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Sample records for controlling sulfur gas

  1. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-30

    The objective of this project is to develop a hot-gas desulfurization process scheme for control of H2S in HTHP coal gas that can be more simply and economically integrated with known regenerable sorbents in DOE/METC-sponsored work than current leading hot-gas desulfurization technologies. In addition to being more economical, the process scheme to be developed must yield an elemental sulfur byproduct. The Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading process for producing an elemental sulfur byproduct in hot-gas desulfurization systems, incurs a coal gas use penalty, because coal gas is required to reduce the SO2 in regeneration off-gas to elemental sulfur. Alternative regeneration schemes, which avoid coal gas use and produce elemental sulfur, will be evaluated. These include (i) regeneration of sulfided sorbent using SO2 ; (ii) partial oxidation of sulfided sorbent in an O2 starved environment; and (iii) regeneration of sulfided sorbent using steam to produce H2S followed by direct oxidation of H2S to elemental sulfur. Known regenerable sorbents will be modified to improve the feasibility of the above alternative regeneration approaches. Performance characteristics of the modified sorbents and processes will be obtained through lab- and bench-scale testing. Technical and economic evaluation of the most promising processes concept(s) will be carried out.

  2. Advanced sulfur control concepts for hot gas desulfurization technology

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a hot-gas desulfurization process scheme for control of H{sub 2}S in HTHP coal gas that can be more simply and economically integrated with known regenerable sorbents in DOE/METC-sponsored work than current leading hot-gas desulfurization technologies. In addition to being more economical, the process scheme to be developed must yield an elemental sulfur byproduct.

  3. Factors controlling sulfur gas exchange in Sphagnum-dominated wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Atmosphere-peatland exchange of reduced sulfur gases was determined seasonally in fen in NH, and in an artificially-acidified fen at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Canada. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) dominated gas fluxes at rates as high as 400 nmol/m(sup -2)hr(sup -1). DMS fluxes measured using enclosures were much higher than those calculated using a stagnant-film model, suggesting that Sphagnum regulated efflux. Temperature controlled diel and seasonal variability in DMS emissions. Use of differing enclosure techniques indicated that vegetated peatlands consume atmospheric carbonyl sulfide. Sulfate amendments caused DMS and methane thiol concentrations in near-surface pore waters to increase rapidly, but fluxes of these gases to the atmosphere were not affected. However, emission data from sites experiencing large differences in rates of sulfate deposition from the atmosphere suggested that chronic elevated sulfate inputs enhance DMS emissions from northern wetlands.

  4. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    A. LOPEZ ORTIZ; D.P. HARRISON; F.R. GROVES; J.D. WHITE; S. ZHANG; W.-N. HUANG; Y. ZENG

    1998-10-31

    This research project examined the feasibility of a second generation high-temperature coal gas desulfurization process in which elemental sulfur is produced directly during the sorbent regeneration phase. Two concepts were evaluated experimentally. In the first, FeS was regenerated in a H2O-O2 mixture. Large fractions of the sulfur were liberated in elemental form when the H2O-O2 ratio was large. However, the mole percent of elemental sulfur in the product was always quite small (<<1%) and a process based on this concept was judged to be impractical because of the low temperature and high energy requirements associated with condensing the sulfur. The second concept involved desulfurization using CeO2 and regeneration of the sulfided sorbent, Ce2O2S, using SO2 to produce elemental sulfur directly. No significant side reactions were observed and the reaction was found to be quite rapid over the temperature range of 500°C to 700°C. Elemental sulfur concentrations (as S2) as large as 20 mol% were produced. Limitations associated with the cerium sorbent process are concentrated in the desulfurization phase. High temperature and highly reducing coal gas such as produced in the Shell gasification process are required if high sulfur removal efficiencies are to be achieved. For example, the equilibrium H2S concentration at 800°C from a Shell gas in contact with CeO2 is about 300 ppmv, well above the allowable IGCC specification. In this case, a two-stage desulfurization process using CeO2 for bulk H2S removal following by a zinc sorbent polishing step would be required. Under appropriate conditions, however, CeO2 can be reduced to non-stoichiometric CeOn (n<2) which has significantly greater affinity for H2S. Pre-breakthrough H2S concentrations in the range of 1 ppmv to 5 ppmv were measured in sulfidation tests using CeOn at 700°C in highly reducing gases, as measured by equilibrium O2 concentration, comparable to the Shell gas. Good sorbent durability was indicated in

  5. Sulfur oxides control technology series: Flue-gas desulfurization. Dual alkali process. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    The report describes a dual alkali (or double alkali) flue gas desulfurization (FGD), which is a throwaway process in which sulfur dioxide (SO2) is removed from the flue gas by a soluble sodium-based scrubbing liquor. The collected SO2 is precipitated as calcium sulfite (CaSO3), calcium sulfate (CaSO4), or a mixed crystal of both salts, and is purged from the system.

  6. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    SciTech Connect

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  7. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.

    1995-11-01

    Regenerable metal oxide sorbents, such as zinc titanate, are being developed to efficiently remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gas in advanced power systems. Dilute air regeneration of the sorbents produces a tailgas containing a few percent sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Catalytic reduction of the SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur with a coal gas slipstream using the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a leading first-generation technology. Currently the DSRP is undergoing field testing at gasifier sites. The objective of this study is to develop second-generation processes that produce elemental sulfur without coal gas or with limited use. Novel approaches that were evaluated to produce elemental sulfur from sulfided sorbents include (1) sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) regeneration, (2) substoichiometric (partial) oxidation, (3) steam regeneration followed by H{sub 2}S oxidation, and (4) steam-air regeneration. Preliminary assessment of these approaches indicated that developing SO{sub 2} regeneration faced the fewest technical and economic problems among the four process options. Elemental sulfur is the only likely product of SO{sub 2} regeneration and the SO{sub 2} required for the regeneration can be obtained by burning a portion of the sulfur produced. Experimental efforts have thus been concentrated on SO{sub 2}-based regeneration processes. Results from laboratory investigations are presented and discussed.

  8. Advanced sulfur control concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.; Lopez-Ortiz, A.; White, J.D.; Groves, F.R. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    The primary objective of this study is the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents. Three possible regeneration concepts were identified as a result of a literature search. The potential for elemental sulfur production from a number of candidate metal oxide sorbents using each regeneration concept was evaluated on the basis of a thermodynamic analysis. Two candidate sorbents, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} were chosen for experimental testing. The experimental test program using both electrobalance and fixed-bed reactor sis now getting underway. The objective is to determine reaction conditions--temperature, pressure, space velocity, and regeneration feed gas composition--which will maximize the yield of elemental sulfur in the regeneration product gas. Experimental results are to be used to define a conceptual desulfurization-regeneration process and to provide a preliminary economic evaluation.

  9. Advanced sulfur control concepts for hot gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    Favorable results were achieved in the sulfidation of CeO{sub 2} by H{sub 2}S and the regeneration of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S by SO{sub 2}. Successful removal of approximately 99% of the H{sub 2}S from the sulfidation gas to levels of about 100 ppmv (or lower), and the production of approximately 12% elemental sulfur (as S{sub 2}) in the regeneration product gas were highlights. Final effort in the preliminary phase included a ten-cycle test at standard sulfidation and regeneration conditions with little or no sorbent deterioration. In the initial test of the detailed experimental phase of the program, the authors investigated the effect of temperature on the regeneration reaction. Results of preliminary tests showed that the Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} reaction did not occur at 350 C, and all subsequent regeneration tests were at 600 C where the reaction was rapid. Significant progress has been made on the process analysis effort during the quarter. Detailed process flow diagrams along with material and energy balance calculations for six design case studies were completed in the previous quarter. Two of the cases involved two-stage desulfurization with steam regeneration, three used two-stage desulfurization with SO{sub 2} regeneration, and the sixth was based on single-stage desulfurization with elemental sulfur recovery using the DSRP concept. In the present quarter, major process equipment was sized for each of the six cases. Preliminary annual operating and levelized total cost estimates were then completed for two design cases--one involving two-stage desulfurization with SO{sub 2} regeneration and the second based on single-stage desulfurization with DSRP.

  10. Identification of control parameters for the sulfur gas storability with bag sampling methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Air samples containing sulfur compounds are often collected and stored in sample bags prior to analyses. The storage stability of six gaseous sulfur compounds (H2S, CH3SH, DMS, CS2, DMDS and SO2) was compared between two different bag materials (polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) and polyester aluminum (PEA))...

  11. Advanced Sulfur Control Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Gangwal, S.K.; Portzer, J.W.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of an alternate concept for the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents in which elemental sulfur, instead of SO{sub 2}, is produced. If successful, this concept will eliminate or alleviate problems caused by the highly exothermic nature of the regeneration reaction, the tendency for metal sulfate formation, and the need to treat the regeneration off-gas to prevent atmospheric SO{sub 2}, emissions. Iron and cerium-based sorbents were chosen on the basis of thermodynamic analysis to determine the feasibility of elemental sulfur production. The ability of both to remove H{sub 2}S during the sulfidation phase is less than that of zinc-based sorbents, and a two-stage desulfurization process will likely be required. Preliminary experimental work used electrobalance reactors to compare the relative rates of reaction of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O with FeS. More detailed studies of the regeneration of FeS as well as the sulfidation of CeO{sub 2} and regeneration of Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S are being carried out in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor equipped with a unique analytical system which permits semi-continuous analysis of the distribution of elemental sulfur, H{sub 2}S, and SO{sub 2} in the reaction product gas.

  12. Advanced sulfur control concepts in hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.

    1994-07-01

    The primary objective of this research project is the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of known high temperature desulfurization sorbents. The contract was awarded to LSU on April 12, 1994, and this quarterly report covers accomplishments during the first 2 1/2 months of the project. Effort during the initial 2 1/2 month period has been limited to Tasks 1 and 2, and involves a search of the literature to identify concepts for producing elemental sulfur during regeneration of known metal oxide sorbents and a thermodynamic evaluation of these concepts. While searching and evaluating the literature is a continuing process, concentrated effort on that phase is now complete and a detailed summary is included in this report. Three possible concepts for the direct production of elemental sulfur were identified in the LSU proposal, and the literature search has not uncovered any additional concepts. Thus, the three concepts being investigated involve: (1) regeneration with SO{sub 2}, (2) regeneration with mixtures Of 02 and H{sub 2}O, and (3) regeneration with H{sub 2}O. While concept (3) directly produces H{sub 2}S instead of elemental sulfur, the concept is included because the possibility exists for converting H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur using the Claus process. Each of the concepts will ultimately be compared to the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) under development by RTI. DSRP involves initial sorbent regeneration to SO{sub 2}, and the inclusion of additional processing steps to reduce the SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur.

  13. Advanced sulfur control concepts in hot-gas desulfurization technology: Phase 1, Feasibility of the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.; White, J.; Groves, F.R.; Harrison, D.P.

    1994-10-01

    This topical report de-scribes the results of Phase 1 research performed during the first six months of a three-year contract to study the feasibility of the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents. Much effort has gone into the development of a high-temperature meal oxide sorbent process for removal of H{sub 2}S from the coal gas. A number of sorbents based upon metals such as zinc, iron, manganese and others have been studied. In order for high temperature desulfurization to be economical it is necessary that the sorbents be regenerated to permit multicycle operation. Current methods of sorbent regeneration involve oxidation of the metal sulfide to reform the metal oxide and free the sulfur as SO{sub 2}. An alternate regeneration process in which the sulfur is liberated in elemental form is preferable. The overall objective of the current research is to study simpler and economically superior processing of known sorbents capable of producing elemental sulfur during regeneration. This topical report summarizes the first steps of this effort. A literature search has been completed to identify possible regeneration concepts and to collect relevant thermodynamic, kinetic, and process data. Three concepts involving reaction with SO{sub 2}, partial oxidation using an O{sub 2} {minus} H{sub 2}O mixture, and steam regeneration have been identified. The first two concepts result in the direct production of elemental sulfur while H{sub 2}S is the product of steam regeneration. This concept is of potential interest, however, since existing Claus technology can be used to convert H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur. Following the literature search, a thermodynamic analysis, based upon free-energy minimization was carried out to evaluate candidate sorbents for possible use with the three regeneration concepts.

  14. Production of sulfur from sulfur dioxide obtained from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes a regenerable process for recovery of elemental sulfur from a gas containing sulfur dioxide comprising the steps of: contacting the gas with an aqueous, alkaline reaction medium containing sodium sulfite in concentration sufficient so that a slurry containing solid sodium sulfide is formed to react sulfur dioxide with sodium sulfite to form a solution containing dissolved sodium pyrosulfite and sodium sulfite; separating sulfur dioxide from the solution produced to leave a residual mixture containing water, sodium sulfite and a sodium pyrosulfite, the amount of sulfur dioxide separated being equal to about one-third the amount of sulfur dioxide which reacted with sodium sulfite; adding, in substantial absence of air, sufficient water and sodium bicarbonate to the residual mixture to react with the dissolved sodium pyrsulfide and form a slurry of solid sodium sulfite suspended in the resulting aqueous, alkaline reaction medium and gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the gaseous carbon dioxide; separating the solid sodium sulfite from the aqueous alkaline reaction medium and recycling the separated reaction medium; reducing the separated sodium sulfite to sodium sulfide; adding the sodium sulfide to an aqueous reaction medium containing sodium bicarbonate and, in the substantial absence of air, carbonating the resulting mixture with the gaseous carbon dioxide to form a slurry of solid particles of sodium bicarbonate dispersed in an aqueous reactor medium containing sodium bicarbonate, along with a gas composed primarily of hydrogen sulfide.

  15. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  16. Sulfur control in ion-conducting membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Richards, Robin Edward; Brengel, David Douglas; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2003-08-05

    A method for controlling the sulfur dioxide partial pressure in a pressurized, heated, oxygen-containing gas mixture which is contacted with an ion-conducting metallic oxide membrane which permeates oxygen ions. The sulfur dioxide partial pressure in the oxygen-depleted non-permeate gas from the membrane module is maintained below a critical sulfur dioxide partial pressure, p.sub.SO2 *, to protect the membrane material from reacting with sulfur dioxide and reducing the oxygen flux of the membrane. Each ion-conducting metallic oxide material has a characteristic critical sulfur dioxide partial pressure which is useful in determining the required level of sulfur removal from the feed gas and/or from the fuel gas used in a direct-fired feed gas heater.

  17. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-05-01

    This first quarter report of 2001 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf{trademark} (service mark of Gas Research Institute) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. During this reporting periods new catalyst formulations were tested. The experiments showed that the newest catalyst has slightly better performance, but catalyst TDA No.2 is still superior overall for use with the hybrid CrystaSulf process due to lower costs. Plans for catalyst pelletization and continued testing are described.

  18. Hot-Gas Desulfurization with Sulfur Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Portzer, Jeffrey W.; Damle, Ashok S.; Gangwal, Santosh K.

    1997-07-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a second generation HGD process that regenerates the sulfided sorbent directly to elemental sulfur using SO{sub 2}, with minimal consumption of coal gas. The goal is to have better overall economics than DSRP when integrated with the overall IGCC system.

  19. Sulfur dioxide removal from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, P.; Ginger, E.A.

    1986-11-11

    A process is described for removal of sulfur dioxide pollutant gas from gas stream which comprises contacting the gas stream with pretreated shale in the form of an aqueous solution of aluminum sulfate including from about 0.1 to about 2.0% by weight of the pretreated shale. The pretreatment of the shale comprises the heating of the shale in the presence of a gas unable to support combustion at a temperature in a range of from about 340/sup 0/C. to about 480/sup 0/C.

  20. Organic Sulfur Gas Production in Sulfidic Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, L. A.; Engel, A. S.; Bennett, P. C.

    2001-12-01

    Lower Kane Cave, Big Horn Basin, WY, permits access to an environment where anaerobic sulfide-rich groundwater meets the aerobic vadose zone. At this interface microorganisms thrive on diverse metabolic pathways including autotrophic sulfur oxidation, sulfate reduction, and aerobic heterotrophy. Springs introduce groundwater rich in H2S to the cave where it both degasses into the cave atmosphere and is used by chemautotrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria in the cave spring and stream habitat. The cave atmosphere in the immediate vicinity of the springs has elevated levels of CO2, H2S and methane, mirroring the higher concentration of H2S and methane in the spring water. The high CO2 concentrations are attenuated toward the two main sources of fresh air, the cave entrance and breathing holes at the rear of the cave. Conventional toxic gas monitors permit estimations of H2S concentrations, but they have severe cross sensitivity with other reduced sulfur gases, and thus are inadequate for characterization of sulfur cave gases. However employment of a field-based GC revealed elevated concentrations of carbonyl sulfide in cave atmosphere. Cultures of microorganisms collected from the cave optimized for enriching fermenters and autotrophic and heterophic sulfate reducing bacteria each produced carbonyl sulfide suggesting a biogenic in origin of the COS in addition to H2S. Enrichment cultures also produced methanethiol (methyl mercaptan) and an additional as yet undetermined volatile organic sulfur compound. In culture, the organo-sulfur compounds were less abundant than H2S, whereas in the cave atmosphere the organo-sulfur compounds were the dominant sulfur gases. Thus, these organo-sulfur gases may prove to be important sources of both reduced sulfur and organic carbon to microorganisms living on the cave wall in a subaerial habitat. Moreover groundwater has not yet been recognized as a source of sulfur gases to the atmosphere, but with the abundance of sulfidic

  1. Advanced sulfur control concepts in hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.

    1995-10-01

    Both the Antek total sulfur analyzer and the modifications to the Shimadzu GC-14A gas chromatograph to be used for analysis for SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S were delivered during the quarter. Problems were faced during the installation and calibration phases of both instruments. By the end of the quarter we believe that the GC problems have been solved, but problems remain with the Antek analyzer. It appears that too much sulfur (as SO{sub 2}) reaches the UV detector and causes it to become saturated. This shows up as a maximum in the instrument calibration curve. At 200 psia, the capillary flow restrictor allows a total flow rate of about 180 sccm, and the maximum occurs at about 1 % H{sub 2}S in the calibration gas. Reducing the pressure so that the total flow is reduced to about 25 sccm shifts the calibration curve maximum to about 5.7% H{sub 2}S. It appears that we must reduce the total flow rate to the detector or provide additional dilution. This may be accomplished by increasing the resistance of the capillary restrictor, by diverting a portion of the flow leaving the pyrotube to vent, or adding an inert such as N{sub 2} to the gases exiting the pyrotube. We are in contact with Antek representatives about the problem. Both the atmospheric pressure and high pressure electrobalances were used during the quarter to study the regeneration of FeS in atmospheres of O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O/N{sub 2}. In the atmospheric pressure unit the effects of temperature (600 - 800{degrees}C), flow rate (130 - 500 sccm), and reactive gas mol fraction (0.005 to 0.03 O{sub 2} and 0.1 to 0.5 H{sub 2}O) are being studied. Regeneration tests completed to date in the high pressure unit have utilized only O{sub 2}/N. and the parameters studied include temperature (600 - 800{degrees}C), flow rate (500 - 1000 sccm), pressure (1 - 15 atm) ad O{sub 2} mol fraction (0.005 - 0.03).

  2. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2003-10-01

    This third quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas.

  3. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2004-04-01

    This first quarter report of 2004 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane while avoiding methane oxidation and fouling due to coking from other hydrocarbon contaminants. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas.

  4. Sulfur pollution control. Phase II. The impact of stack gas cleanup on the sulfur mining industry of Texas and Louisiana. Open file report (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, M.; Barker, J.M.; Worrall, M.

    1981-01-01

    The impacts of various (reduced) levels of Frasch sulfur production on the States of Texas and Louisiana are analyzed. The analytic time basis is 1979. Industry labor and output characteristics are developed on a company and mine basis. State and local impacts (to the level of independent school districts) are developed on a scenario basis. The measures include income, unemployment, and taxes. Some data are presented on energy and water use.

  5. Childhood physical abnormalities following paternal exposure to sulfur mustard gas in Iran: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mustard gas, a known chemical weapon, was used during the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-1988. We aimed to determine if exposure to mustard gas among men was significantly associated with abnormalities and disorders among progenies. Methods Using a case-control design, we identified all progenies of Sardasht men (exposed group, n = 498), who were born at least nine months after the exposure, compared to age-matched controls in Rabat, a nearby city (non-exposed group, n = 689). We conducted a thorough medical history, physical examination, and appropriate paraclinical studies to detect any physical abnormality and/or disorder. Given the presence of correlated data, we applied Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) multivariable models to determine associations. Results The overall frequency of detected physical abnormalities and disorders was significantly higher in the exposed group (19% vs. 11%, Odds Ratio [OR] 1.93, 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.37-2.72, P = 0.0002). This was consistent across sexes. Congenital anomalies (OR 3.54, 95% CI, 1.58-7.93, P = 0.002) and asthma (OR, 3.12, 95% CI, 1.43-6.80, P = 0.004) were most commonly associated with exposure. No single abnormality was associated with paternal exposure to mustard gas. Conclusion Our study demonstrates a generational effect of exposure to mustard gas. The lasting effects of mustard gas exposure in parents effects fertility and may impact child health and development in the long-term. PMID:20630096

  6. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2002-07-01

    This second quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. This report describes testing using the laboratory apparatus but operated at the pilot plant using the actual pilot plant

  7. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-08-01

    This first quarter report of 2001 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of Gas Research Institute) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. During this reporting period tests were done to determine the effect of hydrocarbons such as n-hexane on catalyst performance with and without H{sub 2}S present. The experiments showed that hexane oxidation is suppressed when H{sub 2}S is present. Hexane represents the most reactive of the C1 to C6 series of alkanes. Since hexane exhibits low reactivity under H{sub 2}S oxidation conditions, and more importantly, does not change the

  8. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2002-04-01

    This first quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf{sup SM} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. In a previous reporting period tests were done to determine the effect of hydrocarbons such as n-hexane on catalyst performance with and without H{sub 2}S present. The experiments showed that hexane oxidation is suppressed when H{sub 2}S is present. Hexane represents the most reactive of the C1 to C6 series of alkanes. Since hexane exhibits low reactivity under H{sub 2}S oxidation conditions, and more importantly, does not change

  9. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2004-06-01

    This final report describes the objectives, technical approach, results and conclusions for a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept is a configuration of CrystaTech, Inc.'s CrystaSulf{reg_sign} process which utilizes a direct oxidation catalyst upstream of the absorber tower to oxidize a portion of the inlet hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and elemental sulfur. This hybrid configuration of CrystaSulf has been named CrystaSulf-DO and represents a low-cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day and more. This hybrid process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both onshore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf is a nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes H{sub 2}S from gas streams and converts it to elemental sulfur. In CrystaSulf, H{sub 2}S in the inlet gas is reacted with SO{sub 2} to make elemental sulfur according to the liquid phase Claus reaction: 2H{sub 2}S + SO{sub 2} {yields} 2H{sub 2}O + 3S. The SO{sub 2} for the reaction can be supplied from external sources by purchasing liquid SO{sub 2} and injecting it into the CrystaSulf solution, or produced internally by converting a portion of the inlet gas H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} or by burning a portion of the sulfur produced to make SO{sub 2}. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, the needed SO{sub 2} is produced by placing a bed of direct oxidation catalyst in the inlet gas stream to oxidize a

  10. Process for production of synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content

    DOEpatents

    Najjar, Mitri S.; Corbeels, Roger J.; Kokturk, Uygur

    1989-01-01

    A process for the partial oxidation of a sulfur- and silicate-containing carbonaceous fuel to produce a synthesis gas with reduced sulfur content which comprises partially oxidizing said fuel at a temperature in the range of 1800.degree.-2200.degree. F. in the presence of a temperature moderator, an oxygen-containing gas and a sulfur capture additive which comprises an iron-containing compound portion and a sodium-containing compound portion to produce a synthesis gas comprising H.sub.2 and CO with a reduced sulfur content and a molten slag which comprises (i) a sulfur-containing sodium-iron silicate phase and (ii) a sodium-iron sulfide phase. The sulfur capture additive may optionally comprise a copper-containing compound portion.

  11. Surfactant control of gas uptake: effect of butanol films on HCl and HBr entry into supercooled sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Jennifer R; Glass, Samuel V; Park, Seong-Chan; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2005-08-25

    The entry of HCl into 60-68 wt % D(2)SO(4) and HBr into 68 wt % acid containing 0-0.18 M 1-butanol was monitored by measuring the fractions of impinging HCl and HBr molecules that desorb as DCl and DBr after undergoing H --> D exchange within the deuterated acid. The addition of 0.18 M butanol to the acid creates butyl films that reach approximately 80% surface coverage at 213 K. Surprisingly, this butyl film does not impede exchange but instead enhances it: the HCl --> DCl exchange fractions increase from 0.52 to 0.74 for 60 wt % D(2)SO(4) and from 0.14 to 0.27 for 68 wt % D(2)SO(4). HBr --> DBr exchange increases even more sharply, rising from 0.22 to 0.65 for 68 wt % D(2)SO(4). We demonstrate that this enhanced exchange corresponds to enhanced uptake into the butyl-coated acid for HBr and infer this equivalence for HCl. In contrast, the entry probability of the basic molecule CF(3)CH(2)OH exceeds 0.85 at all acid concentrations and is only slightly diminished by the butyl film. The OD groups of surface butanol molecules may assist entry by providing extra interfacial protonation sites for HCl and HBr dissociation. The experiments suggest that short-chain surfactants in sulfuric acid aerosols do not hinder heterogeneous reactions of HCl or HBr with other solute species.

  12. Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing

    SciTech Connect

    Erekson, E.J.; Miao, F.Q.

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process, called the HSM (Hydrogen Sulfide-Methane) Process, consists of two steps that each utilize a catalyst and sulfur-containing intermediates: (1) converting natural gas to CS{sub 2} and (2) converting CS{sub 2} to gasoline range liquids. Catalysts have been found that convert methane to carbon disulfide in yields up to 98%. This exceeds the target of 40% yields for the first step. The best rate for CS{sub 2} formation was 132 g CS{sub 2}/kg-cat-h. The best rate for hydrogen production is 220 L H{sub 2} /kg-cat-h. A preliminary economic study shows that in a refinery application hydrogen made by the HSM technology would cost $0.25-R1.00/1000 SCF. Experimental data will be generated to facilitate evaluation of the overall commercial viability of the process.

  13. Advanced sulfur control concepts in hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.

    1998-09-01

    Twenty-five reduction/sulfidation tests plus one sulfidation/regeneration test were completed during the quarter. The reduction/sulfidation tests examined the behavior of six cerium oxide sorbents from different sources with reaction variables of temperature, pressure, gas composition and flow rate. Most significantly, steam was added to the sulfidation feed gas for the first time. Tests using pre-reduced sorbents and tests in which reduction and sulfidation occurred simultaneously were performed. Prebreakthrough H{sub 2}S concentrations less than 10 ppmv were obtained over a range of reaction conditions with prebreakthrough concentrations as low as 1 ppmv achieved at the most favorable conditions. The general response to reaction variables was as expected except when feed rate was varied. In some of these cases the FPD breakthrough time did not correspond to expectation. The single regeneration run was conducted at 600 C and 2 atm using 12% SO{sub 2} in N{sub 2} at a feet rate of 400 sccm. This was the first regeneration test at other than 1 atm pressure; favorable results were obtained. The only experimental objective remaining is additional high pressure regeneration testing.

  14. Low Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal and Recovery CNG Claus Sulfur Recovery Process

    SciTech Connect

    Klint, V.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-10-01

    Increased use of natural gas (methane) in the domestic energy market will force the development of large non-producing gas reserves now considered to be low quality. Large reserves of low quality natural gas (LQNG) contaminated with hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (N) are available but not suitable for treatment using current conventional gas treating methods due to economic and environmental constraints. A group of three technologies have been integrated to allow for processing of these LQNG reserves; the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFZ) process for hydrocarbon / acid gas separation; the Triple Point Crystallizer (TPC) process for H{sub 2}S / C0{sub 2} separation and the CNG Claus process for recovery of elemental sulfur from H{sub 2}S. The combined CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus group of processes is one program aimed at developing an alternative gas treating technology which is both economically and environmentally suitable for developing these low quality natural gas reserves. The CFZ/TPC/CNG Claus process is capable of treating low quality natural gas containing >10% C0{sub 2} and measurable levels of H{sub 2}S and N{sub 2} to pipeline specifications. The integrated CFZ / CNG Claus Process or the stand-alone CNG Claus Process has a number of attractive features for treating LQNG. The processes are capable of treating raw gas with a variety of trace contaminant components. The processes can also accommodate large changes in raw gas composition and flow rates. The combined processes are capable of achieving virtually undetectable levels of H{sub 2}S and significantly less than 2% CO in the product methane. The separation processes operate at pressure and deliver a high pressure (ca. 100 psia) acid gas (H{sub 2}S) stream for processing in the CNG Claus unit. This allows for substantial reductions in plant vessel size as compared to conventional Claus / Tail gas treating technologies. A close integration of the components of the CNG Claus

  15. Advanced sulfur control concepts in hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report 14, July--October 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.

    1997-10-01

    Experimental work during the quarter was limited to a series of CeO{sub 2} reduction tests using an atmospheric pressure electrobalance reactor. Both Rhonc-Poulenc and Molycorp CeO{sub 2} were tested over a temperature range of 600 to 1000{degrees}C in various reducing gas compositions. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with equilibrium calculations of the oxygen partial pressure from CHEMQ coupled with earlier experimental results from Bevan and Kordis. Weight loss corresponding to the reduction of CeO{sub 2} to CeO{sub 1.86} was observed at 1000{degrees} in an atmosphere of 40% H{sub 2}, 3.5% CO{sub 2}, balance He. Helium was used as the carrier gas instead of nitrogen to reduce aerodynamic noise, and the H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} concentrations were chosen since this mixture results in oxygen partial pressure similar to those expected in Shell gas. The experimental value of CeO{sub 1.86} compares quite favorably to the predicted value of CeO{sub 1.83}. One unexpected results was a weight loss of about 9% from Rhone-Poulenc CeO{sub 2} in an inert atmosphere at 600{degrees}C. BET surface area measurements of nine samples were performed consisting of as-received CeO{sub 2} (both Rhone Poulenc and Molycorp), as-received Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, both CeO{sub 2} samples with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as initially charged to the reactor, and both CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixtures after multicycle sulfidation-regeneration tests. The BET surface area of the Rhone-Poulenc CeO{sub 2} was about 20 times larger than the surface area of Molycorp CeO{sub 2} which explains differences in sulfidation performance reported earlier. Finally a more complete search of the literature for thermodynamic data for cerium compounds was carried out. It appears that the free energy of formation of CeO{sub 2} as a function of temperature is well defined.

  16. Method for removing sulfur dioxide from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, R.I.; Herron, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    The combustion of sulfur-containing fuels generates significant amounts of sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) are also often generated in the course of the combustion of various fuels. Without appropriate treatment of the exhaust gases of combustion, large amounts of sulfur and nitrogen oxides would be injected into the atmosphere, causing a variety of ecological problems. A method is provided for removing SO/sub 2/ from gas streams by its gas-phase reaction with a stabilized Criegee intermediate under conditions where a very large excess of water vapor is avoided, resulting in efficient scavenging of SO2 by the Criegee intermediate to form an adduct. The adduct reacts with water vapor to convert it directly to sulfuric acid, which is then separated from the gas stream. The Criegee intermediate may be generated in a variety of ways.

  17. Method for removing sulfur dioxide from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Herron, J.T.; Martinez, R.I.

    1982-09-28

    A method is provided for removing SO2 from gas streams by its gas-phase reaction with a stabilized Criegee intermediate under conditions where a very large excess of water vapor is avoided, resulting in efficient scavenging of SO2 by the Criegee intermediate to form an adduct. The adduct reacts with water vapor to convert it directly to sulfuric acid, which is then separated from the gas stream. The Criegee intermediate may be generated in a variety of ways.

  18. Workshop on sulfur chemistry in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, W.E. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    The Flue Gas Desulfurization Workshop was held at Morgantown, West Virginia, June 7-8, 1979. The presentations dealt with the chemistry of sulfur and calcium compounds in scrubbers. DOE and EPRI programs in this area are described. Ten papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  19. Sulfur cycling of intertidal Wadden Sea sediments (Konigshafen, Island of Sylt, Germany): sulfate reduction and sulfur gas emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, E.; Bodenbender, J.; Jensen, M. H.; Rennenberg, H.; Jensen, K. M.

    2000-05-01

    Sulfate reduction rates (SRR t) and reduced inorganic sulfur pools (RIS) in Wadden Sea sediment as well as sulfur gas emissions directly to the atmosphere were measured at intervals of 2 to 12 months from 1991 to 1994. Three stations were chosen in the intertidal embayment, Königshafen, representing the range of sediments found in the Wadden Sea: Organic-poor coarse sand, organic-poor and Arenicola marina inhabited medium sand, and organic-rich muddy sand. Maximum SRR t were 2 to 5 times higher in muddy sand than in the sandy sediments. The depth-integrated SRR t varied 12 to 13-fold on a seasonal basis at the three stations. Although temperature controls biochemical processes, the overall control is more complex due to the simultaneous influence of other seasonal factors such as availability of organic matter and oxidation level of surface sediment. The sedimentary RIS pools were low due to iron limitation and contained only 30% acid volatile sulfur (AVS). Muddy sand had up to an order of magnitude more RIS than the two sandy sediments. The turnover of RIS was rapid (turnover time from ˜1 to 32 h), fastest during summer and at the sandy stations. The emission of S-gases was dominated by H 2S during summer (45-67% of the total), and was highest in muddy and lowest in coarse sand. H 2S was less important in early spring (3-49% of the total). Other sulfur gases, such as COS, DMS and CS 2, each accounted for less than 20% of the total sulfur emissions with no specific temporal and spatial pattern. Due to the low content of metals in the sediment, the reduced sulfur pools are cycled rapidly with chemical and biological reoxidation at oxic-anoxic boundaries as a major sink. Thus, the emissions of H 2S account for less than 1‰ of the sulfide produced.

  20. ENGINEERING EVALUATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION WITH SULFUR RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    G.W. ROBERTS; J.W. PORTZER; S.C. KOZUP; S.K. GANGWAL

    1998-05-31

    Engineering evaluations and economic comparisons of two hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) processes with elemental sulfur recovery, being developed by Research Triangle Institute, are presented. In the first process, known as the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), the SO{sub 2} tail gas from air regeneration of zinc-based HGD sorbent is catalytically reduced to elemental sulfur with high selectivity using a small slipstream of coal gas. DSRP is a highly efficient first-generation process, promising sulfur recoveries as high as 99% in a single reaction stage. In the second process, known as the Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP), the zinc-based HGD sorbent is modified with iron so that the iron portion of the sorbent can be regenerated using SO{sub 2} . This is followed by air regeneration to fully regenerate the sorbent and provide the required SO{sub 2} for iron regeneration. This second-generation process uses less coal gas than DSRP. Commercial embodiments of both processes were developed. Process simulations with mass and energy balances were conducted using ASPEN Plus. Results show that AHGP is a more complex process to operate and may require more labor cost than the DSRP. Also capital costs for the AHGP are higher than those for the DSRP. However, annual operating costs for the AHGP appear to be considerably less than those for the DSRP with a potential break-even point between the two processes after just 2 years of operation for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant using 3 to 5 wt% sulfur coal. Thus, despite its complexity, the potential savings with the AHGP encourage further development and scaleup of this advanced process.

  1. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2000-12-01

    A test program is being sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPRI, FirstEnergy, and TVA to investigate furnace injection of alkaline sorbents as a means of reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in the flue gas from coal-fired boilers. This test program is being conducted at the FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP), although later testing will be conducted at a TVA plant. A sorbent injection test was conducted the week of April 18, 2000. The test was the first of several short-term (one- to two-week duration) tests to investigate the effectiveness of various alkaline sorbents for sulfuric acid control and the effects of these sorbents on boiler equipment performance. This first short-term test investigated the effect of injecting dry dolomite powder (CaCO{sub 3} {center_dot} MgCO{sub 3}), a mineral similar to limestone, into the furnace of Unit 2. During the test program, various analytical techniques were used to assess the effects of sorbent injection. These primarily included sampling with the controlled condensation system (CCS) for determining flue gas SO{sub 3} content and an acid dew-point (ADP) meter for determining the sulfuric acid dew point (and, indirectly, the concentration of sulfuric acid) of the flue gas. EPA Reference Method 26a was used for determining hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrofluoric acid (HF), as well and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and fluorine (F{sub 2}) concentrations in the flue gas. Fly ash resistivity was measured using a Southern Research Institute (SRI) point-to-plane resistivity probe, and unburned carbon in fly ash was determined by loss on ignition (LOI). Coal samples were also collected and analyzed for a variety of parameters. Finally, visual observations were made of boiler furnace and convective pass surfaces prior to and during sorbent injection.

  2. Dielectric gas mixtures containing sulfur hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Chathan M.

    1979-01-01

    Electrically insulating gaseous media of unexpectedly high dielectric strength comprised of mixtures of two or more dielectric gases are disclosed wherein the dielectric strength of at least one gas in each mixture increases at less than a linear rate with increasing pressure and the mixture gases are present in such proportions that the sum of their electrical discharge voltages at their respective partial pressures exceeds the electrical discharge voltage of each individual gas at the same temperature and pressure as that of the mixture.

  3. 40 CFR 52.57 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.57... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Alabama § 52.57 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides... for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for sulfur oxides in the vicinity of...

  4. 40 CFR 52.724 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.724 Control strategy: Sulfur... Board necessary to insure attainment and maintenance of the sulfur dioxide standard, and...

  5. 40 CFR 52.724 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.724 Control strategy: Sulfur... Board necessary to insure attainment and maintenance of the sulfur dioxide standard, and...

  6. 40 CFR 52.1126 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52... strategy: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revisions to the control strategy resulting from the modification to the..., which allows a relaxation of sulfur in fuel limitations under certain conditions, is approved for...

  7. 40 CFR 52.1126 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52... strategy: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revisions to the control strategy resulting from the modification to the..., which allows a relaxation of sulfur in fuel limitations under certain conditions, is approved for...

  8. 40 CFR 52.2575 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... strategy: Sulfur dioxide. (a) Part D—Approval—With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the Administrator approved the Wisconsin sulfur dioxide control plan. (1) Part D—No action—USEPA takes no action...

  9. 40 CFR 52.795 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.795 Control strategy: Sulfur... (sulfur dioxide emission limitation) is disapproved insofar as the provisions identified below...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1126 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52... strategy: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revisions to the control strategy resulting from the modification to the..., which allows a relaxation of sulfur in fuel limitations under certain conditions, is approved for...

  11. 40 CFR 52.724 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.724 Control strategy: Sulfur... Board necessary to insure attainment and maintenance of the sulfur dioxide standard, and...

  12. 40 CFR 52.724 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.724 Control strategy: Sulfur... Board necessary to insure attainment and maintenance of the sulfur dioxide standard, and...

  13. 40 CFR 52.2575 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... strategy: Sulfur dioxide. (a) Part D—Approval—With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the Administrator approved the Wisconsin sulfur dioxide control plan. (1) Part D—No action—USEPA takes no action...

  14. 40 CFR 52.2575 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... strategy: Sulfur dioxide. (a) Part D—Approval—With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the Administrator approved the Wisconsin sulfur dioxide control plan. (1) Part D—No action—USEPA takes no action...

  15. 40 CFR 52.724 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.724 Control strategy: Sulfur... Board necessary to insure attainment and maintenance of the sulfur dioxide standard, and...

  16. 40 CFR 52.795 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.795 Control strategy: Sulfur... (sulfur dioxide emission limitation) is disapproved insofar as the provisions identified below...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2575 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... strategy: Sulfur dioxide. (a) Part D—Approval—With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the Administrator approved the Wisconsin sulfur dioxide control plan. (1) Part D—No action—USEPA takes no action...

  18. 40 CFR 52.795 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.795 Control strategy: Sulfur... (sulfur dioxide emission limitation) is disapproved insofar as the provisions identified below...

  19. 40 CFR 52.795 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.795 Control strategy: Sulfur... (sulfur dioxide emission limitation) is disapproved insofar as the provisions identified below...

  20. 40 CFR 52.57 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.57... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Alabama § 52.57 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides... for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for sulfur oxides in the vicinity of...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2575 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... strategy: Sulfur dioxide. (a) Part D—Approval—With the exceptions set forth in this subpart, the Administrator approved the Wisconsin sulfur dioxide control plan. (1) Part D—No action—USEPA takes no action...

  2. 40 CFR 52.1126 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52... strategy: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revisions to the control strategy resulting from the modification to the..., which allows a relaxation of sulfur in fuel limitations under certain conditions, is approved for...

  3. 40 CFR 52.795 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Indiana § 52.795 Control strategy: Sulfur... (sulfur dioxide emission limitation) is disapproved insofar as the provisions identified below...

  4. 40 CFR 52.1126 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52... strategy: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revisions to the control strategy resulting from the modification to the..., which allows a relaxation of sulfur in fuel limitations under certain conditions, is approved for...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sulfur oxides. (iii) Fossil fuel means natural gas, refinery fuel gas, coke oven gas, petroleum, coal and any form of solid, liquid, or gaseous fuel derived from such materials. (iv) Fossil fuel-fired steam generating unit means a furnace or boiler used in the process of burning fossil fuel for the purpose...

  6. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sulfur oxides. (iii) Fossil fuel means natural gas, refinery fuel gas, coke oven gas, petroleum, coal and any form of solid, liquid, or gaseous fuel derived from such materials. (iv) Fossil fuel-fired steam generating unit means a furnace or boiler used in the process of burning fossil fuel for the purpose...

  7. Low-Quality Natural Gas Sulfur Removal/Recovery System

    SciTech Connect

    Lokhandwala, K.A.; Ringer, M.; Wijams, H.; Baker, R.W.

    1997-10-01

    Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. Much raw gas is `subquality`, that is, it exceeds the pipeline specifications for nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and/or hydrogen sulfide content, and much of this low-quality natural gas cannot be produced economically with present processing technology. Against this background, a number of industry-wide trends are affecting the natural gas industry. Despite the current low price of natural gas, long-term demand is expected to outstrip supply, requiring new gas fields to be developed. Several important consequences will result. First, gas fields not being used because of low-quality products will have to be tapped. In the future, the proportion of the gas supply that must be treated to remove impurities prior to delivery to the pipeline will increase substantially. The extent of treatment required to bring the gas up to specification will also increase. Gas Research Institute studies have shown that a substantial capital investment in facilities is likely to occur over the next decade. The estimated overall investment for all gas processing facilities up to the year 2000 alone is approximates $1.2 Billion, of which acid gas removal and sulfur recovery are a significant part in terms of invested capital. This large market size and the known shortcomings of conventional processing techniques will encourage development and commercialization of newer technologies such as membrane processes. Second, much of today`s gas production is from large, readily accessible fields. As new reserves are exploited, more gas will be produced from smaller fields in remote or offshore locations. The result is an increasing need for technology able to treat small-scale gas streams.

  8. Gas and aerosol fluxes. [emphasizing sulfur, nitrogen, and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, C. S.

    1980-01-01

    The development of remote sensing techniques to address the global need for accurate distribution and flux determinations of both man made and natural materials which affect the chemical composition of the atmosphere, the heat budget of the Earth, and the depletion, of stratospheric ozone is considered. Specifically, trace gas fluxes, sea salt aerosol production, and the effect of sea surface microlayer on gas and aerosol fluxes are examined. Volatile sulfur, carbon, nitrogen, and halocarbon compounds are discussed including a statement of the problem associated with each compound or group of compounds, a brief summary of current understanding, and suggestions for needed research.

  9. Distribution of sulfur deposition near a wellbore in a sour gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinghong; Yang, Xuefeng; He, ShunLi; Zhao, Jinzhou

    2013-02-01

    Elemental sulfur precipitates from sour gas when reservoir pressure and temperature decrease. Sulfur deposition in a formation may significantly reduce the inflow performance of sour gas wells. This paper develops a micro-mechanical migration model and experiments which describe the law of sulfur precipitation, plugging and distribution near a wellbore. Based on the analysis of the sulfur deposition law and micro-mechanical migration theory, elemental sulfur mechanical models in pores are presented. The critical velocity of sulfur is calculated and the rule of precipitated sulfur distribution near a wellbore is deduced. Reservoir cores and supersaturated sour gas are utilized to observe sulfur precipitation and plugging in sulfur damage experiments, and the main influential factor is analysed. According to the models and experimental results, precipitated sulfur can decrease reservoir permeability. The liquid bridge force is the most important factor to affect reservoir permeability due to sulfur deposition. Precipitated sulfur cannot be carried away from pores if the liquid bridge force is considered; the critical velocity increases as the diameter of the sulfur particles increases, which may cause serious formation damage. Moreover, it can be seen from the results that the biggest volume of sulfur deposition does not occur at the bottom but near the bottom of a borehole. These results can be used to describe the profile of dynamic sulfur deposition and help a reservoir engineer to develop a plan for removing the sulfur near a wellbore.

