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Sample records for controls cellular proliferation

  1. Role of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) in controlling cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuang-Hueih; Dasgupta, Asish; Ding, Jinhui; Indig, Fred E.; Ghosh, Paritosh; Longo, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that Mitofusin2 (Mfn2) inhibits cell proliferation when overexpressed. We wanted to study the role of endogenous Mfn2 in cell proliferation, along with the structural features of Mfn2 that influence its mitochondrial localization and control of cell proliferation. Mfn2-knockdown clones of a B-cell lymphoma cell line BJAB exhibited an increased rate of cell proliferation. A 2-fold increase in cell proliferation was also observed in Mfn2-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells as compared with the control wild-type cells, and the proliferative advantage of the knockout MEF cells was blocked on reintroduction of the Mfn2 gene. Mfn2 exerts its antiproliferative effect by acting as an effector molecule of Ras, resulting in the inhibition of the Ras-Raf-ERK signaling pathway. Furthermore, both the N-terminal (aa 1–264) and the C-terminal (aa 265–757) fragments of Mfn2 blocked cell proliferation through distinct mechanisms: the N-terminal-mediated inhibition was due to its interaction with Raf-1, whereas the C-terminal fragment of Mfn2 inhibited cell proliferation by interacting with Ras. The inhibition of proliferation by the N-terminal fragment was independent of its mitochondrial localization. Collectively, our data provide new insights regarding the role of Mfn2 in controlling cellular proliferation.—Chen, K.-H., Dasgupta, A., Ding, J., Indig, F. E., Ghosh, P., Longo, D. L. Role of Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) in controlling cellular proliferation. PMID:24081906

  2. Adenovirus type 5 exerts genome-wide control over cellular programs governing proliferation, quiescence, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel L; Myers, Chad L; Rickards, Brenden; Coller, Hilary A; Flint, S Jane

    2007-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses, such as serotype 5 (Ad5), encode several proteins that can perturb cellular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis, as well as those that mediate mRNA production and translation. However, a global view of the effects of Ad5 infection on such programs in normal human cells is not available, despite widespread efforts to develop adenoviruses for therapeutic applications. Results We used two-color hybridization and oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor changes in cellular RNA concentrations as a function of time after Ad5 infection of quiescent, normal human fibroblasts. We observed that the expression of some 2,000 genes, about 10% of those examined, increased or decreased by a factor of two or greater following Ad5 infection, but were not altered in mock-infected cells. Consensus k-means clustering established that the temporal patterns of these changes were unexpectedly complex. Gene Ontology terms associated with cell proliferation were significantly over-represented in several clusters. The results of comparative analyses demonstrate that Ad5 infection induces reversal of the quiescence program and recapitulation of the core serum response, and that only a small subset of the observed changes in cellular gene expression can be ascribed to well characterized functions of the viral E1A and E1B proteins. Conclusion These findings establish that the impact of adenovirus infection on host cell programs is far greater than appreciated hitherto. Furthermore, they provide a new framework for investigating the molecular functions of viral early proteins and information relevant to the design of conditionally replicating adenoviral vectors. PMID:17430596

  3. Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry Does Not Control Proliferation in Primary Cultures of Human Metastatic Renal Cellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Ilaria; Potenza, Duilio Michele; Bottino, Cinzia; Glasnov, Toma N.; Ferulli, Federica; Mosca, Alessandra; Guerra, Germano; Rosti, Vittorio; Luinetti, Ombretta; Porta, Camillo; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is activated following depletion of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive Ca2+ pool to regulate proliferation in immortalized cell lines established from either primary or metastatic lesions. The molecular nature of SOCE may involve both Stim1, which senses Ca2+ levels within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ reservoir, and a number of a Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membrane, including Orai1, Orai3, and members of the canonical transient receptor (TRPC1–7) family of ion channels. The present study was undertaken to assess whether SOCE is expressed and controls proliferation in primary cultures isolated from secondary lesions of heavily pretreated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. SOCE was induced following pharmacological depletion of the ER Ca2+ store, but not by InsP3-dependent Ca2+ release. Metastatic RCC cells express Stim1-2, Orai1–3, and TRPC1–7 transcripts and proteins. In these cells, SOCE was insensitive to BTP-2, 10 µM Gd3+ and Pyr6, while it was inhibited by 100 µM Gd3+, 2-APB, and carboxyamidotriazole (CAI). Neither Gd3+ nor 2-APB or CAI impaired mRCC cell proliferation. Consistently, no detectable Ca2+ signal was elicited by growth factor stimulation. Therefore, a functional SOCE is expressed but does not control proliferation of mRCC cells isolated from patients resistant to multikinase inhibitors. PMID:25126575

  4. Control of cellular proliferation by modulation of oxidative phosphorylation in human and rodent fast-growing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Enriquez, Sara . E-mail: rodsar@mail.cardiologia.org.mx; Vital-Gonzalez, Paola A.; Flores-Rodriguez, Fanny L.; Marin-Hernandez, Alvaro; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Moreno-Sanchez, Rafael

    2006-09-01

    The relationship between cell proliferation and the rates of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in HeLa (human) and AS-30D (rodent) tumor cells was evaluated. In glutamine plus glucose medium, both tumor lines grew optimally. Mitochondria were the predominant source of ATP in both cell types (66-75%), despite an active glycolysis. In glucose-free medium with glutamine, proliferation of both lines diminished by 30% but oxidative phosphorylation and the cytosolic ATP level increased by 50%. In glutamine-free medium with glucose, proliferation, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP concentration diminished drastically, although the cells were viable. Oligomycin, in medium with glutamine plus glucose, abolished growth of both tumor lines, indicating an essential role of mitochondrial ATP for tumor progression. The presumed mitochondrial inhibitors rhodamines 123 and 6G, and casiopeina II-gly, inhibited tumor cell proliferation and oxidative phosphorylation, but also glycolysis. In contrast, gossypol, iodoacetate and arsenite strongly blocked glycolysis; however, they did not affect tumor proliferation or mitochondrial metabolism. Growth of both tumor lines was highly sensitive to rhodamines and casiopeina II-gly, with IC{sub 5} values for HeLa cells lower than 0.5 {mu}M, whereas viability and proliferation of human lymphocytes were not affected by these drugs (IC{sub 5} > 30 {mu}M). Moreover, rhodamine 6G and casiopeina II-gly, at micromolar doses, prolonged the survival of animals bearing i.p. implanted AS-30D hepatoma. It is concluded that fast-growing tumor cells have a predominantly oxidative type of metabolism, which might be a potential therapeutic target.

  5. The human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 controls cellular proliferation through regulation of p27{sup Kip1} protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, Nicole; Ruetz, Stephan; Natt, Francois; Hall, Jonathan; Weiler, Jan; Mestan, Juergen; Ducarre, Monique; Grossenbacher, Rita; Hauser, Patrick; Kempf, Dominique; Hofmann, Francesco . E-mail: francesco.hofmann@pharma.novartis.com

    2005-02-15

    Ubiquitin-mediated degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27{sup Kip1} was shown to be required for the activation of key cyclin-dependent kinases, thereby triggering the onset of DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Although the SCF{sup Skp2} ubiquitin ligase has been reported to mediate p27{sup Kip1} degradation, the nature of the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme involved in this process has not yet been determined at the cellular level. Here, we show that antisense oligonucleotides targeting the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 downregulate its expression, inhibit the degradation of p27{sup Kip1}, and prevent cellular proliferation. Elevation of p27{sup Kip1} protein level is found to be the sole requirement for the inhibition of cellular proliferation induced upon downregulation of Cdc34. Indeed, reducing the expression of p27{sup Kip1} with a specific antisense oligonucleotide is sufficient to reverse the anti-proliferative phenotype elicited by the Cdc34 antisense. Furthermore, downregulation of Cdc34 is found to specifically increase the abundance of the SCF{sup Skp2} ubiquitin ligase substrate p27{sup Kip1}, but has no concomitant effect on the level of IkB{alpha} and {beta}-catenin, which are known substrates of a closely related SCF ligase.

  6. Cellular proliferation after experimental glaucoma filtration surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jampel, H.D.; McGuigan, L.J.; Dunkelberger, G.R.; L'Hernault, N.L.; Quigley, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    We used light microscopic autoradiography to determine the time course of cellular incorporation of tritiated thymidine (a correlate of cell division) following glaucoma filtration surgery in seven eyes of four cynomolgus monkeys with experimental glaucoma. Incorporation of tritiated thymidine was detected as early as 24 hours postoperatively. Peak incorporation occurred five days postoperatively and had returned to baseline levels by day 11. Cells incorporating tritiated thymidine included keratocytes, episcleral cells, corneal and capillary endothelial cells, and conjunctival and corneal epithelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy was correlated with the autoradiographic results to demonstrate that fibroblasts were dividing on the corneoscleral margin. These findings have potential clinical implications for the use of antiproliferative agents after filtration surgery.

  7. Cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability on conducting polymer substrates.

    PubMed

    del Valle, Luis J; Estrany, Francesc; Armelin, Elaine; Oliver, Ramón; Alemán, Carlos

    2008-12-01

    This work reports a comprehensive study about cell adhesion and proliferation on the surface of different electroactive substrates formed by pi-conjugated polymers. Biological assays were performed considering four different cellular lines: two epithelial and two fibroblasts. On the other hand, the electroactivity of the three conducting systems was determined in physiological conditions. Results indicate that the three substrates behave as a cellular matrix, even though compatibility with cells is larger for PPy and the 3-layered system. Furthermore, the three polymeric systems are electro-compatible with the cellular monolayers. PMID:18683167

  8. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Adams, Matthew; High, Alec S.; Johnson, Colin A.; Robinson, Philip A.

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ► We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ► HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ► We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ► Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

  9. NOTE: Effects of cellular repair and proliferation on targeted radionuclide therapy: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atthey, M.; Nahum, A. E.; Flower, M. A.; McCready, V. R.

    2000-04-01

    A previous targeted radionuclide therapy modelling study has been extended to include the radiobiological effects of cellular repair and proliferation. Dose distributions have been converted into biologically effective dose (BED) distributions using a previously published formulation. With suitable estimated parameters, corrected tumour control probability (TCP) values were derived. The dependence of BED on the physical half-life of the radionuclide was also modelled. Results indicate that the TCP is greater when a shorter physical half-life is employed.

  10. Transferrin synthesis by small cell lung cancer cells acts as an autocrine regulator of cellular proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Vostrejs, M; Moran, P L; Seligman, P A

    1988-01-01

    Since transferrin is required for cellular proliferation, we investigated transferrin synthesis by a small cell lung cancer line (NCI-H510) that survives in serum-free media without added transferrin. Immunoassays for human transferrin demonstrated that these cells contained immunoreactive human transferrin. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the protein is expressed on the surface of cells, presumably bound to transferrin receptor. Media conditioned by NCI-H510 cells support proliferation of human leukemic cells that would not survive in media lacking transferrin. [35S]Methionine incorporation documented transferrin synthesis by NCI-H510 cells as well as three other small cell lines. Transferrin synthesis by NCI-H510 cells increased more than 10-fold when cells entered active phases of the cell cycle, and this increase was seen before large increases in transferrin-receptor expression. Further experiments examining the effects of agents that affect iron metabolism show that the addition of transferrin-iron or hemin to the media is associated with a more rapid initial rate of proliferation and lower rates of transferrin synthesis than control cells. Gallium salts, which inhibit iron uptake, inhibited proliferation of these cells. If the cells recovered from this effect, transferrin synthesis remained greatly increased compared to control. We conclude that transferrin synthesis by these malignant cells is ultimately related to an iron requirement for cellular proliferation. It appears that this synthesized transferrin acts as part of an important autocrine mechanism permitting proliferation of these cells, and perhaps permitting tumor cell growth in vivo in areas not well vascularized. Images PMID:2839550

  11. Acute lethal graft-versus-host disease stimulates cellular proliferation in the adult rat liver.

    PubMed

    Klein, R M; Clancy, J; Stuart, S

    1982-11-01

    The present investigation was designed to analyse the effects of acute lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in adult (DA x LEW)F1 rats on cellular proliferation within the liver. The influence of the host thymus on GVHD-induced proliferation was also assessed. From 1-28 days after initiation of GVHD [3H]thymidine ([3H]-TdR) was injected i.v. and rats were killed one hour later. Percentage labelled cells (LI) of periportal infiltrating cells (PIC), hepatocytes (H), and sinusoidal lining cells (SC) were counted. Mean values for control rats were 0.3 +/- 0.1% (H), 0.4 +/- 0.1% (SC) and 0.2 +/- 0.1% (PIC). GVHD rats demonstrated a significant increase in LI of PIC (days 1-21), SC (days 2-17) and H (days 2-17). Most labelled cells in PIC were large lymphocytes. Peak LI values were 7.0 +/- 1.0% PIC (day 17), 6.8 +/- 0.9% SC (day 17), and 5.2 +/- 0.9% H (day 7), with all cellular compartments returning to near normal LI values by day 28. Stimulation of cellular proliferation occurred in all three liver cell compartments in neonatally thymectomized (TXM) rats. The intensity of GVHD-induced cell proliferation was significantly decreased at day 7 in all compartments and PIC was dramatically decreased at day 21 in TXM-GVHD rats as compared to non-TXM-GVHD rats. It is hypothesized that the general stimulation of hepatocyte cell proliferation in GVHD is related to the secretion of lymphokines by primarily donor and secondarily host T cells in the periportal infiltrate. PMID:7172201

  12. Modulation of 17β-Estradiol Signaling on Cellular Proliferation by Caveolin-2.

    PubMed

    Totta, Pierangela; Gionfra, Fabio; Busonero, Claudia; Acconcia, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    The sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) exerts pleiotropic effects by binding to the ligand-activated transcription factor estrogen receptor α (ERα). The E2:ERα complex regulates several physiological processes, including cell survival and proliferation, through transcriptional effects (i.e., estrogen responsive element [ERE]-based gene transcription) and non-transcriptional membrane-initiated effects (i.e., the activation of extra-nuclear signaling cascades), which derive from the activation of the pool of ERα that is localized to plasma membrane caveolae. Caveolae are ω-shaped membrane sub-domains that are composed of scaffold proteins named caveolins (i.e., caveolin-1, caveolin-2, and caveolin-3). Although caveolin-3 is exclusively expressed in muscles, caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 are co-expressed in all human tissues. From a functional point of view, caveolin-2 can operate both dependently on and independently of caveolin-1, which is the main coat component of caveolae. Interestingly, while a functional interplay between caveolin-1 and ERα has been reported in the control of E2-induced physiological effects, the role of caveolin-2 in E2:ERα signaling within the cell remains poorly understood. This study shows that siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion in breast ductal carcinoma cells (MCF-7) reduces E2-induced ERα phosphorylation at serine residue 118 (S118), controls intracellular receptor levels, precludes ERα-mediated extra-nuclear activation of signaling pathways, reduces ERα transcriptional activity, and prevents cellular proliferation. Meanwhile, the impact of caveolin-1 depletion on ERα signaling in MCF-7 cells is shown to be similar to that elicited by siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion. Altogether, these data demonstrate that caveolin-2 expression is necessary for the control of E2-dependent cellular proliferation. PMID:26480297

  13. Cell proliferation and cell cycle control: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Golias, C H; Charalabopoulos, A; Charalabopoulos, K

    2004-12-01

    Tumourigenesis is the result of cell cycle disorganisation, leading to an uncontrolled cellular proliferation. Specific cellular processes-mechanisms that control cell cycle progression and checkpoint traversation through the intermitotic phases are deregulated. Normally, these events are highly conserved due to the existence of conservatory mechanisms and molecules such as cell cycle genes and their products: cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases (Cdks), Cdk inhibitors (CKI) and extra cellular factors (i.e. growth factors). Revolutionary techniques using laser cytometry and commercial software are available to quantify and evaluate cell cycle processes and cellular growth. S-phase fraction measurements, including ploidy values, using histograms and estimation of indices such as the mitotic index and tumour-doubling time indices, provide adequate information to the clinician to evaluate tumour aggressiveness, prognosis and the strategies for radiotherapy and chemotherapy in experimental researches.

  14. The antidepressant tranylcypromine alters cellular proliferation and migration in the adult goldfish brain.

    PubMed

    Romanczyk, Tara B; Jacobowitz, David M; Pollard, Harvey B; Wu, Xingjia; Anders, Juanita J

    2014-10-01

    The goldfish (Carassius auratus) is a widely studied vertebrate model organism for studying cell proliferation in the adult brain, and provide the experimental advantage of growing their body and brain throughout their ∼30-year life time. Cell proliferation occurs in the teleost brain in widespread proliferation zones. Increased cell proliferation in the brain has been linked to the actions of certain antidepressants, including tranylcypromine (TCP), which is used in the treatment of depression. We hypothesized that proliferation zones in the adult goldfish brain can be used to determine the antidepressant effects on cellular proliferation. Here, we report that bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling over a 24-hr period can be used to rapidly identify the proliferation zones throughout the goldfish brain, including the telencephalon, diencephalon, optic tectal lobes, cerebellum, and facial and vagal lobes. In the first 24 hr of BrdU administration, TCP caused an approximate and significant doubling of labeled cells in the combined brain regions examined, as detected by BrdU immunohistochemistry. TCP caused the greatest increase in cell proliferation in the cerebellum. The normal migratory paths of the proliferating cells within the cerebellum were not affected by TCP treatment. These results indicate that the goldfish provide significant advantages as a vertebrate model for rapidly investigating the effects of antidepressant drugs on cellular proliferation and migration in the normal and injured brain.

  15. Immunohistochemical expression of EGFR in oral leukoplakia: Association with clinicopathological features and cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Daniela C.; Gleber-Netto, Frederico O.; Sousa, Sílvia F.; Bernardes, Vanessa F.; Guimarães-Abreu, Mauro H.N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: to investigate the immunoexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a sample of oral leukoplakias (OL) and to determine the receptor’s association with dysplasia, tobacco consumption, lesion site, and proliferation rate. Although EGFR should be overexpressed in some oral leukoplakias, the factors that may interfere with this expression and the influence of this receptor on epithelial proliferation have yet to be investigated. Study Design: Samples of oral leukoplakias (48) and of normal oral epithelium (10) were immunohistologically examined for expression of EGFR. Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67, and p27 were also performed in leukoplakias. EGFR expression was associated with clinical and pathological features. Results: EGFR was positive in 62.5% of the leukoplakias and 50% of normal oral epithelium. The number of EGFR positive OL located in high-risk sites was significantly higher than EGFR positive OL located in low-risk sites. Most of the p27 negative leukoplakias were EGFR positive, and the p27 index in the parabasal layer was diminished in the presence of dysplasia. Positivity for EGFR was not associated with dysplasia, tobacco exposure, or Ki-67. Conclusion: EGFR is expressed in leukoplakia regardless of dysplasia, but EGFR positivity should be more frequent in lesions sited in areas of high cancer risk. The association between EGFR and p27 may represent an important mechanism in the control of cellular proliferation and malignant progression of oral epithelium and therefore warrants further investigation. Key words:Oral leukoplakia, EGFR, p27, Ki-67, epithelial dysplasia. PMID:22322523

  16. Graphene Enhances Cellular Proliferation through Activating the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Liao, Chunyang; Cui, Lin; Li, Haishan; Qu, Guangbo; Yu, Wenlian; Song, Naining; Cui, Yuan; Wang, Zheng; Xie, Wenping; Chen, Huiming; Zhou, Qunfang

    2016-07-27

    Graphene has promising applications in food packaging, water purification, and detective sensors for contamination monitoring. However, the biological effects of graphene are not fully understood. It is necessary to clarify the potential risks of graphene exposure to humans through diverse routes, such as foods. In the present study, graphene, as the model nanomaterial, was used to test its potential effects on the cell proliferation based on multiple representative cell lines, including HepG2, A549, MCF-7, and HeLa cells. Graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, particle size analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The cellular responses to graphene exposure were evaluated using flow cytometry, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, and alamarBlue assays. Rat cerebral astrocyte cultures, as the non-cancer cells, were used to assess the potential cytotoxicity of graphene as well. The results showed that graphene stimulation enhanced cell proliferation in all tested cell cultures and the highest elevation in cell growth was up to 60%. A western blot assay showed that the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) was upregulated upon graphene treatment. The phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and the downstream proteins, ShC and extracellular regulating kinase (ERK), were remarkably induced, indicating that the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway was triggered. The activation of PI3 kinase p85 and AKT showed that the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was also involved in graphene-induced cell proliferation, causing the increase of cell ratios in the G2/M phase. No influences on cell apoptosis were observed in graphene-treated cells when compared to the negative controls, proving the low cytotoxicity of this emerging nanomaterial. The findings in this study revealed the potential cellular biological effect of graphene, which may give useful hints on its biosafety

  17. Multistructural biomimetic substrates for controlled cellular differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orza, Anamaria I.; Mihu, Carmen; Soritau, Olga; Diudea, Mircea; Florea, Adrian; Matei, Horea; Balici, Stefana; Mudalige, Thilak; Kanarpardy, Ganesh K.; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2014-02-01

    Multidimensional scaffolds are considered to be ideal candidates for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering based on their potential to provide an excellent microenvironment and direct the fate of the cultured cells. More recently, the use of stem cells in medicine has opened a new technological opportunity for controlled tissue formation. However, the mechanism through which the substrate directs the differentiation of stem cells is still rather unclear. Data concerning its specific surface chemistry, topology, and its signaling ability need to be further understood and analyzed. In our study, atomic force microscopy was used to study the stiffness, roughness, and topology of the collagen (Coll) and metallized collagen (MC) substrates, proposed as an excellent substrate for regenerative medicine. The importance of signaling molecules was studied by constructing a new hybrid signaling substrate that contains both collagen and laminin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The cellular response—such as attachment capability, proliferation and cardiac and neuronal phenotype expression on the metallized and non-metallized hybrid substrates (collagen + laminin)—was studied using MTT viability assay and immunohistochemistry studies. Our findings indicate that such hybrid materials could play an important role in the regeneration of complex tissues.

