not regard medical care as an appropriate intervention for malnutrition or measles. Only 28% of mothers indicated they would seek medical care for malnutrition. Conversely, medical care was considered indicated for diarrhea, colds, and worms. These findings indicate a need for intensive nutritional programs targeted toward the families of low-income female children.

  15. Child Care Health Connections, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guralnick, Eva, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Oku, Cheryl, Ed.; Kunitz, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 2002 issues of a bimonthly newsletter on children's health for California's child care professionals. The newsletter provides information on current and emerging health and safety issues relevant to child care providers and links the health, safety, and child care communities. Regular features include columns…

  16. Pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Lin, Kun-Der; Lee, Yu-Li; Wang, Yi-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    To validate a hypothesized model exploring the influencing pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Overall, 295 patients with T2DM were recruited from five endocrine clinics in Taiwan through convenience sampling. Data regarding personal characteristics, empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, self-care behaviors, and HbA1c levels were collected. A structural equation modeling was used to validate the hypothesized model. Significant direct pathways were determined from empowerment perceptions to health literacy, from health literacy to self-efficacy, from self-efficacy to self-care behaviors, and from self-care behaviors to HbA1c levels. The empowerment perceptions and health literacy relatively influenced self-efficacy and self-care behaviors. Self-efficacy and self-care behaviors relatively influenced glycemic control in patients with T2DM. Modifying self-care behaviors have been demonstrated to be the most essential for improving glycemic control. To improve self-care behaviors, healthcare providers should target improving self-efficacy, and enhancing health literacy can be considered to be a potential strategy for improving self-efficacy. To enhance health literacy, healthcare providers could use an empowerment approach rather than an authoritative approach that emphasizes patient compliance in managing patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of personal lifestyle intervention among health care providers on their patients and clinics; the Promoting Health by Self Experience (PHASE) randomized controlled intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Shai, Iris; Erlich, Dorit; Cohen, Arnon D; Urbach, Marianna; Yosef, Noga; Levy, Orna; Shahar, Danit R

    2012-10-01

    To determine the effect of self-experience multidisciplinary lifestyle intervention on health care providers (HCPs), patients and clinics. We randomized 15 primary-care clinics (serving 93,821 members), matched by patient profile, to provide the HCPs, either intervention or control HMO program. We followed personally 77 HCPs and 496 patients, and evaluated clinical measurement rate (CMR) changes (January-September 2010; Israel). HCPs within the intervention group demonstrated personal improvement in health initiative attitudes (p<0.05 vs. baseline), and a decrease in salt intake (p<0.05 vs. control). HCP intervention group's patients exhibited overall improvement in dietary patterns, specifically in salt, red meat (p<0.05 vs. baseline), fruit, and vegetable (p<0.05 vs. control) intake. Height, lipids, HbA1(C) and CMR increased within the intervention group's clinics (p<0.05 vs. baseline) with increased referral to angiography tests (p<0.05 vs. control). Within the intervention group, HCPs' salt pattern improvement was associated with increased lipid CMR (r=0.71; p=0.048), and lower HCPs' body weight was associated with increased blood pressure (r=-0.81; p=0.015) and lipid (r=-0.69; p=0.058) CMR. HCPs' personal lifestyles are directly correlated with their clinical performance. Interventions to promote health through HCP's self-experience are valuable and somewhat haloed to patients and clinics, suggesting an adjunct strategy in primary prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Redirecting health care spending: consumer-directed health care.

    PubMed

    Nolin, JoAnn; Killackey, Janet

    2004-01-01

    In an environment of rising health care costs, defined contribution plans and closely related consumer-directed health plans are emerging as a possible next phase in health plan development and offer new opportunities for the nursing profession.

  19. Evolution of US Health Care Reform.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Helm Ii, Standiford; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2017-03-01

    Major health policy creation or changes, including governmental and private policies affecting health care delivery are based on health care reform(s). Health care reform has been a global issue over the years and the United States has seen proposals for multiple reforms over the years. A successful, health care proposal in the United States with involvement of the federal government was the short-lived establishment of the first system of national medical care in the South. In the 20th century, the United States was influenced by progressivism leading to the initiation of efforts to achieve universal coverage, supported by a Republican presidential candidate, Theodore Roosevelt. In 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt, a Democrat, included a publicly funded health care program while drafting provisions to Social Security legislation, which was eliminated from the final legislation. Subsequently, multiple proposals were introduced, starting in 1949 with President Harry S Truman who proposed universal health care; the proposal by Lyndon B. Johnson with Social Security Act in 1965 which created Medicare and Medicaid; proposals by Ted Kennedy and President Richard Nixon that promoted variations of universal health care. presidential candidate Jimmy Carter also proposed universal health care. This was followed by an effort by President Bill Clinton and headed by first lady Hillary Clinton in 1993, but was not enacted into law. Finally, the election of President Barack Obama and control of both houses of Congress by the Democrats led to the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), often referred to as "ObamaCare" was signed into law in March 2010. Since then, the ACA, or Obamacare, has become a centerpiece of political campaigning. The Republicans now control the presidency and both houses of Congress and are attempting to repeal and replace the ACA. Key words: Health care reform, Affordable Care Act (ACA), Obamacare, Medicare, Medicaid, American Health Care Act.

  20. [Ethical problems in health care].

    PubMed

    Zácek, A

    1994-02-28

    Changes in the scale of values associated with society entering plural democracy caused as regards conceptual problems of health care some ethical doubts and objections. In the author's opinion the most important ones are: problems on the essence of health and mission of health policy, responsibility for health care, nature of health services under conditions of market economy, problems of the interpretation of right to health, health requirements and the importance of equity in advanced cultural societies.

  1. Effectiveness of a Web-Based Health Education Program to Promote Oral Hygiene Care Among Stroke Survivors: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ab Malik, Normaliza; Mohamad Yatim, Sa'ari; Lam, Otto Lok Tao; Jin, Lijian

    2017-01-01

    Background Oral hygiene care is of key importance among stroke patients to prevent complications that may compromise rehabilitation or potentially give rise to life-threatening infections such as aspiration pneumonia. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Web-based continuing professional development (CPD) program on “general intention” of the health carers to perform daily mouth cleaning for stroke patients using the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Methods A double-blind cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted among 547 stroke care providers across 10 hospitals in Malaysia. The centers were block randomized to receive either (1) test intervention (a Web-based CPD program on providing oral hygiene care to stroke patients using TPB) or (2) control intervention (a Web-based CPD program not specific to oral hygiene). Domains of TPB: “attitude,” “subjective norm” (SN), “perceived behavior control” (PBC), “general intention” (GI), and “knowledge” related to providing oral hygiene care were assessed preintervention and at 1 month and 6 months postintervention. Results The overall response rate was 68.2% (373/547). At 1 month, between the test and control groups, there was a significant difference in changes in scores of attitude (P=.004) and subjective norm (P=.01), but not in other TPB domains (GI, P=.11; PBC, P=.51; or knowledge, P=.08). At 6 months, there were significant differences in changes in scores of GI (P=.003), attitude (P=.009), SN (P<.001) and knowledge (P=.001) between the test and control groups. Regression analyses identified that the key factors associated with a change in GI at 6 months were changes in SN (beta=.36, P<.001) and changes in PBC (beta=.23, P<.001). Conclusions The Web-based CPD program based on TPB increased general intention, attitudes, subjective norms, and knowledge to provide oral hygiene care among stroke carers for their patients. Changing subjective norms and

  2. Assessment of the effectiveness of primary health care interventions in the control of three intestinal nematode infections in rural communities.

    PubMed

    Udonsi, J K; Ogan, V N

    1993-01-01

    In a 30 months' longitudinal study, primary health care intervention was effective in reducing the prevalence of three common intestinal nematode infections (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and Necator americanus) in three communities. This was achieved by training school leavers and auxiliary aides as microscopists, health inspectors and field assistants and deploying them to provide screening, surveillance, environmental sanitation, and mass-expulsion chemotherapy (MEC). Post-control surveillance confirmed that the prevalence of these infections had been greatly reduced. The prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides had declined from 49.3% (pre-intervention) to 10.5% (post-intervention). Hookworm had fallen from 31.4% (pre-intervention) to 4.1% (post-intervention) and whipworm from 40.7% (pre-intervention) to 6.5% (post-intervention). Overall percentage decreases of 78.7%, 86.9% and 84.0% were recorded for Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus and Trichuris trichiura respectively. The initial decline in prevalence was due to the MEC campaign, but the improved sanitation and health education presumably reduced the reinfection rate. If the entire population participated, periodic repetition of the mass expulsion therapy campaign at appropriate intervals combined with continued attention to environmental hygiene and prolonged health education could bring these infections under control within a few years.

  3. Infection Control Link Nurse Program: An interdisciplinary approach n targeting health care-acquired infection

    PubMed Central

    Sopirala, Madhuri M.; Yahle-Dunbar, Lisa; Smyer, Justin; Wellington, Linda; Dickman, Jeanne; Zikri, Nancy; Martin, Jennifer; Kulich, Pat; Taylor, David; Mekhjian, Hagop; Nash, Mary; Mansfield, Jerry; Pancholi, Preeti; Howard, Mary; Chase, Linda; Brown, Susan; Kipp, Kristopher; Lefeld, Kristen; Myers, Amber; Pan, Xueliang; Mangino, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe a successful interdisciplinary liaison program that effectively reduced health care-acquired (HCA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a university hospital setting. Methods Baseline was from January 2006 to March 2008, and intervention period was April 2008 to September 2009. Staff nurses were trained to be liaisons (link nurses) to infection prevention (IP) personnel with clearly defined goals assigned and with ongoing monthly education. HCA-MRSA incidence per 1,000 patient-days (PD) was compared between baseline and intervention period along with total and non-HCA-MRSA, HCA and non-HCA-MRSA bacteremia, and hand soap/sanitizer usage. Hand hygiene compliance was assessed. Results A reduction in MRSA rates was as follows in intervention period compared with baseline: HCA-MRSA decreased by 28% from 0.92 to 0.67 cases per 1,000 PD (incidence rate ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval: 0.62–0.83, P < .001), and HCA-MRSA bacteremia rate was reduced by 41% from 0.18 to 0.10 per 1,000 PD (incidence rate ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval: 0.42–0.84, P = .003). Total MRSA rate and MRSA bacteremia rate also showed significant reduction with nonsignificant reductions in overall non-HCA-MRSA and non-HCA-MRSA bacteremia. Hand soap/sanitizer usage and compliance with hand hygiene also increased significantly during IP. Conclusion Link nurse program effectively reduced HCA-MRSA. Goal-defined metrics with ongoing reeducation for the nurses by IP personnel helped drive these results. PMID:24548456

  4. International health care spending.

    PubMed

    Schieber, G J; Puollier, J P

    1986-01-01

    Trends in health are reviewed for the member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) covering the following: the basic difficulties inherent in international comparative studies; the absolute levels of health expenditures in 1984; the levels and rates of growth of the health share in the gross domestic product (GDP) and the public share of total health expenditures; the elasticities of real health expenditures to real GDP for the 1960-75, 1975-84, and 1960-84 time periods; growth in health expenditures for the largest 7 OECD countries in terms of growth in population, health prices, health care prices in excess of overall prices, and utilization/intensity of services per person. International comparisons are a problem due to differences in defining the boundaries of the health sector, the heterogeneity of data, and methodological problems arising from comparing different economic, demographic, cultural, and institutional structures. The most difficult problem in international comparisons of health expenditures is lack of appropriate measures of health outcome. Exhibit 1 contains per capita health expenditures denominated in US dollars based on GDP purchasing power parities for 21 OECD countries for 1984. Per capita health expenditures ranged from less than $500 in Greece, Portugal, and Spain to over $1400 in Sweden and the US, with an OECD average of $871. After adjusting for price level differences, there still appears to be a greater than 3-fold difference in the "volume" of services consumed across the OECD countries. To determine if per capita health expenditures are related to a country's wealth as measured by its per capita GDP, the relationship between per capita health expenditures and per capita GDP for the 21 countries were examined for 1984. The data points and the "best fitting" trend line indicate a statistically significant relationship in which each $100 difference in per capita GDP is associated with a $10

  5. [Consumer health-care information technology].

    PubMed

    Sunyaev, A

    2013-06-01

    Consumer health-care information technology is intended to improve patients' opportunities to gather information about their own health. Ideally, this will be achieved through an improved involvement of existing data bases and an improved communication of information to patients and to care providers, if desired by patients. Additionally, further interconnection of existing and new systems and pervasive system design may be used. All consumer health-care information technology services are optional and leave patients in control of their medical data at all times. This article reflects the current status of consumer health-care information technology research and suggests further research areas that should be addressed.

  6. Infant Oral Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Michael J.; Levine, Norman

    1988-01-01

    The family physician/pediatrician who sees a child from birth as part of the well-baby visit program is in the best position to identify early dental problems and to educate the family about early oral preventive health care. Since children under three years of age are not seen routinely by dentists, they are at risk of developing dental disease. This paper briefly covers the areas of infant oral pathology, early preventive care, teething, suckling habits, and dental trauma in the toddler. The physician will then be in a better position to recommend to parents when they should seek dental advice and treatment for their young children. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21253204

  7. Health care at the end of the road: opportunities from 20 years of partnership in onchocerciasis control.

    PubMed

    Haddad, D; Cross, C; Thylefors, B; Richards, F O; Bush, S; Hopkins, A D; Baker, S K

    2008-01-01

    The unprecedented decision of Merck & Co., Inc., to donate ivermectin through the Mectizan(R) Donation Program, has catalysed an exemplary partnership, to distribute the drug to the communities at risk of onchocerciasis, and empower them to take charge of the drug distribution themselves. Integration with other activities has always been part of the plan, but has been accelerated in recent years because of the need to strengthen primary health care, and to meet the challenges of integrating the rapid impact of Neglected Tropical Disease programmes. Activities that have been integrated include provision of vitamin A capsules, elimination of lymphatic filariasis, the distribution of insecticide-treated nets, and comprehensive eye health. Although these integrated activities show promising results for all programmes involved, challenges still remain. The risk of overburdening communities with multiple activities, and the problem of remuneration at the community level, are the major concerns, as is the need for effective coordination. The expanded onchocerciasis control partnership is a model of translating the eighth Millennium Development Goal (MDG), namely 'develop a global partnership for development', into action and also addresses other key MDGs. In 2006, the partnership provided more than 62 million treatments for onchocerciasis control, and offers a firm foundation from which to deliver other needed health interventions while safeguarding the achievements of onchocerciasis control thus far.

  8. Profit-seeking, corporate control, and the trustworthiness of health care organizations: assessments of health plan performance by their affiliated physicians.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Mark; Quon, Nicole; Wynia, Matthew; Cummins, Deborah; Gray, Bradford

    2005-06-01

    To compare the relative trustworthiness of nonprofit and for-profit health plans, using physician assessments to measure dimensions of plan performance that are difficult for consumers to evaluate. A nationally representative sample of 1,621 physicians who responded to a special topics module of the 1998 Socioeconomic Monitoring System Survey (SMS), fielded by the American Medical Association. Physicians assessed various aspects of their primary managed care plan, defined as the plan in which they had the largest number of patients. Plan ownership was measured as the interaction of tax-exempt status (nonprofit versus for-profit) and corporate control (single state versus multistate health plans). Two sets of regression models are estimated. The dependent variables in the regressions are five measures of performance related to plan trustworthiness: two related to deceptive practices and three to dimensions of quality that are largely hidden from enrollees. The first set (baseline) models relate plan ownership to trustworthy practices, controlling for other characteristics of the plan, the marketplace for health insurance, and the physician respondents. The second (interactive) set of models examines how the magnitude of ownership-related differences in trustworthiness varies with the market share of nonprofit plans in each community. The 1998 SMS was fielded between April and September of 1998 by Westat Inc. The average time required for a completed interview was approximately 30 minutes. The overall response rate was 52.2 percent. Compared with more local nonprofit plans, for-profit plans affiliated with multistate corporations are consistently reported by their affiliated physicians to engage in practices associated with reduced trustworthiness. Nonprofit plans affiliated with multistate corporations have more physician-reported practices associated with trustworthiness than do for-profit corporate plans on four of five outcomes, but appear less trustworthy than

  9. Profit-Seeking, Corporate Control, and the Trustworthiness of Health Care Organizations: Assessments of Health Plan Performance by Their Affiliated Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Mark; Quon, Nicole; Wynia, Matthew; Cummins, Deborah; Gray, Bradford

    2005-01-01

    Objective To compare the relative trustworthiness of nonprofit and for-profit health plans, using physician assessments to measure dimensions of plan performance that are difficult for consumers to evaluate. Data Source A nationally representative sample of 1,621 physicians who responded to a special topics module of the 1998 Socioeconomic Monitoring System Survey (SMS), fielded by the American Medical Association. Physicians assessed various aspects of their primary managed care plan, defined as the plan in which they had the largest number of patients. Study Design Plan ownership was measured as the interaction of tax-exempt status (nonprofit versus for-profit) and corporate control (single state versus multistate health plans). Two sets of regression models are estimated. The dependent variables in the regressions are five measures of performance related to plan trustworthiness: two related to deceptive practices and three to dimensions of quality that are largely hidden from enrollees. The first set (baseline) models relate plan ownership to trustworthy practices, controlling for other characteristics of the plan, the marketplace for health insurance, and the physician respondents. The second (interactive) set of models examines how the magnitude of ownership-related differences in trustworthiness varies with the market share of nonprofit plans in each community. Data Collection The 1998 SMS was fielded between April and September of 1998 by Westat Inc. The average time required for a completed interview was approximately 30 minutes. The overall response rate was 52.2 percent. Principal Findings Compared with more local nonprofit plans, for-profit plans affiliated with multistate corporations are consistently reported by their affiliated physicians to engage in practices associated with reduced trustworthiness. Nonprofit plans affiliated with multistate corporations have more physician-reported practices associated with trustworthiness than do for

  10. Research Challenges in Future Health Care Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulatunga, Harini

    Future health care systems will involve a network of heterogeneous resources providing different levels of service and will comprise of a physical and a virtual decision and control layer. The initial results presented here will lead to health care delivery with on-line decision making in order to meet QoS requirements and management targets.

  11. Guidelines for preventing health-care--associated pneumonia, 2003: recommendations of CDC and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee.

    PubMed

    Tablan, Ofelia C; Anderson, Larry J; Besser, Richard; Bridges, Carolyn; Hajjeh, Rana

    2004-03-26

    This report updates, expands, and replaces the previously published CDC "Guideline for Prevention of Nosocomial Pneumonia". The new guidelines are designed to reduce the incidence of pneumonia and other severe, acute lower respiratory tract infections in acute-care hospitals and in other health-care settings (e.g., ambulatory and long-term care institutions) and other facilities where health care is provided. Among the changes in the recommendations to prevent bacterial pneumonia, especially ventilator-associated pneumonia, are the preferential use of oro-tracheal rather than naso-tracheal tubes in patients who receive mechanically assisted ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation to reduce the need for and duration of endotracheal intubation, changing the breathing circuits of ventilators when they malfunction or are visibly contaminated, and (when feasible) the use of an endotracheal tube with a dorsal lumen to allow drainage of respiratory secretions; no recommendations were made about the use of sucralfate, histamine-2 receptor antagonists, or antacids for stress-bleeding prophylaxis. For prevention of health-care--associated Legionnaires disease, the changes include maintaining potable hot water at temperatures not suitable for amplification of Legionella spp., considering routine culturing of water samples from the potable water system of a facility's organ-transplant unit when it is done as part of the facility's comprehensive program to prevent and control health-care--associated Legionnaires disease, and initiating an investigation for the source of Legionella spp. when one definite or one possible case of laboratory-confirmed health-care--associated Legionnaires disease is identified in an inpatient hemopoietic stem-cell transplant (HSCT) recipient or in two or more HSCT recipients who had visited an outpatient HSCT unit during all or part of the 2-10 day period before illness onset. In the section on aspergillosis, the revised recommendations

  12. Are all skilled birth attendants created equal? A cluster randomised controlled study of non-physician based obstetric care in primary health care clinics in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Walker, Dilys; DeMaria, Lisa; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Dolores; Padron-Salas, Aldanely; Romero-Alvarez, Minerva; Suarez, Leticia

    2013-10-01

    the great majority of births in Mexico are attended by physicians. Non-physician health professionals have never been evaluated or compared to the medical model of obstetric care. This study evaluates the relative strengths of adding an obstetric nurse or professional midwife to the physician based team in rural clinics. we undertook a cluster-randomised trial in 27 clinics in 2 states with high maternal mortality. Twelve non-physician providers (obstetric nurses (4) and professional midwives (8)) were randomly assigned to clinics; 15 clinics served as control sites. Over an 18-month period in 2009-2010, we evaluated quality of care through chart review and monthly interviews with providers about last three deliveries performed. We analysed practices by creating indices using WHO care guidelines for normal labour and childbirth. Volume of care was assessed using administrative reporting forms. two thousand two hundred fifty-four pregnancies were followed, and a total of 461 deliveries occurred in study sites. Intervention clinics were more likely to score highly on the index for favourable practices on admission (OR=3.6, 95% CI 2.3-5.8), and during labour, childbirth, and immediately post partum (OR=8.6, 95% CI 2.9-25.6) and less likely to use excessively used or harmful practices during labour, childbirth and immediately post partum (OR=0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.4). There was a significant increase in volume of care in intervention clinics for antenatal visits (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.3, 95% CI 1.2-1.4), deliveries (IRR=2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.7) and for postpartum visits (IRR=1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.7). the addition of non-physician skilled birth attendants to rural clinics in Mexico where they independently provided basic obstetric services led to improved care and higher coverage than clinics without. The potential value of including a professional midwife or obstetric nurse in all rural clinics providing obstetric care should be considered. Mexican National Institute for

  13. Testing Activity Monitors’ Effect on Health: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial Among Older Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Fisher, Steve R; Jennings, Kristofer; Brown, Arleen F; Swartz, Maria C; Lyons, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the United States. Maintaining healthy levels of physical activity is critical to cardiovascular health, but many older adults are inactive. There is a growing body of evidence linking low motivation and inactivity. Standard behavioral counseling techniques used within the primary care setting strive to increase motivation, but often do not emphasize the key component of self-control. The addition of electronic activity monitors (EAMs) to counseling protocols may provide more effective behavior change and increase overall motivation for exercise through interactive self-monitoring, feedback, and social support from other users. Objective The objective of the study is to conduct a three month intervention trial that will test the feasibility of adding an EAM system to brief counseling within a primary care setting. Participants (n=40) will be randomized to receive evidence-based brief counseling plus either an EAM or a pedometer. Methods Throughout the intervention, we will test its feasibility and acceptability, the change in primary outcomes (cardiovascular risk and physical activity), and the change in secondary outcomes (adherence, weight and body composition, health status, motivation, physical function, psychological feelings, and self-regulation). Upon completion of the intervention, we will also conduct focus groups with the participants and with primary care stakeholders. Results The study started recruitment in October 2015 and is scheduled to be completed by October 2016. Conclusions This project will lay the groundwork and establish the infrastructure for intervention refinement and ultimately translation within the primary care setting in order to prevent cardiovascular disease on a population level. Trial Registration ClinicalTrails.gov NCT02554435; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02554435 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation/6fUlW5tdT) PMID:27129602

  14. Patient preferences in controlling access to their electronic health records: a prospective cohort study in primary care.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Peter H; Caine, Kelly; Alpert, Sheri A; Meslin, Eric M; Carroll, Aaron E; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have measured individuals' willingness to share personal information stored in electronic health records (EHRs) with health care providers, but none has measured preferences among patients when they are allowed to determine the parameters of provider access. Patients were given the ability to control access by doctors, nurses, and other staff in a primary care clinic to personal information stored in an EHR. Patients could restrict access to all personal data or to specific types of sensitive information, and could restrict access for a specific time period. Patients also completed a survey regarding their understanding of and opinions regarding the process. Of 139 eligible patients who were approached, 105 (75.5 %) were enrolled, and preferences were collected from all 105 (100 %). Sixty patients (57 %) did not restrict access for any providers. Of the 45 patients (43 %) who chose to limit the access of at least one provider, 36 restricted access only to all personal information in the EHR, while nine restricted access of some providers to a subset of the their personal information. Thirty-four (32.3 %) patients blocked access to all personal information by all doctors, nurses, and/or other staff, 26 (24.8 %) blocked access by all doctors and/or nurses, and five (4.8 %) denied access to all doctors, nurses, and staff. A significant minority of patients chose to restrict access by their primary care providers to personal information contained in an EHR, and few chose to restrict access to specific types of information. More research is needed to identify patient goals and understanding of the implications when facing decisions of this sort, and to identify the impact of patient education regarding information contained in EHRs and their use in the clinical care setting.