  10. 40 CFR 52.1030 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.1030 Section 52.1030 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revision to Regulation 100.6 (Chapter 106) “Low Sulfur Fuel Regulation” for...

  11. 40 CFR 52.2780 - Control strategy for sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy for sulfur oxides. 52... strategy for sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this chapter are not met since there has... maintenance of the national ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides on the island of St. Croix....

  12. 40 CFR 52.1030 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.1030 Section 52.1030 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revision to Regulation 100.6 (Chapter 106) “Low Sulfur Fuel Regulation” for...

  13. 40 CFR 52.1030 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.1030 Section 52.1030 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revision to Regulation 100.6 (Chapter 106) “Low Sulfur Fuel Regulation” for...

  14. 40 CFR 52.1117 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52...: Sulfur oxides. (a) (b) The requirements of § 51.112(a) of this chapter are not met because the State did....04B (1) and (2) would not interfere with the attainment and maintenance of the national sulfur...

  15. 40 CFR 52.1117 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52...: Sulfur oxides. (a) (b) The requirements of § 51.112(a) of this chapter are not met because the State did....04B (1) and (2) would not interfere with the attainment and maintenance of the national sulfur...

  16. 40 CFR 52.1117 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52...: Sulfur oxides. (a) (b) The requirements of § 51.112(a) of this chapter are not met because the State did....04B (1) and (2) would not interfere with the attainment and maintenance of the national sulfur...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2780 - Control strategy for sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy for sulfur oxides. 52... strategy for sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this chapter are not met since there has... maintenance of the national ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides on the island of St. Croix....

  18. 40 CFR 52.2780 - Control strategy for sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy for sulfur oxides. 52... strategy for sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this chapter are not met since there has... maintenance of the national ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides on the island of St. Croix....

  19. 40 CFR 52.1030 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.1030 Section 52.1030 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revision to Regulation 100.6 (Chapter 106) “Low Sulfur Fuel Regulation” for...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1030 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.1030 Section 52.1030 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revision to Regulation 100.6 (Chapter 106) “Low Sulfur Fuel Regulation” for...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2780 - Control strategy for sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy for sulfur oxides. 52... strategy for sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this chapter are not met since there has... maintenance of the national ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides on the island of St. Croix....

  2. 40 CFR 52.2780 - Control strategy for sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy for sulfur oxides. 52... strategy for sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this chapter are not met since there has... maintenance of the national ambient air quality standards for sulfur oxides on the island of St. Croix....

  3. 40 CFR 52.1117 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52...: Sulfur oxides. (a) (b) The requirements of § 51.112(a) of this chapter are not met because the State did....04B (1) and (2) would not interfere with the attainment and maintenance of the national sulfur...

  4. 40 CFR 52.1117 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52...: Sulfur oxides. (a) (b) The requirements of § 51.112(a) of this chapter are not met because the State did....04B (1) and (2) would not interfere with the attainment and maintenance of the national sulfur...

  5. Sulfur dioxide control (excludes coal burning sources). (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning air pollution control technology and removal of sulfur dioxide from waste streams and atmospheres. Removal methods include flue gas desulfurization by wet or dry sorbents, electron beam processes, corona discharge, reductive gases, microbial processes, and burner injection systems. Applications to utilities, oil refineries, and the metallurgical and chemical industries are described. Control of sulfur dioxide produced from coal burning is discussed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Sulfur dioxide control (excludes coal burning sources). (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning air pollution control technology and removal of sulfur dioxide from waste streams and atmospheres. Removal methods include flue gas desulfurization by wet or dry sorbents, electron beam processes, corona discharge, reductive gases, microbial processes, and burner injection systems. Applications to utilities, oil refineries, and the metallurgical and chemical industries are described. Control of sulfur dioxide produced from coal burning is discussed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Sulfur dioxide control (excludes coal burning sources). (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning air pollution control technology and removal of sulfur dioxide from waste streams and atmospheres. Removal methods include flue gas desulfurization by wet or dry sorbents, electron beam processes, corona discharge, reductive gases, microbial processes, and burner injection systems. Applications to utilities, oil refineries, and the metallurgical and chemical industries are described. Control of sulfur dioxide produced from coal burning is discussed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Damon, D.A.; Siwajek, L.A.; Klint, B.W.

    1993-12-31

    Low quality natural gas processing with the integrated CFZ/CNG Claus process is feasible for low quality natural gas containing 10% or more of CO{sub 2}, and any amount of H{sub 2}S. The CNG Claus process requires a minimum CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the feed gas of about 100 psia (15% CO{sub 2} for a 700 psia feed gas) and also can handle any amount of H{sub 2}S. The process is well suited for handling a variety of trace contaminants usually associated with low quality natural gas and Claus sulfur recovery. The integrated process can produce high pressure carbon dioxide at purities required by end use markets, including food grade CO{sub 2}. The ability to economically co-produce high pressure CO{sub 2} as a commodity with significant revenue potential frees process economic viability from total reliance on pipeline gas, and extends the range of process applicability to low quality gases with relatively low methane content. Gases with high acid gas content and high CO{sub 2} to H{sub 2}S ratios can be economically processed by the CFZ/CNG Claus and CNG Claus processes. The large energy requirements for regeneration make chemical solvent processing prohibitive. The cost of Selexol physical solvent processing of the LaBarge gas is significantly greater than the CNG/CNG Claus and CNG Claus processes.

  9. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.059-0.87 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, H{sub 2}S concentration, reaction pressure, and catalyst loading on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 62-78 v% hydrogen, 3,000-7,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,500-3,500 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 50 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an

  10. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2004-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 1-6 milliseconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, moisture concentration, reaction pressure on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 70 v% hydrogen, 2,500-7,500-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,250-3,750 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 0-15 vol% moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 100 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The

  11. Process screening study of alternative gas treating and sulfur removal systems for IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) power plant applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biasca, F.E.; Korens, N.; Schulman, B.L.; Simbeck, D.R.

    1987-12-01

    One of the inherent advantages of the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plant (IGCC) over other coal-based electric generation technologies is that the sulfur in the coal is converted into a form which can be removed and recovered. Extremely low sulfur oxide emissions can result. Gas treating and sulfur recovery processes for the control of sulfur emissions are an integral part of the overall IGCC plant design. There is a wide range of commercially proven technologies which are highly efficient for sulfur control. In addition, there are many developing technologies and new concepts for applying established technologies which offer potential improvements in both technical and economic performance. SFA Pacific, Inc. has completed a screening study to compare several alternative methods of removing sulfur from the gas streams generated by the Texaco coal gasification process for use in an IGCC plant. The study considered cleaning the gas made from high and low sulfur coals to produce a low sulfur fuel gas and a severely desulfurized synthesis gas (suitable for methanol synthesis), while maintaining a range of low levels of total sulfur emissions. The general approach was to compare the technical performance of the various processes in meeting the desulfurization specifications laid out in EPRI's design basis for the study. The processing scheme being tested at the Cool Water IGCC facility incorporates the Selexol acid gas removal process which is used in combination with a Claus sulfur plant and a SCOT tailgas treating unit. The study has identified several commercial systems, as well as some unusual applications, which can provide efficient removal of sulfur from the fuel gas and also produce extremely low sulfur emissions - so as to meet very stringent sulfur emissions standards. 29 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. SULFUR REMOVAL FROM PIPE LINE NATURAL GAS FUEL: APPLICATION TO FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    King, David L.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2003-11-21

    Pipeline natural gas is being considered as the fuel of choice for utilization in fuel cell-based distributed generation systems because of its abundant supply and the existing supply infrastructure (1). For effective utilization in fuel cells, pipeline gas requires efficient removal of sulfur impurities (naturally occurring sulfur compounds or sulfur bearing odorants) to prevent the electrical performance degradation of the fuel cell system. Sulfur odorants such as thiols and sulfides are added to pipeline natural gas and to LPG to ensure safe handling during transportation and utilization. The odorants allow the detection of minute gas line leaks, thereby minimizing the potential for explosions or fires.

  13. Portable instrument and method for detecting reduced sulfur compounds in a gas

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, J.S.; Kelly, T.J.; Tanner, R.L.

    1983-06-01

    A portable real time instrument for detecting concentrations in the part per billion range of reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas. Ozonized air or oxygen and reduced sulfur compounds in a sample gas stream react to produce chemiluminescence in a reaction chamber and the emitted light is filtered and observed by a photomultiplier to detect reduced sulfur compounds. Selective response to individual sulfur compounds is achieved by varying reaction chamber temperature and ozone and sample gas flows, and by the use of either air or oxygen as the ozone source gas.

  14. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING LAST TECHNICAL REPORT BEFORE NOVATION FROM URS CORP. TO CRYSTATECH, INC.

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-02-01

    This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf (service mark of Gas Research Institute) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane while avoiding methane oxidation. The project involved the development of a detailed plan for laboratory and bench scale-up application, laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and demonstration of scale-up economic advantages. The bench-scale tests examined two different catalysts that are promoted modifications of TDA's patented partial oxidation catalyst used to make elemental sulfur. The experiments showed that catalyst TDA No.2 is superior for use with the hybrid CrystaSulf process in that much higher yields of SO{sub 2} can be obtained. Continued testing is planned.

  15. Gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry for the identification of organic sulfur compounds in shellfish and fish

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, M.; Miyake, Y.

    1980-11-01

    The authors determined that the organic sulfur compounds usually contained in crude oil can be used as a marker of oil pollution in shellfish and fish. Short-necked clams and eels were maintained in a controlled laboratory environment in water with suspension of crude oil. Mass spectra and mass chromatograms of short-necked clam extract showed the presence of organic sulfur compounds. Capillary column gas chromatography-mass chromatograms of crude oil and extract from the soft body of a short-necked clam showed the presence of organic sulfur compounds. Besides sulfur components, various other compounds were contained in crude oil and short-necked clam. Mass chromatograms of crude oil and the extract from eel flesh showed the presence of alkyl benzothiophene, dibenzothiophene, naphthalene, and alkyl naphthalene. Data indicated that the organic sulfur compounds and polyaromatic compounds could serve as markers of oil pollution in shellfish and fish.

  16. Gas exchange-wind speed relation measured with sulfur hexafluoride on a lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanninkhof, R.; Broecker, W. S.; Ledwell, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-exchange processes control the uptake and release of various gases in natural systems such as oceans, rivers, and lakes. Not much is known about the effect of wind speed on gas exchange in such systems. In the experiment described here, sulfur hexafluoride was dissolved in lake water, and the rate of escape of the gas with wind speed (at wind speeds up to 6 meters per second) was determined over a 1-month period. A sharp change in the wind speed dependence of the gas-exchange coefficient was found at wind speeds of about 2.4 meters per second, in agreement with the results of wind-tunnel studies. However the gas-exchange coefficients at wind speeds above 3 meters per second were smaller than those observed in wind tunnels and are in agreement with earlier lake and ocean results.

  17. 40 CFR 52.834 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52.834 Section 52.834 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Iowa § 52.834 Control strategy: Sulfur...

  18. 40 CFR 52.2033 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.2033 Section 52.2033 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... strategy: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revision to the control strategy resulting from the modification to...

  19. 40 CFR 52.834 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52.834 Section 52.834 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Iowa § 52.834 Control strategy: Sulfur...

  20. 40 CFR 52.834 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52.834 Section 52.834 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Iowa § 52.834 Control strategy: Sulfur...

  1. 40 CFR 52.834 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52.834 Section 52.834 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Iowa § 52.834 Control strategy: Sulfur...

  2. 40 CFR 52.2033 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.2033 Section 52.2033 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... strategy: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revision to the control strategy resulting from the modification to...

  3. 40 CFR 52.2033 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.2033 Section 52.2033 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... strategy: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revision to the control strategy resulting from the modification to...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2033 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.2033 Section 52.2033 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... strategy: Sulfur oxides. (a) The revision to the control strategy resulting from the modification to...

  5. 40 CFR 52.834 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52.834 Section 52.834 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Iowa § 52.834 Control strategy: Sulfur...

  6. Sulfur oxide adsorbents and emissions control

    DOEpatents

    Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2006-12-26

    High capacity sulfur oxide absorbents utilizing manganese-based octahedral molecular sieve (Mn--OMS) materials are disclosed. An emissions reduction system for a combustion exhaust includes a scrubber 24 containing these high capacity sulfur oxide absorbents located upstream from a NOX filter 26 or particulate trap.

  7. Sulfur gas exchange in Sphagnum-dominated wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Demello, William Zamboni; Porter, Carolyn A.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur gases are important components of the global cycle of S. They contribute to the acidity of precipitation and they influence global radiation balance and climate. The role of terrestrial sources of biogenic S and their effect on atmospheric chemistry remain as major unanswered questions in our understanding of the natural S cycle. The role of northern wetlands as sources and sinks of gaseous S was investigated by measuring rates of S gas exchange as a function of season, hydrologic conditions, and gradients in trophic status. The effects of inorganic S input on the production and emission of gaseous S were also investigated. Experiments were conducted in wetlands in New Hampshire, particularly a poor fen, fens within the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Ontario, Canada and in freshwater and marine tundra. Emissions were determined using Teflon enclosures, gas cryotrapping methods, and gas chromatography (GC) with flame photometric detection. Dynamic (sweep flow) and static enclosures were employed. Dissolved gases were determined by gas stripping followed by GC.

  8. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for control of NO.sub.x emissions in a sulfur-containing gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly

    2015-08-11

    An exhaust gas treatment process, apparatus, and system for reducing the concentration of NOx, CO and hydrocarbons in a gas stream, such as an exhaust stream (29), via selective catalytic reduction with ammonia is provided. The process, apparatus and system include a catalytic bed (32) having a reducing only catalyst portion (34) and a downstream reducing-plus-oxidizing portion (36). Each portion (34, 36) includes an amount of tungsten. The reducing-plus-oxidizing catalyst portion (36) advantageously includes a greater amount of tungsten than the reducing catalyst portion (36) to markedly limit ammonia salt formation.

  9. 40 CFR 52.57 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions, of the rules and regulations of the State of Alabama, as adopted by the Alabama Air Pollution Control Commission on May 29, 1973, and amended on March 25, 1975, which...

  10. 40 CFR 52.57 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions, of the rules and regulations of the State of Alabama, as adopted by the Alabama Air Pollution Control Commission on May 29, 1973, and amended on March 25, 1975, which...

  11. 40 CFR 52.57 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions, of the rules and regulations of the State of Alabama, as adopted by the Alabama Air Pollution Control Commission on May 29, 1973, and amended on March 25, 1975, which...

  12. Sulfur

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, elemental sulfur and the byproduct sulfuric acid were produced at 109 operations in 29 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Total shipments were valued at about $1.6 billion. Elemental sulfur production was 8.2 Mt (9 million st); Louisiana and Texas accounted for about 53 percent of domestic production.

  13. 40 CFR 52.2525 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52.2525 Section 52.2525 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... strategy: Sulfur dioxide. (a) The provisions of § 51.112(a) are not met because the State did...

  14. 40 CFR 52.2525 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52.2525 Section 52.2525 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... strategy: Sulfur dioxide. (a) The provisions of § 51.112(a) are not met because the State did...

  15. 40 CFR 52.2525 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52.2525 Section 52.2525 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... strategy: Sulfur dioxide. (a) (b) EPA approves the attainment demonstration State Implementation Plan...

  16. 40 CFR 52.2033 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.2033 Section 52.2033 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... strategy: Sulfur oxides. (a) (b) EPA approves the attainment demonstration State Implementation Plan...

  17. 40 CFR 52.2525 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52.2525 Section 52.2525 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... strategy: Sulfur dioxide. (a) The provisions of § 51.112(a) are not met because the State did...

  18. 40 CFR 52.2525 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52.2525 Section 52.2525 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... strategy: Sulfur dioxide. (a) The provisions of § 51.112(a) are not met because the State did...

  19. Application of microturbines to control emissions from associated gas

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Darren D.

    2013-04-16

    A system for controlling the emission of associated gas produced from a reservoir. In an embodiment, the system comprises a gas compressor including a gas inlet in fluid communication with an associated gas source and a gas outlet. The gas compressor adjusts the pressure of the associated gas to produce a pressure-regulated associated gas. In addition, the system comprises a gas cleaner including a gas inlet in fluid communication with the outlet of the gas compressor, a fuel gas outlet, and a waste product outlet. The gas cleaner separates at least a portion of the sulfur and the water from the associated gas to produce a fuel gas. Further, the system comprises a gas turbine including a fuel gas inlet in fluid communication with the fuel gas outlet of the gas cleaner and an air inlet. Still further, the system comprises a choke in fluid communication with the air inlet.

  20. Removal of Sulfur from Natural Gas to Reduce Particulate Matter Emission from a Turbine Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spang, Brent Loren

    The present work investigates the effect of natural gas fuel sulfur on particulate emissions from stationary gas turbine engines used for electricity generation. Fuel sulfur from standard line gas was scrubbed using a system of fluidized reactor beds containing a specially designed activated carbon purpose built for sulfur absorption. A sulfur injection system using sonic orifices was designed and constructed to inject methyl mercaptan into the scrubbed gas stream at varying concentrations. Using these systems, particulate emissions created by various fuel sulfur levels between 0 and 8.3 ppmv were investigated. Particulate samples were collected from a Capstone C65 microturbine generator system using a Horiba MDLT-1302TA micro dilution tunnel and analyzed using a Horiba MEXA-1370PM particulate analyzer. In addition, ambient air samples were collected to determine incoming particulate levels in the combustion air. The Capstone C65 engine air filter was also tested for particulate removal efficiency by sampling downstream of the filter. To further differentiate the particulate entering the engine in the combustion air from particulate being emitted from the exhaust stack, two high efficiency HEPA filters were installed to eliminate a large portion of incoming particulate. Variable fuel sulfur testing showed that there was a strong correlation between total particulate emission factor and fuel sulfur concentration. Using eleven variable sulfur tests, it was determined that an increase of 1 ppmv fuel sulfur will produce an increase of approximately 3.2 microg/m3 total particulate. Also, the correlation also predicted that, for this particular engine, the total particulate emission factor for zero fuel sulfur was approximately 19.1 microg/m3. With the EC and OC data removed, the correlation became 3.1 microg/m3 of sulfur particulate produced for each ppmv of fuel sulfur. The correlation also predicted that with no fuel sulfur present, 6.6 microg/m3 of particulate will

  1. Comparison of the UCB sulfur recovery process with conventional sulfur recovery technology for treating recycle gas from a crude oil residuum hydrotreater. [UCBSRP sulfur recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, S.; Neumann, D.W.; Sciamanna, S.F.; Vorhis, F.H.

    1986-03-31

    The University of California, Berkeley, Sulfur Recovery Process (UCBSRP) is being developed as an alternative to conventional sulfur recovery technology for removing hydrogen sulfide from gas streams and converting it to elemental sulfur. In the UCBSRP the hydrogen sulfide is absorbed by a physical solvent and the resulting solution of H/sub 2/S is mixed with a stoichiometrically equivalent amount of slulfur dioxide dissolved in the same solvent. The reaction between the two sulfur compounds forms water, which is miscible with the solvent, and elemental sulfur, which crystallizes from solution when its solubility is exceeded. Part of the sulfur formed in the reaction is burned to make the SO/sub 2/ needed in the process, and the heat of combustion is recovered in a waste-heat boiler. Sulfur is recovered by cooling the solution, settling the additional crystals that form, and centrifuging the slurry pumped from the bottom of the crystallizer-surge tank. In this report the UCBSRP is compared to conventional technology for the case of the removal of H/sub 2/S from the recycle gas of a high-pressure petroleum residuum hydrotreater. The conventional technology selected for this comparison consists of an absorber/stripper operation using diethanol amine as the absorbent, a Claus sulfur plant, and a SCOT tail-gas treating unit. From this comparison it is estimated that the DFC for the UCBSRP would be about 61% of that for the conventional technology. The utility costs for this application of the UCBSRP are estimated to be less than the credit for the high-pressure steam produced whereas the utility costs for the conventional process are substantially more. 6 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery: Task 2. Topical report, September 30, 1992--August 29, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, W.J.; Neyman, M.; Brown, W.; Klint, B.W.; Kuehn, L.; O`Connell, J.; Paskall, H.; Dale, P.

    1993-08-01

    The primary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to present conceptual designs developed to treat a large portion of proven domestic natural gas reserves which are low quality. The conceptual designs separate hydrogen sulfide and large amounts of carbon dioxide (>20%) from methane, convert hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur, produce a substantial portion of the carbon dioxide as EOR or food grade CO{sub 2}, and vent residual CO{sub 2} virtually free of contaminating sulfur containing compounds. A secondary purpose of this Task 2 Report is to review existing gas treatment technology and identify existing commercial technologies currently used to treat large volumes of low quality natural gas with high acid content. Section II of this report defines low quality gas and describes the motivation for seeking technology to develop low quality gas reserves. The target low quality gas to be treated with the proposed technology is identified, and barriers to the production of this gas are reviewed. Section III provides a description of the Controlled Freeze Zone (CFG)-CNG technologies, their features, and perceived advantages. The three conceptual process designs prepared under Task 2 are presented in Section IV along with the design basis and process economics. Section V presents an overview of existing gas treatment technologies, organized into acid gas removal technology and sulfur recovery technology.

  3. Novel cellulose derivative, process for preparing the same and sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane comprising the same

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, K.; Shiomi, T.; Tezuka, Y.

    1987-09-15

    This patent relates to a novel cellulose derivative and a sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane comprising the same, and particularly to hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose, a process for preparing the same and the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane comprising the same. An object of the present invention is to provide hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose which is a novel cellulose derivative and useful as a material for the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane and a process for preparing the same. Another object of the present invention is to supply a novel sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane having an excellent sulfur dioxide gas permselectivity. The present invention provides hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose. The novel hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose of the present invention indicates markedly high sulfur dioxide gas permselectivity compared with the conventional cellulose derivatives, for example, cellulose acetate, ethyl cellulose, etc. Accordingly, the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane of the present invention can be utilized for separation, purification of sulfur dioxide gas from a gas mixture such as air or for concentration of sulfur dioxide gas in a gas mixture, and is highly practical in industrial use. More specifically, the sulfur dioxide gas permselective membrane is useful for, for example, removal of harmful sulfur dioxide gas from discharged gases from the viewpoint of environmental protection and purification of starting gases for synthesis, etc. from the viewpoint of industrial production. Further, the hydrocarbylsulfinylethyl cellulose of the present invention is useful for a thickening agent, binder, protective colloidal agent, etc.

  4. Modified dry limestone process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions

    DOEpatents

    Shale, Correll C.; Cross, William G.

    1976-08-24

    A method and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from flue gas comprise cooling and conditioning the hot flue gas to increase the degree of water vapor saturation prior to passage through a bed of substantially dry carbonate chips or lumps, e.g., crushed limestone. The reaction products form as a thick layer of sulfites and sulfates on the surface of the chips which is easily removed by agitation to restore the reactive surface of the chips.

  5. Sulfur-Bridged Terthiophene Dimers: How Sulfur Oxidation State Controls Interchromophore Electronic Coupling.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Chad D; Christensen, Peter R; Chronister, Eric L; Casanova, David; Wolf, Michael O; Bardeen, Christopher J

    2015-10-07

    Symmetric dimers have the potential to optimize energy transfer and charge separation in optoelectronic devices. In this paper, a combination of optical spectroscopy (steady-state and time-resolved) and electronic structure theory is used to analyze the photophysics of sulfur-bridged terthiophene dimers. This class of dimers has the unique feature that the interchromophore (intradimer) electronic coupling can be modified by varying the oxidation state of the bridging sulfur from sulfide (S), to sulfoxide (SO), to sulfone (SO2). Photoexcitation leads to the formation of a delocalized charge resonance state (S1) that relaxes quickly (<10 ps) to a charge-transfer state (S1*). The amount of charge-transfer character in S1* can be enhanced by increasing the oxidation state of the bridging sulfur group as well as the solvent polarity. The S1* state has a decreased intersystem crossing rate when compared to monomeric terthiophene, leading to an enhanced photoluminescence quantum yield. Computational results indicate that electrostatic screening by the bridging sulfur electrons is the key parameter that controls the amount of charge-transfer character. Control of the sulfur bridge oxidation state provides the ability to tune interchromophore interactions in covalent assemblies without altering the molecular geometry or solvent polarity. This capability provides a new strategy for the design of functional supermolecules with applications in organic electronics.

  6. Sulfur dioxide control (excludes coal-burning sources). (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning air pollution control technology and removal of sulfur dioxide from waste streams and atmospheres. Removal methods include flue gas desulfurization by wet or dry sorbents, electron beam processes, corona discharge, reductive gases, microbial processes, and burner injection systems. Applications to utilities, oil refineries, and the metallurgical and chemical industries are described. Control of sulfur dioxide produced from coal burning is discussed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. 40 CFR 52.928 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.928 Section 52.928 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.928 Control strategy:...

  8. 40 CFR 52.928 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.928 Section 52.928 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.928 Control strategy:...

  9. 40 CFR 52.928 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.928 Section 52.928 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.928 Control strategy:...

  10. 40 CFR 52.928 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.928 Section 52.928 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.928 Control strategy:...

  11. 40 CFR 52.928 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52.928 Section 52.928 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Kentucky § 52.928 Control strategy:...

  12. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2003-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 60-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a PFA differential fixed-bed micro reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.01-0.047 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, moisture concentrations, reaction pressures on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 61-89 v% hydrogen, 2,300-9,200-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-4,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 2.6-13.7 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 100-110 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 28-127 psia. The following results were obtained based on experimental data generated from the differential reactor system, and their interpretations, (1) Concentration of moisture and concentrations of both H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} appear to affect slightly reaction

  13. Alternative Strategies for Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Bryce I.

    1975-01-01

    Achievement of air quality goals requires careful consideration of alternative control strategies in view of national concerns with energy and the economy. Three strategies which might be used by coal fired steam electric plants to achieve ambient air quality standards for sulfur dioxide have been compared and the analysis presented. (Author/BT)

  14. 40 CFR 52.1601 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1601 Section 52.1601 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1601 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The applicable limitation on the sulfur... permit applied for that would authorize a relaxation in the sulfur-in-coal limitation at any...

  15. 40 CFR 52.1601 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1601 Section 52.1601 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1601 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The applicable limitation on the sulfur... permit applied for that would authorize a relaxation in the sulfur-in-coal limitation at any...

  16. 40 CFR 52.1601 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1601 Section 52.1601 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1601 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The applicable limitation on the sulfur... permit applied for that would authorize a relaxation in the sulfur-in-coal limitation at any...

  17. 40 CFR 52.1601 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1601 Section 52.1601 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1601 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The applicable limitation on the sulfur... permit applied for that would authorize a relaxation in the sulfur-in-coal limitation at any...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1601 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1601 Section 52.1601 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1601 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The applicable limitation on the sulfur... permit applied for that would authorize a relaxation in the sulfur-in-coal limitation at any...

  19. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. ); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. ); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. )

    1992-05-01

    This topical report on Sulfur Control'' presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT's electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  20. Electrochemical separation and concentration of sulfur containing gases from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Winnick, Jack

    1981-01-01

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4.sup.= or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S.sup.=. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  1. 40 CFR 52.1781 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and... Carolina § 52.1781 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) The plan's control strategy... State expects the resulting emission reductions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide from this...

  2. 40 CFR 52.1781 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and... Carolina § 52.1781 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) The plan's control strategy... State expects the resulting emission reductions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide from this...

  3. 40 CFR 52.1781 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and... Carolina § 52.1781 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) The plan's control strategy... State expects the resulting emission reductions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide from this...

  4. Effect of Environmental Factors on Sulfur Gas Emissions from Drywall

    SciTech Connect

    Maddalena, Randy

    2011-08-20

    Problem drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) investigation of problem drywall incorporates three parallel tracks: (1) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and reported health symptoms; (2) evaluating the relationship between the drywall and electrical and fire safety issues in affected homes; and (3) tracing the origin and the distribution of the drywall. To assess the potential impact on human health and to support testing for electrical and fire safety, the CPSC has initiated a series of laboratory tests that provide elemental characterization of drywall, characterization of chemical emissions, and in-home air sampling. The chemical emission testing was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The LBNL study consisted of two phases. In Phase 1 of this study, LBNL tested thirty drywall samples provided by CPSC and reported standard emission factors for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aldehydes, reactive sulfur gases (RSGs) and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). The standard emission factors were determined using small (10.75 liter) dynamic test chambers housed in a constant temperature environmental chamber. The tests were all run at 25 C, 50% relative humidity (RH) and with an area-specific ventilation rate of {approx}1.5 cubic meters per square meter of emitting surface per hour [m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}/h]. The thirty samples that were tested in Phase 1 included seventeen that were manufactured in China in 2005, 2006 and 2009, and thirteen that were manufactured in North America in 2009. The measured emission factors for VOCs and aldehydes were generally low and did not differ significantly between the Chinese and North American drywall. Eight of the samples tested had elevated emissions of volatile sulfur-containing compounds with total RSG emission factors between 32 and 258 micrograms per square meter

  5. 40 CFR 52.675 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides-Eastern Idaho Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides-Eastern... PLANS Idaho § 52.675 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides—Eastern Idaho Intrastate Air Quality Control Region... part of the sulfur dioxide (SO2) control strategy, is disapproved since it is inconsistent with...

  6. 40 CFR 52.675 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides-Eastern Idaho Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides-Eastern... PLANS Idaho § 52.675 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides—Eastern Idaho Intrastate Air Quality Control Region... part of the sulfur dioxide (SO2) control strategy, is disapproved since it is inconsistent with...

  7. Factors controlling sulfur concentrations in volcanic apatite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, G.; Luhr, J.F.; McGee, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Apatite crystals from two types of samples were analyzed by electron microprobe for 15 major and trace elements: (1) apatite in H2O- and S-saturated experimental charges of the 1982 El Chicho??n trachyandesite and (2) apatite in volcanic rocks erupted from 20 volcanoes. The SO3 contents of the experimental apatite increase with increasing oxygen fugacity (fo2), from ???0.04 wt% in reduced charges buffered by fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ), to 1.0-2.6 wt% in oxidized charges buffered by manganosite-hausmanite (MNH) or magnetite-hematite (MTH). The SO3 contents of MNH- and MTH-buffered apatite also generally increase with increasing pressure from 2 to 4 kbar and decreasing temperature from 950 to 800??C. The partition coefficient for SO3 between apatite and oxidized melt increases with decreasing temperature but appears to be independent of pressure. Apatites in volcanic rocks show a wide range of SO3 contents (<0.04 to 0.63 wt%). Our sample set includes one group known to contain primary anhydrite and a second group inferred to have been free of primary anhydrite. No systematic differences in apatite S contents are observed between these two groups. Our study was initiated to define the factors controlling S contents in apatite and to evaluate the hypothesis that high S contents in apatite could be characteristic of S-rich anhydrite-bearing magmas such as those erupted from El Chicho??n in 1982 and Pinatubo in 1991. This hypothesis is shown to be invalid, probably chiefly a consequence of the slow intra-crystaline diffusion that limits re-equilibration between early formed apatite and the evolving silicate melt. Contributing factors include early crystallization of most apatite over a relatively small temperature interval, common late-stage magmatic enrichment of S, progressive oxidation during magmatic evolution, and strong controls on S contents in apatite exerted fo2, temperature, and pressure.

  8. Elemental sulfur-producing high-temperature fuel gas desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.L.; Garrigan, P.C.; Berry, F.O.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary studies have shown that certain materials when added to air-regenerable, high-temperature, fuel gas desulfurization sorbents, such as iron oxide or zinc oxide, significantly increase elemental sulfur formation during regeneration. Although the full range of conditions under which these materials can be applied remains to be determined, successful applications could eliminate a costly SO/sub 2/ reduction step.

  9. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2001-11-06

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x

  10. 40 CFR 52.578 - Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and... Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 31859, June 2, 2011... of the user, the added text is set forth as follows: § 52.578 Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides...

  11. Low quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Siwajek, L.A.; Kuehn, L.

    1995-06-01

    The project comprises a Base Program and an Optional Program. The Base Program, which included NEPA reporting, process design and an experimental research plan for the optional program, was completed August 31, 1993 with submission of the Task 2 Final Report. The Optional Program, Task 3, began in July 1994. The project goal is to further develop and demonstrate two of the component technologies of the CFZ-CNG Process: (1) pilot-scale triple-point crystallization of carbon dioxide, producing commercially pure carbon dioxide from contaminated carbon dioxide at the rate of 25 ton/day, and (2) bench-scale modified high pressure Claus technology, recovering elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide at the rate of 200 lb/day.

  12. Determination of total sulfur compounds and benzothiazole in asphalt fume samples by gas chromatography with sulfur chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Jaycox, L B; Olsen, L D

    2000-09-01

    As part of a collaborative project between the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the Federal Highway Administration to evaluate asphalt pavers' exposures to asphalt fume and their potential health effects, a method was developed for the determination of total sulfur compounds and benzothiazole in asphalt fume samples. Asphalt fume samples were collected from asphalt mixtures with and without the addition of ground-up rubber tires. The asphalt fume samples were collected with sampling trains that consisted of a Teflon membrane filter and an XAD-2 adsorbent tube. Filter and sampling tube media were extracted with hexane and subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector. Separation was achieved with a 100 percent dimethyl polysiloxane fused silica column. Typical calibration curves had linear correlation coefficients of 0.99 or better with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5 percent. Benzothiazole desorption efficiency (DE) determined using spiked sampling tubes ranged from 96.5 percent at 5.0 micrograms to 89.4 percent at 40 micrograms with RSD values from 0.9 to 4.0 percent. Benzothiazole storage recovery determined using sampling tubes spiked at 20 micrograms and refrigerated for 30 days at 4 degrees C was 89.8 percent when corrected for the DE with an RSD of 1.1 percent. The limit of detection for the method determined using spiked sampling tubes was 0.30 microgram. Quantitation for total sulfur compounds and benzothiazole was against benzothiazole standards in hexane. Because of detector selectivity, sample preparation consisted of a simple hexane extraction even when samples had a high background due to hydrocarbon overload. Detector sensitivity provided quantitation in the sub-microgram region. Because of the sample preparation step and because benzothiazole was determined during the same analysis run, this method is straightforward and analytically efficient. The method has been used to

  13. Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Qu, Zan; Chi, Yao; Qiao, Shao-Hua; Dod, Ray; Chang, Shih-Ger; Miller, Charles

    2008-07-02

    Oxidation of Hg0 with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg0 by gas phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas phase reaction rate constants between Hg0 and the sulfur/chlorine compounds were determined, and the effects of temperature and the main components in flue gases were studied. The gas phase reaction between Hg0 and SCl2 is shown to be more rapid than the gas phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1(+-0.5) x 10-18 mL-molecules-1cdots-1 at 373oK. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibited the gas phase reaction of Hg0 with sulfur-chlorine compounds. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg0 removal is about 90percent with 5 ppm SCl2 or S2Cl2 and 40 g/m3 of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that co-injection of 3-5 ppm of SCl2 (or S2Cl2) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90percent of Hg0 can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 is used. Unlike gas phase reactions, NO exhibited little effect on Hg0 reactions with SCl2 or S2Cl2 on flyash or activated carbon. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg0/SCl2 or Hg0/S2Cl2 reactions. Additionally, about 8percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution.

  14. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2002-02-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that employ coal and natural gas and produce electric power and clean transportation fuels. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. Specifically, we aim to: Measure the kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur over selective catalysts in the presence of major

  15. Low-quality natural gas sulfur removal/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    K. Amo; R.W. Baker; V.D. Helm; T. Hofmann; K.A. Lokhandwala; I. Pinnau; M.B. Ringer; T.T. Su; L. Toy; J.G. Wijmans

    1998-01-29

    A significant fraction of U.S. natural gas reserves are subquality due to the presence of acid gases and nitrogen; 13% of existing reserves (19 trillion cubic feed) may be contaminated with hydrogen sulfide. For natural gas to be useful as fuel and feedstock, this hydrogen sulfide has to be removed to the pipeline specification of 4 ppm. The technology used to achieve these specifications has been amine, or similar chemical or physical solvent, absorption. Although mature and widely used in the gas industry, absorption processes are capital and energy-intensive and require constant supervision for proper operation. This makes these processes unsuitable for treating gas at low throughput, in remote locations, or with a high concentration of acid gases. The U.S. Department of Energy, recognizes that exploitation of smaller, more sub-quality resources will be necessary to meet demand as the large gas fields in the U.S. are depleted. In response to this need, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has developed membranes and a membrane process for removing hydrogen sulfide from natural gas. During this project, high-performance polymeric thin-film composite membranes were brought from the research stage to field testing. The membranes have hydrogen sulfide/methane selectivities in the range 35 to 60, depending on the feed conditions, and have been scaled up to commercial-scale production. A large number of spiral-wound modules were manufactured, tested and optimized during this project, which culminated in a field test at a Shell facility in East Texas. The short field test showed that membrane module performance on an actual natural gas stream was close to that observed in the laboratory tests with cleaner streams. An extensive technical and economic analysis was performed to determine the best applications for the membrane process. Two areas were identified: the low-flow-rate, high-hydrogen-sulfide-content region and the high-flow-rate, high

  16. High-voltage electrical apparatus utilizing an insulating gas of sulfur hexafluoride and helium

    DOEpatents

    Wootton, Roy E.

    1980-01-01

    High-voltage electrical apparatus includes an outer housing at low potential, an inner electrode disposed within the outer housing at high potential with respect thereto, and support means for insulatably supporting the inner electrode within the outer housing. Conducting particles contaminate the interior of the outer housing, and an insulating gas electrically insulates the inner electrode from the outer housing even in the presence of the conducting particles. The insulating gas is comprised of sulfur hexafluoride at a partial pressure of from about 2.9 to about 3.4 atmospheres absolute, and helium at a partial pressure from about 1.1 to about 11.4 atmospheres absolute. The sulfur hexafluoride comprises between 20 and 65 volume percent of the insulating gas.

  17. Performance of a pilot-scale wet electrostatic precipitator for the control of sulfuric acid mist.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiayu; Wang, Hongmei; Shi, Yingjie; Zhang, Fan; Dang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hui; Shu, Yun; Deng, Shuang; Liu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    The use of a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is often regarded as a viable option to reduce sulfuric acid mist emitted from the wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) tower in coal-fired power plants. In this study, a pilot-scale wet electrostatic precipitator equipped with a wall-cooled collection electrode is investigated for the control of sulfuric acid mist from a simulated WFGD system. The results show that due to partial charging effect, the removal efficiency of sulfuric acid aerosol decreases when the aerosol size decreases to several tens of nanometers. Moreover, due to the plasma-induced effect, a large number of ultrafine sulfuric acid aerosols below 50 nm formed at a voltage higher than 24 kV inside the WESP. The percentages of submicron-sized aerosols significantly increase together with the voltage. To minimize the adverse plasma-induced effect, a WESP should be operated at a high gas velocity with an optimum high voltage. Even at a high flue gas velocity of 2.3 m s(-1), the mass concentration and the total number concentration of uncaptured sulfuric acid aerosols at the WESP outlet are as low as ca. 0.6 mg m(-3) and ca. 10(4) 1 cm(-3) at 28 kV, respectively. The corresponding removal efficiencies were respectively higher than 99.4 and 99.9 % and are very similar to that at 1.1 and 1.6 m s(-1). Moreover, the condensation-induced aerosol growth enhances the removal of sulfuric acid mist inside a WESP and enables a low emission concentration of ca. 0.65 mg m(-3) with a corresponding removal efficiency superior to 99.4 % even at a low voltage of 21 kV, and of ca. 0.35 mg m(-3) with a corresponding removal efficiency superior to 99.6 % at a higher voltage level of 26 kV.

  18. Effect of biologically produced sulfur on gas absorption in a biotechnological hydrogen sulfide removal process.

    PubMed

    Kleinjan, Wilfred E; Lammers, Jos N J J; de Keizer, Arie; Janssen, Albert J H

    2006-07-05

    Absorption of hydrogen sulfide in aqueous suspensions of biologically produced sulfur particles was studied in a batch stirred cell reactor, and in a continuous set-up, consisting of a lab-scale gas absorber column and a bioreactor. Presence of biosulfur particles was found to enhance the absorption rate of H(2)S gas in the mildly alkaline liquid. The mechanism for this enhancement was however found to depend on the type of particles used. In the gently stirred cell reactor only small hydrophilic particles were present (d(p) < 3 microm) and the enhancement of the H(2)S absorption rate can be explained from the heterogeneous reaction between dissolved H(2)S and solid elemental sulfur to polysulfide ions, S(x) (2-). Conditions favoring enhanced H(2)S absorption for these hydrophilic particles are: low liquid side mass transfer (k(L)), high sulfur content, and presence of polysulfide ions. In the set-up of gas absorber column and bioreactor, both small hydrophilic particles and larger, more hydrophobic particles were continuously produced (d(p) up to 20 microm). Here, observed enhancement could not be explained by the heterogeneous reaction between sulfide and sulfur, due to the relatively low specific particle surface area, high k(L), and low [S(x) (2-)]. A more likely explanation for enhancement here is the more hydrophobic behavior of the larger particles. A local increase of the hydrophobic sulfur particle concentration near the gas/liquid interface and specific adsorption of H(2)S at the particle surface can result in an increase in the H(2)S absorption rate.

  19. 40 CFR 52.528 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and... strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) In a letter dated October 10, 1986, the Florida... sulfur dioxide in the Everglades National Park. These plants must meet the 0.1#/MMBTU particulate...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1475 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1475 Section 52.1475 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1475 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur oxides in the Nevada Intrastate Region. (b) Article...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.2731 Section 52.2731 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Rico § 52.2731 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of... the national standards for sulfur oxides in the areas of Aguirre, Barceloneta, Trujillo...

  2. 40 CFR 52.528 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and... strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) In a letter dated October 10, 1986, the Florida... sulfur dioxide in the Everglades National Park. These plants must meet the 0.1#/MMBTU particulate...

  3. 40 CFR 52.528 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and... strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) In a letter dated October 10, 1986, the Florida... sulfur dioxide in the Everglades National Park. These plants must meet the 0.1#/MMBTU particulate...

  4. 40 CFR 52.1475 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1475 Section 52.1475 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1475 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur oxides in the Nevada Intrastate Region. (b) Article...

  5. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.2731 Section 52.2731 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Rico § 52.2731 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of... the national standards for sulfur oxides in the areas of Aguirre, Barceloneta, Trujillo...

  6. 40 CFR 52.1475 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1475 Section 52.1475 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1475 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur oxides in the Nevada Intrastate Region. (b) Article...

  7. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.2731 Section 52.2731 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Rico § 52.2731 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of... the national standards for sulfur oxides in the areas of Aguirre, Barceloneta, Trujillo...

  8. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.2731 Section 52.2731 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Rico § 52.2731 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of... the national standards for sulfur oxides in the areas of Aguirre, Barceloneta, Trujillo...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1475 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1475 Section 52.1475 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1475 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur oxides in the Nevada Intrastate Region. (b) Article...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1475 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1475 Section 52.1475 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1475 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur oxides in the Nevada Intrastate Region. (b) Article...

  11. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.2731 Section 52.2731 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Rico § 52.2731 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of... the national standards for sulfur oxides in the areas of Aguirre, Barceloneta, Trujillo...

  12. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi

  13. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rondo, L; Ehrhart, S; Kürten, A; Adamov, A; Bianchi, F; Breitenlechner, M; Duplissy, J; Franchin, A; Dommen, J; Donahue, N M; Dunne, E M; Flagan, R C; Hakala, J; Hansel, A; Keskinen, H; Kim, J; Jokinen, T; Lehtipalo, K; Leiminger, M; Praplan, A; Riccobono, F; Rissanen, M P; Sarnela, N; Schobesberger, S; Simon, M; Sipilä, M; Smith, J N; Tomé, A; Tröstl, J; Tsagkogeorgas, G; Vaattovaara, P; Winkler, P M; Williamson, C; Wimmer, D; Baltensperger, U; Kirkby, J; Kulmala, M; Petäjä, T; Worsnop, D R; Curtius, J

    2016-03-27

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  14. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  15. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit. PMID:27610289

  16. Hydrogen sulfide generation by reaction of natural gas, sulfur, and steam. Report of investigations/1981

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, S.R.; Crocker, L.; Nissen, W.I.