  18. Structure and biochemical characterization of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen from a parasitic protozoon

    SciTech Connect

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Brieba, Luis G.

    2012-02-08

    Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a toroidal-shaped protein that is involved in cell-cycle control, DNA replication and DNA repair. Parasitic protozoa are early-diverged eukaryotes that are responsible for neglected diseases. In this work, a PCNA from a parasitic protozoon was identified, cloned and biochemically characterized and its crystal structure was determined. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that PCNA from Entamoeba histolytica assembles as a homotrimer that is able to interact with and stimulate the activity of a PCNA-interacting peptide-motif protein from E. histolytica, EhDNAligI. The data indicate a conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of PCNA-mediated interactions between metazoa, yeast and parasitic protozoa.

  19. Cellular proliferation in the canine pancreas after d,l-ethionine dosage as detected by double immunohistochemical labelling.

    PubMed

    Govendir, Merran; Canfield, Paul J; Church, David B

    2003-09-01

    d,l-Ethionine produces pancreatic exocrine necrosis and islet proliferation in hamsters and dogs. As a first step in examining whether induction of islet proliferation has therapeutic applications in animals with exhausted or destroyed insulin-producing beta-cells, we studied pancreatic cellular proliferation after intravenous administration of d,l-ethionine in normal dogs. Double immunohistochemical labelling of pancreatic tissue was used to identify proliferating cells in three groups of six clinically normal crossbred dogs administered d,l-ethionine (100 mg/kg) intravenously three times a week for two weeks. Six additional dogs served as untreated controls. Group I was euthanased and necropsied on day 15 (72 hours after the final dose of ethionine). Groups II and III were euthanased on days 29 and 43 respectively. Utilising markers for proliferating nuclei, insulin and cytokeratin, proliferating cells were classified as acinar, endocrine (both intra or extra-islet), duct or 'other' (i.e. infiltrative or interstitial) and counted under the light microscope (40x magnification). Compared to controls, an increase in the number of proliferating cells was found in all categories except ducts. Acinar cells demonstrated statistically significant (p < 0.05) proliferation, greatest two weeks after ethionine cessation continuing over four weeks. The interstitial, infiltrative or 'other' group also showed proliferation, however this was a more immediate response, which substantially decreased two weeks after ethionine administration. Endocrine cells showed only minor and non-significant proliferative activity and were probably not responsible for a significant increase in apparent beta-cell mass. The number of proliferating duct cells was inconsequential and there appeared to be no specific relationship between any cell populations and duct cells.

  20. Tetraspanin CD9 modulates human lymphoma cellular proliferation via histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Herr, Michael J.; Longhurst, Celia M.; Baker, Benjamin; Homayouni, Ramin; Speich, Henry E.; Kotha, Jayaprakash; Jennings, Lisa K.

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD9 is differentially expressed in human Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. • We found that CD9 expression promotes these cells proliferation. • CD9 expression also increases HDAC activity. • HDAC inhibition decreased both cell proliferation and importantly CD9 expression. • CD9 may dictate HDAC efficacy and play a role in HDAC regulation. - Abstract: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a type of hematological malignancy that affects two percent of the overall population in the United States. Tetraspanin CD9 is a cell surface protein that has been thoroughly demonstrated to be a molecular facilitator of cellular phenotype. CD9 expression varies in two human lymphoma cell lines, Raji and BJAB. In this report, we investigated the functional relationship between CD9 and cell proliferation regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in these two cell lines. Introduction of CD9 expression in Raji cells resulted in significantly increased cell proliferation and HDAC activity compared to Mock transfected Raji cells. The increase in CD9–Raji cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) treatment. Pretreatment of BJAB cells with HDAC inhibitors resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous CD9 mRNA and cell surface expression. BJAB cells also displayed decreased cell proliferation after HDACi treatment. These results suggest a significant relationship between CD9 expression and cell proliferation in human lymphoma cells that may be modulated by HDAC activity.

  1. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges and inhibition of cellular proliferation in vitro. I. Caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Guglielmi, G.E.; Vogt, T.F.; Tice, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    While many agents have been examined for their ability to induce SCE's, complete dose-response information has often been lacking. We have reexamined the ability of one such compound - caffeine - to induce SCEs and also to inhibit cellular proliferation in human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro. An acute exposure to caffeine prior to the DNA synthetic period did not affect either SCE frequency or the rate of cellular proliferation. Chronic exposure to caffeine throughout the culture period lead to both a dose-dependent increase in SCEs (SCE/sub d/ or doubling dose = 2.4 mM; SCE/sub 10/ or the dose capable of inducing 10 SCE = 1.4 mM) and a dose-dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation (IC/sub 50/ or the 50% inhibition concentration = 2.6 mM). The relative proportion of first generation metaphase cells, an assessment of proliferative inhibiton, increased linearly with increasing caffeine concentrations. However, SCE frequency increased nonlinearly over the same range of caffeine concentrations. Examination of the ratio of nonsymmetrical to symmetrical SCEs in third generation metaphase cells indicated that caffeine induced SCEs in equal frequency in each of three successive generations. The dependency of SCE induction and cellular proliferative inhibition on caffeine's presence during the DNA synthetic period suggests that caffeine may act as an antimetabolite in normal human cells.

  2. In vivo imaging of cellular proliferation in colorectal cancer using positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Francis, D L; Freeman, A; Visvikis, D; Costa, D C; Luthra, S K; Novelli, M; Taylor, I; Ell, P J

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F labelled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) is an established imaging tool, although the recent development of a biologically stable thymidine analogue [18F] 3′-deoxy-3-fluorothymidine (18FLT) has allowed PET to image cellular proliferation by utilising the salvage pathway of DNA synthesis. In this study, we have compared uptake of 18FLT and 18FDG with MIB-1 immunohistochemistry to evaluate the role of PET in quantifying in vivo cellular proliferation in colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients and methods: Patients with resectable, primary, or recurrent CRC were prospectively studied. Thirteen lesions from 10 patients (five males, five females), median age 68 years (range 54–87), were evaluated. Patients underwent 18FDG and 18FLT PET scanning. Tracer uptake within lesions was quantified using standardised uptake values (SUVs). Histopathological examination and MIB-1 immunohistochemistry were performed on all lesions, and proliferation quantified by calculating a labelling index (% of MIB-1 positively stained nuclei within 1500 tumour cells). Results: Histology confirmed adenocarcinoma in 12 of 13 lesions; the remaining lesion was reactive. All eight extrahepatic lesions were visualised using both 18FLT and 18FDG. Three of the five resected liver metastases were also avid for 18FLT and showed high proliferation, while the remaining two lesions which demonstrated no uptake of 18FLT had correspondingly very low proliferation. There was a statistically significant positive correlation (r =0.8, p<0.01) between SUVs of the tumours visualised with 18FLT and the corresponding MIB-1 labelling indices. No such correlation was demonstrated with 18FDG avid lesions (r =0.4). Conclusions: 18FLT PET correlates with cellular proliferation markers in both primary and metastatic CRC. This technique could provide a mechanism for in vivo grading of malignancy and early prediction of response to adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID

  3. [Cell signaling pathways interaction in cellular proliferation: Potential target for therapeutic interventionism].

    PubMed

    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor Manuel; Valdespino-Castillo, Patricia Margarita; Valdespino-Castillo, Víctor Edmundo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, cellular physiology is best understood by analysing their interacting molecular components. Proteins are the major components of the cells. Different proteins are organised in the form of functional clusters, pathways or networks. These molecules are ordered in clusters of receptor molecules of extracellular signals, transducers, sensors and biological response effectors. The identification of these intracellular signaling pathways in different cellular types has required a long journey of experimental work. More than 300 intracellular signaling pathways have been identified in human cells. They participate in cell homeostasis processes for structural and functional maintenance. Some of them participate simultaneously or in a nearly-consecutive progression to generate a cellular phenotypic change. In this review, an analysis is performed on the main intracellular signaling pathways that take part in the cellular proliferation process, and the potential use of some components of these pathways as target for therapeutic interventionism are also underlined. PMID:25986976

  4. A loss of FUS/TLS function leads to impaired cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ward, C L; Boggio, K J; Johnson, B N; Boyd, J B; Douthwright, S; Shaffer, S A; Landers, J E; Glicksman, M A; Bosco, D A

    2014-01-01

    Fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS or FUS) is a multifunctional RNA/DNA-binding protein that is pathologically associated with cancer and neurodegeneration. To gain insight into the vital functions of FUS and how a loss of FUS function impacts cellular homeostasis, FUS expression was reduced in different cellular models through RNA interference. Our results show that a loss of FUS expression severely impairs cellular proliferation and leads to an increase in phosphorylated histone H3, a marker of mitotic arrest. A quantitative proteomics analysis performed on cells undergoing various degrees of FUS knockdown revealed protein expression changes for known RNA targets of FUS, consistent with a loss of FUS function with respect to RNA processing. Proteins that changed in expression as a function of FUS knockdown were associated with multiple processes, some of which influence cell proliferation including cell cycle regulation, cytoskeletal organization, oxidative stress and energy homeostasis. FUS knockdown also correlated with increased expression of the closely related protein EWS (Ewing's sarcoma). We demonstrate that the maladaptive phenotype resulting from FUS knockdown is reversible and can be rescued by re-expression of FUS or partially rescued by the small-molecule rolipram. These results provide insight into the pathways and processes that are regulated by FUS, as well as the cellular consequences for a loss of FUS function. PMID:25501833

  5. Effect of the dietary fibre content of lifelong diet on colonic cellular proliferation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C A; Wilson, R G; Hanlon, L; Eastwood, M A

    1992-08-01

    The effect of the fibre content of lifelong (18 months) diets on proximal and distal colonic cellular proliferation and short chain fatty acid (SCFA) content was investigated in 40 rats. Rats were fed a low fibre diet (17 g/kg non-starch polysaccharides NSP) or the stock diet (133 g/kg NSP). The higher fibre fed rats had increased caecal and colonic total contents (p < 0.001) and SCFAs than the low fibre fed rats (caecal SCFAs: higher fibre rats 96.4 (6.8) mumol/g wet weight v low fibre 22.7 (3.0): p < 0.001, colonic SCFAs: higher fibre 52.3 (3.1) mumol/g wet weight v low fibre 6.9 (2.2) mumol/g wet weight: p < 0.001). Cellular proliferation was increased in the proximal colon (bromodeoxyuridine labelling index, higher fibre 9.3 v low fibre 8.4 p < 0.05; flow cytometry, % cells in S phase higher fibre diet 7.9 v low fibre 6.9; p < 0.01) and there was a shift of proliferating cells to a higher region in each crypt. There was no significant difference in the percentage of cells in S phase in the distal colon of rats in both diet groups. The proliferative zone, however, was expanded in the distal colon of the higher fibre diet fed rats. This study indicates that long term higher fibre intake in rats is associated with a modest increase in cellular proliferation in the proximal colon but not the distal colon.

  6. Cellular senescence controls fibrosis in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Jun, Joon-Il; Lau, Lester F

    2010-09-01

    Mammalian wound healing involves the rapid synthesis and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) to maintain tissue integrity during repair. This process must be tightly controlled, as its deregulation may result in fibrosis, scarring, and loss of tissue function. Recent studies have uncovered an efficient and parsimonious mechanism for rendering fibrogenesis self-limiting in wound healing: in such diverse organs as the liver and skin, the myofibroblasts that initially proliferate and produce ECM are themselves eventually driven into senescence, blocking their further proliferation and converting them into matrix-degrading cells. Myofibroblast senescence in skin wounds is triggered by a dynamically expressed matricellular protein, CCN1/CYR61, which acts through integrin-mediated induction of oxidative stress. We propose that the onset of myofibroblast senescence is a programmed wound healing response that functions as a self-limiting mechanism for fibrogenesis, and this process may be regulated by the ECM microenvironment through the expression of CCN1/CYR61.

  7. Locust cellular defense against infections: sites of pathogen clearance and hemocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Duressa, Tewodros Firdissa; Vanlaer, Ria; Huybrechts, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The locust cellular defense is mediated by hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue. In Locusta migratoria, the hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue mutually assist each other in clearing invading pathogens from circulation. A β-1, 3-glucan infection induces nodule formation and apoptotic, TUNEL positive, cells in the hematopoietic tissue and massive loss of hemocytes in the circulation, calling for instant proliferation of hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue cells to assure continued host cellular defense. As the locust hematopoietic tissue persists at the adult stage, it was originally designated as being the major source for the replenishment process. Revisiting post infection hemocyte proliferation, using immunofluorescence based tests for DNA synthesis and mitosis, evidenced the lack of β-1, 3-glucan induced cell proliferation in the hematopoietic tissue. Instead these tests identified the circulating hemocytes as the major source for hemocyte replenishment in the circulation. The hematopoietic tissue, however, undergoes a continuous, slow and infection independent regeneration, thereby accumulating potential phagocytes despite infection, and might serve a prophylactic role in containing pathogens in this swarming insect. PMID:25281274

  8. Feedback control of unstable cellular solidification fronts.

    PubMed

    Pons, A J; Karma, A; Akamatsu, S; Newey, M; Pomerance, A; Singer, H; Losert, W

    2007-02-01

    We present a feedback control scheme to stabilize unstable cellular patterns during the directional solidification of a binary alloy. The scheme is based on local heating of cell tips which protrude ahead of the mean position of all tips in the array. The feasibility of this scheme is demonstrated using phase-field simulations and, experimentally, using a real-time image processing algorithm, to track cell tips, coupled with a movable laser spot array device to heat the tips locally. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that spacings well below the threshold for a period-doubling instability can be stabilized. As predicted by the numerical calculations, cellular arrays become stable with uniform spacing through the feedback control which is maintained with minimal heating.

  9. How inositol pyrophosphates control cellular phosphate homeostasis?

    PubMed

    Saiardi, Adolfo

    2012-05-01

    Phosphorus in his phosphate PO(4)(3-) configuration is an essential constituent of all life forms. Phosphate diesters are at the core of nucleic acid structure, while phosphate monoester transmits information under the control of protein kinases and phosphatases. Due to these fundamental roles in biology it is not a surprise that phosphate cellular homeostasis is under tight control. Inositol pyrophosphates are organic molecules with the highest proportion of phosphate groups, and they are capable of regulating many biological processes, possibly by controlling energetic metabolism and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Furthermore, inositol pyrophosphates influence inorganic polyphosphates (polyP) synthesis. The polymer polyP is solely constituted by phosphate groups and beside other known functions, it also plays a role in buffering cellular free phosphate [Pi] levels, an event that is ultimately necessary to generate ATP and inositol pyrophosphate. Although it is not yet clear how inositol pyrophosphates regulate cellular metabolism, understanding how inositol pyrophosphates influence phosphates homeostasis will help to clarify this important link. In this review I will describe the recent literature on this topic, with in the hope of inspiring further research in this fascinating area of biology.

  10. Effect of the mannose-binding Artocarpus integer lectin on the cellular proliferation of murine lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lim, S B; Kanthimathi, M S; Hashim, O H

    1998-12-01

    The effect of the mannose-binding champedak (Artocarpus integer) lectin-M on the cellular proliferation of murine lymphocytes was investigated in this study. Our data demonstrated that the lectin was the main mitogenic component in the crude extract of the champedak seeds. It stimulated the proliferation of murine T cells at an optimal concentration of 2.5 microg/ml in a 3 day culture. Lectin-M appeared to be a T-cell mitogen as it does not induce significant DNA synthesis when cultured with spleen cells from the nude mouse. In the absence of T cells, the lectin was incapable of inducing resting B cells to differentiate into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells.

  11. Arecoline augments cellular proliferation in the prostate gland of male Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Indraneel; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Mondal, Anushree; Maiti, Bishwa Ranjan; Chatterji, Urmi

    2011-09-01

    Areca nut chewing is the fourth most popular habit in the world due to its effects as a mild stimulant, causing a feeling of euphoria and slightly heightened alertness. Areca nuts contain several alkaloids and tannins, of which arecoline is the most abundant and known to have several adverse effects in humans, specially an increased risk of oral cancer. On evaluating the effects of arecoline on the male endocrine physiology in Wistar rats, it was found that arecoline treatment led to an overall enlargement and increase in the wet weight of the prostate gland, and a two-fold increase in serum gonadotropin and testosterone levels. Since the prostate is a major target for testosterone, the consequences of arecoline consumption were studied specifically in the prostate gland. Arecoline treatment led to an increase in the number of rough endoplasmic reticulum and reduction of secretory vesicles, signifying a hyperactive state of the prostate. Increased expression of androgen receptors in response to arecoline allowed for enhanced effect of testosterone in the prostate of treated animals, which augmented cell proliferation, subsequently confirmed by an increase in the expression of Ki-67 protein. Cellular proliferation was also the outcome of concomitant over expression of the G{sub 1}-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and CDK4, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. Taken together, the findings provide the first evidence that regular use of arecoline may lead to prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and eventually to disorders associated with prostate enlargement. - Highlights: > Effect of arecoline was investigated on the endocrine physiology of male Wistar rats. > Increase observed in prostate size, wet weight, serum testosterone and gonadotropins. > Arecoline increased RER, expression of androgen receptor and cellular proliferation. > Upregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 seen at transcriptional and translational levels. > It may cause

  12. [Enhanced control of proliferation in telomerized cells].