  15. Health care resource utilisation in primary care prior to and after a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: a retrospective, matched case-control study in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Reed, Catherine; Happich, Michael; Nyhuis, Allen; Lenox-Smith, Alan

    2014-06-17

    This study examined medical resource utilisation patterns in the United Kingdom (UK) prior to and following Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis. A patient cohort aged 65 years and older with newly diagnosed AD between January 2008 and December 2010 was identified through the UK's Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). Patients with a continuous record in the CPRD (formerly the General Practice Research Database [GPRD]) for both the 3 years prior to, and the 1 year following, AD diagnosis were eligible for inclusion. A control cohort was identified by matching general older adult (GOA) patients to patients with AD based on year of birth, gender, region, and Charlson Comorbidity Index at a ratio of 2:1. Medical resource utilisation was calculated in 6-month intervals over the 4-year study period. Comparisons between AD and GOA control cohorts were conducted using conditional logistic regression for patient characteristics and a generalised linear model for resource utilisation. Data for the AD cohort (N = 3,896) and matched GOA control cohort (N = 7,792) were extracted from the CPRD. The groups were 65% female and the AD cohort had a mean age of 79.9 years (standard deviation 6.5 years) at the date of diagnosis. Over the entire study period, the AD cohort had a significantly higher mean primary care consultation rate than the GOA cohort (p < .0001). While the GOA cohort primary care consultation rate gradually increased over the 4-year period (ranging from 5 to 7 consultations per 6-month period), increases were more pronounced in the AD cohort (ranging from 6 to 11 consultations per 6-month period, peaking during the 6-month periods immediately prior to and post diagnosis). The AD cohort also had a higher overall specialty referral rate than the GOA cohort over the 4-year period (37% vs. 25%, respectively; p < .0001); the largest difference was during the 6 months immediately prior to AD diagnosis (17% vs. 5%, respectively; p < .0001). In the

  16. Evaluating a health care provider delivered intervention to reduce intimate partner violence and mitigate associated health risks: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Falb, Kathryn L; Diaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Campos, Paola A; Valades, Jimena; Cardenas, Roosebelinda; Carino, Giselle; Gupta, Jhumka

    2014-07-30

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization is a prevalent issue among women residing in Mexico City. Comprehensive and integrated health care provider (HCP) delivered programs in clinic-settings are needed, yet few have been evaluated in Latin America, including Mexico. In addition, there has been minimal attention to interventions among lower income women presenting at settings outside of antenatal care clinics. The current randomized controlled trial seeks to increase midlevel HCPs' capacity, specifically nurses, who are often the first point of contact in this setting, to identify women presenting at health clinics with experiences of IPV and to assist these women with health risk mitigation. Specific outcomes include changes in past-year IPV (physical and/or sexual), reproductive coercion, safety planning, use of community resources, and quality of life. Forty-two public health clinics in Mexico City were randomized to treatment or control clinics. Nurses meeting eligibility criteria in treatment groups received an intensive training on screening for IPV, providing supportive referrals, and assessing for health and safety risks. Nurses meeting eligibility criteria at control clinics received the standard of care which included a one-day training focused on sensitizing staff to IPV as a health issue and referral cards to give to women. Women were screened for eligibility (currently experiencing abuse in a heterosexual relationship, 18-44 years of age, non-pregnant or in first trimester) by research assistants in private areas of waiting rooms in health clinics. Consenting women completed a baseline survey and received the study protocol for that clinic. In treatment clinics, women received the nurse delivered session at baseline and received a follow-up counseling session after three months. Surveys are conducted at baseline, three months, and fifteen months from baseline. This study will provide important insight into whether a nurse-delivered program can

  17. Weight loss among female health care workers- a 1-year workplace based randomized controlled trial in the FINALE-health study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Weight management constitutes a substantial problem particularly among groups of low socio-economic status. Interventions at work places may be a solution, but high quality worksite interventions documenting prolonged weight loss are lacking. This paper presents results of an intervention aimed to achieve a 12 months weight loss among overweight health care workers. Methods Ninety-eight overweight female health care workers were randomized into an intervention or a reference group. The intervention consisted of diet, physical exercise and cognitive behavioral training during working hours 1 hour/week. The reference group was offered monthly oral presentations. Several anthropometric measures, blood pressure, cardiorespiratory fitness, maximal muscle strength, and musculoskeletal pain were measured before and after the 12-months intervention period. Data were analyzed by intention-to-treat analysis. Results The intervention group significantly reduced body weight by 6 kg (p < 0.001), BMI by 2.2 (p < 0.001) and body fat percentage by 2.8 (p < 0.001). There were no statistical reductions in the control group, resulting in significant differences between the two groups over time. Conclusions The intervention generated substantial reductions in body weight, BMI and body fat percentage among overweight female health care workers over 12 months. The positive results support the workplace as an efficient arena for weight loss among overweight females. Trial registration NCT01015716. PMID:22871173

  18. Improving quality of care and long-term health outcomes through continuity of care with the use of an electronic or paper patient-held portable health file (COMMUNICATE): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lassere, Marissa Nichole; Baker, Sue; Parle, Andrew; Sara, Anthony; Johnson, Kent Robert

    2015-06-04

    The advantages of patient-held portable health files (PHF) and personal health records (PHR), paper or electronic, are said to include improved health-care provider continuity-of-care and patient empowerment in maintaining health. Top-down approaches are favored by public sector government and health managers. Bottom-up approaches include systems developed directly by health-care providers, consumers and industry, implemented locally on devices carried by patient-consumers or shared via web-based portals. These allow individuals to access, manage and share their health information, and that of others for whom they are authorized, in a private, secure and confidential environment. Few medical record technologies have been evaluated in randomized trials to determine whether there are important clinical benefits of these interventions. The COMMUNICATE trial will assess the acceptability and long-term clinical outcomes of an electronic and paper patient-held PHF. This is a 48-month, open-label pragmatic, superiority, parallel-group design randomized controlled trial. Subjects (n = 792) will be randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to each of the trial arms: the electronic PHF added to usual care, the paper PHF added to usual care and usual care alone (no PHF). Inclusion criteria include those 60 years or older living independently in the community, but who have two or more chronic medical conditions that require prescription medication and regular care by at least three medical practitioners (general and specialist care). The primary objective is whether use of a PHF compared to usual care reduces a combined endpoint of deaths, overnight hospitalizations and blindly adjudicated serious out-of-hospital events. All primary analyses will be undertaken masked to randomized arm allocation using intention-to-treat principles. Secondary outcomes include quality of life and health literacy improvements. Lack of blinding creates potential for bias in trial conduct and ascertainment of

  19. Service delivery through public health care system to control sexually transmitted infections in Himachal pradesh

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, Sunite A; Kanga, Anil K; Bhagra, Suruchi; Guleria, Ramesh C; Singh, Dig Vijay; Agnihotri, Vinay; Verma, Santwana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The National AIDS Control Organization has designed multiple synergistic interventions to identify and control curable sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Objective: To assess the impact of services offered at designated STI clinics in the state of Himachal Pradesh, India and the profile of the attending clients. Materials and Methods: This was a two-year prospective study, conducted from April 2011 to March 2013. Training on delivering STI/RTI services was imparted to the staff of 16 designated STI clinics including recording of data. The staff in each STI clinic comprises of one doctor, one counselor, one nurse, and one laboratory technician. The clients attending these designated clinics were offered counseling, syndromic case management (SCM), and diagnostic services wherever possible. Monthly data of STI clinic attendees was collected, compiled, and analyzed. Results: A total of 65,760 clinic visits were reported, of which 32,385 (49%) visits were for index STI/RTI complaint(s). The ratio of male to female attendees was 1:2. The commonest age group accessing the STI clinics was 25-44 years (n = 38,966; 59.3%). According to SCM, 52.9% clients were managed. The commonest presenting syndrome was urethral discharge (n = 4,500; 41%) in males, and vaginal discharge (n = 13,305; 56%) in females. Genital ulcer disease was treated in 2099 cases. Laboratory tests were performed only in 6466 patients, and 39,597 antenatal mothers were screened for syphilis. Counseling services were provided to 51,298 (f = 34,804; 68%: m = 16,494; 32%) clients and of these, 48% (n = 25,056) of the clients were referred to integrated counseling and testing centers. Forty-three clients (m = 24: f = 19) were detected positive for HIV infection. Conclusion: Uniform and standardized services delivered to clients attending public health clinics can gather reliable data to monitor trends of STI infection. PMID:25165642

  20. Health Care Provider Communication

    PubMed Central

    Chochinov, Harvey M; McClement, Susan E; Hack, Thomas F; McKeen, Nancy A; Rach, Amanda M; Gagnon, Pierre; Sinclair, Shane; Taylor-Brown, Jill

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients who are facing life-threatening and life-limiting cancer almost invariably experience psychological distress. Responding effectively requires therapeutic sensitivity and skill. In this study, we examined therapeutic effectiveness within the setting of cancer-related distress with the objective of understanding its constituent parts. METHODS Seventy-eight experienced psychosocial oncology clinicians from 24 health care centers across Canada were invited to participate in 3 focus groups each. In total, 29 focus groups were held over 2 years, during which clinicians articulated the therapeutic factors deemed most helpful in mitigating patient psychosocial distress. The content of each focus group was summarized into major themes and was reviewed with participants to confirm their accuracy. Upon completion of the focus groups, workshops were held in various centers, eliciting participant feedback on an empirical model of therapeutic effectiveness based on the qualitative analysis of focus group data. RESULTS Three primary, interrelated therapeutic domains emerged from the data, forming a model of optimal therapeutic effectiveness: 1) personal growth and self-care (domain A), 2) therapeutic approaches (domain B), and 3) creation of a safe space (domain C). Areas of domain overlap were identified and labeled accordingly: domain AB, therapeutic humility; domain BC, therapeutic pacing; and domain AC, therapeutic presence. CONCLUSIONS This empirical model provides detailed insights regarding the elements and pedagogy of effective communication and psychosocial care for patients who are experiencing cancer-related distress. [See editorial on pages 000–000, this issue.] Cancer 2013. © 2013 American Cancer Society. PMID:23341092

  1. Oregon's experiment in health care delivery and payment reform: coordinated care organizations replacing managed care.

    PubMed

    Howard, Steven W; Bernell, Stephanie L; Yoon, Jangho; Luck, Jeff; Ranit, Claire M

    2015-02-01

    To control Medicaid costs, improve quality, and drive community engagement, the Oregon Health Authority introduced a new system of coordinated care organizations (CCOs). While CCOs resemble traditional Medicaid managed care, they have differences that have been deliberately designed to improve care coordination, increase accountability, and incorporate greater community governance. Reforms include global budgets integrating medical, behavioral, and oral health care and public health functions; risk-adjusted payments rewarding outcomes and evidence-based practice; increased transparency; and greater community engagement. The CCO model faces several implementation challenges. If successful, it will provide improved health care delivery, better health outcomes, and overall savings.

  2. Reforming the health care system: implications for health care marketers.

    PubMed

    Petrochuk, M A; Javalgi, R G

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform has become the dominant domestic policy issue in the United States. President Clinton, and the Democratic leaders in the House and Senate have all proposed legislation to reform the system. Regardless of the plan which is ultimately enacted, health care delivery will be radically changed. Health care marketers, given their perspective, have a unique opportunity to ensure their own institutions' success. Organizational, managerial, and marketing strategies can be employed to deal with the changes which will occur. Marketers can utilize personal strategies to remain proactive and successful during an era of health care reform. As outlined in this article, responding to the health care reform changes requires strategic urgency and action. However, the strategies proposed are practical regardless of the version of health care reform legislation which is ultimately enacted.

  3. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care » Program Overview » Outreach Materials » FAQs Women Veterans Health Care Menu Menu Womens Health Women Veterans Health Care ... Who can I call for more help? What health care services are available to women Veterans? A full ...

  4. [Patient participation in medical decision making within an integrated health care system in Germany: results of a controlled cohort study].

    PubMed

    Hölzel, L P; Vollmer, M; Kriston, L; Siegel, A; Härter, M

    2012-11-01

    An integrated health care project called "Gesundes Kinzigtal" was conducted in a rural area in Germany. As part of the project, physicians were trained and other measures were taken to enhance patient involvement in medical decision making. As part of the external evaluation, various effects regarding patient involvement in medical decision making, patient involvement and information preference, decision confidence, patient satisfaction with ambulatory care and patient quality of life were examined. The data were gathered by means of a questionnaire on an annual basis between 2007 and 2009. Effects were compared between patients who were participating in the integrated care project and two control groups. Analyses are based on the data of 1,205 patients. Over time all outcomes decreased slightly, except for information preference and physical quality of life. No statistically significant intervention effects on patient involvement in medical decision making or any other outcome variable could be found. The intensity of the training was presumably too low to establish an enduring change in the physician-patient interaction.

  5. Impact of improved recording of work-relatedness in primary care visits at occupational health services on sickness absences: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Salla; Ojajärvi, Ulla; Talola, Nina; Viljamaa, Mervi; Nevalainen, Jaakko; Uitti, Jukka

    2017-07-26

    Employment protects and fosters health. Occupational health services, particularly in Finland, have a central role in protecting employee health and preventing work ability problems. However, primary care within occupational health services is currently underused in informing preventive activities. This study was designed to assess whether the recording of work ability problems and improvement of follow-up of work-related primary care visits can reduce sickness absences and work disability pensions after 1 year. A pragmatic trial will be conducted using patient electronic registers and registers of the central pensions agency in Finland. Twenty-two occupational health centres will be randomised to intervention and control groups. Intervention units will receive training to improve recording of work ability illnesses in the primary care setting and improved follow-up procedures. The intervention impact will be assessed through examining rates of sickness absence across intervention and control clinics as well as before and after the intervention. The trial will develop knowledge of the intervention potential of primary care for preventing work disability pensions and sickness absence. The use of routine patient registers and pensions registers to assess the outcomes of a randomised controlled trial will bring forward trial methodology, particularly when using register-based data. If successful, the intervention will improve the quality of occupational health care primary care and contribute to reducing work disability. ISRCTN Registry reference number ISRCTN45728263 . Registered on 18 April 2016.

  6. [Study on tuberculosis in a Seville Health Care District. Current situation and control improvement alternatives].

    PubMed

    Limón Mora, Juan; Nieto Cervera, Pilar

    2003-01-01

    In our setting (District, Seville, Andalusia, Spain....) it is not rare to find annual incidence rates for TBC of more than 30 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. It reveals that this problem is nowhere near being eradicated. This study is aimed at describing the clinical and public health patterns of tuberculosis cases within the "South-East Seville" Healthcare District. Descriptive study of the reported cases (personal traits, location, time, type of disease, risk factors) throughout the 1992-2000 period in the "South-East Seville" Healthcare District, located in the city of Seville and including some rural centers of population. Percentage distribution of cases for the different studied factors and the incidence rates for group of interest (sex, age groups, geographic areas) are provided. A mean annual incidence rate of 19.4 cases/100,000 inhabitants has been estimated. Notable differences in incidence depending on group of sex (RR = 2.1), age (annual incidence of more than 24 cases/100,000 inhabitants among children age 0-4 and adults age 25-39) and geographical area were found. The frequency of relapses and repeated treatments, as well as shortcomings with regard to conducting and reporting the studies on family members and contacts were noted. The situation analysis in a Healthcare District such as the one described here (currently approx. 610,000 inhabitants) throughout a nine-year follow-up period -entailing 1,065 reported cases- may well provide us some orientation about the situation in our environment. It also gives us the possibility to compare it with some other studies. A downward trend in the incidence rate has been noted as of 1997. Some organizational measures to be taken into account for controlling this infection are provided.

  7. An eclectic approach to quality control in fee-for-service health care: The New York City Medicaid Experience.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, S N; Gunston, C; Berenson, L; Klein, A

    1976-01-01

    A computer-based system for evaluating the quality of fee-for-service health care in the New York City Medicaid Program is described. Specific information is sought for use in educational, enforcement and managerial activities to improve health care quality. The gathering of this information necessitates coordinated assessment of the structure, process and outcome of health care, through inspection of offices, computerized analysis of patterns of practice as revealed by billing forms, and reexamination of patients. The program's focus on patterns of practice, its use of multiple assessment techniques, and its concentration on unequivocally substandard care circumvent several limitations on current evaluation technology. Implications for Professional Standards Review Organizations and national health insurance are explored. PMID:1108679

  8. National Health Care Skill Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Consortium on Health Science and Technology Education, Okemos, MI.

    This document presents the National Health Care Skill Standards, which were developed by the National Consortium on Health Science and Technology and West Ed Regional Research Laboratory, in partnership with educators and health care employers. The document begins with an overview of the purpose and benefits of skill standards. Presented next are…

  9. Health Care Coverage and the Health Care Industry

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Pamela Jo; Ward, Andrew; Blewett, Lynn A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We examined rates of uninsurance among workers in the US health care workforce by health care industry subtype and workforce category. Methods. We used 2004 to 2006 National Health Interview Survey data to assess health insurance coverage rates. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the odds of uninsurance among health care workers by industry subtype. Results. Overall, 11% of the US health care workforce is uninsured. Ambulatory care workers were 3.1 times as likely as hospital workers (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.3, 4.3) to be uninsured, and residential care workers were 4.3 times as likely to be uninsured (95% CI = 3.0, 6.1). Health service workers had 50% greater odds of being uninsured relative to workers in health diagnosing and treating occupations (odds ratio [OR] = 1.5; 95% CI = 1.0, 2.4). Conclusions. Because uninsurance leads to delays in seeking care, fewer prevention visits, and poorer health status, the fact that nearly 1 in 8 health care workers lacks insurance coverage is cause for concern. PMID:19834000

  10. The German health care system and health care reform.

    PubMed

    Kamke, K

    1998-02-01

    This article presents a structured survey of the German health care and health insurance system, and analyzes major developments of current German health policy. The German statutory health insurance system has been known as a system that provides all citizens with ready access to comprehensive high quality medical care at a cost the country considered socially acceptable. However, an increasing concern for rapidly rising health care expenditure led to a number of cost-containment measures since 1977. The aim was to bring the growth of health care expenditure in line with the growth of wages and salaries of the sickness fund members. The recent health care reforms of 1989 and 1993 yielded only short-term reductions of health care expenditure, with increases in the subsequent years. 'Stability of the contribution rate' is the uppermost political objective of current health care reform initiatives. Options under discussion include reductions in the benefit package and increases of patients' co-payments. The article concludes with the possible consequences of the 1997 health care reform of which the major part became effective 1 July 1997.

  11. Applying economic principles to health care.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, R. D.; Solomon, S. L.; McGowan, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Applying economic thinking to an understanding of resource use in patient care is challenging given the complexities of delivering health care in a hospital. Health-care markets lack the characteristics needed to determine a "market" price that reflects the economic value of resources used. However, resource allocation in a hospital can be analyzed by using production theory to determine efficient resource use. The information provided by hospital epidemiologists is critical to understanding health-care production processes used by a hospital and developing economic incentives to promote antibiotic effectiveness and infection control. PMID:11294724

  12. Adolescent seasonal allergic rhinitis and the impact of health-care professional training: cluster randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention in primary care.

    PubMed

    Hammersley, Victoria S; Elton, Rob A; Walker, Samantha; Hansen, Christian H; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-06-05

    Seasonal allergic rhinitis is typically poorly managed, particularly in adolescents, in whom it is responsible for considerable morbidity. Our previous work has demonstrated that if poorly controlled this can impair educational performance. The primary aim of this trial was to assess the impact of a primary care-based professional training intervention on clinical outcomes in adolescents with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Cluster trial in which UK general practice staff were randomised to a short, intensive workshop on the evidence-based management of seasonal allergic rhinitis. The primary outcome measure was the change in the validated Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire with Standardized Activities (RQLQ(S)) score between baseline and 6 weeks post intervention (minimal clinically important difference=0.5). Secondary outcome measures of interest included health-care professionals' knowledge and confidence in managing seasonal allergic rhinitis, number of seasonal allergic rhinitis-related consultations, relevant treatments prescribed and symptom scores. Thirty-eight general practices were randomised (20 in the intervention arm) and 246 patients (50.2% males, mean age 15 years) were included in the primary outcome analysis. Health-care professionals' knowledge and confidence of the clinical management of seasonal allergic rhinitis improved. This did not, however, result in clinically or statistically significant improvements in RQLQ(S): -0.15, (95% confidence interval, -0.5 to +0.2). There were no differences in consultation frequency, treatments issued for seasonal allergic rhinitis or symptom scores. Although associated with increases in professionals' self-assessed confidence and understanding of seasonal allergic rhinitis management, this intensive training workshop did not translate into improvements in adolescents' disease-specific quality of life or a reduction in rhinitis symptoms.

  13. Information Technology Outside Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-health-care uses of information technology (IT) provide important lessons for health care informatics that are often overlooked because of the focus on the ways in which health care is different from other domains. Eight examples of IT use outside health care provide a context in which to examine the content and potential relevance of these lessons. Drawn from personal experience, five books, and two interviews, the examples deal with the role of leadership, academia, the private sector, the government, and individuals working in large organizations. The interviews focus on the need to manage technologic change. The lessons shed light on how to manage complexity, create and deploy standards, empower individuals, and overcome the occasional “wrongness” of conventional wisdom. One conclusion is that any health care informatics self-examination should be outward-looking and focus on the role of health care IT in the larger context of the evolving uses of IT in all domains. PMID:10495095

  14. Gypsies and health care.

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, A

    1992-01-01

    Gypsies in the United States are not a healthy group. They have a high incidence of heart disease, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. When they seek medical care, Gypsies often come into conflict with medical personnel who find their behavior confusing, demanding, and chaotic. For their part, Gypsies are often suspicious of non-Gypsy people and institutions, viewing them as a source of disease and uncleanliness. Gypsy ideas about health and illness are closely related to notions of good and bad fortune, purity and impurity, and inclusion and exclusion from the group. These basic concepts affect everyday life, including the way Gypsies deal with eating and washing, physicians and hospitals, the diagnosis of illness, shopping around for cures, and coping with birth and death. PMID:1413769

  15. Telemedicine in diabetes foot care delivery: health care professionals' experience.

    PubMed

    Kolltveit, Beate-Christin Hope; Gjengedal, Eva; Graue, Marit; Iversen, Marjolein M; Thorne, Sally; Kirkevold, Marit

    2016-04-18

    Introducing new technology in health care is inevitably a challenge. More knowledge is needed to better plan future telemedicine interventions. Our aim was therefore to explore health care professionals' experience in the initial phase of introducing telemedicine technology in caring for people with diabetic foot ulcers. Our methodological strategy was Interpretive Description. Data were collected between 2014 and 2015 using focus groups (n = 10). Participants from home-based care, primary care and outpatient hospital clinics were recruited from the intervention arm of an ongoing cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01710774). Most were nurses (n = 29), but the sample also included one nurse assistant, podiatrists (n = 2) and physicians (n = 2). The participants reported experiencing meaningful changes to their practice arising from telemedicine, especially associated with increased wound assessment knowledge and skills and improved documentation quality. They also experienced more streamlined communication between primary health care and specialist health care. Despite obstacles associated with finding the documentation process time consuming, the participants' attitudes to telemedicine were overwhelmingly positive and their general enthusiasm for the innovation was high. Our findings indicate that using a telemedicine intervention enabled the participating health care professionals to approach their patients with diabetic foot ulcer with more knowledge, better wound assessment skills and heightened confidence. Furthermore, it streamlined the communication between health care levels and helped seeing the patients in a more holistic way.

  16. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  17. Health and Disability: Partnerships in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Jane; McDonald, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite awareness of the health inequalities experienced by people with intellectual disability, their health status remains poor. Inequalities in health outcomes are manifest in higher morbidity and rates of premature death. Contributing factors include the barriers encountered in accessing and receiving high-quality health care.…

  18. Primary health care models

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Judith Belle; French, Reta; McCulloch, Amy; Clendinning, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the knowledge and perceptions of fourth-year medical students regarding the new models of primary health care (PHC) and to ascertain whether that knowledge influenced their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Design Qualitative study using semistructured interviews. Setting The Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at The University of Western Ontario in London. Participants Fourth-year medical students graduating in 2009 who indicated family medicine as a possible career choice on their Canadian Residency Matching Service applications. Methods Eleven semistructured interviews were conducted between January and April of 2009. Data were analyzed using an iterative and interpretive approach. The analysis strategy of immersion and crystallization assisted in synthesizing the data to provide a comprehensive view of key themes and overarching concepts. Main findings Four key themes were identified: the level of students’ knowledge regarding PHC models varied; the knowledge was generally obtained from practical experiences rather than classroom learning; students could identify both advantages and disadvantages of working within the new PHC models; and although students regarded the new PHC models positively, these models did not influence their decisions to pursue careers in family medicine. Conclusion Knowledge of the new PHC models varies among fourth-year students, indicating a need for improved education strategies in the years before clinical training. Being able to identify advantages and disadvantages of the PHC models was not enough to influence participants’ choice of specialty. Educators and health care policy makers need to determine the best methods to promote and facilitate knowledge transfer about these PHC models. PMID:22518904

  19. Unlearning in health care

    PubMed Central

    Rushmer, R; Davies, H

    2004-01-01

    Learning in health care is essential if healthcare organisations are to tackle a challenging quality of care agenda. Yet while we know a reasonable amount about the nature of learning, how learning occurs, the forms it can take, and the routines that encourage it to happen within organisations, we know very little about the nature and processes of unlearning. We review the literature addressing issues pivotal to unlearning (what it is, why it is important, and why it is often neglected), and go further to explore the conditions under which unlearning is likely to be encouraged. There is a difference between routine unlearning (and subsequent re-learning) and deep unlearning—unlearning that requires a substantive break with previous modes of understanding, doing, and being. We argue that routine unlearning merely requires the establishment of new habits, whereas deep unlearning is a sudden, potentially painful, confrontation of the inadequacy in our substantive view of the world and our capacity to cope with that world competently. PMID:15576685

  20. Flourishing in Health Care.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Andrew; Pattison, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer an account of 'flourishing' that is relevant to health care provision, both in terms of the flourishing of the individual patient and carer, and in terms of the flourishing of the caring institution. It is argued that, unlike related concepts such as 'happiness', 'well-being' or 'quality of life', 'flourishing' uniquely has the power to capture the importance of the vulnerability of human being. Drawing on the likes of Heidegger and Nussbaum, it is argued that humans are at once beings who are autonomous and thereby capable of making sense of their lives, but also subject to the contingencies of their bodies and environments. To flourish requires that one engages, imaginatively and creatively, with those contingencies. The experience of illness, highlighting the vulnerability of the human being, thereby becomes an important experience, stimulating reflection in order to make sense of one's life as a narrative. To flourish, it is argued, is to tell a story of one's life, realistically engaging with vulnerability and suffering, and thus creating a framework through which one can meaningful and constructively go on with one's life.

  1. [Prevention and control of nosocomial and health-care facilities associated infections caused by species of Candida and other yeasts].

    PubMed

    Pemán, Javier; Zaragoza, Rafael; Salavert, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the epidemiology of invasive fungal diseases caused by yeasts (Candida spp., especially) in health care settings allows the establishment of the levels necessary for its prevention. A first step is to identify groups of patients at high risk of nosocomial invasive fungal infections, establish accurate risk factors, observing the periods of greatest risk, and analyze the epidemiological profile in genera and species as well as the patterns of antifungal resistance. Secondly, mechanisms to avoid persistent exposure to potential fungal pathogens must be programed, protecting areas and recommending measures such as the control of the quality of the air and water, inside and outside the hospital, and other products or substances able to cause outbreaks. Finally, apart from the correct implementation of these measures, in selected patients at very high risk, the use of antifungal prophylaxis should be considered following the guidelines published.

  2. National Health-Care Reform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-24

    hospitals and providers, the Board could link costs to outcomes . This link would empower health -care consumers.57 Properly informed consumers would be...government, poor healthcare outcomes , and presidential campaign promises. Standing against reform are influential health -care interest groups, who...begs the question – what is driving health -care cost growth? Drivers of cost growth include the increased use of new and existing medical technology

  3. "Cloud" health-care workers.

    PubMed Central

    Sherertz, R. J.; Bassetti, S.; Bassetti-Wyss, B.

    2001-01-01

    Certain bacteria dispersed by health-care workers can cause hospital infections. Asymptomatic health-care workers colonized rectally, vaginally, or on the skin with group A streptococci have caused outbreaks of surgical site infection by airborne dispersal. Outbreaks have been associated with skin colonization or viral upper respiratory tract infection in a phenomenon of airborne dispersal of Staphylococcus aureus called the "cloud" phenomenon. This review summarizes the data supporting the existence of cloud health-care workers. PMID:11294715

  4. Making integrated health care work.

    PubMed

    Coddington, D C; Moore, K D; Fischer, E A

    1996-01-01

    The primary purpose of forming integrated health care systems should be to increase value added for payers and patients. Without this kind of focus on customer needs, integration efforts are likely to fail. The authors identify seven factors that make up the value-added continuum for health care purchasers and providers. The article assesses several of the major strategies pursued by integrating systems (e.g., primary care network development, health plan partnership arrangements) against value-added criteria. The major finding: integrated health care has the potential to bring substantial added value to customers.

  5. Optimizing Health Care Environmental Hygiene.

    PubMed

    Carling, Philip C

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a review and perspectives on aspects of optimizing health care environmental hygiene. The topics covered include the epidemiology of environmental surface contamination, a discussion of cleaning health care patient area surfaces, an overview of disinfecting health care surfaces, an overview of challenges in monitoring cleaning versus cleanliness, a description of an integrated approach to environmental hygiene and hand hygiene as interrelated disciplines, and an overview of the research opportunities and challenges related to health care environmental hygiene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Health care insurance for Africa].