    1981-07-01

    One Bureau of Mines goal is to minimize the undesirable environmental impacts associated with industrial plants emitting waste gases containing SO/sub 2/. To help meet this goal, a regenerable flue gas desulfurization process was developed. This process, known as the citrate process, uses a buffered weak acid solution to absorb SO/sub 2/ from the waste gas. The absorbed SO/sub 2/ is reacted with H/sub 2/S to precipitate elemental sulfur and regenerate the solution for recycle. The H/sub 2/S feedstock for the process, if not otherwise available, may be produced by reacting two-thirds of the recovered elemental sulfur with natural gas and steam. Laboratory investigations and pilot plant operations were conducted by the Bureau to determine if H2S from the natural gas, sulfur, and steam reaction was suitable for the citrate process. The laboratory investigations, in which an H2S generator was integrated with other citrate process operations, provided a basis for design and operation of the pilot plant. The objective of the pilot plant was primarily to provide H2S for the citrate process pilot plant at the Bunker Hill Co. lead smelter in Kellogg, Idaho.

  17. Venus volcanism: Rate estimates from laboratory studies of sulfur gas-solid reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.; Prinn, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    Thermochemical reactions between sulfur-bearing gases in the atmosphere of Venus and calcium-, iron-, magnesium-, and sulfur-bearing minerals on the surface of Venus are an integral part of a hypothesized cycle of thermochemical and photochemical reactions responsible for the maintenance of the global sulfuric acid cloud cover on Venus. SO2 is continually removed from the Venus atmosphere by reaction with calcium bearing minerals on the planet's surface. The rate of volcanism required to balance SO2 depletion by reactions with calcium bearing minerals on the Venus surface can therefore be deduced from a knowledge of the relevant gas-solid reaction rates combined with reasonable assumptions about the sulfur content of the erupted material (gas + magma). A laboratory program was carried out to measure the rates of reaction between SO2 and possible crustal minerals on Venus. The reaction of CaCO3(calcite) + SO2 yields CaSO4 (anhydrite) + CO was studied. Brief results are given.

  18. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 2: SOx/Nox/Hg Removal for High Sulfur Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Degenstein; Minish Shah; Doughlas Louie

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxy-combustion technology. The objective of Task 2 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning high sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was not only to investigate a new method of flue gas purification but also to produce useful acid byproduct streams as an alternative to using a traditional FGD and SCR for flue gas processing. During the project two main constraints were identified that limit the ability of the process to achieve project goals. 1) Due to boiler island corrosion issues >60% of the sulfur must be removed in the boiler island with the use of an FGD. 2) A suitable method could not be found to remove NOx from the concentrated sulfuric acid product, which limits sale-ability of the acid, as well as the NOx removal efficiency of the process. Given the complexity and safety issues inherent in the cycle it is concluded that the acid product would not be directly saleable and, in this case, other flue gas purification schemes are better suited for SOx/NOx/Hg control when burning high sulfur coal, e.g. this project's Task 3 process or a traditional FGD and SCR.

  19. Kinetics of Direct Oxidation of H2S in Coal Gas to Elemental Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-11-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct

  20. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-06-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the seventh reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO3 removal results were presented in the semi

  1. Aqueous process for recovering sulfur from hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Arunabha

    2015-05-05

    A process for recovering sulfur from a hydrogen sulfide-bearing gas utilizes an aqueous reaction medium, a temperature of about 110-150.degree. C., and a high enough pressure to maintain the aqueous reaction medium in a liquid state. The process reduces material and equipment costs and addresses the environmental disadvantages associated with known processes that rely on high boiling point organic solvents.

  2. 40 CFR 80.500 - What are the implementation dates for the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control program? 80.500 Section 80.500 Protection of Environment... Information § 80.500 What are the implementation dates for the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control... sulfur content standard in § 80.520(c). (1) Beginning June 1, 2006, the sulfur content standard of §...

  3. 40 CFR 80.500 - What are the implementation dates for the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control program? 80.500 Section 80.500 Protection of Environment... Information § 80.500 What are the implementation dates for the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control... sulfur content standard in § 80.520(c). (1) Beginning June 1, 2006, the sulfur content standard of §...

  4. 40 CFR 80.500 - What are the implementation dates for the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control program? 80.500 Section 80.500 Protection of Environment... Information § 80.500 What are the implementation dates for the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control... sulfur content standard in § 80.520(c). (1) Beginning June 1, 2006, the sulfur content standard of §...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1781 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.1781 Section 52.1781 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Carolina § 52.1781 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) The plan's control...

  6. 40 CFR 52.1781 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.1781 Section 52.1781 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Carolina § 52.1781 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) The plan's control...

  7. DISSOCIATION OF SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE TRACER GAS IN THE PRESENCE OF AN INDOOR COMBUSTION SOURCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    As an odorless, non-toxic, and inert compound, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the most widely used tracer gases in indoor air quality studies in both controlled and uncontrolled environments. This compound may be subject to hydrolysis under elevated temperature to form acidi...

  8. 40 CFR 52.2231 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.2231 Section 52.2231 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.2231 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) Part D conditional approval....

  9. 40 CFR 52.2679 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide. 52.2679 Section 52.2679 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....2679 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide. (a) Approvals of the following rules are...

  10. 40 CFR 52.2679 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide. 52.2679 Section 52.2679 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....2679 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide. (a) Approvals of the following rules are...

  11. 40 CFR 52.2231 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.2231 Section 52.2231 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.2231 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) Part D conditional approval....

  12. 40 CFR 52.2130 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.2130 Section 52.2130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Carolina § 52.2130 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In letters dated May 7,...

  13. 40 CFR 52.2231 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.2231 Section 52.2231 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.2231 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) Part D conditional approval....

  14. 40 CFR 52.2679 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide. 52.2679 Section 52.2679 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....2679 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide. (a) Approvals of the following rules are...

  15. 40 CFR 52.2231 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.2231 Section 52.2231 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.2231 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) Part D conditional approval....

  16. 40 CFR 52.2231 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.2231 Section 52.2231 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.2231 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) Part D conditional approval....

  17. 40 CFR 52.2130 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.2130 Section 52.2130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Carolina § 52.2130 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In letters dated May 7,...

  18. 40 CFR 52.2130 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.2130 Section 52.2130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Carolina § 52.2130 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In letters dated May 7,...

  19. 40 CFR 52.2679 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide. 52.2679 Section 52.2679 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....2679 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide. (a) Approvals of the following rules are...

  20. 40 CFR 52.2679 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide. 52.2679 Section 52.2679 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....2679 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide. (a) Approvals of the following rules are...

  1. 40 CFR 52.2130 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.2130 Section 52.2130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Carolina § 52.2130 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In letters dated May 7,...

  2. 40 CFR 52.2130 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.2130 Section 52.2130 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Carolina § 52.2130 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In letters dated May 7,...

  3. Ferric iron-bearing sediments as a mineral trap for CO2 sequestration: Iron reduction using sulfur-bearing waste gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palandri, J.L.; Kharaka, Y.K.

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel method for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 in ferrous carbonate, using ferric iron present in widespread redbeds and other sediments. Iron can be reduced by SO2 that is commonly a component of flue gas produced by combustion of fossil fuel, or by adding SO2 or H2S derived from other industrial processes to the injected waste gas stream. Equilibrium and kinetically controlled geochemical simulations at 120 bar and 50 and 100 ??C with SO2 or H2S show that iron can be transformed almost entirely to siderite thereby trapping CO2, and simultaneously, that sulfur can be converted predominantly to dissolved sulfate. If there is an insufficient amount of sulfur-bearing gas relative to CO2 as for typical flue gas, then some of the iron is not reduced, and some of the CO2 is not sequestered. If there is an excess of sulfur-bearing gas, then complete iron reduction is ensured, and some of the iron precipitates as pyrite or other solid iron sulfide, depending on their relative precipitation kinetics. Gas mixtures with insufficient sulfur relative to CO2 can be used in sediments containing Ca, Mg, or other divalent metals capable of precipitating carbonate minerals. For quartz arenite with an initial porosity of 21% and containing 0.25 wt.% Fe2O3, approximately 0.7 g of CO2 is sequestered per kg of rock, and the porosity decrease is less than 0.03%. Sequestration of CO2 using ferric iron has the advantage of disposing of SO2 that may already be present in the combustion gas. ?? 2005 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Gas-phase Mechanisms of Sulfur Isotope Mass-independent Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in sulfur isotopes in ancient sulfur-bearing rocks (Farquhar et al. 2000a) is interpreted as evidence for gas-phase MIF processes in the early Earth atmosphere. This interpretation is made by analogy with oxygen isotope MIF in the modern atmosphere (produced during ozone formation), and by laboratory photolysis experiments on SO2 (Farquhar et al. 2001; Wing et al. 2004) that yield both elemental sulfur and sulfate with S MIF signatures at wavelengths above and below the SO2 dissociation limit. What is lacking is a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms of gas-phase S MIF. Quantification is essential in order to extract the full implications of sulfur MIF throughout Earth history, including for bacterial sulfate reduction processes which largely conserve D33S and D36S. Several sulfur MIF mechanisms are possible. The most obvious is the gas-phase thiozone reaction, which is isovalent to the ozone formation reaction. Ozone formation produces a well-known MIF signature in oxygen isotopes (Thiemens and Heidenreich 1983), and a symmetry-dependent non-RRKM mechanism has been proposed as the origin of O MIF (Gao and Marcus 2001). It is possible and perhaps likely that S3 formation also proceeds by a non-RRKM process. Data are lacking on isotopic (an even non-isotopic) rates of S3 formation, so it is not possible to make definitive statements about MIF in S3 at this time. However modeling results suggest that the vapor pressure of S2 is too low for gas-phase S3 formation to be significant. Two additional species that may exhibit a non-RRKM MIF signature are S2O2 and S4. Again, there is a lack of isotopomer-specific kinetic data for these reactions, and gas-phase formation of S4 is likely inconsequential. Perhaps the most obvious mechanism is simply the primary act of SO2 photolysis. The SO2 absorption spectrum is highly structured, with strong vibronic bands above and below the dissociation limit. In contrast H2S, with its mostly

  5. Surface acoustic wave sensors/gas chromatography; and Low quality natural gas sulfur removal and recovery CNG Claus sulfur recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Klint, B.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-12-01

    This topical report consists of the two titled projects. Surface Acoustic Wave/Gas Chromatography (SAW/GC) provides a cost-effective system for collecting real-time field screening data for characterization of vapor streams contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Model 4100 can be used in a field screening mode to produce chromatograms in 10 seconds. This capability will allow a project manager to make immediate decisions and to avoid the long delays and high costs associated with analysis by off-site analytical laboratories. The Model 4100 is currently under evaluation by the California Environmental Protection Agency Technology Certification Program. Initial certification focuses upon the following organics: cis-dichloroethylene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and o-xylene. In the second study the CNG Claus process is being evaluated for conversion and recovery of elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide, especially found in low quality natural gas. This report describes the design, construction and operation of a pilot scale plant built to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the integrated CNG Claus process.

  6. Sulfur-doped graphene via thermal exfoliation of graphite oxide in H2S, SO2, or CS2 gas.

    PubMed

    Poh, Hwee Ling; Šimek, Petr; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2013-06-25

    Doping of graphene with heteroatoms is an effective way to tailor its properties. Here we describe a simple and scalable method of doping graphene lattice with sulfur atoms during the thermal exfoliation process of graphite oxides. The graphite oxides were first prepared by Staudenmaier, Hofmann, and Hummers methods followed by treatments in hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, or carbon disulfide. The doped materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, combustible elemental analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The ζ-potential and conductivity of sulfur-doped graphenes were also investigated in this paper. It was found that the level of doping is more dramatically influenced by the type of graphite oxide used rather than the type of sulfur-containing gas used during exfoliation. Resulting sulfur-doped graphenes act as metal-free electrocatalysts for an oxygen reduction reaction.

  7. Modeling and control study of the NASA 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel for use with sulfur hexafluoride medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishna, S.; Kilgore, W. Allen

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel is to be modified to operate with sulfur hexafluoride gas while retaining its present capability to operate with nitrogen. The modified tunnel will provide high Reynolds number flow on aerodynamic models with two different test gases. The document details a study of the SF6 tunnel performance boundaries, thermodynamic modeling of the tunnel process, nonlinear dynamical simulation of math model to yield tunnel responses, the closed loop control requirements, control laws, and mechanization of the control laws on the microprocessor based controller.

  8. Investigation on mercury removal method from flue gas in the presence of sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongpeng; Qu, Zan; Xu, Haomiao; Wang, Wenhua; Yan, Naiqiang

    2014-08-30

    A new integrated process was developed for the removal and reclamation of mercury from the flue gas in the presence of SO2, typically derived from nonferrous metal smelting. The new process contains a pre-desulfurization unit (Stage I) and a co-absorption unit (Stage II). In Stage I, 90% of the SO2 from flue gas can be efficiently absorbed by ferric sulfate and reclaimed sulfuric acid. Meanwhile, the proportion of Hg(2+) and Hg(0) in the flue gas can be redistributed in this stage. Then, over 95% of the Hg(0) and the residual SO2 can be removed simultaneously with a composite absorption solution from the flue gas in Stage II, which is much more efficient for the Hg(0) reclaiming than the traditional method. The composite absorption solution in Stage II, which is composed of 0.1g/L HgSO4, 1.0% H2O2 and H2SO4, could effectively remove and reclaim Hg(0) overcoming the negative effect of SO2 on Hg(0) absorption. Moreover, the concentrations of HgSO4 and H2O2 were adjusted with the changes in of the concentrations of Hg(0) and SO2 in the flue gas. It is a potential and promising technology for the mercury removal and reclaim from the flue gas in the presence of SO2.

  9. 78 FR 5303 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri; Control of Sulfur Emissions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... Sulfur Emissions From Stationary Boilers AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct... ) emissions (a precursor pollutant to PM 2.5 ), from industrial boilers. EPA is approving this revision... 10 CSR 10- 5.570 Control of Sulfur Emissions from Stationary Boilers to the SIP. This rule...

  10. 40 CFR 52.528 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.528 Section 52.528 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) In a letter dated October 10, 1986, the...

  11. 40 CFR 52.528 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.528 Section 52.528 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) In a letter dated October 10, 1986, the...

  12. 40 CFR 52.578 - Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.578 Section 52.578 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In a letter dated March 26, 1987, the Georgia Department...

  13. 40 CFR 52.578 - Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.578 Section 52.578 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In a letter dated March 26, 1987, the Georgia Department...

  14. 40 CFR 52.578 - Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.578 Section 52.578 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In a letter dated March 26, 1987, the Georgia Department...

  15. 40 CFR 52.933 - Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.933 Section 52.933 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In a letter dated March 27, 1987, the Kentucky...

  16. 40 CFR 52.578 - Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.578 Section 52.578 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In a letter dated March 26, 1987, the Georgia Department...

  17. 40 CFR 52.933 - Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.933 Section 52.933 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) In a letter dated March 27, 1987, the...

  18. 40 CFR 52.62 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. 52.62 Section 52.62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In a letter dated May 29, 1987, the Alabama Department...

  19. 40 CFR 52.675 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides-Eastern Idaho Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of Sulfur Oxide Emissions from Sulfuric Acid Plants) of the “Rules and Regulations for the Control of... have previously been established for certain existing acid plants in this Air Quality Control Region... apply to existing acid plants with approved or promulgated emission limits that are more stringent...

  20. 40 CFR 52.675 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides-Eastern Idaho Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of Sulfur Oxide Emissions from Sulfuric Acid Plants) of the “Rules and Regulations for the Control of... have previously been established for certain existing acid plants in this Air Quality Control Region... apply to existing acid plants with approved or promulgated emission limits that are more stringent...

  1. Kinetics of thermochemical gas-solid reactions important in the Venus sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The thermochemical net reaction CaCO3 + SO2 yields CaSO4 + CO is predicted to be an important sink for incorporation of SO2 into the Venus crust. The reaction rate law was established to understand the dependence of rate on experimental variables such as temperature and partial pressure of SO2, CO2, and O2. The experimental approach was a variant of the thermogravimetric method often employed to study the kinetics of thermochemical gas-solid reactions. Clear calcite crystals were heated at constant temperature in SO2-bearing gas streams for varying time periods. Reaction rate was determined by three independent methods. A weighted linear least squares fit to all rate data yielded a rate equation. Based on the Venera 13, 14 and Vega 2 observations of CaO content of the Venus atmosphere, SO2 at the calculated rate would be removed from the Venus atmosphere in about 1,900,00 years. The most plausible endogenic source of the sulfur needed to replenish atmospheric SO2 is volcanism. The annual amount of erupted material needed for the replenishment depends on sulfur content; three ratios are used to calculate rates ranging from 0.4 to 11 cu km/year. This geochemically derived volcanism rate can be used to test if geophysically derived rates are correct. The work also suggests that Venus is less volcanically active than the Earth.

  2. Smart battery controller for lithium sulfur dioxide batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, Terrill; Bard, Arnold; Testa, Bruce; Shader, William

    1992-08-01

    Each year, the U.S. Army purchases millions of lithium sulfur dioxide batteries for use in portable electronics equipment. Because of their superior rate capability and service life over a wide variety of conditions, lithium batteries are the power source of choice for military equipment. There is no convenient method of determining the available energy remaining in partially used lithium batteries; hence, users do not take full advantage of all the available battery energy. Currently, users replace batteries before each mission, which leads to premature disposal, and results in the waste of millions of dollars in battery energy every year. Another problem of the lithium battery is that it is necessary to ensure complete discharge of the cells when the useful life of the battery has been expended, or when a hazardous condition exists; a hazardous condition may result in one or more of the cells venting. The Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory has developed a working prototype of a smart battery controller (SBC) that addresses these problems.

  3. Sulfur-emission-control technology for coal-conversion plants. [List of 60 processes with uses, brief description and flowsheet; 63 references

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, R.C.; Herman, D.R.; Smock, M.E.

    1981-10-01

    The degree of commercialization and the industrial applications of each control technology are summarized in Table 2. The technologies which have been used or planned for coal conversion facilities are listed in Table 3. The Chiyoda Thoroughbred 101 was the most used process for flue gas SO/sub 2/ control, followed by the Citrate process. Both are recovery processes. However, throwaway processes are much more common for flue gas desulfurization. Therefore, both the dual alkali process and a conventional lime/limestone process should be included when evaluating control technology options. Thus, the SO/sub x/ removal processes recommended for further study are: (1) Chiyoda Thoroughbred 101; (2) Citrate; (3) generalized dual-alkali (e.g., CEA-ADL); and (4) conventional lime/limestone scrubbing. From Table 3, the Rectisol, Stretford, Benfield, Selexol, Claus and Amoco sulfur recovery processes were most often chosen for acid gas removal and sulfur recovery. These processes are all widely commercialized. For tail gas clean-up from sulfur recovery plants, the SCOT, IFP, Beavon and W-L SO/sub 2/ recovery processes were most often specified for coal conversion facilities, as shown in Table 3. They are all fully commercialized and applicable technologies, as shown in Table 2. The control technologies selected for further detailed examination cover the general types of sulfur control schemes potentially applicable to coal conversion facilities. Further, they are all commercially available.

  4. Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

    1999-11-15

    The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

  5. Gas turbine engine fuel control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A variable orifice system is described that is responsive to compressor inlet pressure and temperature, compressor discharge pressure and rotational speed of a gas-turbine engine. It is incorporated into a hydraulic circuit that includes a zero gradient pump driven at a speed proportional to the speed of the engine. The resulting system provides control of fuel rate for starting, steady running, acceleration and deceleration under varying altitudes and flight speeds.

  6. Study of the ammonia (gas)-sulfuric acid (aerosol) reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.; Takano, H.; Anderson, G.R.

    1983-06-01

    An experimental study of the reaction rate between monodisperse sulfuric acid aerosols and ammonia gas is described. Reactions took place in a laminar flow reactor at 24/sup 0/C and 6% relative humidity, and reaction products were sampled from the core of the flow so that reaction times were well defined. For the data reported here, the reaction time was 5.0 +/- 0.5 s, ammonia concentrations ranged from 13 to 63 ppb, and particle sizes ranged from 0.03 to 0.2 ..mu..m. The extent of reaction was determined by comparing the hygroscopic and deliquescent properties of the product aerosols with known properties of aerosols consisting of internal mixtures of sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate. It was found that the average fraction of ammonia-aerosol collisions that resulted in chemical reaction during neutralization decreased from 0.40 +/- 0.10 for 0.058-..mu..m particles to 0.18 +/- 0.03 for 0.10-..mu..m particles. Differential mobility analyzers were used for generating the monodisperse aerosols and also for measuring the hygroscopic and deliquescent properties of the product aerosols.

  7. Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide adsorbents for diesel engine emission control

    DOEpatents

    Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

    2011-03-15

    Disclosed herein are sorbents and devices for controlling sulfur oxides emissions as well as systems including such sorbents and devices. Also disclosed are methods for making and using the disclosed sorbents, devices and systems. In one embodiment the disclosed sorbents can be conveniently regenerated, such as under normal exhaust stream from a combustion engine, particularly a diesel engine. Accordingly, also disclosed are combustion vehicles equipped with sulfur dioxide emission control devices.

  8. Gasoline from natural gas by sulfur processing. Quarterly report No. 8, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Erekson, E.J.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents the work performed at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) during the eighth program quarter from April 1 to June 30, 1995, under Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC22-93PC92114. This program has coordinated funding for Task 1 from IGT`s Sustaining Membership Program (SMP), while DOE is funding Tasks 2 through 8. Progress in all tasks is reported here. The overall objective of this research project is to develop a catalytic process to convert natural gas to liquid transportation fuels. The process consists of two steps that each use catalysts and sulfur-containing intermediates: (1) converting natural gas to CS{sub 2} and (2) converting CS{sub 2} to gasoline-range liquids. Experimental data will be generated to demonstrate the potential of catalysts and the overall process. During this quarter, progress in the following areas has been made: (1) Short duration activity. test on catalyst IGT-MS-103 showed that no deactivation over a 10 hour period. (2) A preliminary economic estimate for the application of the HSM process technology in a refinery showed potential for profitable commercialization. Engineers at oil companies have requested further information. (3) Tests with equimolar amounts of H{sub 2}S and CO{sub 2} in the feed showed that CS{sub 2} yield decrease with the addition of CO{sub 2}.

  9. Effect of fuel gas composition in chemical-looping combustion with Ni-based oxygen carriers. 1. Fate of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Labiano, F.; de Diego, L.F.; Gayan, P.; Adanez, J.; Abad, A.; Dueso, C.

    2009-03-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has been suggested among the best alternatives to reduce the economic cost of CO{sub 2} capture using fuel gas because CO{sub 2} is inherently separated in the process. For gaseous fuels, natural gas, refinery gas, or syngas from coal gasification can be used. These fuels may contain different amounts of sulfur compounds, such as H{sub 2}S and COS. An experimental investigation of the fate of sulfur during CH{sub 4} combustion in a 500 W{sub th} CLC prototype using a Ni-based oxygen carrier has been carried out. The effect on the oxygen carrier behavior and combustion efficiency of several operating conditions such as temperature and H{sub 2}S concentration has been analyzed. Nickel sulfide, Ni3S{sub 2}, was formed at all operating conditions in the fuel reactor, which produced an oxygen carrier deactivation and lower combustion efficiencies. However, the oxygen carrier recovered their initial reactivity after certain time without sulfur addition. The sulfides were transported to the air reactor where SO{sub 2} was produced as final gas product. Agglomeration problems derived from the sulfides formation were never detected during continuous operation. Considering both operational and environmental aspects, fuels with sulfur contents below 100 vppm H{sub 2}S seem to be adequate to be used in an industrial CLC plant.

  10. Evaluation of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with flame photometric detection: potential application for sulfur speciation in shale oil.

    PubMed

    Mitrevski, Blagoj; Amer, Mohammad W; Chaffee, Alan L; Marriott, Philip J

    2013-11-25

    Flame photometric detection in the sulfur channel has been evaluated for sulfur speciation and quantification in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography [GC × GC-FPD(S)] for S-compound speciation in shale extracts. Signal non-linearity and potential quenching effects were reportedly major limitations of this detector for analysis of sulfur in complex matrices. However, reliable linear relationships with correlation coefficient >0.99 can be obtained if the sum of the square root of each modulation slice in GC × GC is plotted vs. sulfur concentration. Furthermore, the quenching effects are reduced due to essentially complete separation of S-containing components from the hydrocarbon matrix. An increase of S/N of up to 150 times has been recorded for benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene in GC × GC-FPD when compared to GC-FPD due to the modulation process. As a consequence, 10 times lower detection limits were observed in the former mode. The applicability of the method was demonstrated using shale oil sample extracts. Three sulfur classes were completely separated and the target class (thiophenes) was successfully quantified after the rest of the sample was diverted to the second detector by using a heart-cut strategy. Based on the proposed method, 70% of the sulfur in the shale oil was assigned to the thiophenes, 24% to benzothiophenes, and 5% to dibenzothiophene compounds.

  11. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control. Topical report for Subtask 3.1, In-bed sulfur capture tests; Subtask 3.2, Electrostatic desulfurization; Subtask 3.3, Microbial desulfurization and denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M.; Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T.; Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    This topical report on ``Sulfur Control`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT`s electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  12. Gas-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation with gas gate

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1994-06-07

    Disclosed is a dynamic vacuum insulation comprising sidewalls enclosing an evacuated chamber and gas control means for releasing hydrogen gas into a chamber to increase gas molecule conduction of heat across the chamber and retrieving hydrogen gas from the chamber. The gas control means includes a metal hydride that absorbs and retains hydrogen gas at cooler temperatures and releases hydrogen gas at hotter temperatures; a hydride heating means for selectively heating the metal hydride to temperatures high enough to release hydrogen gas from the metal hydride; and gate means positioned between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively allowing hydrogen to flow or not to flow between said metal hydride and said chamber.

  13. Gas-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation with gas gate

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1994-06-07

    Disclosed is a dynamic vacuum insulation comprising sidewalls enclosing an evacuated chamber and gas control means for releasing hydrogen gas into a chamber to increase gas molecule conduction of heat across the chamber and retrieving hydrogen gas from the chamber. The gas control means includes a metal hydride that absorbs and retains hydrogen gas at cooler temperatures and releases hydrogen gas at hotter temperatures; a hydride heating means for selectively heating the metal hydride to temperatures high enough to release hydrogen gas from the metal hydride; and gate means positioned between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively allowing hydrogen to flow or not to flow between said metal hydride and said chamber. 25 figs.

  14. Enhancement of mercury control in flue-gas cleanup systems

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C.D.; Huang, Hann S.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, Jiann M.

    1996-07-01

    This paper summarizes research at Argonne National Laboratory which is focused on techniques to enhance the capture of elemental mercury and integrate its control into existing flue-gas cleanup (FGC) systems. Both laboratory and field tests have shown that very little elemental mercury is captured in a wet scrubber system due to the low solubility of that species. To enhance the ability of wet scrubbers to capture mercury, Argonne has studied improved mass transfer through both mechanical and chemical means, as well as the conversion of elemental mercury into a more soluble species that can be easily absorbed. Current research is investigating the roles of several halogen species either alone or in combination with typical flue-gas components such as sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide in the oxidation of mercury to form compounds that are easily scrubbed from the flue gas.

  15. Method of testing gas insulated systems for the presence of conducting particles utilizing a gas mixture of nitrogen and sulfur hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Wootton, Roy E.

    1979-01-01

    A method of testing a gas insulated system for the presence of conducting particles. The method includes inserting a gaseous mixture comprising about 98 volume percent nitrogen and about 2 volume percent sulfur hexafluoride into the gas insulated system at a pressure greater than 60 lb./sq. in. gauge, and then applying a test voltage to the system. If particles are present within the system, the gaseous mixture will break down, providing an indicator of the presence of the particles.

  16. ULTRA-LOW SULFUR REDUCTION EMISSION CONTROL DEVICE/DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-BOARD FUEL SULFUR TRAP

    SciTech Connect

    Ron Rohrbach; Gary Zulauf; Tim Gavin

    2003-04-01

    Honeywell is actively working on a 3-year program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an ''on-vehicle'' desulfurization fuel filter for heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NO{sub x} adsorbers. The NO{sub x} adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and ''2007-Rule'' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters will also be examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. It is anticipated that the technology developed for heavy-duty applications will be applicable to light-duty as well. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consists of four phases. Phase I will focus on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II we will concentrate on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III will study life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV will focus on efficacy and life testing and component integration. The project team will include a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum), a catalyst technology developer (Johnson

  17. Removal of sulfur dioxide from flue gas using the sludge sodium humate.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Hu, Guoxin

    2013-01-01

    This study shows the ability of sodium humate from alkaline treatment sludge on removing sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the simulated flue gas. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of various operating parameters, like the inlet SO2 concentration or temperature or O2, on the SO2 absorption efficiency and desulfurization time in a lab-scale bubbling reactor. The sludge sodium humate in the supernatant after alkaline sludge treatment shows great performance in SO2 absorption, and such efficiency can be maintained above 98% with 100 mL of this absorption solution at 298 K (flue gas rate of 0.12 m(3)/h). The highest SO2 absorption by 1.63 g SHA-Na is 0.946 mmol in the process, which is translated to 0.037 g SO2 g(-1) SHA-Na. The experimental results indicate that the inlet SO2 concentration slightly influences the SO2 absorption efficiency and significantly influences the desulfurization time. The pH of the absorption solution should be above 3.5 in this process in order to make an effective desulfurization. The products of this process were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. It can be seen that the desulfurization products mainly contain sludge humic acid sediment, which can be used as fertilizer components.

  18. Removal of Sulfur Dioxide from Flue Gas Using the Sludge Sodium Humate

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guoxin

    2013-01-01

    This study shows the ability of sodium humate from alkaline treatment sludge on removing sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the simulated flue gas. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of various operating parameters, like the inlet SO2 concentration or temperature or O2, on the SO2 absorption efficiency and desulfurization time in a lab-scale bubbling reactor. The sludge sodium humate in the supernatant after alkaline sludge treatment shows great performance in SO2 absorption, and such efficiency can be maintained above 98% with 100 mL of this absorption solution at 298 K (flue gas rate of 0.12 m3/h). The highest SO2 absorption by 1.63 g SHA-Na is 0.946 mmol in the process, which is translated to 0.037 g SO2 g−1 SHA-Na. The experimental results indicate that the inlet SO2 concentration slightly influences the SO2 absorption efficiency and significantly influences the desulfurization time. The pH of the absorption solution should be above 3.5 in this process in order to make an effective desulfurization. The products of this process were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. It can be seen that the desulfurization products mainly contain sludge humic acid sediment, which can be used as fertilizer components. PMID:24453875

  19. Eddy covariance flux of sulfur dioxide to the sea surface: Air-side resistance to deposition of a highly soluble gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, J.; De Bruyn, W. J.; Miller, S. D.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Deposition to the sea surface represents a major atmospheric removal mechanism for sulfur dioxide and many other highly soluble products of tropospheric photochemistry. Such gases include nitric acid, ammonia, organic acids, sulfur dioxide, and highly soluble organic compounds such as methanol and acetone. The deposition of highly soluble gases is controlled by turbulent and diffusive transport on the air side of the air/sea interface. In this study, air/sea fluxes of the soluble gas sulfur dioxide (SO2 ), sensible and latent heat, and momentum were measured using eddy covariance. This was a pilot study carried out in April 2014 on Scripps pier in La Jolla, California, that was designed to assess the potential for measuring SO2 fluxes over the ocean. SO2 was detected using chemical ion mass spectrometry in negative ion mode with a sensitivity of roughly 100 Hz/ppt. The ionization scheme involved addition of ozone to a dried air stream and subsequent conversion of SO2 to the SO5 - ion. The results demonstrate the feasibility of seagoing SO2 flux measurements. Such measurements can be used to constrain the depositional velocities of soluble gases and test models for air-side resistance to air/sea gas transfer.

  20. Synthesis and development of processes for the recovery of sulfur from acid gases. Part 1, Development of a high-temperature process for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas using limestone -- thermodynamic and kinetic considerations; Part 2, Development of a zero-emissions process for recovery of sulfur from acid gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Towler, G.P.; Lynn, S.

    1993-05-01

    Limestone can be used more effectively as a sorbent for H{sub 2}S in high-temperature gas-cleaning applications if it is prevented from undergoing calcination. Sorption of H{sub 2}S by limestone is impeded by sintering of the product CaS layer. Sintering of CaS is catalyzed by CO{sub 2}, but is not affected by N{sub 2} or H{sub 2}. The kinetics of CaS sintering was determined for the temperature range 750--900{degrees}C. When hydrogen sulfide is heated above 600{degrees}C in the presence of carbon dioxide elemental sulfur is formed. The rate-limiting step of elemental sulfur formation is thermal decomposition of H{sub 2}S. Part of the hydrogen thereby produced reacts with CO{sub 2}, forming CO via the water-gas-shift reaction. The equilibrium of H{sub 2}S decomposition is therefore shifted to favor the formation of elemental sulfur. The main byproduct is COS, formed by a reaction between CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S that is analogous to the water-gas-shift reaction. Smaller amounts of SO{sub 2} and CS{sub 2} also form. Molybdenum disulfide is a strong catalyst for H{sub 2}S decomposition in the presence of CO{sub 2}. A process for recovery of sulfur from H{sub 2}S using this chemistry is as follows: Hydrogen sulfide is heated in a high-temperature reactor in the presence of CO{sub 2} and a suitable catalyst. The primary products of the overall reaction are S{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. Rapid quenching of the reaction mixture to roughly 600{degrees}C prevents loss Of S{sub 2} during cooling. Carbonyl sulfide is removed from the product gas by hydrolysis back to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Unreacted CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S are removed from the product gas and recycled to the reactor, leaving a gas consisting chiefly of H{sub 2} and CO, which recovers the hydrogen value from the H{sub 2}S. This process is economically favorable compared to the existing sulfur-recovery technology and allows emissions of sulfur-containing gases to be controlled to very low levels.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide removal from hot gas and concentration of sulfur using electrochemistry. Annual report, August 1983-August 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Winnick, J.

    1985-01-01

    The virtual omnipresence of sulfur in fossil fuels raises concern regarding the increased use of coal for high-temperature fuel utilization and conversion processes. A typical raw gas composition from burning Illinois No. 6 coal (3.9% sulfur) in an air-blown gasifier is 19.6% CO, 8.1% CO/sub 2/, 10%H/sub 2/, 3.4%H/sub 2/O, 3% CH/sub 4/, 0.6% H/sub 2/S with the balance being inerts. This gas has several potential uses. Of most interest is its conversion to high-BTU SNG which requires passage over a methanation catalyst at 300-400C. The methanation catalysts, however, are sensitive to even small (5ppm) concentrations of H/sub 2/S. Thus, in the absence of a very effective high-temperature sulfur clean-up process, the gas must be cooled to the temperatures of operation of commercially available processes (e.g., Selexol or Rectisol). The use of high-temperature clean-up is estimated to allow savings of up to 7% of the energy value of the gas. Since a high-temperature sulfur-removal process is desirable several have undergone examination. Most are based on reaction of a metal oxide with the H/sub 2/S, with subsequent regeneration to the fresh sorbent and a concentrated stream of H/sub 2/S. This H/sub 2/S is then sent to a Claus Plant to be oxidized to elemental sulfur (and water). Difficulties of various kinds have not permitted any of these processes to as yet reach commercialization.

  2. 40 CFR 52.675 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides-Eastern Idaho Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... at least 10 days prior to such a test to afford him an opportunity to have an observer present. (iii... measurement system(s) for: (A) Continuously monitoring and recording SO2 concentration rates in each sulfuric... Administrator may specify, the SO2 concentration measurement system(s) and stack gas volumetric flow rate...

  3. Analysis of low concentration reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) in air: storage issues and measurement by gas chromatography with sulfur chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A H; Whelan, M E; Rhew, R C

    2012-01-15

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) were measured at low concentrations in small volume air samples using a cryo-trapping inlet system and gas chromatograph outfitted with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector (GC-SCD). The relative sensitivity of the system to the RSCs follows the sequence H(2)Ssulfur mass injected, we found that the response properties for each RSC differed. At concentrations below 2ppb, the compounds H(2)S and CH(3)SH have diminished responses, leading to larger measurement uncertainties. Two generations of commercially available SilcoCan canisters were tested to evaluate the relative RSC loss due to storage in the canister and loss of inertness because of coating age. The older generation canister (>6 years from initial coating) saw significant loss of H(2)S and CH(3)SH within 2 days, while the more recent generation canister (<1 year from initial coating) yielded percent recoveries of RSCs in the range of 85% (H(2)S and CH(3)SH) to 95% (OCS, DMS and CS(2)) after 7 days of storage, suggesting that these canisters may be suitable for the short-term storage of low level RSCs. The development of this low concentration, low sample volume method is well suited for measuring RSC gas fluxes from natural soils in laboratory incubations and in field flux chamber studies.

  4. Cost-effective sulfur control strategies for the Great Plains gasification project

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, R.D.; Wilzbach, K.E. . Energy and Environmental Systems Div.)

    1989-09-01

    The Great Plains gasification plant in Beulah, North Dakota, uses 14 Lurgi gasifiers to produce 152x10/sup 6/ scf/d (4.1x10/sup 6/ Nm/sup 3//d) of pipeline-quality gas from lignite. Since start-up in mid-1984, the plant has provided a serious challenge to the reliable operation of the Stretford sulfur recovery system. To address this challenge, over forty options for mitigating sulfur emissions were evaluated on an economic and technical basis, beginning at the emissions source (the stack) and working back through the plant. Although this study was directed toward providing a timely solution to the sulfur dioxide emissions problem, the status and opportunities for a number of emerging technologies were brought into focus. This evaluation is detailed here by the authors.

  5. Reduced sulfur compounds in gas from construction and demolition debris landfills.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sue; Xu, Qiyong; Booth, Matthew; Townsend, Timothy G; Chadik, Paul; Bitton, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    The biological conversion of sulfate from disposed gypsum drywall to hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the anaerobic environment of a landfill results in odor problems and possible health concerns at many disposal facilities. To examine the extent and magnitude of such emissions, landfill gas samples from wells, soil vapor samples from the interface of the waste and cover soil, and ambient air samples, were collected from 10 construction and demolition (C&D) debris landfills in Florida and analyzed for H(2)S and other reduced sulfur compounds (RSC). H(2)S was detected in the well gas and soil vapor at all 10 sites. The concentrations in the ambient air above the surface of the landfill were much lower than those observed in the soil vapor, and no direct correlation was observed between the two sampling locations. Methyl mercaptan and carbonyl sulfide were the most frequently observed other RSC, though they occurred at smaller concentrations than H(2)S. This research confirmed the presence of H(2)S at C&D debris landfills. High concentrations of H(2)S may be a concern for employees working on the landfill site. These results indicate that workers should use proper personal protection at C&D debris landfills when involved in excavation, landfill gas collection, or confined spaces. The results indicate that H(2)S is sufficiently diluted in the atmosphere to not commonly pose acute health impacts for these landfill workers in normal working conditions. H(2)S concentrations were extremely variable with measurements occurring over a very large range (from less than 3 ppbv to 12,000 ppmv in the soil vapor and from less than 3 ppbv to 50 ppmv in ambient air). Possible reasons for the large intra- and inter-site variability observed include waste and soil heterogeneities, impact of weather conditions, and different site management practices.

  6. Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Mitchell R.; Gal, Eli

    1993-01-01

    A process and system for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous The government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC21-88MC 23174 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, M.R.; Gal, E.

    1993-04-13

    A process and system are described for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous mixture.

  8. Advances of flue gas desulfurization technology for coal-fired boilers and strategies for sulfur dioxide pollution prevention in China

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Zeng, G.; Li, G.; Qiu, J.

    1999-07-01

    Coal is one of the most important kinds of energy resources at the present time and in the immediate future in China. Sulfur dioxide resulting from combustion of coal is one of the principle pollutants in the air. Control of SO{sub 2} discharge is still a major challenge for environmental protection in developing China. In this paper, research, development and application of technology of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) for coal-fired boilers in China will be reviewed with emphasis on cost-effective technology, and the development trends of FGD technology, as well as the strategy for SO{sub 2} discharge control in China, will be analyzed. A practical technology for middle-small-sized boilers developed by the primary author and the field investigation results will also be presented. At present, there are four major kinds of FGD technologies that are practical to be applied in China for their cost-effectiveness and efficiency to middle-small-sized boilers. An important development trend of the FGD technology for middle-small-sized boilers for the next decade is improvement of the existing cost-effective wet-type FGD technology, and in the future it will be the development of dry-type FGD technology. For middle-sized generating boilers, the development direction of the FGD technology is the spraying and drying process. For large-sized generating boilers, the wet-type limestone-plaster process will still be applied in the immediate future, and dry-type FGD technologies, such as ammonia with electron beam irradiation, will be developed in the future. State strategies for the control of SO{sub 2} discharge will involve the development and popularization of efficient coal-fired devices, extension of gas coal and liquefied coal, spreading coal washing, and centralized heating systems.

  9. Sulfur-bearing phases detected by evolved gas analysis of the Rocknest aeolian deposit, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdam, Amy C.; Franz, Heather B.; Sutter, Brad; Archer, Paul D.; Freissinet, Caroline; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Ming, Douglas W.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Bish, David L.; Blake, David F.; Bower, Hannah E.; Brunner, Anna; Buch, Arnaud; Glavin, Daniel P.; Grotzinger, John P.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; McLennan, Scott M.; Morris, Richard V.; Navarro-González, Rafael; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Squyres, Steven W.; Steele, Andrew; Stern, Jennifer C.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Wray, James J.

    2014-02-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite detected SO2, H2S, OCS, and CS2 from ~450 to 800°C during evolved gas analysis (EGA) of materials from the Rocknest aeolian deposit in Gale Crater, Mars. This was the first detection of evolved sulfur species from a Martian surface sample during in situ EGA. SO2 (~3-22 µmol) is consistent with the thermal decomposition of Fe sulfates or Ca sulfites, or evolution/desorption from sulfur-bearing amorphous phases. Reactions between reduced sulfur phases such as sulfides and evolved O2 or H2O in the SAM oven are another candidate SO2 source. H2S (~41-109 nmol) is consistent with interactions of H2O, H2 and/or HCl with reduced sulfur phases and/or SO2 in the SAM oven. OCS (~1-5 nmol) and CS2 (~0.2-1 nmol) are likely derived from reactions between carbon-bearing compounds and reduced sulfur. Sulfates and sulfites indicate some aqueous interactions, although not necessarily at the Rocknest site; Fe sulfates imply interaction with acid solutions whereas Ca sulfites can form from acidic to near-neutral solutions. Sulfides in the Rocknest materials suggest input from materials originally deposited in a reducing environment or from detrital sulfides from an igneous source. The presence of sulfides also suggests that the materials have not been extensively altered by oxidative aqueous weathering. The possibility of both reduced and oxidized sulfur compounds in the deposit indicates a nonequilibrium assemblage. Understanding the sulfur mineralogy in Rocknest materials, which exhibit chemical similarities to basaltic fines analyzed elsewhere on Mars, can provide insight in to the origin and alteration history of Martian surface materials.

  10. Sulfur-Bearing Phases Detected by Evolved Gas Analysis of the Rocknest Aeolian Deposit, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcadam, Amy Catherine; Franz, Heather Bryant

    2014-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite detected SO2, H2S, OCS, and CS2 from approx.450 to 800 C during evolved gas analysis (EGA) of materials from the Rocknest aeolian deposit in Gale Crater, Mars. This was the first detection of evolved sulfur species from a Martian surface sample during in situ EGA. SO2(approx. 3-22 micro-mol) is consistent with the thermal decomposition of Fe sulfates or Ca sulfites, or evolution/desorption from sulfur-bearing amorphous phases. Reactions between reduced sulfur phases such as sulfides and evolved O2 or H2O in the SAM oven are another candidate SO2 source. H2S (approx.41-109 nmol) is consistent with interactions of H2O, H2 and/or HCl with reduced sulfur phases and/or SO2 in the SAM oven. OCS (approx.1-5 nmol) and CS2(approx.0.2-1 nmol) are likely derived from reactions between carbon-bearing compounds and reduced sulfur. Sulfates and sulfites indicate some aqueous interactions, although not necessarily at the Rocknest site; Fe sulfates imply interaction with acid solutions whereas Ca sulfites can form from acidic to near-neutral solutions. Sulfides in the Rocknest materials suggest input from materials originally deposited in a reducing environment or from detrital sulfides from an igneous source. The presence of sulfides also suggests that the materials have not been extensively altered by oxidative aqueous weathering. The possibility of both reduced and oxidized sulfur compounds in the deposit indicates a nonequilibrium assemblage. Understanding the sulfur mineralogy in Rocknest materials, which exhibit chemical similarities to basaltic fines analyzed elsewhere on Mars, can provide insight in to the origin and alteration history of Martian surface materials.