    PubMed

    Egorov, E E; Moldaver, M V; Vishniakova, Kh S; Terekhov, S M; Dashinimaev, E B; Cheglakov, I B; Toropygin, I Iu; Iarygin, K N; Chumakov, P M; Korochkin, L I; Antonova, G A; Rybalkina, E Iu; Saburina, I N; Burnaevskiĭ, N S; Zelenin, A V

    2007-01-01

    Clones of telomerized fibroblasts of adult human skin have earlier been obtained. It was shown that despite their fast growth in mass cultures, these cells poorly form colonies. Conditioned medium, antioxidants, and reduced partial oxygen pressure enhanced their colony formation, but not to the level characteristic of the initial cells. The conditioned medium of telomerized cells enhanced colony formation to a much greater extent than that of the initial cells. A study of proteome of the telomerized fibroblasts has revealed changes in the activities of tens of genes. A general trend consists in weakening and increased lability of the cytoskeleton and in activation of the mechanisms controlling protein degradation. However, these changes are not very pronounced. During the formation of immortal telomerized cells, selection takes place, which appears to determine changes in the expression of some genes. It was proposed that a decrease in the capacity of telomerized cells for colony formation is due to increased requirements of these cells to cell-cell contacts. The rate of cell growth reached that characteristic of mass cultures only in the largest colonies. In this respect, the telomerized fibroblasts resembled stem cells: they are capable of self-maintenance, but "escape" to differentiation in the absence of the corresponding microenvironment (niche), which is represented by other fibroblasts. Non-dividing cells in the test of colony formation should be regarded as differentiated cells, since they have no features of degradation, preserve their viability, actively move, grow, phagocytized debris, etc. It was also shown that telomerization did not prevent differentiation of myoblasts and human neural stem cells. Thus, the results obtained suggest the existence of normal mechanisms underlying the regulation of proliferation in the telomerized cells, which opens possibilities of their use in cell therapy, especially in the case of autotransplantation to senior people

  13. Control of Proliferation and Cancer Growth by the Hippo Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ehmer, Ursula; Sage, Julien

    2016-02-01

    The control of cell division is essential for normal development and the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Abnormal cell proliferation is associated with multiple pathological states, including cancer. Although the Hippo/YAP signaling pathway was initially thought to control organ size and growth, increasing evidence indicates that this pathway also plays a major role in the control of proliferation independent of organ size control. In particular, accumulating evidence indicates that the Hippo/YAP signaling pathway functionally interacts with multiple other cellular pathways and serves as a central node in the regulation of cell division, especially in cancer cells. Here, recent observations are highlighted that connect Hippo/YAP signaling to transcription, the basic cell-cycle machinery, and the control of cell division. Furthermore, the oncogenic and tumor-suppressive attributes of YAP/TAZ are reviewed, which emphasizes the relevance of the Hippo pathway in cancer.

  14. Suppression of cellular proliferation and invasion by the concerted lipid and protein phosphatase activities of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lindsay; Maccario, Helene; Perera, Nevin M.; Yang, Xuesong; Spinelli, Laura; Tibarewal, Priyanka; Glancy, Ben; Gray, Alex; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Downes, C. Peter; Leslie, Nick R.

    2009-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor with phosphatase activity in vitro against both lipids and proteins and other potential non-enzymatic mechanisms of action. Although the importance of PTEN’s lipid phosphatase activity in regulating the PI3K signalling pathway is recognised, the significance of PTEN’s other mechanisms of action is currently unclear. Here, we describe the systematic identification of a PTEN mutant, PTEN Y138L, with activity against lipid, but not soluble substrates. Using this mutant we provide evidence for the interfacial activation of PTEN against lipid substrates. We also show that when re-expressed at physiological levels in PTEN null U87MG glioblastoma cells the protein phosphatase activity of PTEN is not required to regulate cellular PtdInsP3 levels or the downstream protein kinase Akt/PKB. Finally, in 3D Matrigel cultures of U87MG cells similarly re-expressing PTEN mutants, both the protein and lipid phosphatase activities were required to inhibit invasion, but either activity alone significantly inhibited proliferation, albeit only weakly for the protein phosphatase activity. Our data provides a novel tool to address the significance of PTEN’s separable lipid and protein phosphatase activities and suggest that both activities act to suppress proliferation and act together to suppress invasion. PMID:19915616

  15. Structural Development, Cellular Differentiation and Proliferation of the Respiratory Epithelium in the Bovine Fetal Lung.

    PubMed

    Drozdowska, J; Cousens, C; Finlayson, J; Collie, D; Dagleish, M P

    2016-01-01

    Fetal bovine lung samples of 11 different gestational ages were assigned to a classical developmental stage based on histological morphology. Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize the morphology of forming airways, proliferation rate of airway epithelium and the presence of epithelial cell types (i.e. ciliated cells, club cells, neuroepithelial cells (NECs) and type II pneumocytes). Typical structural organization of pseudoglandular (84-98 days gestational age [DGA]), canalicular (154-168 DGA) and alveolar (224-266 DGA) stages was recognized. In addition, transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular (112-126 DGA) and canalicular-saccular (182 DGA) morphologies were present. The embryonic stage was not observed. A significantly (P <0.05) higher proliferation rate of pulmonary epithelium, on average 5.5% and 4.4% in bronchi and bronchioles, respectively, was present in the transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular phase (112-126 DGA) compared with all other phases, while from 8 weeks before term (224-266 DGA) proliferation had almost ceased. The first epithelial cells identified by specific marker proteins in the earliest samples available for study (84 DGA) were ciliated cells and NECs. Club cells were present initially at 112 DGA and type II pneumocytes at 224 DGA. At the latest time points (224-226 DGA) these latter cell types were still present at a much lower percentage compared with adult cattle. This study characterized bovine fetal lung development by histological morphology and cellular composition of the respiratory epithelium and suggests that the apparent structural anatomical maturity of the bovine lung at term is not matched by functional maturity of the respiratory epithelium.

  16. Human DMTF1β antagonizes DMTF1α regulation of the p14ARF Tumor Suppressor and Promotes Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tschan, Mario P.; Federzoni, Elena A.; Haimovici, Aladin; Britschgi, Christian; Moser, Bettina A.; Jin, Jing; Reddy, Venkateshwar A.; Sheeter, Dennis A.; Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Sun, Peiqing; Torbett, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    The human DMTF1 (DMP1) transcription factor, a DNA binding protein that interacts with cyclin D, is a positive regulator of the p14ARF (ARF) tumor suppressor. Our earlier studies have shown that three differentially spliced human DMP1 mRNAs, α, β and γ, arise from the human gene. We now show that DMP1α, β and γ isoforms differentially regulate ARF expression and promote distinct cellular functions. In contrast to DMP1α, DMP1β and γ did not activate the ARF promoter, whereas only β resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of DMP1α-induced transactivation of the ARF promoter. Ectopic expression of DMP1β reduced endogenous ARF mRNA levels in human fibroblasts. The DMP1β- and γ-isoforms share domains necessary for the inhibitory function of the β-isoform. That DMP1β may interact with DMP1α to antagonize its function was shown in DNA binding assays and in cells by the close proximity of DMP1α/β in the nucleus. Cells stably expressing DMP1β, as well as shRNA targeting all DMP1 isoforms, disrupted cellular growth arrest induced by serum deprivation or in PMA-derived macrophages in the presence or absence of cellular p53. DMP1 mRNA levels in acute myeloid leukemia samples, as compared to granulocytes, were reduced. Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia patient samples with all-trans retinoic acid promoted differentiation to granulocytes and restored DMP1 transcripts to normal granulocyte levels. Our findings imply that DMP1α- and β-ratios are tightly regulated in hematopoietic cells and DMP1β antagonizes DMP1α transcriptional regulation of ARF resulting in the alteration of cellular control with a gain in proliferation. PMID:26187004

  17. SGK1 inhibits cellular apoptosis and promotes proliferation via the MEK/ERK/p53 pathway in colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jian-An; Xu, Gui-Fang; Yan, Li-Jun; Zeng, Wei-Wen; Ji, Qian-Qian; Wu, Jin-Dao; Tang, Qi-Yun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of serum-and-glucocorticoid-inducible-kinase-1 (SGK1) in colitis and its potential pathological mechanisms. METHODS: SGK1 expression in mucosal biopsies from patients with active Crohn’s disease (CD) and normal controls was detected by immunohistochemistry. We established an acute colitis model in mice induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonicacid, and demonstrated the presence of colitis using the disease activity index, the histologic activity index and hematoxylin and eosin staining. The cellular events and potential mechanisms were implemented with small interference RNA and an inhibitor of signaling molecule (i.e., U0126) in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). The interaction between SGK1 and the signaling molecule was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. RESULTS: SGK1 expression was significantly increased in the inflamed epithelia of patients with active CD and TNBS-induced colitis model (0.58 ± 0.055 vs 0.85 ± 0.06, P < 0.01). At the cellular level, silencing of SGK1 by small interference RNA (siSGK1) significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) and the downstream molecule extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2, which induced the upregulation of p53 and Bcl-2-associated X protein, mediating the subsequent cellular apoptosis and proliferation in IECs. Cells treated with MEK1 inhibitor (i.e., U0126) before siSGK1 transfection showed a reversal of the siSGK1-induced cellular apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Our data suggested that SGK1 may protect IECs in colitis from tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis partly by triggering MEK/ERK activation. PMID:26034353

  18. Lycopene modulates cellular proliferation, glycolysis and hepatic ultrastructure during hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prachi; Bhatia, Nisha; Bansal, Mohinder Pal; Koul, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of lycopene extracted from tomatoes (LycT) on ultrastructure, glycolytic enzymes, cell proliferation markers and hypoxia during N-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. METHODS Female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: The Control, NDEA (200 mg NDEA/kg b.w. given i.p.), LycT (5 mg/kg b.w. given orally on alternate days) and LycT + NDEA group. The mRNA and protein expression of various cell proliferation markers (PCNA, Cyclin D1, and p21) were assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The ultrastructure of hepatic tissue was analyzed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The enzymatic activity of glycolytic enzymes was estimated using standardized protocols, while glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity level was estimated using a kit obtained from Reckon Diagnostic P. Ltd. (India). RESULTS Uncontrolled proliferation in the liver of NDEA (P ≤ 0.001) mice was evident from the high expression of cell-proliferation associated genes (PCNA, Cyclin D1, and p21) when compared to control and LycT mice. In addition, enhanced activities of hexokinase, phosphoglucoisomerase, aldolase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α were observed in NDEA mice as compared to control (P ≤ 0.001) and LycT (P ≤ 0.001) mice. The alterations in hepatic ultrastructure observed in the NDEA group correlated with the changes in the above parameters. LycT pre-treatment in NDEA-challenged mice ameliorated the investigated pathways disrupted by NDEA treatment. Moreover, hepatic electron micrographs from the LycT + NDEA group showed increased macrophages, apoptotic bodies and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in comparison to undifferentiated HCC as observed in the NDEA treated group. CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that dietary supplementation with LycT has a multidimensional role in preventing

  19. Extracellular Calcium Has Multiple Targets to Control Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capiod, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channels and the two G-protein coupled receptors sensing extracellular calcium, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and GPRC6a, are the two main means by which extracellular calcium can signal to cells and regulate many cellular processes including cell proliferation, migration and invasion of tumoral cells. Many intracellular signaling pathways are sensitive to cytosolic calcium rises and conversely intracellular signaling pathways can modulate calcium channel expression and activity. Calcium channels are undoubtedly involved in the former while the CaSR and GPRC6a are most likely to interfere with the latter. As for neurotransmitters, calcium ions use plasma membrane channels and GPCR to trigger cytosolic free calcium concentration rises and intracellular signaling and regulatory pathways activation. Calcium sensing GPCR, CaSR and GPRC6a, allow a supplemental degree of control and as for metabotropic receptors, they not only modulate calcium channel expression but they may also control calcium-dependent K+ channels. The multiplicity of intracellular signaling pathways involved, their sensitivity to local and global intracellular calcium increase and to CaSR and GPRC6a stimulation, the presence of membrane signalplex, all this confers the cells the plasticity they need to convert the effects of extracellular calcium into complex physiological responses and therefore determine their fate.

  20. Extracellular Calcium Has Multiple Targets to Control Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Capiod, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Calcium channels and the two G-protein coupled receptors sensing extracellular calcium, calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and GPRC6a, are the two main means by which extracellular calcium can signal to cells and regulate many cellular processes including cell proliferation, migration and invasion of tumoral cells. Many intracellular signaling pathways are sensitive to cytosolic calcium rises and conversely intracellular signaling pathways can modulate calcium channel expression and activity. Calcium channels are undoubtedly involved in the former while the CaSR and GPRC6a are most likely to interfere with the latter. As for neurotransmitters, calcium ions use plasma membrane channels and GPCR to trigger cytosolic free calcium concentration rises and intracellular signaling and regulatory pathways activation. Calcium sensing GPCR, CaSR and GPRC6a, allow a supplemental degree of control and as for metabotropic receptors, they not only modulate calcium channel expression but they may also control calcium-dependent K+ channels. The multiplicity of intracellular signaling pathways involved, their sensitivity to local and global intracellular calcium increase and to CaSR and GPRC6a stimulation, the presence of membrane signalplex, all this confers the cells the plasticity they need to convert the effects of extracellular calcium into complex physiological responses and therefore determine their fate. PMID:27161228

  1. Surfactant tuning of hydrophilicity of porous degradable copolymer scaffolds promotes cellular proliferation and enhances bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohammed A; Leknes, Knut N; Sun, Yang; Lie, Stein A; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Poly(l-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (poly(LLA-co-CL)) has been blended with Tween 80 to tune the material properties and optimize cell-material interactions. Accordingly, the aims of this study were fourfold: to evaluate the effect of low concentrations of Tween 80 on the surface microstructure of 3D poly(LLA-co-CL) porous scaffolds: to determine the effect of different concentrations of Tween 80 on proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vitro under dynamic cell culture at 7 and 21 days; to assess the influence of Tween 80 on the degradation rate of poly(LLA-co-CL) at 7 and 21 days; and in a subcutaneous rat model, to evaluate the effect on bone formation of porous scaffolds modified with 3% Tween 80 at 2 and 8 weeks. Blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly(LLA-co-CL) improves the surface wettability (p < 0.001). Poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 shows significantly increased cellular proliferation at days 7 and 21 (p < 0.001). Moreover, the presence of Tween 80 facilitates the degradation of poly(LLA-co-CL). Two weeks post-implantation, the poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds exhibit significant mRNA expression of Runx2 (p = 0.004). After 8 weeks, poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds show significantly increased de novo bone formation, demonstrated by μ-CT (p = 0.0133) and confirmed histologically. It can be concluded that blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly (LLA-co-CL) improves the hydrophilicity and osteogenic potential of the scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2049-2059, 2016.

  2. Proliferation and cellular kinetics of villous epithelial cells and M cells in the chicken caecum

    PubMed Central

    TAKEUCHI, TAKASHI; KITAGAWA, HIROSHI; IMAGAWA, TOMOHIRO; UEHARA, MASATO

    1998-01-01

    The proliferation sites and cellular kinetics of villous epithelial cells and M cells in the intestine of the adult chicken have never been clarified. In this study, we determined the proliferation sites in the chicken caecum using colchicine treatment and detection of proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The cellular kinetics of these cells were also studied using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) as a tracer. Enterocytes in their mitotic period were observed along the entire length of the intestinal crypt of the caecum, with a denser distribution in the middle portion of the crypt, except for the caecal tonsil. The centres of distributions were at 49% of the distance from the bottom of the crypt in the base and 41% in the apex of the caecum. In the caecal tonsil, the centres of distributions were at 64% in the long type of crypt from the bottom of the crypt and at 44% in the short type of crypt. On the other hand, the PCNA-positive enterocytes were distributed more densely at the bottom of the crypt, except for the caecal tonsil. The centres of distributions were at 36% in the base from the bottom of the crypt, 37% in the body, and 34% in the apex. In the caecal tonsil, they were at 54% in the long type of crypt and 44% in the short type. The BrdU-labelled enterocytes reached to the basement of the intestinal villi in all caecal portions at 1 d after the BrdU administration. The leading edge of the labelled enterocytes disappeared from the villous tips at 4 d in the base and the body and 3 d in the apex. In the caecal tonsil, the BrdU-labelled microvillous epithelial cells and the M cells appeared near the orifice of the crypt at 1 d, and BrdU-labelled M cells were not observed in the crypt. Thereafter, almost all of these cells disappeared at 5 d from the follicle associated epithelium (FAE). These results suggest that M cells are transformed from their precursors within 1 d, and the turnover time for M cells occurs within 4 d after the cell division of the

  3. The expression of AIB1 correlates with cellular proliferation in human prolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Carretero, José; Blanco, Enrique J; Carretero, Manuel; Carretero-Hernández, Marta; García-Barrado, Ma José; Iglesias-Osma, Ma Carmen; Burks, Deborah Jane; Font de Mora, Jaime

    2013-05-01

    Estrogens as well as certain growth factors strongly influence the development and growth of prolactinomas. However, the molecular mechanisms by which extracellular factors trigger prolactinomas are not well known. Amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1), also known as steroid receptor co-activator 3 (SRC-3), belongs to the p160/SRC family of nuclear receptor co-activators and is a major co-activator of the estrogen receptor. Here, we report that the estrogen receptor coactivator AIB1 is overexpressed in human prolactinomas and correlates with the detection of aromatase and estrogen receptor α (ERα). Of the 87 pituitary tumors evaluated in women, 56%, corresponding to hyperoprolactinemic women, contained an enriched population of prolactin-positive cells and hence were further classified as prolactinomas. All prolactinomas stained positive for both ERα and AIB1. Moreover, AIB1 sub-cellular distribution was indicative of the cell-cycle status of tumors; the nuclear expression of AIB1 was correlated with proliferative markers whereas the cytoplasmic localization of AIB1 coincided with active caspase-3. Thus, our results demonstrate for the first time that AIB1 is expressed in prolactinomas and suggest its participation in the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis of tumoral cells. Because aromatase expression is also enhanced in these prolactinomas and it is involved in the local production of estradiol, both mechanisms, ER-AIB1 and aromatase could be related.

  4. Dysfunction of nucleus accumbens-1 activates cellular senescence and inhibits tumor cell proliferation and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Cheng, Yan; Ren, Xingcong; Hori, Tsukasa; Huber-Keener, Kathryn J; Zhang, Li; Yap, Kai Lee; Liu, David; Shantz, Lisa; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong; Wang, Hong-Gang; Shih, Ie-Ming; Yang, Jin-Ming

    2012-08-15

    Nucleus accumbens-1 (NAC1), a nuclear factor belonging to the BTB/POZ gene family, has emerging roles in cancer. We report here that NAC1 acts as a negative regulator of cellular senescence in transformed and nontransformed cells, and dysfunction of NAC1 induces senescence and inhibits its oncogenic potential. We show that NAC1 deficiency markedly activates senescence and inhibits proliferation in tumor cells treated with sublethal doses of γ-irradiation. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts from NAC1 knockout mice, following infection with a Ras virus, NAC1-/- cells undergo significantly more senescence and are either nontransformed or less transformed in vitro and less tumorigenic in vivo when compared with NAC1+/+ cells. Furthermore, we show that the NAC1-caused senescence blunting is mediated by ΔNp63, which exerts its effect on senescence through p21, and that NAC1 activates transcription of ΔNp63 under stressful conditions. Our results not only reveal a previously unrecognized function of NAC1, the molecular pathway involved and its impact on pathogenesis of tumor initiation and development, but also identify a novel senescence regulator that may be exploited as a potential target for cancer prevention and treatment.

  5. Hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids precedes cellular proliferation in asbestos-stimulated tracheobronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sesko, A.; Mossman, B. ); Cabot, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Metabolism of inositol phospholipids and phosphatidylcholine was investigated in tracheobronchial epithelial cells exposed to mitogenic concentrations of crocidolite asbestos. Alterations in levels of diacylglycerol, the endogenous activator of protein kinase C, and inositol polyphosphates, presumed mobilizers of intracellular calcium, were examined. Cultures labeled with ({sup 3}H)diacylglycerol. In contrast, crocidolite-exposed cells labeled with ({sup 3}H)myristic acid or ({sup 3}H)choline did not display elevated production of ({sup 3}H)diacylglycerol or release of ({sup 3}H)choline metabolites (i.e., evidence of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis). The soluble tumor promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate catalyzed both of these changes. myo-({sup 3}H)Inositol-labeled cells exposed as briefly as 10 min to mitogenic concentrations of crocidolite demonstrated elevations in ({sup 3}H)inositol mono-, tris-, and terakisphosphates, phenomena indicating turnover of inositol phospholipids. The detection of diacylglycerol and inositol phosphates in crocidolite asbestos-exposed cells suggests that this fibrous tumor promoter activates phospholipase C as it stimulates cellular proliferation.