    PubMed

    Schellekens, O P; Lindner, M E; van Esch, J P L; van Vugt, M; Rinke de Wit, T F

    2007-12-01

    Long-term substantial development aid has not prevented many African countries from being caught in a vicious circle in health care: the demand for care is high, but the overburdened public supply of low quality care is not aligned with this demand. The majority of Africans therefore pay for health care in cash, an expensive and least solidarity-based option. This article describes an innovative approach whereby supply and demand of health care can be better aligned, health care can be seen as a value chain and health insurance serves as the overarching mechanism. Providing premium subsidies for patients who seek health care through private, collective African health insurance schemes stimulates the demand side. The supply of care improves by investing in medical knowledge, administrative systems and health care infrastructure. This initiative comes from the Health Insurance Fund, a unique collaboration of public and private sectors. In 2006 the Fund received Euro 100 million from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to implement insurance programmes in Africa. PharmAccess Foundation is the Fund's implementing partner and presents its first experiences in Africa.

  7. Applying sensory modulation to mental health inpatient care to reduce seclusion and restraint: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Charlotte; Kolmos, Anne; Andersen, Kjeld; Sippel, Volkmar; Stenager, Elsebeth

    2017-10-01

    Clinical training in managing conflicts and preventing violence seldom contains sensory modulation (SM) as a method to de-escalate and prevent restraint and seclusion. Sensory-based interventions promote adaptive regulation of arousal and emotion. SM is a complementary approach that is associated with reduced rates of seclusion and restraint in mental healthcare, but there is need for more research in this area. Using SM to reduce restraint and seclusion in inpatient mental health care. The study included two similar psychiatric units where one unit implemented SM and one unit served as the control group. In the very beginning of the study, a staff-training program in the use of SM including assessment tools and intervention strategies was established. Data on restraint and forced medicine were sampled post the course of the year of implementation and compared with the control group. The use of belts decreased with 38% compared to the control group. The use of forced medication decreased with 46% compared to the control group. Altogether the use of physical restraint and forced medication decreased significantly with 42% (p < .05). Implementing a SM approach in mental healthcare facilities has a significant effect on the reduction of restraint and seclusion. As a part of the implementation, staff training and education in SM are crucial.

  8. Effects of combination oral care on oral health, dry mouth and salivary pH of intubated patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jang, Chun Sun; Shin, Yong Soon

    2016-10-01

    Intubated patients are at risk of oral health problems. Although a variety of oral care regimens for intubated patients have been studied, there is a lack of research on the effects of combination oral care that includes tooth brushing, chlorhexidine and cold water. This open-labelled, randomized, controlled trial aimed to evaluate the effects of combination oral care on oral health status. Participants aged 20 years and older were recruited on the first day after intubation through convenience sampling in a medical intensive care unit. Random assignment was performed using an internet randomization service. The primary outcome was oral health status. Data were collected during May and June 2013. Participants were randomized to one of two groups (23 intervention and 21 control). The final analysis included 18 patients with combination oral care and 17 in the control group. The intervention group had better oral health (effect size = 1.56), less dry mouth and higher salivary pH than the control group. Any additional burden of providing combination oral care to patients who are mechanically ventilated is worthwhile in terms of clinical outcomes.

  9. Control in chronic condition self-care management: how it occurs in the health worker-client relationship and implications for client empowerment.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Sharon; Delany, Toni; Sweet, Linda; Battersby, Malcolm; Skinner, Timothy C

    2014-02-01

    To examine health worker-client interactions during care planning to understand processes that foster client empowerment and disempowerment. It is unclear how health worker-client exchanges and information sharing through chronic condition care planning currently operate in primary health care. Moreover, it is unclear how control in these exchanges either enhances collaborative decision-making, partnership and client empowerment, or works to create client disempowerment and dependency on workers and health services. Critical discourse analysis of qualitative data from ethnographic observations and audio-taped worker-client consultations. Multidisciplinary teams in two Australian community-based primary healthcare sites participated. This included nurses, general practitioners and allied health workers and their clients who had a chronic condition care plan. Nineteen worker-client consultations were observed/recorded in 2011. Control was expressed through multiple processes inherent in the worker role and in their interactions with clients. When workers exercised disproportionate control and clients relinquished their own control, client disempowerment and dependency were evident. Clients' attempts to gain control and workers' attempts to relinquish control alleviated clients' disempowerment and dependency. However, structural features of information sharing systems and workers' care planning behaviours diminished such efforts. Worker awareness of their communication style and the power of their role must improve for client chronic condition self-care management to be achieved. Training on the impacts of control in worker communication and systems where they work must be provided if unbeneficial forms of client dependency are to be overcome and true self-care management is to be realized. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Health care reform: prospects and progress.

    PubMed

    Rockefeller, J

    1992-03-01

    No longer can the health care community and the politicians work separately as they usually did until just a generation ago. Now, with or without the frustrations involved, both groups need one another and must work together to fulfill their common goal of caring for people. The U.S. economy can no longer sustain the immense and mounting costs of health care: the system must change drastically before the end of the century or there will be revolution or a collapse of the system. For the first time, there is a strong constituency calling for health care reform. The politicians and the health care community must stop ignoring that constituency and instead work together on a health care bill to head off the coming crisis. Such a bill will exact sacrifices and compromises from all sectors, and must control costs and provide universal access to health care. The author outlines proposed bills and other activities that are now being considered, describes a bill that he has helped craft and introduce, and notes that the Bush administration has done an about-face and is now promising a health care bill. He challenges academic medicine to help produce more primary care physicians, gives examples of efforts that are fostering primary care, especially in rural areas, and explains why having more primary care physicians is vital and also a key to cost containment. He ends by again urging the health care community to participate in defining what can be done to avert the coming crisis and establish a workable and equitable health care system.

  11. Quality assurance in the health care industry.

    PubMed

    Guth, Kim Ann; Kleiner, Brian

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the quality assurance methods commonly used in the health care industry. Factors that influence the delivery of quality patient care is explored as well as factors that affect implementation of quality control measures. The importance of quality patient care to the economic success of the health care industry is described. Quality improvement efforts that are utilized by health care institutions are described including: independent performance audits, internal audits, outcomes analysis, consumer reports, industry guidelines, and consumer satisfaction surveys. Highly effective hospital managers exhibit management roles, behaviors, and a range of activities that correlate strongly to institutional commitment to quality and improved patient care outcomes. By reinforcing their involvement in quality improvement efforts, hospital managers were able to enhance their effectiveness in promoting and sustaining quality care.

  12. A digital intake approach in specialized mental health care: study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Metz, Margot J; Elfeddali, Iman; Krol, David G H; Veerbeek, Marjolein A; de Beurs, Edwin; Beekman, Aartjan T F; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2017-03-07

    Enhancing patient participation is becoming increasingly important in mental health care as patients use to have a dependent, inactive role and nonadherence to treatment is a regular problem. Research shows promising results of initiatives stimulating patient participation in partnership with their clinicians. However, few initiatives targeting both patients' and clinicians' behaviour have been evaluated in randomised trials (RCT). Therefore, in GGz Breburg, a specialized mental health institution, a digital intake approach was developed aimed at exploring treatment needs, expectations and preferences of patients intended to prepare patients for the intake consultations. Subsequently, patients and clinicians discuss this information during intake consultations and make shared decisions about options in treatment. The aim of this trial is to test the efficacy of this new digital intake approach facilitated by Routine Outcome Monitoring (ROM), peer support and training of clinicians as compared to the intake as usual. The primary outcome is decisional conflict about choices in treatment. Secondary outcomes focus on patient participation, shared decision making, working alliance, adherence to treatment and clinical outcomes. This article presents the study protocol of a cluster-randomised controlled trial in four outpatient departments for adults with depression, anxiety and personality disorders, working in two different regions. Randomisation is done between two similar intake-teams within each department. In the four intervention teams the new intake approach is implemented. The four control teams apply the intake as usual and will implement the new approach after the completion of the study. In total 176 patients are projected to participate in the study. Data collection will be at baseline, and at two weeks and two months after the intake. This study will potentially demonstrate the efficacy of the new digital intake approach in mental health care in terms of the

  13. Health care time of crisis, crises in health care--current reality in B&H Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Salihovic, H; Kulenovic, F; Tanovic-Mikulec, E

    2001-01-01

    In the period from 1945 till 1992 the health protection had constant growth of coverage, availability and quality of protection in the promotion of health care of the inhabitants, and the health care activity noticed spreading of the network of health care institutions, evidently staff improving of all profiles of health care workers, and supplying of equipment so said in the accordance with the movements in for developed countries. The detaching for health care in 1990 amounted 6.9 per cent of that time BDP. The period from 1991 till 1955 is difficulty to analyze, because of the disturbances which appear in all sphere of life and work, and the period from 1996 till 1999 can be analyzed, from the already known reasons, only for the area of the Federation. The correct amount of the means of payment spent for health care in the postwar period is impossible incorrectly to confirm, except detaching from BDP (1999 3.7 per cent) arrived the donations in equipment, drugs, sanitary material, training of staff, free of charge experts, means for the reconstruction of objects, to this in the future cannot be considered. Besides that the rate of detaching for the health care from BDP is less than before the war, BDP by it self is far lesser what means that the means of payment detached are far lesser. It is necessary the URGENT reform of health care financing system, evaluation strategy of the reform of health care which up-to-now did not show shifts, the bringing of instruments of planning in the health care, instruments of quality control, the legislator must define clearly the relations between the private practice, patients and state funds.

  14. Space age health care delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  15. Space age health care delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Space age health care delivery is being delivered to both NASA astronauts and employees with primary emphasis on preventive medicine. The program relies heavily on comprehensive health physical exams, health education, screening programs and physical fitness programs. Medical data from the program is stored in a computer bank so epidemiological significance can be established and better procedures can be obtained. Besides health care delivery to the NASA population, NASA is working with HEW on a telemedicine project STARPAHC, applying space technology to provide health care delivery to remotely located populations.

  16. Maintenance of gingival health post professional care.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Mary Lynn

    2011-08-01

    Oral hygiene habits are strongly associated with general health behaviours; good oral self care should result in good dental health. Clinical dental hygiene services have limited long range probability of success if the patient is not diligent in the daily procedures of personal care to remove and control dental plaque. Therefore, it is important to help make the individual aware of their own ability to control and maintain good oral health after a dental prophylaxis through oral care instruction and the use of select antimicrobials to maintain the gingival health. This paper reviews the evidence outlining the relative roles of prophylaxis and correct oral self-care in maintaining gingival health. © 2011 FDI World Dental Federation.

  17. A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele-Behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    user satisfaction with home-based telemental health in the military setting. The objectives of the Pilot study were as follows: 1. Evaluate the...technology suitable for video conferencing. Patients with access to computer technology may accrue less costs while maintaining quality health care for...1-7. doi: 10.1089/tmj.2014.0235 Jenkins-Guarnieri, M., Pruitt, L.D., Luxton, D.D., Johnson, K. (2015). Patient perceptions of telemental health

  18. Perceived racial discrimination in health care, completion of standard diabetes services, and diabetes control among a sample of American Indian women.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Kelly L; Lambert, William E; Fu, Rongwei; Jacob, Michelle; Harding, Anna K

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine perceived experiences of racial discrimination (perceived discrimination) in health care and its associations with completing standards of care for diabetes management and diabetes control. This cross-sectional study included 200 adult American Indian (AI) women with type 2 diabetes from 4 health care facilities located on tribal reservations in the Pacific Northwest. Participants completed a survey, and medical records were abstracted. Logistic regression was completed to assess associations. Sixty-seven percent of AI women reported discrimination during their lifetime of health care. After adjusting for patient characteristics, perceived discrimination was significantly associated with lower rates of dental exam; checks for blood pressure, creatinine, and total cholesterol; and pneumococcal vaccination. The association between perceived discrimination and total number of diabetes services completed was not statistically significant. Perceived discrimination was associated with having A1C values above target levels for diabetes control in unadjusted and adjusted models, but no association was observed for blood pressure or total cholesterol. In our sample of AI women with diabetes, two-thirds reported experiencing racial discrimination in their health care experience. Those reporting perceived discrimination completed fewer diabetes services and therefore may be at increased risk for comorbidities of diabetes. This finding supports the continued need for culturally responsive health care and programs of diabetes education to recognize perceived discrimination and its potential to impact success in self-management and services utilization. © 2014 The Author(s).

  19. Health Literacy and Access to Care

    PubMed Central

    Janke, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-documented links between low health literacy, low rates of health insurance coverage, and poor health outcomes, there has been almost no research on the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported access to care. This study analyzed a large, nationally representative sample of community-dwelling adults ages 50 and older to estimate the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported difficulty obtaining care. We found that individuals with low health literacy were significantly more likely than individuals with adequate health literacy to delay or forego needed care or to report difficulty finding a provider, even after controlling for other factors including health insurance coverage, employment, race/ethnicity, poverty, and general cognitive function. They were also more likely to lack a usual source of care, although this result was only marginally significant after controlling for other factors. The results show that in addition to any obstacles that low health literacy creates within the context of the clinical encounter, low health literacy also reduces the probability that people get in the door of the health care system in a timely way. PMID:27043757

  20. Health Literacy and Access to Care.

    PubMed

    Levy, Helen; Janke, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-documented links between low health literacy, low rates of health insurance coverage, and poor health outcomes, there has been almost no research on the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported access to care. This study analyzed a large, nationally representative sample of community-dwelling adults ages 50 and older to estimate the relationship between low health literacy and self-reported difficulty obtaining care. We found that individuals with low health literacy were significantly more likely than individuals with adequate health literacy to delay or forgo needed care or to report difficulty finding a provider, even after we controlled for other factors, including health insurance coverage, employment, race/ethnicity, poverty, and general cognitive function. They were also more likely to lack a usual source of care, although this result was only marginally significant after we controlled for other factors. The results show that in addition to any obstacles that low health literacy creates within the context of the clinical encounter, low health literacy also reduces the probability that people get in the door of the health care system in a timely way.

  1. Effects of a randomized controlled intervention trial on return to work and health care utilization after long-term sickness absence.

    PubMed

    Momsen, Anne-Mette H; Stapelfeldt, Christina Malmose; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Nielsen, Maj Britt D; Aust, Birgit; Rugulies, Reiner; Jensen, Chris

    2016-11-09

    The aim of the RCT study was to investigate if the effect of a multidisciplinary intervention on return to work (RTW) and health care utilization differed by participants' self-reported health status at baseline, defined by a) level of somatic symptoms, b) health anxiety and c) self-reported general health. A total of 443 individuals were randomized to the intervention (n = 301) or the control group (n = 142) and responded to a questionnaire measuring health status at baseline. Participants were followed in registries measuring RTW and health care utilization. Relative risk (RR) and odds ratio (OR) were used as measures of associations. Results were adjusted for gender, age, educational level, work ability and previous sick leave. Among all responders we found no effect of the intervention on RTW. Among participants with low health anxiety, the one-year probability of RTW was lower in the intervention than in the control group (RR = 0.79 95 % CI 0.68-0.93), but for those with high health anxiety there was no difference between the groups (RR = 1.15 95 % CI 0.84-1.57). Neither general health nor somatic symptoms modified the effect of the intervention on RTW. The intervention had no effect on health care utilization. The multidisciplinary intervention did not facilitate RTW or decrease health care utilization compared to ordinary case management in subgroups with multiple somatic symptoms, health anxiety or low self-rated health. However, the intervention resulted in a reduced chance of RTW among participants with low health anxiety levels. ISRCTN43004323 , and ISRCTN51445682.

  2. Effect of preventive primary care outreach on health related quality of life among older adults at risk of functional decline: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Brazil, Kevin; Hutchison, Brian; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Dalby, Dawn M; Goldsmith, Charles H; Furlong, William

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of a provider initiated primary care outreach intervention compared with usual care among older adults at risk of functional decline. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting Patients enrolled with 35 family physicians in five primary care networks in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Participants Patients were eligible if they were 75 years of age or older and were not receiving home care services. Of 3166 potentially eligible patients, 2662 (84%) completed the validated postal questionnaire used to determine risk of functional decline. Of 1724 patients who met the risk criteria, 769 (45%) agreed to participate and 719 were randomised. Intervention The 12 month intervention, provided by experienced home care nurses in 2004-6, consisted of a comprehensive initial assessment using the resident assessment instrument for home care; collaborative care planning with patients, their families, and family physicians; health promotion; and referral to community health and social support services. Main outcome measures Quality adjusted life years (QALYs), use and costs of health and social services, functional status, self rated health, and mortality. Results The mean difference in QALYs between intervention and control patients during the study period was not statistically significant (0.017, 95% confidence interval −0.022 to 0.056; P=0.388). The mean difference in overall cost of prescription drugs and services between the intervention and control groups was not statistically significant, (−$C165 (£107; €118; $162), 95% confidence interval −$C16 545 to $C16 214; P=0.984). Changes over 12 months in functional status and self rated health were not significantly different between the intervention and control groups. Ten patients died in each group. Conclusions The results of this study do not support adoption of this preventive primary care intervention for this target population of high risk older adults. Trial registration Clinical

  3. Effect of preventive primary care outreach on health related quality of life among older adults at risk of functional decline: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ploeg, Jenny; Brazil, Kevin; Hutchison, Brian; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Dalby, Dawn M; Goldsmith, Charles H; Furlong, William

    2010-04-16

    To evaluate the impact of a provider initiated primary care outreach intervention compared with usual care among older adults at risk of functional decline. Randomised controlled trial. Patients enrolled with 35 family physicians in five primary care networks in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Patients were eligible if they were 75 years of age or older and were not receiving home care services. Of 3166 potentially eligible patients, 2662 (84%) completed the validated postal questionnaire used to determine risk of functional decline. Of 1724 patients who met the risk criteria, 769 (45%) agreed to participate and 719 were randomised. The 12 month intervention, provided by experienced home care nurses in 2004-6, consisted of a comprehensive initial assessment using the resident assessment instrument for home care; collaborative care planning with patients, their families, and family physicians; health promotion; and referral to community health and social support services. Quality adjusted life years (QALYs), use and costs of health and social services, functional status, self rated health, and mortality. The mean difference in QALYs between intervention and control patients during the study period was not statistically significant (0.017, 95% confidence interval -0.022 to 0.056; P=0.388). The mean difference in overall cost of prescription drugs and services between the intervention and control groups was not statistically significant, (-$C165 ( pound107; euro118; $162), 95% confidence interval -$C16 545 to $C16 214; P=0.984). Changes over 12 months in functional status and self rated health were not significantly different between the intervention and control groups. Ten patients died in each group. The results of this study do not support adoption of this preventive primary care intervention for this target population of high risk older adults. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00134836.

  4. Pharmacists' Role in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maronde, Robert F.

    1977-01-01

    Pharmacists' contribution to the health care of the future in the future in the U.S. may have to be in the context of increasing the efficiency and effectiveness of health-care delivery. It is from the area of drug therapy, now poorly administered, that the pharmacist will have to justify his role in a cost-effective manner. (Author/LBH)

  5. Contagious Ideas from Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Financial problems plague both higher education and health care, two sectors that struggle to meet public expectations for quality services at affordable rates. Both higher education and health care also have a complex bottom line, heavy reliance on relatively autonomous professionals, and clients who share personal responsibility for achieving…

  6. Prospects for Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore

    1992-01-01

    This editorial reviews areas of health care reform including managed health care, diagnosis-related groups, and the Resource-Based Relative Value Scale for physician services. Relevance of such reforms to people with developmental disabilities is considered. Much needed insurance reform is not thought to be likely, however. (DB)

  7. Health care for nautical tourist.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, N

    1992-01-01

    Nautical tourism is one of the developing branches of tourism in Europe. It differs from other forms of tourism. Conditions under which nautical tourists live are similar to those of seamen employed on vessels in costal shipping. The health care for nautical tourists should be organized according to the principles of health care for crews of merchant ships engaged in constal shipping.

  8. The Politics of Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John B.

    Before the mid-1960's the Federal role in health care was extremely limited, but technological breakthroughs, the new importance of hospitals, and the recognition that the poor and elderly have been underserved prompted Congress to pass the Medicare and Medicaid package in 1966. Since then the Federal share of the health care dollar has risen by…

  9. Diaspora, disease, and health care.

    PubMed

    Wick, Jeannette Y; Zanni, Guido R

    2007-03-01

    When groups of people relocate from their homelands to other nations, especially if the movement is involuntary, minority populations are created in the countries that receive them. The issues related to these diaspora and diasporic communities--any groups that have been dispersed outside their traditional homelands--are financial, social, historical, political, or religious. In health care, issues include heritable diseases, cultural barriers, patients' health care beliefs, and unique disease presentations. In long-term care, many residents and health care providers have relocated to the United States from other countries.

  10. Foster Care and Child Health.

    PubMed

    McDavid, Lolita M

    2015-10-01

    Children in foster care need more from health providers than routine well-child care. The changes in legislation that were designed to prevent children from languishing in foster care also necessitate a plan that works with the child, the biological family, and the foster family in ensuring the best outcome for the child. This approach acknowledges that most foster children will return to the biological family. Recent research on the effect of adverse childhood experiences across all socioeconomic categories points to the need for specifically designed, focused, and coordinated health and mental health services for children in foster care.

  11. Service quality in health care.

    PubMed

    Kenagy, J W; Berwick, D M; Shore, M F

    1999-02-17

    Although US health care is described as "the world's largest service industry," the quality of service--that is, the characteristics that shape the experience of care beyond technical competence--is rarely discussed in the medical literature. This article illustrates service quality principles by analyzing a routine encounter in health care from a service quality point of view. This illustration and a review of related literature from both inside and outside health care has led to the following 2 premises: First, if high-quality service had a greater presence in our practices and institutions, it would improve clinical outcomes and patient and physician satisfaction while reducing cost, and it would create competitive advantage for those who are expert in its application. Second, many other industries in the service sector have taken service quality to a high level, their techniques are readily transferable to health care, and physicians caring for patients can learn from them.

  12. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  13. Health Professionals' Knowledge of Women's Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beatty, Rebecca M.

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses from 71 health professionals, benchmarking data from 8 hospitals, continuing education program evaluations, and focus groups with nursing, allied health, and primary care providers indicated a need for professional continuing education on women's health issues. Primary topic needs were identified. The data formed the basis for…

  14. Associations Between Health Literacy, Diabetes Knowledge, Self-Care Behaviors, and Glycemic Control in a Low Income Population with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Sujeev S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study assessed associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care, and glycemic control in a low income, predominately minority population with type 2 diabetes. Methods One hundred twenty-five adults with diabetes were recruited from a primary care clinic. Subjects completed validated surveys to measure health literacy, diabetes knowledge, and self-care (medication adherence, diet, exercise, blood sugar testing, and foot care). Hemoglobin A1c values were extracted from the medical record. Spearman's correlation and multiple linear regression were used to assess the relationship among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, self-care, and glycemic control controlling for covariates. Results Cronbach's α was 0.95 for the Revised Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine. The majority of the sample was <65 years old (50.7%), female (72.5%), and African American (71.4%), had less than a high school education (68.2%) and a household income <$15,000 (64.2%), and reported their health status as worse than last year (73.9%). In adjusted models that examined the associations among health literacy, diabetes knowledge, medication adherence, and self-care, health literacy was only significantly associated with diabetes knowledge (β = 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29, 0.82). In the final adjusted model for independent factors associated with glycemic control, both diabetes knowledge (β = 0.12; 95% CI 0.01, 0.23) and perceived health status (β = 1.14; 95% CI 0.13, 2.16) were significantly associated with glycemic control, whereas health literacy was not associated with glycemic control (β = −0.03; 95% CI −0.19, 0.13). Conclusions Diabetes knowledge and perceived health status are the most important factors associated with glycemic control in this population. Health literacy appears to exert its influence through diabetes knowledge and is not directly related to self-care or medication adherence. PMID:21299402

  15. Health care organization improvement reports using control charts for key quality characteristics: ORYX measures as examples.

    PubMed

    Caron, A; Neuhauser, D V

    2001-01-01

    Some medical centers have developed quarterly quality performance reports consisting of key quality characteristics reported in the form of annotated control charts. The content of these reports needs to be linked with the mission, vision, values, and the structure of the organization. A partial example using one hospital's Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations' ORYX measures is presented along with comments. The examples have been chosen to show the use of different types of control charts (XmR, P, and rare events) and different clinical conditions (congestive heart failure, low birth weight, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

  16. Anal Health Care Basics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jason; Mclemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy.The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate.Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area.Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases.In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists.

  17. Anal Health Care Basics

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason; McLemore, Elisabeth; Tejirian, Talar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that countless patients suffer from anal problems, there tends to be a lack of understanding of anal health care. Unfortunately, this leads to incorrect diagnoses and treatments. When treating a patient with an anal complaint, the primary goals are to first diagnose the etiology of the symptoms correctly, then to provide an effective and appropriate treatment strategy. The first step in this process is to take an accurate history and physical examination. Specific questions include details about bowel habits, anal hygiene, and fiber supplementation. Specific components of the physical examination include an external anal examination, a digital rectal examination, and anoscopy if appropriate. Common diagnoses include pruritus ani, anal fissures, hemorrhoids, anal abscess or fistula, fecal incontinence, and anal skin tags. However, each problem presents differently and requires a different approach for management. It is of paramount importance that the correct diagnosis is reached. Common errors include an inaccurate diagnosis of hemorrhoids when other pathology is present and subsequent treatment with a steroid product, which is harmful to the anal area. Most of these problems can be avoided by improving bowel habits. Adequate fiber intake with 30 g to 40 g daily is important for many reasons, including improving the quality of stool and preventing colorectal and anal diseases. In this Special Report, we provide an overview of commonly encountered anal problems, their presentation, initial treatment options, and recommendations for referral to specialists. PMID:27723447

  18. Health care's service fanatics.

    PubMed

    Merlino, James I; Raman, Ananth

    2013-05-01

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there and decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds Lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths. Hospital leaders: Publicized the problem internally. Seeing the hospital's dismal service scores shocked employees into recognizing that serious flaws existed. Worked to understand patients' needs. Management commissioned studies to get at the root causes of dissatisfaction. Made everyone a caregiver. An enterprisewide program trained everyone, from physicians to janitors, to put the patient first. Increased employee engagement. The Clinic instituted a "caregiver celebration" program and redoubled other motivational efforts. Established new processes. For example, any patient, for any reason, can now make a same-day appointment with a single call. Set patients' expectations. Printed and online materials educate patients about their stays--before they're admitted. Operating a truly patient-centered organization, the authors conclude, isn't a program; it's a way of life.

  19. The national health care imperative.

    PubMed

    Halamandaris, V J

    1990-03-01

    In summary, the nation's health care system is in serious need of reform. It is expensive and woefully inefficient. Millions of people are excluded from coverage, while others receive limited or second-class care. For those millions who suffer serious chronic problems that require long-term care, there is virtually no help. There is no help for the family whose loved one suffers from Alzheimer's disease. There is no help for the family whose child is born with cerebral palsy or epilepsy. There is no help for the middle-aged father, disabled in an automobile accident. Providing good care to all Americans is not a matter of money. America currently spends some 13% of its gross national product on health care, and yet the health statistics of Americans are the worst in the industrialized world. What America needs is a comprehensive system of health care that includes both acute and long-term care. Congress must take action to restore health care as a basic constitutional right of all Americans. Coverage for long-term care must be included within the context of any new national health care program. Funding for such a program should come from the most progressive tax that the Congress can fashion, which to this point is the federal income tax. Although there is an appropriate role for private insurance, it should function as a supplement to rather than as a substitute for a new national program. There are several other elements that are key to a national health care program: Home care must be the first line of any national long-term care program.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Teens, technology, and health care.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Francesco; Hauser, Diane

    2014-09-01

    Teens are avid users of new technologies and social media. Nearly 95% of US adolescents are online at least occasionally. Health care professionals and organizations that work with teens should identify online health information that is both accurate and teen friendly. Early studies indicate that some of the new health technology tools are acceptable to teens, particularly texting, computer-based psychosocial screening, and online interventions. Technology is being used to provide sexual health education, medication reminders for contraception, and information on locally available health care services. This article reviews early and emerging studies of technology use to promote teen health.