  11. Mass spectral studies on vinylic degradation products of sulfur mustards under gas chromatography/mass spectrometry conditions.

    PubMed

    Sai Sachin, L; Karthikraj, R; Kalyan Kumar, K; Sony, T; Prasada Raju, N; Prabhakar, S

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustards are a class of vesicant chemical warfare agents that rapidly degrade in environmental samples. The most feasible degradation products of sulfur mustards are chloroethyl vinylic compounds and divinylic compounds, which are formed by the elimination of one and two HCl molecules from sulfur mustards, respectively. The detection and characterization of these degradation products in environmental samples are an important proof for the verification of sulfur mustard usage. In this study, we synthesized a set of sulfur mustard degradation products, i.e., divinylic compounds (1-7) and chloroethyl vinylic compounds (8-14), and characterized using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) under electron ionization (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) (methane) conditions. The EI mass spectra of the studied compounds mainly included the fragment ions that resulted from homolytic cleavages with or without hydrogen migrations. The divinylic compounds (1-7) showed [M-SH](+) ions, whereas the chloroethylvinyl compounds (8-14) showed [M-Cl](+) and [M-CH2CH2Cl](+) ions. Methane/CI mass spectra showed [M+H](+) ions and provided molecular weight information. The GC retention index (RI) values were also calculated for the studied compounds. The EI and CI mass spectral data together with RI values are extremely useful for off-site analysis for the verification of the chemical weapons convention and also to participate in official Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons proficiency tests.

  12. Rapid monitoring of sulfur mustard degradation in solution by headspace solid-phase microextraction sampling and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Creek, Jo-Anne M; McAnoy, Andrew M; Brinkworth, Craig S

    2010-12-15

    A method using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis has been developed to gain insight into the degradation of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard in solution. Specifically, the described approach simplifies the sample preparation for GC/MS analysis to provide a rapid determination of changes in sulfur mustard abundance. These results were found to be consistent with those obtained using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) GC/MS. The utility of the described approach was further demonstrated by the investigation of the degradation process in a complex matrix with surfactant added to assist solvation of sulfur mustard. A more rapid reduction in sulfur mustard abundance was observed using the HS-SPME approach with surfactant present and was similar to results from LLE experiments. Significantly, this study demonstrates that HS-SPME can simplify the sample preparation for GC/MS analysis to monitor changes in sulfur mustard abundance in solution more rapidly, and with less solvent and reagent usage than LLE.

  13. Ultra-low Sulfur Reduction Emission Control Device/Development of an On-board Fuel Sulfur Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrbach, Ron; Barron, Ann

    2008-07-31

    Honeywell has completed working on a multiyear program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an 'on-vehicle' desulfurization fuel filter for both light duty and heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NOx adsorbers. The NOx adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and '2007-Rule' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters was also examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. In the second phase of the program a light duty diesel engine test was also demonstrated. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consisted of four phases. Phase I focused on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II concentrated on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III studied life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV focused on efficacy and benefits in the desulfation steps of a NOx adsorber on both a heavy and light duty engine. The project team included a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum), a catalyst technology developer

  14. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  15. Sulfur and Chlorine in Late Cretaceous Deccan Magmas and Eruptive Gas Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, Stephen; Blake, Stephen; Sharma, Kirti; Widdowson, Mike; Sephton, Sarah

    2008-03-01

    Large-volume pāhoehoe lava flows erupted 67 to 65 million years ago, forming the Deccan Traps, India. The impact of these flood basalt eruptions on the global atmosphere and the coeval end-Cretaceous mass extinction has been uncertain. To assess the potential gas release from this volcanism, we measured sulfur and chlorine concentrations in rare glass inclusions inside crystals and on glassy selvages preserved within lavas. Concentrations range from ~1400 parts per million of S and 900 parts per million of Cl in inclusions down to a few hundred parts per million in the lava. These data indicate that eruptions of Deccan lavas could have released at most 0.103 weight % of S, yielding up to 5.4 teragrams of SO2 per cubic kilometer of lava. A more conservative estimate is 0.07 weight % of S and 0.04 weight % of Cl, yielding 3.5 teragrams of SO2 and 1 teragram of HCl for every cubic kilometer of lava erupted. The flows were very large in volume, and these results imply that huge amounts of S and Cl gases were released. The environmental impact from even individual eruptions during past flood basalt activity was probably severe.

  16. Sulfur and chlorine in late Cretaceous Deccan magmas and eruptive gas release.

    PubMed

    Self, Stephen; Blake, Stephen; Sharma, Kirti; Widdowson, Mike; Sephton, Sarah

    2008-03-21

    Large-volume pāhoehoe lava flows erupted 67 to 65 million years ago, forming the Deccan Traps, India. The impact of these flood basalt eruptions on the global atmosphere and the coeval end-Cretaceous mass extinction has been uncertain. To assess the potential gas release from this volcanism, we measured sulfur and chlorine concentrations in rare glass inclusions inside crystals and on glassy selvages preserved within lavas. Concentrations range from approximately 1400 parts per million of S and 900 parts per million of Cl in inclusions down to a few hundred parts per million in the lava. These data indicate that eruptions of Deccan lavas could have released at most 0.103 weight % of S, yielding up to 5.4 teragrams of SO2 per cubic kilometer of lava. A more conservative estimate is 0.07 weight % of S and 0.04 weight % of Cl, yielding 3.5 teragrams of SO2 and 1 teragram of HCl for every cubic kilometer of lava erupted. The flows were very large in volume, and these results imply that huge amounts of S and Cl gases were released. The environmental impact from even individual eruptions during past flood basalt activity was probably severe.

  17. Development of a solid absorption process for removal of sulfur from fuel gas. First quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Stegen, G.E.; Olson, K.M.

    1980-05-01

    Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories has begun to develop a project for removing sulfur compounds from fuel gases at elevated temperature (> 700/sup 0/C) based on the use of molten mixtures of alkali metal carbonates and calcium carbonate as the active reactants. The sulfur removal capacity of the molten salt mixture may be regenerated by stripping with CO/sub 2/ and steam, usually at a reduced temperature. In this process, the molten salt mixture is contained within the pores of a porous ceramic substrate material which may be used in a packed bed, moving bed, or fluidized bed absorber. The process would be used most advantageously in applications where it is desirable to reduce or eliminate any cooling of the fuel gas between the gasifier outlet and the gas user. Examples of such applications include gas turbines, high temperature fuel cells, boilers, and furnaces which operate in relatively close proximity to a coal gasifier. In these applications, reduction or elimination of the gas cooling requirements will generally improve thermal efficiency by retaining the sensible heat in the gas and may result in simplification of the process by elimination of gas cooling (and in some cases reheating) equipment and by elimination of process condensates and the equipment required for their handling and treatment. The objectives of the program are to obtain process and materials data sufficient to demonstrate feasibility of the process at bench scale and to allow preliminary economic analysis. Process data to be obtained include sorbent sulfur capacity, reaction kinetics, and other operating characteristics. Various candidate materials will be purchased or fabricated and tested for suitability as porous ceramic substrate materials.

  18. Distillers by-product cattle diets enhance reduced sulfur gas fluxes from feedlot soils and manures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total reduced sulfur (TRS) emissions from animal feeding operations are a concern with increased feeding of high-sulfur distillers by-products. Three feeding trials were conducted to evaluate feeding wet distillers grain plus solubles (WDGS) on TRS fluxes. Fresh manure was collected three times duri...

  19. Adaptive control system for gas producing wells

    SciTech Connect

    Fedor, Pashchenko; Sergey, Gulyaev; Alexander, Pashchenko

    2015-03-10

    Optimal adaptive automatic control system for gas producing wells cluster is proposed intended for solving the problem of stabilization of the output gas pressure in the cluster at conditions of changing gas flow rate and changing parameters of the wells themselves, providing the maximum high resource of hardware elements of automation.

  20. Mustard gas or sulfur mustard: an old chemical agent as a new terrorist threat.

    PubMed

    Wattana, Monica; Bey, Tareg

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is a member of the vesicant class of chemical warfare agents that causes blistering to the skin and mucous membranes. There is no specific antidote, and treatment consists of systematically alleviating symptoms. Historically, sulfur mustard was used extensively in inter-governmental conflicts within the trenches of Belgium and France during World War I and during the Iran-Iraq conflict. Longitudinal studies of exposed victims show that sulfur mustard causes long-term effects leading to high morbidity. Given that only a small amount of sulfur mustard is necessary to potentially cause an enormous number of casualties, disaster-planning protocol necessitates the education and training of first-line healthcare responders in the recognition, decontamination, triage, and treatment of sulfur mustard-exposed victims in a large-scale scenario.

  1. Sorbent utilization prediction methodology: sulfur control in fluidized-bed combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Fee, D.C.; Wilson, W.I.; Shearer, J.A.; Smith, G.W.; Lenc, J.F.; Fan, L.S.; Myles, K.M.; Johnson, I.

    1980-09-01

    The United States Government has embarked on an ambitious program to develop and commercialize technologies to efficiently extract energy from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. One of the more promising new technologies for steam and power generation is the fluidized-bed combustion of coal. In this process, coal is burned in a fluidized bed composed mainly of calcined limestone sorbent. The calcium oxide reacts chemically to capture the sulfur dioxide formed during the combustion and to maintain the stack gas sulfur emissions at acceptable levels. The spent sulfur sorbent, containing calcium sulfate, is a dry solid that can be disposed of along with coal ash or potentially used. Other major advantages of fluidized-bed combustion are the reduction in nitrogen oxide emissions because of the relatively low combustion temperatures, the capability of burning wide varieties of fuel, the high carbon combustion efficiencies, and the high heat-transfer coefficients. A key to the widespread commercialization of fluidized-bed technology is the ability to accurately predict the amount of sulfur that will be captured by a given sorbent. This handbook meets this need by providing a simple, yet reliable, user-oriented methodology (the ANL method) that allows performance of a sorbent to be predicted. The methodology is based on only three essential sorbent parameters, each of which can be readily obtained from standardized laboratory tests. These standard tests and the subsequent method of data reduction are described in detail.

  2. Diaryl disulfide solves sulfur-deposition problems at sour gas field

    SciTech Connect

    Voorhees, R.J. ); Thomas, E.R. ); Kennelley, K.J. )

    1991-09-02

    This paper reports on use of diaryl disulfide (DADS) sulfur solvent which was successful in removing sulfur from tubulars and flow lines at Exxon Co. USA's LaBarge field in Wyoming. Additionally, the company's experience indicates that sulfur deposition can be a concern for gases with {lt}5% H{sub 2}S and that phase behavior and well bore hydraulic models can be used to predict where, and how much, sulfur can be expected to be deposited. Deposition of elemental sulfur in tubulars and flow lines can lead to decreased production, increased corrosion, and higher filtration-water disposal costs. These problems have been seen at LaBarge field even though its 5% H{sub 2}S concentration is below a level at which sulfur deposition is normally a concern. In its LaBarge application, Exxon found DADS to be preferable for sulfur-deposition problems because it was cheaper, less volatile, and easier to regenerate with no disposal needed when compared with the more commonly used solvent, dimethyl disulfide (DMDS).

  3. Comparison of sulfuric and oxalic acid anodizing for preparation of thermal control coatings for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Huong G.; Watcher, John M.; Smith, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of thermal control surfaces, which maintain stable solar absorptivity and infrared emissivity over long periods, is challenging due to severe conditions in low-Earth orbit (LEO). Some candidate coatings are second-surface silver-coated Teflon; second-surface, silvered optical solar reflectors made of glass or quartz; and anodized aluminum. Sulfuric acid anodized and oxalic acid anodized aluminum was evaluated under simulated LEO conditions. Oxalic acid anodizing shows promise of greater stability in LEO over long missions, such as the 30 years planned for the Space Station. However, sulfuric acid anodizing shows lower solar absorptivity.

  4. Mesoporous carbon spheres with controlled porosity for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dexian; Fu, Aiping; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Yiqian; Guo, Peizhi; Liu, Jingquan; Zhao, Xiu Song

    2015-07-01

    Mesoporous carbon (MC) spheres with hierarchical pores, controlled pore volume and high specific surface areas have been prepared by a mass-producible spray drying assisted template method using sodium alginate as carbon precursor and commercial colloidal silica particles as hard template. The resulting MC spheres, possessing hierarchical pores in the range of 3-30 nm, are employed as conductive matrices for the preparation of cathode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. A high pressure induced one-step impregnation of elemental sulfur into the pore of the MC spheres has been exploited. The electrochemical performances of sulfur-impregnated MC spheres (S-MC) derived from MC spheres with different pore volume and specific surface area but with the same sulfur loading ratio of 60 wt% (S-MC-X-60) have been investigated in details. The S-MC-4-60 composite cathode material displayed a high initial discharge capacity of 1388 mAhg-1 and a good cycling stability of 857 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.2C, and shows also excellent rate capability of 864 mAhg-1 at 2C. More importantly, the sulfur loading content in MC-4 spheres can reach as high as 80%, and it still can deliver a capacity of 569 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.2C.

  5. Emission control of mercury and sulfur by mild thermal upgrading of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Zhang; Gang Chen; Rajender Gupta; Zhenghe Xu

    2009-01-15

    Mercury and sulfur emissions from power plants is becoming increasingly an environmental concern. In this study, two Chinese coals from the Guizhou province and one Canadian coal from Alberta were selected to study the potential of thermal upgrading as mercury and sulfur emission control strategy prior to coal use. A low-temperature asher (LTA) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) were used to characterize the occurrence of mercury and sulfur in coal. An experiment of mild thermal upgrading at different atmospheres was performed to explore the removal efficiencies of mercury before combustion. Our study shows that mercury is associated with different minerals in these coal samples. The correlation between mercury and sulfur is also investigated. Mercury was found to be removed effectively by mild thermal upgrading at 400{sup o}C under a 4% O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} atmosphere. An oxidizing atmosphere increased the removal of pyritic sulfur significantly at low temperatures. The mercury release rate was found to be higher under an oxidizing atmosphere than under a nitrogen atmosphere between 300 and 400{sup o}C during mild thermal upgrading. 30 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. 40 CFR 52.1278 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Mississippi § 52.1278 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In a letter dated January 30, 1987, the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources certified that no emission limits in the State's... does not apply to: Mississippi Power-Daniel; South Mississippi Electric Power, Hattiesburg-Morrow;...

  7. 40 CFR 52.1278 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Mississippi § 52.1278 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) In a letter dated January 30, 1987, the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources certified that no emission limits in the State's... does not apply to: Mississippi Power-Daniel; South Mississippi Electric Power, Hattiesburg-Morrow;...

  8. 40 CFR 52.1278 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Mississippi § 52.1278 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. (a) In a letter dated January 30, 1987, the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources certified that no emission limits in the State's... does not apply to: Mississippi Power-Daniel; South Mississippi Electric Power, Hattiesburg-Morrow;...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1278 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Mississippi § 52.1278 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In a letter dated January 30, 1987, the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources certified that no emission limits in the State's... does not apply to: Mississippi Power-Daniel; South Mississippi Electric Power, Hattiesburg-Morrow;...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1278 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Mississippi § 52.1278 Control strategy: Sulfur oxides and particulate matter. In a letter dated January 30, 1987, the Mississippi Department of Natural Resources certified that no emission limits in the State's... does not apply to: Mississippi Power-Daniel; South Mississippi Electric Power, Hattiesburg-Morrow;...

  11. Decomposition of potent greenhouse gas sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) by Kirschsteinite-dominant stainless steel slag.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhou, Ji Zhi; Xu, Zhi Ping; Li, Yajun; Cao, Tiehua; Zhao, Jun; Ruan, Xiuxiu; Liu, Qiang; Qian, Guangren

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, kirschsteinite-dominant stainless steel slag (SSS) has been found to decompose sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) with the activity higher than pure metal oxides, such as Fe2O3 and CaO. SSS is mainly made up of CaO·FeO·SiO2(CFS)/MgO·FeO·MnO(RO) phase conglomeration. The SF6 decomposition reaction with SSS at 500-700 °C generated solid MF2/MF3 and gaseous SiF4, SO2/SO3 as well as HF. When 10 wt % of SSS was replaced by Fe2O3 or CaO, the SF6 decomposition amount decreased from 21.0 to 15.2 or 15.0 mg/g at 600 °C. The advantage of SSS over Fe2O3 or CaO in the SF6 decomposition is related to its own special microstructure and composition. The dispersion of each oxide component in SSS reduces the sintering of freshly formed MF2/MF3, which is severe in the case of pure metal oxides and inhibits the continuous reaction of inner components. Moreover, SiO2 in SSS reacts with SF6 and evolves as gaseous SiF4, which leaves SSS with voids and consequently exposes inner oxides for further reactions. In addition, we have found that oxygen significantly inhibited the SF6 decomposition with SSS while H2O did not, which could be explained in terms of reaction pathways. This research thus demonstrates that waste material SSS could be potentially an effective removal reagent of greenhouse gas SF6.

  12. DMS pulse and COS valley: the effect of simulated rainfall on sulfur gas exchange in dry soils of uncultivated marine terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelan, M.; Khan, M. H.; Barnash, K.; Vollering, J.; Rhew, R.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric sulfur compounds regulate climate by affecting cloud dynamics and reducing the amount of solar radiation that reaches the Earth's surface. Quantifying the terrestrial-atmosphere exchanges of sulfur has been challenging as only some of the controlling factors are known. In general, oxic soils are observed to act as a sink of reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs), while anoxic soils tend to act a source. Changes in soil moisture are therefore expected to greatly influence the direction of net gas fluxes of RSCs. Here we report the effect of simulated rainfall on soil samples from uncultivated marine terraces near Santa Cruz, CA, U.S.A (37.0°N, 122°W). Soils were collected in the dry season of a Mediterranean-type climate and air dried before the analysis. The rate of production of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a compound known to be produced by phytoplankton and bacteria, increased dramatically in the first hours after water addition, tapering off over a few days. A concurrent pulse in microbial respiration (as CO_2) was observed. Soils that experience lengthy dry periods, such as those from arid and Mediterranean climates, have been shown to exhibit increases of carbon mineralization after rain events due to a combination of released soil organic matter and increased microbial activity. Conversely, production of carbonyl sulfide (COS), the most abundant reduced sulfur compound in the atmosphere, decreased immediately upon wetting the soil, perhaps due to isolation of the soil atmosphere from the headspace by water. These simultaneous processes after the addition of water can transform a soil in the bulk oxic state into a net source of RSCs in a relatively short span of time.

  13. Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide, dimethyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide by isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandy, Alan R.; Thornton, Donald C.; Driedger, Arthur R., III

    1993-01-01

    A gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer is described for determining atmospheric sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbonyl sulfide from aircraft and ship platforms. Isotopically labelled variants of each analyte were used as internal standards to achieve high precision. The lower limit of detection for each species for an integration time of 3 min was 1 pptv for sulfur dioxide and dimethyl sulfide and 0.2 pptv for carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide. All four species were simultaneously determined with a sample frequency of one sample per 6 min or greater. When only one or two species were determined, a frequency of one sample per 4 min was achieved. Because a calibration is included in each sample, no separate calibration sequence was needed. Instrument warmup was only a few minutes. The instrument was very robust in field deployments, requiring little maintenance.

  14. New constraints on the sulfur reservoir in the dense interstellar medium provided by Spitzer observations of S I in shocked gas

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dana E.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Maret, Sébastien

    2013-12-20

    We present observations of fine-structure line emission of atomic sulfur, iron, and rotational lines of molecular hydrogen in shocks associated with several Class 0 protostars obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph of the Spitzer Space Telescope. We use these observations to investigate the 'missing sulfur problem', that significantly less sulfur is found in dense regions of the interstellar medium (ISM) than in diffuse regions. For sources where the sulfur fine-structure line emission is co-spatial with the detected molecular hydrogen emission and in the presence of weak iron emission, we derive sulfur and H{sub 2} column densities for the associated molecule-dominated C-shocks. We find the S I abundance to be ≳5%-10% of the cosmic sulfur abundance, indicating that atomic sulfur is a major reservoir of sulfur in shocked gas. This result suggests that in the quiescent dense ISM sulfur is present in some form that is released from grains as atoms, perhaps via sputtering, within the shock.

  15. Alkali- and Sulfur-Resistant Tungsten-Based Catalysts for NOx Emissions Control.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiwei; Li, Hao; Gao, Jiayi; Gu, Xiao; Zheng, Li; Hu, Pingping; Xin, Ying; Chen, Junxiao; Chen, Yaxin; Zhang, Zhaoliang; Chen, Jianmin; Tang, Xingfu

    2015-12-15

    The development of catalysts with simultaneous resistance to alkalis and sulfur poisoning is of great importance for efficiently controlling NOx emissions using the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 (SCR), because the conventional V2O5/WO3-TiO2 catalysts often suffer severe deactivation by alkalis. Here, we support V2O5 on a hexagonal WO3 (HWO) to develop a V2O5/HWO catalyst, which has exceptional resistance to alkali and sulfur poisoning in the SCR reactions. A 350 μmol g(-1) K(+) loading and the presence of 1,300 mg m(-3) SO2 do not almost influence the SCR activity of the V2O5/HWO catalyst, and under the same conditions, the conventional V2O5/WO3-TiO2 catalysts completely lost the SCR activity within 4 h. The strong resistance to alkali and sulfur poisoning of the V2O5/HWO catalysts mainly originates from the hexagonal structure of the HWO. The HWO allows the V2O5 to be highly dispersed on the external surfaces for catalyzing the SCR reactions and has the relatively smooth surfaces and the size-suitable tunnels specifically for alkalis' diffusion and trapping. This work provides a useful strategy to develop SCR catalysts with exceptional resistance to alkali and sulfur poisoning for controlling NOx emissions from the stationary source and the mobile source.

  16. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  17. Simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from incineration flue gas using activated carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Li, Wen-Kai; Hung, Ming-Jui

    2014-09-01

    Incineration flue gas contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The effects of SO2 concentration (0, 350, 750, and 1000 ppm), reaction temperature (160, 200, and 280 degrees C), and the type of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) on the removal of SO2 and PAHs by ACFs were examined in this study. A fluidized bed incinerator was used to simulate practical incineration flue gas. It was found that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas could drastically decrease removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. The effect of rise in the reaction temperature from 160 to 280 degrees C on removal of PAHs was greater than that on SO2 removal at an SO2 concentration of 750 ppm. Among the three ACFs studied, ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and the tightest structure, was the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs when these gases coexisted in the incineration flue gas. Implications: Simultaneous adsorption of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from incineration flue gas onto activated carbon fibers (ACFs) meant to devise a new technique showed that the presence of SO2 in the incineration flue gas leads to a drastic decrease in removal of PAHs because of competitive adsorption. Reaction temperature had a greater influence on PAHs removal than on SO2 removal. ACF-B, with the highest microporous volume, highest O content, and tightest structure among the three studied ACFs, was found to be the best adsorbent for removing SO2 and PAHs.

  18. Lunar sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  19. Preparing ultrafine PbS powders from the scrap lead-acid battery by sulfurization and inert gas condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Huipeng; Zhan, Lu; Xie, Bing

    2017-02-01

    A novel method for preparing ultrafine PbS powders involving sulfurization combined with inert gas condensation is developed in this paper, which is applicable to recycle Pb from lead paste of spent lead-acid batteries. Initially, the effects of the evaporation and condensation temperature, the inert gas pressure, the condensation distance and substrate on the morphology of as-obtained PbS ultrafine particles are intensively investigated using sulfur powders and lead particles as reagents. Highly dispersed and homogeneous PbS nanoparticles can be prepared under the optimized conditions which are 1223 K heating temperature, 573 K condensation temperature, 100 Pa inert gas pressure and 60 cm condensation distance. Furthermore, this method is successfully applied to recycle Pb from the lead paste of spent lead acid battery to prepare PbS ultrafine powders. This work does not only provide the theoretical fundamental for PbS preparation, but also provides a novel and efficient method for recycling spent lead-acid battery with high added-value products.

  20. Influence of liquid and gas flow rates on sulfuric acid mist removal from air by packed bed tower

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The possible emission of sulfuric acid mists from a laboratory scale, counter-current packed bed tower operated with a caustic scrubbing solution was studied. Acid mists were applied through a local exhaust hood. The emissions from the packed bed tower were monitored in three different categories of gas flow rate as well as three liquid flow rates, while other influencing parameters were kept almost constant. Air sampling and sulfuric acid measurement were carried out iso-kinetically using USEPA method 8. The acid mists were measured by the barium-thorin titration method. According to the results when the gas flow rate increased from 10 L/s to 30 L/s, the average removal efficiency increased significantly (p < 0.001) from 76.8 ± 1.8% to 85.7 ± 1.2%. Analysis of covariance method followed by Tukey post-hoc test of 92 tests did not show a significant change in removal efficiency between liquid flow rates of 1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 L/min (p = 0.811). On the other hand, with fixed pressure loss across the tower, by increasing the liquid/gas (L/G) mass ratio, the average removal efficiency decreased significantly (p = 0.001) from 89.9% at L/G of <2 to 83.1% at L/G of 2–3 and further to 80.2% at L/G of >3, respectively. L/G of 2–3 was recommended for designing purposes of a packed tower for sulfuric acid mists and vapors removal from contaminated air stream. PMID:23369487

  1. Influence of liquid and gas flow rates on sulfuric acid mist removal from air by packed bed tower.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad Javad; Ghasemi, Roohollah; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Yazdanbakhsh, Ahmad Reza; Hajibabaei, Majid

    2012-12-10

    The possible emission of sulfuric acid mists from a laboratory scale, counter-current packed bed tower operated with a caustic scrubbing solution was studied. Acid mists were applied through a local exhaust hood. The emissions from the packed bed tower were monitored in three different categories of gas flow rate as well as three liquid flow rates, while other influencing parameters were kept almost constant. Air sampling and sulfuric acid measurement were carried out iso-kinetically using USEPA method 8. The acid mists were measured by the barium-thorin titration method. According to the results when the gas flow rate increased from 10 L/s to 30 L/s, the average removal efficiency increased significantly (p < 0.001) from 76.8 ± 1.8% to 85.7 ± 1.2%. Analysis of covariance method followed by Tukey post-hoc test of 92 tests did not show a significant change in removal efficiency between liquid flow rates of 1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 L/min (p = 0.811). On the other hand, with fixed pressure loss across the tower, by increasing the liquid/gas (L/G) mass ratio, the average removal efficiency decreased significantly (p = 0.001) from 89.9% at L/G of <2 to 83.1% at L/G of 2-3 and further to 80.2% at L/G of >3, respectively. L/G of 2-3 was recommended for designing purposes of a packed tower for sulfuric acid mists and vapors removal from contaminated air stream.

  2. PID control of gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Coltharp, B.; Bergmann, J.

    1996-09-01

    The use of low cost digital controllers for pipeline control is increasing as the reliability and cost improves. In pipeline applications, the proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) controller algorithm is often used. However, the unique problems associated with pipeline operation have caused manufacturers to modify the basic control algorithms. Features such as set point ramping, built in pressure control, freeze on input error, and high and low output limits help assure safe and predictable pipeline operation.

  3. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

  4. Reduced and Oxidized Sulfur Compounds Detected by Evolved Gas Analyses of Materials from Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Freissinet, C.; Atreya, S. K.; Bish, D. L.; Blake, D. F.; Brunner, A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Rampe, E. B.; Steele, A.; Wray, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfate minerals have been directly detected or strongly inferred from several Mars datasets and indicate that aqueous alteration of martian surface materials has occurred. Indications of reduced sulfur phases (e.g., sulfides) from orbital and in situ investigations of martian materials have been fewer in number, but these phases are observed in martian meteorites and are likely because they are common minor phases in basaltic rocks. Here we discuss potential sources for the S-bearing compounds detected by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument’s evolved gas analysis (EGA) experiments.

  5. Sulfur and Iron Speciation in Gas-rich Impact-melt Glasses from Basaltic Shergottites Determined by Microxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Mossbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO4 is deduced from MgO - SO3 correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/ S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/ sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. To understand the implications of these observations for the formation of the Gas-rich Impact-melt (GRIM) glasses, we determined the oxidation state of Fe in the GRIM glasses using Fe K micro-XANES techniques.

  6. Controlling Gas-Flow Mass Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Brian G.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed system automatically controls proportions of gases flowing in supply lines. Conceived for control of oxidizer-to-fuel ratio in new gaseous-propellant rocket engines. Gas-flow control system measures temperatures and pressures at various points. From data, calculates control voltages for electronic pressure regulators for oxygen and hydrogen. System includes commercially available components. Applicable to control of mass ratios in such gaseous industrial processes as chemical-vapor depostion of semiconductor materials and in automotive engines operating on compressed natural gas.

  7. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor, Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuel performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

  8. Looking Northwest at Furnace Control Panels and Gas Control Furnace ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Northwest at Furnace Control Panels and Gas Control Furnace in Red Room Within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  9. SOXAL combined SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} flue gas control demonstration. Quarterly report, July--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    AQUATECH Systems, a business unit of Allied-Signal Inc., proposes to demonstrate the technical viability and cost effectiveness of the SOXAL process a combined SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control process on a 3 MW equivalent flue gas slip stream from Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation Dunkirk Steam Station Boiler No. 4, a coal fired boiler. The SOXAL process combines 90+% sulfur dioxide removal from the flue gas using a sodium based scrubbing solution and regeneration of the spent scrubbing liquor using AQUATECH Systems` proprietary bipolar membrane technology. This regeneration step recovers a stream of sulfur dioxide suitable for subsequent processing to salable sulfur or sulfuric acid. Additionally 90+% control of NO{sub x} gases can be achieved in combination with conventional urea/methanol injection of NO{sub 2} gas into the duct. The SOXAL process is applicable to both utility and industrial scale boilers using either high or lower sulfur coal. The SOXAL demonstration Program began September 10, 1991 and is approximately 26 months in duration. During the 6 months of scheduled operations, between January and July of 1993, data was collected from the SOXAL system to define: SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control efficiencies; Current efficiency for the regeneration unit; Sulfate oxidation in the absorber; Make-up reagent rates; Product quality including concentrations and compositions; System integration and control philosophy; and Membrane stability and performance with respect to foulants. The program is expected to be concluded in November 1993.

  10. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis.

  11. Thiophenic Sulfur Compounds Released During Coal Pyrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Mengwen; Kong, Jiao; Dong, Jie; Jiao, Haili; Li, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Thiophenic sulfur compounds are released during coal gasification, carbonization, and combustion. Previous studies indicate that thiophenic sulfur compounds degrade very slowly in the environment, and are more carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogenous compounds. Therefore, it is very important to study the principle of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal conversion, in order to control their emission and promote clean coal utilization. To realize this goal and understand the formation mechanism of thiophenic sulfur compounds, this study focused on the release behavior of thiophenic sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis, which is an important phase for all coal thermal conversion processes. The pyrolyzer (CDS-5250) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (Focus GC-DSQII) were used to analyze thiophenic sulfur compounds in situ. Several coals with different coal ranks and sulfur contents were chosen as experimental samples, and thiophenic sulfur compounds of the gas produced during pyrolysis under different temperatures and heating rates were investigated. Levels of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene were obtained during pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 200°C to 1300°C, and heating rates ranging from 6°C/ms to 14°C/ms and 6°C/s to 14°C/s. Moreover, the relationship between the total amount of benzothiophene and dibenzothiophene released during coal pyrolysis and the organic sulfur content in coal was also discussed. This study is beneficial for understanding the formation and control of thiophenic sulfur compounds, since it provides a series of significant results that show the impact that operation conditions and organic sulfur content in coal have on the amount and species of thiophenic sulfur compounds produced during coal pyrolysis. PMID:23781126

  12. Controlling crystalline structure of ZnS nanocrystals only by tuning sulfur precursor addition rate.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chong; Pan, Liqing; Xu, Mei; Xiao, John Q

    2010-12-01

    Unlike previous studies that emphasize the important role of thermodynamics or surface energy on the structure stabilization of ZnS nanocrystals, we successfully controlled the crystalline structure of ZnS nanocrystals simply by tuning sulfur precursor addition rate under exactly the same other conditions. We observed the structure of as prepared ZnS nanocrystals was evolved from wurtzite into zinc blende with increasing the addition rate of sulfur precursor. The method may extend to engineer other nanomaterials with desired physicochemical properties by controlling crystalline structure. On the other hand, it also makes a new approach to understand the crucial factors that determine the growth mechanism and the crystal structure of nanomaterials in theory.

  13. Control apparatus for hot gas engine

    SciTech Connect

    Stotts, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    A mean pressure power control system for a hot gas (Stirling) engine utilizing a plurality of supply tanks for storing a working gas at different pressures. During pump down operations gas is bled from the engine by a compressor having a plurality of independent pumping volumes. In one embodiment of the invention, a bypass control valve system allows one or more of the compressor volumes to be connected to the storage tanks. By selectively sequencing the bypass valves, a capacity range can be developed over the compressor that allows for lower engine idle pressures and more rapid pump down rates.

  14. Gas Control System for HEAO-B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, B.; Brissette, R.; Humphrey, A.; Morris, J.; Luger, J.; Swift, W.

    1978-01-01

    The HEAO-B Gas Control System consists of a high pressure gas storage supply together with distribution and regulation assemblies and their associated electronics for management of gas required for HEAO-B X-ray counter experiments. The Gas Control System replenishes a gas mixture (82 percent argon, 12.3 percent carbon dioxide, 5.7 percent xenon) in the counter volumes which is lost by: diffusion through controlled leakage plugs, diffusion through counter windows, and consumption resulting from periodic purges. The gas density in each counter volume is maintained constant to within 0.25 percent by comparison with a sealed reference volume. The system is fully redundant, capable of operating at atmospheric pressure as well as in a vacuum, contains interlocks which shut down gas flow in the event of either leakage or excessive pressure, and is able to shut down counter high voltage if counter pressure is abnormally low. The system is electronically controlled by ground command and self-sustaining in orbit for a period of at least one year.

  15. Gas Sensing Analysis of Ag-Decorated Graphene for Sulfur Hexafluoride Decomposition Products Based on the Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Huang, Rong; Gui, Yingang; Zeng, Hong

    2016-11-01

    Detection of decomposition products of sulfur hexafluoride (SF₆) is one of the best ways to diagnose early latent insulation faults in gas-insulated equipment, and the occurrence of sudden accidents can be avoided effectively by finding early latent faults. Recently, functionalized graphene, a kind of gas sensing material, has been reported to show good application prospects in the gas sensor field. Therefore, calculations were performed to analyze the gas sensing properties of intrinsic graphene (Int-graphene) and functionalized graphene-based material, Ag-decorated graphene (Ag-graphene), for decomposition products of SF₆, including SO₂F₂, SOF₂, and SO₂, based on density functional theory (DFT). We thoroughly investigated a series of parameters presenting gas-sensing properties of adsorbing process about gas molecule (SO₂F₂, SOF₂, SO₂) and double gas molecules (2SO₂F₂, 2SOF₂, 2SO₂) on Ag-graphene, including adsorption energy, net charge transfer, electronic state density, and the highest and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The results showed that the Ag atom significantly enhances the electrochemical reactivity of graphene, reflected in the change of conductivity during the adsorption process. SO₂F₂ and SO₂ gas molecules on Ag-graphene presented chemisorption, and the adsorption strength was SO₂F₂ > SO₂, while SOF₂ absorption on Ag-graphene was physical adsorption. Thus, we concluded that Ag-graphene showed good selectivity and high sensitivity to SO₂F₂. The results can provide a helpful guide in exploring Ag-graphene material in experiments for monitoring the insulation status of SF₆-insulated equipment based on detecting decomposition products of SF₆.

  16. Gas Sensing Analysis of Ag-Decorated Graphene for Sulfur Hexafluoride Decomposition Products Based on the Density Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Huang, Rong; Gui, Yingang; Zeng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Detection of decomposition products of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the best ways to diagnose early latent insulation faults in gas-insulated equipment, and the occurrence of sudden accidents can be avoided effectively by finding early latent faults. Recently, functionalized graphene, a kind of gas sensing material, has been reported to show good application prospects in the gas sensor field. Therefore, calculations were performed to analyze the gas sensing properties of intrinsic graphene (Int-graphene) and functionalized graphene-based material, Ag-decorated graphene (Ag-graphene), for decomposition products of SF6, including SO2F2, SOF2, and SO2, based on density functional theory (DFT). We thoroughly investigated a series of parameters presenting gas-sensing properties of adsorbing process about gas molecule (SO2F2, SOF2, SO2) and double gas molecules (2SO2F2, 2SOF2, 2SO2) on Ag-graphene, including adsorption energy, net charge transfer, electronic state density, and the highest and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The results showed that the Ag atom significantly enhances the electrochemical reactivity of graphene, reflected in the change of conductivity during the adsorption process. SO2F2 and SO2 gas molecules on Ag-graphene presented chemisorption, and the adsorption strength was SO2F2 > SO2, while SOF2 absorption on Ag-graphene was physical adsorption. Thus, we concluded that Ag-graphene showed good selectivity and high sensitivity to SO2F2. The results can provide a helpful guide in exploring Ag-graphene material in experiments for monitoring the insulation status of SF6-insulated equipment based on detecting decomposition products of SF6. PMID:27809269

  17. Gas analyzers to detect nitrogen and sulfur oxides in the gas effluents from heat and electric power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azbukin, Alexander A.; Buldakov, Michail A.; Korolev, Boris V.; Korolkov, Vladimir A.; Matrosov, Ivan I.

    1999-11-01

    Three kinds of gas analyzers designed for continuous monitoring of the sulfer and nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gases of a power plant are described. The operation of gas analyzers is based on use of laserless UV sources and differential absorption method. High efficiency of gas analyzers developed has been demonstrated under industrial conditions.

  18. Gas Analysis and Control Methods for Thermal Batteries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    September 2013 Gas Analysis and Control Methods for Thermal Batteries Frank C. Krieger and Michael S. Ding Sensors and Electron Devices...certified gas cylinder calibration tests. These measured gas pressures all include the 0.5813 total volume fraction of argon gas in the certified gas...volume fraction of argon gas in the certified gas cylinder. .....................................................................8 Table 4. Moles of

  19. Gas chromatographic identification of interferences and their elimination in measuring total reduced sulfur gases

    SciTech Connect

    de Souza, T.L.C. )

    1992-05-01

    This paper reports on a selective filter that is capable of eliminating positive interference in the coulometric measurement of ambient concentrations of total reduced sulfur gases which has been successfully developed and field tested. Most of the interference was found to be caused by terpenes, which react with bromine, the active reagent in the coulometric titrators. Terpenes are given off by conifer trees in the natural environment as well as emitted in pulping and other wood-handling and lumber manufacturing operations.

  20. Sulfur mustard gas exposure: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Goverman, J; Montecino, R; Ibrahim, A; Sarhane, K A; Tompkins, R G; Fagan, S P

    2014-09-30

    This report describes a case of burn injury following exposure to sulfur mustard, a chemical agent used in war. A review of the diagnostic characteristics, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic measures used to treat this uncommon, yet extremely toxic, entity is presented. The aim of this report is to highlight the importance of considering this diagnosis in any war victim, especially during these unfortunate times of rising terrorist activities.

  1. Hybrid sulfur cycle operation for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    DOEpatents

    Gorensek, Maximilian B

    2015-02-17

    A hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process for the production of hydrogen is provided. The process uses a proton exchange membrane (PEM) SO.sub.2-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) for the low-temperature, electrochemical reaction step and a bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step The process can be operated at lower temperature and pressure ranges while still providing an overall energy efficient cycle process.

  2. Sulfur mustard gas exposure: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Goverman, J.; Montecino, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Sarhane, K.A.; Tompkins, R.G.; Fagan, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This report describes a case of burn injury following exposure to sulfur mustard, a chemical agent used in war. A review of the diagnostic characteristics, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic measures used to treat this uncommon, yet extremely toxic, entity is presented. The aim of this report is to highlight the importance of considering this diagnosis in any war victim, especially during these unfortunate times of rising terrorist activities. PMID:26170794

  3. Comparison between pre-fractionation and fractionation process of heavy gas oil for determination of sulfur compounds using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Machado, Maria Elisabete; Bregles, Lucas Panizzi; de Menezes, Eliana Weber; Caramão, Elina Bastos; Benvenutti, Edilson Valmir; Zini, Cláudia Alcaraz

    2013-01-25

    The separation of the organic sulfur compounds (OSC) of petroleum or its heavy fractions is a critical step and is essential for the correct characterization of these compounds, especially due to similar physical and chemical properties of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASH) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). This similarity results in coelutions among PAH and PASH and for this reason former steps of fractionation are required before gas chromatographic analysis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of GC×GC for the separation and identification of OSC in a heavy gas oil sample without fractionation, after pre-fractionation in an alumina column and also after fractionation process. This last one was performed with a modified stationary phase manufactured and characterized in the laboratory, called Pd(II)-MPSG, where palladium is chemically linked to silica through mercaptopropyl groups. The fractions obtained from both procedures were analyzed by GC×GC/TOFMS, which was effective to separate and identify various classes of OSC. A hundred and thirty-five compounds were tentatively identified in the sample that was only pre-fractionated. However, when the fractionation was also performed with the Pd(II)-MPSG phase, a larger number of sulfur compounds were found (317). Results have shown that the analysis of a pre-fractionated sample by GC×GC/TOFMS is suitable when the goal is a general characterization of classes of compounds in the sample, while a more detailed analysis of PASH can be performed, using also the fractionation Pd(II)-MPSG phase. GC×GC/TOFMS played a major role in the comparison of samples obtained from pre-fractionation and fractionation steps due to its high peak capacity, selectivity, organized distribution of chromatographic peaks and resolution.

  4. Process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal sulfide sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Ayala, Raul E.; Gal, Eli

    1995-01-01

    A process and apparatus for generating elemental sulfur and re-usable metal oxide from spent metal-sulfur compound. Spent metal-sulfur compound is regenerated to re-usable metal oxide by moving a bed of spent metal-sulfur compound progressively through a single regeneration vessel having a first and second regeneration stage and a third cooling and purging stage. The regeneration is carried out and elemental sulfur is generated in the first stage by introducing a first gas of sulfur dioxide which contains oxygen at a concentration less than the stoichiometric amount required for complete oxidation of the spent metal-sulfur compound. A second gas containing sulfur dioxide and excess oxygen at a concentration sufficient for complete oxidation of the partially spent metal-sulfur compound, is introduced into the second regeneration stage. Gaseous sulfur formed in the first regeneration stage is removed prior to introducing the second gas into the second regeneration stage. An oxygen-containing gas is introduced into the third cooling and purging stage. Except for the gaseous sulfur removed from the first stage, the combined gases derived from the regeneration stages which are generally rich in sulfur dioxide and lean in oxygen, are removed from the regenerator as an off-gas and recycled as the first and second gas into the regenerator. Oxygen concentration is controlled by adding air, oxygen-enriched air or pure oxygen to the recycled off-gas.

  5. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  6. Experimental investigation on NOx and green house gas emissions from a marine auxiliary diesel engine using ultralow sulfur light fuel.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Tan, Qinming; Zhang, Chunhui; Wei, Lijiang; He, Xianzhong; Cao, Erming; Jiang, Kai

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, marine auxiliary diesel engine has been widely used to produce electricity in the large ocean-going ship. One of the main technical challenges for ocean-going ship is to reduce pollutant emissions from marine auxiliary diesel engine and to meet the criteria of disposal on ships pollutants of IMO (International Maritime Organization). Different technical changes have been introduced in marine auxiliary diesel engine to apply clean fuels to reduce pollutant emissions. The ultralow sulfur light fuel will be applied in diesel engine for emission reductions in China. This study is aimed to investigate the impact of fuel (ultralow sulfur light fuel) on the combustion characteristic, NOx and green house gas emissions in a marine auxiliary diesel engine, under the 50%-90% engine speeds and the 25%-100% engine torques. The experimental results show that, in the marine auxiliary diesel engine, the cylinder pressure and peak heat release rate increase slightly with the increase of engine torques, while the ignition advances and combustion duration become longer. With the increases of the engine speed and torque, the fuel consumption decreases significantly, while the temperature of the exhaust manifold increases. The NOx emissions increase significantly with the increases of the engine speed and torque. The NO emission increases with the increases of the engine speed and torque, while the NO2 emission decreases. Meanwhile, the ratio of NO2 and NO is about 1:1 when the diesel engine operated in the low speed and load, while the ratio increases significantly with the increases of engine speed and torque, due to the increase of the cylinder temperature in the diffusive combustion mode. Moreover, the CO2 emission increases with the increases of engine speed and torque by the use of ultralow sulfur light fuel.

  7. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas system... the cargo area meeting paragraph (a) of this section; (c) Automatic and manual inert gas...