  6. Mzf1 controls cell proliferation and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gaboli, Mirella; Kotsi, Paraskevi A.; Gurrieri, Carmela; Cattoretti, Giorgio; Ronchetti, Simona; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Broxmeyer, Hal E.; Hromas, Robert; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2001-01-01

    MZF1 is a transcription factor belonging to the Krüppel family of zinc finger proteins, expressed in totipotent hemopoietic cells as well as in myeloid progenitors. Here we have inactivated Mzfi1 by gene targeting. Mzf1−/− mice develop lethal neoplasias characterized by the infiltration and complete disruption of the liver architecture by a monomorphic population of cells of myeloid origin reminiscent of human chloromas. Mzf1 inactivation results in a striking increase of the autonomous cell proliferation and of the ability of Mzf1−/− hemopoietic progenitors to sustain long-term hemopoiesis. These findings demonstrate that Mzf1 can act as a tumor/growth suppressor in the hemopoietic compartment. PMID:11445537

  7. Proliferation of nuclear weapons: opportunities for control and abolition.

    PubMed

    Sidel, Victor W; Levy, Barry S

    2007-09-01

    Nuclear weapons pose a particularly destructive threat. Prevention of the proliferation and use of nuclear weapons is urgently important to public health. "Horizontal" proliferation refers to nation-states or nonstate entities that do not have, but are acquiring, nuclear weapons or developing the capability and materials for producing them. "Vertical" proliferation refers to nation-states that do possess nuclear weapons and are increasing their stockpiles of these weapons, improving the technical sophistication or reliability of their weapons, or developing new weapons. Because nation-states or other entities that wish to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons need methods for delivering those weapons, proliferation of delivery mechanisms must also be prevented. Controlling proliferation--and ultimately abolishing nuclear weapons--involves national governments, intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental and professional organizations, and society at large.

  8. 14-3-3σ regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by modulating Yap1 cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Sumitha A.T.; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Xue, Lei; Dean, Douglas C.; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2015-01-01

    The homozygous repeated epilation (Er/Er) mouse mutant of the gene encoding 14-3-3σ displays an epidermal phenotype characterized by hyperproliferative keratinocytes and undifferentiated epidermis. Heterozygous Er/+ mice develop spontaneous skin tumors and are highly sensitive to tumor-promoting DMBA/TPA induction. The molecular mechanisms underlying 14-3-3σ regulation of epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and tumor formation have not been well elucidated. In the present study, we found that Er/Er keratinocytes failed to sequester Yap1 in the cytoplasm, leading to its nuclear localization during epidermal development in vivo and under differentiation-inducing culture conditions in vitro. In addition, enhanced Yap1 nuclear localization was also evident in DMBA/TPA-induced tumors from Er/+ skin. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Yap1 expression in Er/Er keratinocytes inhibited their proliferation, suggesting that YAP1 functions as a downstream effector of 14-3-3σ controlling epidermal proliferation. We then demonstrated that keratinocytes express all seven 14-3-3 protein isoforms, some of which form heterodimers with 14-3-3σ, either full-length WT or the mutant form found in Er/Er mice. However Er 14-3-3σ does not interact with Yap1, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. We conclude that Er 14-3-3σ disrupts the interaction between 14-3-3 and Yap1, thus fails to block Yap1 nuclear transcriptional function, causing continued progenitor expansion and inhibition of differentiation in Er/Er epidermis. PMID:25668240

  9. Cellular immunity in vitro. Clonal proliferation of antigen-stimulated lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W H; Valentine, F T; Lawrence, H S

    1969-08-01

    When sensitive lymphocytes are cultured with the appropriate antigen, lymphoblasts appear after 24-48 hr of incubation and the number of these increases steadily from the 2nd to the 6th or 7th day. Our problem was to discover, at a cellular level, how this increase takes place; whether it is a massive response of many cells, stepwise recruitment of cells into the lymphoblast class, or simply repeated division of a few cells to form clones. In these experiments lymphocytes were incubated with antigen in culture tubes for 2-4 days and then a few cells, usually less than 200, were transferred to special microchambers for further culture. In these microchambers the cells could be viewed continually with a microscope and their fate recorded over the next 3-5 days by time-lapse cinemicrography. Examination of the film produced in this way showed that lymphoblasts divided and redivided to produce clones of 64 cells or more. It was possible to measure generation times from the film for 301 cells; the majority were between 8 and 13 hr but the range was 7.5-38.0 hr. There was no clear difference between generation times of human lymphocytes stimulated with tuberculin, streptokinase-streptodrnase, extract of the American pokeweed, or in the mixed leukocyte reaction. Similar times were also found for rat cells in the mixed leukocyte reaction. While these observations show that clonal proliferation does occur and could reasonably account for all the increase of lymphoblasts in lymphocyte cultures, the experiments, because of their design, do not exclude the possibility that other mechanisms such as recruitment may play a role as well, particularly during the first 48 hr after contact between sensitive cells and antigens.

  10. The DEK oncogene promotes cellular proliferation through paracrine Wnt signaling in Ron receptor positive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Privette Vinnedge, Lisa M.; Benight, Nancy M.; Wagh, Purnima K.; Pease, Nicholas A.; Nashu, Madison A.; Serrano-Lopez, Juana; Adams, Allie K.; Cancelas, Jose A.; Waltz, Susan E.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Disease progression and recurrence are major barriers to surviving breast cancer. Understanding the etiology of recurrent or metastatic breast cancer and underlying mechanisms is critical for the development of new treatments and improved survival. Here, we report that two commonly over-expressed breast cancer oncogenes, Ron and DEK, cooperate to promote advanced disease through multi-pronged effects on β-catenin signaling. The Ron receptor is commonly activated in breast cancers, and Ron over-expression in human disease stimulates β-catenin nuclear translocation and is an independent predictor of metastatic dissemination. Dek is a chromatin-associated oncogene whose expression has been linked to cancer through multiple mechanisms, including β-catenin activity. We demonstrate here that Dek is a downstream target of Ron receptor activation in murine and human models. The absence of Dek in the MMTV-Ron mouse model led to a significant delay in tumor development, characterized by decreased cell proliferation, diminished metastasis, and fewer cells expressing cancer stem cell markers. Dek complementation of cell lines established from this model was sufficient to promote cellular growth and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, Dek expression stimulated the production and secretion of Wnt ligands to sustain an autocrine/paracrine canonical β-catenin signaling loop. Finally, we show that Dek over-expression promotes tumorigenic phenotypes in immortalized human mammary epithelial MCF10A cells and, in the context of Ron receptor activation, correlates with disease recurrence and metastasis in patients. Overall, our studies demonstrate that DEK over-expression, due in part to Ron receptor activation, drives breast cancer progression through the induction of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24954505

  11. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 is a crucial target for histone deacetylase 1 as a regulator of cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zupkovitz, Gordin; Grausenburger, Reinhard; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Senese, Silvia; Tischler, Julia; Jurkin, Jennifer; Rembold, Martina; Meunier, Dominique; Egger, Gerda; Lagger, Sabine; Chiocca, Susanna; Propst, Fritz; Weitzer, Georg; Seiser, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are chromatin-modifying enzymes that are involved in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation and development. HDAC inhibitors induce cell cycle arrest, differentiation, or apoptosis in tumor cells and are therefore promising antitumor agents. Numerous genes were found to be deregulated upon HDAC inhibitor treatment; however, the relevant target enzymes are still unidentified. HDAC1 is required for mouse development and unrestricted proliferation of embryonic stem cells. We show here that HDAC1 reversibly regulates cellular proliferation and represses the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 in embryonic stem cells. Disruption of the p21 gene rescues the proliferation phenotype of HDAC1(-/-) embryonic stem cells but not the embryonic lethality of HDAC1(-/-) mice. In the absence of HDAC1, mouse embryonic fibroblasts scarcely undergo spontaneous immortalization and display increased p21 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrate a direct regulation of the p21 gene by HDAC1 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Transformation with simian virus 40 large T antigen or ablation of p21 restores normal immortalization of primary HDAC1(-/-) fibroblasts. Our data demonstrate that repression of the p21 gene is crucial for HDAC1-mediated control of proliferation and immortalization. HDAC1 might therefore be one of the relevant targets for HDAC inhibitors as anticancer drugs.

  12. Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons: Opportunities for Control and Abolition

    PubMed Central

    Sidel, Victor W.; Levy, Barry S.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear weapons pose a particularly destructive threat. Prevention of the proliferation and use of nuclear weapons is urgently important to public health. “Horizontal” proliferation refers to nation-states or nonstate entities that do not have, but are acquiring, nuclear weapons or developing the capability and materials for producing them. “Vertical” proliferation refers to nation-states that do possess nuclear weapons and are increasing their stockpiles of these weapons, improving the technical sophistication or reliability of their weapons, or developing new weapons. Because nation-states or other entities that wish to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons need methods for delivering those weapons, proliferation of delivery mechanisms must also be prevented. Controlling proliferation—and ultimately abolishing nuclear weapons—involves national governments, intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental and professional organizations, and society at large. PMID:17666690

  13. KIF7 Controls the Proliferation of Cells of the Respiratory Airway through Distinct Microtubule Dependent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Garry L.; Baglia, Laurel A.; Ackerman, Kate G.

    2015-01-01

    The cell cycle must be tightly coordinated for proper control of embryonic development and for the long-term maintenance of organs such as the lung. There is emerging evidence that Kinesin family member 7 (Kif7) promotes Hedgehog (Hh) signaling during embryonic development, and its misregulation contributes to diseases such as ciliopathies and cancer. Kif7 encodes a microtubule interacting protein that controls Hh signaling through regulation of microtubule dynamics within the primary cilium. However, whether Kif7 has a function in nonciliated cells remains largely unknown. The role Kif7 plays in basic cell biological processes like cell proliferation or cell cycle progression also remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that Kif7 is required for coordination of the cell cycle, and inactivation of this gene leads to increased cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Immunostaining and transmission electron microscopy experiments show that Kif7 dda/dda mutant lungs are hyperproliferative and exhibit reduced alveolar epithelial cell differentiation. KIF7 depleted C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts and Kif7 dda/dda mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts have increased growth rates at high cellular densities, suggesting that Kif7 may function as a general regulator of cellular proliferation. We ascertained that in G1, Kif7 and microtubule dynamics regulate the expression and activity of several components of the cell cycle machinery known to control entry into S phase. Our data suggest that Kif7 may function to regulate the maintenance of the respiratory airway architecture by controlling cellular density, cell proliferation, and cycle exit through its role as a microtubule associated protein. PMID:26439735

  14. Early-life environmental intervention may increase the number of neurons, astrocytes, and cellular proliferation in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann-Duarte, Elisa C; Padilha-Hoffmann, Camila B; Martins, Daniel F; Schuh, Artur F S; Fernandes, Marilda C; Santin, Ricardo; Merlo, Suelen; Sanvitto, Gilberto L; Lucion, Aldo B

    2011-11-01

    Neonatal handling reduces the stress response in adulthood due to a feedback mechanism. The present study analyzed the effects of repeated neonatal environmental intervention (daily handling during the first 10 days after birth) on neuron-, astroglial cell density, and cellular proliferation of the hippocampal (CA1, CA2, and CA3) pyramidal cell layers in female rats. Pups were divided into two groups, nonhandled and handled, which were submitted to repeated handling sessions between postnatal days 1 and 10. Histological and immunohistochemical procedures were used to determine changes in neuron density, astroglial cell density, and cellular proliferation. We found an increase in neuron density in each pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, and CA3) in female rats (11 and 90 day old) that were handled during the neonatal period. Furthermore, we found an increase in astroglial cell density in both hemispheres of the brain in the handled group. Finally, we observed an increase in cellular proliferation in both hippocampi (CA1, CA2, and CA3) of the brain in female pups (11 days old) handled during the neonatal period. This study demonstrates that an early-life environmental intervention may induce morphological changes in a structure involved with several functions, including the stress response. The results of the current study suggest that neonatal handling may influence the animals' responses to environmental adversities later in life.

  15. Arsenic acid inhibits proliferation of skin fibroblasts, and increases cellular senescence through ROS mediated MST1-FOXO signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yuya; Madhyastha, Harishkumar; Madhyastha, Radha; Choijookhuu, Narantsog; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Pengjam, Yutthana; Nakajima, Yuichi; Maruyama, Masugi

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic exposure through drinking water is a major public health problem. It causes a number of toxic effects on skin. Arsenic has been reported to inhibit cell proliferation in in vitro conditions. However, reports about the molecular mechanisms are limited. Here, we investigated the mechanism involved in arsenic acid-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation using mouse skin fibroblast cell line. The present study found that 10 ppm arsenic acid inhibited cell proliferation, without any effect on cell death. Arsenic acid induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative stress to DNA. It also activated the mammalian Ste20-like protein kinase 1 (MST1); however the serine/threonine kinase Akt was downregulated. Forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are activated through phosphorylation by MST1 under stress conditions. They are inhibited by phosphorylation by Akt through external and internal stimuli. Activation of FOXOs results in their nuclear localization, followed by an increase in transcriptional activity. Our results showed that arsenic induced the nuclear translocation of FOXO1 and FOXO3a, and altered the cell cycle, with cells accumulating at the G2/M phase. These effects caused cellular senescence. Taken together, our results indicate that arsenic acid inhibited cell proliferation through cellular senescence process regulated by MST1-FOXO signaling pathway. PMID:26763397

  16. Uteroglobin induces the development and cellular proliferation of the mouse early embryo.

    PubMed

    Riffo, Marta; González, Keybell Díaz; Nieto, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Two-cell mouse embryos cultured in vitro in the presence of either purified rabbit uteroglobin (UG) or recombinant human UG developed and proliferated faster than controls cultured in the absence of this protein. Both the percentage of embryos developing to the blastocyst stage and the number of cells per embryo were increased. Treatment with UG for 3 hr was enough to trigger this response. The effect of UG was blocked by genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine protein kinases, suggesting the involvement of these kinases in the stimulation of the embryo by UG. To further support this suggestion, embryos were metabolically labeled in vitro with [32P] and the phosphorylated proteins were immunoprecipitated with anti-phosphotyrosine. Analysis of the immunoprecipitates by SDS-PAGE showed that UG induced the phosphorylation of several proteins of M(r) between 200 and 37 kDa. This induction was observed after 1 hr of stimulation with UG and further increased after 3 hr of treatment. Since UG is synthesized and secreted in the uterus and the oviduct, these results suggest a physiological role of this protein in the correct development of the embryo in vivo. PMID:17094107

  17. Controlling Cellular Endocytosis at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2011-03-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of drug delivery is the intra-cellular delivery of active agents. Several drugs and especially nucleic acids all need to be delivered within the cell interior to exert their therapeutic action. Small hydrophobic molecules can permeate cell membranes with relative ease, but hydrophilic molecules and especially large macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids require a vector to assist their transport across the cell membrane. This must be designed so as to ensure intracellular delivery without compromising cell viability. We have recently achieved this by using pH-sensitive poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-phosphorylcholine)- co -poly(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PMPC-PDPA) and poly(ethylene oxide)-co- poly(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PEO-PDPA) diblock copolymers that self-assemble to form vesicles in aqueous solution. These vesicles combine a non-fouling PMPC or PEO block with a pH-sensitive PDPA block and have the ability to encapsulate both hydrophobic molecules within the vesicular membrane and hydrophilic molecules within their aqueous cores. The pH sensitive nature of the PDPA blocks make the diblock copolymers forming stable vesicles at physiological pH but that rapid dissociation of these vesicles occurs between pH 5 and pH 6 to form molecularly dissolved copolymer chains (unimers). We used these vesicles to encapsulate small and large macromolecules and these were successfully delivered intracellularly including nucleic acid, drugs, quantum dots, and antibodies. Dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurements, and transmission electron microscopy were used to study and optimise the encapsulation processes. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, fluorescence flow cytometry and lysates analysis were used to quantify cellular uptake and to study the kinetics of this process in vitro and in vivo. We show the effective cytosolic delivery of nucleic acids, proteins, hydrophobic molecules

  18. Depolarization of Cellular Resting Membrane Potential Promotes Neonatal Cardiomyocyte Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jen-Yu; Williams, Corin; Levin, Michael; Black, Lauren Deems

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) undergo a rapid transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth soon after birth, which is a major challenge to the development of engineered cardiac tissue for pediatric patients. Resting membrane potential (Vmem) has been shown to play an important role in cell differentiation and proliferation during development. We hypothesized that depolarization of neonatal CMs would stimulate or maintain CM proliferation in vitro. To test our hypothesis, we isolated postnatal day 3 neonatal rat CMs and subjected them to sustained depolarization via the addition of potassium gluconate or Ouabain to the culture medium. Cell density and CM percentage measurements demonstrated an increase in mitotic CMs along with a ~2 fold increase in CM numbers with depolarization. In addition, depolarization led to an increase in cells in G2 and S phase, indicating increased proliferation, as measured by flow cytometry. Surprisingly depolarization of Vmem with either treatment led to inhibition of proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. This effect is abrogated when the study was carried out on postnatal day 7 neonatal CMs, which are less proliferative, indicating that the likely mechanism of depolarization is the maintenance of the proliferating CM population. In summary, our findings suggest that depolarization maintains postnatal CM proliferation and may be a novel approach to encourage growth of engineered tissue and cardiac regeneration in pediatric patients. PMID:25295125

  19. Fish oil supplementation associated with decreased cellular degeneration and increased cellular proliferation 6 weeks after middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Michaela C; Howells, David W; Crewther, David P; Carey, Leeanne M; Crewther, Sheila G

    2015-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-LC-PUFAs) are both neuroprotective and have antidepressive effects. However the influence of dietary supplemented n-3-LC-PUFAs on inflammation-related cell death and proliferation after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo)-induced stroke is unknown. We have previously demonstrated that anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors are reduced in n-3-LC-PUFA-fed MCAo animals. Thus in the present study, male hooded Wistar rats were exposed to MCAo or sham surgeries and examined behaviorally 6 weeks later, prior to euthanasia and examination of lesion size, cell death and proliferation in the dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis region of the hippocampus of the ipsilesional hemispheres, and the thalamus of the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres. Markers of cell genesis and cell degeneration in the hippocampus or thalamus of the ipsilesional hemisphere did not differ between surgery and diet groups 6 weeks post MCAo. Dietary supplementation with n-3-LC-PUFA decreased cell degeneration and increased cell proliferation in the thalamic region of the contralesional hemisphere. MCAo-associated cell degeneration in the hippocampus and thalamus positively correlated with anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors previously reported in these animals. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory n-3-LC-PUFA supplementation appears to have cellular protective effects after MCAo in the rat, which may affect behavioral outcomes. PMID:25609971

  20. Fish oil supplementation associated with decreased cellular degeneration and increased cellular proliferation 6 weeks after middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Michaela C; Howells, David W; Crewther, David P; Carey, Leeanne M; Crewther, Sheila G

    2015-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-LC-PUFAs) are both neuroprotective and have antidepressive effects. However the influence of dietary supplemented n-3-LC-PUFAs on inflammation-related cell death and proliferation after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo)-induced stroke is unknown. We have previously demonstrated that anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors are reduced in n-3-LC-PUFA-fed MCAo animals. Thus in the present study, male hooded Wistar rats were exposed to MCAo or sham surgeries and examined behaviorally 6 weeks later, prior to euthanasia and examination of lesion size, cell death and proliferation in the dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis region of the hippocampus of the ipsilesional hemispheres, and the thalamus of the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres. Markers of cell genesis and cell degeneration in the hippocampus or thalamus of the ipsilesional hemisphere did not differ between surgery and diet groups 6 weeks post MCAo. Dietary supplementation with n-3-LC-PUFA decreased cell degeneration and increased cell proliferation in the thalamic region of the contralesional hemisphere. MCAo-associated cell degeneration in the hippocampus and thalamus positively correlated with anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors previously reported in these animals. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory n-3-LC-PUFA supplementation appears to have cellular protective effects after MCAo in the rat, which may affect behavioral outcomes.