  1. A comparison of engineering controls for formaldehyde exposure during grossing activities in health care anatomic pathology laboratories.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenhai; Stewart, Erica J

    2016-07-01

    This article for the first time reports a large set of monitoring results for formaldehyde exposure during grossing activities in health care anatomic pathology laboratories, and compares the effectiveness of different local exhaust ventilation systems on the exposure. To control the confounding effects from grossing work load, sampling duration, and the sizes of specimens grossed, only 15-min short-term personal exposure samples collected during large tissue specimen grossing were used for the comparison of the effectiveness of these local exhaust systems. While we also collected long-term 8-hr time weighted average samples, these are not treated in this analysis. The systems examined were canopy receiving hoods, slot exhausts, and commercially available pre-manufactured backdraft grossing stations, both recirculating and ducted exhaust types. Out of over 2,000 personal short-term air samples, 307 samples from 163 surveys met the data selection criteria. Over a third of the data were less than the analytical laboratory limits of detection. Using the robust maximum likelihood estimation method for multiple limits of detection, the mean and geometric mean of the dataset for each type of local exhaust system were found to be less than the short-term personal exposure regulatory limit of 2 ppm. Nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum pairwise tests of five types of engineering controls showed a statistically significant difference among these controls, with the most effective being the manufactured backdraft grossing stations ducted to the outside, and the least effective being canopy exhaust systems and manufactured filtered recirculating grossing stations. Finally, exposure with each of the major engineering control types was rated by the American Industrial Hygiene Association exposure control rating scheme.

  2. Integrating sustainability and health care.

    PubMed

    Podein, Rian J; Hernke, Michael T

    2010-03-01

    Unsustainable development around the world has contributed to ecological degradation and human suffering while compromising the ability of ecosystems and social institutions to support human life. The United States health care system and its institutions are significant contributors to unsustainable development, but leaders of change are emerging from the health care arena. Health professionals, including primary care providers, are poised to serve as models for sustainability and to facilitate the necessary transformation toward more sustainable practices. Health professionals must, within a practical framework, embrace an objective definition of sustainability and then act to achieve it. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele-behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Tele-behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory A. Gahm, Ph.D...Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0118 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...based psychosocial treatments for depression . This is a necessary step prior to the large scale dissemination of home‐based telemental healthcare

  4. Selective primary health care: strategies for control of disease in the developing world. VI. Onchocerciasis.

    PubMed

    Greene, B M

    1983-01-01

    Onchocerca volvulus, a major filarial parasite of humans, infects tens of millions of people and is a leading cause of blindness. It also causes disabling or disfiguring dermatitis and lymph node involvement. The infection is transmitted by the bite of female blackflies of Simulium species, which breed around freely flowing waterways. Vector control by aerial spraying of rivers and streams with larvicide has achieved some success in the Volta River Basin, but other areas are less well-suited for such an approach. Efforts to control onchocerciasis are plagued by emerging resistance of blackflies, excessive costs of spraying, and the lack of suitable chemotherapy for existing cases. Mass chemotherapy for infected persons as a means to limit the disease and its impact is not feasible because existing drug regiments are too complex, too toxic, or not effective enough. Selective chemotherapy directed at persons at high risk of complications may be a more effective means of minimizing the impact of the disease.

  5. [Quality control and assessment of qualitative interview in health care research].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan-ming; Liao, Xing

    2008-07-01

    It is not finally concluded how to standardize the use of qualitative research in the world. Qualitative researchers disagree with each other about this issue. As we know, there have been a large number of articles written in different ways about qualitative research due to the "flexibility", one of its features. Qualitative research is quite different from quantitative research which is easy to control its quality and quality assessment. A series of criteria has been set up for quantitative research. However qualitative research needs to be improved in these aspects, in which qualitative interviews are mostly used at home and abroad at present. Hence, it becomes an important and urgent issue for qualitative researchers to standardly control and assess the quality of qualitative interview.

  6. Total quality management in health care.

    PubMed

    McDonald, S C

    1994-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM), continuous quality improvement (CQI) and quality control are terms that are becoming very familiar to workers in the health care environment. The purpose of this article is to discuss these terms and the concepts they describe. The origins of TQM and the keen interest in its application to the health care environment today are addressed. In other environments, TQM has shown significant increases in productivity while increasing effectiveness. Its application to the health care environment is the provision of the best possible care through continuously improving service to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the customer. The customer in the health care environment could be the patient, staff, physician and community serviced by the hospital. Characteristics of the new organizational structure are reviewed. Established techniques and processes are commonly used to identify process-improvement opportunities to assist the manager in continuously evaluating quality trends.

  7. HealthCare.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace plan. Get Answers Site Search Search Need health insurance? You can enroll in or change plans if ... report your health coverage! April 06 No 2017 health insurance? See if you can still get coverage See ...

  8. Providing adolescent sexual health care in the pediatric emergency department: views of health care providers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Melissa K; Mollen, Cynthia J; O'Malley, Donna; Owens, Rhea L; Maliszewski, Genevieve A; Goggin, Kathy; Kelly, Patricia

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore health care providers' (HCPs') attitudes and beliefs about adolescent sexual health care provision in the emergency department (ED) and to identify barriers to a health educator-based intervention. We conducted focused, semistructured interviews of HCPs from the ED and adolescent clinic of a children's hospital. The interview guide was based on the theory of planned behavior and its constructs: attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to facilitate care. We used purposive sampling and enrollment continued until themes were saturated. Interviews were recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were analyzed using directed content analysis. Twenty-nine interviews were required for saturation. Participants were 12 physicians, 12 nurses, 3 nurse practitioners, and 2 social workers; the majority (83%) were female. Intention to facilitate care was influenced by HCP perception of (1) their professional role, (2) the role of the ED (focused vs expanded care), and (3) need for patient safety. Health care providers identified 3 practice referents: patients/families, peers and administrators, and professional organizations. Health care providers perceived limited behavioral control over care delivery because of time constraints, confidentiality issues, and comfort level. There was overall support for a health educator, and many felt the educator could help overcome barriers to care. Despite challenges unique to the ED, HCPs were supportive of the intervention and perceived the health educator as a resource to improve adolescent care and services. Future research should evaluate efficacy and costs of a health educator in this setting.

  9. Prevalence, management and control of diabetes mellitus and associated risk factors in primary health care in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Cortez-Dias, Nuno; Martins, Susana; Belo, Adriana; Fiuza, Manuela

    2010-04-01

    To assess the prevalence, treatment and control of diabetes mellitus (DM) in primary health care users, to characterize associated cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and effectiveness of their treatment, and to estimate the clinical impact of DM on the occurrence of coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke. The VALSIM Study was performed in a primary care setting and involved 719 general practitioners (GPs), based on stratified distribution and proportional to the population density of each region of mainland Portugal and the islands of Madeira and the Azores. A questionnaire on sociodemographic and clinical data (previous diagnosis of DM, CAD or stroke, antidiabetic and antihypertensive medication and statins) and laboratory tests (lipids and HbA1C) was applied by participating GPs to the first two adult patients scheduled for an appointment on a given day, and blood pressure (BP) was measured. DM was defined as fasting glucose of > or = 126 mg/dl or use of antidiabetic agents. The study included 16,856 individuals (mean age 58.1 +/- 15.1 years; 61.6% women), of whom 3215 were identified as diabetic. The prevalence of DM adjusted for gender and age in primary health care users was 14.9%, higher in men (M: 16.8%; F: 13.2%), and increased with age. Among the diabetic population, 90.2% were being treated with antidiabetic drugs and 51.7% had HbA1C lower than 7%. Around 91% had high BP (> or = 130/80 mmHg or were taking antihypertensive medication), 39.5% were overweight, 45.1% were obese, 69.3% had abdominal obesity, 71.8% had metabolic syndrome (ATP III criteria), 12% presented CAD and 5% had past history of stroke. The association between these CV risk factors and DM was stronger in women, and the impact of DM on occurrence of CAD and stroke was also higher in women. Among diabetic hypertensives, 78.4% were being treated with antihypertensive drugs, but only 9.3% had BP < 130/80 mmHg (M: 9.5%; F: 9.1%). Of diabetic patients with CAD, 94.2% were taking

  10. Hope for health and health care.

    PubMed

    Stempsey, William E

    2015-02-01

    Virtually all activities of health care are motivated at some level by hope. Patients hope for a cure; for relief from pain; for a return home. Physicians hope to prevent illness in their patients; to make the correct diagnosis when illness presents itself; that their prescribed treatments will be effective. Researchers hope to learn more about the causes of illness; to discover new and more effective treatments; to understand how treatments work. Ultimately, all who work in health care hope to offer their patients hope. In this paper, I offer a brief analysis of hope, considering the definitions of Hobbes, Locke, Hume and Thomas Aquinas. I then differentiate shallow and deep hope and show how hope in health care can remain shallow. Next, I explore what a philosophy of deep hope in health care might look like, drawing important points from Ernst Bloch and Gabriel Marcel. Finally, I suggest some implications of this philosophy of hope for patients, physicians, and researchers.

  11. Racial Discrimination in Health Care Is Associated with Worse Glycemic Control among Black Men but Not Black Women with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Assari, Shervin; Lee, Daniel B; Nicklett, Emily Joy; Moghani Lankarani, Maryam; Piette, John D; Aikens, James E

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of research suggests that racial discrimination may affect the health of Black men and Black women differently. This study examined Black patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) in order to test gender differences in (1) levels of perceived racial discrimination in health care and (2) how perceived discrimination relates to glycemic control. A total of 163 Black patients with type 2 DM (78 women and 85 men) provided data on demographics (age and gender), socioeconomic status, perceived racial discrimination in health care, self-rated health, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Data were analyzed using linear regression. Black men reported more racial discrimination in health care than Black women. Although racial discrimination in health care was not significantly associated with HbA1c in the pooled sample (b = 0.20, 95% CI = -0.41 -0.80), gender-stratified analysis indicated an association between perceived discrimination and higher HbA1c levels for Black men (b = 0.86, 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 0.01-1.73) but not Black women (b = -0.31, 95% CI = -1.17 to -0.54). Perceived racial discrimination in diabetes care may be more salient for glycemic control of Black men than Black women. Scholars and clinicians should take gender into account when considering the impacts of race-related discrimination experiences on health outcomes. Policies should reduce racial discrimination in the health care.

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele-behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    symptoms, attitudes toward seeking mental health services, quality of life , and health care utilization, as well as treatment satisfaction... depression is an understandable response to negative life events and difficult environments [13]. This stance, that “ depression makes sense,” renders...satisfaction with and attitudes toward treatment (CSQ, IASMHS), quality of life (LS), and healthcare utilization. 2.10. Statistical methods We are using a

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of In-Home Tele-Behavioral Health Care Utilizing Behavioral Activation for Depression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    A. P., & Mishkind, M. C. (2010). Safety of Telemental Health Care Delivered to Clinically Unsupervised Settings: A Systematic Review. Telemedicine ...Mauldin, P. D., Knapp, R. G., & Lejuez, C. (2009). Rationale and design: Telepsychology service delivery for depressed elderly veterans. Trials...unsupervised settings: A systematic review. Telemedicine and E-Health, 16, 705-711. doi: 10.1089/tmj .2009.0179 Luxton, D. D., Pruitt, L. D., O’Brien, K

  14. [A Maternal Health Care System Based on Mobile Health Care].

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Zeng, Weijie; Li, Chengwei; Xue, Junwei; Wu, Xiuyong; Liu, Yinjia; Wan, Yuxin; Zhang, Yiru; Ji, Yurong; Wu, Lei; Yang, Yongzhe; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Bin; Huang, Yueshan; Wu, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Wearable devices are used in the new design of the maternal health care system to detect electrocardiogram and oxygen saturation signal while smart terminals are used to achieve assessments and input maternal clinical information. All the results combined with biochemical analysis from hospital are uploaded to cloud server by mobile Internet. Machine learning algorithms are used for data mining of all information of subjects. This system can achieve the assessment and care of maternal physical health as well as mental health. Moreover, the system can send the results and health guidance to smart terminals.

  15. The influence of health care organisations on health system performance.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Katharina; Rice, Nigel; Smith, Peter

    2003-04-01

    The governments of many countries are undertaking initiatives to assess the extent to which health care organisations fulfil important objectives of health care, such as health improvement, fair access and efficiency. However, the extent to which these health care organisations can influence these objectives is unclear. The purpose of this study is to examine the potential influence of English National Health Service territorial health authorities on 14 indicators of system performance. The study uses performance data relating to approximately 5000 small geographical areas with average populations of 10,000. Multi-level statistical models are used to attribute variation in the indicators to three hierarchical levels--small areas, district health authorities and regional health authorities--after controlling for socio-demographic characteristics. Variations in indicators attributable to district or regional level give an indication of the extent to which health authorities may influence performance. After adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics, the proportion of variation in performance attributable to district health authorities varies from about 8% (for standardised mortality ratios) to about 76% (for waiting time for elective surgery). Variation at the regional level is smaller than at the district level. There appear to be very large variations between indicators in the extent to which health care organisations can influence health system performance. Choice of performance indicators and the managerial incentive regime based on the indicators should recognise this variability, as it is highly dysfunctional to hold managers accountable for measures of performance that are beyond their control.

  16. Finding Health Care Services

    Cancer.gov

    If you have been diagnosed with cancer, finding a doctor and treatment hospital for your cancer care is an important step to getting the best treatment possible. Learn tips for choosing a doctor and treatment facility to manage your cancer care.

  17. Primary health care in India--plans.

    PubMed

    Saigal, M D

    1982-09-01

    In India a draft Health Policy has been formulated with the following objectives: to improve and expand the health care delivery system to make primary health care services available to each individual; to make people conscious of their health needs and to encourage their involvement and participation in the planning and implementation of the health programs; to improve the standards of environmental sanitation and personal hygiene leading to reduction in the incidence of diseases and a healthier life; to improve maternal and child health services and to create such services; to control and eradicate common communicable and infectious desease; and to lower by about 50% maternal and infant mortality rates and other mortality rates. To achieve the general objectives, it is proposed to use certain specific indicators to plan and monitor the health programs. The indicators proposed, which are outlined, fall into the categories of health status indicators and indicators for provision of health services. The main objective of primary health care will be to provide better health care services to the rural areas and urban slums. The population will be encouraged both individually and collectively to participate in the development of health. The government and the medical profession will help the people to realize their responsibility by providing a large band of health volunteers from among the community itself to take care of the basic health needs of the community. There will be a more equitable distribution of health resources, and, to correct past imbalances, preferential allocations will be made for developing health facilities in rural areas. The primary emphasis will be on preventive, promotive, and rehabilitative aspects of health which will be integrated with functions and responsibilities of all these institutions which currently are providing only curative services. In providing primary health care, full advantage will be taken of the traditional methods and

  18. The challenges of health care restructuring.

    PubMed

    Hunter, D

    Since the late 1980s, virtually every developed, and many developing, countries have re-examined the structure of their health care systems. Health care reform has become a truly global phenomenon with considerable potential for cross-nation lesson-learning. In countries where the state has been the central actor in the health sector, its role is being reassessed and, in some cases, reconfigured. The introduction of market principles to health care is a feature of many countries: market romantics believe markets in health care will improve efficiency, empower consumers, control costs, and overthrow monolithic bureaucracies. But will they? The evidence, such as it is, suggests otherwise. The greatest pressure for change and for introducing markets into health care has been in the relative role of the private sector in the operation, and in some countries also the financing of health care services. But it is not a simple case of the state versus the market. The issues are much more complex and various hybrid models are emerging involving some sort of public-private mix. The move is towards greater diversity and pluralism, an inevitable consequence of which is growing fragmentation in the funding and provision of care with all the associated on-costs in terms of increased coordination and management that this entails. The policy aim is to harness the benefits of market behaviour without also adopting the inherent weaknesses of markets with regard to questions of distributive justice and equity.

  19. Preventive Care in Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Anita K; Goodall, Perpetua

    2016-06-01

    Specialists in general obstetrics and gynecology are key providers of primary care in women. They diagnose and provide the initial management of many medical conditions unrelated to reproductive health. Most importantly they can impact the overall health of patients through incorporating preventive approaches in the annual well-woman visit. This article defines preventive care and identifies leading causes of mortality in women. A framework for identifying key elements of the well-woman examination is summarized. Examples of prevention are provided, which focus on major health care issues that affect adult women.

  20. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  1. Group Patient Education: Effectiveness of a Brief Intervention in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Primary Health Care in Greece: A Clinically Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merakou, K.; Knithaki, A.; Karageorgos, G.; Theodoridis, D.; Barbouni, A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the impact of a brief patient group education intervention in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The sample, 193 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were patients at the diabetic clinic of a primary health care setting in Attica, was assigned to two groups, intervention (138 individuals) and control group (55…

  2. Supporting self-care for families of children with eczema with a Web-based intervention plus health care professional support: pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Santer, Miriam; Muller, Ingrid; Yardley, Lucy; Burgess, Hana; Selinger, Hannah; Stuart, Beth L; Little, Paul

    2014-03-04

    Childhood eczema, or childhood atopic dermatitis, causes significant distress to children and their families through sleep disturbance and itch. The main cause of treatment failure is nonuse of prescribed treatments. The objective of this study was to develop and test a Web-based intervention to support families of children with eczema, and to explore whether support from a health care professional (HCP) is necessary to engage participants with the intervention. We followed the PRECEDE-PROCEED model: regular emollient use was the target behavior we were seeking to promote and we identified potential techniques to influence this. LifeGuide software was used to write the intervention website. Carers of children with eczema were invited through primary care mail-out and randomized to 3 groups: (1) website only, (2) website plus HCP support, or (3) usual care. Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) scores were measured online by carer report at baseline and at 12 weeks. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 13 HCPs (primarily practice nurses) and 26 participants to explore their experiences of taking part in the study. A total of 143 carers were recruited through 31 practices. We found a decrease of ≥2 in follow-up compared with baseline POEM score in 23 of 42 (55%) participants in the website only group, 16 of 49 (33%) in the usual care group, and 18 of 47 (38%) in the website plus HCP group. Website use data showed that 75 of 93 (81%) participants allocated to the website groups completed the core modules, but less than half used other key components (videos: 35%; regular text reminders: 39%). There were no consistent differences in website use between the website only or the website plus HCP groups. Qualitative feedback showed that most HCPs had initial concerns about providing support for eczema self-care because this was not a condition that they felt expert in. However, HCPs reported productive consultations and that they found it helpful to use the

  3. Supporting Self-Care for Families of Children With Eczema With a Web-Based Intervention Plus Health Care Professional Support: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Ingrid; Yardley, Lucy; Burgess, Hana; Selinger, Hannah; Stuart, Beth L; Little, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood eczema, or childhood atopic dermatitis, causes significant distress to children and their families through sleep disturbance and itch. The main cause of treatment failure is nonuse of prescribed treatments. Objective The objective of this study was to develop and test a Web-based intervention to support families of children with eczema, and to explore whether support from a health care professional (HCP) is necessary to engage participants with the intervention. Methods We followed the PRECEDE-PROCEED model: regular emollient use was the target behavior we were seeking to promote and we identified potential techniques to influence this. LifeGuide software was used to write the intervention website. Carers of children with eczema were invited through primary care mail-out and randomized to 3 groups: (1) website only, (2) website plus HCP support, or (3) usual care. Patient-Oriented Eczema Measure (POEM) scores were measured online by carer report at baseline and at 12 weeks. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 13 HCPs (primarily practice nurses) and 26 participants to explore their experiences of taking part in the study. Results A total of 143 carers were recruited through 31 practices. We found a decrease of ≥2 in follow-up compared with baseline POEM score in 23 of 42 (55%) participants in the website only group, 16 of 49 (33%) in the usual care group, and 18 of 47 (38%) in the website plus HCP group. Website use data showed that 75 of 93 (81%) participants allocated to the website groups completed the core modules, but less than half used other key components (videos: 35%; regular text reminders: 39%). There were no consistent differences in website use between the website only or the website plus HCP groups. Qualitative feedback showed that most HCPs had initial concerns about providing support for eczema self-care because this was not a condition that they felt expert in. However, HCPs reported productive consultations and that

  4. Optimisation of infection prevention and control in acute health care by use of behaviour change: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Rachel; Charani, Esmita; Sevdalis, Nick; Alexandrou, Banos; Sibley, Eleanor; Mullett, David; Loveday, Heather P; Drumright, Lydia N; Holmes, Alison

    2012-04-01

    Changes in the behaviour of health-care workers (HCWs) are required to improve adherence to infection prevention and control (IPC) guidelines. Despite heavy investment in strategies to change behaviour, effectiveness has not been adequately assessed. We did a systematic review to assess the effectiveness and sustainability of interventions to change IPC behaviour and assessed exploratory literature for barriers to and facilitators of behaviour change. 21 studies published from 1999 to 2011 met our inclusion criteria: seven intervention studies and 14 exploratory studies. Of the intervention studies none explicitly incorporated psychological theory and only two contained elements of social marketing in the design, although five addressed sustainability. All elicited behaviour change, reduction in infection risk, or both. The exploratory studies identified social and cultural factors that affect the IPC behaviour of HCWs. To improve the standard of research and broaden the evidence base, we recommend that quality criteria are added to existing systematic review guidelines to enable the inclusion of qualitative research and to ensure robust design, implementation, and reporting of interventions.

  5. Awareness, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension in Primary Health Care and Secondary Referral Medical Outpatient Clinic Settings at Enugu, Southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chijioke, Chioli; Okolo, Teddy; Ekwe, Esther; Eze, Chukwuemeka; Agunyenwa, Charles; Amah, Christopher; Nwadike, Kenneth; Chijioke, Udunma

    2016-01-01

    Essential hypertension is the most common noncommunicable disease (NCD), affecting more than half the adult population in many countries and being the major NCD contributor to the double burden of disease in developing countries. We undertook a survey of the hypertension awareness, treatment, and control in primary and secondary referral health care clinics in Enugu, Nigeria, and compared these data with those obtained in local community surveys. The prevalence of hypertension in the primary care clinic (9.2%) was lower than in a previously reported community survey (42.2%), while, in the referral clinic, 70.3% of patients attending were hypertensive. Hypertension awareness rates were 91.9%, 29.4%, and 93.2% in these respective health care settings. Treatment and control rates (89.9% and 72.9%) were better in the secondary care clinic than in the primary care centre (87.7% and 46.0%). (Chi-square analysis confirmed statistically significant differences between these rates (p < 0.05).) These data may form a useful index of health care system effectiveness in Nigeria. Possible reasons for the differences observed and effective strategies to address the waxing pandemic of hypertension are discussed. PMID:28050277

  6. Improving children's obesity-related health care quality: process outcomes of a cluster-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Taveras, Elsie M; Marshall, Richard; Horan, Christine M; Gillman, Matthew W; Hacker, Karen; Kleinman, Ken P; Koziol, Renata; Price, Sarah; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Simon, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To examine the extent to which an intervention using electronic decision support delivered to pediatricians at the point-of-care of obese children, with or without direct-to-parent outreach, improved health care quality measures for child obesity. Process outcomes from a three-arm, cluster-randomized trial from 14 pediatric practices in Massachusetts were reported. Participants were 549 children aged 6-12 years with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 95th percentile. In five practices (Intervention-1), pediatricians receive electronic decision support at the point-of-care. In five other practices (Intervention-2), pediatricians receive point-of-care decision support and parents receive information about their child's prior BMI before their scheduled visit. Four practices receive usual care. The main outcomes were Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) performance measures for child obesity: documentation of BMI percentile and use of counseling codes for nutrition or physical activity. Compared to the usual care condition, participants in Intervention-2, but not Intervention-1, had substantially higher odds of use of HEDIS codes for BMI percentile documentation (adjusted OR: 3.97; 95% CI: 1.92, 8.23) and higher prevalence of use of HEDIS codes for counseling for nutrition or physical activity (adjusted predicted prevalence 20.3% [95% CI 8.5, 41.2] for Intervention -2 vs. 0.0% [0.0, 2.0] for usual care). An intervention that included both decision support for clinicians and outreach to parents resulted in improved health care quality measures for child obesity. © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  7. Integration of comprehensive women’s health programmes into health systems: cervical cancer prevention, care and control in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Binagwaho, Agnes; Ngabo, Fidele; Mugeni, Cathy; Gatera, Maurice; Nutt, Cameron T; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Problem Although it is highly preventable and treatable, cervical cancer is the most common and most deadly cancer among women in Rwanda. Approach By mobilizing a diverse coalition of partnerships, Rwanda became the first country in Africa to develop and implement a national strategic plan for cervical cancer prevention, screening and treatment. Local setting Rwanda – a small, landlocked nation in East Africa with a population of 10.4 million – is well positioned to tackle a number of “high-burden” noncommunicable diseases. The country’s integrated response to infectious diseases has resulted in steep declines in premature mortality over the past decade. Relevant changes In 2011–2012, Rwanda vaccinated 227 246 girls with all three doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Among eligible girls, three-dose coverage rates of 93.2% and 96.6% were achieved in 2011 and 2012, respectively. The country has also initiated nationwide screening and treatment programmes that are based on visual inspection of the cervix with acetic acid, testing for HPV DNA, cryotherapy, the loop electrosurgical excision procedure and various advanced treatment options. Lessons learnt Low-income countries should begin to address cervical cancer by integrating prevention, screening and treatment into routine women’s health services. This requires political will, cross-sectoral collaboration and planning, innovative partnerships and robust monitoring and evaluation. With external support and adequate planning, high nationwide coverage rates for HPV vaccination and screening for cervical cancer can be achieved within a few years. PMID:24101786

  8. A pragmatic randomized controlled trial of a guided self-help intervention versus a waiting list control in a routine primary care mental health service.