  8. Application of a quantitative structure retention relationship approach for the prediction of the two-dimensional gas chromatography retention times of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycle compounds.

    PubMed

    Gieleciak, Rafal; Hager, Darcy; Heshka, Nicole E

    2016-03-11

    Information on the sulfur classes present in petroleum is a key factor in determining the value of refined products and processing behavior in the refinery. A large part of the sulfur present is included in polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs), which in turn are difficult to desulfurize. Furthermore, some PASHs are potentially more mutagenic and carcinogenic than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs. All of this calls for improved methods for the identification and quantification of individual sulfur species. Recent advances in analytical techniques such as comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) have enabled the identification of many individual sulfur species. However, full identification of individual components, particularly in virgin oil fractions, is still out of reach as standards for numerous compounds are unavailable. In this work, a method for accurately predicting retention times in GC×GC using a QSRR (quantitative structure retention relationship) method was very helpful for the identification of individual sulfur compounds. Retention times for 89 saturated, aromatic, and polyaromatic sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds were determined using two-dimensional gas chromatography. These retention data were correlated with molecular descriptors generated with CODESSA software. Two independent QSRR relationships were derived for the primary as well as the secondary retention characteristics. The predictive ability of the relationships was tested by using both independent sets of compounds and a cross-validation technique. When the corresponding chemical standards are unavailable, the equations developed for predicting retention times can be used to identify unknown chromatographic peaks by matching their retention times with those of sulfur compounds of known molecular structure.

  9. Multidimensional and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography of dichloromethane soluble products from a high sulfur Jordanian oil shale.

    PubMed

    Amer, Mohammad W; Mitrevski, Blagoj; Jackson, W Roy; Chaffee, Alan L; Marriott, Philip J

    2014-03-01

    A high sulfur Jordanian oil shale was converted into liquid hydrocarbons by reaction at 390 °C under N2, and the dichloromethane soluble fraction of the products was isolated then analyzed by using gas chromatography (GC). Comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GC×GC) and multidimensional GC (MDGC) were applied for component separation on a polar - non-polar column set. Flame-ionization detection (FID) was used with GC×GC for general sample profiling, and mass spectrometry (MS) for component identification in MDGC. Multidimensional GC revealed a range of thiophenes (th), benzothiophenes (bth) and small amounts of dibenzothiophenes (dbth) and benzonaphthothiophenes (bnth). In addition, a range of aliphatic alkanes and cycloalkanes, ethers, polar single ring aromatic compounds and small amounts of polycyclic aromatics were also identified. Some of these compound classes were not uniquely observable by conventional 1D GC, and certainly this is true for many of their minor constituent members. The total number of distinct compounds was very large (ca.>1000). GC×GC was shown to be appropriate for general sample profiling, and MDGC-MS proved to be a powerful technique for the separation and identification of sulfur-containing components and other polar compounds.

  10. Turbine gas temperature measurement and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A fluidic Turbine Inlet Gas Temperature (TIGIT) Measurement and Control System was developed for use on a Pratt and Whitney Aircraft J58 engine. Based on engine operating requirements, criteria for high temperature materials selection, system design, and system performance were established. To minimize development and operational risk, the TIGT control system was designed to interface with an existing Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) Trim System and thereby modulate steady-state fuel flow to maintain a desired TIGT level. Extensive component and system testing was conducted including heated (2300F) vibration tests for the fluidic sensor and gas sampling probe, temperature and vibration tests on the system electronics, burner rig testing of the TIGT measurement system, and in excess of 100 hours of system testing on a J58 engine. (Modified author abstract)

  11. Sulfur tolerant anode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

  12. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Hu, Zhicheng

    1993-01-01

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO.sub.2 in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst.

  13. Elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

    1993-09-07

    An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

  14. Flue gas desulfurization of high sulfur coals retrofit costs, lime consumption and removal efficiencies 10 Mwe DOE demonstrate plant

    SciTech Connect

    Goss, W.L.

    1993-12-31

    AirPol, with the assistance of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), is demonstrating the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) technology in the Clean Coal Technology project entitled {open_quote}10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption.{close_quote} AirPol is performing this demonstration under a Cooperative Agreement awarded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) in October 1990, in Round III of the Clean Coal Technology Program. This project will be the first North American demonstration of the GSA system in its application for flue gas desulfurization. This low-cost retrofit project seeks to demonstrate the GSA system which is expected to remove more than 90% of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) from coal-fired flue gas, while achieving a high utilization of reagent lime. TVA has provided its National Center for Emissions Research (NCER) as the host site and will provide operation and testing services during the operations and testing phase. The TVA NCER is located at the TVA Shawnee Fossil Plant in West Paducah, Kentucky. This Clean Coal Technology project is designed to demonstrate the GSA system`s performance in a coal-fired boiler application, and its suitability for retrofit at existing boiler plants. Air foxics testing and operation and testing of a 1 Mwe fabric filter were added to the operation/testing phase of the project. The additional testing work will be conducted for the purpose of determining the GSA`s performance in removal of air toxics and the significance of replacing the electrostatic precipitator with a fabric filter. The experience gained by AirPol in designing, manufacturing, and constructing the GSA equipment through executing this project will be used for future commercialization of the GSA system. Results of the operation and testing phase will be used to further improve the GSA system design and operation.

  15. Effect of liming on sulfate transformation and sulfur gas emissions in degraded vegetable soil treated by reductive soil disinfestation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Tianzhu; Zhu, Tongbin; Zhang, Jinbo; Cai, Zucong

    2015-10-01

    Reductive soil disinfestation (RSD), namely amending organic materials and mulching or flooding to create strong reductive status, has been widely applied to improve degraded soils. However, there is little information available about sulfate (SO4(2-)) transformation and sulfur (S) gas emissions during RSD treatment to degraded vegetable soils, in which S is generally accumulated. To investigate the effects of liming on SO4(2-) transformation and S gas emissions, two SO4(2-)-accumulated vegetable soils (denoted as S1 and S2) were treated by RSD, and RSD plus lime, denoted as RSD0 and RSD1, respectively. The results showed that RSD0 treatment reduced soil SO4(2-) by 51% and 61% in S1 and S2, respectively. The disappeared SO4(2-) was mainly transformed into the undissolved form. During RSD treatment, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were detected, but the total S gas emission accounted for <0.006% of total S in both soils. Compared to RSD0, lime addition stimulated the conversion of SO4(2-) into undissolved form, reduced soil SO4(2-) by 81% in S1 and 84% in S2 and reduced total S gas emissions by 32% in S1 and 57% in S2, respectively. In addition to H2S, COS and DMS, the emissions of carbon disulfide, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl disulfide were also detected in RSD1 treatment. The results indicated that RSD was an effective method to remove SO4(2-), liming stimulates the conversion of dissolved SO4(2-) into undissolved form, probably due to the precipitation with calcium.

  16. ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Blythe; B. Marsh; S. Miller; C. Richardson; M. Richardson

    2001-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI have co-funded this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project investigated catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems and to future FGD installations. Field tests have been conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit has been used to test the activity of four different catalyst materials for a period of up to six months at each of three utility sites. Catalyst testing was completed at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, in December 1998 and at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal in the fall of 1999. Testing at the third site, which fires a medium- to high-sulfur bituminous coal, began in June 2000 and was completed at the end of January 2001. This Topical Reports includes results from Site 3; results from Sites 1 and 2 were reported previously. At Site 3, catalysts were tested in two forms, including powders dispersed in sand bed reactors and in a commercially available form as a coated honeycomb structure. Field testing has been supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results related to the Site 3 field effort are also included and discussed in this Topical Report.

  17. ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI co-funded this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project has investigated catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installations. Field tests were conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit was used to test the activity of four different catalyst materials for a period of up to six months each at three utility sites. Catalyst testing was completed at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, in December 1998; at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, in November 1999; and at the third site, which fires a medium- to high-sulfur bituminous coal, in January 2001. Results of testing at each of the three sites were reported in previous technical notes. At Site 1, catalysts were tested only as powders dispersed in sand bed reactors. At Sites 2 and 3, catalysts were tested in two forms, including powders dispersed in sand and in commercially available forms such as extruded pellets and coated honeycomb structures. This final report summarizes and presents results from all three sites, for the various catalyst forms tested. Field testing was supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results are also summarized and discussed in this report.

  18. Nanocomposite oxygen carriers for chemical-looping combustion of sulfur-contaminated synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rahul D. Solunke; Goetz Veser

    2009-09-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean combustion. We have previously demonstrated that the embedding of metal nanoparticles into a nanostructured ceramic matrix can result in unusually active and sinter-resistant nanocomposite oxygen carrier materials for CLC, which combine the high reactivity of metals with the high-temperature stability of ceramics. In the present study, we investigate the effect of H{sub 2}S in a typical coal-derived syngas on the stability and redox kinetics of Ni- and Cu-based nanostructured oxygen carriers. Both carriers show excellent structural stability and only mildly changed redox kinetics upon exposure to H{sub 2}S, despite a significant degree of sulfide formation. Surprisingly, partial sulfidation of the support results in a strong increase in oxygen carrier capacity in both cases because of the addition of a sulfide-sulfate cycle. Overall, the carriers show great potential for use in CLC of high-sulfur fuels. 21 refs., 13 figs. 1 tab.

  19. Mineralogical controls on surface colonization by sulfur-metabolizing microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. A.; Bennett, P.

    2012-12-01

    When characterizing microbial diversity and the microbial ecosystem of the shallow subsurface the mineral matrix is generally assumed to be homogenous and unreactive. We report here experimental evidence that microorganisms colonize rock surfaces according to the rock's chemistry and the organism's metabolic requirements and tolerances. We investigated this phenomenon using laboratory biofilm reactors with both a pure culture of sulfur-oxidizing Thiothrix unzii and a mixed environmental sulfur-metabolizing community from Lower Kane, Cave, WY, USA. Reactors contained rock and mineral chips (calcite, albite, microcline, quartz, chert, Madison Limestone (ML), Madison Dolostone (MD), and basalt) amended with one of the two inoculants. Biomass of attached microorganisms on each mineral surface was quantified. The 16S rRNA of attached microbial communities were compared using Roche FLX and Titanium 454 next generation pyrosequencing. A primary controlling factor on taxonomy of attached microorganisms in both pure and mixed culture experiments was mineral buffering capacity. In mixed culture experiments acid-buffering carbonates were preferentially colonized by neutrophilic sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms (~18% to ~27% of microorganisms), while acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms colonized non-buffering quartz exclusively (~46% of microorganisms). The nutrient content of the rock was a controlling factor on biomass accumulation, with neutrophilic organisms selecting between carbonate surfaces of equivalent buffer capacities according to the availability of phosphate. Dry biomass on ML was 17.8 ± 2.3 mg/cm2 and MD was 20.6 ± 6.8 mg/cm2; while nutrient poor calcite accumulated 2.4 ± 0.3 mg/cm2. Biomass accumulation was minimal on non-buffering nutrient-limited surfaces. These factors are countered by the competitive exclusion of some populations. A pure culture of T. unzii preferentially colonizes carbonates while a very closely related Thiothrix spp is excluded

  20. Sulfate geoengineering: a review of the factors controlling the needed injection of sulfur dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visioni, Daniele; Pitari, Giovanni; Aquila, Valentina

    2017-03-01

    Sulfate geoengineering has been proposed as an affordable and climate-effective means to temporarily offset the warming produced by the increase of well-mixed greenhouse gases (WMGHGs). This technique would likely have to be applied while and after global intergovernmental measures on emissions of WMGHGs are implemented in order to achieve surface temperature stabilization. The direct radiative effects of sulfur injection in the tropical lower stratosphere can be summarized as increasing shortwave scattering with consequent tropospheric cooling and increasing longwave absorption with stratospheric warming. Indirect radiative effects are related to induced changes in the ozone distribution; stratospheric water vapor abundance,;formation and size of upper-tropospheric cirrus ice particles; and lifetime of long-lived species, namely CH4 in connection with OH changes through several photochemical mechanisms. Direct and indirect effects of sulfate geoengineering both concur to determine the atmospheric response. A review of previous studies on these effects is presented here, with an outline of the important factors that control the amount of sulfur dioxide to be injected in an eventual realization of the experiment. However, we need to take into account that atmospheric models used for these studies have shown a wide range of climate sensitivity and differences in the response to stratospheric volcanic aerosols. In addition, large uncertainties exist in the estimate of some of these aerosol effects.

  1. Factors controlling the abundance of organic sulfur in flash pyrolyzates of Upper Cretaceous kerogens from Sergipe Basin, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carmo, A.M.; Stankiewicz, B.A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Pratt, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene + dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in the type of primary organic input and/or to variations in rates of bacterial sulfate reduction. A concomitant increase in S/C and O/C ratios determined in situ using the electron microprobe is observed in AOM and alginites and may be related to a progressive oxidation of the organic matter during sulfurization. The S/C ratio of the AOM is systematically higher than the S C ratio of the alginites. Combined with a thiophene distribution characteristic of pyrolyzates of Type II organic matter, the higher S/C of AOM in Sergipe kerogens suggests that sulfurization and incorporation of low-molecular weight lipids derived from normal marine organic matter into the kerogen structure predominated over direct sulfurization of highly aliphatic algal biomacromolecules.The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene+dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in

  2. Ambient nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide concentrations over a region of natural gas production, Northeastern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, S. M. Nazrul; Jackson, Peter L.; Aherne, Julian

    2016-10-01

    The Peace River district of Northeastern British Columbia, Canada is a region of natural gas production that has undergone rapid expansion since 2005. In order to assess air quality implications, Willems badge passive diffusive samplers were deployed for six two-week exposure periods between August and November 2013, at 24 sites across the region to assess the ambient concentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The highest concentrations of both species (NO2: 9.1 ppb, SO2: 1.91 ppb) during the whole study period (except the 1st exposure period), were observed in Taylor (Site 14), which is consistent with its location near major industrial sources. Emissions from industrial activities, and their interaction with meteorology and topography, result in variations in atmospheric dispersion that can increase air pollution concentrations in Taylor. However, relatively high concentrations of NO2 were also observed near the center of Chetwynd (site F20), indicating the importance of urban emissions sources in the region as well. Observations of both species from the other study sites document the spatial variability and show relatively high concentrations near Fort St. John and Dawson Creek, where unconventional oil and gas development activities are quite high. Although a few sites in Northeastern British Columbia recorded elevated concentrations of NO2 and SO2 during this investigation, the concentrations over the three-month period were well below provincial annual ambient air quality objectives. Nonetheless, given the limited observations in the region, and the accelerated importance of unconventional oil and gas extraction in meeting energy demands, it is imperative that monitoring networks are established to further assess the potential for elevated ambient concentrations associated with industrial emissions sources in the Peace River region.

  3. Improved Recovery Boiler Performance Through Control of Combustion, Sulfur, and Alkali Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Larry L.

    2008-06-09

    This project involved the following objectives: 1. Determine black liquor drying and devolatilization elemental and total mass release rates and yields. 2. Develop a public domain physical/chemical kinetic model of black liquor drop combustion, including new information on drying and devolatilization. 3. Determine mechanisms and rates of sulfur scavenging in recover boilers. 4. Develop non-ideal, public-domain thermochemistry models for alkali salts appropriate for recovery boilers 5. Develop data and a one-dimensional model of a char bed in a recovery boiler. 6. Implement all of the above in comprehensive combustion code and validate effects on boiler performance. 7. Perform gasification modeling in support of INEL and commercial customers. The major accomplishments of this project corresponding to these objectives are as follows: 1. Original data for black liquor and biomass data demonstrate dependencies of particle reactions on particle size, liquor type, gas temperature, and gas composition. A comprehensive particle submodel and corresponding data developed during this project predicts particle drying (including both free and chemisorbed moisture), devolatilization, heterogeneous char oxidation, char-smelt reactions, and smelt oxidation. Data and model predictions agree, without adjustment of parameters, within their respective errors. The work performed under these tasks substantially exceeded the original objectives. 2. A separate model for sulfur scavenging and fume formation in a recovery boiler demonstrated strong dependence on both in-boiler mixing and chemistry. In particular, accurate fume particle size predictions, as determined from both laboratory and field measurements, depend on gas mixing effects in the boilers that lead to substantial particle agglomeration. Sulfur scavenging was quantitatively predicted while particle size required one empirical mixing factor to match data. 3. Condensed-phase thermochemistry algorithms were developed for salt

  4. Simultaneous combined microbial removal of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide from a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Sublette, K.L.

    1991-12-31

    A program is under way at the University of Tulsa to develop a viable process concept whereby a microbial process can impact on the problem of flue gas desulfurization and NO{sub x} removal. We have previously reported studies of SO{sub 2} reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and NO{sub x} reduction by Thiobacillus denitrificans. One potential process concept is the simultaneous combined removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from cooled flue gas by contact with cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SO{sub 2}{r_arrow}H{sub 2}S) and T. denitrificans (H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 4}{sup -2}) as cultures-in-series or in coculture in a single contacting stage. Each of these contacting schemes has been investigated.

  5. Power control for hot gas engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macglashan, W. F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A hot gas engine in which the expander piston of the engine is connected to an expander crankshaft. A displacer piston of the engine is connected to a separate displacer crankshaft which may or may not be coaxial with the expander crankshaft. A phase angle control mechanism used as a power control for changing the phase angle between the expander and displacer crankshaft is located between the two crankshafts. The phase angle control mechanism comprises a differential type mechanism comprised of a pair of gears, as for example, bevel gears, one of which is connected to one end of the expander crankshaft and the other of which is connected to the opposite end of the displacer crankshaft. A mating bevel gear is disposed in meshing engagement with the first two level gears to provide a phase angle control between the two crankshafts. Other forms of differential mechanisms may be used including conventional spur gears connected in a differential type arrangement.

  6. Absorption of sulfur dioxide from simulated flue gas by polyethyleneimine-phosphoric acid solution.

    PubMed

    Bo, Wen; Li, Hongxia; Zhang, Junjie; Song, Xiangjia; Hu, Jinshan; Liu, Ce

    2016-12-01

    Clean fuel technologies have been widely developed in current society because fuel combustion can directly bring about the emission of hazardous gasses such as SO2. Flue gas desulfurization by polyethyleneimine (PEI)-phosphoric acid solution is an efficient desulfurization method. In this research, the PEI and the additive H3PO4 were used as absorption solution. SO2 was absorbed by the system and desorbed from the loaded solution. The cycle operation was also analyzed. Some technology conditions such as the concentration of PEI, the temperature, the gas flow rate, the concentration of SO2 and the pH value were experimentally researched. With the optimized process, the absorption efficiency of this system could reach 98% and the desorption efficiency was over 60%, showing good absorption/desorption capability. With this efficient approach, the present study may open a new window for developing high-performance absorbents which can make SO2 be well desorbed from the loaded solution and better reused in the flue gas desulfurization.

  7. Spatial Dependence of Reduced Sulfur in Everglades Dissolved Organic Matter Controlled by Sulfate Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Brett A; Ryan, Joseph N; Nagy, Kathryn L; Stubbins, Aron; Dittmar, Thorsten; Orem, William H; Krabbenhoft, David P; Aiken, George R

    2017-03-01

    Sulfate inputs to the Florida Everglades stimulate sulfidic conditions in freshwater wetland sediments that affect ecological and biogeochemical processes. An unexplored implication of sulfate enrichment is alteration of the content and speciation of sulfur in dissolved organic matter (DOM), which influences the reactivity of DOM with trace metals. Here, we describe the vertical and lateral spatial dependence of sulfur chemistry in the hydrophobic organic acid (HPOA) fraction of DOM from unimpacted and sulfate-impacted Everglades wetlands using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry. Spatial variation in DOM sulfur content and speciation reflects the degree of sulfate enrichment and resulting sulfide concentrations in sediment pore waters. Sulfur is incorporated into DOM predominantly as highly reduced species in sulfidic pore waters. Sulfur-enriched DOM in sediment pore waters exchanges with overlying surface waters and the sulfur likely undergoes oxidative transformations in the water column. Across all wetland sites and depths, the total sulfur content of DOM correlated with the relative abundance of highly reduced sulfur functionality. The results identify sulfate input as a primary determinant on DOM sulfur chemistry to be considered in the context of wetland restoration and sulfur and trace metal cycling.

  8. Improve operations and enhance refinery sulfur recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdon, J.C.

    1997-04-01

    Sulfur is a common contaminant in fossil fuels, released when these fuels are combusted. It causes acid rain and other environmental problems. Sulfur emissions have gained worldwide attention, resulting in tighter requirements for sulfur recovery facilities. New technologies and enhancements to existing technologies have emerged as a result. This overview presents many technologies used for sulfur recovery. It is organized around the unit operations of gas and liquid sweetening, sour water stripping, sulfur recovery, sulfur degassing and solidification, tail gas treating, and incineration. New technical and equipment innovations have resulted in sulfur recovery facilities that are more reliable, recover more sulfur, are easier to operate, and reduce capital and operating costs.

  9. Controlled exposure of volunteers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Linn, W.S.; Fischer, D.A.; Shamoo, D.A.; Spier, C.E.; Valencia, L.M.; Anzar, U.T.; Hackney, J.D.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-four volunteers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were exposed to sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) at 0, 0.4, and 0.8 ppm in an environmental control chamber. Exposures lasted 1 hr and included two 15-min exercise periods (mean exercise ventilation rate 18 liter/min). Pulmonary mechanical function was evaluated before exposures, after initial exercise, and at the end of exposure. Blood oxygenation was measured by ear oximetry before exposure and during the second exercise period. Symptoms were recorded throughout exposure periods and for 1 week afterward. No statistically significant changes in physiology or symptoms could be attributed to SO/sub 2/ exposure. Older adults with COPD seem less reactive to a given concentration of SO/sub 2/ than heavily exercising young adult asthmatics. This may be due to lower ventilation rates (i.e., lower SO/sub 2/ dose rates) and/or to lower airway reactivity in the COPD group.

  10. Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxide Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Federal Energy Technology Center

    1999-12-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment of a project selected in CCT Round 2. The project is described in the report ''Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Technology for the Control of Nitrogen Oxide (NO{sub x}) Emissions from High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers'' (Southern Company Services 1990). In June 1990, Southern Company Services (Southern) entered into a cooperative agreement to conduct the study. Southern was a cofunder and served as the host at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist. Other participants and cofunders were EPRI (formerly the Electric Power Research Institute) and Ontario Hydro. DOE provided 40 percent of the total project cost of $23 million. The long-term operation phase of the demonstration was started in July 1993 and was completed in July 1995. This independent evaluation is based primarily on information from Southern's Final Report (Southern Company Services 1996). The SCR process consists of injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into boiler flue gas and passing the 3 flue gas through a catalyst bed where the NO{sub x} and NH{sub 3} react to form nitrogen and water vapor. The objectives of the demonstration project were to investigate: Performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and manufacturing methods at typical U.S. high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions; Catalyst resistance to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals but not present, or present at much lower concentrations, in fuels from other countries; and Effects on the balance-of-plant equipment

  11. Power control system for a hot gas engine

    DOEpatents

    Berntell, John O.

    1986-01-01

    A power control system for a hot gas engine of the type in which the power output is controlled by varying the mean pressure of the working gas charge in the engine has according to the present invention been provided with two working gas reservoirs at substantially different pressure levels. At working gas pressures below the lower of said levels the high pressure gas reservoir is cut out from the control system, and at higher pressures the low pressure gas reservoir is cut out from the system, thereby enabling a single one-stage compressor to handle gas within a wide pressure range at a low compression ratio.

  12. Preventing and controlling accidental gas releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.; Kalb, P. D.

    1988-07-01

    Toxic, flammable, and explosive gases may be used in photovoltaic cell research laboratories and in commercial manufacturing facilities. Accidental release of these materials can present hazards to life and property. Accidents can arise from a variety of mechanical and human related failures. These can occur from the time materials are received at the loading dock of the facility to the time treated gases are discharged to the atmosphere through a stack. Each type of initiating event may require a different control approach. These may range from the training and certification of plant workers charged with the handling of gas cylinder hookups to installation of emergency pollution control systems. Since engineering options for controlling released materials are limited, emphasis should be placed on administrative and engineering approaches for preventing such accidents. These are likely to be the most effective approaches for protecting life and property.

  13. STOVL hot gas ingestion control technology

    SciTech Connect

    Amuedo, K.C.; Williams, B.R.; Flood, J.D. ); Johns, A.L. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a comprehensive wind tunnel test program conducted to evaluate control of Hot Gas Ingestion (HGI) on a 9.2 percent scale model of the McDonnell Aircraft Company model 279-3C advanced Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing (STOVL) configuration. The test was conducted in the NASA-Lewis Research Center 9 ft by 15 ft Low Speed Wind Tunnel during the summer of 1987. Initial tests defined baseline HGI levels as determined by engine face temperature rise and temperature distortion. Subsequent testing was conducted to evaluate HGI control parametrically using Lift Improvement Devices (LIDs), forward nozzle splay angle, a combination of LIDs and forward nozzle splay angle, and main inlet blocking. The results from this test program demonstrate that HGI can be effectively controlled and that HGI is not a barrier to STOVL aircraft development.

  14. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  15. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  16. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN OF A FLUID-CONTROLLED HOT GAS VALVE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Effort is described toward development of a hot gas jet reaction valve utilizing boundary layer techniques to control a high pressure, high...temperature gas stream. The result has been the successful design of a hot gas valve in a reaction control system utilizing fluid-controlled bi-stable

  17. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  18. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Einerson, Carolyn J.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1989-01-01

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

  19. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Henry`s law gas-solid chromatography and correlations of virial coefficients for hydrocarbons, chlorofluorocarbons, ethers, and sulfur hexafluoride adsorbed onto carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Rybolt, T.R.; Epperson, M.T.; Weaver, H.W.; Thomas, H.E.; Clare, S.E.; Manning, B.M.; McClung, J.T.

    1995-07-01

    Gas-solid chromatography was used to determine the Henry`s law second gas-solid virial coefficients within the temperature range of 314--615 K for ethane, propane, butane, isobutane, pentane, hexane, heptane, chloromethane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, tetrachloromethane, trichlorofluoromethane (Freon 11), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon 22), dichlorodifluoromethane (Freon 12), methyl ether, ethyl ether, and sulfur hexafluoride with Carbopack B, a microporous carbon adsorbent. The temperature dependence of the second gas-solid virial coefficients of these adsorbates was used in conjunction with analyses based on a graphical method, a single-surface numeric integration method, a single-surface analytic expression method, and a two-surface analytic expression method to determine the gas-solid interaction energies and other parameters. The interaction energies were correlated with a ratio of the critical temperature divided by the square root of the critical pressure. The four methods were compared in their abilities to successfully calculate second gas-solid virial coefficient values.

  1. Performance of the 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel with air, nitrogen, and sulfur hexafluoride media under closed loop automatic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishna, S.; Kilgore, W. Allen

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel was modified in 1994, to operate with any one of the three test gas media viz., air, cryogenic nitrogen gas, or sulfur hexafluoride gas. This document provides the initial test results with respect to the tunnel performance and tunnel control, as a part of the commissioning activities on the microcomputer based controller. The tunnel can provide precise and stable control of temperature to less than or equal to +/- 0.3 K in the range 80-320 K in cyro mode or 300-320 K in air/SF6 mode, pressure to +/- 0.01 psia in the range 15-88 psia and Mach number to +/- O.0015 in the range 0.150 to transonic Mach numbers up to 1.000. A new heat exchanger has been included in the tunnel circuit and is performing adequately. The tunnel airfoil testing benefits considerably by precise control of tunnel states and helps in generating high quality aerodynamic test data from the 0.3-m TCT.

  2. Modeling sulfur dioxide absorption by fine water spray

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng-Hsiung Huang

    2005-07-01

    A novel theoretical model was developed to determine the removal efficiency of sulfur dioxide using fine water spray. The droplet pH, diameter, S(IV) concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, and liquid-to-gas ratio are found to influence the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the fine water spray. The results demonstrate that the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the fine water spray increases as the droplet diameter falls. The concentration gradient between the interface of the gaseous and liquid phases causes the absorption of sulfur dioxide by the droplets to increase as the initial S(IV) concentration decreases or the sulfur dioxide concentration increases. The results indicate that the performance of the fine water spray in removing sulfur dioxide is generally improved by reducing the droplet diameter or the initial S(IV) concentration, or by increasing the sulfur dioxide concentration, the droplet pH or the liquid-to-gas ratio. The proposed model reveals the parameters that should be controlled in using a fine water spray device and a method for improving its performance in removing sulfur dioxide.

  3. Sensors control gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Siewert, T.A.; Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1997-04-01

    The response time of a trained welder from the time a weld problem is identified to the time action is taken is about one second--especially after a long, uneventful period of welding. This is acceptable for manual welding because it is close to the time it takes for the weld pool to solidify. If human response time were any slower, manual welding would not be possible. However, human response time is too slow to respond to some weld events, such as melting of the contact tube in gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and only automated intelligent control systems can react fast enough to correct or avoid these problems. Control systems incorporate welding knowledge that enables intelligent decisions to be made about weld quality and, ultimately, to keep welding parameters in the range where only high-quality welds are produced. This article discusses the correlation of electrical signals with contact-tube wear, changes in shielding gas, changes in arc length, and other weld process data.

  4. Preparation and analysis of high reactive Zn-Ti-O hot gas sulfur sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Deping

    1997-12-31

    Three hot gas desulfurization sorbents (HGSS) was prepared by plain mixing of powder ZnCO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} in a conical agitator, by vibrating, grinding and mixing of the same material, and by co-precipitating of ZnCO{sub 3} and Ti(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} using NH{sub 3}H{sub 2}O or (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} as precipitating agent. Calcining temperature was 1,030 K, and Zn/Ti atom ratio was 2/1. Sulfidation performance was tested in a quartz tube at 923 K, space speed being 10,000 h{sup {minus}1} , H{sub 2}S being 0.5% (v/v). The author found that the desulfurization activity of co-precipitating HGSS was two times that of plain mixing HGSS; the grinding mixing HGSS was similar to co-precipitating HGSS. The three sorbents were characterized by XRD and SEM analysis. The breakthrough curve and solid conversion are discussed in terms of grain size, crystalline state, inactive nucleus of crystallization, and the generating course of zinc titanate of each sorbent.

  5. Sulfur Isotopes in Gas-rich Impact-Melt Glasses in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Hoppe, P.; Sutton, S. R.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Huth, J.

    2010-01-01

    Large impact melt glasses in some shergottites contain huge amounts of Martian atmospheric gases and they are known as gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses. By studying the neutron-induced isotopic deficits and excesses in Sm-149 and Sm-150 isotopes resulting from Sm-149 (n,gamma) 150Sm reaction and 80Kr excesses produced by Br-79 (n,gamma) Kr-80 reaction in the GRIM glasses using mass-spectrometric techniques, it was shown that these glasses in shergottites EET79001 and Shergotty contain regolith materials irradiated by a thermal neutron fluence of approx.10(exp 15) n/sq cm near Martian surface. Also, it was shown that these glasses contain varying amounts of sulfates and sulfides based on the release patterns of SO2 (sulfate) and H2S (sulfide) using stepwise-heating mass-spectrometric techniques. Furthermore, EMPA and FE-SEM studies in basaltic-shergottite GRIM glasses EET79001, LithB (,507& ,69), Shergotty (DBS I &II), Zagami (,992 & ,994) showed positive correlation between FeO and "SO3" (sulfide + sulfate), whereas those belonging to olivine-phyric shergottites EET79001, LithA (,506, & ,77) showed positive correlation between CaO/Al2O3 and "SO3".

  6. Method and system for capturing carbon dioxide and/or sulfur dioxide from gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xinglei

    2014-07-08

    The present invention provides a system for capturing CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 absorber comprising an amine and/or amino acid salt capable of absorbing the CO.sub.2 and/or SO.sub.2 to produce a CO.sub.2- and/or SO.sub.2-containing solution; (b) an amine regenerator to regenerate the amine and/or amino acid salt; and, when the system captures CO.sub.2, (c) an alkali metal carbonate regenerator comprising an ammonium catalyst capable catalyzing the aqueous alkali metal bicarbonate into the alkali metal carbonate and CO.sub.2 gas. The present invention also provides for a system for capturing SO.sub.2, comprising: (a) a SO.sub.2 absorber comprising aqueous alkali metal carbonate, wherein the alkali metal carbonate is capable of absorbing the SO.sub.2 to produce an alkali metal sulfite/sulfate precipitate and CO.sub.2.

  7. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  8. Application of noncatalytic gas-solid reactions for a single pellet of changing size to the modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal char containing sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Saxena, S.C.; Land, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A mechanistic model is developed for coal char combustion, with sulfur retention by limestone or dolomite sorbent, in a gas fluidized bed employing noncatalytic single pellet gas-solid reactions. The shrinking core model is employed to describe the kinetics of chemical reactions taking place on a single pellet; changes in pellet size as the reaction proceeds are considered. The solids are assumed to be in back-mix condition whereas the gas flow is regarded to be in plug flow. Most char combustion occurs near the gas distributor plate (at the bottom of the bed), where the bubbles are small and consequently the mass transfer rate is high. For such a case, the analysis is considerably simplified by ignoring the bubble phase since it plays an insignificant role in the overall rate of carbon conversion. Bubble-free operation is also encounterd in the turbulent regime, where the gas flow is quite high and classical bubbles do not exist. Formulation of the model includes setting up heat and mass balance equations pertaining to a single particle (1) exposed to a varying reactant concentration along the height of the bed and (2) whose size changes during reaction. These equations are then solved numerically to account for particles of all sizes in the bed in obtaining the overall carbon conversion efficiency and resultant sulfur retention. In particular, the influence on sorbent requirement of several fluid-bed variables such as oxygen concentration profile, particle size, reaction rate for sulfation reaction, and suflur adsorption efficiency are examined.

  9. Power control for hot gas engines

    SciTech Connect

    Frosch, R.A.; Macglashan, W.F.

    1980-10-21

    A hot gas engine is described in which the expander piston of the engine is connected to an expander crankshaft. A displacer piston of the engine is connected to a separate displacer crankshaft which may or may not be coaxial with the expander crankshaft. A phase angle control mechanism used as a power control for changing the phase angle between the expander and displacer crankshaft is located between the two crankshafts. The phase angle control mechanism comprises a differential-type mechanism comprised of a pair of gears, as for example, bevel gears, one of which is connected to one end of the expander crankshaft and the other of which is connected to the opposite end of the displacer crankshaft. A mating bevel gear is disposed in meshing engagement with the first two bevel gears to provide a phase-angle control between the two crankshafts. Other forms of differential mechanisms may be used including conventional spur gears connected in a differential type arrangement.

  10. Field-scale sulfur hexafluoride tracer experiment to understand long distance gas transport in the deep unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Andraski, Brian; Green, Christopher T.; Stonestrom, David A.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    A natural gradient SF6 tracer experiment provided an unprecedented evaluation of long distance gas transport in the deep unsaturated zone (UZ) under controlled (known) conditions. The field-scale gas tracer test in the 110-m-thick UZ was conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in southwestern Nevada. A history of anomalous (theoretically unexpected) contaminant gas transport observed at the ADRS, next to the first commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in the United States, provided motivation for the SF6 tracer study. Tracer was injected into a deep UZ borehole at depths of 15 and 48 m, and plume migration was observed in a monitoring borehole 9 m away at various depths (0.5–109 m) over the course of 1 yr. Tracer results yielded useful information about gas transport as applicable to the spatial scales of interest for off-site contaminant transport in arid unsaturated zones. Modeling gas diffusion with standard empirical expressions reasonably explained SF6 plume migration, but tended to underpredict peak concentrations for the field-scale experiment given previously determined porosity information. Despite some discrepancies between observations and model results, rapid SF6 gas transport commensurate with previous contaminant migration was not observed. The results provide ancillary support for the concept that apparent anomalies in historic transport behavior at the ADRS are the result of factors other than nonreactive gas transport properties or processes currently in effect in the undisturbed UZ.

  11. Characterization of sulfur compounds in whisky by full evaporation dynamic headspace and selectable one-dimensional/two-dimensional retention time locked gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with simultaneous element-specific detection.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; MacNamara, Kevin

    2012-12-28

    A method is described for characterization of sulfur compounds in unaged and aged whisky. The method is based on full evaporation dynamic headspace (FEDHS) of 100 μL of whisky samples followed by selectable one-dimensional ((1)D) or two-dimensional ((2)D) retention-time-locked (RTL) gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry (MS) with simultaneous element-specific detection using a sulfur chemiluminescence detector (SCD) and a nitrogen chemiluminescence detector (NCD). Sequential heart-cuts of the 16 sulfur fractions were used to identify each individual sulfur compound in the unaged whisky. Twenty sulfur compounds were positively identified by a MS library search, linear retention indices (LRI), and formula identification using MS calibration software. Additionally eight formulas were also identified for unknown sulfur compounds. Simultaneous heart-cuts of the 16 sulfur fractions were used to produce the (2)D RTL GC-SCD chromatograms for principal component analysis. PCA of the (2)D RTL GC-SCD data clearly demonstrated the difference between unaged and aged whisky, as well as two different whisky samples. Fourteen sulfur compounds could be characterized as key sulfur compounds responsible for the changes in the aging step and/or the difference between two kinds of whisky samples. The determined values of the key sulfur compounds were in the range of 0.3-210 ng mL(-1) (RSD: 0.37-12%, n=3).

  12. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN KAZAKHASTAN: USING OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION BY-PRODUCT SULFUR FOR COST-EFFECTIVE SECONDARY END-USE PRODUCTS.

    SciTech Connect

    KALB, P.D.; VAGIN, S.; BEALL, P.W.; LEVINTOV, B.L.

    2004-09-25

    The Republic of Kazakhstan is continuing to develop its extensive petroleum reserves in the Tengiz region of the northeastern part of the Caspian Sea. Large quantities of by-product sulfur are being produced as a result of the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the oil and gas produced in the region. Lack of local markets and economic considerations limit the traditional outlets for by-product sulfur and the buildup of excess sulfur is a becoming a potential economic and environmental liability. Thus, new applications for re-use of by-product sulfur that will benefit regional economies including construction, paving and waste treatment are being developed. One promising application involves the cleanup and treatment of mercury at a Kazakhstan chemical plant. During 19 years of operation at the Pavlodar Khimprom chlor-alkali production facility, over 900 tons of mercury was lost to the soil surrounding and beneath the buildings. The Institute of Metallurgy and Ore Benefication (Almaty) is leading a team to develop and demonstrate a vacuum-assisted thermal process to extract the mercury from the soil and concentrate it as pure, elemental mercury, which will then be treated using the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process. The use of locally produced sulfur will recycle a low-value industrial by-product to treat hazardous waste and render it safe for return to the environment, thereby helping to solve two problems at once. SPSS chemically stabilizes mercury to mercuric sulfide, which has a low vapor pressure and low solubility, and then physically encapsulates the material in a durable, monolithic solid sulfur polymer matrix. Thus, mercury is placed in a solid form very much like stable cinnabar, the form in which it is found in nature. Previous research and development has shown that the process can successfully encapsulate up to 33 wt% mercury in the solid form, while still meeting very strict regulatory standards for leachable mercury (0.025 mg

  13. Ajoene, a Sulfur-Rich Molecule from Garlic, Inhibits Genes Controlled by Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; van Gennip, Maria; Phipps, Richard Kerry; Shanmugham, Meenakshi Sundaram; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten; Skindersoe, Mette Eline; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Friedrich, Karlheinz; Uthe, Friedrich; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Eberl, Leo; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Tanner, David; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In relation to emerging multiresistant bacteria, development of antimicrobials and new treatment strategies of infections should be expected to become a high-priority research area. Quorum sensing (QS), a communication system used by pathogenic bacteria like Pseudomonas aeruginosa to synchronize the expression of specific genes involved in pathogenicity, is a possible drug target. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies revealed a significant inhibition of P. aeruginosa QS by crude garlic extract. By bioassay-guided fractionation of garlic extracts, we determined the primary QS inhibitor present in garlic to be ajoene, a sulfur-containing compound with potential as an antipathogenic drug. By comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies, the effect of synthetic ajoene toward P. aeruginosa was elucidated. DNA microarray studies of ajoene-treated P. aeruginosa cultures revealed a concentration-dependent attenuation of a few but central QS-controlled virulence factors, including rhamnolipid. Furthermore, ajoene treatment of in vitro biofilms demonstrated a clear synergistic, antimicrobial effect with tobramycin on biofilm killing and a cease in lytic necrosis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Furthermore, in a mouse model of pulmonary infection, a significant clearing of infecting P. aeruginosa was detected in ajoene-treated mice compared to a nontreated control group. This study adds to the list of examples demonstrating the potential of QS-interfering compounds in the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:22314537

  14. Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanowire Arrays on Sulfur Doped Graphene as High Performance Electrocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongyue; Higgins, Drew C.; Hoque, Md Ariful; Lee, DongUn; Hassan, Fathy; Chen, Zhongwei

    2013-01-01

    Graphene supported Pt nanostructures have great potential to be used as catalysts in electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies; however the simultaneous control of Pt morphology and dispersion, along with ideally tailoring the physical properties of the catalyst support properties has proven very challenging. Using sulfur doped graphene (SG) as a support material, the heterogeneous dopant atoms could serve as nucleation sites allowing for the preparation of SG supported Pt nanowire arrays with ultra-thin diameters (2–5 nm) and dense surface coverage. Detailed investigation of the preparation technique reveals that the structure of the resulting composite could be readily controlled by fine tuning the Pt nanowire nucleation and growth reaction kinetics and the Pt-support interactions, whereby a mechanistic platinum nanowire array growth model is proposed. Electrochemical characterization demonstrates that the composite materials have 2–3 times higher catalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reaction compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst. PMID:23942256

  15. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 5, July--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  16. Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  17. Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 3, January--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  18. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  19. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 6, October--December, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  20. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of Nitrogen Oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third and fourth quarters 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese, and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  1. Trends and effectiveness of emission control of sulfur dioxide in China: a satellite perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Wang, S.; Martin, R. V.; He, K.; Richter, A.; Krotkov, N. A.; Philip, S.; Wang, T.

    2011-12-01

    The combination of two satellite instruments (OMI and SCIAMACHY) provides high quality space-borne measurements for the trend analysis of sulfur dioxide (SO2) column density. An improved product of SO2 retrievals from these two satellites was derived with the consistent local air mass factor (AMF) algorithm which converts the line-of-sight 'slant' columns to vertical columns for the period of 2003-2010. The local AMF was calculated using altitude-dependent scattering weights computed from a radiative transfer model (LIDORT) with state-of-art a priori parameters, weighted by relative vertical SO2 profiles (shape factor) determined locally with a global atmospheric chemical model (GEOS-Chem). The derived vertical columns and modeled vertical SO2 profiles were compared to measurements from aircraft campaigns in China. Trends of the long-term SO2 columns showed discrepancies between different regions in China: SO2 columns increased fast during 2003-2007 and then decreased by ~30% in 2010 in North China Plain; continuous increase of SO2 columns were found in Southwest of China with only a slight decrease in 2008 due to the global economic recession. The trends of SO2 columns were further compared to a unit-based power plant emission inventory to evaluate the effectiveness of power plant SO2 emission reductions related to the wide-spread installations of flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) devices since 2005 in China. The combinations of NO2 and SO2 measurements were used to examine the operation and efficiency of the FGD devices in power plants.

  2. Pressure-Sensitive System for Gas-Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cesaro, Richard S; Matz, Norman

    1948-01-01

    A thermodynamic relation is derived and simplified for use as a temperature-limiting control equation involving measurement of gas temperature before combustion and gas pressures before and after combustion. For critical flow in the turbine nozzles of gas-turbine engines, the control equation is further simplified to require only measurements upstream of the burner. Hypothetical control systems are discussed to illustrate application of the control equations.

  3. Software to Control and Monitor Gas Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkin, C.; Curley, Charles; Gore, Eric; Floyd, David; Lucas, Damion

    2012-01-01

    This software package interfaces with various gas stream devices such as pressure transducers, flow meters, flow controllers, valves, and analyzers such as a mass spectrometer. The software provides excellent user interfacing with various windows that provide time-domain graphs, valve state buttons, priority- colored messages, and warning icons. The user can configure the software to save as much or as little data as needed to a comma-delimited file. The software also includes an intuitive scripting language for automated processing. The configuration allows for the assignment of measured values or calibration so that raw signals can be viewed as usable pressures, flows, or concentrations in real time. The software is based on those used in two safety systems for shuttle processing and one volcanic gas analysis system. Mass analyzers typically have very unique applications and vary from job to job. As such, software available on the market is usually inadequate or targeted on a specific application (such as EPA methods). The goal was to develop powerful software that could be used with prototype systems. The key problem was to generalize the software to be easily and quickly reconfigurable. At Kennedy Space Center (KSC), the prior art consists of two primary methods. The first method was to utilize Lab- VIEW and a commercial data acquisition system. This method required rewriting code for each different application and only provided raw data. To obtain data in engineering units, manual calculations were required. The second method was to utilize one of the embedded computer systems developed for another system. This second method had the benefit of providing data in engineering units, but was limited in the number of control parameters.