  1. mRNA stability and control of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, Cristina; Falcone, Claudio

    2011-10-01

    Most of the studies on cell proliferation examine the control of gene expression by specific transcription factors that act on transcriptional initiation. In the last few years, it became evident that mRNA stability/turnover provides an important mechanism for post-transcriptional control of gene expression. In eukaryotes, mRNAs are mainly degraded after deadenylation by decapping and exosome pathways. Mechanisms of mRNA surveillance comprise deadenylation-independent pathways such as NMD (nonsense-mediated decay), when mRNAs harbour a PTC (premature termination codon), NSD (non-stop decay, when mRNAs lack a termination codon, and NGD (no-go decay), when mRNA translation elongation stalls. Many proteins involved in these processes are conserved from bacteria to yeast and humans. Recent papers showed the involvement of proteins deputed to decapping in controlling cell proliferation, virus replication and cell death. In this paper, we will review the newest findings in this field.

  2. Tart cherry juice induces differential dose-dependent effects on apoptosis, but not cellular proliferation, in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R; Wooden, Alissa

    2012-11-01

    Consumption of polyphenol-rich fruits, for example, tart cherries, is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. This is due, in large part, to the diverse myriad bioactive agents, that is, polyphenol anthocyanins, present in fruits. Anthocyanin-rich tart cherries purportedly modulate numerous cellular processes associated with oncogenesis such as apoptosis, cellular proliferation (CP), and cell cycle progression, although the effective concentrations eliciting these effects are unclear. We hypothesized that several dose-dependent effects over a large concentration range of 100% tart cherry juice (TCJ) would exist and affect these processes differentially with the potential for cellular protection and cellular death either by apoptosis or by necrosis. In this in vitro study, we tested the dose response of TCJ on CP and cell death in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. TCJ was added at 0.03-30% (v/v) to cells and incubated overnight with the medium alone or with increasing TCJ. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly reduced by 20% at ≥10% (v/v) TCJ and associated with necrosis, but was not different between the control and treatment groups at <10% TCJ. MTT reduction was also significantly reduced by 27% and 80% at 10% and 30% TCJ, respectively, and associated with necrosis. Apoptosis, but not necrosis, was increased ∼63% at 3% TCJ (∼307 nM monomeric anthocyanins), yet significantly decreased (P<.05) by 20% at 1% TCJ (920 nM) both of which were physiologically relevant concentrations of anthocyanins. The data support a biphasic effect on apoptosis and no effect on proliferation. PMID:23057779

  3. MAP kinase subcellular localization controls both pattern and proliferation in the developing Drosophila wing

    PubMed Central

    Marenda, Daniel R.; Vrailas, Alysia D.; Rodrigues, Aloma B.; Cook, Summer; Powers, Maureen A.; Lorenzen, James A.; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Moses, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) phosphorylate target proteins in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, and a strong correlation exists between the subcellular localization of MAPK and resulting cellular responses. It was thought that MAPK phosphorylation was always followed by rapid nuclear translocation. However, we and others have found that MAPK phosphorylation is not always sufficient for nuclear translocation in vivo. In the developing Drosophila wing, MAPK-mediated signaling is required both for patterning and for cell proliferation, although the mechanism of this differential control is not fully understood. Here, we show that phosphorylated MAPK (pMAPK) is held in the cytoplasm in differentiating larval and pupal wing vein cells, and we show that this cytoplasmic hold is required for vein cell fate. At the same time, we show that MAPK does move into the nucleus of other wing cells where it promotes cell proliferation. We propose a novel Ras pathway bifurcation in Drosophila and our results suggest a mechanism by which MAPK phosphorylation can signal two different cellular outcomes (differentiation versus proliferation) based on the subcellular localization of MAPK. PMID:16308331

  4. CNBP: a multifunctional nucleic acid chaperone involved in cell death and proliferation control.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Nora B; Armas, Pablo; Weiner, Andrea M J; Borgognone, Mariana

    2010-10-01

    Cellular nucleic acid binding protein (CNBP) has been implicated in vertebrate craniofacial development and in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) and sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) human diseases. In these seemingly unrelated biological processes, CNBP appears to be involved in controlling cell death and proliferation rates. Low levels of CNBP may reduce rate of global protein synthesis, thereby reducing proliferation and increasing apoptosis. Conversely, CNBP might affect transcription of genes required for cell proliferation. Experimental evidences gathered so far make it difficult to ascertain or rule out any of these possibilities. Moreover, both possibilities may not be mutually exclusive. CNBP is a small and strikingly conserved single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein that is able to bind DNA as well as RNA. CNBP has a broad spectrum of targets, ranging from regulatory sites in gene promoters to translational regulatory elements in mRNA untranslated regions. Biochemical experiments have recently shed light on the possible mechanism of action for CNBP, which may act as a nucleic acid chaperone catalyzing the rearrangement of G-rich nucleic acid secondary structures likely relevant for transcriptional and/or translational gene regulation. This review focuses on the involvement of CNBP in vertebrate craniofacial development and human DM2 and sIBM diseases, as well as on the biochemical and structural features of CNBP and its cellular and molecular mechanism of action.

  5. Cellular differentiation and proliferation in the ovine lung during gestation and early postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Martineau, H M; Dagleish, M P; Cousens, C; Underwood, C; Forbes, V; Palmarini, M; Griffiths, D J

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates epithelial cell differentiation and proliferation in specific anatomical regions of the ovine lung during prenatal and postnatal development. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify ciliated epithelial cells, Clara cells, neuroepithelial bodies and type II pneumocytes in the lungs of preterm (67, 127 and 140 days of gestation), full-term (147 days) and postnatal (9, 16 and 91 days old) lambs. Differentiation of ciliated epithelial cells was seen at 67 days of gestation and at term for Clara cells. Neuroepithelial bodies were first detected at 127 days of gestation. From 16 to 91 days of age there was a significant (P <0.05) increase in beta-tubulin (present in ciliated epithelial cells) and Clara cell protein (present in Clara cells) in multiple regions of the lung. Detection of Ki67, a marker of proliferation, in preterm lambs showed a reduction in proliferation index in multiple anatomical regions of the lung between 70 days of gestation and term. Cell proliferation increased following parturition, and then decreased between 16 and 91 days of age, with the largest reduction occurring in the alveolar compartment. Knowledge of which cells are present at specific times of lung development provides valuable information on the anatomy of the ovine lung, improving its use as a model for ovine and human neonatal disease. In addition, the antibodies used here will be valuable for future studies requiring the identification and quantification of respiratory epithelial cell phenotypes in the sheep lung.

  6. Cellular Mechanisms of Ciliary Length Control.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Jacob; Tsiokas, Leonidas; Maskey, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are evolutionarily conserved, membrane-bound, microtubule-based organelles on the surface of most eukaryotic cells. They play important roles in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways during growth, development, cell mobility, and tissue homeostasis. Defects in ciliary structure or function are associated with multiple human disorders called ciliopathies. These diseases affect diverse tissues, including, but not limited to the eyes, kidneys, brain, and lungs. Many processes must be coordinated simultaneously in order to initiate ciliogenesis. These include cell cycle, vesicular trafficking, and axonemal extension. Centrioles play a central role in both cell cycle progression and ciliogenesis, making the transition between basal bodies and mitotic spindle organizers integral to both processes. The maturation of centrioles involves a functional shift from cell division toward cilium nucleation which takes place concurrently with its migration and fusion to the plasma membrane. Several proteinaceous structures of the distal appendages in mother centrioles are required for this docking process. Ciliary assembly and maintenance requires a precise balance between two indispensable processes; so called assembly and disassembly. The interplay between them determines the length of the resulting cilia. These processes require a highly conserved transport system to provide the necessary substances at the tips of the cilia and to recycle ciliary turnover products to the base using a based microtubule intraflagellar transport (IFT) system. In this review; we discuss the stages of ciliogenesis as well as mechanisms controlling the lengths of assembled cilia. PMID:26840332

  7. Cellular Mechanisms of Ciliary Length Control

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Jacob; Tsiokas, Leonidas; Maskey, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are evolutionarily conserved, membrane-bound, microtubule-based organelles on the surface of most eukaryotic cells. They play important roles in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways during growth, development, cell mobility, and tissue homeostasis. Defects in ciliary structure or function are associated with multiple human disorders called ciliopathies. These diseases affect diverse tissues, including, but not limited to the eyes, kidneys, brain, and lungs. Many processes must be coordinated simultaneously in order to initiate ciliogenesis. These include cell cycle, vesicular trafficking, and axonemal extension. Centrioles play a central role in both cell cycle progression and ciliogenesis, making the transition between basal bodies and mitotic spindle organizers integral to both processes. The maturation of centrioles involves a functional shift from cell division toward cilium nucleation which takes place concurrently with its migration and fusion to the plasma membrane. Several proteinaceous structures of the distal appendages in mother centrioles are required for this docking process. Ciliary assembly and maintenance requires a precise balance between two indispensable processes; so called assembly and disassembly. The interplay between them determines the length of the resulting cilia. These processes require a highly conserved transport system to provide the necessary substances at the tips of the cilia and to recycle ciliary turnover products to the base using a based microtubule intraflagellar transport (IFT) system. In this review; we discuss the stages of ciliogenesis as well as mechanisms controlling the lengths of assembled cilia. PMID:26840332

  8. In Vivo Bystander Effect: Cranial X-Irradiation Leads to Elevated DNA Damage, Altered Cellular Proliferation and Apoptosis, and Increased p53 Levels in Shielded Spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Koturbash, Igor; Loree, Jonathan; Kutanzi, Kristy; Koganow, Clayton; Pogribny, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: It is well accepted that irradiated cells may 'forward' genome instability to nonirradiated neighboring cells, giving rise to the 'bystander effect' phenomenon. Although bystander effects were well studied by using cell cultures, data for somatic bystander effects in vivo are relatively scarce. Methods and Materials: We set out to analyze the existence and molecular nature of bystander effects in a radiation target-organ spleen by using a mouse model. The animal's head was exposed to X-rays while the remainder of the body was completely protected by a medical-grade shield. Using immunohistochemistry, we addressed levels of DNA damage, cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and p53 protein in the spleen of control animals and completely exposed and head-exposed/body bystander animals. Results: We found that localized head radiation exposure led to the induction of bystander effects in the lead-shielded distant spleen tissue. Namely, cranial irradiation led to increased levels of DNA damage and p53 expression and also altered levels of cellular proliferation and apoptosis in bystander spleen tissue. The observed bystander changes were not caused by radiation scattering and were observed in two different mouse strains; C57BL/6 and BALB/c. Conclusion: Our study proves that bystander effects occur in the distant somatic organs on localized exposures. Additional studies are required to characterize the nature of an enigmatic bystander signal and analyze the long-term persistence of these effects and possible contribution of radiation-induced bystander effects to secondary radiation carcinogenesis.

  9. PUMILIO-2 is involved in the positive regulation of cellular proliferation in human adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shigunov, Patrícia; Sotelo-Silveira, Jose; Kuligovski, Crisciele; de Aguiar, Alessandra Melo; Rebelatto, Carmen K; Moutinho, José A; Brofman, Paulo S; Krieger, Marco A; Goldenberg, Samuel; Munroe, David; Correa, Alejandro; Dallagiovanna, Bruno

    2012-01-20

    Stem cells can either differentiate into more specialized cells or undergo self-renewal. Several lines of evidence from different organisms suggest that these processes depend on the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The presence of the PUF [Pumilio/FBF (fem-3 binding factor)] domain defines a conserved family of RNA binding proteins involved in repressing gene expression. It has been suggested that a conserved function of PUF proteins is to repress differentiation and sustain the mitotic proliferation of stem cells. In humans, Pumilio-2 (PUM2) is expressed in embryonic stem cells and adult germ cells. Here we show that PUM2 is expressed in a subpopulation of adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) cultures, with a granular pattern of staining in the cytoplasm. Protein levels of PUM2 showed no changes during the differentiation of ASCs into adipocytes. Moreover, RNAi knockdown of pum2 did not alter the rate of adipogenic differentiation compared with wild-type control cells. A ribonomic approach was used to identify PUM2-associated mRNAs. Microarray analysis showed that PUM2-bound mRNAs are part of gene networks involved in cell proliferation and gene expression control. We studied pum2 expression in cell cultures with low or very high levels of proliferation and found that changes in pum2 production were dependent on the proliferation status of the cell. Transient knockdown of pum2 expression by RNAi impaired proliferation of ASCs in vitro. Our results suggest that PUM2 does not repress differentiation of ASCs but rather is involved in the positive control of ASCs division and proliferation.

  10. PUMILIO-2 Is Involved in the Positive Regulation of Cellular Proliferation in Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shigunov, Patrícia; Kuligovski, Crisciele; de Aguiar, Alessandra Melo; Rebelatto, Carmen K.; Moutinho, José A.; Brofman, Paulo S.; Krieger, Marco A.; Goldenberg, Samuel; Munroe, David; Correa, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells can either differentiate into more specialized cells or undergo self-renewal. Several lines of evidence from different organisms suggest that these processes depend on the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The presence of the PUF [Pumilio/FBF (fem-3 binding factor)] domain defines a conserved family of RNA binding proteins involved in repressing gene expression. It has been suggested that a conserved function of PUF proteins is to repress differentiation and sustain the mitotic proliferation of stem cells. In humans, Pumilio-2 (PUM2) is expressed in embryonic stem cells and adult germ cells. Here we show that PUM2 is expressed in a subpopulation of adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) cultures, with a granular pattern of staining in the cytoplasm. Protein levels of PUM2 showed no changes during the differentiation of ASCs into adipocytes. Moreover, RNAi knockdown of pum2 did not alter the rate of adipogenic differentiation compared with wild-type control cells. A ribonomic approach was used to identify PUM2-associated mRNAs. Microarray analysis showed that PUM2-bound mRNAs are part of gene networks involved in cell proliferation and gene expression control. We studied pum2 expression in cell cultures with low or very high levels of proliferation and found that changes in pum2 production were dependent on the proliferation status of the cell. Transient knockdown of pum2 expression by RNAi impaired proliferation of ASCs in vitro. Our results suggest that PUM2 does not repress differentiation of ASCs but rather is involved in the positive control of ASCs division and proliferation. PMID:21649561

  11. Cellular proliferation in the skin of X-rayed newt limbs (with a note on x-ray-induced limb regression)

    SciTech Connect

    Wertz, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    Left hind limbs, including the pelvis, of adult newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) were locally irradiated with a dose of x-rays that inhibited regeneration (2,000 R). This x-ray dose and other doses (700-2,000 R) capable of inhibiting limb regeneration also cause limb regression prior to amputation. Before limb regression occurred, there was a latent period of 3 to 6 weeks. Limb regression was characterized by necrotic wasting and resorption of distal elements. The degree of loss was variable and dependent upon dosage. After this further degenerative changes were not noted. Proliferation of epidermal cells was examined 4 days after irradiation prior to limb regression or after x-ray-induced degeneration of the limbs had ended. Proliferative activity in x-rayed limbs was also compared at various stages of contralateral control limb regeneration. Limbs examined after x-ray-induced limb regression had ended showed levels of (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA comparable to normal epidermis. In contrast, limbs examined 4 days after irradiation had lower levels of DNA synthesis (P much less than 0.01). Amputation of limbs in both groups caused an increase in DNA synthesis (P much less than 0.01). Histological examination showed that cellular proliferation was associated primarily with the epidermis. These results indicate that epidermal cell proliferation was not resistant to x-rays. However, levels of normal cell division were observed after amputation of after cessation of x-ray-induced limb regression.

  12. Downregulation of cellular prion protein inhibited the proliferation and invasion and induced apoptosis of Marek's disease virus-transformed avian T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xuerui; Yang, Runxia; Liu, Guilin; Zhu, Manling; Zhang, Tianliang; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is ubiquitously expressed in the cytomembrane of a considerable number of eukaryotic cells. Although several studies have investigated the functions of PrPC in cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and tumorigenesis of mammals, the correlated functions of chicken PrPC (chPrPC) remain unknown. In this study, stable chPrPC-downregulated Marek's disease (MD) virus-transformed avian T cells (MSB1-SiRNA-3) were established by introducing short interfering RNA (SiRNA) targeting chicken prion protein genes. We found that downregulation of chPrPC inhibits proliferation, invasion, and migration, and induces G1 cell cycle phase arrest and apoptosis of MSB1-SiRNA-3 cells compared with Marek's disease virus-transformed avian T cells (MSB1) and negative control cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first evidence supporting the positive correlation between the expression level of chPrPC and the proliferation, migration, and invasion ability of MSB1 cells, but appears to protect MSB1 cells from apoptosis, which suggests it functions in the formation and development of MD tumors. This evidence may contribute to future research into the specific molecular mechanisms of chPrPC in the formation and development of MD tumors. PMID:26243599

  13. The effect of ruby laser light on cellular proliferation of epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Liew, S H; Grobbelaar, A O; Gault, D T; Green, C J; Linge, C

    1999-11-01

    In ruby laser-assisted hair removal, microscopic damage is often seen in the basal epidermal cells, where melanosomes are concentrated. It is not known whether this treatment leads to cellular hyperproliferation. It was the aim of this study to investigate this. Ten white patients were treated with the Chromos 694-nm Depilation Ruby Laser, and biopsies taken before and after treatments to assess the presence of cell hyperproliferation, which normally accompanies epidermal damage, with immunohistochemical staining of keratin 16 and Ki67. No evidence of cell hyperproliferation was seen in all specimens examined after ruby laser irradiation. The authors conclude that despite the possible microscopic damages seen in the basal epidermis after laser hair removal, there is no evidence of cellular hyperproliferation. This is in contrast to ultraviolet-irradiated cell damage, in which increased basal cell turnover is seen.

  14. Control of cellular vortex shedding over a cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, O.; Chopde, Rahul

    2007-11-01

    Vortex shedding over 3D geometries is known to be complex involving the so-called cellular vortex shedding phenomenon, wherein cells of constant frequency are formed. In the present work we consider the passive control methodology of Strykowski and Sreenivasan (of placing a small control cylinder outside the undisturbed wake of the main cylinder) to the cellular shedding problem. It is interesting that this control methodology which was originally meant for 2D flows works well in the present 3D flows also. Similarly, the vortex shedding was quenched by this methodology even for other cellular shedding configurations such as a uniform flow over a stepped cylinder or a shear flow over a uniform cylinder also. The smearing of vorticity due to the control rod (envisaged in the 2D scenario of Strykowski and Sreenivasan hypothesis) may be expected to be non-uniform all over the span in a 3D geometry as the gap between the main cylinder and the control cylinder varies with the span. It is hypothesised that the control rod works on the global instability modes and alters their growth rates all across the span even when the gap between the cone and the control cylinder varies along the span.

  15. MicroRNA-124 inhibits cellular proliferation and invasion by targeting Ets-1 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Zang, Wenqiao; Liu, Pei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Du, Yuwen; Chen, Xiaonan; Deng, Meng; Sun, Wencong; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Guoqiang; Zhai, Baoping

    2014-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that, by targeting certain messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for translational repression or cleavage, can regulate the expression of these genes. In addition, miRNAs may also function as oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, as the abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with various human tumors. However, the effects of the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer remain unclear. The present study was conducted to study the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer, paying particular attention to miR-124's relation to the proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis in breast cancer cell MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to identify miR-124 that was down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. We also showed E26 transformation specific-1 (Ets-1) and miR-124 expression levels in breast cancer tissues that were associated with lymph node metastases. With transfected synthetic miR-124 agomir into MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and colony forming potential was observed after treatment with miR-124. Apoptosis and migration rates were found to be significantly higher in two breast-derived cell lines transfected with a miR-124 agomir (P < 0.05). Luciferase reporter assay and Western blot were used to verify Ets-1 as a potential major target gene of miR-124, and the result showed that miR-124 can bind to putative binding sites within the Ets-1 mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR) to reduce its expression. Based on these findings, we propose that miR-124 and Ets-1 may serve as a therapeutic agent in breast cancer.