    PubMed

    Lucock, Mike; Kirby, Rebecca; Wainwright, Nigel

    2011-09-01

    OBJECTIVES. To evaluate the effectiveness of a two session guided self-help (GSH) intervention provided by primary care graduate mental health workers (PCGMHWs) in a primary care mental health service. DESIGN. Pragmatic randomized trial, with a wait list control design. METHOD. Patients presenting with significant anxiety and depression problems were given one or more self-help booklets at screening and randomly allocated to an immediate (ITG) or delayed treatment group (DTG). Following this, a two-session GSH intervention was provided by one of two PCGMHWs, with a review session to decide on the need for further intervention. The DTG began the intervention 8 weeks after the screening and the primary outcome was Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) scores after 8 weeks. RESULTS. A total of 63 patients were allocated to the ITG, 59 to the DTG. Analysis of covariance, carried out on an intention to treat basis, showed a significant treatment effect, F(1,98) = 15, p < .001, and a comparison of means at 8 weeks showed a significant difference, t(116) = 2.1 (95% CI [1.1, 5.9]), p= .042 with an effect size, d= 0.375. Taking the two groups together, CORE-OM scores for patients who completed the intervention reduced between screening and the review session by an average of 7.9 (95% CI [6.3, 9.5]), effect size of 1.2. Between screening and the review session, 47% showed a reliable and clinically significant improvement. CONCLUSIONS. The study provides some support for the effectiveness of a two-session GSH intervention and a stepped-care service model. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Effectiveness of a weight loss intervention in postpartum women: results from a randomized controlled trial in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Huseinovic, Ena; Bertz, Fredrik; Leu Agelii, Monica; Hellebö Johansson, Else; Winkvist, Anna; Brekke, Hilde Kristin

    2016-08-01

    Reproduction has been identified as an important factor for long-term weight gain among women. A previous efficacy trial has successfully produced postpartum weight loss; however, the effectiveness of this intervention needs to be established. This study was designed to evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of a diet behavior modification treatment to produce weight loss in postpartum women within the primary health care setting in Sweden. During 2011-2014, 110 women with a self-reported body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) of ≥27 at 6-15 wk postpartum were randomly assigned to the diet behavior modification group (D group) or the control group (C group). Women randomly assigned to the D group (n = 54) received a structured 12-wk diet behavior modification treatment by a dietitian and were instructed to gradually implement a diet plan based on the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations and to self-weigh ≥3 times/wk. Women randomly assigned to the C group (n = 56) were given a brochure on healthy eating. The primary outcome was change in body weight after 12 wk and 1 y. The retention rate was 91% and 85% at 12 wk and 1 y, respectively. At baseline, women had a median (1st, 3rd quartile) BMI of 31.0 (28.8, 33.6), and 84% were breastfeeding. After 12 wk, median weight change in the D group was -6.1 kg (-8.4, -3.2 kg) compared with -1.6 kg (-3.5, -0.4 kg) in the C group (P < 0.001). The difference was maintained at the 1-y follow-up for the D group, -10.0 kg (-11.7, -5.9 kg) compared with -4.3 kg (-10.2, -1.0 kg) in the C group (P = 0.004). In addition, the D group reduced BMI, waist circumference, hip circumference, and body fat percentage more than did the C group at both 12 wk and 1 y (all P < 0.05). A low-intensity diet treatment delivered by a dietitian within the primary health care setting can produce clinically relevant and sustainable weight loss in postpartum women with overweight and obesity. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT

  10. Health needs and nursing care.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Cristina Buischi; Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia de; Boemer, Magali Roseira; Rocha, Semiramis Melani Melo

    2016-01-01

    to present the concept of needs according to different approaches to discuss the possibility of health care that incorporates a broader view of human vulnerabilities in health services. the arguments are founded on nursing theorists who worked on the construction of frameworks relevant to care, based on needs and on philosophers who show the possibility of identifying the vulnerabilities of human beings, defending art as a therapeutic instrument that can promote health care. although care can acquire a new dimension with the introduction of art, according to certain perspectives, philosophical studies on ethics and aesthetics should be resumed to identify human vulnerabilities that can in fact be compensated by sensible understanding of the outer world. To incorporate art in nursing care requires studies from theorists to be recovered, deepening concepts and working on empirical investigations for their adequate use.

  11. Healthy Aging: Paying for Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... This information in Spanish ( en español ) Paying for health care More information on paying for health care Better ... Coping without insurance More information on paying for health care Explore other publications and websites Age Page: Choosing ...

  12. Clinical care and health disparities.

    PubMed

    Starfield, B; Gérvas, J; Mangin, D

    2012-04-01

    Health disparities, also known as health inequities, are systematic and potentially remediable differences in one or more aspects of health across population groups defined socially, economically, demographically, or geographically. This topic has been the subject of research stretching back at least decades. Reports and studies have delved into how inequities develop in different societies and, with particular regard to health services, in access to and financing of health systems. In this review, we consider empirical studies from the United States and elsewhere, and we focus on how one aspect of health systems, clinical care, contributes to maintaining systematic differences in health across population groups characterized by social disadvantage. We consider inequities in clinical care and the policies that influence them. We develop a framework for considering the structural and behavioral components of clinical care and review the existing literature for evidence that is likely to be generalizable across health systems over time. Starting with the assumption that health services, as one aspect of social services, ought to enhance equity in health care, we conclude with a discussion of threats to that role and what might be done about them.

  13. [Corruption and health care system].

    PubMed

    Marasović Šušnjara, Ivana

    2014-06-01

    Corruption is a global problem that takes special place in health care system. A large number of participants in the health care system and numerous interactions among them provide an opportunity for various forms of corruption, be it bribery, theft, bureaucratic corruption or incorrect information. Even though it is difficult to measure the amount of corruption in medicine, there are tools that allow forming of the frames for possible interventions.

  14. Organizing health care within political turmoil: the Palestinian case.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Motasem; Defever, Mia; Abdeen, Ziad

    2003-01-01

    Palestinians were given control over their own health services in late 1994. Since then they have been facing the challenge of reorganizing disordered health services into a cohesive, regulated and sustainable health care system. This paper focuses on the experience of organizing health care during political instability. It considers the ways that health care is currently provided and funded in the Palestinian Territories. The patterns of accessibility to health care services in terms of insurance coverage and provision (physical allocation) of services are discussed. Finally, the major health care policy changes in this transitional period are examined.

  15. Model Child Care Health Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan; Smith, Herberta

    Drawn from a review of policies at over 100 child care programs nationwide, the model health policies presented in this report are intended for adaptation and selective use by out-of-home child care facilities. Following an introduction, the report presents model policy forms with blanks for adding individualized information for the following…

  16. Linear association between household income and metabolic control in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus despite free access to health care.

    PubMed

    Deladoëy, Johnny; Henderson, Mélanie; Geoffroy, Louis

    2013-05-01

    In health care systems with a user fee, the impact of socioeconomic factors on pediatric insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) control could be due to the cost of accessing care. There is a linear association between household income and the average glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of children and adolescents with IDDM despite free access to health care. We used a linear regression model to examine the association between normalized average HbA1c of 1766 diabetic children (diagnosed at our institution from 1980 to 2011 before 17 years of age) and the median household income of their neighborhoods (obtained from Statistics Canada, 2006 Census data). We found a negative linear association (P < .001; r = -0.2) between the level of income and metabolic control assessed by HbA1c after controlling for sex, age at diagnosis, duration of diabetes, ethnicity, geographical factors, frequency of visits, current age (as a proxy for change in practice over time), and change of measurement methods of HbA1c across time. For every increase of $15,000 in annual income, HbA1c decreased by 0.1%. We report a linear association of household income with metabolic control of IDDM in childhood. Given that Canada has a system of free universal access to health care, confounding by access to care is unlikely. Considering the impact of poorly controlled IDDM in childhood on the development of long-term complications, our findings suggest that the higher complication rate found in adults of low socioeconomic status might originate from the poor control that they experienced in childhood. Support for the care of IDDM children from low-income neighborhoods should be increased.

  17. [Calculation of workers' health care costs].

    PubMed

    Rydlewska-Liszkowska, Izabela

    2006-01-01

    In different health care systems, there are different schemes of organization and principles of financing activities aimed at ensuring the working population health and safety. Regardless of the scheme and the range of health care provided, economists strive for rationalization of costs (including their reduction). This applies to both employers who include workers' health care costs into indirect costs of the market product manufacture and health care institutions, which provide health care services. In practice, new methods of setting costs of workers' health care facilitate regular cost control, acquisition of detailed information about costs, and better adjustment of information to planning and control needs in individual health care institutions. For economic institutions and institutions specialized in workers' health care, a traditional cost-effect calculation focused on setting costs of individual products (services) is useful only if costs are relatively low and the output of simple products is not very high. But when products form aggregates of numerous actions like those involved in occupational medicine services, the method of activity based costing (ABC), representing the process approach, is much more useful. According to this approach costs are attributed to the product according to resources used during different activities involved in its production. The calculation of costs proceeds through allocation of all direct costs for specific processes in a given institution. Indirect costs are settled on the basis of resources used during the implementation of individual tasks involved in the process of making a new product. In this method, so called map of processes/actions consisted in the manufactured product and their interrelations are of particular importance. Advancements in the cost-effect for the management of health care institutions depend on their managerial needs. Current trends in this regard primarily depend on treating all cost reference

  18. American Health Care Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... preferred... Read More Executive Director | Dogwood Village of Orange County US - VA - Orange, Executive Director Dogwood Village of Orange County Health and Rehabilitation and Senior Living, a ...

  19. Substitution of Usual Perioperative Care by eHealth to Enhance Postoperative Recovery in Patients Undergoing General Surgical or Gynecological Procedures: Study Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Eva; Huirne, Judith Af; Bouwsma, Esther Va; van Dongen, Johanna M; Terwee, Caroline B; van de Ven, Peter M; den Bakker, Chantal M; van der Meij, Suzan; van Baal, W Marchien; Leclercq, Wouter Kg; Geomini, Peggy Maj; Consten, Esther Cj; Schraffordt Koops, Steven E; van Kesteren, Paul Jm; Stockmann, Hein Bac; Ten Cate, A Dorien; Davids, Paul Hp; Scholten, Petrus C; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; Meijerink, Wilhelmus Jhj; Bonjer, H Jaap; Anema, Johannes R

    2016-12-21

    Due to the strong reduction in the length of hospital stays in the last decade, the period of in-hospital postoperative care is limited. After discharge from the hospital, guidance and monitoring on recovery and resumption of (work) activities are usually not provided. As a consequence, return to normal activities and work after surgery is hampered, leading to a lower quality of life and higher costs due to productivity loss and increased health care consumption. With this study we aim to evaluate whether an eHealth care program can improve perioperative health care in patients undergoing commonly applied abdominal surgical procedures, leading to accelerated recovery and to a reduction in costs in comparison to usual care. This is a multicenter randomized, single-blinded, controlled trial. At least 308 patients between 18 and 75 years old who are on the waiting list for a laparoscopic cholecystectomy, inguinal hernia surgery, or laparoscopic adnexal surgery for a benign indication will be included. Patients will be randomized to an intervention or control group. The intervention group will have access to an innovative, perioperative eHealth care program. This intervention program consists of a website, mobile phone app, and activity tracker. It aims to improve patient self-management and empowerment by providing guidance to patients in the weeks before and after surgery. The control group will receive usual care and will have access to a nonintervention (standard) website consisting of the digital information brochure about the surgical procedure being performed. Patients are asked to complete questionnaires at 5 moments during the first 6 months after surgery. The primary outcome measure is time to return to normal activities based on a patient-specific set of 8 activities selected from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) physical functioning item bank version 1.2. Secondary outcomes include social participation, self-rated health

  20. Health Economic Evaluation of a Strict Glucose Control Guideline Implemented Using Point-of-Care Testing in Three Intensive Care Units in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van Hooijdonk, Roosmarijn T M; Steuten, Lotte M G; Kip, Michelle M A; Monteban, Helma; Mulder, Marianne R; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Spronk, Peter E; Schultz, Marcus J

    2015-08-01

    Point-of-care testing of blood glucose (BG-POCT) is essential for safe and effective insulin titrations in critically ill patients under glucose control with insulin. The costs associated with this practice are considered substantial, especially when more frequent blood glucose (BG) testing is needed, as with more strict glucose control (SGC) aiming for lower BG levels. The objective of this study was to estimate, from a hospital perspective, the incremental cost effectiveness of an SGC guideline, aiming for BG levels of 4.4-6.1 mmol/L, compared to the situation before implementation of that guideline (aiming for BG levels <8.3 mmol/L), both using BG-POCT. This is a secondary analysis of a guideline implementation project aiming for implementation of a guideline of SGC in three intensive care units in The Netherlands. A Markov model including the four health states 'target glucose', 'hyperglycaemia' (defined as BG levels >6.1 mmol/L), 'hypoglycaemia' (defined as BG levels <4.4 mmol/L) and 'in-hospital death' was developed to compare expected costs, number of patients within target and number of life-years saved before and after implementation of the SGC guideline. The effectiveness estimates are based on empirical data from 3195 patients 12 and 24 months before and after implementation of the guideline, respectively. All costs have been converted to price year 2013, and are estimated based on hospital data, the literature and available price lists. The number of BG-POCT increased from 4.8 [interquartile range (IQR) 2.6-6.7] to 8.0 [IQR 4.1-11.2] per patient per day, accruing 58% higher costs for BG-POCT (€13.56 vs. €8.57 per patient) in the SGC protocol versus the situation before implementation. When taking total hospital costs and clinical effects into account, implementation of the SGC guideline increased total hospital costs per patient by 1.8%, i.e., €355 (from €20,617 to €20,972) during the inpatient stay, while the number of patients in target

  1. The Potential Trajectory of Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae, an Emerging Threat to Health-Care Facilities, and the Impact of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Toolkit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bruce Y; Bartsch, Sarah M; Wong, Kim F; McKinnell, James A; Slayton, Rachel B; Miller, Loren G; Cao, Chenghua; Kim, Diane S; Kallen, Alexander J; Jernigan, John A; Huang, Susan S

    2016-03-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), a group of pathogens resistant to most antibiotics and associated with high mortality, are a rising emerging public health threat. Current approaches to infection control and prevention have not been adequate to prevent spread. An important but unproven approach is to have hospitals in a region coordinate surveillance and infection control measures. Using our Regional Healthcare Ecosystem Analyst (RHEA) simulation model and detailed Orange County, California, patient-level data on adult inpatient hospital and nursing home admissions (2011-2012), we simulated the spread of CRE throughout Orange County health-care facilities under 3 scenarios: no specific control measures, facility-level infection control efforts (uncoordinated control measures), and a coordinated regional effort. Aggressive uncoordinated and coordinated approaches were highly similar, averting 2,976 and 2,789 CRE transmission events, respectively (72.2% and 77.0% of transmission events), by year 5. With moderate control measures, coordinated regional control resulted in 21.3% more averted cases (n = 408) than did uncoordinated control at year 5. Our model suggests that without increased infection control approaches, CRE would become endemic in nearly all Orange County health-care facilities within 10 years. While implementing the interventions in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's CRE toolkit would not completely stop the spread of CRE, it would cut its spread substantially, by half.

  2. Delivering Health Care and Mental Health Care Services to Children in Family Foster Care after Welfare and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simms, Mark D.; Freundlich, Madelyn; Battistelli, Ellen S.; Kaufman, Neal D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the essential features of a health care system that can meet the special needs of children in out-of-home care. Discusses some of the major recent changes brought about by welfare and health care reform. Notes that it remains to be seen whether the quality of services will improve as a result of these reforms. (Author)

  3. Blood glucose control and quality of health care in non-insulin-treated patients with Type 2 diabetes in Spain: a retrospective and cross-sectional observational study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, A; Calle, A; Vázquez, L; Chacón, F; Polavieja, P; Reviriego, J

    2011-01-01

    Aims To assess blood glucose control and quality of health care provided to non-insulin-treated patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus in routine clinical practice in Spain. Methods In this observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study, patients were grouped as either having good or suboptimal blood glucose control according to International Diabetes Federation or American Diabetes Association HbA1c goals. Clinical and socio-demographic data and compliance with the main standard level of care recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation were recorded during a routine visit. Correlates of glucose control were analysed by logistic regression. Results Many patients were grouped as having suboptimal control under International Diabetes Federation (61.9%) or American Diabetes Association (45.0%) criteria. The mean number of accomplished International Diabetes Federation recommendations (7.3 out of 11) was higher for endocrinologists (than for internists or primary care physicians), and significantly more patients under their care were in the good glucose control group (than with primary care physicians). More recommendations were associated with blood glucose control using International Diabetes Federation than American Diabetes Association criteria, demanding higher quality of health care for achieving stricter goals. Some recommendations were poorly observed, particularly those concerning patients’ education on diabetes, the prompt prescription of effective treatments and monitoring of complications. Diabetes complications were associated with being in the suboptimal control group. Patients’ education on diabetes and HbA1c monitoring were associated with being in the good control group. Conclusions These results demonstrate the need for improvement in the management of patients with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes in actual clinical practice in Spain. Such improvement would entail a stricter adherence to International Diabetes Federation

  4. Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission on ...

  5. Variability in the performance of preventive services and in the degree of control of identified health problems: A primary care study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bolíbar, Bonaventura; Pareja, Clara; Astier-Peña, M Pilar; Morán, Julio; Rodríguez-Blanco, Teresa; Rosell-Murphy, Magdalena; Iglesias, Manuel; Juncosa, Sebastián; Mascort, Juanjo; Violan, Concepció; Magallón, Rosa; Apezteguia, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Background Preventive activities carried out in primary care have important variability that makes necessary to know which factors have an impact in order to establish future strategies for improvement. The present study has three objectives: 1) To describe the variability in the implementation of 7 preventive services (screening for smoking status, alcohol abuse, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, influenza and tetanus immunization) and to determine their related factors; 2) To describe the degree of control of 5 identified health problems (smoking, alcohol abuse, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and obesity); 3) To calculate intraclass correlation coefficients. Design Multi-centered cross-sectional study of a randomised sample of primary health care teams from 3 regions of Spain designed to analyse variability and related factors of 7 selected preventive services in years 2006 and 2007. At the end of 2008, we will perform a cross-sectional study of a cohort of patients attended in 2006 or 2007 to asses the degree of control of 5 identified health problems. All subjects older than16 years assigned to a randomised sample of 22 computerized primary health care teams and attended during the study period are included in each region providing a sample with more than 850.000 subjects. The main outcome measures will be implementation of 7 preventive services and control of 5 identified health problems. Furthermore, there will be 3 levels of data collection: 1) Patient level (age, gender, morbidity, preventive services, attendance); 2) Health-care professional level (professional characteristics, years working at the team, workload); 3) Team level (characteristics, electronic clinical record system). Data will be transferred from electronic clinical records to a central database with prior encryption and dissociation of subject, professional and team identity. Global and regional analysis will be performed including standard analysis for primary health care

  6. Health care trends in today's marketplace.

    PubMed

    Berger, J; Dauten, M S

    1999-12-01

    As the year 2000 approaches, it is apparent that employer-sponsored health plans will again begin to experience high rate increases. Employers will need to utilize an up-to-date benefits philosophy and health plan purchasing strategy coupled with monitoring tools and vendor performance guarantees to deal with the situation. While many of the cost drivers are beyond an employer's control, taking a preemptive strike at health care inflation through design, cost sharing and other focused initiatives will minimize its impact.

  7. FastStats: Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography ... Person’s Health Related Links Adult Day Services Centers Hospice Care National Study of Long-Term Care Providers Nursing ...

  8. Public Mistrust of the U.S. Health Care System's Profit Motives: Mixed-Methods Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Jennifer; Powell, Wizdom; Maurer, Maureen; Mangrum, Rikki; Gold, Marthe R; Pathak-Sen, Ela; Yang, Manshu; Carman, Kristin L

    2017-09-05

    Decision makers are increasingly tasked with reducing health care costs, but the public may be mistrustful of these efforts. Public deliberation helps gather input on these types of issues by convening a group of diverse individuals to learn about and discuss values-based dilemmas. To explore public perceptions of health care costs and how they intersect with medical mistrust. This mixed-methods study analyzed data from a randomized controlled trial including four public deliberation groups (n = 96) and a control group (n = 348) comprising English-speaking adults aged 18 years and older. Data were collected in 2012 in four U.S. regions. We used data from four survey items to compare attitude shifts about costs among participants in deliberation groups to participants in the control group. We qualitatively analyzed deliberation transcripts to identify themes related to attitude shifts and to provide context for quantitative results about attitude shifts. Deliberation participants were significantly more likely than control group participants to agree that doctors and patients should consider cost when making treatment decisions (β = 0.59; p < 0.01) and that people should consider the effect on group premiums when making treatment decisions (β = 0.48; p < 0.01). Qualitatively, participants mistrusted the health care system's profit motives (e.g., that systems prioritize making money over patient needs); however, after grappling with patient/doctor autonomy and learning about and examining their own views related to costs during the process of deliberation, they largely concluded that payers have the right to set some boundaries to curb costs. Individuals who are informed about costs may be receptive to boundaries that reduce societal health care costs, despite their mistrust of the health care system's profit motives, especially if decision makers communicate their rationale in a transparent manner. Future work should aim to develop transparent policies

  9. Health care entrepreneurship: financing innovation.

    PubMed

    Grazier, Kyle L; Metzler, Bridget

    2006-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is often described as the ability to create new ventures from new or existing concepts, ideas and visions. There has been significant entrepreneurial response to the changes in the scientific and social underpinnings of health care services delivery. However, a growing portion of the economic development driving health care industry expansion is threatened further by longstanding use of financing models that are suboptimal for health care ventures. The delayed pace of entrepreneurial activity in this industry is in part a response to the general economy and markets, but also due to the lack of capital for new health care ventures. The recent dearth of entrepreneurial activities in the health services sector may also due to failure to consider new approaches to partnerships and strategic ventures, despite their mutually beneficial organizational and financing potential. As capital becomes more scarce for innovators, it is imperative that those with new and creative ideas for health and health care improvement consider techniques for capital acquisition that have been successful in other industries and at similar stages of development. The capital and added expertise can allow entrepreneurs to leverage resources, dampen business fluctuations, and strengthen long term prospects.

  10. Collaborative Approaches and Policy Opportunities for Accelerated Progress toward Effective Disease Prevention, Care, and Control: Using the Case of Poverty Diseases to Explore Universal Access to Affordable Health Care.

    PubMed

    Laokri, Samia

    2017-01-01

    commitment and mobilization efforts from funding, the global development goal of financial protection for health-newly adopted in TB control as no TB-affected household experiencing catastrophic expenditure-may remain aspirational. To enhance effective access to care for all, innovative opportunities in patient-centered and collaborative practices must be taken. Further research is greatly needed to optimize the use of locally relevant knowledge, networks, and technologies.

  11. Barriers of influenza vaccination in health care personnel in France.

    PubMed

    Kadi, Zoher; Atif, Mohamed-Lamine; Brenet, Annie; Izoard, Sylvain; Astagneau, Pascal

    2016-03-01

    To identify barriers against influenza vaccination of health care personnel in Northern France, a cross-sectional study was conducted in health care facilities. A total of 3,213 questionnaires from 67 health care facilities were completed. In multivariate analysis using a logistic model, influenza vaccine coverage in health care personnel was significantly associated with level of knowledge about influenza disease and vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Managing Home Health Care (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Managing Home Health Care KidsHealth > For Parents > Managing Home Health Care A ... español La atención médica en el hogar Intensive Health Care at Home Kids can need intensive health care ...

  13. Agents of Change for Health Care Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry M.

    2007-01-01

    It is widely recognized throughout the health care industry that the United States leads the world in health care spending per capita. However, the chilling dose of reality for American health care consumers is that for all of their spending, the World Health Organization ranks the country's health care system 37th in overall performance--right…

  14. Agents of Change for Health Care Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry M.

    2007-01-01

    It is widely recognized throughout the health care industry that the United States leads the world in health care spending per capita. However, the chilling dose of reality for American health care consumers is that for all of their spending, the World Health Organization ranks the country's health care system 37th in overall performance--right…

  15. Ergonomics and Health Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    h t, a rt icle p rot videe a brief h i ctory’ ol the field of ers,’onomfnicc and explorete the interrelationship beta ee health (tare andi ergjonomic...prq/fric ionsi. Health tare Practitioners contri bute a unique Perspective to an ergonomic reiearch and intervention team. ’lhiý %ingular perspective...is based on lnozvlcdge of health issues, disease and injury etwiol(gy and prognosi s, and the psychosocial inpuct of illneAs. Topic.$ for c

  16. Health care's 100 most wired.

    PubMed

    Solovy, A; Serb, C

    1999-02-01

    They're wired all right, and America's 100 most techno-savvy hospitals and health systems share one more thing: a commitment to using technology to link with employees, patients, suppliers, and insurers. "We want to be a health care travel agency for our community," says one chief information officer. "And we see Internet technology as a key."

  17. Help Yourself to Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Sarah

    A booklet on health care for limited English speakers provides information on choosing the right doctor, buying medicine, paying the bill, and the individual's role in maintaining his or her health. Cartoons, questions and puzzles concerning the message in cartoons and narrative passages, checklists about an individual's personal habits related to…

  18. Help Yourself to Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Sarah

    A booklet on health care for limited English speakers provides information on choosing the right doctor, buying medicine, paying the bill, and the individual's role in maintaining his or her health. Cartoons, questions and puzzles concerning the message in cartoons and narrative passages, checklists about an individual's personal habits related to…

  19. Levinas, justice and health care.

    PubMed

    Nortvedt, P

    2003-01-01

    In this paper I argue that the metaphysical ethics of Emmanuel Levinas captures some essential moral intuitions that are central to health care. However, there is an ongoing discussion about the relevance of ethical metaphysics for normative ethics and in particular on the question of the relationship between justice and individualized care. In this paper I take part in this debate and I argue that Levinas' idea of an ethics of the Other that guides politics and justice can shed important light on issues that are central to priorities in health care. In fact, the ethics of Levinas in seeking the foundation of normativity itself, captures the ethical core and central values of health care.

  20. Health Care Becomes an Industry

    PubMed Central

    Rastegar, Darius A.