  4. 78 FR 5346 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri; Control of Sulfur Emissions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... Sulfur Emissions From Stationary Boilers AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed... pollutant to PM 2.5 ), from industrial boilers. EPA is approving this revision because it strengthens...

  5. LIFAC flue gas desulfurization process an alternative SO{sub 2} control strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, J.G.; Vilala, J.

    1995-12-01

    This paper discusses the results from two recently completed LIFAC flue gas desulfurization plants - 300 MW Shand lignite powered station owned by Saskatchewan Power Corporation and 60 MW Whitewater Valley high sulfur coal fired station owned by Richmond Powerand Light. LIFACis a dry FGD process in which limestone is injected into the upper regions of the boiler furnace and an activation reactor is used to humidify the unreacted limestone to achieve additional sulfur capture. The performance in both plants indicates that 70 to 80% sulfur is removed at a Ca/S ratio of 2. Cost performance data from these plants has shown that LI FAC both on construction cost and $/ton SO{sub 2} removed basis is very cost competitive compared to other SO{sub 2} control technologies. The Richmond plant has been realized under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology program. The Shand plant is the first commercial installation in North America. The paper also discusses highlights of operating and maintenance experience, availability and handling of the solid waste product.

  6. Smart battery controller for lithium/sulfur dioxide batteries. Technical report, Jan 89-Apr 91

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, T.; Bard, A.; Testa, B.; Shader, W.

    1992-08-01

    Each year, the U.S. Army purchases millions of lithium sulfur dioxide batteries for use in portable electronics equipment. Because of their superior rate capability and service life over a wide variety of conditions, lithium batteries are the power source of choice for military equipment. There is no convenient method of determining the available energy remaining in partially used lithium batteries; hence, users do not take full advantage of all the available battery energy. Currently, users replace batteries before each mission, which leads to premature disposal, and results in the waste of millions of dollars in battery energy every year. Another problem of the lithium battery is that it is necessary to ensure complete discharge of the cells when the useful life of the battery has been expended, or when a hazardous condition exists; a hazardous condition may result in one or more of the cells venting. The Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory has developed a working prototype of a smart battery controller (SBC) that addresses these problems.

  7. System for controlling the flow of gas into and out of a gas laser

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry; Uhlich, Dennis M.; Benett, William J.; Ault, Earl R.

    1994-01-01

    A modularized system for controlling the gas pressure within a copper vapor or like laser is described herein. This system includes a gas input assembly which serves to direct gas into the laser in a controlled manner in response to the pressure therein for maintaining the laser pressure at a particular value, for example 40 torr. The system also includes a gas output assembly including a vacuum pump and a capillary tube arrangement which operates within both a viscous flow region and a molecular flow region for drawing gas out of the laser in a controlled manner.

  8. Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolism and Its Control in Lactococcus lactis IL1403

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Brice; Polard, Patrice; Ehrlich, Dusko S.; Renault, Pierre; Guédon, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine and methionine availability influences many processes in the cell. In bacteria, transcription of the specific genes involved in the synthesis of these two amino acids is usually regulated by different mechanisms or regulators. Pathways for the synthesis of cysteine and methionine and their interconversion were experimentally determined for Lactococcus lactis, a lactic acid bacterium commonly found in food. A new gene, yhcE, was shown to be involved in methionine recycling to cysteine. Surprisingly, 18 genes, representing almost all genes of these pathways, are under the control of a LysR-type activator, FhuR, also named CmbR. DNA microarray experiments showed that FhuR targets are restricted to this set of 18 genes clustered in seven transcriptional units, while cysteine starvation modifies the transcription level of several other genes potentially involved in oxidoreduction processes. Purified FhuR binds a 13-bp box centered 46 to 53 bp upstream of the transcriptional starts from the seven regulated promoters, while a second box with the same consensus is present upstream of the first binding box, separated by 8 to 10 bp. O-Acetyl serine increases FhuR binding affinity to its binding boxes. The overall view of sulfur amino acid metabolism and its regulation in L. lactis indicates that CysE could be a master enzyme controlling the activity of FhuR by providing its effector, while other controls at the enzymatic level appear to be necessary to compensate the absence of differential regulation of the genes involved in the interconversion of methionine and cysteine and other biosynthesis genes. PMID:15901700

  9. Redox Control of the Human Iron-Sulfur Repair Protein MitoNEET Activity via Its Iron-Sulfur Cluster*

    PubMed Central

    Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Lescop, Ewen; Mons, Cécile; Gonçalves, Sergio; Clémancey, Martin; Santolini, Jérôme; Guittet, Eric; Blondin, Geneviève; Latour, Jean-Marc; Bouton, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Human mitoNEET (mNT) is the first identified Fe-S protein of the mammalian outer mitochondrial membrane. Recently, mNT has been implicated in cytosolic Fe-S repair of a key regulator of cellular iron homeostasis. Here, we aimed to decipher the mechanism by which mNT triggers its Fe-S repair capacity. By using tightly controlled reactions combined with complementary spectroscopic approaches, we have determined the differential roles played by both the redox state of the mNT cluster and dioxygen in cluster transfer and protein stability. We unambiguously demonstrated that only the oxidized state of the mNT cluster triggers cluster transfer to a generic acceptor protein and that dioxygen is neither required for the cluster transfer reaction nor does it affect the transfer rate. In the absence of apo-acceptors, a large fraction of the oxidized holo-mNT form is converted back to reduced holo-mNT under low oxygen tension. Reduced holo-mNT, which holds a [2Fe-2S]+ with a global protein fold similar to that of the oxidized form is, by contrast, resistant in losing its cluster or in transferring it. Our findings thus demonstrate that mNT uses an iron-based redox switch mechanism to regulate the transfer of its cluster. The oxidized state is the “active state,” which reacts promptly to initiate Fe-S transfer independently of dioxygen, whereas the reduced state is a “dormant form.” Finally, we propose that the redox-sensing function of mNT is a key component of the cellular adaptive response to help stress-sensitive Fe-S proteins recover from oxidative injury. PMID:26887944

  10. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 4, April--June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor, Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuel performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

  11. Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

  12. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third and fourth quarters 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese, and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. Coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and European gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small- scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The demonstration is being performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Ontario Hydro. SCS is the participant responsible for managing al aspects of this project. 1 ref., 69 figs., 45 tabs.

  13. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO[sub x] to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur, coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO[sub 2] and SO[sub 3] and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small- scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high-sulfur US coal. The demonstration will be performed at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida.

  14. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Third quarterly technical progress report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur, coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small- scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high-sulfur US coal. The demonstration will be performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida.

  15. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction technology for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. First and second quarterly technical progress reports, [January--June 1995]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor containing a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal. The demonstration is being performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW nameplate capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project is funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Ontario Hydro. SCS is the participant responsible for managing all aspects of this project.

  16. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers: Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO.) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO. to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal- fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: 1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels. 2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of- plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. 3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacturer under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties were explored by operating nine small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. In addition, the test facility operating experience provided a basis for an economic study investigating the implementation of SCR technology.

  17. Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first and second quarters 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involve injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in a boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The project is being conducted in the following three phases: permitting, environmental monitoring plan and preliminary engineering; detailed design engineering and construction; and operation, testing, disposition and final report. The project was in the operation and testing phase during this reporting period. Accomplishments for this period are described.

  18. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal.

  19. Heat pipe temperature control utilizing a soluble gas absorption reservior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A new gas-controlled heat pipe design is described which uses a liquid matrix reservior, or sponge, to replace the standard gas reservior. Reservior volume may be reduced by a factor of five to ten for certain gas-liquid combinations, while retaining the same level of temperature control. Experiments with ammonia, butane, and carbon dioxide control gases with methanol working fluid are discussed.

  20. Assessment of hot gas contaminant control

    SciTech Connect

    Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

  1. 75 FR 7426 - Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicle and Light-Duty Truck Emission Standards and Gasoline Sulfur Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... gasoline they produce. Sulfur in gasoline has a detrimental impact on catalyst performance and the sulfur... much-reduced content of sulfur, primarily to protect the improved catalyst systems anticipated on...

  2. Gas-Jet Meniscus Control in Ribbon Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Vonroos, O.

    1983-01-01

    Gas jet used to control shape of meniscus and thus to regulate ribbon thickness in vertical silicon-ribbon growth. Gas jet also cools ribbon, increasing maximum possible pull speed for silicon, contact angle of 11 degrees plus or minus 1 degree required for constant thickness ribbon growth. Cooling effect of gas jet increases maximum possible pull speed.

  3. Biogenic gas: Controls, habitats, and resource potential

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D. )

    1993-01-01

    As much as 20 percent of the world's natural-gas resource is estimated to have been generated by the decomposition of organic matter by anaerobic microbes at low temperatures. This gas is commonly referred to as biogenic gas. Most biogenic gas was generated early in the burial history of sediments. Some biogenic gas was also generated in relatively recent geologic time and is associated with groundwater flow. The factors that favor significant generation of biogenic gas are anoxic conditions, low sulfate content, low temperature, abundant organic matter, and sufficient pore space for the microbes to thrive. Conditions beneficial for the accumulation of biogenic gas include stratigraphic or early structural traps, adequate seals, low permeability, low pressure, early dissolution of the gas, and formation of gas hydrates. Rapid sediment deposition is critical to both the generation and the accumulation of biogenic gas generated during the early stage. Biogenic gas is distinguished by its molecular and isotopic composition. The hydrocarbon fraction is generally more than 99 percent methane, and the diagnostic isotopic composition of the methane component is as follows: [delta][sup 13]C values are generally lighter than -55 parts per thousand (permil), and [delta]D values are usually in the range of -150 to -250 permil. This isotopic composition indicates that the methane generally resulted from CO[sub 2] reduction. Significant accumulations of ancient biogenic gas have been discovered in Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and South America. These accumulations occur in Mississippian and younger rocks, at burial depths as much as 4,600 m. They are associated with a variety of rock types (carbonate, clastic, and coal), and occur in a variety of marine and nonmarine depositional settings generally characterized by rapid deposition. 111 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Sulfur and iron speciation in gas-rich impact-melt glasses from basaltic shergottites determined by microXANES

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, S.R.; Rao, M.N.; Nyquist, L.E.

    2008-04-28

    Sulfur and iron K XANES measurements were made on GRIM glasses from EET 79001. Iron is in the ferrous state. Sulfur speciation is predominately sulfide coordination but is Fe coordinated in Lith B and, most likely, Ca coordinated in Lith A. Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Moessbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO{sub 4} is deduced from MgO-SO{sub 3} correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. On Earth, volcanic rocks contain measurable quantities of sulfur present as both sulfide and sulfate. Carroll and Rutherford showed that oxidized forms of sulfur may comprise a significant fraction of total dissolved sulfur, if the oxidation state is higher than {approx}2 log fO{sub 2} units relative to the QFM buffer. Terrestrial samples containing sulfates up to {approx}25% in fresh basalts from the Galapagos Rift on one hand and high sulfide contents present in oceanic basalts on the other indicate that the relative abundance of sulfide and sulfate varies depending on the oxygen fugacity of the system. Basaltic shergottites (bulk) such as Shergotty, EET79001 and Zagami usually contain small amounts of sulfur ({approx}0.5%) as pyrrhotite. But, in isolated glass pockets containing secondary salts (known as GRIM glasses) in these meteorites, sulfur is present in high abundance ({approx}1-12%). To

  5. Reactions Involving Calcium and Magnesium Sulfates as Potential Sources of Sulfur Dioxide During MSL SAM Evolved Gas Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAdam, A. C.; Knudson, C. A.; Sutter, B.; Franz, H. B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) and Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instruments on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) have analyzed several subsamples of <150 micron fines from ten sites at Gale Crater. Three were in Yellowknife Bay: the Rocknest aeolian bedform (RN) and drilled Sheepbed mudstone from sites John Klein (JK) and Cumberland (CB). One was drilled from the Windjana (WJ) site on a sandstone of the Kimberly formation. Four were drilled from sites Confidence Hills (CH), Mojave (MJ), Telegraph Peak (TP) and Buckskin (BK) of the Murray Formation at the base of Mt. Sharp. Two were drilled from sandstones of the Stimson formation targeting relatively unaltered (Big Sky, BY) and then altered (Greenhorn, GH) material associated with a light colored fracture zone. CheMin analyses provided quantitative sample mineralogy. SAM's evolved gas analysis mass spectrometry (EGA-MS) detected H2O, CO2, O2, H2, SO2, H2S, HCl, NO, and other trace gases. This contribution will focus on evolved SO2. All samples evolved SO2 above 500 C. The shapes of the SO2 evolution traces with temperature vary between samples but most have at least two "peaks' within the wide high temperature evolution, from approx. 500-700 and approx. 700-860 C (Fig. 1). In many cases, the only sulfur minerals detected with CheMin were Ca sulfates (e.g., RN and GH), which should thermally decompose at temperatures above those obtainable by SAM (>860 C). Sulfides or Fe sulfates were detected by CheMin (e.g., CB, MJ, BK) and could contribute to the high temperature SO2 evolution, but in most cases they are not present in enough abundance to account for all of the SO2. This additional SO2 could be largely associated with x-ray amorphous material, which comprises a significant portion of all samples. It can also be attributed to trace S phases present below the CheMin detection limit, or to reactions which lower the temperatures of SO2 evolution from sulfates that are typically expected to thermally decompose

  6. Sulfur-controlled iron isotope fractionation experiments of core formation in planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, A.; Hillgren, V. J.; Horan, M. F.; Mesa-Garcia, J.; Kaufman, L. A.; Mock, T. D.

    2015-02-01

    A series of high pressure and temperature experiments were conducted to better constrain the Fe isotope fractionation during core-mantle differentiation in planetesimal and planetary bodies. Synthetic mixtures of oxides and metal having varying amounts of sulfur, approximating terrestrial and Martian compositions, were melted at 1-2 GPa and 1650 °C. Iron isotopic equilibrium between the resulting metal and glass run products was verified for all experiments using the three-isotope technique. Purified Fe from metal and glass was analyzed by multiple-collector ICP-MS in high resolution mode. Iron alloy and silicate glass show a well-resolved Δ57Femetal-silicate of +0.12 ± 0.04‰ in a sulfur-free system. Isotope fractionation increases with sulfur content to +0.43 ± 0.03‰ at 18 wt.% sulfur in the metal. These results cannot be easily interpreted within the context of known Fe isotope ratios in most natural samples of planetary and asteroidal mantles and therefore suggest more complex processes affected the Fe isotope fractionation therein. However, to reconcile Martian meteorite iron isotopic signatures with geophysical models using this new experimental data requires a smaller amount of sulfur in the Martian core than previous estimates, with an upper limit of ∼8 wt.%.

  7. Henry's law solubilities and Śetchenow coefficients for biogenic reduced sulfur species obtained from gas-liquid uptake measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruyn, W. J.; Swartz, E.; Hu, J. H.; Shorter, Jeffrey A.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Zahniser, M. S.; Kolb, C. E.

    1995-04-01

    Biogenically produced reduced sulfur compounds, including dimethylsulfide (DMS, CH3SCH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon disulfide (CS2), methyl mercaptan (CH3SH), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS), are a major source of sulfur in the marine atmosphere. This source is estimated to contribute 25-40% of global sulfur emissions. These species and their oxidation products, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2), and methane sulfonic acid (MSA), dominate the production of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the clean marine atmosphere. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion-produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. Using a newly developed bubble column apparatus, a series of aqueous phase uptake studies have been completed for the reduced sulfur species DMS, H2S, CS2, CH3SH, and OCS. Aqueous phase uptake has been studied as a function of temperature (278-298 K), pH (1-14), H2O2 concentration (0-1 M), NaCl concentration (0-5 M), and (NH4)2SO4 concentration (0-4 M). The Henry's law coefficients for CH3SH and CS2 were determined for the first time, as were the Setchenow coefficients for all the species studied.

  8. Factors controlling fluxes of volatile sulfur compounds in Sphagnum peatlands. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demello, William Zamboni

    1992-01-01

    Exchange of DMS and OCS between the surface of Sphagnum peatlands and the atmosphere were measured with dynamic (S-free sweep air) and static enclosures. DMS emission rates determined by both methods were comparable. The dynamic method provided positive OCS flux rates (emission) for measurements performed at sites containing Sphagnum. Conversely, data from the static method indicated that OCS was consumed from the atmosphere. Short and long-term impacts of increased S deposition on fluxes of volatile S compounds (VSC's) from Sphagnum peatlands were investigated in a poor fen (Mire 239) at the Experimental Lakes Area, Ontario, Canada. Additional experiments were conducted in a poor fen (Sallie's Fen in Barrington, NH, USA). At Mire 239, emissions of VSC's were monitored, before and after acidification, at control and experimental sections within two major physiographic areas of the mire (oligotrophic and minerotrophic). DMS was the predominant VSC released from Mire 239 and varied largely with time and space. Sulfur addition did not affect DMS emissions in a period of hours to a few days. DMS emissions in the experimental oligotrophic area of the mire was approximately 3-fold greater than in the control oligotrophic area, and approximately 10-fold greater than in the minerotrophic zones. These differences could be due to a combination of differences in types of vegetation, nutritional status, and S input. At Sallie's Fen, DMS fluxes were not significantly affected by sulfate amendments, while DMS and MSH concentrations increased greatly with time in the top 10 cm of the peat column. The major environmental factors controlling fluxes of DMS in a Sphagnum-dominated peatland were investigated in Sallie's Fen, NH. DMS emissions from the surface of the peatland varied greatly over 24 hours and seasonally. Temperature seemed to be the major environmental factor controlling these variabilities. Concentrations of dissolved VSC's varied with time and space throughout the fen

  9. Demonstration of SCR technology for the control of NOx emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired utility boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, W.S.; Maxwell, J.D.; Healy, E.C.; Hardman, R.R.; Baldwin, A.L.

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the completed Innovative Clean Coal Technology project which demonstrated SCR technology for reduction of flue gas NO{sub x} emissions from a utility boiler burning US high-sulfur coal. The project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, managed and co-funded by Southern Company Services, Inc. on behalf of the Southern Company, and also co-funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and Ontario Hydro. The project was located at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit 5 (a 75 MW tangentially-fired boiler burning US coals that had a sulfur content ranging from 2.5--2.9%), near Pensacola, Florida. The test program was conducted for approximately two years to evaluate catalyst deactivation and other SCR operational effects. The SCR test facility had nine reactors: three 2.5 MW (5,000 scfm), and operated on low-dust flue gas. The reactors operated in parallel with commercially available SCR catalysts obtained from suppliers throughout the world. Long-term performance testing began in July 1993 and was completed in July 1995. A brief test facility description and the results of the project are presented in this paper.

  10. A purge and trap technique to capture volatile compounds combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry to investigate the effect of sulfur-fumigation on Radix Angelicae Dahuricae.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gang; Li, Qinglin; Zhang, Jida; Cai, Hao; Cai, Baochang

    2014-09-01

    Sulfur-fumigation is known to reduce volatile compounds that are the main active components in herbs used in herbal medicine. We investigated changes in chemical composition between sun-dried and sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Dahuricae using a purge and trap technique to capture volatile compounds, and two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry for identification. Using sun-dried Radix Angelicae Dahuricae samples as a reference, the results showed that 73 volatile compounds, including 12 sulfide compounds, were found to be present only in sulfur-fumigated samples. Furthermore, 32 volatile compounds that were found in sun-dried Radix Angelicae Dahuricae samples disappeared after sulfur-fumigation. The proposed method can be applied to accurately discriminate sulfur-fumigated Radix Angelicae Dahuricae from different commercial sources.

  11. Controls and rates of acid production in commercial-scale sulfur blocks.

    PubMed

    Birkham, T K; Hendry, M J; Barbour, S L; Lawrence, J R

    2010-01-01

    Acidic drainage (pH 0.4-1.0) from oxidizing elemental sulfur (S(0)) blocks is an environmental concern in regions where S(0) is stockpiled. In this study, the locations, controls, and rates of H(2)SO(4) production in commercial-scale S(0) blocks ( approximately 1-2 x 10(6) m(3)) in northern Alberta, Canada, were estimated. In situ modeling of O(2) concentrations ([O(2)]) suggest that 70 to >97% of the annual H(2)SO(4) production occurs in the upper 1 m of the blocks where temperatures increase to >15 degrees C during the summer. Laboratory experiments show that S(0) oxidation rates are sensitive to temperature (Q(10) = 4.3) and dependent on the activity of autotrophic S(0)-oxidizing microbes. The annual efflux of SO(4) in drainage water from a S(0) block (5.5 x 10(5) kg) was within the estimated range of SO(4) production within the block (2.7 x 10(5) to 1.2 x 10(6) kg), suggesting that H(2)SO(4) production and removal rates were approximately equal during the study period. The low mean relative humidity within the block (68%; SD = 17%; n = 21) was attributed to osmotic suction from elevated H(2)SO(4) concentrations and suggests a mean in situ pH of approximately -2.1. The low pH of drainage waters was attributed to the mixing of fresh infiltrating water and low-pH in situ water. Heat generation during S(0) oxidation was an important factor in maintaining elevated temperatures (mean, 11.1 degrees C) within the block. The implications of this research are relevant globally because construction methods and the physical properties of S(0) blocks are similar worldwide.

  12. Combined nitrogen oxides/sulfur dioxide control in dry scrubber systems

    SciTech Connect

    Harkness, J. B.L.; Gorski, A. J.; Huang, H. S.

    1989-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is investigating alternative control concepts that involve modifying existing SO{sub 2}-removal processes and sorbents, with the objective of achieving simultaneous removal of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Laboratory-scale research conducted using a fixed-bed reactor and a spray-dryer/fabric-filter system has been paralleled by field tests at ANL's commercial-scale (20-MW electric equivalent) dry scrubber. In the fixed-bed experiments, a range of chemical reagents was surveyed, and the best-performing additives were studied in detail. Sodium chloride, sodium bisulfite, sodium hydroxide, and Fe(II)*EDTA were found to increase both NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} removals; the additives did not appear to increase NO{sub x} removal directly, but they interacted strongly with the other primary variables to improve sorbent performance. The laboratory spray-dryer system was used to study the effects on combined NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} removal of the best-performing fixed-bed additives and certain process modifications. The tests showed that sodium chloride increased NO{sub x} removal at all temperatures; sodium bisulfite was generally less effective, and calcium chloride was effective only at 65{degree}C. Up to 80{degree}C, all three additives significantly improved SO{sub 2} removal, but improvement ceased at higher temperatures. This report discusses the experimental results in terms of the effects the additives and principal process variables had on NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} removals and the mechanistic implications. 14 refs., 74 figs., 33 tabs.

  13. Dynamic behavior of the bray-liebhafsky oscillatory reaction controlled by sulfuric acid and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejić, N.; Vujković, M.; Maksimović, J.; Ivanović, A.; Anić, S.; Čupić, Ž.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2011-12-01

    The non-periodic, periodic and chaotic regimes in the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillatory reaction observed in a continuously fed well stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under isothermal conditions at various inflow concentrations of the sulfuric acid were experimentally studied. In each series (at any fixed temperature), termination of oscillatory behavior via saddle loop infinite period bifurcation (SNIPER) as well as some kind of the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation is presented. In addition, it was found that an increase of temperature, in different series of experiments resulted in the shift of bifurcation point towards higher values of sulfuric acid concentration.

  14. Controllable synthesis of α-sulfur spheres with hierarchical nanostructures for efficient visible-light-driven photocatalytic ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Xueming; Zhang, Xiufang; Zhang, Weiqiang; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Guowen; Ma, Hongchao

    2015-08-01

    Visible-light-active α-sulfur spheres with hierarchical nanostructures were fabricated by simple solution-phase synthesis with PVP as the template for enhanced photocatalytic ability. The α-sulfur hierarchical spheres with an ultrahigh specific surface area can controllable synthesized by changing the addition quantity of PVP. The obtained products are systematically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy (DRS), Fluorescence (FL) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared samples is evaluated by photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) aqueous solution under visible light illumination. The results indicate that the morphology, specific surface area, photo absorbance ability, the separation efficiency of photogenerated carriers and the reactant adsorption performance can be controlled by varying the addition quantity of PVP. When 200 mg PVP is added, α-sulfur hierarchical spheres with uniform particle size about 1 μm and ultrahigh specific surface area of 67.1 m2/g is obtained, and its photocatalytic activity reaches a maximum value, which can be attributed to the combined effects of photo absorbance ability, the separation efficiency of photogenerated carriers and the reactant adsorption performance.

  15. The role of crystallization-driven exsolution on the sulfur mass balance in volcanic arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Zajacz, Zoltán.; Wright, Heather; Vazquez, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    The release of large amounts of sulfur to the stratosphere during explosive eruptions affects the radiative balance in the atmosphere and consequentially impacts climate for up to several years after the event. Quantitative estimations of the processes that control the mass balance of sulfur between melt, crystals, and vapor bubbles is needed to better understand the potential sulfur yield of individual eruption events and the conditions that favor large sulfur outputs to the atmosphere. The processes that control sulfur partitioning in magmas are (1) exsolution of volatiles (dominantly H2O) during decompression (first boiling) and during isobaric crystallization (second boiling), (2) the crystallization and breakdown of sulfide or sulfate phases in the magma, and (3) the transport of sulfur-rich vapor (gas influx) from deeper unerupted regions of the magma reservoir. Vapor exsolution and the formation/breakdown of sulfur-rich phases can all be considered as closed-system processes where mass balance arguments are generally easier to constrain, whereas the contribution of sulfur by vapor transport (open system process) is more difficult to quantify. The ubiquitous "excess sulfur" problem, which refers to the much higher sulfur mass released during eruptions than what can be accounted for by amount of sulfur originally dissolved in erupted melt, as estimated from melt inclusion sulfur concentrations (the "petrologic estimate"), reflects the challenges in closing the sulfur mass balance between crystals, melt, and vapor before and during a volcanic eruption. In this work, we try to quantify the relative importance of closed- and open-system processes for silicic arc volcanoes using kinetic models of sulfur partitioning during exsolution. Our calculations show that crystallization-induced exsolution (second boiling) can generate a significant fraction of the excess sulfur observed in crystal-rich arc magmas. This result does not negate the important role of vapor

  16. Determination of the sulfur isotope ratio in carbonyl sulfide using gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry on fragment ions 32S+, 33S+, and 34S+.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Shohei; Toyoda, Akari; Toyoda, Sakae; Ishino, Sakiko; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2015-01-06

    Little is known about the sulfur isotopic composition of carbonyl sulfide (OCS), the most abundant atmospheric sulfur species. We present a promising new analytical method for measuring the stable sulfur isotopic compositions (δ(33)S, δ(34)S, and Δ(33)S) of OCS using nanomole level samples. The direct isotopic analytical technique consists of two parts: a concentration line and online gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) using fragmentation ions (32)S(+), (33)S(+), and (34)S(+). The current levels of measurement precision for OCS samples greater than 8 nmol are 0.42‰, 0.62‰, and 0.23‰ for δ(33)S, δ(34)S, and Δ(33)S, respectively. These δ and Δ values show a slight dependence on the amount of injected OCS for volumes smaller than 8 nmol. The isotope values obtained from the GC-IRMS method were calibrated against those measured by a conventional SF6 method. We report the first measurement of the sulfur isotopic composition of OCS in air collected at Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan. The δ(34)S value obtained for OCS (4.9 ± 0.3‰) was lower than the previous estimate of 11‰. When the δ(34)S value for OCS from the atmospheric sample is postulated as the global signal, this finding, coupled with isotopic fractionation for OCS sink reactions in the stratosphere, explains the reported δ(34)S for background stratospheric sulfate. This suggests that OCS is a potentially important source for background (nonepisodic or nonvolcanic) stratospheric sulfate aerosols.

  17. Sub-atmospheric gas purification for EUVL vacuum environment control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Abneesh; Pereira, Stenio; Gaffney, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    High purity gas supply for optics purging and cleaning under vacuum is required to be maintained at the output of the mini-environment gas distribution box in EUV scanners. Typically H2 gas is used for cleaning and purging while N2 gas is used for purging H2 lines post exposure. An investigation of gas purifier performance for moisture removal is made under sub-atmospheric pressure conditions. An evaluation of moisture levels as a function of switching between H2 and N2 gas supply states is also conducted. A superior performance (below instrument LDL) is observed for HX (Entegris, Inc.) gas purifier under various test conditions in the 10-100 kPa pressure range. Our preliminary studies provide a better understanding of gas purifier related moisture outgassing under vacuum and should facilitate better control and standardization of tool set-up parameters for environment in EUV lithography.

  18. 40 CFR 52.125 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amount prescribed by the following equations: E = 12,245 S or e = 1,540 S Where: E = Allowable sulfur... following equations, except as provided in paragraph (3)(ii) of this paragraph (c). E1 = 0.333 E or e1 = 0... Services and the State Hearing Board over all existing copper smelters. (1) The requirements of § 51.13...

  19. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CHEMICAL SPECIFIC. VOL. 15: CONTROL OF ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF SULFUR TRIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, discussing sulfur trioxide (SO3), is one of a series addressing the prevention of accidental releases of toxic chemicals. SO3, a clear oily liquid or solid at typical ambient conditions, has an Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) concentration of 20 ppm, w...

  20. Structures of lipoyl synthase reveal a compact active site for controlling sequential sulfur insertion reactions.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Jenny E; Hiscox, Martyn J; Dinis, Pedro C; Fox, Stephen J; Iliopoulos, Andreas; Hussey, James E; Sandy, James; Van Beek, Florian T; Essex, Jonathan W; Roach, Peter L

    2014-11-15

    Lipoyl cofactors are essential for living organisms and are produced by the insertion of two sulfur atoms into the relatively unreactive C-H bonds of an octanoyl substrate. This reaction requires lipoyl synthase, a member of the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzyme superfamily. In the present study, we solved crystal structures of lipoyl synthase with two [4Fe-4S] clusters bound at opposite ends of the TIM barrel, the usual fold of the radical SAM superfamily. The cluster required for reductive SAM cleavage conserves the features of the radical SAM superfamily, but the auxiliary cluster is bound by a CX4CX5C motif unique to lipoyl synthase. The fourth ligand to the auxiliary cluster is an extremely unusual serine residue. Site-directed mutants show this conserved serine ligand is essential for the sulfur insertion steps. One crystallized lipoyl synthase (LipA) complex contains 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), a breakdown product of SAM, bound in the likely SAM-binding site. Modelling has identified an 18 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) deep channel, well-proportioned to accommodate an octanoyl substrate. These results suggest that the auxiliary cluster is the likely sulfur donor, but access to a sulfide ion for the second sulfur insertion reaction requires the loss of an iron atom from the auxiliary cluster, which the serine ligand may enable.

  1. ENHANCEMENT OF REACTIVITY IN SURFACTANT-MODIFIED SORBENTS FOR SULFUR DIOXIDE CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Injection of calcium-based sorbents into the postflame zone of utility boilers is capable of achieving sulfur dioxide (SO2) captures of 50-60% at a stoichiometry of 2. Calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2] appears to be the most effective commercially available sorbent. Recent attempts to ...

  2. First online measurements of sulfuric acid gas in modern heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust: implications for nanoparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, F; Pirjola, L; Rönkkö, T; Reichl, U; Schlager, H; Lähde, T; Heikkilä, J; Keskinen, J

    2012-10-16

    To mitigate the diesel particle pollution problem, diesel vehicles are fitted with modern exhaust after-treatment systems (ATS), which efficiently remove engine-generated primary particles (soot and ash) and gaseous hydrocarbons. Unfortunately, ATS can promote formation of low-vapor-pressure gases, which may undergo nucleation and condensation leading to formation of nucleation particles (NUP). The chemical nature and formation mechanism of these particles are only poorly explored. Using a novel mass spectrometric method, online measurements of low-vapor-pressure gases were performed for exhaust of a modern heavy-duty diesel engine operated with modern ATS and combusting low and ultralow sulfur fuels and also biofuel. It was observed that the gaseous sulfuric acid (GSA) concentration varied strongly, although engine operation was stable. However, the exhaust GSA was observed to be affected by fuel sulfur level, exhaust after-treatment, and driving conditions. Significant GSA concentrations were measured also when biofuel was used, indicating that GSA can be originated also from lubricant oil sulfur. Furthermore, accompanying NUP measurements and NUP model simulations were performed. We found that the exhaust GSA promotes NUP formation, but also organic (acidic) precursor gases can have a role. The model results indicate that that the measured GSA concentration alone is not high enough to grow the particles to the detected sizes.

  3. Theoretical study on the gas phase reaction of sulfuric acid with hydroxyl radical in the presence of water.

    PubMed

    Long, Bo; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Tan, Xing-Feng; Long, Zheng-Wen; Wang, Yi-Bo; Ren, Da-Sen

    2011-03-03

    The reactions of H2SO4 with the OH radical without water and with water are investigated employing the quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2p) and MP2/aug-cc-pv(T+d)z levels of theory, respectively. The calculated results show that the reaction of H2SO4 with OH and H2O is a very complex mechanism because of the formation of the prereactive complex prior to the transition state and product. There are two prereactive complexes with stabilization energies being -20.28 and -20.67 kcal/mol, respectively. In addition, the single water can lower the energy barriers of the hydrogen abstraction and the proton transfer to 7.51 and 6.37 kcal/mol, respectively from 13.79 and 8.82 kcal/mol with respect to the corresponding prereactive complex. The computed rate constants indicate that the water-assisted reaction of sulfuric acid with OH radical is of greater importance than the reaction of the naked sulfuric acid with the OH radical because the rate constant of the water-assisted process is about 10(3) faster than that of the reaction sulfuric acid with OH. Therefore, the conclusion is obtained that the water-assisted process plays an important role in the sink for the gaseous sulfuric acid in the clean area.

  4. Landfill Gas Control at Military Installations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Explosions or Fires 8 2 Composition of Municipal Solid Waste 10 3 Optimal Conditions for Anaerobic Decomposition 10 4 Variation Composition in a Typical...Composition of Municipal Solid Waste I I 4 Variation in Gas Production With Increasing Moisture Content 12 5 Variation in Carbon Dioxide and Methane...produces methane gas. Objective Municipal solid waste (MSW) is made up mostly (50 to The objective of this report is to provide any 80 percent) of

  5. Gas controller's paper pipeline - transportation and exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, R.E. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    When gas supplies began to decline during the 1970s, the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission promulgated Orders 402 and 402-A to allow curtailed companies to make 60-day emergency purchases. In assisting its customer companies with such transactions, Texas Gas encountered several problems: the gas had to be allocated to each company, the sales required separate billing, the allocated volumes had to be received and delivered, and new contracts were necessary. Another stopgap measure, known as the 533 transportation service, also proved difficult to implement because the gas volumes were usually very small and were often interrupted when regular supplies began to resume. Under the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978, interstate companies could offer the same gas prices to producers that intrastate companies paid; the NGPA also allowed sales from intra- to interstate companies. These provisions created a greater need for transportation-or-exchange service among all the parties. More recently, the FERC's Order 60 gave interstate companies the power to enter into self-implementing transportation-or-exchange service. Under legal modifications now being considered, pipeline companies will be able to significantly reduce regulatory delays by using blanket certificates.

  6. Development of dry control technology for emissions of mercury in flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hann S.; Wu, Jiann M.; Livengood, C.D.

    1995-06-01

    In flue gases from coal-combustion systems, mercury in either the elemental state or its chloride form (HgCl{sub 2}) can be predominant among all the possible mercury species present; this predominance largely depends on the chlorine-to-mercury ratio in the coal feeds. Conventional flue-gas cleanup technologies are moderately effective in controlling HgCl{sub 2} but are very poor at controlling elemental mercury. Experiments were conducted on the removal of elemental mercury vapor by means of a number of different types of sorbents, using a fixed-bed adsorption system. Of the four commercial activated carbons evaluated, the sulfur-treated carbon sample gives the best removal performance, with good mercury-sorption capacities. Promising removal results also have been obtained with low-cost minerals after chemical treatments. These inorganic sorbents could potentially be developed into a cost-effective alternative to activated carbons for mercury removal.

  7. Henry`s law solubilities and Setchenow coefficients for biogenic reduced sulfur species obtained from gas-liquid uptake measurements

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, W.J.; Swartz, E.; Hu, J.H.

    1995-04-20

    Biogenically produced reduced sulfur compounds, including dimethylsulfide (DMS, CH{sub 3}SCH{sub 3}), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}SH), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS), are a major source of sulfur in the marine atmosphere. This source is estimated to contribute 25-40% of global sulfur emissions. These species and their oxidation products, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}), and methane sulfonic acid (MSA), dominate the production of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the clean marine atmosphere. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion-produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. Using a newly developed bubble column apparatus, a series of aqueous phase uptake studies have been completed for the reduced sulfur species DMS, H{sub 2}S, CS{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}SH, and OCS. Aqueous phase uptake has been studied as a function of temperature (278-298 K), pH (1-14), H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration (0-1 M), NaCl concentration (0-5 M), and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration (0-4 M). The Henry`s law coefficients for CH{sub 3}SH and CS{sub 2} were determined for the first time, as were the Setchenow coefficients for all the species studied. 33 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Anthropogenic Sulfur Perturbations on Biogenic Oxidation: SO2 Additions Impact Gas-Phase OH Oxidation Products of α- and β-Pinene.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Beth; Brophy, Patrick; Brune, William H; Farmer, Delphine K

    2016-02-02

    In order to probe how anthropogenic pollutants can impact the atmospheric oxidation of biogenic emissions, we investigated how sulfur dioxide (SO2) perturbations impact the oxidation of two monoterpenes, α-and β-pinene. We used chemical ionization mass spectrometry to examine changes in both individual molecules and gas-phase bulk properties of oxidation products as a function of SO2 addition. SO2 perturbations impacted the oxidation systems of α-and β-pinene, leading to an ensemble of products with a lesser degree of oxygenation than unperturbed systems. These changes may be due to shifts in the OH:HO2 ratio from SO2 oxidation and/or to SO3 reacting directly with organic molecules. Van Krevelen diagrams suggest a shift from gas-phase functionalization by alcohol/peroxide groups to functionalization by carboxylic acid or carbonyl groups, consistent with a decreased OH:HO2 ratio. Increasing relative humidity dampens the impact of the perturbation. This decrease in oxygenation may impact secondary organic aerosol formation in regions dominated by biogenic emissions with nearby SO2 sources. We observed sulfur-containing organic compounds following SO2 perturbations of monoterpene oxidation; whether these are the result of photochemistry or an instrumental artifact from ion-molecule clustering remains uncertain. However, our results demonstrate that the two monoterpene isomers produce unique suites of oxidation products.

  9. Toxic Acid Gas Absorber Design Considerations for Air Pollution Control in Process Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manyele, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the design parameters for an absorber used for removal of toxic acid gas (in particular sulfur dioxide) from a process gas stream for environmental health protection purposes. Starting from the equilibrium data, Henry's law constant was determined from the slope of the y-x diagram. Based on mass balances across the absorber,…

  10. EPRI High-Sulfur Test Center: Wet FGD (flue gas desulfurization) sodium carbonate mass-transfer tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, J.B.; Burke, J.M.

    1988-10-01

    HSTC contains pilot- and mini-pilot-scale systems for investigating wet FGD technologies, as well as dry-injection and spray-drying pilot systems for investigating dry FGD technologies. A series of sodium carbonate (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) mass-transfer tests is the first step in characterizing the SO/sub 2/ removal capabilities of wet FGD systems at HSTC. By using sodium as the SO/sub 2/ absorbent, an excess of liquid-phase alkalinity is provided to assure that gas-limited mass transfer alone will control SO/sub 2/ removal. Objectives of this project were to determine the maximum possible SO/sub 2/ removal capabilities of the HSTC wet FGD systems under different configurations; to provide data for modeling SO/sub 2/ absorption under gas-limited mass-transfer conditions. Sodium mass-transfer tests were conducted using slurry with a high concentration of liquid-phase alkalinity, established by adding sodium carbonate and maintained with a unique, in situ, dual-alkali operating system that continuously regenerated slurry alkalinity with slaked quicklime (Ca(OH)/sub 2/). This process allows testing of a slurry, simulating a lime or limestone scrubber, while maintaining an excess of liquid-phase alkalinity to assure gas-limited mass-transfer conditions. SO/sub 2/ removal efficiencies were measured of the mini-pilot and pilot systems for three absorber configurations---spray tower, tray tower, and packed tower. More than 300 tests were conducted over a wide range of operating conditions, using various types of spray nozzles characterized for spray distribution patterns. 5 refs., 74 figs., 23 tabs.

  11. Dominant factors in controlling marine gas pools in South China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, S.; Watney, W.L.

    2007-01-01

    In marine strata from Sinian to Middle Triassic in South China, there develop four sets of regional and six sets of local source rocks, and ten sets of reservoir rocks. The occurrence of four main formation periods in association with five main reconstruction periods, results in a secondary origin for the most marine gas pools in South China. To improve the understanding of marine gas pools in South China with severely deformed geological background, the dominant control factors are discussed in this paper. The fluid sources, including the gas cracked from crude oil, the gas dissolved in water, the gas of inorganic origin, hydrocarbons generated during the second phase, and the mixed pool fluid source, were the most significant control factors of the types and the development stage of pools. The period of the pool formation and the reconstruction controlled the pool evolution and the distribution on a regional scale. Owing to the multiple periods of the pool formation and the reconstruction, the distribution of marine gas pools was complex both in space and in time, and the gas in the pools is heterogeneous. Pool elements, such as preservation conditions, traps and migration paths, and reservoir rocks and facies, also served as important control factors to marine gas pools in South China. Especially, the preservation conditions played a key role in maintaining marine oil and gas accumulations on a regional or local scale. According to several dominant control factors of a pool, the pool-controlling model can be constructed. As an example, the pool-controlling model of Sinian gas pool in Weiyuan gas field in Sichuan basin was summed up. ?? Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag 2007.