  16. Microfluidic device to control interstitial flow-mediated homotypic and heterotypic cellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Luis F.; Moya, Monica L.; Shirure, Venktesh S.; George, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering can potentially recreate in vivo cellular microenvironments in vitro for an array of applications such as biological inquiry and drug discovery. However, the majority of current in vitro systems still neglect many biological, chemical, and mechanical cues that are known to impact cellular fucntions such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation. To address this gap, we have developed a novel microfluidic device that precisely controls the spatial and temporal interactions between adjacent three-dimensional cellular environments. The device consists of four interconnected microtissue compartments (~0.1 mm3) arranged in a square. The top and bottom pairs of compartments can be sequentially loaded with discreate cellularized hydrogels creating the opportunity to investigate homotypic (left to right or x-direction) and heterotypic (top to bottom or y-direction) cell-cell communication. A controlled hydrostatic pressure difference across the tissue compartments in both x and y direction induces interstitial flow and modulates communication via soluble factors. To validate the biological significance of this novel platform, we examined the role of stromal cells in the process of vasculogenesis. Our device confirms previous observations that soluble mediators derived from normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLFs) are necessary to form a vascular network derived from endothelial colony forming cell-derived endothelial cells (ECFC-ECs). We conclude that this platfrom could be used to study important physiological and pathological processes that rely on homotypic and heterotypic cell-cell communication. PMID:26190172

  17. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells in vitro: effect of cyclic AMP on cellular morphology and proliferation rate.

    PubMed

    Davison, P M; Karasek, M A

    1981-02-01

    Macrovascular endothelial cells isolated from the human umbilical vein and microvessel endothelium from the newborn foreskin dermis differ in their requirements for optimal growth in vitro. In the presence of 5 X 10(-4) M dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP), human dermal microvessel endothelial cell proliferation rate increased to give a cell number of 203% of controls values by day 10 in culture. The cells retained their characteristic endothelial cell morphology, reached confluence, and could be serially passaged. Cells grown in the absence of Bt2cAMP did not proliferate readily and grew in a disorganized pattern. The effect of Bt2cAMP on microvascular endothelial cell proliferation rate and morphology could be duplicated by cholera toxin (CT) used together with isobutyl methylxanthine (IMX). These agents were found to elevate intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in microvascular endothelium over 40-fold. Human umbilical vein cells in culture failed to respond to either Bt2cAMP or CT together with IMX. The growth-promoting effect of dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP) on human foreskin dermal microvascular endothelium in vitro is in marked contrast to the lack of response of human umbilical vein cells. These results provide further evidence of differences in the mechanisms that regulate macro and microvessel endothelial cell proliferation in vitro.

  18. p53 immunoexpression in stepwise progression of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and correlation with angiogenesis and cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Florence, Michelle Etienne Baptistella; Massuda, Juliana Yumi; Soares, Tânia Cristina Benetti; Stelini, Rafael Fantelli; Poppe, Lidia Marilia; Bröcker, Eva-Bettina; Metze, Konradin; Cintra, Maria Letícia; de Souza, Elemir Macedo

    2015-10-01

    Multistep carcinogenesis involves loss of function of tumor suppressor proteins such as p53 and induction of angiogenesis. Such mechanisms contribute to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma progression and may be interconnected. We aimed to explore p53 immunoexpression in spectral stages of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and correlate expression to both neovascularization and cellular proliferation. We estimated the percentages of immunostained cells for p53 and Ki67 (proliferation marker) in three groups: 23 solar keratoses, 28 superficially invasive squamous cell carcinomas and 28 invasive squamous cell carcinomas. The Chalkley method was used to quantify the microvascular area by neoangiogenesis (CD105) immunomarker in each group. There was no significant difference for rate of p53- and Ki67-positive cells between groups. Significant positive correlation was found between the CD105 microvascular area and the rate of p53 positive cells in superficially invasive squamous cell carcinoma as well as between the rate of p53- and Ki67-positive cells in invasive squamous cell carcinoma. p53 and Ki67 immunoexpression did not increase with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma progression. Neovascularization in the initial stage of invasion and proliferative activity in the frankly invasive stage were both associated with p53 immunoexpression. Loss of p53 tumor suppressor function through progressive steps may be directly involved in skin carcinogenesis.

  19. Balanced cell proliferation and expansion is essential for flowering stem growth control.

    PubMed

    Ferjani, Ali; Hanai, Kenya; Gunji, Shizuka; Maeda, Saori; Sawa, Shinichiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    The postembryonic development of aboveground plant organs relies on a continuous supply of cells from the shoot apical meristem. Previous studies of developmental regulation in leaves and flowers have revealed the crucial role of coordinated cell proliferation and differentiation during organogenesis. However, the importance of this coordination has not been examined in flowering stems. Very recently, we attempted to identify regulatory factors that maintain flowering stem integrity. We found that the increased cell number in clavata (clv) mutants and the decreased cell size in de-etiolated (det)3-1 resulted in flowering stems that were thicker and thinner, respectively, than in wild-type (WT) plants. Interestingly, in the cell proliferation- and cell expansion-defective double mutant clv det3-1, the flowering stems often exhibited severe cracking, resulting in exposure of their inner tissues. In this study, further quantification of the cellular phenotypes in the cotyledons and leaves revealed no differences between det3-1 and clv3 det3-1. Together, the above findings suggest that the clv3 mutation in a det3-1 background primarily affects flowering stems, while its effect on other organs is likely negligible. We propose that the coordination between cell proliferation and differentiation is not only important during leaf development, but also plays a role in the growth control of Arabidopsis flowering stems.

  20. Amino acids and autophagy: cross-talk and co-operation to control cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Bernadette; Korolchuk, Viktor I; Sarkar, Sovan

    2015-10-01

    Maintenance of amino acid homeostasis is important for healthy cellular function, metabolism and growth. Intracellular amino acid concentrations are dynamic; the high demand for protein synthesis must be met with constant dietary intake, followed by cellular influx, utilization and recycling of nutrients. Autophagy is a catabolic process via which superfluous or damaged proteins and organelles are delivered to the lysosome and degraded to release free amino acids into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, autophagy is specifically activated in response to amino acid starvation via two key signaling cascades: the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) and the general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) pathways. These pathways are key regulators of the integration between anabolic (amino acid depleting) and catabolic (such as autophagy which is amino acid replenishing) processes to ensure intracellular amino acid homeostasis. Here, we discuss the key roles that amino acids, along with energy (ATP, glucose) and oxygen, are playing in cellular growth and proliferation. We further explore how sophisticated methods are employed by cells to sense intracellular amino acid concentrations, how amino acids can act as a switch to dictate the temporal and spatial activation of anabolic and catabolic processes and how autophagy contributes to the replenishment of free amino acids, all to ensure cell survival. Relevance of these molecular processes to cellular and organismal physiology and pathology is also discussed.

  1. Discovery of the cellular and molecular basis of cholesterol control.

    PubMed

    Schekman, Randy

    2013-09-10

    The cellular control of cholesterol metabolism mediated by lipoproteins was first appreciated in pioneering work published in a 1974 PNAS Classic by Michael Brown and Joseph Goldstein. We know from this paper that the LDL binds to a cell surface receptor and dampens the activity of a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis and that a receptor deficiency is responsible for a major genetic cause of hypercholesterolemia and premature atherosclerosis.

  2. Persistent Cellular Motion Control and Trapping Using Mechanotactic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoying; Bouffanais, Roland; Yue, Dick K. P.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotactic signaling and the associated directed cell migration have been extensively studied owing to their importance in emergent processes of cellular aggregation. In contrast, mechanotactic signaling has been relatively overlooked despite its potential for unique ways to artificially signal cells with the aim to effectively gain control over their motile behavior. The possibility of mimicking cellular mechanotactic signals offers a fascinating novel strategy to achieve targeted cell delivery for in vitro tissue growth if proven to be effective with mammalian cells. Using (i) optimal level of extracellular calcium ([Ca2+ ]ext mM) we found, (ii) controllable fluid shear stress of low magnitude (), and (iii) the ability to swiftly reverse flow direction (within one second), we are able to successfully signal Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae and trigger migratory responses with heretofore unreported control and precision. Specifically, we are able to systematically determine the mechanical input signal required to achieve any predetermined sequences of steps including straightforward motion, reversal and trapping. The mechanotactic cellular trapping is achieved for the first time and is associated with a stalling frequency of Hz for a reversing direction mechanostimulus, above which the cells are effectively trapped while maintaining a high level of directional sensing. The value of this frequency is very close to the stalling frequency recently reported for chemotactic cell trapping [Meier B, et al. (2011) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108:11417–11422], suggesting that the limiting factor may be the slowness of the internal chemically-based motility apparatus. PMID:25207940

  3. In search of cellular control: signal transduction in context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D.

    1998-01-01

    The field of molecular cell biology has experienced enormous advances over the last century by reducing the complexity of living cells into simpler molecular components and binding interactions that are amenable to rigorous biochemical analysis. However, as our tools become more powerful, there is a tendency to define mechanisms by what we can measure. The field is currently dominated by efforts to identify the key molecules and sequences that mediate the function of critical receptors, signal transducers, and molecular switches. Unfortunately, these conventional experimental approaches ignore the importance of supramolecular control mechanisms that play a critical role in cellular regulation. Thus, the significance of individual molecular constituents cannot be fully understood when studied in isolation because their function may vary depending on their context within the structural complexity of the living cell. These higher-order regulatory mechanisms are based on the cell's use of a form of solid-state biochemistry in which molecular components that mediate biochemical processing and signal transduction are immobilized on insoluble cytoskeletal scaffolds in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Key to the understanding of this form of cellular regulation is the realization that chemistry is structure and hence, recognition of the the importance of architecture and mechanics for signal integration and biochemical control. Recent work that has unified chemical and mechanical signaling pathways provides a glimpse of how this form of higher-order cellular control may function and where paths may lie in the future.

  4. Proliferation control in neural stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Homem, Catarina CF; Repic, Marko; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuit function can be drastically affected by variations in the number of cells that are produced during development or by a reduction in adult cell number due to disease. Unlike many other organs, the brain is unable to compensate for such changes by increasing cell numbers or altering the size of the cells. For this reason, unique cell cycle and cell growth control mechanisms operate in the developing and adult brain. In Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian neural stem and progenitor cells these mechanisms are intricately coordinated with the developmental age and the nutritional, metabolic and hormonal state of the animal. Defects in neural stem cell proliferation that result in the generation of incorrect cell numbers or defects in neural stem cell differentiation can cause microcephaly or megalencephaly. PMID:26420377

  5. Dpp signaling inhibits proliferation in the Drosophila wing by Omb-dependent regional control of bantam.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xubo; Luo, Dan; Pflugfelder, Gert O; Shen, Jie

    2013-07-01

    The control of organ growth is a fundamental aspect of animal development but remains poorly understood. The morphogen Dpp has long been considered as a general promoter of cell proliferation during Drosophila wing development. It is an ongoing debate whether the Dpp gradient is required for the uniform cell proliferation observed in the wing imaginal disc. Here, we investigated how the Dpp signaling pathway regulates proliferation during wing development. By systematic manipulation of Dpp signaling we observed that it controls proliferation in a region-specific manner: Dpp, via omb, promoted proliferation in the lateral and repressed proliferation in the medial wing disc. Omb controlled the regional proliferation rate by oppositely regulating transcription of the microRNA gene bantam in medial versus lateral wing disc. However, neither the Dpp nor Omb gradient was essential for uniform proliferation along the anteroposterior axis.

  6. Controlled cellular energy conversion in brown adipose tissue thermogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Plant, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue serves as a model system for nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) since a) it has as a primary physiological function the conversion of chemical energy to heat; and b) preliminary data from other tissues involved in NST (e.g., muscle) indicate that parallel mechanisms may be involved. Now that biochemical pathways have been proposed for brown fat thermogenesis, cellular models consistent with a thermodynamic representation can be formulated. Stated concisely, the thermogenic mechanism in a brown fat cell can be considered as an energy converter involving a sequence of cellular events controlled by signals over the autonomic nervous system. A thermodynamic description for NST is developed in terms of a nonisothermal system under steady-state conditions using network thermodynamics. Pathways simulated include mitochondrial ATP synthesis, a Na+/K+ membrane pump, and ionic diffusion through the adipocyte membrane.

  7. The circadian clock controls fluctuations of colonic cell proliferation during the light/dark cycle via feeding behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Daisuke; Aoki, Natsumi; Tanaka, Mizuho; Aoyama, Shinya; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system is controlled not only by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), but also by the peripheral clocks located in tissues such as liver, kidney, small intestine, and colon, mediated through signals such as hormones. Peripheral clocks, but not the SCN, can be entrained by food intake schedules. While it is known that cell proliferation exhibits a circadian rhythm in the colon epithelium, it is unclear how this rhythm is influenced by food intake schedules. Here, we aimed to determine the relationships between feeding schedules and cell proliferation in the colon epithelium by means of immunochemical analysis, using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), as well as to elucidate how feeding schedules influence the colonic expression of clock and cell cycle genes, using real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Cell proliferation in the colonic epithelium of normal mice exhibited a daily fluctuation, which was abrogated in Clock mutant mice. The day/night pattern of cellular proliferation and clock gene expression under daytime and nighttime restricted feeding (RF) schedules showed opposite tendencies. While daytime RF for every 4 h attenuated the day/night pattern of cell proliferation, this was restored to normal in the Clock mutant mice under the nighttime RF schedule. These results suggest that feeding schedules contribute to the establishment of a daily fluctuation of cell proliferation and RF can recover it in Clock mutant mice. Thus, this study demonstrates that the daily fluctuation of cell proliferation in the murine colon is controlled by a circadian feeding rhythm, suggesting that feeding schedules are important for rhythmicity in the proliferation of colon cells.

  8. Cellular metabolic and autophagic pathways: traffic control by redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-10-01

    It has been established that the key metabolic pathways of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are intimately related to redox biology through control of cell signaling. Under physiological conditions glucose metabolism is linked to control of the NADH/NAD redox couple, as well as providing the major reductant, NADPH, for thiol-dependent antioxidant defenses. Retrograde signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus or cytosol controls cell growth and differentiation. Under pathological conditions mitochondria are targets for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and are critical in controlling apoptotic cell death. At the interface of these metabolic pathways, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway functions to maintain mitochondrial quality and generally serves an important cytoprotective function. In this review we will discuss the autophagic response to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are generated from perturbations of cellular glucose metabolism and bioenergetic function.

  9. Evaluation of residual cellularity and proliferation on preoperatively treated breast cancer: a comparison between image analysis and light microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Corletto, V; Verderio, P; Giardini, R; Cipriani, S; Di Palma, S; Rilke, F

    1998-01-01

    Histopathology has been suggested as a reliable method for tumour reduction evaluation of preoperatively treated breast cancer. Immunocytochemistry can be used to enhance the visibility of residual tumour cellularity and in the evaluation of its proliferative activity. We compared Image Analysis (IA) with Light Microscopy Analysis (LMA) on sections of breast carcinomas treated with preoperative chemo- or chemo/radiotherapy in the evaluation of the Neoplastic Cell Density (NCD) (69 cases) and the Proliferation Index (PI) (35 cases). NCD was expressed as the immunoreactive area to cytokeratin over the total original neoplastic area and PI was expressed as the number of immunostained tumoural nuclei with MIB 1 MoAb over the total of tumoural nuclei. The intraobserver agreement and that between IA and LMA for both indices were estimated by the common (kappa(w)) and the jackknife weighted kappa statistic (kappa(w)). The extent of agreement of each considered category was also assessed by means of the category-specific kappa statistics (kappa(cs)). The intraobserver agreement within LMA for NCD and PI and that between IA and LMA for PI were both satisfactory. Upon evaluation of the NCD, the agreement between IA and LMA showed unsatisfactory results, especially when the ratio between the residual tumour cells and the background was critical.

  10. Evaluation of Residual Cellularity and Proliferation on Preoperatively Treated Breast Cancer: A Comparison between Image Analysis and Light Microscopy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Corletto, Valentina; Verderio, Paolo; Giardini, Roberto; Cipriani, Sonia; Di Palma, Silvana; Rilke, Franco

    1998-01-01

    Histopathology has been suggested as a reliable method for tumour reduction evaluation of preoperatively treated breast cancer. Immunocytochemistry can be used to enhance the visibility of residual tumour cellularity and in the evaluation of its proliferative activity. We compared Image Analysis (IA) with Light Microscopy Analysis (LMA) on sections of breast carcinomas treated with preoperative chemo‐ or chemo/radiotherapy in the evaluation of the Neoplastic Cell Density (NCD) (69 cases) and the Proliferation Index (PI) (35 cases). NCD was expressed as the immunoreactive area to cytokeratin over the total original neoplastic area and PI was expressed as the number of immunostained tumoural nuclei with MIB1 MoAb over the total of tumoural nuclei. The intraobserver agreement and that between IA and LMA for both indices were estimated by the common (Kw) and the jackknife weighted kappa statistic (K~w). The extent of agreement of each considered category was also assessed by means of the category‐specific kappa statistics (Kcs). The intraobserver agreement within LMA for NCD and PI and that between IA and LMA for PI were both satisfactory. Upon evaluation of the NCD, the agreement between IA and LMA showed unsatisfactory results, especially when the ratio between the residual tumour cells and the background was critical. PMID:9692682

  11. Effects of nicotine on cellular proliferation, macromolecular synthesis and cell cycle phase distribution in human and murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, S.; Chiao, J.; Rossi, J.; Wang, C.H.; Wu, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Addition of nicotine causes a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth in established human and murine cells. In the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemic cells, 3 mM nicotine results in a 50% inhibition of cellular proliferation after 80 h. Nicotine was also found to affect the cell cycle distribution of HL-60 cells. Treatment with 4 mM nicotine for 20 h causes an increase in proportion of Gl-phase cells (from 49% to 57%) and a significant decrease in the proportion of S-phase cells (from 41% to 32%). These results suggest that nicotine causes cell arrest in the Gl-phase which may in part account for its effects on cell growth. To determine whether nicotine has a primary effect on the uptake/transport of macromolecular precursors into cells, HL-60 cells were treated with 2-6 mM nicotine for 30 h/sub 3/ at the end of which time cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine, (/sup 3/H)uridine, (/sup 14/C)lysine and (/sup 35/S)methionine, the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) soluble and insoluble radioactivities from each of the labeling conditions were determined. These studies show that nicotine primarily affect the synthesis of proteins.

  12. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2012-08-15

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  13. US arms control obligations under the Non-Proliferation Treaty

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-27

    Article VI of the 1968 Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) obligates the nuclear weapon states parties to the Treaty ''to pursue negotiations in good faith on effective measures relating to cessation of the nuclear arms race, ... to nuclear disarmament, and on a treaty on general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control.'' The preamble to the NPT recalls the 1963 Limited Test Ban Treaty ''determination ... to achieve the discontinuance of ... explosions.'' These provisions are interpreted by a majority of the non-nuclear weapon states parties to the Treaty as an obligation of the nuclear weapon states parties to the Treaty to pursue a comprehensive test ban (CTB). However, a review of the history of the NPT negotiations and US ratification proceedings makes clear that the NPT imposes no legal obligation on the US to pursue a CTB. The US did not make a one-to-one correspondence between Article VI and any specific arms control measure; to the contrary, the US argued successfully that such a connection (to any specific measure) would be pernicious to the attempt to achieve agreement on the NPT. This interpretation, which was sustained through the negotiations and the ratification proceedings, still reflects the limits of the legal obligations the US has accepted. But, in the absence of progress on other arms control measures, which would relieve the pressure for a CTB, the majority interpretation creates political difficulties for the US and could threaten the NPT regime in the future. These problems highlight the need for the US to better defend its compliance with Article VI and to develop a long-term strategy that will permit necessary testing while assuring the survival of the NPT regime in effective form.