    2004-01-01

    The delivery of health care is in the process of “industrialization” in that it is undergoing changes in the organization of work which mirror those that began in other industries a century ago. This process is characterized by an increasing division of labor, standardization of roles and tasks, the rise of a managerial superstructure, and the degradation (or de-skilling) of work. The consolidation of the health care industry, the fragmentation of physician roles, and the increasing numbers of nonphysician clinicians will likely accelerate this process. Although these changes hold the promise of more efficient and effective health care, physicians should be concerned about the resultant loss of autonomy, disruption of continuity of care, and the potential erosion of professional values. PMID:15053287

  1. Patient self-management in primary care patients with mild COPD - protocol of a randomised controlled trial of telephone health coaching.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Manbinder S; Daley, Amanda; Jordan, Rachel; Coventry, Peter A; Heneghan, Carl; Jowett, Sue; Singh, Sally; Marsh, Jennifer; Adab, Peymane; Varghese, Jinu; Nunan, David; Blakemore, Amy; Stevens, Jenny; Dowson, Lee; Fitzmaurice, David; Jolly, Kate

    2015-02-22

    The prevalence of diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the UK is 1.8%, although it is estimated that this represents less than half of the total disease in the population as much remains undiagnosed. Case finding initiatives in primary care will identify people with mild disease and symptoms. The majority of self-management trials have identified patients from secondary care clinics or following a hospital admission for exacerbation of their condition. This trial will recruit a primary care population with mild symptoms of COPD and use telephone health coaching to encourage self-management. In this study, using a multi-centred randomised controlled trial (RCT) across at least 70 general practices in England, we plan to establish the effectiveness of nurse-led telephone health coaching to support self-management in primary care for people who report only mild symptoms of their COPD (MRC grade 1 and 2) compared to usual care. The intervention focuses on taking up smoking cessation services, increasing physical activity, medication management and action planning and is underpinned by behavioural change theory. In total, we aim to recruit 556 patients with COPD confirmed by spirometry with follow up at six and 12 months. The primary outcome is health related quality of life using the St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Spirometry and BMI are measured at baseline. Secondary outcomes include self-reported health behaviours (smoking and physical activity), physical activity measured by accelerometery (at 12 months), psychological morbidity, self-efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Longitudinal qualitative interviews will explore how engaged participants were with the intervention and how embedded behaviour change was in every day practices. This trial will provide robust evidence about the effectiveness of a novel telephone health coaching intervention to promote behaviour change and prevent disease progression in patients

  2. Clinical effectiveness of an ultra-brief intervention for common mental health syndromes in primary care: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Collings, Sunny; Mathieson, Fiona; Dowell, Anthony; Stanley, James; Hatcher, Simon; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Lane, Brigitte; Munsterman, Amy

    2015-06-05

    Although mild to moderate mental health problems are common and often debilitating, treatment options in primary care settings in New Zealand are often severely limited for patients with these conditions. Previously, we developed an ultra-brief intervention (UBI) to address mild to moderate psychological concerns, designed to be delivered by primary care clinicians. Recent feasibility testing, including an adaptation for Māori individuals (the indigenous people of New Zealand), showed that the brief intervention was feasible and acceptable to both clinicians and their patients. This protocol describes a large pragmatic randomized controlled trial of our UBI in primary care settings across the greater Wellington region, compared with practice as usual. We are using a two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial, with primary care practices randomized to exclusively deliver either the UBI or practice as usual to all their recruited participants. The structured, guided self-help UBI is delivered in three brief general practitioner (GP) appointments over a five week period. Participants are invited into the study based on partner primary health organization access criteria (youth, people with low income, or people with Māori or Pacific Island heritage). Improvements in mental health from baseline to post-treatment will be compared between the intervention and control groups using a mixed-models application of analysis of covariance. Data analysis will be on an intention-to-treat basis, to increase the real-world relevance of UBI and to meet the study's objective of releasing UBI to primary care clinicians nationwide. The UBI is a first-line intervention tool for GPs that models the stepped care approach advocated in New Zealand, against a background of limited access to treatments for often-overlooked patient groups. It is proposed to be accessible to clinicians and patients alike, with the potential to be relevant to primary care clinicians across New Zealand

  3. Redefining competition in health care.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael E; Teisberg, Elizabeth Olmsted

    2004-06-01

    The U.S. health care system is in bad shape. Medical services are restricted or rationed, many patients receive poor care, and high rates of preventable medical error persist. There are wide and inexplicable differences in costs and quality among providers and across geographic areas. In well-functioning competitive markets--think computers, mobile communications, and banking--these outcomes would be inconceivable. In health care, these results are intolerable, with life and quality of life at stake. Competition in health care needs to change, say the authors. It currently operates at the wrong level. Payers, health plans, providers, physicians, and others in the system wrangle over the wrong things, in the wrong locations, and at the wrong times. System participants divide value instead of creating it. (And in some instances, they destroy it.) They shift costs onto one another, restrict access to care, stifle innovation, and hoard information--all without truly benefiting patients. This form of zero-sum competition must end, the authors argue, and must be replaced by competition at the level of preventing, diagnosing, and treating individual conditions and diseases. Among the authors' well-researched recommendations for reform: Standardized information about individual diseases and treatments should be collected and disseminated widely so patients can make informed choices about their care. Payers, providers, and health plans should establish transparent billing and pricing mechanisms to reduce cost shifting, confusion, pricing discrimination, and other inefficiencies in the system. And health care providers should be experts in certain conditions and treatments rather than try to be all things to all people. U.S. employers can also play a big role in reform by changing how they manage their health benefits.

  4. Health care fraud and abuse.

    PubMed

    Kalb, P E

    In recent years, health care fraud and abuse have become major issues, in part because of the rising cost of health care, industry consolidation, the emergence of private "whistle-blowers," and a change in the concept of fraud to include an emerging concern about quality of care. The 3 types of conduct that are generally prohibited by health care fraud laws are false claims, kickbacks, and self-referrals. False claims are subject to several criminal, civil, and administrative prohibitions, notably the federal civil False Claims Act. Kickbacks, or inducements with the intent to influence the purchase or sale of health care-related goods or services, are prohibited under the federal Anti-Kickback statute as well as by state laws. Finally, self-referrals-the referral of patients to an entity with which the referring physician has a financial relationship-are outlawed by the Ethics in Patient Referral Act as well as numerous state statutes. Consequences of violations of these laws can include, in addition to imprisonment and fines, civil monetary penalties, loss of licensure, loss of staff privileges, and exclusion from participation in federal health care programs. Federal criminal and civil statutes are enforced by the US Department of Justice; administrative actions are pursued by the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General; and all state actions are pursued by the individual states. In addition, private whistle-blowers may, acting in the name of the United States, file suit against an entity under the False Claims Act. Enforcement of health care fraud and abuse laws has become increasingly commonplace and now affects many mainstream providers. This trend is likely to continue.

  5. Patients’ Knowledge, Attitudes, Behaviour and Health Care Experiences on the Prevention, Detection, Management and Control of Hypertension in Colombia: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Legido-Quigley, Helena; Camacho Lopez, Paul Anthony; Balabanova, Dina; Perel, Pablo; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Nieuwlaat, Robby; Schwalm, J-D; McCready, Tara; Yusuf, Salim; McKee, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a leading cause of premature death worldwide and the most important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Effective screening programs, communication with patients, regular monitoring, and adherence to treatment are essential to successful management but may be challenging in health systems facing resource constraints. This qualitative study explored patients’ knowledge, attitudes, behaviour and health care seeking experiences in relation to detection, treatment and control of hypertension in Colombia. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 26 individuals with hypertension and 4 family members in two regions. Few participants were aware of ways to prevent high blood pressure. Once diagnosed, most reported taking medication but had little information about their condition and had a poor understanding of their treatment regime. The desire for good communication and a trusting relationship with the doctor emerged as key themes in promoting adherence to medication and regular attendance at medical appointments. Barriers to accessing treatment included co-payments for medication; costs of transport to health care facilities; unavailability of drugs; and poor access to specialist care. Some patients overcame these barriers with support from social networks, family members and neighbours. However, those who lacked such support, experienced loneliness and struggled to access health care services. The health insurance scheme was frequently described as administratively confusing and those accessing the state subsidized system believed that the treatment was inferior to that provided under the compulsory contributory system. Measures that should be addressed to improve hypertension management in Colombia include better communication between health care professionals and patients, measures to improve understanding of the importance of adherence to treatment, reduction of co-payments and transport costs, and easier

  6. Patients' knowledge, attitudes, behaviour and health care experiences on the prevention, detection, management and control of hypertension in Colombia: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Legido-Quigley, Helena; Camacho Lopez, Paul Anthony; Balabanova, Dina; Perel, Pablo; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Nieuwlaat, Robby; Schwalm, J-D; McCready, Tara; Yusuf, Salim; McKee, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a leading cause of premature death worldwide and the most important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Effective screening programs, communication with patients, regular monitoring, and adherence to treatment are essential to successful management but may be challenging in health systems facing resource constraints. This qualitative study explored patients' knowledge, attitudes, behaviour and health care seeking experiences in relation to detection, treatment and control of hypertension in Colombia. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with 26 individuals with hypertension and 4 family members in two regions. Few participants were aware of ways to prevent high blood pressure. Once diagnosed, most reported taking medication but had little information about their condition and had a poor understanding of their treatment regime. The desire for good communication and a trusting relationship with the doctor emerged as key themes in promoting adherence to medication and regular attendance at medical appointments. Barriers to accessing treatment included co-payments for medication; costs of transport to health care facilities; unavailability of drugs; and poor access to specialist care. Some patients overcame these barriers with support from social networks, family members and neighbours. However, those who lacked such support, experienced loneliness and struggled to access health care services. The health insurance scheme was frequently described as administratively confusing and those accessing the state subsidized system believed that the treatment was inferior to that provided under the compulsory contributory system. Measures that should be addressed to improve hypertension management in Colombia include better communication between health care professionals and patients, measures to improve understanding of the importance of adherence to treatment, reduction of co-payments and transport costs, and easier access

  7. [Integrated Health Care in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Graf, C

    2006-01-01

    Integrated Health Care forces rethinking of all partners. Health care providers need to cooperate and have to face an emerging competition among themselves. Health insurance companies are no longer the common enemy, but a business partner on an individual basis. Rethinking has already commenced. The Barmer insurance company has initiated a considerable number of similar contracts with respect to Integrated Health Care in cardiology. One of the first contracts was agreed upon at Recklinghausen (it is reported later in this volume) and a couple of them have been concluded in the Berlin/Brandenburg region (which are also reported in this volume).A special feature is the support for the general disease management programs that have been initiated in light of the new laws beginning in 2000. The Barmer company will enroll some 500,000 patients with coronary artery disease in these programs.

  8. DOD Health Care: Domestic Health Care for Female Servicemembers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    and rubella); • medical readiness laboratory tests, such as a human immunodeficiency virus test and results current within the past 24 months...established in order to provide for medical recovery from childbirth and to allow additional time to prepare family care plans and child care. However...164.530(c). The Department of Health and Human Services does not consider restructuring of hospitals and doctors’ offices, such as providing

  9. Health Care Provider Initiative Strategic Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Environmental Education & Training Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This document lays out the strategy for achieving the goals and objectives of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative." The goal of NEETF's "Health Care Provider Initiative" is to incorporate environmental health into health professionals' education and practice in order to improve health care and public health, with a special emphasis on…

  10. Sale of drugs and health care utilization in a health care district in Zaire.

    PubMed

    Courtois, X; Dumoulin, J

    1995-06-01

    Health centres of Idjwi district (Zaire) have been self-financed through the selling of drugs since 1985. Medical care is expensive and its use is low (24 visits per year per 100 inhabitants). In 1989 the medical team tried to reduce the cost of visits by changing the prices of drugs and prescriptions. A limited control was set up to assess this intervention. The study showed that although prescribed drug costs were stabilized compared to inflation, there was no increase in the use of medical care. Moreover, the reduction of drug profit margins for health centres seriously affected the health care institution by causing a drop in income. Six months after the intervention the monthly accounts showed a deficit in 6 centres out of 8. The need for health care centres to be self-financing is a major limiting factor in the use of health care in Idjwi district. There are no easy solutions for health centre managers that satisfy both low-cost access to care and health care self-financing. Some minimal financial participation from the state is required. Only then can the concept of financing health care through the selling of drugs be operational.

  11. The Effect of a Freely Available Flipped Classroom Course on Health Care Worker Patient Safety Culture: A Prospective Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Ling, Lowell; Gomersall, Charles David; Samy, Winnie; Joynt, Gavin Matthew; Leung, Czarina Ch; Wong, Wai-Tat; Lee, Anna

    2016-07-05

    Patient safety culture is an integral aspect of good standard of care. A good patient safety culture is believed to be a prerequisite for safe medical care. However, there is little evidence on whether general education can enhance patient safety culture. Our aim was to assess the impact of a standardized patient safety course on health care worker patient safety culture. Health care workers from Intensive Care Units (ICU) at two hospitals (A and B) in Hong Kong were recruited to compare the changes in safety culture before and after a patient safety course. The BASIC Patient Safety course was administered only to staff from Hospital A ICU. Safety culture was assessed in both units at two time points, one before and one after the course, by using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire. Responses were coded according to the Survey User's Guide, and positive response percentages for each patient safety domain were compared to the 2012 Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality ICU sample of 36,120 respondents. We distributed 127 questionnaires across the two hospitals with an overall response rate of 74.8% (95 respondents). After the safety course, ICU A significantly improved on teamwork within hospital units (P=.008) and hospital management support for patient safety (P<.001), but decreased in the frequency of reporting mistakes compared to the initial survey (P=.006). Overall, ICU A staff showed significantly greater enhancement in positive responses in five domains than staff from ICU B. Pooled data indicated that patient safety culture was poorer in the two ICUs than the average ICU in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality database, both overall and in every individual domain except hospital management support for patient safety and hospital handoffs and transitions. Our study demonstrates that a structured, reproducible short course on patient safety may be associated with an enhancement in several domains in ICU patient safety

  12. Factors influencing choice of care-seeking for acute fever comparing private chemical shops with health centres and hospitals in Ghana: a study using case-control methodology.

    PubMed

    Ansah, Evelyn K; Gyapong, Margaret; Narh-Bana, Solomon; Bart-Plange, Constance; Whitty, Christopher J M

    2016-05-25

    Several public health interventions to improve management of patients with fever are largely focused on the public sector yet a high proportion of patients seek care outside the formal healthcare sector. Few studies have provided information on the determinants of utilization of the private sector as against formal public sector. Understanding the differences between those who attend public and private health institutions, and their pathway to care, has significant practical implications. The chemical shop is an important source of care for acute fever in Ghana. Case-control methodology was used to identify factors associated with seeking care for fever in the Dangme West District, Ghana. People presenting to health centres, or hospital outpatients, with a history or current fever were compared to counterparts from the same community with fever visiting a chemical shop. Of 600 patients, 150 each, were recruited from the district hospital and two health centres, respectively, and 300 controls from 51 chemical shops. Overall, 103 (17.2 %) patients tested slide positive for malaria. Specifically, 13.7 % (41/300) of chemical shop patients, 30.7 % (46/150) health centre and 10.7 % (16/150) hospital patients were slide positive. While it was the first option for care for 92.7 % (278/300) chemical shop patients, 42.7 % (64/150) of health centre patients first sought care from a chemical shop. More health centre patients (61.3 %; 92/150) presented with fever after more than 3 days than chemical shop patients (27.7 %; 83/300) [AOR = 0.19; p < 0.001 CI 0.11-0.30]. Although the hospital was the first option for 83.3 % (125/150) of hospital patients, most (63.3 %; 95/150) patients arrived there over 3 days after their symptoms begun. Proximity was significantly associated with utilization of each source of care. Education, but not other socioeconomic or demographic factors were significantly associated with chemical shop use. The private drug retail sector is

  13. National Health Care Reform, Medicaid, and Children in Foster Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfon, Neal; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Outlines access to health care for children in out-of-home care under current law, reviews how health care access for these children would be affected by President Clinton's health care reform initiative, and proposes additional measures that could be considered to improve access and service coordination for children in the child welfare system.…

  14. Predictors of head start and child-care providers' healthful and controlling feeding practices with children aged 2 to 5 years.

    PubMed

    Dev, Dipti A; McBride, Brent A; Speirs, Katherine E; Donovan, Sharon M; Cho, Hyun Keun

    2014-09-01

    Few child-care providers meet the national recommendations for healthful feeding practices. Effective strategies are needed to address this disparity, but research examining influences on child-care providers' feeding practices is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify determinants of child-care providers' healthful and controlling feeding practices for children aged 2 to 5 years. In this cross-sectional study, child-care providers (n=118) from 24 center-based programs (six Head Start [HS], 11 Child and Adult Care Food Program [CACFP] funded, and seven non-CACFP) completed self-administered surveys during 2011-2012. Multilevel multivariate linear regression models were used to predict seven feeding practices. Working in an HS center predicted teaching children about nutrition and modeling healthy eating; that may be attributed to the HS performance standards that require HS providers to practice healthful feeding. Providers who reported being concerned about children's weight, being responsible for feeding children, and had an authoritarian feeding style were more likely to pressure children to eat, restrict intake, and control food intake to decrease or maintain children's weight. Providers with nonwhite race, who were trying to lose weight, who perceived nutrition as important in their own diet, and who had a greater number of nutrition training opportunities were more likely to use restrictive feeding practices. These findings suggest that individual- and child-care-level factors, particularly provider race, education, training, feeding attitudes and styles, and the child-care context may influence providers' feeding practices with young children. Considering these factors when developing interventions for providers to meet feeding practice recommendations may add to the efficacy of childhood obesity prevention programs.

  15. Health promotion and primary health care: examining the discourse.

    PubMed

    Ashcroft, Rachelle

    2015-01-01

    The health promotion discourse is comprised of assumptions about health and health care that are compatible with primary health care. An examination of the health promotion discourse illustrates how assumptions of health can help to inform primary health care. Despite health promotion being a good fit for primary health care, this analysis demonstrates that the scope in which it is being implemented in primary health care settings is limited. The health promotion discourse appears largely compatible with primary health care-in theory and in the health care practices that follow. The aim of this article is to contribute to the advancement of theoretical understanding of the health promotion discourse, and the relevance of health promotion to primary health care.

  16. Business in Richmond attacks health care costs.

    PubMed

    Reisler, M

    1985-01-01

    Like a fever that will not break, health care premiums continue to climb relentlessly, yet remedies have been hard to come by. Employers, for the most part, have accepted ever-rising expenditures as the price of good employee relations. And federal regulations designed to control medical costs have proven weak. The road to recovery begins, this author tells us, when a health maintenance organization, or HMO, enters a community, because its prepayment approach upsets the medical profession's conventional fee-for-service rules. Thus it quickly evokes competitive responses from other health care providers, who must become equally cost-conscious or lose their market share. HMOs need advocates, however, to spread as rapidly as their potential warrants. Drawing on recent events in Richmond, Virginia, the author shows how a city's business leadership can become the catalyst for changing the health care system.

  17. The health care market: can hospitals survive?

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J C

    1980-01-01

    Does it sound familiar? Resources are scarce, competition is tough, and government regulations and a balanced budget are increasingly hard to meet at the same time. This is not the automobile or oil industry but the health care industry, and hospital managers are facing the same problems. And, maintains the author of this article, they must borrow some proven marketing techniques from business to survive in the new health care market. He first describes the features of the new market (the increasing economic power of physicians, new forms of health care delivery, prepaid health plans, and the changing regulatory environment) and then the possible marketing strategies for dealing with them (competing hard for physicians who control the patient flow and diversifying and promoting the mix of services). He also describes various planning solutions that make the most of a community's hospital facilities and affiliations.

  18. [Optimized quality of care for affective disorders by health insurance-based case-management: a controlled cost-study].

    PubMed

    Salize, Hans Joachim; Jacke, Christian; Gallas, Christine; Stamm, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    Improvement of depression treatment by health insurance based case-management. Criteria of improvement were a higher treatment rate of patients suffering from affective disorders or depression by psychiatrists or psychotherapists than by general practitioners or family doctors and sickness fund payments. Training of health insurance account managers (characteristics of depression, counselling and, case management techniques). Evaluation of outcomes during 12-months against a control group of account managers without training. Intervention group: 87.8 % patients with in average 13.5 contacts to psychiatrists or psychotherapists; control group: 82.6 % patients with 11.8 contacts. The difference was statistically significant. Health insurance payments did not differ. A higher treatment rate by psychiatrists and psychotherapists can be achieved by health insurance-based case-management without a cost-increase. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. [Contribution of Health Care Research to Establishing Social Equality in Health and Health Care Opportunities].

    PubMed

    Pfaff, H; Pförtner, T-K

    2016-02-01

    Social inequalities in health and health care services represent issues of major concern. Findings in this area reveal inequalities in health and health care indicating disadvantages for individuals with a low socioeconomic background. Although the health care system plays a marginal role in the explanation of inequalities in health, health services research can be an important part in the development of equal health opportunities. The current article describes the causal associations between social inequalities, health inequalities and the health care service. Health services research can make a contribution to increasing equal opportunities in health and health care service. Against this background, we discuss the existing potential and need of research in the area of health services. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. A right to health care.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Pavlos

    2012-01-01

    What does it mean to say that there is a right to health care? Health care is part of a cooperative project that organizes finite resources. How are these resources to be distributed? This essay discusses three rival theories. The first two, a utilitarian theory and an interst theory, are both instrumental, in that they collapse rights to good states of affairs. A third theory, offered by Thomas Pogge, locates the question within an institutional legal context and distinguishes between a right to health care that results in claimable duties and other dimensions of health policy that do not. Pogge's argument relies on a list of "basic needs," which itself, however, relies on some kind of instrumental reasoning. The essay offers a reconstruction of Pogge's argument to bring it in line with a political conception of a right to health care. Health is a matter of equal liberty and equal citizenship, given our common human vulnerability. If we are to live as equal members in a political community, then our institutions need to create processes by which we are protected from the kinds of suffering that would make it impossible for us to live as equal members.

  1. Health care and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Eisdorfer, C

    1985-01-01

    America's health care crisis is hitting our elderly and threatens to cripple Medicare, the elderly's financial support system. Medicare was designed to ensure that every elderly American would be protected against the destruction of life savings as a result of illness. Elderly Americans would be able to enjoy their golden years without the financial burden of medical bills. Today, this vision is almost extinct. Medicare has been placed on the endangered species list. Market predictions indicate that Medicare's Hospital insurance Trust Fund will be depleted by 1988 if current trends continue. The elderly presently must pay on the average about 14% of their health care bill. In addition, Medicare pays little for long-term care; and about 45% of long-term care is paid for out-of-pocket by the elderly and their families. Alternative approaches are desperately needed of Medicare if our elderly are to survive.

  2. Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care Home For Patients Search FAQs Good ... FAQ056, April 2017 PDF Format Good Health Before Pregnancy: Preconception Care Pregnancy What is a preconception care ...

  3. Public Health Data for Individual Patient Care: Mapping Poison Control Center Data to the C-CDA Consultation Note

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, Aly; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Cummins, Mollie R.

    2016-01-01

    We are developing a new process of health information exchange supported collaboration that leverages the HL7 consolidated CDA standard through four document types (consultation note, history and physical, progress note and discharge summary). The focus of the present study is the C-CDA consultation note template that will be submitted from poison control centers (PCC)s to emergency departments (EDs) with treatment recommendations. Specifically, we aimed to (i) create computable mappings between a poison control center database and the C-CDA consultation note template; and (ii) assess the extent and nature of information types that successfully map to discrete data elements in a poison control center database. The resulting template and mappings can be used to implement standards-based health information exchange between PCCs and EDs in the U.S. This is a part of the first formal effort to leverage health information exchange standards to support PCC-ED collaboration. PMID:28269944

  4. Public Health Data for Individual Patient Care: Mapping Poison Control Center Data to the C-CDA Consultation Note.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Aly; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Cummins, Mollie R

    2016-01-01

    We are developing a new process of health information exchange supported collaboration that leverages the HL7 consolidated CDA standard through four document types (consultation note, history and physical, progress note and discharge summary). The focus of the present study is the C-CDA consultation note template that will be submitted from poison control centers (PCC)s to emergency departments (EDs) with treatment recommendations. Specifically, we aimed to (i) create computable mappings between a poison control center database and the C-CDA consultation note template; and (ii) assess the extent and nature of information types that successfully map to discrete data elements in a poison control center database. The resulting template and mappings can be used to implement standards-based health information exchange between PCCs and EDs in the U.S. This is a part of the first formal effort to leverage health information exchange standards to support PCC-ED collaboration.

  5. Effectiveness of an intervention led by lay health counsellors for depressive and anxiety disorders in primary care in Goa, India (MANAS): a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vikram; Weiss, Helen A; Chowdhary, Neerja; Naik, Smita; Pednekar, Sulochana; Chatterjee, Sudipto; De Silva, Mary J; Bhat, Bhargav; Araya, Ricardo; King, Michael; Simon, Gregory; Verdeli, Helen; Kirkwood, Betty R

    2010-12-18

    Depression and anxiety disorders are common mental disorders worldwide. The MANAS trial aimed to test the effectiveness of an intervention led by lay health counsellors in primary care settings to improve outcomes of people with these disorders. In this cluster randomised trial, primary care facilities in Goa, India, were assigned (1:1) by computer-generated randomised sequence to intervention or control (enhanced usual care) groups. All adults who screened positive for common mental disorders were eligible. The collaborative stepped-care intervention offered case management and psychosocial interventions, provided by a trained lay health counsellor, supplemented by antidepressant drugs by the primary care physician and supervision by a mental health specialist. The research assessor was masked. The primary outcome was recovery from common mental disorders as defined by the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems-10th revision (ICD-10) at 6 months. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00446407. 24 study clusters, with an equal proportion of public and private facilities, were randomised equally between groups. 1160 of 1360 (85%) patients in the intervention group and 1269 of 1436 (88%) in the control group completed the outcome assessment. Patients with ICD-10-confirmed common mental disorders in the intervention group were more likely to have recovered at 6 months than were those in the control group (n=620 [65·0%] vs 553 [52·9%]; risk ratio 1·22, 95% CI 1·00-1·47; risk difference=12·1%, 95% CI 1·6%-22·5%). The intervention had strong evidence of an effect in public facility attenders (369 [65·9%] vs 267 [42·5%], risk ratio 1·55, 95% CI 1·02-2·35) but no evidence for an effect in private facility attenders (251 [64·1%] vs 286 [65·9%], risk ratio 0·95, 0·74-1·22). There were three deaths and four suicide attempts in the collaborative stepped-care group and six deaths and six suicide

  6. Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections pose growing threat to health care-associated infection control in the hospitals of Southern China: a case-control surveillance study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yang; Bi, Jiaqi; Shi, Jing; Li, Ying; Ye, Xiaohua; Chen, Xiaofeng; Yao, Zhenjiang

    2014-12-01

    Multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRPA) is one of the most common agents among health care-associated infections. There is a lack of data on the clinical features of MDRPA from Southern China. A case-control surveillance study of P aeruginosa was conducted based on surveillance from July 2008-December 2012, in 5 hospitals of Guangzhou, China. Data were analyzed by univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression using Stata 13 (StataCorp, College Station, TX). Of the 348 P aeruginosa strains, the prevalence of MDRPA was 54%, and it has increased over time. Isolates of P aeruginosa showed increased resistance to most antimicrobials during this time period. Independent risk factors were tracheal intubation insertion (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-4.23; P = .02) and use of carbapenem (odds ratio [OR], 3.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75-6.47; P < .01). The distribution of MDRPA infections was uneven among the 5 hospitals (P = .01). Being infected with MDRPA strains resulted in longer duration of hospitalization (39 vs 24 days) and higher mortality (49% vs 20%). The infections of MDRPA were severe issues. More stringent measures should be applied for those with independent predictors of MDRPA infections because they may induce adverse clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Corporate attitudes and responses to rising health care costs.

    PubMed

    Rooney, E

    1990-07-01

    Faced with eroding profitability from rising health care costs, corporations are beginning to aggressively implement cost containment strategies. Although few companies have coordinated long range plans in place, corporations' attempts to exert control over the health care system will affect insurers, providers, and consumers. Occupational health nurses need to be aware of how cost-containment pressures will affect the various aspects of the U.S. health care system if they want to influence the changes. Occupational health nurses have an opportunity to work with benefits personnel and others in their company to maximize employee health while helping to implement programs to contain health care costs.

  8. Lost in the Health Care Reform Discussion: Health Care as a Right or Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Thomas W.