  12. Commercialization Development of Oxygen Fired CFB for Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2007-03-31

    advancements offer significant reductions in power requirements, which would improve plant efficiency and economics for the oxygen-fired technology. The second phase consisted of pilot-scale testing followed by a refined performance and economic evaluation of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. As a part of this workscope, ALSTOM modified its 3 MW{sub th} (9.9 MMBtu/hr) Multiuse Test Facility (MTF) pilot plant to operate with O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures of up to 70 percent O{sub 2} by volume. Tests were conducted with coal and petroleum coke. The test objectives were to determine the impacts of oxygen firing on heat transfer, bed dynamics, potential agglomeration, and gaseous and particulate emissions. The test data results were used to refine the design, performance, costs, and economic models developed in Phase-I for the O{sub 2}-fired CFB with CO{sub 2} capture. Nsakala, Liljedahl, and Turek reported results from this study in 2004. ALSTOM identified several items needing further investigation in preparation for large scale demonstration of the oxygen-fired CFB concept, namely: (1) Operation and performance of the moving bed heat exchanger (MBHE) to avoid recarbonation and also for cost savings compared to the standard bubbling fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHE); (2) Performance of the back-end flash dryer absorber (FDA) for sulfur capture under high CO{sub 2}/high moisture flue gas environment using calcined limestone in the fly ash and using fresh commercial lime directly in the FDA; (3) Determination of the effect of recarbonation on fouling in the convective pass; (4) Assessment of the impact of oxygen firing on the mercury, other trace elements, and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions; and (5) Develop a proposal-level oxygen-fired retrofit design for a relatively small existing CFB steam power plant in preparation for a large-scale demonstration of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. Hence, ALSTOM responded to a DOE Solicitation to address all these issues with further O

  13. Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Task 3: SOx/NOx/Hg Removal for Low Sulfur Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Zanfir, Monica; Solunke, Rahul; Shah, Minish

    2012-06-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing PC (pulverized coal) power plants that are retrofitted with oxycombustion technology. The objective of Task 3 of this project was to evaluate an alternative method of SOx, NOx and Hg removal from flue gas produced by burning low sulfur coal in oxy-combustion power plants. The goal of the program was to conduct an experimental investigation and to develop a novel process for simultaneously removal of SOx and NOx from power plants that would operate on low sulfur coal without the need for wet-FGD & SCRs. A novel purification process operating at high pressures and ambient temperatures was developed. Activated carbon's catalytic and adsorbent capabilities are used to oxidize the sulfur and nitrous oxides to SO{sub 3} and NO{sub 2} species, which are adsorbed on the activated carbon and removed from the gas phase. Activated carbon is regenerated by water wash followed by drying. The development effort commenced with the screening of commercially available activated carbon materials for their capability to remove SO{sub 2}. A bench-unit operating in batch mode was constructed to conduct an experimental investigation of simultaneous SOx and NOx removal from a simulated oxyfuel flue gas mixture. Optimal operating conditions and the capacity of the activated carbon to remove the contaminants were identified. The process was able to achieve simultaneous SOx and NOx removal in a single step. The removal efficiencies were >99.9% for SOx and >98% for NOx. In the longevity tests performed on a batch unit, the retention capacity could be maintained at high level over 20 cycles. This process was able to effectively remove up to 4000 ppm SOx from the simulated feeds corresponding to oxyfuel flue gas from high sulfur coal plants. A dual bed continuous unit with five times the capacity of the batch unit was constructed to test continuous operation and longevity. Full

  14. The role of crystallization-driven exsolution on the sulfur mass balance in volcanic arc magmas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, Yanqing; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Zajacz, Zoltán; Wright, Heather M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    The release of large amounts of sulfur to the stratosphere during explosive eruptions affects the radiative balance in the atmosphere and consequentially impacts climate for up to several years after the event. Quantitative estimations of the processes that control the mass balance of sulfur between melt, crystals, and vapor bubbles is needed to better understand the potential sulfur yield of individual eruption events and the conditions that favor large sulfur outputs to the atmosphere. The processes that control sulfur partitioning in magmas are (1) exsolution of volatiles (dominantly H2O) during decompression (first boiling) and during isobaric crystallization (second boiling), (2) the crystallization and breakdown of sulfide or sulfate phases in the magma, and (3) the transport of sulfur-rich vapor (gas influx) from deeper unerupted regions of the magma reservoir. Vapor exsolution and the formation/breakdown of sulfur-rich phases can all be considered as closed-system processes where mass balance arguments are generally easier to constrain, whereas the contribution of sulfur by vapor transport (open system process) is more difficult to quantify. The ubiquitous “excess sulfur” problem, which refers to the much higher sulfur mass released during eruptions than what can be accounted for by amount of sulfur originally dissolved in erupted melt, as estimated from melt inclusion sulfur concentrations (the “petrologic estimate”), reflects the challenges in closing the sulfur mass balance between crystals, melt, and vapor before and during a volcanic eruption. In this work, we try to quantify the relative importance of closed- and open-system processes for silicic arc volcanoes using kinetic models of sulfur partitioning during exsolution. Our calculations show that crystallization-induced exsolution (second boiling) can generate a significant fraction of the excess sulfur observed in crystal-rich arc magmas. This result does not negate the important role of

  15. To control and to be controlled: understanding the Arabidopsis SLIM1 function in sulfur deficiency through comprehensive investigation of the EIL protein family

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzyńska, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur limitation 1 (SLIM1), a member of the EIN3-like (EIL) family of transcription factors in Arabidopsis, is the regulator of many sulfur deficiency responsive genes. Among the five other proteins of the family, three regulate ethylene (ET) responses and two have unassigned functions. Contrary to the well-defined ET signaling, the pathway leading from sensing sulfate status to the activation of its acquisition via SLIM1 is completely unknown. SLIM1 binds to the 20 nt-long specific UPE-box sequence; however, it also recognizes the shorter TEIL sequence, unique for the whole EIL family. SLIM1 takes part in the upregulation and downregulation of various sulfur metabolism genes, but also it controls the degradation of glucosinolates under sulfur deficient conditions. Besides facilitating the increased flux through the sulfate assimilation pathway, SLIM1 induces microRNA395, specifically targeting ATP sulfurylases and a low-affinity sulfate transporter, SULTR2;1, thus affecting sulfate translocation to the shoot. Here, we briefly review the identification, structural characteristics, and molecular function of SLIM1 from the perspective of the whole EIL protein family. PMID:25374579

  16. To control and to be controlled: understanding the Arabidopsis SLIM1 function in sulfur deficiency through comprehensive investigation of the EIL protein family.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur limitation 1 (SLIM1), a member of the EIN3-like (EIL) family of transcription factors in Arabidopsis, is the regulator of many sulfur deficiency responsive genes. Among the five other proteins of the family, three regulate ethylene (ET) responses and two have unassigned functions. Contrary to the well-defined ET signaling, the pathway leading from sensing sulfate status to the activation of its acquisition via SLIM1 is completely unknown. SLIM1 binds to the 20 nt-long specific UPE-box sequence; however, it also recognizes the shorter TEIL sequence, unique for the whole EIL family. SLIM1 takes part in the upregulation and downregulation of various sulfur metabolism genes, but also it controls the degradation of glucosinolates under sulfur deficient conditions. Besides facilitating the increased flux through the sulfate assimilation pathway, SLIM1 induces microRNA395, specifically targeting ATP sulfurylases and a low-affinity sulfate transporter, SULTR2;1, thus affecting sulfate translocation to the shoot. Here, we briefly review the identification, structural characteristics, and molecular function of SLIM1 from the perspective of the whole EIL protein family.

  17. Emissions control for ground power gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudney, R. A.; Priem, R. J.; Juhasz, A. J.; Anderson, D. N.; Mroz, T. S.; Mularz, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    The similarities and differences of emissions reduction technology for aircraft and ground power gas turbines is described. The capability of this technology to reduce ground power emissions to meet existing and proposed emissions standards is presented and discussed. Those areas where the developing aircraft gas turbine technology may have direct application to ground power and those areas where the needed technology may be unique to the ground power mission are pointed out. Emissions reduction technology varying from simple combustor modifications to the use of advanced combustor concepts, such as catalysis, is described and discussed.

  18. Separation of sulfur isotopes

    DOEpatents

    DeWitt, Robert; Jepson, Bernhart E.; Schwind, Roger A.

    1976-06-22

    Sulfur isotopes are continuously separated and enriched using a closed loop reflux system wherein sulfur dioxide (SO.sub.2) is reacted with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or the like to form sodium hydrogen sulfite (NaHSO.sub.3). Heavier sulfur isotopes are preferentially attracted to the NaHSO.sub.3, and subsequently reacted with sulfuric acid (H.sub.2 SO.sub.4) forming sodium hydrogen sulfate (NaHSO.sub.4) and SO.sub.2 gas which contains increased concentrations of the heavier sulfur isotopes. This heavy isotope enriched SO.sub.2 gas is subsequently separated and the NaHSO.sub.4 is reacted with NaOH to form sodium sulfate (Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4) which is subsequently decomposed in an electrodialysis unit to form the NaOH and H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 components which are used in the aforesaid reactions thereby effecting sulfur isotope separation and enrichment without objectionable loss of feed materials.

  19. Improved Controllers For Heaters In Toxic-Gas Combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wishard, James; Lamb, James; Fortier, Edward; Velasquez, Hugo; Waltman, Doug

    1995-01-01

    Commercial electronic proportional controllers installed in place of mechanical power controllers for electric heaters in toxic-gas combustors at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Designed to maintain temperature of heater at preset value by turning power fully on or fully off when temperature falls below or rises above that value, respectively. Solid-state power controllers overcome deficiencies of mechanical power controllers.

  20. [Quality assessment of sulfur-fumigated paeoniae alba radix].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Chen, Yu-Wu; Wang, Qiong; Sun, Lei; Xu, Wei-Yi; Jin, Hong-Yu; Ma, Shuang-Cheng

    2014-08-01

    The samples of sulfur-fumigated Paeoniae Alba Radix acquired both by random spot check from domestic market and self-production by the research group in the laboratory were used to evaluate the effects of sulphur fumigation on the quality of Paeoniae Alba Radix by comparing sulfur-fumigated degree and character, the content of paeoniflorin and paeoniflorin sulfurous acid ester, and changes of the fingerprint. We used methods in Chinese Pharmacopeia to evaluate the character of sulfur-fumigated Paeoniae Alba Radix and determinate the content of aulfur-fumigated paeoniflorin. LC-MS method was used to analyze paeoniflorin-converted products. HPLC fingerprint methods were established to evaluate the differences on quality by similarity. Results showed that fumigated Paeoniae Alba Radix became white and its unique fragrance disappeared, along with the production of pungent sour gas. It also had a significant effect on paeoniflorin content. As sulfur smoked degree aggravated, paeoniflorin content decreased subsequently, some of which turned into paeoniflorin sulfurous acid ester, and this change was not reversible. Fingerprint also showed obvious changes. Obviously, sulfur fumigation had severe influence on the quality of Paeoniae Alba Radix, but we can control the quality of the Paeoniae Alba Radix by testing the paeoniflorin sulfurous acid ester content.

  1. Emissions of toxic pollutants from compressed natural gas and low sulfur diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested over multiple driving cycles.

    PubMed

    Kado, Norman Y; Okamoto, Robert A; Kuzmicky, Paul A; Kobayashi, Reiko; Ayala, Alberto; Gebel, Michael E; Rieger, Paul L; Maddox, Christine; Zafonte, Leo

    2005-10-01

    The number of heavy-duty vehicles using alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas (CNG) and new low-sulfur diesel fuel formulations and equipped with after-treatment devices are projected to increase. However, few peer-reviewed studies have characterized the emissions of particulate matter (PM) and other toxic compounds from these vehicles. In this study, chemical and biological analyses were used to characterize the identifiable toxic air pollutants emitted from both CNG and low-sulfur-diesel-fueled heavy-duty transit buses tested on a chassis dynamometer over three transient driving cycles and a steady-state cruise condition. The CNG bus had no after-treatment, and the diesel bus was tested first equipped with an oxidation catalyst (OC) and then with a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). Emissions were analyzed for PM, volatile organic compounds (VOCs; determined on-site), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and mutagenic activity. The 2000 model year CNG-fueled vehicle had the highest emissions of 1,3-butadiene, benzene, and carbonyls (e.g., formaldehyde) of the three vehicle configurations tested in this study. The 1998 model year diesel bus equipped with an OC and fueled with low-sulfur diesel had the highest emission rates of PM and PAHs. The highest specific mutagenic activities (revertants/microg PM, or potency) and the highest mutagen emission rates (revertants/mi) were from the CNG bus in strain TA98 tested over the New York Bus (NYB) driving cycle. The 1998 model year diesel bus with DPF had the lowest VOCs, PAH, and mutagenic activity emission. In general, the NYB driving cycle had the highest emission rates (g/mi), and the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) had the lowest emission rates for all toxics tested over the three transient test cycles investigated. Also, transient emissions were, in general, higher than steady-state emissions. The emissions of toxic compounds from an in-use CNG transit bus (without an oxidation

  2. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases

    DOEpatents

    Rochelle, Gary T.; Jozewicz, Wojciech

    1989-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accorda The government may own certain rights in the present invention pursuant to EPA Cooperative Agreement CR 81-1531.

  3. A Branch Point of Streptomyces Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolism Controls the Production of Albomycin

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Aditya; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Wei; Van Lanen, Steven; Zhang, Weiwen

    2015-01-01

    Albomycin (ABM), also known as grisein, is a sulfur-containing metabolite produced by Streptomyces griseus ATCC 700974. Genes predicted to be involved in the biosynthesis of ABM and ABM-like molecules are found in the genomes of other actinomycetes. ABM has potent antibacterial activity, and as a result, many attempts have been made to develop ABM into a drug since the last century. Although the productivity of S. griseus can be increased with random mutagenesis methods, understanding of Streptomyces sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism, which supplies a precursor for ABM biosynthesis, could lead to improved and stable production. We previously characterized the gene cluster (abm) in the genome-sequenced S. griseus strain and proposed that the sulfur atom of ABM is derived from either cysteine (Cys) or homocysteine (Hcy). The gene product, AbmD, appears to be an important link between primary and secondary sulfur metabolic pathways. Here, we show that propargylglycine or iron supplementation in growth media increased ABM production by significantly changing the relative concentrations of intracellular Cys and Hcy. An SAA metabolic network of S. griseus was constructed. Pathways toward increasing Hcy were shown to positively impact ABM production. The abmD gene and five genes that increased the Hcy/Cys ratio were assembled downstream of hrdBp promoter sequences and integrated into the chromosome for overexpression. The ABM titer of one engineered strain, SCAK3, in a chemically defined medium was consistently improved to levels ∼400% of the wild type. Finally, we analyzed the production and growth of SCAK3 in shake flasks for further process development. PMID:26519385

  4. A Branch Point of Streptomyces Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolism Controls the Production of Albomycin.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Aditya; Zeng, Yu; Zhou, Wei; Van Lanen, Steven; Zhang, Weiwen; Chen, Shawn

    2015-10-30

    Albomycin (ABM), also known as grisein, is a sulfur-containing metabolite produced by Streptomyces griseus ATCC 700974. Genes predicted to be involved in the biosynthesis of ABM and ABM-like molecules are found in the genomes of other actinomycetes. ABM has potent antibacterial activity, and as a result, many attempts have been made to develop ABM into a drug since the last century. Although the productivity of S. griseus can be increased with random mutagenesis methods, understanding of Streptomyces sulfur amino acid (SAA) metabolism, which supplies a precursor for ABM biosynthesis, could lead to improved and stable production. We previously characterized the gene cluster (abm) in the genome-sequenced S. griseus strain and proposed that the sulfur atom of ABM is derived from either cysteine (Cys) or homocysteine (Hcy). The gene product, AbmD, appears to be an important link between primary and secondary sulfur metabolic pathways. Here, we show that propargylglycine or iron supplementation in growth media increased ABM production by significantly changing the relative concentrations of intracellular Cys and Hcy. An SAA metabolic network of S. griseus was constructed. Pathways toward increasing Hcy were shown to positively impact ABM production. The abmD gene and five genes that increased the Hcy/Cys ratio were assembled downstream of hrdBp promoter sequences and integrated into the chromosome for overexpression. The ABM titer of one engineered strain, SCAK3, in a chemically defined medium was consistently improved to levels ∼400% of the wild type. Finally, we analyzed the production and growth of SCAK3 in shake flasks for further process development.

  5. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  6. Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide absorbents for lean-burn diesel engine emission control

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2010-01-23

    It is known that sulfur oxides contribute significantly and deleteriously to the overall performance of lean-burn diesel engine aftertreatment systems, especially in the case of NOx traps. A Ag-based, fast regenerable SO2 absorbent has been developed and will be described. Over a temperature range of 300oC to 550oC, it absorbs almost all of the SO2 in the simulated exhaust gases during the lean cycles and can be fully regenerated by the short rich cycles at the same temperature. Its composition has been optimized as 1 wt% Pt-5wt%Ag-SiO2, and the preferred silica source for the supporting material has been identified as inert Cabosil fumed silica. The thermal instability of Ag2O under fuel-lean conditions at 230oC and above makes it possible to fast regenerate the sulfur-loaded absorbent during the following fuel-rich cycles. Pt catalyst helps reducing Ag2SO4 during rich cycles at low temperatures. And the chemically inert fumed SiO2 support gives the absorbent long term stability. This absorbent shows great potential to work under the same lean-rich cycling conditions as those imposed on the NOx traps, and thus, can protect the downstream particulate filter and the NOx trap from sulfur poisoning.

  7. Variation in sulfur and selenium accumulation is controlled by naturally occurring isoforms of the key sulfur assimilation enzyme ADENOSINE 5'-PHOSPHOSULFATE REDUCTASE2 across the Arabidopsis species range.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dai-Yin; Baraniecka, Patrycja; Danku, John; Koprivova, Anna; Lahner, Brett; Luo, Hongbing; Yakubova, Elena; Dilkes, Brian; Kopriva, Stanislav; Salt, David E

    2014-11-01

    Natural variation allows the investigation of both the fundamental functions of genes and their role in local adaptation. As one of the essential macronutrients, sulfur is vital for plant growth and development and also for crop yield and quality. Selenium and sulfur are assimilated by the same process, and although plants do not require selenium, plant-based selenium is an important source of this essential element for animals. Here, we report the use of linkage mapping in synthetic F2 populations and complementation to investigate the genetic architecture of variation in total leaf sulfur and selenium concentrations in a diverse set of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions. We identify in accessions collected from Sweden and the Czech Republic two variants of the enzyme ADENOSINE 5'-PHOSPHOSULFATE REDUCTASE2 (APR2) with strongly diminished catalytic capacity. APR2 is a key enzyme in both sulfate and selenate reduction, and its reduced activity in the loss-of-function allele apr2-1 and the two Arabidopsis accessions Hodonín and Shahdara leads to a lowering of sulfur flux from sulfate into the reduced sulfur compounds, cysteine and glutathione, and into proteins, concomitant with an increase in the accumulation of sulfate in leaves. We conclude from our observation, and the previously identified weak allele of APR2 from the Shahdara accession collected in Tadjikistan, that the catalytic capacity of APR2 varies by 4 orders of magnitude across the Arabidopsis species range, driving significant differences in sulfur and selenium metabolism. The selective benefit, if any, of this large variation remains to be explored.

  8. Volatile sulfur compounds from a redox-controlled-cattle-manure slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, W.E.; Guenzi, W.D.

    1983-01-01

    Volatile S compounds have been implicated as contributors to the odor problem from cattle-feedlots. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of oxidation-reduction potentials (E/sub h/) on the type and amount of volatile S compounds released from cattle manure. The laboratory experiment utilized a manure slurry controlled at pH 7, 30/sup 0/C, and a preselected E/sub h/ levels. The E/sub h/ of the slurry was initially controlled at +300 mV, and subsequently decreased in increments of 100 mV/week through -200 mV. Effluent gases from the incubation flask were trapped, and the S gases analyzed by gas chromatography. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon disulfide (CS/sub 2/) production was low (less than or equal to 0.07 ..mu..g/g manure/d) at all redox levels. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) were highest at 0 mV, while hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) and methanethiol (MeSH) were greatest at -100 mV. The total amount of S volatilized from the manure slurry as each compound was: H/sub 2/O, 155 ..mu..g; MeSH, 135 ..mu..g; DMS, 83..mu..g; DMDS, 27 ..mu..g; COS, 8 ..mu..g; and CS/sub 2/, 3 ..mu..g; representing about 1.7% of the total manure S.

  9. Electrochemical performance of lithium-sulfur batteries based on a sulfur cathode obtained by H2S gas treatment of a lithium salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressel, Carina B.; Jha, Himendra; Eberle, Anna-Marietta; Gasteiger, Hubert A.; Fässler, Thomas F.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique to produce Li2S/C composites and Li2S cathodes as well as their application in high-capacity Li-S batteries is demonstrated. The simple but effective method converts an easy-to-handle lithium salt-containing composite or electrode to Li2S using H2S. The main advantage is that the conversion to Li2S can be performed towards the final stage of the electrode preparation process, which significantly reduces the need of controlled atmosphere otherwise required for Li2S handling. LiOH is used to demonstrate the technique, and such fabricated Li2S electrode is successfully used in a Li-S battery (half-cell) where it shows discharge capacities of up to 770 mAh g-1(Li2S) and retained >410 mAh g-1(Li2S) after 100 cycles at C/5.

  10. Inhibiting effect of sulfur and oxygen compounds on carbazole hydrogenitrogenation on NiMo/Al sub 2 O sub 3 catalysts and relation to gas-phase acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, M.; Ogino, T. )

    1987-04-01

    The inhibiting effect of various sulfur and oxygen compounds on carbazole hydrodenitrogenation on NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts has been studied. The reactions were carried out with a flow microreactor at 260-360{degree}C and 10.1 MPa total pressure. A major denitrogenated product was bicyclohexyl, and a hydrogenated compound was tetrahydrocarbazole, accompanied by small amounts of perhydrocarbazole and hexahydrocarbazole. Sulfidation of the reduced catalyst increased the activity of the catalyst at all temperatures. At 360{degree}C, the presence of the sulfur and oxygen compounds depressed the denitrogenation of perhydrocarbazole to bicyclohexyl on the reduced and sulfided catalyst which was a rate-determining step. At lower temperatures, all the additives affected the hydrogenation of carbazole to tetrahydrocarbazole which was not in equilibrium and resulted in a decrease of denitrogenation. The denitrogenation of perhydrocarbazole was assumed to follow the Langmuir-type equation, allowing for competitive adsorption of perhydrocarbazole and additives on the denitrogenated sites. The relationship between the inhibiting effect of the additives and their gas-phase acidity was also discussed.

  11. Associations between immune function in yearling beef cattle and airborne emissions of sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and VOCs from oil and natural gas facilities.

    PubMed

    Bechtel, Daniel G; Waldner, Cheryl L; Wickstrom, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Researchers assessed the associations between airborne emissions from oil and gas field facilities and the structure and function of the immune system of yearling beef cattle in 27 herds during spring 2002. They evaluated the immune systems of these animals by enumerating B lymphocytes and T-lymphocyte subtypes (CD4, CD8, gammadelta, and WC1) in peripheral circulation and by measuring systemic antibody production in response to vaccination. Researchers prospectively measured exposure to sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by using air-quality data from passive monitors installed in pastures and wintering areas. They estimated the mean exposure of each animal over the 6-month period before the start of sample collection. The researchers used mixed models, which adjusted for clustering by herd and accounted for known risk factors, to examine potential associations between exposure to airborne sulfur dioxide, VOCs (measured as concentrations of benzene and toluene) and hydrogen sulfide, as well as proximity to emission sources (well-site density), and the immune system outcomes. Increasing exposure to VOCs measured as toluene was associated with significant CD4 T lymphocytopenia. The number of CD4 T lymphocytes was 30% lower in cattle exposed to VOCs measured as toluene in the highest quartile (> 0.823 microg/m3) than in cattle exposed in the lowest quartile (< 0.406 microg/m3).

  12. Sulfur Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariss, R.; Niki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Among the general categories of tropospheric sulfur sources, anthropogenic sources have been quantified the most accurately. Research on fluxes of sulfur compounds from volcanic sources is now in progress. Natural sources of reduced sulfur compounds are highly variable in both space and time. Variables, such as soil temperature, hydrology (tidal and water table), and organic flux into the soil, all interact to determine microbial production and subsequent emissions of reduced sulfur compounds from anaerobic soils and sediments. Available information on sources of COS, CS2, DMS, and H2S to the troposphere in the following paragraphs are summarized; these are the major biogenic sulfur species with a clearly identified role in tropospheric chemistry. The oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 can often have a significant impact on the acidity of precipitation. A schematic representation of some important transformations and sinks for selected sulfur species is illustrated.

  13. Sulfur revisited.

    PubMed

    Lin, A N; Reimer, R J; Carter, D M

    1988-03-01

    Sulfur is a time-honored therapeutic agent useful in a variety of dermatologic disorders. Its keratolytic action is due to formation of hydrogen sulfide through a reaction that depends upon direct interaction between sulfur particles and keratinocytes. The smaller the particle size, the greater the degree of such interaction and the greater the therapeutic efficacy. When applied topically, sulfur induces various histologic changes, including hyperkeratosis, acanthosis, and dilatation of dermal vasculature. One study showed that sulfur was comedogenic when applied onto human and rabbit skin, findings that were not reproduced in other studies. About 1% of topically applied sulfur is systemically absorbed. Adverse effects from topically applied sulfur are uncommon and are mainly limited to the skin. In infants, however, fatal outcome after extensive application has been reported.

  14. Two stage sorption of sulfur compounds

    DOEpatents

    Moore, William E.

    1992-01-01

    A two stage method for reducing the sulfur content of exhaust gases is disclosed. Alkali- or alkaline-earth-based sorbent is totally or partially vaporized and introduced into a sulfur-containing gas stream. The activated sorbent can be introduced in the reaction zone or the exhaust gases of a combustor or a gasifier. High efficiencies of sulfur removal can be achieved.

  15. Sulfur Dioxide Pollution Monitor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    The sulfur dioxide pollution monitor described in this document is a government-owed invention that is available for licensing. The background of the invention is outlined, and drawings of the monitor together with a detailed description of its function are provided. A sample stream of air, smokestack gas or the like is flowed through a…

  16. Combinatorial control of diverse metabolic and physiological functions by transcriptional regulators of the yeast sulfur assimilation pathway.

    PubMed

    Petti, Allegra A; McIsaac, R Scott; Ho-Shing, Olivia; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Botstein, David

    2012-08-01

    Methionine abundance affects diverse cellular functions, including cell division, redox homeostasis, survival under starvation, and oxidative stress response. Regulation of the methionine biosynthetic pathway involves three DNA-binding proteins-Met31p, Met32p, and Cbf1p. We hypothesized that there exists a "division of labor" among these proteins that facilitates coordination of methionine biosynthesis with diverse biological processes. To explore combinatorial control in this regulatory circuit, we deleted CBF1, MET31, and MET32 individually and in combination in a strain lacking methionine synthase. We followed genome-wide gene expression as these strains were starved for methionine. Using a combination of bioinformatic methods, we found that these regulators control genes involved in biological processes downstream of sulfur assimilation; many of these processes had not previously been documented as methionine dependent. We also found that the different factors have overlapping but distinct functions. In particular, Met31p and Met32p are important in regulating methionine metabolism, whereas p functions as a "generalist" transcription factor that is not specific to methionine metabolism. In addition, Met31p and Met32p appear to regulate iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis through direct and indirect mechanisms and have distinguishable target specificities. Finally, CBF1 deletion sometimes has the opposite effect on gene expression from MET31 and MET32 deletion.

  17. Combinatorial control of diverse metabolic and physiological functions by transcriptional regulators of the yeast sulfur assimilation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Petti, Allegra A.; McIsaac, R. Scott; Ho-Shing, Olivia; Bussemaker, Harmen J.; Botstein, David

    2012-01-01

    Methionine abundance affects diverse cellular functions, including cell division, redox homeostasis, survival under starvation, and oxidative stress response. Regulation of the methionine biosynthetic pathway involves three DNA-binding proteins—Met31p, Met32p, and Cbf1p. We hypothesized that there exists a “division of labor” among these proteins that facilitates coordination of methionine biosynthesis with diverse biological processes. To explore combinatorial control in this regulatory circuit, we deleted CBF1, MET31, and MET32 individually and in combination in a strain lacking methionine synthase. We followed genome-wide gene expression as these strains were starved for methionine. Using a combination of bioinformatic methods, we found that these regulators control genes involved in biological processes downstream of sulfur assimilation; many of these processes had not previously been documented as methionine dependent. We also found that the different factors have overlapping but distinct functions. In particular, Met31p and Met32p are important in regulating methionine metabolism, whereas p functions as a “generalist” transcription factor that is not specific to methionine metabolism. In addition, Met31p and Met32p appear to regulate iron–sulfur cluster biogenesis through direct and indirect mechanisms and have distinguishable target specificities. Finally, CBF1 deletion sometimes has the opposite effect on gene expression from MET31 and MET32 deletion. PMID:22696679

  18. [Effects of sulfur- and polymer-coated controlled release urea fertilizers on wheat yield and quality and fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency].

    PubMed

    Ma, Fu-Liang; Song, Fu-Peng; Gao, Yang; Zou, Peng

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of sulfur- and polymer-coated controlled release urea fertilizers on wheat yield and its quality, plow layer soil inorganic nitrogen (N) contents, and fertilizer N use efficiency. Compared with traditional urea fertilizer, both sulfur- and polymer-coated controlled release urea fertilizers increased the grain yield by 10.4%-16.5%, and the grain protein and starch contents by 5.8%-18.9% and 0.3%-1.4%, respectively. The controlled release urea fertilizers could maintain the topsoil inorganic N contents to meet the N requirement for the wheat, especially during its late growth stage. In the meantime, the fertilizer N use efficiency was improved by 58.2%-101.2%. Polymer-coated urea produced better wheat yield and higher fertilizer N use efficiency, compared with sulfur-coated controlled release urea.

  19. Gas cushion control of OVJP print head position

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, Stephen R

    2014-10-07

    An OVJP apparatus and method for applying organic vapor or other flowable material to a substrate using a printing head mechanism in which the print head spacing from the substrate is controllable using a cushion of air or other gas applied between the print head and substrate. The print head is mounted for translational movement towards and away from the substrate and is biased toward the substrate by springs or other means. A gas cushion feed assembly supplies a gas under pressure between the print head and substrate which opposes the biasing of the print head toward the substrate so as to form a space between the print head and substrate. By controlling the pressure of gas supplied, the print head separation from the substrate can be precisely controlled.

  20. Double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with ambient gas in the vacuum ultraviolet: Optimization of parameters for detection of carbon and sulfur in steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.; Hayden, P.; Costello, J. T.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2014-11-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) has been applied to calibrated steel samples for the low concentration level detection of the light elements, carbon and sulfur in steel. Experimental optimization parameters, aimed at enhancing the sensitivity of the technique, included short wavelength spectral detection, double-pulse (DP) operation, variable focusing conditions and different ambient environments in terms of gas type and pressure. Two lasers were employed respectively as an ablation laser (Spectron: 1.06 μm/200 mJ/15 ns) and a reheating laser (Surelite: 1.06 μm/665 mJ/6 ns) in a collinear geometry. The results include insight into the most salient experimental variables and limits of detection in the parts per million range.

  1. Control Decisions for Flammable Gas Hazards in Waste Transfer Systems

    SciTech Connect

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2000-06-28

    This report describes the control decisions for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems (i.e., waste transfer piping and waste transfer-associated structures) made at control decision meetings on November 30, 1999a and April 19, 2000, and their basis. These control decisions, and the analyses that support them, will be documented in an amendment to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (CHG 2000a) and Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) (CHG 2000b) to close the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) (Bacon 1996 and Wagoner 1996). Following the Contractor Tier I review of the FSAR and TSR amendment, it will be submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) for review and approval. The control decision meeting on November 30, 1999 to address flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems followed the control decision process and the criteria for control decisions described in Section 3.3.1.5 of the FSAR. The control decision meeting agenda, attendance list, and introductory and background presentations are included in Attachments 1 through 4. The control decision discussions on existing and other possible controls for flammable gas hazards in waste transfer systems and the basis for selecting or not selecting specific controls are summarized in this report.

  2. A novel approach to realize SANI process in freshwater sewage treatment--Use of wet flue gas desulfurization waste streams as sulfur source.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Zhang, Liang; Peng, Guo-Liang; Liang, Si-Yun; Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2013-10-01

    SANI (Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification and Nitrification Integrated) process has been approved to be a sludge-minimized sewage treatment process in warm and coastal cities with seawater supply. In order to apply this sulfur-based process in inland cold areas, wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) can be simplified and integrated with SANI process, to provide sulfite as electron carrier for sulfur cycle in sewage treatment. In this study, a lab-scale system of the proposed novel process was developed and run for over 200 days while temperature varied between 30 and 5 °C, fed with synthetic FGD wastewaters and sewage. The sulfite-reducing upflow anaerobic sludge bed (SrUASB) reactor, as the major bioreactor of the system, removed 86.9% of organics while the whole system removed 94% of organics even when water temperature decreased to around 10 °C. The bactericidal effect of sulfite was not observed in the SrUASB reactor, while thiosulfate was found accumulated under psychrophilic conditions. The sludge yield of the SrUASB reactor was determined to be 0.095 kg VSS/kg COD, higher than of sulfate reduction process but still much lower than of conventional activated sludge processes. The dominant microbes in the SrUASB reactor were determined as Lactococcus spp. rather than sulfate-reducing bacteria, but sulfite reduction still contributed 85.5% to the organic carbon mineralization in this reactor. Ammonia and nitrate were effectively removed in the aerobic and anoxic filters, respectively. This study confirms the proposed process was promising to achieve sludge-minimized sewage treatment integrating with flue gas desulfurization in inland and cold areas.

  3. Prevention of formation of acid drainage from high-sulfur coal refuse by inhibition of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms. I. Preliminary experiments in controlled shaken flasks.

    PubMed

    Dugan, P R

    1987-01-01

    Changes of pH and sulfate concentration in high-sulfur coal refuse slurries are used as measurements of microbial pyrite oxidation in the laboratory. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), alkylbenzene sulfonate (ABS), benzoic acid (BZ) and combinations of SLS plus BZ and ABS plus BZ effectively inhibited formation of sulfate and acid when added in concentrations greater than 50 mg/L to inoculated 20 or 30% coal refuse slurries. Here 25 mg/L concentrations of SLS, ABS, and ABS + BZ stimulated acid production. Formic, hexanoic, oxalic, propionic, and pyruvic acids at 0.1% concentrations were also effective inhibitors. Four different lignin sulfonates were only slightly effective inhibitors at 0.1% concentrations. It was concluded that acid formation resulting from microbial oxidation in high-sulfur coal refuse can be inhibited.

  4. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan

    2001-12-01

    We propose a process that uses sulfur dioxide from coal combustion as a raw material to synthesize polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a water treatment agent. The process uses sodium chlorate as an oxidant and ferrous sulfate as an absorbent. The major chemical mechanisms in this reaction system include oxidation, hydrolysis, and polymerization. Oxidation determines sulfur conversion efficiency while hydrolysis and polymerization control the quality of product. Many factors, including SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, flow rate of simulated flue gas, reaction temperature, addition rate of oxidant and stirring rate, may affect the efficiencies of SO{sub 2} removal. Currently, the effects of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration, the flow rate of simulated flue gas and addition rate of flue gas on removal efficiencies of SO{sub 2}, are being investigated. Experiments shown in this report have demonstrated that the conversion efficiencies of sulfur dioxide with ferrous sulfate as an absorbent are in the range of 60-80% under the adopted process conditions. However, the conversion efficiency of sulfur dioxide may be improved by optimizing reaction conditions to be investigated. Partial quality indices of the synthesized products, including Fe{sup 2+} concentration and total iron concentration, have been evaluated.

  5. Ultrasonic coal-wash for de-sulfurization.

    PubMed

    Ambedkar, B; Nagarajan, R; Jayanti, S

    2011-05-01

    Coal is the one of the world's most abundant fossil fuel resources. It is not a clean fuel, as it contains ash and sulfur. SOx as a pollutant are a real threat to both the ecosystem and to human health. There are numerous de-sulfurization methods to control SO(2) emissions. Nowadays, online flue gas de-sulfurization is being used as one such method to remove sulfur from coal during combustion. The biggest disadvantage associated with this method is formation of by-products (FGD gypsum). A way for effective usage of FGD gypsum has not yet been found. This will lead to acute and chronic effects to humans as well as plants. Power ultrasound can be used for the beneficiation of coal by the removal of sulfur from coal prior to coal combustion. The main effects of ultrasound in liquid medium are acoustic cavitation and acoustic streaming. The process of formation, growth and implosion of bubbles is called cavitation. Bulk fluid motion due to sound energy absorption is known as acoustic streaming. In addition, coupling of an acoustic field to water produces OH radicals, H(2)O(2), O(2), ozone and HO(2) that are strong oxidizing agents. Oxidation that occurs due to ultrasound is called Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP). It converts sulfur from coal to water-soluble sulphates. Conventional chemical-based soaking and stirring methods are compared here to ultrasonic methods of de-sulfurization. The main advantages of ultrasonic de-sulfurization over conventional methods, the mechanism involved in ultrasonic de-sulfurization and the difference between aqueous-based and solvent-based (2N HNO(3), 3-volume percentage H(2)O(2)) de-sulfurization are investigated experimentally.

  6. Method for removing sulfur oxide from waste gases and recovering elemental sulfur

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Raymond H.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous catalytic fused salt extraction process is described for removing sulfur oxides from gaseous streams. The gaseous stream is contacted with a molten potassium sulfate salt mixture having a dissolved catalyst to oxidize sulfur dioxide to sulfur trioxide and molten potassium normal sulfate to solvate the sulfur trioxide to remove the sulfur trioxide from the gaseous stream. A portion of the sulfur trioxide loaded salt mixture is then dissociated to produce sulfur trioxide gas and thereby regenerate potassium normal sulfate. The evolved sulfur trioxide is reacted with hydrogen sulfide as in a Claus reactor to produce elemental sulfur. The process may be advantageously used to clean waste stack gas from industrial plants, such as copper smelters, where a supply of hydrogen sulfide is readily available.

  7. Computer Control For Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, Kristinn; Springfield, James F.; Barnett, Robert J.; Cook, George E.

    1994-01-01

    Prototype computer-based feedback control system developed for use in gas/tungsten arc welding. Beyond improving welding technician's moment-to-moment general control of welding process, control system designed to assist technician in selecting appropriate welding-process parameters, and provide better automatic voltage control. Modular for ease of reconfiguration and upgrading. Modularity also reflected in software. Includes rack-mounted computer, based on VME bus, containing Intel 80286 and 80386 processors.

  8. [Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture]. [Quarterly technical progress report, September 27, 1993--January 2, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    A major concern with the utilization of coal in directly fired gas turbines is the control of particulate emissions and reduction of sulfur dioxide, and alkali vapor from combustion of coal, upstream of the gas turbine. The Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture program focuses upon the application of an MTCI proprietary invention (Patent No. 5,197,399) for simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration of the combustor effluent. This application can be adapted as either a ``hot flue gas cleanup`` subsystem for the current concepts for combustor islands or as an alternative primary pulse combustor island in which slagging, sulfur capture, particulate agglomeration and control, and alkali gettering as well as NO{sub x} control processes become an integral part of the pulse combustion process. The goal of the program is to support the DOE mission in developing coal-fired combustion gas turbines. In particular, the MTCI proprietary process for bimodal ash agglomeration and simultaneous sulfur capture will be evaluated and developed. The technology embodiment of the invention provides for the use of standard grind, moderately beneficiated coal and WEM for firing the gas turbine with efficient sulfur capture and particulate emission control upstream of the turbine. The process also accommodates injection of alkali gettering material if necessary. This is aimed at utilization of relatively inexpensive coal fuels, thus realizing the primary benefit being sought by direct firing of coal in such gas turbine systems.

  9. Utility flue gas mercury control via sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.; Carey, T.; Hargrove, B.

    1996-12-31

    The potential for power plant mercury control under Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments generated significant interest in assessing whether cost effective technologies are available for removing the mercury present in fossil-fired power plant flue gas. One promising approach is the direct injection of mercury sorbents such as activated carbon into flue gas. This approach has been shown to be effective for mercury control from municipal waste incinerators. However, tests conducted to date on utility fossil-fired boilers show that it is much more difficult to remove the trace species of mercury present in flue gas. EPRI is conducting research in sorbent mercury control including bench-scale evaluation of mercury sorbent activity and capacity with simulated flue gas, pilot testing under actual flue gas conditions, evaluation of sorbent regeneration and recycle options, and the development of novel sorbents. A theoretical model that predicts maximum mercury removals achievable with sorbent injection under different operating conditions is also being developed. This paper presents initial bench-scale and model results. The results to date show that very fine and large amounts of sorbents are needed for mercury control unless long residence times are available for sorbent-mercury contact. Also, sorbent activity and capacity are highly dependent on flue gas composition, temperature, mercury species, and sorbent properties. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Treatment of air pollution control residues with iron rich waste sulfuric acid: does it work for antimony (Sb)?

    PubMed

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Breedveld, Gijs D; Kirkeng, Terje; Lægreid, Marit; Mæhlum, Trond; Mulder, Jan

    2013-03-15

    Antimony (Sb) in air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration has gained increased focus due to strict Sb leaching limits set by the EU landfill directive. Here we study the chemical speciation and solubility of Sb at the APC treatment facility NOAH Langøya (Norway), where iron (Fe)-rich sulfuric acid (∼3.6M, 2.3% Fe(II)), a waste product from the industrial extraction of ilmenite, is used for neutralization. Antimony in water extracts of untreated APC residues occurred exclusively as pentavalent antimonate, even at low pH and Eh values. The Sb solubility increased substantially at pH<10, possibly due to the dissolution of ettringite (at alkaline pH) or calcium (Ca)-antimonate. Treated APC residues, stored anoxically in the laboratory, simulating the conditions at the NOAH Langøya landfill, gave rise to decreasing concentrations of Sb in porewater, occurring exclusively as Sb(V). Concentrations of Sb decreased from 87-918μgL(-1) (day 3) to 18-69μgL(-1) (day 600). We hypothesize that an initial sorption of Sb to Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rust) and eventually precipitation of Ca- and Fe-antimonates (tripuhyite; FeSbO4) occurred. We conclude that Fe-rich, sulfuric acid waste is efficient to immobilize Sb in APC residues from waste incineration.

  11. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOEpatents

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios; Xu, Liming; Lewis, Doyle C.

    2002-01-01

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  12. Controls on evolution of gas-hydrate system in the Krishna-Godavari basin, offshore India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badesab, F.; Dewangan, P.; Usapkar, A.; Kocherla, M.; Peketi, A.; Mohite, K.; Sangode, S. J.; Deenadayalan, K.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we integrate environmental magnetic, sedimentological, and geochemical records of sediment core of Hole NGHP-01-10D overlying methane hydrate deposits to decipher the controls on the evolution of fracture-filled gas-hydrate system in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin. Four distinct sedimentary units have been identified, based on the sediment magnetic signatures. An anomalous zone of enhanced magnetic susceptibility (Unit III: 51.9-160.4 mbsf) coinciding with the gas hydrate bearing intervals is due to the presence of magnetite-rich detrital minerals brought-in by the river systems as a result of higher sedimentation events in K-G basin and has no influence over hydrate formation. A strong to moderate correlation between magnetite concentration and chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) content indicates significant influence of sulfidization on the magnetic record and could be further exploited as a proxy to decipher paleo-H2S seepage events. Analysis of high-resolution seismic, bathymetry, and sub-bottom profiler data reveals the existence of a regional fault system in K-G basin. The opening and closing dynamics of the faults facilitated the migration and trapping of required gas concentrations resulting in accumulation of gas hydrates at the studied site. The seismic data provides support to the rock-magnetic interpretations. The observed variations in magnetic and geochemical properties have resulted from the episodic flow of methane and sulfide-enriched fluids through the fracture-filled network formed as a result of shale-tectonism. Our study demonstrated the potential of using an enviro-magnetic approach in combination with other proxies to constrain the evolution of gas-hydrate system in marine environments.

  13. Deposition and cycling of sulfur controls mercury accumulation in Isle Royale fish

    SciTech Connect

    Paul E. Drevnick; Donald E. Canfield; Patrick R. Gorski

    2007-11-01

    Mercury contamination of fish is a global problem. Consumption of contaminated fish is the primary route of methylmercury exposure in humans and is detrimental to health. Newly mandated reductions in anthropogenic mercury emissions aim to reduce atmospheric mercury deposition and thus mercury concentrations in fish. However, factors other than mercury deposition are important for mercury bioaccumulation in fish. In the lakes of Isle Royale, U.S.A., reduced rates of sulfate deposition since the Clean Air Act of 1970 have caused mercury concentrations in fish to decline to levels that are safe for human consumption, even without a discernible decrease in mercury deposition. Therefore, reductions in anthropogenic sulfur emissions may provide a synergistic solution to the mercury problem in sulfate-limited freshwaters. 71 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Gas compressor with side branch absorber for pulsation control

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Ralph E.; Scrivner, Christine M.; Broerman, III, Eugene L.

    2011-05-24

    A method and system for reducing pulsation in lateral piping associated with a gas compressor system. A tunable side branch absorber (TSBA) is installed on the lateral piping. A pulsation sensor is placed in the lateral piping, to measure pulsation within the piping. The sensor output signals are delivered to a controller, which controls actuators that change the acoustic dimensions of the SBA.

  15. Etching radical controlled gas chopped deep reactive ion etching

    DOEpatents

    Olynick, Deidre; Rangelow, Ivo; Chao, Weilun

    2013-10-01

    A method for silicon micromachining techniques based on high aspect ratio reactive ion etching with gas chopping has been developed capable of producing essentially scallop-free, smooth, sidewall surfaces. The method uses precisely controlled, alternated (or chopped) gas flow of the etching and deposition gas precursors to produce a controllable sidewall passivation capable of high anisotropy. The dynamic control of sidewall passivation is achieved by carefully controlling fluorine radical presence with moderator gasses, such as CH.sub.4 and controlling the passivation rate and stoichiometry using a CF.sub.2 source. In this manner, sidewall polymer deposition thicknesses are very well controlled, reducing sidewall ripples to very small levels. By combining inductively coupled plasmas with controlled fluorocarbon chemistry, good control of vertical structures with very low sidewall roughness may be produced. Results show silicon features with an aspect ratio of 20:1 for 10 nm features with applicability to nano-applications in the sub-50 nm regime. By comparison, previous traditional gas chopping techniques have produced rippled or scalloped sidewalls in a range of 50 to 100 nm roughness.