  14. Integration of cellular bioenergetics with mitochondrial quality control and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Bradford G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Ballinger, Scott; Dell’Italia, Lou; Zhang, Jianhua; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergetic dysfunction is emerging as a cornerstone for establishing a framework for understanding the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and neurodegeneration. Recent advances in cellular bioenergetics have shown that many cells maintain a substantial bioenergetic reserve capacity, which is a prospective index of “healthy” mitochondrial populations. The bioenergetics of the cell are likely regulated by energy requirements and substrate availability. Additionally, the overall quality of the mitochondrial population and the relative abundance of mitochondria in cells and tissues also impinge on overall bioenergetic capacity and resistance to stress. Because mitochondria are susceptible to damage mediated by reactive oxygen/nitrogen and lipid species, maintaining a “healthy” population of mitochondria through quality control mechanisms appears to be essential for cell survival under conditions of pathological stress. Accumulating evidence suggest that mitophagy is particularly important for preventing amplification of initial oxidative insults, which otherwise would further impair the respiratory chain or promote mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The processes underlying the regulation of mitophagy depend on several factors including the integrity of mtDNA, electron transport chain activity, and the interaction and regulation of the autophagic machinery. The integration and interpretation of cellular bioenergetics in the context of mitochondrial quality control and genetics is the theme of this review. PMID:23092819

  15. Nuclear EGFR characterize still controlled proliferation retained in better differentiated clear cell RCC.

    PubMed

    Ahel, J; Dordevic, G; Markic, D; Mozetic, V; Spanjol, J; Grahovac, B; Stifter, S

    2015-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common solid kidney tumor representing 2-3% of all cancers, with the highest frequency occurring in Western countries. There was a worldwide and European annual increase in incidence of approximately 2% although incidence has been stabilized in last few years. One third of the patients already have metastases in the time of the diagnosis with poor prognosis because RCC are radio and chemoresistant. The prognostic value of EGFR over-expression in RCC is a controversial issue that could be explained by different histological types of study tumors and non-standardized criteria for evaluation of expression. Recent evidences points to a new mode of EGFR signaling pathway in which activated EGFR undergoes nuclear translocalization and then, as transcription factor, mediates gene expression and other cellular events required for highly proliferating activities. According to our observations, the membranous expression of EGFR associates with high nuclear grade and poor differentiated tumors. On the other hand, nuclear EGFR expression was high in low nuclear graded and well differentiated tumors with good prognosis. We hypothesize that this mode of EGFR signaling characterizes still controlled proliferation retained in well differentiated RCC with Furhman nuclear grade I or II.

  16. SIRT1 controls cell proliferation by regulating contact inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Elizabeth H; Dai, Yan

    2016-09-16

    Contact inhibition keeps cell proliferation in check and serves as a built-in protection against cancer development by arresting cell division upon cell-cell contact. Yet the complete mechanism behind this anti-cancer process remains largely unclear. Here we present SIRT1 as a novel regulator of contact inhibition. SIRT1 performs a wide variety of functions in biological processes, but its involvement in contact inhibition has not been explored to date. We used NIH3T3 cells, which are sensitive to contact inhibition, and H460 and DU145 cancer cells, which lack contact inhibition, to investigate the relationship between SIRT1 and contact inhibition. We show that SIRT1 overexpression in NIH3T3 cells overcomes contact inhibition while SIRT1 knockdown in cancer cells restores their lost contact inhibition. Moreover, we demonstrate that p27 protein expression is controlled by SIRT1 in contact inhibition. Overall, our findings underline the critical role of SIRT1 in contact inhibition and suggest SIRT1 inhibition as a potential strategy to suppress cancer cell growth by restoring contact inhibition.

  17. Fatty Acid Synthase as a Factor Required for Exercise-Induced Cognitive Enhancement and Dentate Gyrus Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chorna, Nataliya E.; Santos-Soto, Iván J.; Carballeira, Nestor M.; Morales, Joan L.; de la Nuez, Janneliz; Cátala-Valentin, Alma; Chornyy, Anatoliy P.; Vázquez-Montes, Adrinel; De Ortiz, Sandra Peña

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN), the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis. PMID:24223732

  18. Fatty acid synthase as a factor required for exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and dentate gyrus cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chorna, Nataliya E; Santos-Soto, Iván J; Carballeira, Nestor M; Morales, Joan L; de la Nuez, Janneliz; Cátala-Valentin, Alma; Chornyy, Anatoliy P; Vázquez-Montes, Adrinel; De Ortiz, Sandra Peña

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN), the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis.

  19. A chimera embryo assay reveals a decrease in embryonic cellular proliferation induced by sperm from X-irradiated male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Raabe, O.; Overstreet, J.W.

    1989-05-01

    Male mice were divided into three experimental groups and a control group. Mice in the experimental groups received one of three doses of acute X irradiation (1.73, 0.29, and 0.05 Gy) and together with the control unirradiated mice were then mated weekly to unirradiated female mice for a 9-week experimental period. Embryos were recovered from the weekly matings at the four-cell stage and examined by the chimera assay for proliferative disadvantage. Aggregation chimeras were constructed of embryos from female mice mated to irradiated males (experimental embryos) and embryos from females mated to unexposed males (control embryos) and contained either one experimental embryo and one control embryo (heterologous chimera) or two control embryos (control chimera). The control embryo in heterologous chimeras and either embryo in control chimeras were prelabeled with the vital dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h and viewed under phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution from the FITC-labeled embryo. Experimental and control embryos that were cultured singly were also examined for embryo cell number at the end of the 40-h culture period. In control chimeras, the mean ratio of the unlabeled cells:total chimera cell number (henceforth referred to as ''mean ratio'') was 0.50 with little or no weekly variation over the 9-week experimental period. During Weeks 4-7, the mean ratios of heterologous chimeras differed significantly from the mean ratio of control chimeras with the greatest differences occurring during Week 7 (0.41 for chimeras of 0.05 Gy dose group, 0.40 for chimeras of the 0.29 Gy dose group, and 0.17 for chimeras of the 1.73 Gy dose group).

  20. Design of a bistable switch to control cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, Diego A; Chaves, Madalena

    2015-12-01

    Bistable switches are widely used in synthetic biology to trigger cellular functions in response to environmental signals. All bistable switches developed so far, however, control the expression of target genes without access to other layers of the cellular machinery. Here, we propose a bistable switch to control the rate at which cells take up a metabolite from the environment. An uptake switch provides a new interface to command metabolic activity from the extracellular space and has great potential as a building block in more complex circuits that coordinate pathway activity across cell cultures, allocate metabolic tasks among different strains or require cell-to-cell communication with metabolic signals. Inspired by uptake systems found in nature, we propose to couple metabolite import and utilization with a genetic circuit under feedback regulation. Using mathematical models and analysis, we determined the circuit architectures that produce bistability and obtained their design space for bistability in terms of experimentally tuneable parameters. We found an activation-repression architecture to be the most robust switch because it displays bistability for the largest range of design parameters and requires little fine-tuning of the promoters' response curves. Our analytic results are based on on-off approximations of promoter activity and are in excellent qualitative agreement with simulations of more realistic models. With further analysis and simulation, we established conditions to maximize the parameter design space and to produce bimodal phenotypes via hysteresis and cell-to-cell variability. Our results highlight how mathematical analysis can drive the discovery of new circuits for synthetic biology, as the proposed circuit has all the hallmarks of a toggle switch and stands as a promising design to control metabolic phenotypes across cell cultures. PMID:26674196

  1. The effect of secondary cholestasis on the CD68-positive and CD163-positive macrophage population, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shao-Hua; Jiang, Li; Xie, Hai-Yang; Xu, Jian; Zhu, You-Fa; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-08-01

    The pathogenesis of hypogonadism in male patients with cirrhosis is complex and not well explained. Systemic infection and inflammation can inhibit testicular functions of endocrine and spermatogenesis. The acute inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide can cause testicular acute inflammation. Both clinical and animal experimental data indicate that the developing process of cholestasis/cirrhosis can lead to endotoxemia. Little is known about the long-term effects of cholestasis on the intratesticular macrophage population, cellular proliferation and apoptosis. A rat model of secondary cholestasis caused by common bile duct ligation (CBDL) was used to evaluate the impact of cholestasis on them, and the influence of biliary decompression (choledochoduodenostomy). Endotoxemia occurred in animals at 20 days CBDL (20dCBDL) and 30 days CBDL (30dCBDL), but disappeared after 30 days biliary decompression in rats with CBDL. There was a considerable increase in the numbers of intratesticular CD68(+) and CD163(+) macrophages following CBDL. After biliary decompression, CD68(+) macrophage numbers decreased, but remained higher than that of controls; meanwhile, CD163(+) remained elevated only in rats with 30dCBDL. After CBDL, there was a progressive decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 protein and in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA(+)) cells, and a dramatic increase in the expression of Bax, active caspase-3 and apoptotic cells. These data suggest that secondary cholestasis expands the population of CD68(+) and CD163(+) macrophages in the testicular interstitium, decreases testicular proliferative activity, and promotes testicular apoptosis, which may be one of the mechanisms of biliary cirrhosis-related hypogonadism.

  2. Adaptive Posttranslational Control in Cellular Stress Response Pathways and Its Relationship to Toxicity Testing and Safety Assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Pi, Jingbo; Clewell, Rebecca A; Carmichael, Paul L; Andersen, Melvin E

    2015-10-01

    Although transcriptional induction of stress genes constitutes a major cellular defense program against a variety of stressors, posttranslational control directly regulating the activities of preexisting stress proteins provides a faster-acting alternative response. We propose that posttranslational control is a general adaptive mechanism operating in many stress pathways. Here with the aid of computational models, we first show that posttranslational control fulfills two roles: (1) handling small, transient stresses quickly and (2) stabilizing the negative feedback transcriptional network. We then review the posttranslational control pathways for major stress responses-oxidative stress, metal stress, hyperosmotic stress, DNA damage, heat shock, and hypoxia. Posttranslational regulation of stress protein activities occurs by reversible covalent modifications, allosteric or non-allosteric enzymatic regulations, and physically induced protein structural changes. Acting in feedback or feedforward networks, posttranslational control may establish a threshold level of cellular stress. Sub-threshold stresses are handled adequately by posttranslational control without invoking gene transcription. With supra-threshold stress levels, cellular homeostasis cannot be maintained and transcriptional induction of stress genes and other gene programs, eg, those regulating cell metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, takes place. The loss of homeostasis with consequent changes in cellular function may lead to adverse cellular outcomes. Overall, posttranslational and transcriptional control pathways constitute a stratified cellular defense system, handling stresses coherently across time and intensity. As cell-based assays become a focus for chemical testing anchored on toxicity pathways, examination of proteomic and metabolomic changes as a result of posttranslational control occurring in the absence of transcriptomic alterations deserves more attention.

  3. Adaptive Posttranslational Control in Cellular Stress Response Pathways and Its Relationship to Toxicity Testing and Safety Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Pi, Jingbo; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Paul L.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2015-01-01

    Although transcriptional induction of stress genes constitutes a major cellular defense program against a variety of stressors, posttranslational control directly regulating the activities of preexisting stress proteins provides a faster-acting alternative response. We propose that posttranslational control is a general adaptive mechanism operating in many stress pathways. Here with the aid of computational models, we first show that posttranslational control fulfills two roles: (1) handling small, transient stresses quickly and (2) stabilizing the negative feedback transcriptional network. We then review the posttranslational control pathways for major stress responses—oxidative stress, metal stress, hyperosmotic stress, DNA damage, heat shock, and hypoxia. Posttranslational regulation of stress protein activities occurs by reversible covalent modifications, allosteric or non-allosteric enzymatic regulations, and physically induced protein structural changes. Acting in feedback or feedforward networks, posttranslational control may establish a threshold level of cellular stress. Sub-threshold stresses are handled adequately by posttranslational control without invoking gene transcription. With supra-threshold stress levels, cellular homeostasis cannot be maintained and transcriptional induction of stress genes and other gene programs, eg, those regulating cell metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, takes place. The loss of homeostasis with consequent changes in cellular function may lead to adverse cellular outcomes. Overall, posttranslational and transcriptional control pathways constitute a stratified cellular defense system, handling stresses coherently across time and intensity. As cell-based assays become a focus for chemical testing anchored on toxicity pathways, examination of proteomic and metabolomic changes as a result of posttranslational control occurring in the absence of transcriptomic alterations deserves more attention. PMID:26408567

  4. Ultrafast Laser Synthesized Nanostructures for Controlling Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Samarasekera, C; Tan, B; Venkatakrishnan, K

    2015-04-01

    The state-of-the-art in synthesis of nanostructured cell and contra-cell surfaces relies on techniques that utilize elaborate precursor chemicals, catalysts, or vacuum conditions, and any combination thereof. Two type s of nanostructures, sodium oxide (Na2O) nanotips and silicon oxide (SiO2) nanofibers, have been fabricated on soda-lime glass using ultrafast laser ablation. Control over nanotip width was demonstrated via laser dwell time and a new tip formation mechanism is proposed. The nanofibers generated in this work display a level of nanomorphology unseen in other fiber fabrication methods. The resulting fibers show striking morphological similarity to proteins that comprise the natural extra cellular matrix. The interaction of both nanostructures with NIH 3T3 fibroblasts was explored by incubating nanostructured glass with fibroblasts over periods of 12 hours, 1 day, or 1 week. The Na2O nanotip surfaces dissolved within a day yet appeared to induce apoptosis in cells while the SiO2 nanofibers degraded over time but influenced cells to display unique, healthy characteristics such as preferential adhesion to nanofibers and increased microvilli generation. These growth-positive and growth-negative surfaces for cells could find use in novel biological testing equipment. PMID:26310069

  5. Glutathione and cellular redox control in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibañez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Seco-Cervera, Marta; Pallardó, Federico V

    2014-10-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the mitotically/meiotically heritable changes in gene expression that are not due to changes in the primary DNA sequence. Over recent years, growing evidence has suggested a link between redox metabolism and the control of epigenetic mechanisms. The effect of the redox control, oxidative stress, and glutathione (GSH) on the epigenetic mechanisms occur at different levels affecting DNA methylation, miRNAs expression, and histone post-translational modifications (PTMs). Furthermore, a number of redox PTMs are being described, so enriching the histone code. Pioneer works showed how oxidized GSH inhibits the activity of S-adenosyl methionine synthetase, MAT1A, a key enzyme involved in the synthesis of S-adenosyl methionine (SAM), which is used by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone methyltransferases (HMTs). Alteration in NAD /NADH ratio affects the activity of class III histone deacetylases (HDACs) and poly-ADP ribosyltransferases (PARPs). Furthermore, the iron redox state of the catalytic center of key enzymes influences the activity of HDACs and the activity of Tet methylcytosine dioxygenases (DNA demetylases) and JmjC histone demethylases. In this communication, we will show the intricate mechanisms that participate in the redox control of the epigenetic mechanisms. We specially focus our work in the characterization of new PTMs in histones, such as histone carbonylation and glutathionylation. Demonstrating how GSH influences the epigenetic mechanisms beyond a mere regulation of SAM levels. The mechanisms described in this communication place GSH and redox control in the landscape of the epigenetic regulation. The results shown underscore the relevant role that oxidative stress and GSH play as key factors in epigenetics, opening a new window for understating the underlying mechanisms that control cell differentiation, proliferation, development, and disease. PMID:26461333

  6. NOX5-L can stimulate proliferation and apoptosis depending on its levels and cellular context, determining cancer cell susceptibility to cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Eun-Soo; Lim, Jae Cheong; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2015-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase, NOX5, is known to stimulate cell proliferation in some cancers by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show here that the long form of NOX5 (NOX5-L) also promotes cell death, and thus determines the balance of proliferation and death, in skin, breast and lung cancer cells. Moderate expression of NOX5-L induced cell proliferation accompanied by AKT and ERK phosphorylation, whereas an increase in NOX5-L above a certain threshold promoted cancer cell death accompanied by caspase-3 activation. Notably, cisplatin treatment increased NOX5-L levels through CREB activation and enhanced NOX5-L activity through augmentation of Ca2+ release and c-Abl expression, ultimately triggering ROS-mediated cancer cell death—a distinct pathway absent in normal cells. These results indicate that NOX5-L determines cellular responses in a concentration- and context-dependent manner. PMID:26513170

  7. The risk-associated long noncoding RNA NBAT-1 controls neuroblastoma progression by regulating cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Mitra, Sanhita; Subhash, Santhilal; Hertwig, Falk; Kanduri, Meena; Mishra, Kankadeb; Fransson, Susanne; Ganeshram, Abiarchana; Mondal, Tanmoy; Bandaru, Sashidhar; Ostensson, Malin; Akyürek, Levent M; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Pfeifer, Susan; Larsson, Erik; Shi, Leming; Peng, Zhiyu; Fischer, Matthias; Martinsson, Tommy; Hedborg, Fredrik; Kogner, Per; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2014-11-10

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal tumor of the sympathetic nervous system and the most common extracranial tumor of childhood. By sequencing transcriptomes of low- and high-risk neuroblastomas, we detected differentially expressed annotated and nonannotated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). We identified a lncRNA neuroblastoma associated transcript-1 (NBAT-1) as a biomarker significantly predicting clinical outcome of neuroblastoma. CpG methylation and a high-risk neuroblastoma associated SNP on chromosome 6p22 functionally contribute to NBAT-1 differential expression. Loss of NBAT-1 increases cellular proliferation and invasion. It controls these processes via epigenetic silencing of target genes. NBAT-1 loss affects neuronal differentiation through activation of the neuronal-specific transcription factor NRSF/REST. Thus, loss of NBAT-1 contributes to aggressive neuroblastoma by increasing proliferation and impairing differentiation of neuronal precursors. PMID:25517750

  8. Encapsulation of basic fibroblast growth factor by polyelectrolyte multilayer microcapsules and its controlled release for enhancing cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    She, Zhen; Wang, Chunxia; Li, Jun; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Antipina, Maria N

    2012-07-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) is an important protein for cellular activity and highly vulnerable to environmental conditions. FGF2 protected by heparin and bovine serum albumin was loaded into the microcapsules by a coprecipitation-based layer-by-layer encapsulation method. Low cytotoxic and biodegradable polyelectrolytes dextran sulfate and poly-L-arginine were used for capsule shell assembly. The shell thickness-dependent encapsulation efficiency was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A maximum encapsulation efficiency of 42% could be achieved by microcapsules with a shell thickness of 14 layers. The effects of microcapsule concentration and shell thickness on cytotoxicity, FGF2 release kinetics, and L929 cell proliferation were evaluated in vitro. The advantage of using microcapsules as the carrier for FGF2 controlled release for enhancing L929 cell proliferation was analyzed. PMID:22657385

  9. Bioelectric controls of cell proliferation: ion channels, membrane voltage and the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Blackiston, Douglas J; McLaughlin, Kelly A; Levin, Michael

    2009-11-01

    All cells possess long-term, steady-state voltage gradients across the plasma membrane. These transmembrane potentials arise from the combined activity of numerous ion channels, pumps and gap junction complexes. Increasing data from molecular physiology now reveal that the role of changes in membrane voltage controls, and is in turn controlled by, progression through the cell cycle. We review recent functional data on the regulation of mitosis by bioelectric signals, and the function of membrane voltage and specific potassium, sodium and chloride ion channels in the proliferation of embryonic, somatic and neoplastic cells. Its unique properties place this powerful, well-conserved, but still poorly-understood signaling system at the center of the coordinated cellular interactions required for complex pattern formation. Moreover, disregulation of ion channel expression and function is increasingly observed to be not only a useful marker but likely a functional element in oncogenesis. New advances in genomics and the development of in vivo biophysical techniques suggest exciting opportunities for molecular medicine, bioengineering and regenerative approaches to human health. PMID:19823012

  10. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  11. ATF3 controls proliferation of osteoclast precursor and bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Kazuya; Park, Gyujin; Iezaki, Takashi; Horie, Tetsuhiro; Kanayama, Takashi; Ozaki, Kakeru; Onishi, Yuki; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Yoneda, Yukio; Takarada, Takeshi; Kitajima, Shigetaka; Vacher, Jean; Hinoi, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the sophisticated coupled actions of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts. Here we identify activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) as a pivotal transcription factor for the regulation of bone resorption and bone remodeling under a pathological condition through modulating the proliferation of osteoclast precursors. The osteoclast precursor-specific deletion of ATF3 in mice led to the prevention of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-induced bone resorption and bone loss, although neither bone volume nor osteoclastic parameter were markedly altered in these knockout mice under the physiological condition. RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis was impaired in vitro in ATF3-deleted bone marrow macrophages (BMM). Mechanistically, the deficiency of ATF3 impaired the RANKL-induced transient increase in cell proliferation of osteoclast precursors in bone marrow in vivo as well as of BMM in vitro. Moreover, ATF3 regulated cyclin D1 mRNA expression though modulating activator protein-1-dependent transcription in the osteoclast precursor, and the introduction of cyclin D1 significantly rescued the impairment of osteoclastogenesis in ATF3-deleted BMM. Therefore, these findings suggest that ATF3 could have a pivotal role in osteoclastogenesis and bone homeostasis though modulating cell proliferation under pathological conditions, thereby providing a target for bone diseases. PMID:27480204

  12. Cellular and Humoral Mechanisms Involved in the Control of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zuñiga, Joaquin; Torres-García, Diana; Santos-Mendoza, Teresa; Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Granados, Julio; Yunis, Edmond J.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is a major international public health problem. One-third of the world's population is thought to have latent tuberculosis, a condition where individuals are infected by the intracellular bacteria without active disease but are at risk for reactivation, if their immune system fails. Here, we discuss the role of nonspecific inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines and chemokines induced by interaction of innate receptors expressed in macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). We also review current information regarding the importance of several cytokines including IL-17/IL-23 in the development of protective cellular and antibody-mediated protective responses against Mtb and their influence in containment of the infection. Finally, in this paper, emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of failure of Mtb control, including the immune dysregulation induced by the treatment with biological drugs in different autoimmune diseases. Further functional studies, focused on the mechanisms involved in the early host-Mtb interactions and the interplay between host innate and acquired immunity against Mtb, may be helpful to improve the understanding of protective responses in the lung and in the development of novel therapeutic and prophylactic tools in TB. PMID:22666281

  13. Systematic Verification of Upstream Regulators of a Computable Cellular Proliferation Network Model on Non-Diseased Lung Cells Using a Dedicated Dataset

    PubMed Central

    Belcastro, Vincenzo; Poussin, Carine; Gebel, Stephan; Mathis, Carole; Schlage, Walter K.; Lichtner, Rosemarie B.; Quadt-Humme, Sibille; Wagner, Sandra; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C.