    2017-01-01

    Health care has been an ongoing issue of public concern for decades, well before President Obama took office. Passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare, in March 2010 and upheld by a Supreme Court in June 2012. With Republicans now in control of both the House and Senate as well as the presidency, the ACA in its current…

  9. Material need insecurities, control of diabetes mellitus, and use of health care resources: results of the Measuring Economic Insecurity in Diabetes study.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Seth A; Meigs, James B; DeWalt, Darren; Seligman, Hilary K; Barnard, Lily S; Bright, Oliver-John M; Schow, Marie; Atlas, Steven J; Wexler, Deborah J

    2015-02-01

    Increasing access to care may be insufficient to improve the health of patients with diabetes mellitus and unmet basic needs (hereinafter referred to as material need insecurities). How specific material need insecurities relate to clinical outcomes and the use of health care resources in a setting of near-universal access to health care is unclear. To determine the association of food insecurity, cost-related medication underuse, housing instability, and energy insecurity with control of diabetes mellitus and the use of health care resources. Cross-sectional data were collected from June 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013, at 1 academic primary care clinic, 2 community health centers, and 1 specialty center for the treatment of diabetes mellitus in Massachusetts. A random sample of 411 patients, stratified by clinic, consisted of adults (aged ≥21 years) with diabetes mellitus (response rate, 62.3%). The prespecified primary outcome was a composite indicator of poor diabetes control (hemoglobin A1c level, >9.0%; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, >100 mg/dL; or blood pressure, >140/90 mm Hg). Prespecified secondary outcomes included outpatient visits and a composite of emergency department (ED) visits and acute care hospitalizations (ED/inpatient visits). Overall, 19.1% of respondents reported food insecurity; 27.6%, cost-related medication underuse; 10.7%, housing instability; 14.1%, energy insecurity; and 39.1%, at least 1 material need insecurity. Poor diabetes control was observed in 46.0% of respondents. In multivariable models, food insecurity was associated with a greater odds of poor diabetes control (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.97 [95% CI, 1.58-2.47]) and increased outpatient visits (adjusted incident rate ratio [IRR], 1.19 [95% CI, 1.05-1.36]) but not increased ED/inpatient visits (IRR, 1.00 [95% CI, 0.51-1.97]). Cost-related medication underuse was associated with poor diabetes control (OR, 1.91 [95% CI, 1.35-2.70]) and increased ED

  10. Health care clinics in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Wollschlaeger, K

    1995-04-01

    Under the Pol Pot Khmer Rouge regime, most physicians with clinical experience were either killed or fled the country. The few practitioners who managed to survive were forced to hide their knowledge; much of that knowledge and experience is now lost. As part of a general process of national rehabilitation, Cambodia has trained since the 1980s hundreds of physicians and physician assistants. There were 700 physicians, 1300 physician assistants, and 4000 nurses in the country by 1992. Problems do, however, remain with medical education in Cambodia. In particular, the medical texts and lectures are in French, a language which very few of the younger generation speak; instructional texts are designed to meet the needs of developing nations, not a rehabilitating one like Cambodia; emphasis is upon curative health care, hospitals, and vertical programs instead of primary and preventive health care; Cambodian physicians are used to a system based upon the division of patients by ability to pay instead of by age, disease, or need; corruption has grown as the cost of living has outstripped the level of official salaries; and there is neither professional contact, feedback, nor program evaluation within health care programs. The authors is a resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Chicago who worked at two clinics during a stay in Phnom Penh. She recommends that instead of simply training more doctors, these training-related problems should be addressed, including a revision of the curriculum to include both primary health care medicine and psychiatry. Moreover, people in Cambodia need to be taught the importance of preventive health care, which should then reduce the number of visits to physicians. This process will be accomplished more effectively with the cooperation of physicians, the government, nongovernmental organizations, and international organizations associated with health care.

  11. Brentwood Community Health Care Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Melody S.; Gonzalez, Maria; Gil, Sandra; Si, Xuemei; Pashoukos, Judith L.; Stafford, Jewel D.; Ford, Elsa; Pashoukos, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Community Alliance for Research Empowering Social Change (CARES) is an academic–community research partnership designed to train community members on research methods and develop the infrastructure for community-based participatory research (CBPR) to examine and address racial/ethnic health disparities. The Brentwood Community Health Assessment (BCHA) was developed through a CBPR pilot project grant from CARES. Objectives The purpose of the BCHA is to assess health care utilization and identify existing barriers to health care access among a multi-ethnic community in the Hamlet of Brentwood, New York. Methods Using CBPR approaches, the community–academic research partnership develop the study design and survey instrument. Trained Bilingual (English/Spanish) data collectors verbally administered surveys door-to-door to residents of Brentwood from October 2010 to May 2011. Inclusion criteria required participants to be at least 18 years of age and speak either English or Spanish. Results Overall, 232 residents completed the BCHA; 49% were male, 66% Hispanic, 13% non-Hispanic White, 13% non-Hispanic Black, 29% had less than a high school education, and 33% were born in United States. The assessment results revealed that most residents are able to access health care when needed and the most significant barriers to health care access are insurance and cost. Conclusions We describe the community–academic partnered process used to develop and implement the BCHA and report assessment findings; the community-partnered approach improved data collection and allowed access into one of Suffolk County’s most vulnerable communities. PMID:24859100

  12. Health-care workers' perspectives on workplace safety, infection control, and drug-resistant tuberculosis in a high-burden HIV setting.

    PubMed

    Zelnick, Jennifer R; Gibbs, Andrew; Loveday, Marian; Padayatchi, Nesri; O'Donnell, Max R

    2013-08-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is an occupational hazard for health-care workers (HCWs) in South Africa. We undertook this qualitative study to contextualize epidemiological findings suggesting that HCWs' elevated risk of drug-resistant TB is related to workplace exposure. A total of 55 HCWs and 7 hospital managers participated in focus groups and interviews about infection control (IC). Participants discussed caring for patients with drug-resistant TB, IC measures, occupational health programs, also stigma and support in the workplace. Key themes included: (i) lack of resources that hinders IC, (ii) distrust of IC efforts among HCWs, and (iii) disproportionate focus on individual-level personal protections, particularly N95 masks. IC programs should be evaluated, and the impact of new policies to rapidly diagnose drug-resistant TB and decentralize treatment should be assessed as part of the effort to control drug-resistant TB and create a safe workplace.

  13. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  14. Risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome after seasonal influenza vaccination and influenza health-care encounters: a self-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Jeffrey C; Vasa, Priya P; Campitelli, Michael A; Hawken, Steven; Wilson, Kumanan; Rosella, Laura C; Stukel, Therese A; Crowcroft, Natasha S; McGeer, Allison J; Zinman, Lorne; Deeks, Shelley L

    2013-09-01

    The possible risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome from influenza vaccines remains a potential obstacle to achieving high vaccination coverage. However, influenza infection might also be associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome. We aimed to assess the risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome after seasonal influenza vaccination and after influenza-coded health-care encounters. We used the self-controlled risk interval design and linked universal health-care system databases from Ontario, Canada, with data obtained between 1993 and 2011. We used physician billing claims for influenza vaccination and influenza-coded health-care encounters to ascertain exposures. Using fixed-effects conditional Poisson regression, we estimated the relative incidence of hospitalisation for primary-coded Guillain-Barré syndrome during the risk interval compared with the control interval. We identified 2831 incident admissions for Guillain-Barré syndrome; 330 received an influenza vaccine and 109 had an influenza-coded health-care encounter within 42 weeks before hospitalisation. The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome within 6 weeks of vaccination was 52% higher than in the control interval of 9-42 weeks (relative incidence 1·52; 95% CI 1·17-1·99), with the greatest risk during weeks 2-4 after vaccination. The risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome within 6 weeks of an influenza-coded health-care encounter was greater than for vaccination (15·81; 10·28-24·32). The attributable risks were 1·03 Guillain-Barré syndrome admissions per million vaccinations, compared with 17·2 Guillain-Barré syndrome admissions per million influenza-coded health-care encounters. The relative and attributable risks of Guillain-Barré syndrome after seasonal influenza vaccination are lower than those after influenza illness. Patients considering immunisation should be fully informed of the risks of Guillain-Barré syndrome from both influenza vaccines and influenza illness. Canadian Institutes of Health Research

  15. Health Care Procedure Considerations and Individualized Health Care Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2011-01-01

    Teachers need to maintain a safe, healthy environment for all their students in order to promote learning. However, there are additional considerations when students require health care procedures, such as tube feeding or clean intermittent catheterization. Teachers must effectively monitor their students and understand their roles and…

  16. Health disparities among health care workers.

    PubMed

    Mawn, Barbara; Siqueira, Eduardo; Koren, Ainat; Slatin, Craig; Devereaux Melillo, Karen; Pearce, Carole; Hoff, Lee Ann

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe the process of an interdisciplinary case study that examined the social contexts of occupational and general health disparities among health care workers in two sets of New England hospitals and nursing homes. A political economy of the work environment framework guided the study, which incorporated dimensions related to market dynamics, technology, and political and economic power. The purpose of this article is to relate the challenges encountered in occupational health care settings and how these could have impacted the study results. An innovative data collection matrix that guided small-group analysis provided a firm foundation from which to make design modifications to address these challenges. Implications for policy and research include the use of a political and economic framework from which to frame future studies, and the need to maintain rigor while allowing flexibility in design to adapt to challenges in the field.

  17. Challenges for the German Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Riemer-Hommel, P

    2012-06-01

    The German Health Care System (GHCS) faces many challenges among which an aging population and economic problems are just a few. The GHCS traditionally emphasised equity, universal coverage, ready access, free choice, high numbers of providers and technological equipment; however, real competition among health-care providers and insurance companies is lacking. Mainly in response to demographic changes and economic challenges, health-care reforms have focused on cost containment and to a lesser degree also quality issues. In contrast, generational accounting, priorisation and rationing issues have thus far been completely neglected. The paper discusses three important areas of health care in Germany, namely the funding process, hospital management and ambulatory care, with a focus on cost control mechanisms and quality improving measures as the variables of interest. Health Information Technology (HIT) has been identified as an important quality improvement tool. Health Indicators have been introduced as possible instruments for the priorisation debate. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Innovation in Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-02-01

    As reimbursement transitions from a volume-based to a value-based system, innovation in health care delivery will be needed. The process of innovation begins with framing the problem that needs to be solved along with the strategic vision that has to be achieved. Similar to scientific testing, a hypothesis is generated for a new solution to a problem. Innovation requires conducting a disciplined form of experimentation and then learning from the process. This manuscript will discuss the different types of innovation, and the key steps necessary for successful innovation in the health care field.

  19. [Violence on health care workers].

    PubMed

    Cannavò, M; Fusaro, N; Colaiuda, F; Rescigno, G; Fioravanti, M

    2017-01-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is vulnerable for workplace violence, but little is known about this and its consequences. Objectives of this study were presence, characteristics and effects of violence from patients and visitors on health care workers in an Emergency Department (ED). This study was about the Accident and Emergency Department, S. Pertini Hospital, (ASL RMB, Rome, Italy). Data were collected from November 2014 to January 2015 on frequency and type of violent behavior in the past five years experienced by staff members and their level of stress by an ad hoc questionnaire for the evaluation of violent events in health activities (QVS) and a questionnaire on perceived work-related stress (QES). Of the 58 eligible workers, 51 completed the interview. Health care workers were regularly exposed to violence with a consequent severe underreporting to work authorities and only a minor reporting to the police. A diffuse belief that workplace violence is a normal part of the work was also identified. Aggressors were usually patients or their relatives and were mainly males. Health care workers may suffer physical and emotional harm. Emergency Department health care workers are at risk of experiencing workplace violence and should have specific training and support in the management of violent situations focused on early identification, communication strategies, and de-escalation techniques.

  20. Why health improves: defining the issues concerning 'comprehensive primary health care' and 'selective primary health care'.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, S B; Walt, G

    1986-01-01

    What is the impact of technology on improving the life situations of people, especially the poor? How is this impact analyzed in terms of health improvements? These questions are paramount in the minds of health planners as they pursue national policies of primary health care, a policy popularized by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and accepted by over 150 governments at Alma Ata in 1978. The purpose of this paper is to explore these questions in depth. It begins by giving the background to the debate, then examines the origins of two concepts which have dominated the field, those of 'primary health care' and 'selective primary health care.' On this basis it suggests areas of differences in the two concepts and discusses the policy and practical implications of confusing the two approaches. The paper suggests that the differences are firstly who controls the outcome of technological interventions and the perceived time frame in which plans can be carried out.

  1. Health Care Reform: A Values Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popko, Kathleen

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the crisis in health care, considering costs, lack of access, and system ineffectiveness. Reviews "Setting Relationships Right," the Catholic Health Association's proposal for health care reform. Advocates educators' awareness of children's health needs and health care reform issues and support for the Every Fifth Child Act of…

  2. Across the health-social care divide: elderly people as active users of health care and social care.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K

    2001-03-01

    Several ways in which elderly people may assume an active role when using welfare services are discussed here. Selected findings are presented from a study that explored the experience and behaviour of elderly people on discharge from inpatient care with regard to criteria indicating user influence or control (namely participation, representation, access, choice, information and redress). Data were collected via semistructured interviews with service users (n = 30) soon after their return home from hospital. A number of differences were revealed between health care and social care in relation to users being provided with opportunities to assume an active role and in being willing and able to assume an active role. These differences were manifest in elderly service users accessing services, seeking information, exercising choice and acting independently of service providers. It appeared paradoxical that contact points were more easily defined with regard to health care yet users were more likely to exercise choice and act independently in securing social care. It is suggested that social care needs and appropriate service delivery are more easily recognised than making the link between perceived health care needs and appropriate services. In addition, it appeared that informal and private providers are more widely available and accessible for social care. If comprehensive continuing care is to be provided, incorporating both health and social care elements, greater uniformity appears to be required across the welfare sector. Lessons for social care provision from the delivery of health care suggest the clear definition of contact points to facilitate service use. Making health care more accessible, however, does not appear to be easily attainable due to the monopoly provision of health care and the lack of direct purchasing power by potential users.

  3. Obstacles to dependent health care access in Oregon: health insurance or health care?

    PubMed

    Leichter, Howard

    2004-04-01

    In the 1980s, Oregon was one of a handful of "states that could not wait" for national health care reform. Oregon's chosen approach to reform was predicated on two widely accepted assumptions. First, universal access to health care is best achieved by universal access to health insurance. Second, universal access to health care could best be achieved, at least politically, by incrementally building upon the existing health care delivery and insurance system. This article questions both of these assumptions in light of Oregon's decade-long experience in trying to expand access to health care among its dependent population.

  4. Theory and practice for measuring health care quality

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Donald M.; Knapp, Marian Gilbert

    1987-01-01

    As competition, cost control, and new modes of delivery emerge in health care, there is a need to reexamine both the traditional definitions of health care quality and the methods by which it is measured. Industries other than health care have much to teach regarding the methods for obtaining, analyzing, and displaying data; techniques for problem identification, problem solving, and reassessment; and ideas about organizational factors that produce a high quality product or service. The Quality-of-Care Measurement Department at the Harvard Community Health Plan has built a program that draws from a distinguished health care quality assurance tradition and incorporates techniques that have been successful in other industries. PMID:10312319

  5. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for clinically distressed health care workers: Waitlist-controlled evaluation of an ACT workshop in a routine practice setting.

    PubMed

    Waters, Cerith S; Frude, Neil; Flaxman, Paul E; Boyd, Jane

    2017-08-30

    To examine the effects of a 1-day acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) workshop on the mental health of clinically distressed health care employees, and to explore ACT's processes of change in a routine practice setting. A quasi-controlled design, with participants block allocated to an ACT intervention or waiting list control group based on self-referral date. Participants were 35 health care workers who had self-referred for the ACT workshop via a clinical support service for staff. Measures were completed by ACT and control group participants at pre-intervention and 3 months post-intervention. Participants allocated to the waitlist condition went on to receive the ACT intervention and were also assessed 3 months later. At 3 months post-intervention, participants in the ACT group reported a significantly lower level of psychological distress compared to the control group (d = 1.41). Across the 3-month evaluation period, clinically significant change was exhibited by 50% of ACT participants, compared to 0% in the control group. When the control group received the same ACT intervention, 69% went on to exhibit clinically significant change. The ACT intervention also resulted in significant improvements in psychological flexibility, defusion, and mindfulness skills, but did not significantly reduce the frequency of negative cognitions. Bootstrapped mediation analyses indicated that the reduction in distress in the ACT condition was primarily associated with an increase in mindfulness skills, especially observing and non-reactivity. These findings provide preliminary support for providing brief ACT interventions as part of routine clinical support services for distressed workers. A 1-day ACT workshop delivered in the context of a routine staff support service was effective for reducing psychological distress among health care workers. The brief nature of this group intervention means it may be particularly suitable for staff support and primary care mental

  6. Primary health care is viable.

    PubMed

    Segall, M

    1987-01-01

    'Selective primary health care' and other recent vertical health strategies have been justified on the grounds that the broad primary health care (PHC) approach cannot be afforded by developing countries in the present constrained economic circumstances. This judgement is too sweeping. A simulated case example is presented, starting with baseline health expenditure data that are representative of the situation in many developing countries. It is assumed that real economic growth occurs and that government funding of health care is allowed to grow in parallel. Two annual growth rates are considered: 2 and 5 per cent. Two restrictive conditions are applied: none of the main health services is subjected to absolute cuts; and, additional funds from existing or new sources of finance are not considered. It is shown that, even with slow growth rates, substantial increases in the funding of priority (rural and PHC) services can be achieved if the growth in expenditures of lower-priority services is curtailed. Also, savings from improved health service efficiency can be channelled to priority services. The message is that the PHC approach is viable even with slow economic growth. What is required is the technical capacity to identify and plan resource flows in the health sector, and the political will to effect resource allocations according to PHC priorities. A strategic policy like PHC should not be 'adjusted' out of effective existence because of reversible economic problems. Rather, actions should be taken to reverse the adverse economic environment. International health-related agencies should continue to support countries to develop national health systems based on PHC, and should campaign for reforms in the world economy to create at least the minimum economic conditions necessary for PHC implementation.

  7. Health care challenges and opportunities in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Fields, J A; Lilly, F S; Sutton-Bell, N

    1991-01-01

    The 1990s offer both substantial challenges and opportunities for those involved in the delivery of health care. Increasing costs must be managed to ensure that the health of both Americans and America's economy are maintained. Managed care offers the brightest hope for effectively controlling costs while increasing the quality of care.

  8. Health care reform and federalism.

    PubMed

    Greer, Scott L; Jacobson, Peter D

    2010-04-01

    Health policy debates are replete with discussions of federalism, most often when advocates of reform put their hopes in states. But health policy literature is remarkably silent on the question of allocation of authority, rarely asking which levels of government ought to lead. We draw on the larger literatures about federalism, found mostly in political science and law, to develop a set of criteria for allocating health policy authority between states and the federal government. They are social justice, procedural democracy, compatibility with value pluralism, institutional capability, and economic sustainability. Of them, only procedural democracy and compatibility with value pluralism point to state leadership. In examining these criteria, we conclude that American policy debates often get federalism backward, putting the burden of health care coverage policy on states that cannot enact or sustain it, while increasing the federal role in issues where the arguments for state leadership are compelling. We suggest that the federal government should lead present and future financing of health care coverage, since it would require major changes in American intergovernmental relations to make innovative state health care financing sustainable outside a strong federal framework.

  9. Health Care in the United States [and] Health Care Issues: A Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, John; Dempsey, Joanne R.

    1984-01-01

    An article on American health care which focuses on health care costs and benefits is combined with a lesson plan on health care issues to enable students to consider both issues of cost effectiveness and morality in decisions about the allocation of health care. The article covers the history of interest in health care, the reasons for the…

  10. Preventing Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Health Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Punjabi, Chitra D; Perloff, Sarah R; Zuckerman, Jerry M

    2016-12-01

    Patients with tuberculosis (TB) pose a risk to other patients and health care workers, and outbreaks in health care settings occur when appropriate infection control measures are not used. In this article, we discuss strategies to prevent transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within health care settings. All health care facilities should have an operational TB infection control plan that emphasizes the use of a hierarchy of controls (administrative, environmental, and personal respiratory protection). We also discuss resources available to clinicians who work in the prevention and investigation of nosocomial transmission of M tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary Health Care: a strategic framework for the prevention and control of chronic non-communicable disease.

    PubMed

    Demaio, Alessandro R; Kragelund Nielsen, Karoline; Pinkowski Tersbøl, Britt; Kallestrup, Per; Meyrowitsch, Dan W

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, chronic, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) represent the leading causes of global mortality and disability. Government-level concern, and resulting policy changes, are manifesting. However, there continues to be a paucity of guiding frameworks for legislative measures. The surge of NCDs will require strong and effective governance responses, particularly in low and middle-income countries. Simultaneously following the 2008 World Health Report, there has recently been renewed interest in Primary Health Care (PHC) and its core principles. With this, has come strengthened support for revitalizing this approach, which aims for equitable and cost-effective population-health attainment. In this light and reflecting recent major global reports, declarations and events, we propose and critique a PHC approach to NCDs, highlighting PHC, with its core themes, as a valuable guiding framework for health promotion and policy addressing this group of diseases. Responsible Editors: Nawi Ng, Umeå University, Sweden and Julia Schröders, Umeå University, Sweden.

  12. Protocol investigating the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of cognitive–behavioural therapy delivered remotely for unscheduled care users with health anxiety: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shireen; Malins, Sam; Guo, Boliang; James, Marilyn; Kai, Joe; Kaylor-Hughes, Catherine; Rowley, Emma; Simpson, Jayne; Smart, David; Stubley, Michelle; Tyrer, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Background Health anxiety and medically unexplained symptoms cost the National Health Service (NHS) an estimated £3 billion per year in unnecessary costs with little evidence of patient benefit. Effective treatment is rarely taken up due to issues such as stigma or previous negative experiences with mental health services. An approach to overcome this might be to offer remotely delivered psychological therapy, which can be just as effective as face-to-face therapy and may be more accessible and suitable. Aims To investigate the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of remotely delivered cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) to people with high health anxiety repeatedly accessing unscheduled care (trial registration: NCT02298036). Method A multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) will be undertaken in primary and secondary care providers of unscheduled care across the East Midlands. One hundred and forty-four eligible participants will be equally randomised to receive either remote CBT (6–12 sessions) or treatment as usual (TAU). Two doctoral research studies will investigate the barriers and facilitators to delivering the intervention and the factors contributing to the optimisation of therapeutic outcome. Results This trial will be the first to test the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of remotely delivered CBT for the treatment of high health anxiety. Conclusions The findings will enable an understanding as to how this intervention might fit into a wider care pathway to enhance patient experience of care. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703758

  13. Health Care Reform: Lessons From Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deber, Raisa Berlin

    2003-01-01

    Although Canadian health care seems to be perennially in crisis, access, quality, and satisfaction in Canada are relatively high, and spending is relatively well controlled. The Canadian model is built on a recognition of the limits of markets in distributing medically necessary care. Current issues in financing and delivering health care in Canada deserve attention. Key dilemmas include intergovernmental disputes between the federal and provincial levels of government and determining how to organize care, what to pay for (comprehensiveness), and what incentive structures to put in place for payment. Lessons for the United States include the importance of universal coverage, the advantages of a single payer, and the fact that systems can be organized on a subnational basis. PMID:12511378

  14. Prevention of health care-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Vincent

    2014-09-15

    Health care-associated infections cause approximately 75,000 deaths annually, in addition to increasing morbidity and costs. Over the past decade, a downward trend in health care-associated infections has occurred nationwide. Basic prevention measures include administrative support, educating health care personnel, and hand hygiene and isolation precautions. Prevention of central line- or catheter-associated infections begins with avoidance of unnecessary insertion, adherence to aseptic technique when inserting, and device removal when no longer necessary. Specific recommendations for preventing central line-associated bloodstream infections include use of chlorhexidine for skin preparation, as a component of dressings, and for daily bathing of patients in intensive care units. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections are the most common device-related health care-associated infection. Maintaining a closed drainage system below the patient reduces the risk of infection. To prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia, which is associated with high mortality, mechanically ventilated patients should be placed in the semirecumbent position and receive antiseptic oral care. Prevention of surgical site infections includes hair removal using clippers, glucose control, and preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Reducing transmission of Clostridium difficile and multidrug-resistant organisms in the hospital setting begins with hand hygiene and contact precautions. Institutional efforts to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescribing are also strongly recommended. Reducing rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection can be achieved through active surveillance cultures and decolonization therapy with mupirocin.

  15. A pragmatic randomized controlled trial of the Flinders Program of chronic condition management in community health care services.

    PubMed

    Battersby, Malcolm; Harris, Melanie; Smith, David; Reed, Richard; Woodman, Richard

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the Flinders Program in improving self-management in common chronic conditions. To examine properties of the Partners in Health scale (PIH). Participants were randomized to usual care or Flinders Program plus usual care. Self-management competency, quality of life, and other outcomes were measured at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Of 231 participants, 172 provided data at 6 months and 61 at 12 months. At 6 months, intention-to-treat outcomes favoured the intervention group for SF-12 physical health (p=0.043). Other pre-determined outcomes did not show significance. At 6 months intervention participants' problem severity scores reduced (p<0.001) and goal achievement scores increased (p<0.001). Only 55% of the intervention group received a Flinders Program, compromising study power. The PIH was associated with other measures at baseline and for change over time. In a pragmatic community trial, the Flinders Program improved quality of life at 6 months. Incomplete in-practice intervention delivery limited trial power. Studies are now needed on improving delivery. The PIH has potential as a generic risk screening tool and predictive measure of change in self-management and chronic condition outcomes over time. Better implementation including service integration is required for improved chronic disease management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Surgical streams in the flow of health care financing. The role of surgery in national expenditures: what costs are controllable?

    PubMed Central

    Moore, F D

    1985-01-01

    The dollar flow in United States medical care has been analyzed in terms of a six-level model; this model and the gross 1981 flow data are set forth. Of the estimated $310 billion expended in 1981, it is estimated that $85-$95 billion was the "surgical stream", i.e., that amount expended to take care of surgical patients at a variety of institutional types and including ambulatory care and surgeons' fees. Some of the determinants of surgical flow are reviewed as well as controllable costs and case mix pressures. Surgical complications, when severe, increase routine operative costs by a factor of 8 to 20. Maintenance of high quality in American surgery, despite new manpower pressures, is the single most important factor in cost containment. By voluntary or imposed controls on fees, malpractice premiums, case mix selection, and hospital utilization, a saving of $2.0-$4.0 billion can be seen as reachable and practical. This is five per cent of the surgical stream and is a part of the realistic "achievable" savings of total flow estimated to be about +15 billion or 5 per cent. PMID:3918514

  17. The health care cost "problem".

    PubMed

    Arnould, R J; Finifter, D H; Schifrin, L G

    1990-01-01

    This serves as an introduction to this special issue devoted to a selection of papers chosen and revised from a conference on public policy entitled "Health Care Policy: Where Is the Revolution Headed?" sponsored by the Thomas Jefferson Program in Public Policy at the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, November 12-14, 1987.

  18. [Integrated health care at Nuremberg].

    PubMed

    Männl, V

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports in detail on a project of Integrated Health Care in cardiology at Nuremberg, Germany. Information on the structure of the contract, the participants, the agreed claiming of benefits and provision of services are provided as well as relevant figures and contact data.

  19. Learning curves in health care.

    PubMed

    Waldman, J Deane; Yourstone, Steven A; Smith, Howard L

    2003-01-01

    This article explores the uses of learning curve theory in medicine. Though effective application of learning curve theory in health care can result in higher quality and lower cost, it is seldom methodically applied in clinical practice. Fundamental changes are necessary in the corporate culture of medicine in order to capitalize maximally on the benefits of learning.

  20. Hedging opportunities in health care.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J A

    1990-03-01

    Medical care futures contracts offer new hedging opportunities to increase protection against unexpected price changes. Commodity futures contracts can be designed explicitly to hedge volatile group health insurance premiums and capitated hospital and physician prices. This article describes one way to design and use these hedging instruments.