  16. Analysis of Operational Parameters Affecting the Sulfur Content in Hot Metal of the COREX Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shengli; Wang, Laixin; Kou, Mingyin; Wang, Yujue; Zhang, Jiacong

    2017-02-01

    The COREX process, which has obvious advantages in environment protection, still has some disadvantages. It has a higher sulfur content in hot metal (HM) than the blast furnace has. In the present work, the distribution and transfer of sulfur in the COREX have been analyzed and several operational parameters related to the sulfur content in HM ([pct S]) have been obtained. Based on this, the effects of the coal rate, slag ratio, temperature of HM, melting rate, binary basicity ( R 2), the ratio of MgO/Al2O3, utilization of reducing gas, top gas consumption per ton burden solid, metallization rate, oxidation degree of reducing gas, and coal and DRI distribution index on the sulfur content in HM are investigated. What's more, a linear model has been developed and subsequently used for predicting and controlling the S content in HM of the COREX process.

  17. 40 CFR 52.1675 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... only natural gas for the duration of the special limitation. (a) City College of New York, Amsterdam...; (h) New York City Housing Auth., General Grant Houses, 1320 Amsterdam Ave., Manhattan: October...

  18. 40 CFR 52.1675 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... only natural gas for the duration of the special limitation. (a) City College of New York, Amsterdam...; (h) New York City Housing Auth., General Grant Houses, 1320 Amsterdam Ave., Manhattan: October...

  19. 40 CFR 52.1675 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... only natural gas for the duration of the special limitation. (a) City College of New York, Amsterdam...; (h) New York City Housing Auth., General Grant Houses, 1320 Amsterdam Ave., Manhattan: October...

  20. 40 CFR 52.1675 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... only natural gas for the duration of the special limitation. (a) City College of New York, Amsterdam...; (h) New York City Housing Auth., General Grant Houses, 1320 Amsterdam Ave., Manhattan: October...

  1. Geologic settings and controls of shallow gas, Rocky Mountain area

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, D.D. )

    1991-06-01

    Shallow gas is generated by the degradation of organic matter by anaerobic bacteria and is referred to as microbial or bacterial gas. Bacterial gas can be generated and can accumulate in significant quantities and is an important resource in the Rocky Mountain area. Factors controlling bacterial gas generation after sediment burial are anoxic conditions, low sulfate content, low temperatures, abundant organic matter, sufficient pore space, and rapid sediment deposition. Bacterial gas is distinguished by its chemical and isotopic composition; the hydrocarbon fraction generally contains more than 98% methane, and {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 1} values are generally lighter than {minus}55{per thousand}. In the Rocky Mountain area, bacterial gas accumulations occur in three main geologic settings: clastic shelves, carbonate shelves, and coal swamps. In the clastic shelf setting, bacterial gas occurs in thick (200 ft) sequences of sandstone, siltstone, and shale. The siltsone and sandstone occur as thin (a few inches thick), discontinuous lenses and laminae that serve as low-permeability reservoirs because of their small grain size. The enclosing shales are organic rich (average 2% total organic carbon (TOC)), contain type 3 kerogen, and serve as the source of and seal for the bacterial gas. The carbonate shelf setting is analogous to the clastic shelf with rythmically bedded couplets (a few inches thick) of low-permeability chalk (reservoir) and shale (source and seal). These shales are also organic rich (average 3.2% TOC) but contain type 2 kerogen. In the swamp setting, thick (as much as 200 ft), humic (type 3 kerogen) coal beds serve as both the source of and reservoir for the bacterial gas. The gas is trapped by the low porosity and permeability of coal and gas adsorption enhanced by hydrostatic pressure.

  2. Virtual Instrumentation Corrosion Controller for Natural Gas Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, J.; Agnihotri, G.; Deshpande, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    Corrosion is an electrochemical process. Corrosion in natural gas (methane) pipelines leads to leakages. Corrosion occurs when anode and cathode are connected through electrolyte. Rate of corrosion in metallic pipeline can be controlled by impressing current to it and thereby making it to act as cathode of corrosion cell. Technologically advanced and energy efficient corrosion controller is required to protect natural gas pipelines. Proposed virtual instrumentation (VI) based corrosion controller precisely controls the external corrosion in underground metallic pipelines, enhances its life and ensures safety. Designing and development of proportional-integral-differential (PID) corrosion controller using VI (LabVIEW) is carried out. When the designed controller is deployed at field, it maintains the pipe to soil potential (PSP) within safe operating limit and not entering into over/under protection zone. Horizontal deployment of this technique can be done to protect all metallic structure, oil pipelines, which need corrosion protection.

  3. Optimal Discrete Event Supervisory Control of Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Jonathan (Technical Monitor); Ray, Asok

    2004-01-01

    This report presents an application of the recently developed theory of optimal Discrete Event Supervisory (DES) control that is based on a signed real measure of regular languages. The DES control techniques are validated on an aircraft gas turbine engine simulation test bed. The test bed is implemented on a networked computer system in which two computers operate in the client-server mode. Several DES controllers have been tested for engine performance and reliability.

  4. Ultra Low Sulfur Home Heating Oil Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Batey, John E.; McDonald, Roger

    2015-09-30

    This Ultra Low Sulfur (ULS) Home Heating Oil Demonstration Project was funded by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and has successfully quantified the environmental and economic benefits of switching to ULS (15 PPM sulfur) heating oil. It advances a prior field study of Low Sulfur (500 ppm sulfur) heating oil funded by NYSERDA and laboratory research conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Canadian researchers. The sulfur oxide and particulate matter (PM) emissions are greatly reduced as are boiler cleaning costs through extending cleaning intervals. Both the sulfur oxide and PM emission rates are directly related to the fuel oil sulfur content. The sulfur oxide and PM emission rates approach near-zero levels by switching heating equipment to ULS fuel oil, and these emissions become comparable to heating equipment fired by natural gas. This demonstration project included an in-depth review and analysis of service records for both the ULS and control groups to determine any difference in the service needs for the two groups. The detailed service records for both groups were collected and analyzed and the results were entered into two spreadsheets that enabled a quantitative side-by-side comparison of equipment service for the entire duration of the ULS test project. The service frequency for the ULS and control group were very similar and did indicate increased service frequency for the ULS group. In fact, the service frequency with the ULS group was slightly less (7.5 percent) than the control group. The only exception was that three burner fuel pump required replacement for the ULS group and none were required for the control group.

  5. Environmental Controls on Nitrogen and Sulfur Cycles in Surficial Aquatic Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chuanhui; Laverman, Anniet M.; Pallud, Céline E.

    2012-01-01

    Enhanced anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) have disturbed their biogeochemical cycling in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The N and S cycles interact with one another through competition for labile forms of organic carbon between nitrate-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Furthermore, the N and S cycles could interact through nitrate (NO3-) reduction coupled to S oxidation, consuming NO3-, and producing sulfate (SO42-). The research questions of this study were: (1) what are the environmental factors explaining variability in N and S biogeochemical reaction rates in a wide range of surficial aquatic sediments when NO3- and SO42- are present separately or simultaneously, (2) how the N and S cycles could interact through S oxidation coupled to NO3- reduction, and (3) what is the extent of sulfate reduction inhibition by nitrate, and vice versa. The N and S biogeochemical reaction rates were measured on intact surface sediment slices using flow-through reactors. The two terminal electron acceptors NO3- and SO42- were added either separately or simultaneously and NO3- and SO42- reduction rates as well as NO3- reduction linked to S oxidation were determined. We used redundancy analysis, to assess how environmental variables were related to these rates. Our analysis showed that overlying water pH and salinity were two dominant environmental factors that explain 58% of the variance in the N and S biogeochemical reaction rates when NO3- and SO42- were both present. When NO3- and SO42- were added separately, however, sediment N content in addition to pH and salinity accounted for 62% of total variance of the biogeochemical reaction rates. The SO42- addition had little effect on NO3- reduction; neither did the NO3- addition inhibit SO42- reduction. The presence of NO3- led to SO42- production most likely due to the oxidation of sulfur. Our observations suggest that metal-bound S, instead of free sulfide produced by SO42- reduction, was responsible

  6. Method for removing sulfur oxides from combusting gases in wet, calcium-based flue gas desulfurization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, R.E.; Meserole, F.

    1991-02-19

    This patent describes a method for reducing accumulation of solid sulfate-containing deposits in apparatus for storing, transporting or utilizing wet lime or limestone for combustion gas desulfurization. It comprises: the step of contact the combustion gas in a reaction zone in the presence of the wet lime or limestone with thiosulfate and an organic polyacid chelating agent. The thiosulfate and chelating agent being present in sufficient concentrations to diminish the amount of sulfate formed as the result of oxidation of sulfite to sulfate.

  7. Formic acid catalyzed hydrolysis of SO3 in the gas phase: a barrierless mechanism for sulfuric acid production of potential atmospheric importance.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Montu K; Sinha, Amitabha

    2011-11-02

    Computational studies at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) and MP2/6-311++G(3df,3pd) levels are performed to explore the changes in reaction barrier height for the gas phase hydrolysis of SO(3) to form H(2)SO(4) in the presence of a single formic acid (FA) molecule. For comparison, we have also performed calculations for the reference reaction involving water assisted hydrolysis of SO(3) at the same level. Our results show that the FA assisted hydrolysis of SO(3) to form H(2)SO(4) is effectively a barrierless process. The barrier heights for the isomerization of the SO(3)···H(2)O···FA prereactive collision complex, which is the rate limiting step in the FA assisted hydrolysis, are found to be respectively 0.59 and 0.08 kcal/mol at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd) and MP2/6-311++G(3df,3pd) levels. This is substantially lower than the ~7 kcal/mol barrier for the corresponding step in the hydrolysis of SO(3) by two water molecules--which is currently the accepted mechanism for atmospheric sulfuric acid production. Simple kinetic analysis of the relative rates suggests that the reduction in barrier height facilitated by FA, combined with the greater stability of the prereactive SO(3)···H(2)O···FA collision complex compared to SO(3)···H(2)O···H(2)O and the rather plentiful atmospheric abundance of FA, makes the formic acid mediated hydrolysis reaction a potentially important pathway for atmospheric sulfuric acid production.

  8. Vacuum rated flow controllers for inert gas ion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pless, L. C.

    1987-01-01

    Electrical propulsion systems which use a gas as a propellant require a gas flowmeter/controller which is capable of operating in a vacuum environment. The presently available instruments in the required flow ranges are designed and calibrated for use at ambient pressure. These instruments operate by heating a small diameter tube through which the gas is flowing and then sensing the change in temperature along the length of the tube. This temperature change is a function of the flow rate and the gas heat capacity. When installed in a vacuum, the change in the external thermal characteristics cause the tube to overheat and the temperature sensors are then operating outside their calibrated range. In addition, the variation in heat capacity with temperature limit the accuracy obtainable. These problems and the work in progress to solve them are discussed.

  9. [The gas chromatographic determination of sulfur- and oxygen-containing organic compounds released into the air of cellulose sulfate works].

    PubMed

    Taranenko, N A; Dorogova, V B

    1992-01-01

    The article presents data on the design of sensitive, selective, useful in group analysis method to detect dimethylsulphide, dimethyldisulphide, acetic, propionic, butyric and valeric acids, methyl alcohol and phenol by means of gas chromatography in the air of cellulose sulphate production working zone. The methods were tested in examining the work conditions in Bratsk found-lavage shops.

  10. Editorial and Introduction of the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.; Benson, Sally M.; Karimjee, Anhar; Rubin, Edward S.

    2010-03-01

    Short one page editorial to introduce the +30 peer reviewed papers contained within the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

  11. Field evaluation of natural gas and dry sorbent injection for MWC emissions control

    SciTech Connect

    Wohadlo, S; Abbasi, H; Cygan, D

    1993-10-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), in cooperation with the Olmsted Waste-to-Energy Facility (OWEF) and with subcontracted engineering services from the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), has completed the detailed engineering and preparation of construction specifications for an Emissions Reduction Testing System (ERTS). The ERTS has been designed for retrofit to one of two 100-ton/day municipal waste combustors at the OWEF, located in Rochester, Minnesota. The purpose of the retrofit is to conduct a field evaluation of a combined natural gas and sorbent injection process (IGT`s METHANE de-TOX{sup SM}, IGT Patent No. 5,105,747) for reducing the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), hydrochloric acid (HCI), oxides of sulfur (SO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC), and chlorinated hydrocarbons (dioxin/furans). In addition, the design includes modifications for the control of heavy metals (HM). Development of the process should allow the waste-to-energy industry to meet the Federal New Source Performance Standards for these pollutants at significantly lower costs when compared to existing technology of Thermal deNO{sub x} combined with spray dryer scrubber/fabric filters. Additionally, the process should reduce boiler corrosion and increase both the thermal and power production efficiency of the facility.

  12. Layer number controllability of transition-metal dichalcogenides and the establishment of hetero-structures by using sulfurization of thin transition metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Chao; Chu, Tung-Wei; Wu, Chong-Rong; Lee, Si-Chen; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2017-02-01

    Large-area and uniform MoS2 films are fabricated by using sulfurization of pre-deposited molybdenum (Mo) films. One- and three-layer MoS2 films are obtained by sulfurizing 0.5 and 1.0 nm Mo films, respectively. The results have demonstrated the good layer number controllability of this growth technique down to single-layer MoS2. By sequential sulfurization of 0.5 nm W, 0.5 nm Mo and 0.5 nm W under the same condition, three layers of the WS2/MoS2/WS2 hetero-structure are established, which has demonstrated the potential of this growth technique for the establishment of 2D crystal hetero-structures.

  13. Industrial market for sulfur dioxide emission-control systems. Final report. [Forecasting to 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Under the postulated EIA medium world oil price scenario, in which oil prices are projected to rise at a real rate of 2.2% per year, coal will represent from 78 to 91% of MFBI fuel consumption by the year 2000, up from the present 16%. This increase would occur even in the absence of FUA, because the cost of coal is substantially lower than the cost of oil or gas. Much of this market will develop in the relatively near to intermediate term (before 1990). Annual installations will be much lower (by about 40%) after that period, reflecting a lower overall steam demand growth rate and the fact that much of the discretionary conversion of gas and oil boilers to coal will have been completed. About 22% of the sales will be for discretionary conversion of oil and gas boilers still having some useful life; the rest will be for nondiscretionary expansion or replacement of worn-out boilers. Under the postulated cost and performance estimates for the competing coal-burning technologies, we expect that AFB combustors and lime spray dryer FGD systems will dominate the market, with 42% of the market in our base case scenario. If the attitudes of the industrial decision-makers are factored into the analyses, particularly their aversion to FGD systems with wet wastes, the AFB and lime spray dryer technologies will capture as much as 73% of the coal-burning market. Costs for the various flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies were projected to be sufficiently close that the selection of one over another will depend on site-specific factors such as the availability of waste disposal facilities, the demonstrated reliability of the particular systems, and the vendor's reputation.

  14. Control System Design Language Implementation of a Gas Turbine Starting Controller.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    THESIS _ CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN LANGUAGE IMPLEMENTATION OF A GAS TURBINE STARTING CONTROLLER by Richard Preston Riley June 1984 *1Thesis Advisor: A. A...CONTRACT OR GRANT NUM11101(s) Richard Preston Riley S. P01111SOMNM @R11ANS ATION NAME AND ADDRESS iG. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT. TASKAREA A WORKC UNIT...Design Language Implementation of a Gas Turbine Starting Controller by *J.4 Richard Preston Riley Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy B.S

  15. Survey and Analysis of Marine Gas Turbine Control After 1975

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    the existing experimental data. Beginning in the early seventies, the U.S. Navy initiated The Gas Turbine Ship Propulsion Control Systems Research and...destroyers. Figure 1 shows a block diagram of the ship propulsion control system used. Simulations performed during the program tended to give good...Postgraduate school applied state space techniques to a linearized model of an FFG-7 ship propulsion system (5). Dynamic propulsion system equations were

  16. A Technique for Murine Irradiation in a Controlled Gas Environment

    PubMed Central

    Walb, M. C.; Moore, J. E.; Attia, A.; Wheeler, K. T.; Miller, M. S.; Munley, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    NASA’s extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) involve exposure to high energy photons while breathing 100% oxygen. Using previously verified mouse models, our laboratory is studying whether low dose irradiation under these hyperoxic conditions could lead to an increase in carcinogenic potential. To simulate the environment astronauts encounter during an EVA, enclosed chambers were constructed that allowed for mouse movement, controlled gas conditions, and uniform radiation dose delivery. Custom-built gas chambers with input/output gas valves and dividers that allowed for uniform gas flow were used to keep 6 unanesthetized mice separated while they were irradiated. The chambers were supplied with 100% oxygen or air using ball valves linked together with T-splitters. A calibrated ion chamber was used to verify the radiation dose distribution across an entire chamber. Mice were placed in the gas environments for 0.5 h, irradiated with a 10 or 18 MV photon beam from a medical linear accelerator, and left in their gas environment for 2 h post-irradiation. We irradiated 200 mice (5 different doses between 0–1000 mGy) under normoxic or 100% oxygen conditions. For the next step of this research, these mice will be euthanized 9 months post-irradiation, and lung tumors will be counted and sized to determine if hyperoxia increases the carcinogenic effect for this model. PMID:22846321

  17. Sand control in wells with gas generator and resin

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, J.M.

    1992-04-07

    This patent describes a method of treating a wellbore having formation perforations for controlling sand and other fine materials. It comprises positioning a quantity of fluid resin material in alignment with the formation perforations of the wellbore; positioning a gas generator in proximity with the fluid resin material; actuating the gas generator to increase wellbore pressure in a substantially instantaneous manner to a pressure substantially in excess of well pressure to force the fluid resin material from the wellbore into the formation perforations; and subsequently polymerizing the resin material to form a consolidated, porous, permeable matrix which retains the sand and other fine materials while permitting the flow of production fluid into the wellbore. This paper also describes a method of treating a wellbore having formation perforations for controlling sand and other fine materials. It comprises positioning a coiled tubing, having a valve and gas generator attached thereto, so that the valve is positioned in a predetermined location relative to the bottom formation perforation; injecting a predetermined amount of fluid resin material through the coiled tubing and valve into the wellbore; raising the gas generator to a position across the formation perforations and in proximity with the fluid resin material; actuating the gas generator to force the fluid resin material into the formation perforations; and thereafter polymerizing the previously fluid resin material to form a consolidated, porous, permeable matrix which retains the sand and other fine materials while permitting the flow of production fluid into the wellbore.

  18. Mechanistic Processes Controlling Gas Sorption in Shale Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaef, T.; Loring, J.; Ilton, E. S.; Davidson, C. L.; Owen, T.; Hoyt, D.; Glezakou, V. A.; McGrail, B. P.; Thompson, C.

    2014-12-01

    Utilization of CO2 to stimulate natural gas production in previously fractured shale-dominated reservoirs where CO2 remains in place for long-term storage may be an attractive new strategy for reducing the cost of managing anthropogenic CO2. A preliminary analysis of capacities and potential revenues in US shale plays suggests nearly 390 tcf in additional gas recovery may be possible via CO2 driven enhanced gas recovery. However, reservoir transmissivity properties, optimum gas recovery rates, and ultimate fate of CO2 vary among reservoirs, potentially increasing operational costs and environmental risks. In this paper, we identify key mechanisms controlling the sorption of CH4 and CO2 onto phyllosilicates and processes occurring in mixed gas systems that have the potential of impacting fluid transfer and CO2 storage in shale dominated formations. Through a unique set of in situ experimental techniques coupled with molecular-level simulations, we identify structural transformations occurring to clay minerals, optimal CO2/CH4 gas exchange conditions, and distinguish between adsorbed and intercalated gases in a mixed gas system. For example, based on in situ measurements with magic angle spinning NMR, intercalation of CO2 within the montmorillonite structure occurs in CH4/CO2 gas mixtures containing low concentrations (<5 mol%) of CO2. A stable montmorillonite structure dominates during exposure to pure CH4 (90 bar), but expands upon titration of small fractions (1-3 mol%) of CO2. Density functional theory was used to quantify the difference in sorption behavior between CO2 and CH4 and indicates complex interactions occurring between hydrated cations, CH4, and CO2. The authors will discuss potential impacts of these experimental results on CO2-based hydrocarbon recovery processes.

  19. EVALUATING EFFECTS OF NEPTUNIUM ON THE SRS METHOD FOR CONTROLLED POTENTIAL COULOMETRIC ASSAY OF PLUTONIUM IN SULFURIC ACID SUPPORTING ELECTROLYTE

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, M; Sheldon Nichols, S

    2008-05-09

    A study of the impact of neptunium on the coulometric assay of plutonium in dilute sulfuric acid was performed. Weight aliquots of plutonium standard solutions were spiked with purified neptunium solution to evaluate plutonium measurement performance for aliquots with Pu:Np ratios of 50:1, 30:1, 20:1, 15:1, and 10:1. Weight aliquots of the pure plutonium standard solution were measured as controls. Routine plutonium instrument control standards were also measured. The presence of neptunium in plutonium aliquots significantly increases the random uncertainty associated with the plutonium coulometric measurement performed in accordance with ISO12183:2005.7 However, the presence of neptunium does not appear to degrade electrode performance and conditioning as aliquots of pure plutonium that were interspersed during the measurement of the mixed Pu:Np aliquots continued to achieve the historical short-term random uncertainty for the method. Lack of adequate control of the neptunium oxidation state is suspected to be the primary cause of the elevated measurement uncertainty and will be pursued in a future study.

  20. Sulfuric acid as autocatalyst in the formation of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Francisco, Joseph S; Anglada, Josep M

    2012-12-26

    Sulfuric acid can act as a catalyst of its own formation. We have carried out a computational investigation on the gas-phase formation of H(2)SO(4) by hydrolysis of SO(3) involving one and two water molecules, and also in the presence of sulfuric acid and its complexes with one and two water molecules. The hydrolysis of SO(3) requires the concurrence of two water molecules, one of them acting as a catalyzer, and our results predict an important catalytic effect, ranging between 3 and 11 kcal·mol(-1) when the catalytic water molecule is substituted by a sulfuric acid molecule or one of its hydrates. In these cases, the reaction products are either bare sulfuric acid dimer or sulfuric acid dimer complexed with a water molecule. There are broad implications from these new findings. The results of the present investigation show that the catalytic effect of sulfuric acid in the SO(3) hydrolysis can be important in the Earth's stratosphere, in the heterogeneous formation of sulfuric acid and in the formation of aerosols, in H(2)SO(4) formation by aircraft engines, and also in understanding the formation of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere of Venus.

  1. Fluoride and sulfur dioxide indoor pollution situation and control in coal-burning endemic area in Zhaotong, Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yonglin; Luo, Kunli; Li, Ling; Shahid, Muhammad Zeeshaan

    2013-10-01

    traditional flue-curing barn (baking room) was also seriously polluted by fluoride and sulfur. After using the calcined dolomitic siliceous limestone instead of clay mixed with coal, gaseous fluoride and SO2 concentration in the traditional flue-curing barn air have declined markedly. The way of adding calcined dolomitic siliceous limestone instead of clay as a binder for briquette-making is an economically feasible way to control the indoor pollution of fluorine and sulfur in coal-burning endemic in Zhaotong, Yunnan.

  2. Sonic enhanced ash agglomeration and sulfur capture. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    A major concern with the utilization of coal in directly fired gas turbines is the control of particulate emissions and reduction of sulfur dioxide, and alkali vapor from combustion of coal, upstream of the gas turbine. Much research and development has been sponsored on methods for particulate emissions control and the direct injection of calcium-based sorbents to reduce SO{sub 2} emission levels. The results of this research and development indicate that both acoustic agglomeration of particulates and direct injection of sorbents have the potential to become a significant emissions control strategy. The Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture program focuses upon the application of an MTCI proprietary invention (Patent No. 5,197,399) for simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration of the combustor effluent. This application can be adapted as either a {open_quotes}hot flue gas cleanup{close_quotes} subsystem for the current concepts for combustor islands or as an alternative primary pulse combustor island in which slagging, sulfur capture, particulate agglomeration and control, and alkali gettering as well as NO{sub x} control processes become an integral part of the pulse combustion process. The goal of the program is to support the DOE mission in developing coal-fired combustion gas turbines. In particular, the MTCI proprietary process for bimodal ash agglomeration and simultaneous sulfur capture will be evaluated and developed. The technology embodiment of the invention provides for the use of standard grind, moderately beneficiated coal and WEM for firing the gas turbine with efficient sulfur capture and particulate emission control upstream of the turbine. The process also accommodates injection of alkali gettering material if necessary. The proposed technology provides for practical, reliable, and capital (and O&M) cost-effective means of protection for the gas turbine from impurities in the coal combustor effluent.

  3. Control of arc length during gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1994-12-31

    An arc-length control system has been developed for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) under spray transfer welding conditions. The ability to monitor and control arc length during arc welding allows consistent weld characteristics to be maintained and therefore improves weld quality. Arc length control has only been implemented for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), where an automatic voltage control (AVC) unit adjusts torch-to-work distance. The system developed here compliments the voltage- and current-sensing techniques commonly used for control of GMAW. The system consists of an arc light intensity sensor (photodiode), a Hall-effect current sensor, a personal computer and software implementing a data interpretation and control algorithms. Arc length was measured using both arc light and arc current signals. Welding current was adjusted to maintain constant arc length. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller was used. Gains were automatically selected based on the desired welding conditions. In performance evaluation welds, arc length varied from 2.5 to 6.5 mm while welding up a sloped workpiece (ramp in CTWD) without the control. Arc length was maintained within 1 mm of the desired (5 mm ) with the control.

  4. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Saus, Joseph R.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2000-01-01

    Lean-burning combustors are susceptible to combustion instabilities. Additionally, due to non-uniformities in the fuel-air mixing and in the combustion process, there typically exist hot areas in the combustor exit plane. These hot areas limit the operating temperature at the turbine inlet and thus constrain performance and efficiency. Finally, it is necessary to optimize the fuel-air ratio and flame temperature throughout the combustor to minimize the production of pollutants. In recent years, there has been considerable activity addressing Active Combustion Control. NASA Glenn Research Center's Active Combustion Control Technology effort aims to demonstrate active control in a realistic environment relevant to aircraft engines. Analysis and experiments are tied to aircraft gas turbine combustors. Considerable progress has been shown in demonstrating technologies for Combustion Instability Control, Pattern Factor Control, and Emissions Minimizing Control. Future plans are to advance the maturity of active combustion control technology to eventual demonstration in an engine environment.

  5. Modelling and identification for control of gas bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Lukas R. S.; Niemann, Hans H.; Santos, Ilmar F.; Galeazzi, Roberto; Blanke, Mogens

    2016-03-01

    Gas bearings are popular for their high speed capabilities, low friction and clean operation, but suffer from poor damping, which poses challenges for safe operation in presence of disturbances. Feedback control can achieve enhanced damping but requires low complexity models of the dominant dynamics over its entire operating range. Models from first principles are complex and sensitive to parameter uncertainty. This paper presents an experimental technique for "in situ" identification of a low complexity model of a rotor-bearing-actuator system and demonstrates identification over relevant ranges of rotational speed and gas injection pressure. This is obtained using parameter-varying linear models that are found to capture the dominant dynamics. The approach is shown to be easily applied and to suit subsequent control design. Based on the identified models, decentralised proportional control is designed and shown to obtain the required damping in theory and in a laboratory test rig.

  6. Industrial Raman gas sensing for real-time system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buric, M.; Mullen, J.; Chorpening, B.; Woodruff, S.

    2014-06-01

    Opportunities exist to improve on-line process control in energy applications with a fast, non-destructive measurement of gas composition. Here, we demonstrate a Raman sensing system which is capable of reporting the concentrations of numerous species simultaneously with sub-percent accuracy and sampling times below one-second for process control applications in energy or chemical production. The sensor is based upon a hollow-core capillary waveguide with a 300 micron bore with reflective thin-film metal and dielectric linings. The effect of using such a waveguide in a Raman process is to integrate Raman photons along the length of the sample-filled waveguide, thus permitting the acquisition of very large Raman signals for low-density gases in a short time. The resultant integrated Raman signals can then be used for quick and accurate analysis of a gaseous mixture. The sensor is currently being tested for energy applications such as coal gasification, turbine control, well-head monitoring for exploration or production, and non-conventional gas utilization. In conjunction with an ongoing commercialization effort, the researchers have recently completed two prototype instruments suitable for hazardous area operation and testing. Here, we report pre-commercialization testing of those field prototypes for control applications in gasification or similar processes. Results will be discussed with respect to accuracy, calibration requirements, gas sampling techniques, and possible control strategies of industrial significance.

  7. Cost analysis of NOx control alternatives for stationary gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Major

    1999-11-05

    The use of stationary gas turbines for power generation has been growing rapidly with continuing trends predicted well into the future. Factors that are contributing to this growth include advances in turbine technology, operating and siting flexibility and low capital cost. Restructuring of the electric utility industry will provide new opportunities for on-site generation. In a competitive market, it maybe more cost effective to install small distributed generation units (like gas turbines) within the grid rather than constructing large power plants in remote locations with extensive transmission and distribution systems. For the customer, on-site generation will provide added reliability and leverage over the cost of purchased power One of the key issues that is addressed in virtually every gas turbine application is emissions, particularly NO{sub x} emissions. Decades of research and development have significantly reduced the NO{sub x} levels emitted from gas turbines from uncontrolled levels. Emission control technologies are continuing to evolve with older technologies being gradually phased-out while new technologies are being developed and commercialized. The objective of this study is to determine and compare the cost of NO{sub x} control technologies for three size ranges of stationary gas turbines: 5 MW, 25 MW and 150 MW. The purpose of the comparison is to evaluate the cost effectiveness and impact of each control technology as a function of turbine size. The NO{sub x} control technologies evaluated in this study include: Lean premix combustion, also known as dry low NO{sub x} (DLN) combustion; Catalytic combustion; Water/steam injection; Selective catalytic reduction (SCR)--low temperature, conventional, high temperature; and SCONO{sub x}{trademark}.

  8. Stability of Sulfur Capacity Attributed to Zinc Sulfidation on Sorbent Containing Zinc Ferrite-Silica Composite Powder in Pressurized Coal Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, M.; Shirai, H.; Nunokawa, M.

    2002-09-19

    This paper describes an attempt to divide the total sulfur capacity into its contribution from zinc and iron using a pressurized-type thermobalance. The methodology to estimate the sulfur capacities corresponding to zinc and iron was applied to evaluate the variation in performance during multiple-cycle desulfurization. Primary objective of this paper is providing information on the stability of zinc-related sulfur capacity, which is essentially important to the sulfur removal performance at the concentration of the part-per-million level.

  9. Sulfur oxides scrubbing process

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, P.E.

    1986-07-15

    A process is described for removing sulfur oxides and solid particulates from a gaseous effluent. The steps of the process consist of: contacting within a venturi structure a gaseous effluent containing sulfur oxides with a liquid scrubbing mixture; passing the admixture of the gaseous effluent and liquid scrubbing mixture through a constricted passage of the venturi structure to increase the velocity thereof; separating the admixture into a liquid portion and a gas portion; delivering the gas portion of the separation step to a packed tower beneath the packed section thereof; contacting the gas portion with liquid scrubbing mixture in the packed section of the tower to form a gaseous overhead effluent substantially free of sulfur oxides and a bottoms liquid; combining the bottom liquid from the packed section of the tower with the liquid portion from the separating step to form a combined liquid bottoms; adjusting the pH of the combined liquid bottoms with a basic solution to form a liquid scrubbing mixture, the basic solution selected from the group consisting of alkali metal hydroxides, ammonium hydroxide, and ammonia; and dividing the liquid scrubbing mixture into a tower bottoms products, a first recycle stream providing the liquid scrubbing mixture to the first contacting step, and a second recycle stream providing the liquid scrubbing mixture to the second contacting step.

  10. Improved sulfur removal processes evaluated for IGCC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    An inherent advantage of Integrated Coal Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) electric power generation is the ability to easily remove and recover sulfur. During the last several years, a number of new, improved sulfur removal and recovery processes have been commercialized. An assessment is given of alternative sulfur removal processes for IGCC based on the Texaco coal gasifier. The Selexol acid gas removal system, Claus sulfur recovery, and SCOT tail gas treating are currently used in Texaco-based IGCC. Other processes considered are: Purisol, Sulfinol-M, Selefning, 50% MDEA, Sulften, and LO-CAT. 2 tables.

  11. Femtosecond laser micromachining of aluminum surfaces under controlled gas atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, G. M.; Jackson, M. J.

    2006-04-01

    The interaction of 180 femtosecond (fs), 775 nm laser pulses with the surface of aluminum under controlled gas atmospheres at ambient pressure has been investigated to study material redeposition, residual surface roughness, and ablation rate. The effect of using various gases to protect the surface of the material appears to interfere with the effects of the plasma and can change the resulting microstructure of the machined surface. By varying the combinations of fluence and laser-scanning speed during ultrafast ablation at high repetition rates, an optimum micromachining condition can be reached, depending on the type of gas used during machining. The debris produced under certain laser-machining conditions tends to produce pure aluminum nanoparticles that are deposited very close to the machined feature by the gas used to protect the surface of the aluminum.

  12. Controlling the Active Sites of Sulfur-Doped Carbon Nanotube-Graphene Nanolobes for Highly Efficient Oxygen Evolution and Reduction Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sawy, Abdelhamid M.; Mosa, Islam M.; Su, Dong; Guild, Curtis J.; Khalid, Syed; Joesten, Raymond; Rusling, James F.; Suib, Steven L.

    2015-12-03

    Controlling active sites of metal-free catalysts is an important strategy to enhance activity of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We made many attempts have been made to develop metal-free catalysts, but the lack of understanding of active-sites at the atomic-level has slowed the design of highly active and stable metal-free catalysts. We also developed a sequential two-step strategy to dope sulfur into carbon nanotube–graphene nanolobes. This bidoping strategy introduces stable sulfur–carbon active-sites. Fluorescence emission of the sulfur K-edge by X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and scanning transmission electron microscopy electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) mapping and spectra confirm that increasing the incorporation of heterocyclic sulfur into the carbon ring of CNTs not only enhances OER activity with an overpotential of 350 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm-2, but also retains 100% of stability after 75 h. Furthermore, the bidoped sulfur carbon nanotube–graphene nanolobes behave like the state-of-the-art catalysts for OER but outperform those systems in terms of turnover frequency (TOF) which is two orders of magnitude greater than (20% Ir/C) at 400 mV overpotential with very high mass activity 1000 mA cm-2 at 570 mV. Moreover, the sulfur bidoping strategy shows high catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Stable bifunctional (ORR and OER) catalysts are low cost, and light-weight bidoped sulfur carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for next-generation metal-free regenerative fuel cells.

  13. Controlling the Active Sites of Sulfur-Doped Carbon Nanotube-Graphene Nanolobes for Highly Efficient Oxygen Evolution and Reduction Catalysis

    DOE PAGES

    El-Sawy, Abdelhamid M.; Mosa, Islam M.; Su, Dong; ...

    2015-12-03

    Controlling active sites of metal-free catalysts is an important strategy to enhance activity of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We made many attempts have been made to develop metal-free catalysts, but the lack of understanding of active-sites at the atomic-level has slowed the design of highly active and stable metal-free catalysts. We also developed a sequential two-step strategy to dope sulfur into carbon nanotube–graphene nanolobes. This bidoping strategy introduces stable sulfur–carbon active-sites. Fluorescence emission of the sulfur K-edge by X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and scanning transmission electron microscopy electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) mapping and spectra confirm thatmore » increasing the incorporation of heterocyclic sulfur into the carbon ring of CNTs not only enhances OER activity with an overpotential of 350 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm-2, but also retains 100% of stability after 75 h. Furthermore, the bidoped sulfur carbon nanotube–graphene nanolobes behave like the state-of-the-art catalysts for OER but outperform those systems in terms of turnover frequency (TOF) which is two orders of magnitude greater than (20% Ir/C) at 400 mV overpotential with very high mass activity 1000 mA cm-2 at 570 mV. Moreover, the sulfur bidoping strategy shows high catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Stable bifunctional (ORR and OER) catalysts are low cost, and light-weight bidoped sulfur carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for next-generation metal-free regenerative fuel cells.« less

  14. Tectonic Controls on Gas Hydrate Distribution off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, C.; Chi, W. C.; Jegen, M. D.; Muff, S.; Hölz, S.; Lebas, E.; Sommer, M.; Lin, S.; Liu, C. S.; Lin, A. T.; Klaucke, I.; Klaeschen, D.; Chen, L.; Kunath, P.; McIntosh, K. D.; Feseker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The northern part of the South China Sea is characterized by wide-spread occurrence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSR), indicating the presence of marine gas hydrates. Because the area covers both the tectonically inactive passive margin and the northern termination of the Manila Trench subduction zone while sediment input is broadly similar, this area provides an excellent opportunity to study the influence of tectonic processes on the dynamics of gas hydrate systems. Long-offset multi-channel seismic data show that movement along thrust faults and blind thrust faults caused anticlinal ridges on the active margin, while faults are absent on the passive margin. This coincides with high-hydrate saturations derived from ocean bottom seismometer data and controlled source electromagnetic data, and conspicuous high-amplitude reflections in P-Cable 3D seismic data above the BSR in the anticlinal ridges of the active margin. On the contrary, all geophysical evidence for the passive margin points to normal- to low-hydrate saturations. Geochemical analysis of gas samples collected at seep sites on the active margin show methane with heavy δ13C isotope composition, while gas collected on the passive margin shows highly depleted (light) carbon isotope composition. Thus, we interpret the passive margin as a typical gas hydrate province fuelled by biogenic production of methane and the active margin gas hydrate system as a system that is fuelled not only by biogenic gas production but also by additional advection of thermogenic methane from the subduction system. The location of the highest gas hydrate saturations in the hanging wall next to the thrust faults suggests that the thrust faults represent pathways for the migration of methane. Our findings suggest that the most promising gas hydrate occurrences for exploitation of gas hydrate as an energy source may be found in the core of the active margin roll over anticlines immediately above the BSR and that high

  15. Cyclic process for the removal of sulfur dioxide and the recovery of sulfur from gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C.L.

    1991-11-19

    This patent describes a process for the removal of sulfur dioxide from a gas containing sulfur dioxide. It comprises contacting a gas containing sulfur dioxide with an aqueous solution comprising water, ferric chloride and a salt selected from the group consisting of barium chloride and calcium chloride to form ferrous chloride, hydrochloric acid and a precipitate selected from the group consisting of barium sulfate and calcium sulfate; and treating the aqueous solution with an oxidizing agent to convert ferrous chloride to ferric chloride.

  16. Sulfur Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  17. Rice husk ash/calcium oxide/ceria sorbent for simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide from flue gas at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlan, I.; Lee, K.T.; Kamaruddin, A.H.; Mohamed, A.R.

    2009-06-15

    The reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitric oxide (NO) emissions has become an isssue of great importance to government regulatory agencies and general public due to their negative effect towards the environment and human health. In this work, the simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitric oxide (NO) from simulated flue gas was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor using rice husk ash (RHA)/CaO/CeO{sub 2} sorbent. Attention was focused on the major reactor operation parameters affecting sorption capacity of RHA/CaO/CeO{sub 2} sorbent, which include feed concentration of SO{sub 2} and NO, relative humidity (RH), operating temperature and space velocity (GHSV). This is because such information is unavailable for RHA-based sorbent and the effects of these parameters reported in the literature are also not reliable. Enhancement effect of NO on removal of SO{sub 2} was observed and the presence of SO{sub 2} was essential to the removal of NO. However, at a high level of SO{sub 2}/NO concentration, competition in the sorption of NO and SO{sub 2} on the sorbent active sites might have occurred. RH was found to significantly enhance the SO{sub 2} sorption of the RHA/CaO/CeO{sub 2} sorbent. By contrast, NO sorption capacity decreases when RH was further introduced, as it was not easy to sorb NO in the presence of water. Apart from that, the results also shows that there was a threshold value for the RH to ensure higher SO{sub 2} and NO removal and this value was observed at 50% RH. Higher operating temperatures were favored for SO{sub 2} and NO removal. Nevertheless, beyond 150 degrees C the SO{sub 2} removal was found to decrease. On the other hand, a lower space velocity resulted in a higher SO{sub 2} and NO removal.

  18. Technical note: Can the sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas technique be used to accurately measure enteric methane production from ruminally cannulated cattle?

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, K A; Coates, T; Farr, B; McGinn, S M

    2012-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine whether using ruminally cannulated cattle affects the estimate of enteric methane (CH(4)) emissions when using the sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) tracer technique with samples taken from a head canister. Eleven beef cattle were surgically fitted with several types of ruminal cannula (2C, 3C, 3C+washer, 9C; Bar Diamond, Parma, ID). The 2C and 3C models (outer and inner flanges with opposite curvature) had medium to high leakage, whereas the 9C models (outer and inner flanges with the same curvature) provided minimum to moderate leakage of gas. A total of 48 cow-day measurements were conducted. For each animal, a permeation tube containing sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) was placed in the rumen, and a sample of air from around the nose and mouth was drawn through tubing into an evacuated canister (head canister). A second sample of air was collected from outside the rumen near the cannula into another canister (cannula canister). Background concentrations were also monitored. The methane (CH(4)) emission was estimated from the daily CH(4) and SF(6) concentrations in the head canister (uncorrected). The permeation SF(6) release rate was then partitioned based on the proportion of the SF(6) concentration measured in the head vs. the cannula canister. The CH(4) emissions at each site were calculated using the two release rates and the two CH(4):SF(6) concentration ratios. The head and cannula emissions were summed to obtain the total emission (corrected). The difference (corrected - uncorrected) in CH4 emission was attributed to the differences in CH(4):SF(6) ratio at the 2 exit locations. The proportions of CH(4) and SF(6) recovered at the head were greater (P < 0.001) for the 9C cannulas (64% and 66%) compared with the other cannulas, which were similar (P > 0.05; 2C, 6% and 4%; 3C, 17% and 15%; 3C+washer, 19% and 14%). Uncorrected CH(4) emissions were ± 10% of corrected emissions for 53% of the cow-day measurements. Only when more

  19. System evaluation and microbial analysis of a sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment process for Co-treatment of simple wet flue gas desulfurization wastes with freshwater sewage.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jin; Liu, Rulong; Wei, Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    A sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment process, namely the Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification and Nitrification Integrated process (SANI(®) process) has been recently developed for organics and nitrogen removal with 90% sludge minimization and 35% energy reduction in the biological treatment of saline sewage from seawater toilet flushing practice in Hong Kong. In this study, sulfate- and sulfite-rich wastes from simple wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) were considered as a potential low-cost sulfur source to achieve beneficial co-treatment with non-saline (freshwater) sewage in continental areas, through a Mixed Denitrification (MD)-SANI process trialed with synthetic mixture of simple WFGD wastes and freshwater sewage. The system showed 80% COD removal efficiency (specific COD removal rate of 0.26 kg COD/kg VSS/d) at an optimal pH of 7.5 and complete denitrification through MD (specific nitrogen removal rate of 0.33 kg N/kg VSS/d). Among the electron donors in MD, organics and thiosulfate could induce a much higher denitrifying activity than sulfide in terms of both NO3(-) reduction and NO2(-) reduction, suggesting a much higher nitrogen removal rate in organics-, thiosulfate- and sulfide-based MD in MD-SANI compared to sulfide alone-based autotrophic denitrification in conventional SANI(®). Diverse sulfate/sulfite-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera dominated in the bacterial community of sulfate/sulfite-reducing up-flow sludge bed (SRUSB) sludge without methane producing bacteria detected. Desulfomicrobium-like species possibly for sulfite reduction and Desulfobulbus-like species possibly for sulfate reduction are the two dominant groups with respective abundance of 24.03 and 14.91% in the SRB genera. Diverse denitrifying genera were identified in the bacterial community of anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) sludge and the Thauera- and Thiobacillus-like species were the major taxa. These results well explained the successful operation of the lab

  20. An investigation of the interaction of intense laser radiation with molecules of sulfur hexafluoride through the buffer gas technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eletskii, A. V.; Klimov, V. D.; Udalova, T. A.

    1981-02-01

    Measurements of the coefficient of the absorption of intense (approximately 10 to the 7th W/sq cm) radiation from a CO2 laser by SF6 molecules in the presence of noble gases and at pressures up to 40 bars are presented. The dependence of the coefficient of absorption on the pressure and type of buffer gas, as well as on the wavelength and intensity of the incident radiation, makes it possible to follow the formation of the vibrational state distribution function of the molecules. The character of the distribution function depends on the competition between vibrational relaxation processes and laser radiation absorption. At high pressures, that is, at helium pressures greater than approximately 20-40 bars, a two-level scheme for the interaction of intense laser radiation with SF6 is implemented experimentally for the first time. Here, molecules excited by light to the v = 1 state relax instantaneously upon collision. The dependence of the rate constant for the destruction of SF6 molecular states on the number of the vibrational level v upon collision with helium atoms can be evaluated from the experimental data. Taken as a whole, the data confirm the assumption of the linear, single-photon nature of the interaction of laser radiation with SF6 molecules.