  1. Mental health care in Cambodia.

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, D. J.; van de Put, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    An effort is being made in Cambodia to involve grass-roots personnel in the integration of the care of the mentally ill into a broad framework of health services. This undertaking is examined with particular reference to the work of the Transcultural Psychosocial Organization. PMID:10212521

  2. Relationship marketing in health care.

    PubMed

    Wagner, H C; Fleming, D; Mangold, W G; LaForge, R W

    1994-01-01

    Building relationships with patients is critical to the success of many health care organizations. The authors profile the relationship marketing program for a hospital's cardiac center and discuss the key strategic aspects that account for its success: a focus on a specific hospital service, an integrated marketing communication strategy, a specially designed database, and the continuous tracking of results.

  3. A mobile phone application for the assessment and management of youth mental health problems in primary care: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Over 75% of mental health problems begin in adolescence and primary care has been identified as the target setting for mental health intervention by the World Health Organisation. The mobiletype program is a mental health assessment and management mobile phone application which monitors mood, stress, coping strategies, activities, eating, sleeping, exercise patterns, and alcohol and cannabis use at least daily, and transmits this information to general practitioners (GPs) via a secure website in summary format for medical review. Methods We conducted a randomised controlled trial in primary care to examine the mental health benefits of the mobiletype program. Patients aged 14 to 24 years were recruited from rural and metropolitan general practices. GPs identified and referred eligible participants (those with mild or more mental health concerns) who were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (where mood, stress, and daily activities were monitored) or the attention comparison group (where only daily activities were monitored). Both groups self-monitored for 2 to 4 weeks and reviewed the monitoring data with their GP. GPs, participants, and researchers were blind to group allocation at randomisation. Participants completed pre-, post-, and 6-week post-test measures of the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale and an Emotional Self Awareness (ESA) Scale. Results Of the 163 participants assessed for eligibility, 118 were randomised and 114 participants were included in analyses (intervention group n = 68, comparison group n = 46). Mixed model analyses revealed a significant group by time interaction on ESA with a medium size of effect suggesting that the mobiletype program significantly increases ESA compared to an attention comparison. There was no significant group by time interaction for depression, anxiety, or stress, but a medium to large significant main effect for time for each of these mental health measures. Post-hoc analyses suggested

  4. A mobile phone application for the assessment and management of youth mental health problems in primary care: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Reid, Sophie C; Kauer, Sylvia D; Hearps, Stephen J C; Crooke, Alexander H D; Khor, Angela S; Sanci, Lena A; Patton, George C

    2011-11-29

    Over 75% of mental health problems begin in adolescence and primary care has been identified as the target setting for mental health intervention by the World Health Organisation. The mobiletype program is a mental health assessment and management mobile phone application which monitors mood, stress, coping strategies, activities, eating, sleeping, exercise patterns, and alcohol and cannabis use at least daily, and transmits this information to general practitioners (GPs) via a secure website in summary format for medical review. We conducted a randomised controlled trial in primary care to examine the mental health benefits of the mobiletype program. Patients aged 14 to 24 years were recruited from rural and metropolitan general practices. GPs identified and referred eligible participants (those with mild or more mental health concerns) who were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (where mood, stress, and daily activities were monitored) or the attention comparison group (where only daily activities were monitored). Both groups self-monitored for 2 to 4 weeks and reviewed the monitoring data with their GP. GPs, participants, and researchers were blind to group allocation at randomisation. Participants completed pre-, post-, and 6-week post-test measures of the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale and an Emotional Self Awareness (ESA) Scale. Of the 163 participants assessed for eligibility, 118 were randomised and 114 participants were included in analyses (intervention group n = 68, comparison group n = 46). Mixed model analyses revealed a significant group by time interaction on ESA with a medium size of effect suggesting that the mobiletype program significantly increases ESA compared to an attention comparison. There was no significant group by time interaction for depression, anxiety, or stress, but a medium to large significant main effect for time for each of these mental health measures. Post-hoc analyses suggested that participation in the RCT

  5. How to build and evaluate an integrated health care system for chronic patients: study design of a clustered randomised controlled trial in rural China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wenxi; Sun, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yan; Ye, Ting; Zhang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Background While integrated health care system has been proved an effective way to help improving patient health and system efficiency, the exact behaviour model and motivation approach are not so clear in poor rural areas where health human resources and continuous service provision are urgently needed. To gather solid evidence, we initiated a comprehensive intervention project in Qianjiang District, southwest part of rural China in 2012. And after one-year's pilot, we developed an intervention package of team service, comprehensive pathway and prospective- and performance-based payment system. Methods To testify the potential influence of payment interventions, we use clustered randomised controlled trial, 60 clusters are grouped into two treatment groups and one control group to compare the time and group differences. Difference-in-differences model and structural equation modelling will be used to analyse the intervention effects and pathway. The outcomes are: quality of care, disease burden, supplier cooperative behaviour and patient utilisation behaviour and system efficiency. Repeated multivariate variance analysis will be used to statistically examine the outcome differences. Discussion This is the first trial of its kind to prove the effects and efficiency of integrated care. Though we adopted randomised controlled trial to gather the highest rank of evidence, still the fully randomisation was hard to realise in health policy reform experiment. To compensate, the designer should take efforts on control for the potential confounders as much as possible. With this trial, we assume the effects will come from: (1) improvement on the quality of life through risk factors control and lifestyles change on patient's behaviours; (2) improvement on quality of care through continuous care and coordinated supplier behaviours; (3) improvement on the system efficiency through active interaction between suppliers and patients. Conclusion The integrated care system needs

  6. The promise of Lean in health care.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, John S; Berry, Leonard L

    2013-01-01

    An urgent need in American health care is improving quality and efficiency while controlling costs. One promising management approach implemented by some leading health care institutions is Lean, a quality improvement philosophy and set of principles originated by the Toyota Motor Company. Health care cases reveal that Lean is as applicable in complex knowledge work as it is in assembly-line manufacturing. When well executed, Lean transforms how an organization works and creates an insatiable quest for improvement. In this article, we define Lean and present 6 principles that constitute the essential dynamic of Lean management: attitude of continuous improvement, value creation, unity of purpose, respect for front-line workers, visual tracking, and flexible regimentation. Health care case studies illustrate each principle. The goal of this article is to provide a template for health care leaders to use in considering the implementation of the Lean management system or in assessing the current state of implementation in their organizations. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Health care systems and aspects of health care economics. Sector ophthalmology - part 1: development of the German health care system].

    PubMed

    Kern, T; Kohnen, T

    2010-11-01

    Although many health care reforms have been enacted in the last few years in Germany, many of the key points in the current social health care system have been retained from former times. All those introductions for an effective health care system from the last 150 years beginning with mandatory guild membership via Bismarck's social laws to the modern health care systems in Germany with the current problems of financing the heavy burden in the German budget are reported. Data and facts on the current health care system are provided. In the following two articles of this series ambulatory and inpatient treatment in the light of economic aspects of health care are reported.

  8. Managed consumerism in health care.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C

    2005-01-01

    The future of market-oriented health policy and practice lies in "managed consumerism," a blend of the patient-centric focus of consumer-driven health care and the provider-centric focus of managed competition. The optimal locus of incentives will vary among health services according to the nature of the illness, the clinical technology, and the extent of discretion in utilization. A competitive market will manifest a variety of comprehensive and limited benefit designs, broad and narrow contractual networks, and single-and multispecialty provider organizations.

  9. Managed care and the public health challenge of TB.

    PubMed Central

    Halverson, P K; Mays, G P; Miller, C A; Kaluzny, A D; Richards, T B

    1997-01-01

    Managed care is fast becoming the dominant form of medical care delivery and financing in the United States, yet its effects on public health practice remain largely unknown. Tuberculosis (TB) is a classic example of a disease with both public health and medical care implications, and as such it provides an opportunity for examining the impact on public health of the shift towards managed care in the medical marketplace. The authors approach the role of managed care in TB control by first considering the need for interorganizational coordination at the community level. The authors identify four basic models of how managed care organizations may fit into TB control efforts in local communities, using observations from 12 local public health jurisdictions to illustrate these models. These TB control models provide insight into the general mechanisms through which managed care organizations may affect other areas of public health practice. Images p22-a p23-a p25-a p28-a PMID:9018283

  10. Evaluation of quality of TB control services by private health care providers in Plateau state, Nigeria; 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Luka Mangveep; Oleribe, Obinna O; Nguku, Patrick; Tongwong, Gabriel Chukwak; Mato, Lakda Gonen; Longkyer, Musa Istifanus; Ogiri, Samuel; Nsubuga, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) is public health concern in Nigeria. The country uses the Directly Observed Treatment Short course (DOTS) strategy for its control. Plateau state started using the DOTS strategy in 2001 and had the Private health facilities (PHF) as an important stakeholder. We evaluated their contributions to case finding and quality of the services to identify gaps in monitoring and evaluation in the TB control services within the PHF to plan for intervention so as to meet the set target for TB control in the state. Methods We used the logical framework approach to identify and analyze the problem. We drew up an objective tree and from the objective tree developed a logical framework matrix including evaluation plan. We also conducted desk review to extract data on case findings, case management and outcomes of the treatment. We interviewed TB focal persons and laboratory personnel using structured questionnaire. The data was analyzed using excel spread sheet. Results Of the 127 health facilities with TB patients on treatment 27 (21.3%) were PHF. The PHF reported 54.6% (1494) of TB cases in 2011. The sputum conversion rates, cured rate, treatment success rate, and default rates were 85%, 73%, 81.4% and 6.6% respectively. The discordant rates were 3.1% and 1.2% for the state and private health facilities respectively. Conclusion Log frame approach is a useful tool for evaluation of TB control services and helps provide evidence for decision making to improve quality of the TB services in the public and private health facilities in the state. PMID:24711883

  11. Caring for a patient with rabies: implications of the Milwaukee protocol for infection control and public health measures.

    PubMed

    Lampejo, T; Bruce, M; Teall, A; Dall'Antonia, M; Crawley-Boevey, E; Grant, P; Polhill, S; Pillay, D; Brown, D; Brown, M; Nastouli, E

    2017-08-01

    This article discusses the infection control and public health measures taken whilst managing a case of laboratory-confirmed rabies, and the challenges faced in implementing these measures. Case management requires intensive multi-disciplinary co-ordination. The Milwaukee protocol, which to date has five reported human rabies survivors associated with its use, has been suggested as a potential management pathway for human rabies. Consensus among hospital and public health clinicians would aid future deployment of this approach in selected cases. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Control of blood pressure in Spanish hypertensive population attended in primary health-care. PRESCAP 2006 Study].

    PubMed

    Llisterri Caro, José L; Rodríguez Roca, Gustavo C; Alonso Moreno, Francisco J; Banegas Banegas, José R; González-Segura Alsina, Diego; Lou Arnal, Salvador; Divisón Garrote, Juan A; Sánchez Ruiz, Tomás; Santos Rodríguez, José A; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio

    2008-05-17

    More information is needed on hypertension control and its evolution in clinical practice. This study aimed to determine the degree of blood pressure (BP) control in Spanish hypertensive patients attended in primary care (PC) and to determine the factors associated with poor BP control. Cross-sectional, multicenter study, carried out in PC settings throughout Spain. Hypertensive patients >or= 18 years, with antihypertensive treatment (>or= 3 months) were consecutively recruited. BP measurement was performed in surgery hours (morning and evening) following standardized methods and averaging 2 consecutive readings. BP control was regarded as optimum when BP values were < 140/90 mmHg in general population and <130/80 mmHg in patients with diabetes, chronic renal disease or cardiovascular disease. 10,520 hypertensive patients were included (53.7% women), mean age (SD) 64.6 (11.3) years. 41.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.5-42.4) presented good systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) control, 46.5% (95% CI, 45.5-47.4) only SBP control and 67.1% (95% CI, 66.2-68.0) only DBP control. 55.6% of patients were treated with combination therapy (41.2% 2 drugs, 11.7% 3 and 2.8% more than 3). BP control was significantly (p<0.001) higher in the evening measurement (48.9%) than in the morning measurement (40.5%), and if patients had taken the treatment before measurement (42.0%) compared with those who had not taken it (38.8%). Factors such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, sedentary lifestyle, alcohol consumption and surgery hour were associated with poor BP control (p<0.001). The results of the PRESCAP 2006 study indicate that 4 out of 10 hypertensive patients treated in PC in Spain have an optimal BP control. The degree of control of arterial hypertension has improved remarkably with respect to the PRESCAP 2002 study.

  13. Principles of health care financing.

    PubMed

    Libby, Russell

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates that all children must have health insurance coverage that ensures them access to affordable and comprehensive quality care. Access to care depends on the design and implementation of payment systems that ensure the economic viability of the medical home; support and grow the professional pediatric workforce; promote the adoption and implementation of health information technology; enhance medical education, training, and research; and encourage and reward quality-improvement programs that advance and strengthen the medical home. Health insurance plans must be portable from state to state, with administrative procedures to eliminate breaks and gaps in coverage to ensure continuous coverage from year to year. Plans should ensure free choice of clinicians and foster coordination with public and private community-based programs for infants, children, and adolescents through the age of 26. The scope of services provided by all health plans must include preventive, acute and chronic illness, behavioral, inpatient, emergency, and home health care. These plans must be affordable and have cost-sharing policies that protect patients and families from financial strain and are without risk of loss of benefits because of plan design, current illness, or preexisting condition.

  14. Putting population health into practice through primary health care.

    PubMed

    Neuwelt, Pat; Matheson, Don; Arroll, Bruce; Dowell, Anthony; Winnard, Doone; Crampton, Peter; Sheridan, Nicolette Fay; Cumming, Jacqueline

    2009-02-27

    The introduction of the Primary Health Care Strategy has offered opportunities to take a population health approach to the planning and delivery of primary health care. The lack of a common understanding of population health between primary care and public health has been the prompt for a group of academics and practitioners to join forces and produce this statement on a population health approach to primary care, through primary health care. This paper takes the position that the features of a population health approach (such as a concern for equity, community participation, teamwork and attention to the determinants of health) enhance general practice care rather than undermine it. We conclude that the contribution of the health sector towards population health goals can be achieved through collaboration between GPs, nurses, other primary health care workers, and communities, together with health promotion and public health practitioners. Finding common language and understanding is an important step towards improving that collaboration.

  15. Efficacy of an educational intervention in primary health care in inhalation techniques: study protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Leiva-Fernández, José; Vázquez-Alarcón, Rubén L; Aguiar-Leiva, Virginia; Lobnig-Becerra, Mireya; Leiva-Fernández, Francisca; Barnestein-Fonseca, Pilar

    2016-03-17

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) accounts for 10-12 % of primary care consultations, 7 % of hospital admissions and 35 % of chronic incapacity related to productivity. The misuse of inhalers is a significant problem in COPD because it is associated with reduced therapeutic drug effects leading to lack of control of both symptoms and disease. Despite all advice, health care professionals' practice management of inhalation treatments is usually deficient. Interventions to improve inhaler technique by health care professionals are limited, especially among primary care professionals, who provide the most care to patients with COPD. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of an educational intervention to train general practitioners (GPs) in the right inhalation technique for the most commonly used inhalers. We are conducting a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial. The sample population is composed of 267 patients diagnosed with COPD using inhalation therapy selected from among those in 20 general practices, divided into two groups (control and intervention) by block randomisation at 8 primary care centres. The sample has two levels. The first level is patients with COPD who agree to participate in the trial and receive the educational intervention from their GPs. The second level is GPs who are primary health care professionals and receive the educational intervention. The intervention is one session of the educational intervention with a monitor given to GPs for training in the right inhalation technique. The primary outcome is correct inhalation technique in patients. Secondary outcomes are functional status (spirometry) and quality of life. The follow-up period will be 1 year. GPs will have two visits (baseline and at the 1-year follow-up visit. Patients will have four visits (at baseline and 3, 6 and 12 months). Analysis will be done on an intention-to-treat basis. We carried out three previous clinical trials in patients with COPD

  16. The Alberta Mental Health Act 2010 and Revolving Door Syndrome: Control, Care, and Identity in Making up People.

    PubMed

    Barron, Gary R S

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, I describe dividing practices in making up a specific medical-legal category-the revolving door patient-to identify, label, and direct the actions of particular people living with mental illness. The revolving door patient was a category that had been spoken of for some time, but became a formal legal subject with the introduction of the Alberta Mental Health Act 2010 and Community Treatment Orders (CTOs). I demonstrate how a rationale of control over unpredictable and dangerous individuals was primary in creating this new category, and that the characterization of the revolving door patient required a disciplinary technology to reduce danger. I argue that the CTO is a medical-legal technology that solves the problem of governing a subject in order to produce a patient that manages mental illness. I conclude by reflecting on how the narrative of the revolving door patient, and of mental illness more broadly, has implications for personal identity and tensions between care and control. Dans cet article, je décris comment des 'pratiques divisées' ont créé une catégorie spécifique médico-légale - le « revolving door patient » - afin d'identifier, d'étiqueter et de contrôler les comportements de certains individus vivants avec une maladie mentale. Le «revolving door patient», une catégorie dont on avait parlé depuis un certain temps, est devenu un sujet juridique formel par l'introduction de la loi de la santé mentale de l'Alberta 2010 et de l'Ordre de Traitement Communautaire (OCT). Je démontre comment une logique de contrôle sur les individus imprévisibles et dangereux eu un rôle prépondérant lors de la création de cette catégorie et que la caractérisation du «revolving door patient», entant que telle, a nécessité une technologie disciplinaire pour réduire le danger social. Je soutiens que le OTC est une technologie médico-légale qui résout le problème de contrôle d'un sujet en produisant un patient qui gère une

  17. Evaluating the Effect of Web-Based Iranian Diabetic Personal Health Record App on Self-Care Status and Clinical Indicators: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background There are 4 main types of chronic or noncommunicable diseases. Of these, diabetes is one of the major therapeutic concerns globally. Moreover, Iran is among the countries with the highest incidence of diabetic patients. Furthermore, library-based studies by researchers have shown that thus far no study has been carried out to evaluate the relationship between Web-based diabetic personal health records (DPHR) and self-care indicators in Iran. Objective The objective of this study is to examine the effect of Web-based DPHR on self-care status of diabetic patients in an intervention group as compared with a control group. Methods The effect of DPHR on self-care was assessed by using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) protocol for a 2-arm parallel group with a 1:1 allocation ratio. During a 4-month trial period, the control group benefited from the routine care; the intervention group additionally had access to the Web-based DPHR app besides routine care. During the trial, 2 time points at baseline and postintervention were used to evaluate the impact of the DPHR app. A sample size of 72 people was randomly and equally assigned to both the control and intervention groups. The primary outcome measure was the self-care status of the participants. Results Test results showed that the self-care status in the intervention group in comparison with the control group had a significant difference. In addition, the dimensions of self-care, including normal values, changes trend, the last measured value, and the last time measured values had a significant difference while other dimensions had no significant difference. Furthermore, we found no correlation between Web-based DPHR system and covariates, including scores of weight, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), serum creatinine, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol, and planned visit adherence, as well as the change trend of mean for blood glucose and blood pressure. Conclusions

  18. Evaluating the Effect of Web-Based Iranian Diabetic Personal Health Record App on Self-Care Status and Clinical Indicators: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Amirabbas; Aboutorabi, Robab; Mazloum-Khorasani, Zahra; Afzal-Aghaea, Monavar; Tabesh, Hamed; Tara, Mahmood

    2016-10-21

    There are 4 main types of chronic or noncommunicable diseases. Of these, diabetes is one of the major therapeutic concerns globally. Moreover, Iran is among the countries with the highest incidence of diabetic patients. Furthermore, library-based studies by researchers have shown that thus far no study has been carried out to evaluate the relationship between Web-based diabetic personal health records (DPHR) and self-care indicators in Iran. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of Web-based DPHR on self-care status of diabetic patients in an intervention group as compared with a control group. The effect of DPHR on self-care was assessed by using a randomized controlled trial (RCT) protocol for a 2-arm parallel group with a 1:1 allocation ratio. During a 4-month trial period, the control group benefited from the routine care; the intervention group additionally had access to the Web-based DPHR app besides routine care. During the trial, 2 time points at baseline and postintervention were used to evaluate the impact of the DPHR app. A sample size of 72 people was randomly and equally assigned to both the control and intervention groups. The primary outcome measure was the self-care status of the participants. Test results showed that the self-care status in the intervention group in comparison with the control group had a significant difference. In addition, the dimensions of self-care, including normal values, changes trend, the last measured value, and the last time measured values had a significant difference while other dimensions had no significant difference. Furthermore, we found no correlation between Web-based DPHR system and covariates, including scores of weight, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), serum creatinine, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), total cholesterol, and planned visit adherence, as well as the change trend of mean for blood glucose and blood pressure. We found that as a result of the Web-based DPHR

  19. School Readiness Goal Begins with Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1992-01-01

    Currently 59 bills are awaiting Congressional action. Meanwhile, a national coalition of economists and medical specialists (the National Leadership Coalition for Health Care Reform) are circulating a sensible consensus health reform plan proposing national practice guidelines; universal health care access; and efficient cost control, delivery,…

  20. School Readiness Goal Begins with Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Nick

    1992-01-01

    Currently 59 bills are awaiting Congressional action. Meanwhile, a national coalition of economists and medical specialists (the National Leadership Coalition for Health Care Reform) are circulating a sensible consensus health reform plan proposing national practice guidelines; universal health care access; and efficient cost control, delivery,…

  1. A health dialogue intervention reduces cardiovascular risk factor levels: a population based randomised controlled trial in Swedish primary care setting with 1-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hellstrand, Mats; Simonsson, Bo; Engström, Sevek; Nilsson, Kent W; Molarius, Anu

    2017-08-22

    The total number of cardiovascular (CVD) deaths accounted for almost a third of all deaths globally in 2013. Population based randomised controlled trials, managed within primary care, on CVD risk factor interventions are scarce. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a health dialogue intervention in a primary care setting offered to a population at the age of 55 years, focusing on CVD risk factors. The study was performed in five primary health care centres in the county of Västmanland, Sweden between April 2011 and December 2012. Men and women were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 440) and control groups (n = 440). At baseline, both groups filled in a health questionnaire and serum cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), weight, height, waist (WC) and hip circumference, waist hip ratio (WHR) and systolic/diastolic blood pressure were measured. Intervention group attended a health dialogue, supported by a visualised health profile, with a possibility for further activities. Participation rates at baseline were 53% and 52% respectively. A 1-year follow-up was carried out. The intervention group (n = 165) showed reductions compared to the control group (n = 177) concerning body mass index (BMI) (0.3 kg/m(2), p = .031), WC (2.1 cm, p ≤ .001) and WHR (.002, p ≤ .001) at the 1-year follow-up. No differences between the intervention and control groups were found in other variables. Intervention group, compared to baseline, had reduced weight, BMI, WC, WHR, HbA1c, and diet, while the men in the control group had reduced their alcohol consumption. A health dialogue intervention at the age of 55 years, conducted in ordinary primary care, showed a moderate effect on CVD risk factor levels, in terms of BMI, WC and WHR. BioMed Central, ISRCTN22586871 , date assigned; 10/12/2015.

  2. Managing overutilization, quality of care, and sustainable health care outcomes in Oman.

    PubMed

    Abri, Salim M; West, Daniel J; Spinelli, Robert J

    2006-01-01

    The health care system in Oman is facing a major challenge in managing escalating health care costs. One of the reasons for the dramatic increase in health care cost is overutilization. This article explores the problem of overutilization in Oman and its effect on sustaining the quality of health care. A review of the literature is used to develop a comprehensive model in controlling overutilization that is more applicable to the health system in Oman. Efforts to control costs and increase quality are discussed for possible implementation.

  3. Costs and coverage. Pressures toward health care reform.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P R; Soffel, D; Luft, H S

    1992-01-01

    Signs of discontent with the health care system are growing. Calls for health care reform are largely motivated by the continued increase in health care costs and the large number of people without adequate health insurance. For the past 20 years, health care spending has risen at rates higher than the gross national product. As many as 35 million people are without health insurance. As proposals for health care reform are developed, it is useful to understand the roots of the cost problem. Causes of spiraling health care costs include "market failure" in the health care market, expansion in technology, excessive administrative costs, unnecessary care and defensive medicine, increased patient complexity, excess capacity within the health care system, and low productivity. Attempts to control costs, by the federal government for the Medicare program and then by the private sector, have to date been mostly unsuccessful. New proposals for health care reform are proliferating, and important changes in the health care system are likely. PMID:1441510

  4. [Managing diversity in Swiss Health care].

    PubMed

    Bodenmann, P; Bossart, R; Di Bernardo, N; Dominice Dao, M; Durieux, S; Faucherre, F; Hudelson, P; Keller, M; Schuster, S; Zellweger, E; Houmard, S

    2014-11-19

    The development of Migrant Friendly Hospitals is an important first step towards eliminating health care disparities in Switzerland and an important reminder to health policy makers and practitioners across the health care system of their responsibility to provide non-discriminatory quality health care to all patients.

  5. How to strengthen primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pratyush

    2016-01-01

    Realization of health care as primary objective is necessary to strengthen primary health care (PHC). There is a need to build financial viable and sustainable PHC based on rational principles to fulfill the goals of providing quality health services on an affordable and equitable basis and also ensuring fiscal prudence. Health-care leadership, innovations in primary care, family medicine specialists, and effective and accountable health governance are the key steps toward our goal. PMID:28217580

  6. What is the health care product?

    PubMed

    France, K R; Grover, R

    1992-06-01

    Because of the current competitive environment, health care providers (hospitals, HMOs, physicians, and others) are constantly searching for better products and better means for delivering them. The health care product is often loosely defined as a service. The authors develop a more precise definition of the health care product, product line, and product mix. A bundle-of-elements concept is presented for the health care product. These conceptualizations help to address how health care providers can segment their market and position, promote, and price their products. Though the authors focus on hospitals, the concepts and procedures developed are applicable to other health care organizations.

  7. Impact of a Reference Center on Leprosy Control under a Decentralized Public Health Care Policy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Raquel Rodrigues; Sales, Anna Maria; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Duppre, Nádia Cristina; Machado, Alice de Miranda; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Sarno, Euzenir Nunes

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the profile of patients referred to the Fiocruz Outpatient Clinic, a reference center for the diagnosis and treatment of leprosy in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, and analyzed the origins and outcomes of these referrals. This is an observational retrospective study based on information collected from the Leprosy Laboratory database at Fiocruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. A total of 1,845 suspected leprosy cases examined at the reference center between 2010 and 2014 were included. The originating health service referrals and diagnostic outcomes were analyzed as well as the clinical and epidemiological data of patients diagnosed with leprosy. Our data show that the profile of the patients treated at the Clinic has changed in recent years. There was an increase in both the proportion of patients with other skin diseases and those who had visited only one health service prior to our Clinic. Among the total 1,845 cases analyzed, the outcomes of 1,380 were linked to other diseases and, in 74% of these cases, a biopsy was not necessary to reach a diagnostic conclusion. A decrease in new leprosy case detection among our patients was also observed. Yet, among the leprosy patients, 40% had some degree of disability at diagnosis. The results of the present study demonstrated the importance of referral centers in support of basic health services within the decentralization strategy. But, the success of the program depends on the a