    2013-01-01

    We recently constructed a computable cell proliferation network (CPN) model focused on lung tissue to unravel complex biological processes and their exposure-related perturbations from molecular profiling data. The CPN consists of edges and nodes representing upstream controllers of gene expression largely generated from transcriptomics datasets using Reverse Causal Reasoning (RCR). Here, we report an approach to biologically verify the correctness of upstream controller nodes using a specifically designed, independent lung cell proliferation dataset. Normal human bronchial epithelial cells were arrested at G1/S with a cell cycle inhibitor. Gene expression changes and cell proliferation were captured at different time points after release from inhibition. Gene set enrichment analysis demonstrated cell cycle response specificity via an overrepresentation of proliferation related gene sets. Coverage analysis of RCR-derived hypotheses returned statistical significance for cell cycle response specificity across the whole model as well as for the Growth Factor and Cell Cycle sub-network models. PMID:23926424

  14. Activin Modulates the Transcriptional Response of LβT2 Cells to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone and Alters Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Bailey, Janice S.; Coss, Djurdjica; Lin, Bo; Tsutsumi, Rie; Lawson, Mark A.; Mellon, Pamela L.; Webster, Nicholas J. G.

    2009-01-01

    Both GnRH and activin are crucial for the correct function of pituitary gonadotrope cells. GnRH regulates LH and FSH synthesis and secretion and gonadotrope proliferation, whereas activin is essential for expression of FSH. Little is known, however, about the interplay of signaling downstream of these two hormones. In this study, we undertook expression profiling to determine how activin pre-treatment alters the transcriptional response of LβT2 gonadotrope cells to GnRH stimulation. Activin treatment alone altered the transcriptional profile of 303 genes including inducing that of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase B1 gene that converts estrone to 17β-estradiol, altering the sensitivity of the cells to estrone. Furthermore, activin had a dramatic effect on the response of LβT2 cells to GnRH. Hierarchical clustering of 2453 GnRH-responsive genes identified groups of genes the response of which to GnRH was either enhanced or blunted after activin treatment. Mapping of these genes to gene ontology classifications or signaling pathways highlighted significant differences in the classes of altered genes. In the presence of activin, GnRH regulates genes in pathways controlling cell energetics, cytoskeletal rearrangements, organelle organization, and mitosis in the absence of activin, but genes controlling protein processing, cell differentiation, and secretion. Therefore, we demonstrated that activin enhanced GnRH induction of p38MAPK activity, caused GnRH-dependent phosphorylation of p53, and reduced the ability of GnRH to cause G1 arrest. Thus, although activin alone changes a modest number of transcripts, activin pretreatment dramatically alters the response to GnRH from an antiproliferative response to a more differentiated, synthetic response appropriate for a secretory cell. PMID:16772531

  15. HER2 drives Mucin-like 1 to control proliferation in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Conley, S J; Bosco, E E; Tice, D A; Hollingsworth, R E; Herbst, R; Xiao, Z

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-like 1 (MUCL1) was first identified as a breast-specific gene over a decade ago. Based on its highly restricted mRNA expression in breast tissue and continued expression during breast tumorigenesis and progression, MUCL1 is an attractive tumor-associated antigen and a potential therapeutic target. However, very little is known about the cellular location, biological functions and regulation of the MUCL1 protein, which will have a major impact on its druggability. Here we describe our efforts to fully characterize the cellular localization of MUCL1, investigate its regulation by key breast cancer oncogenes such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and discover its functional roles in breast cancer. Although some mucins are membrane bound, our data indicate that MUCL1 is secreted by some breast cancer cells, whereas others only express high levels of intracellular MUCL1. MUCL1 expression is highest in HER2-amplified breast tumors and inhibiting HER2 activity in tumor cells resulted in a decreased MUCL1 expression. In-depth investigation demonstrated that phosphoinositide3-kinase/Akt pathway, but not Ras/MEK pathway, controls MUCL1 expression downstream of HER2. Phenotypic assays revealed a strong dependence of HER2-positive cells on MUCL1 for cell proliferation. We further identified the mechanism by which MUCL1 regulates cell growth. Knockdown of MUCL1 induced a G1/S phase arrest concomitant with decreased cyclin D and increased p21 and p27 levels. Finally, we investigated the impact of MUCL1 loss on kinase signaling pathways in breast cancer cells through phospho-kinase array profiling. MUCL1 silencing abrogated phospho-focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun signals, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase or Akt pathway activities, thereby pointing to FAK/JNK pathway as the downstream effector of MUCL1 signaling. We are the first to identify an important role for MUCL1 in the proliferation of breast cancer

  16. Challenges in Characterizing and Controlling Complex Cellular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikswo, John

    2011-03-01

    Multicellular dynamic biological processes such as developmental differentiation, wound repair, disease, aging, and even homeostasis can be represented by trajectories through a phase space whose extent reflects the genetic, post-translational, and metabolic complexity of the process - easily extending to tens of thousands of dimensions. Intra- and inter-cellular sensing and regulatory systems and their nested, redundant, and non-linear feed-forward and feed-back controls create high-dimensioned attractors in this phase space. Metabolism provides free energy to drive non-equilibrium processes and dynamically reconfigure attractors. Studies of single molecules and cells provide only minimalist projections onto a small number of axes. It may be difficult to infer larger-scale emergent behavior from linearized experiments that perform only small amplitude perturbations on a limited number of the dimensions. Complete characterization may succeed for bounded component problems, such as an individual cell cycle or signaling cascade, but larger systems problems will require a coarse-grained approach. Hence a new experimental and analytical framework is needed. Possibly one could utilize high-amplitude, multi-variable driving of the system to infer coarse-grained, effective models, which in turn can be tested by their ability to control systems behavior. Navigation at will between attractors in a high-dimensioned dynamical system will provide not only detailed knowledge of the shape of attractor basins, but also measures of underlying stochastic events such as noise in gene expression or receptor binding and how both affect system stability and robustness. Needed for this are wide-bandwidth methods to sense and actuate large numbers of intracellular and extracellular variables and automatically and rapidly infer dynamic control models. The success of this approach may be determined by how broadly the sensors and actuators can span the full dimensionality of the phase space

  17. Disorder of G2-M Checkpoint Control in Aniline-Induced Cell Proliferation in Rat Spleen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianling; Wang, Gangduo; Khan, M Firoze

    2015-01-01

    Aniline, a toxic aromatic amine, is known to cause hemopoietic toxicity both in humans and animals. Aniline exposure also leads to toxic response in spleen which is characterized by splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and the eventual formation of tumors on chronic in vivo exposure. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative DNA damage, and increased cell proliferation, which could eventually contribute to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. Despite our demonstration that cell proliferation was associated with deregulation of G1 phase cyclins and increased expression of G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), molecular mechanisms, especially the regulation of G2 phase and contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in aniline-induced splenic cellular proliferation remain largely unclear. This study therefore, mainly focused on the regulation of G2 phase in an animal model preceding a tumorigenic response. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day) in drinking water or drinking water only (controls) for 30 days, and expression of G2 phase cyclins, CDK1, CDK inhibitors and miRNAs were measured in the spleen. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in cell cycle regulatory proteins, including cyclins A, B and CDK1, particularly phosphor-CDK1, and decreases in CDK inhibitors p21 and p27, which could promote the splenocytes to go through G2/M transition. Our data also showed upregulation of tumor markers Trx-1 and Ref-1 in rats treated with aniline. More importantly, we observed lower expression of miRNAs including Let-7a, miR-15b, miR24, miR-100 and miR-125, and greater expression of CDK inhibitor regulatory miRNAs such as miR-181a, miR-221 and miR-222 in the spleens of aniline-treated animals. Our findings suggest that significant increases in the expression of cyclins, CDK1 and aberrant regulation of miRNAs could lead to an accelerated G2/M transition of the splenocytes, and potentially to a

  18. The administration`s non-proliferation and export control policy

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    On September 27, during his speech to the United Nations, President Bill Clinton outlined his administration`s arm control policies, urging tighter restraints on international export control policies and measures to enhance nuclear non-proliferation. That same day, the White House released a fact sheet summarizing the framework for U.S. efforts to prevent proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and missiles that deliver them.

  19. Next steps in arms control and non-proliferation: Report of the US-Japan study group on arms control and non-proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.J.; Imai, R.

    1997-10-01

    Japanese and American experts view 13 key arms control and non-proliferation issues facing East Asia and the world, including how to reduce nuclear weapons, what policies Washington and Tokyo should pursue in dealing with China, theater missile defense, North Korea, and whether the growth of plutonium-based civilian nuclear power programs poses a proliferation threat. This is the final report of a Japanese-American study group co-sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the International House of Japan.

  20. Diverse FGF receptor signaling controls astrocyte specification and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungjun; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2010-05-07

    During CNS development, pluripotency neuronal progenitor cells give rise in succession to neurons and glia. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a major signal that maintains neural progenitors in the undifferentiated state, is also thought to influence the transition from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. Here we present evidence that FGF receptors and underlying signaling pathways transmit the FGF-2 signals that regulate astrocyte specification aside from its mitogenic activity. Application of FGF-2 to cortical progenitors suppressed neurogenesis whereas treatment with an FGFR antagonist in vitro promoted neurogenesis. Introduction of chimeric FGFRs with mutated tyrosine residues into cortical progenitors and drug treatments to specifically block individual downstream signaling pathways revealed that the overall activity of FGFR rather than individual autophosphorylation sites is important for delivering signals for glial specification. In contrast, a signal for cell proliferation by FGFR was mainly delivered by MAPK pathway. Together our findings indicate that FGFR activity promotes astrocyte specification in the developing CNS.

  1. Mapping cellular processes in the mesenchyme during palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 reveals complex proliferation changes and perturbed cell packing and polarity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Lara J; Economou, Andrew D; Cobourne, Martyn T; Green, Jeremy B A

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndromes represent a spectrum of overlapping conditions including cardiac defects and craniofacial malformations. Amongst the craniofacial anomalies that are seen, cleft of the secondary palate is a common feature. Haploinsufficiency of TBX1 is believed to be a major contributor toward many of the developmental structural anomalies that occur in these syndromes, and targeted deletion of Tbx1 in the mouse reproduces many of these malformations, including cleft palate. However, the cellular basis of this defect is only poorly understood. Here, palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 has been analysed, focusing on cellular properties within the whole mesenchymal volume of the palatal shelves. Novel image analyses and data presentation tools were applied to quantify cell proliferation rates, including regions of elevated as well as reduced proliferation, and cell packing in the mesenchyme. Also, cell orientations (nucleus-Golgi axis) were mapped as a potential marker of directional cell movement. Proliferation differed only subtly between wild-type and mutant until embryonic day (E)15.5 when proliferation in the mutant was significantly lower. Tbx1(-/-) palatal shelves had slightly different cell packing than wild-type, somewhat lower before elevation and higher at E15.5 when the wild-type palate has elevated and fused. Cell orientation is biased towards the shelf distal edge in the mid-palate of wild-type embryos but is essentially random in the Tbx1(-/-) mutant shelves, suggesting that polarised processes such as directed cell rearrangement might be causal for the cleft phenotype. The implications of these findings in the context of further understanding Tbx1 function during palatogenesis and of these methods for the more general analysis of genotype-phenotype functional relationships are discussed.

  2. The expression of S100P increases and promotes cellular proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Luyan; Chen, Shuqin; Jiang, Hongye; Huang, Jiaming; Jin, Wenyan; Yao, Shuzhong

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that S100P has a significant role in cancer, and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer and normal endometrium tissues was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we reduced the expression of S100P in HEC-1A and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines by siRNA transfection. Based on the reduced S100P mRNA expression, we measured the effects of S100P on cellular proliferation by the cell-counting kit-8. Nuclear β-catenin protein level was detected by western blotting. Cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA expression regulated by β-catenin was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We found that the expression of S100P mRNA and protein increased in endometrial cancer tissues compared with the normal endometrium. Local S100P expression progressively increased from pathologic differenciation grade 1 to 3. After reducing the S100P expression, the cellular proliferation ability, nuclear β-catenin protein level, cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA levels reduced. It indicated that S100P could promote cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer significantly increased and is associated with pathologic differenciation grade. S100P may promote endometrial cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin.

  3. Mapping cellular processes in the mesenchyme during palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 reveals complex proliferation changes and perturbed cell packing and polarity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Lara J; Economou, Andrew D; Cobourne, Martyn T; Green, Jeremy B A

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndromes represent a spectrum of overlapping conditions including cardiac defects and craniofacial malformations. Amongst the craniofacial anomalies that are seen, cleft of the secondary palate is a common feature. Haploinsufficiency of TBX1 is believed to be a major contributor toward many of the developmental structural anomalies that occur in these syndromes, and targeted deletion of Tbx1 in the mouse reproduces many of these malformations, including cleft palate. However, the cellular basis of this defect is only poorly understood. Here, palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 has been analysed, focusing on cellular properties within the whole mesenchymal volume of the palatal shelves. Novel image analyses and data presentation tools were applied to quantify cell proliferation rates, including regions of elevated as well as reduced proliferation, and cell packing in the mesenchyme. Also, cell orientations (nucleus-Golgi axis) were mapped as a potential marker of directional cell movement. Proliferation differed only subtly between wild-type and mutant until embryonic day (E)15.5 when proliferation in the mutant was significantly lower. Tbx1(-/-) palatal shelves had slightly different cell packing than wild-type, somewhat lower before elevation and higher at E15.5 when the wild-type palate has elevated and fused. Cell orientation is biased towards the shelf distal edge in the mid-palate of wild-type embryos but is essentially random in the Tbx1(-/-) mutant shelves, suggesting that polarised processes such as directed cell rearrangement might be causal for the cleft phenotype. The implications of these findings in the context of further understanding Tbx1 function during palatogenesis and of these methods for the more general analysis of genotype-phenotype functional relationships are discussed. PMID:26689739

  4. Melanoma proliferation and chemoresistance controlled by the DEK oncogene

    PubMed Central

    Khodadoust, Michael S.; Verhaegen, Monique; Kappes, Ferdinand; Riveiro-Falkenbach, Erica; Cigudosa, Juan C.; Kim, David S.L.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Markovitz, David M.; Soengas, María S.

    2009-01-01

    Gain of chromosome 6p is a consistent feature of advanced melanomas. However, the identity of putative oncogene(s) associated with this amplification has remained elusive. The chromatin remodeling factor DEK is an attractive candidate as it maps to 6p (i.e. within common melanoma-amplified loci). Moreover, DEK expression is increased in metastatic melanomas, although the functional relevance of this induction remains unclear. Importantly, in other tumor types, DEK can display various tumorigenic effects, in part through its ability to promote proliferation and inhibit p53-dependent apoptosis. Here, we report a generalized upregulation of DEK protein in cells from aggressive melanomas. In addition, we provide genetic and mechanistic evidence to support a key role of DEK in the maintenance of malignant phenotypes of melanoma cells. Specifically, we show that long-term DEK downregulation by independent shRNAs resulted in premature senescence of a variety of melanoma cell lines. Short-term abrogation of DEK expression was also functionally relevant, as it attenuated the traditional resistance of melanomas to DNA damaging agents. Unexpectedly, DEK shRNA had no impact on p53 levels or p53-dependent apoptosis. Instead, we identified a new role for DEK in the transcriptional activation of the antiapoptotic MCL-1. Other MCL-1 related factors such as BCL-2 or BCL-xL were unaffected by changes in the endogenous levels of DEK, indicating a selective impact of this gene on the apoptotic machinery of melanoma cells. These results provide support for DEK as a long sought-after oncogene mapping at chromosome 6, with novel functions in melanoma proliferation and chemoresistance. PMID:19679545

  5. Platelet Rich Concentrate Promotes Early Cellular Proliferation and Multiple Lineage Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shani, Samuel; Vasudevaraj Naveen, Sangeetha; Murali, Malliga Raman; Puvanan, Karunanithi; Abbas, Azlina Amir; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-01-01

    Platelet rich concentrate (PRC) is a natural adjuvant that aids in human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) proliferation in vitro; however, its role requires further exploration. This study was conducted to determine the optimal concentration of PRC required for achieving the maximal proliferation, and the need for activating the platelets to achieve this effect, and if PRC could independently induce early differentiation of hMSC. The gene expression of markers for osteocytes (ALP, RUNX2), chondrocytes (SOX9, COL2A1), and adipocytes (PPAR-γ) was determined at each time point in hMSC treated with 15% activated and nonactivated PRC since maximal proliferative effect was achieved at this concentration. The isolated PRC had approximately fourfold higher platelet count than whole blood. There was no significant difference in hMSC proliferation between the activated and nonactivated PRC. Only RUNX2 and SOX9 genes were upregulated throughout the 8 days. However, protein expression study showed formation of oil globules from day 4, significant increase in ALP at days 6 and 8 (P ≤ 0.05), and increased glycosaminoglycan levels at all time points (P < 0.05), suggesting the early differentiation of hMSC into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. This study demonstrates that the use of PRC increased hMSC proliferation and induced early differentiation of hMSC into multiple mesenchymal lineages, without preactivation or addition of differentiation medium. PMID:25436230

  6. Effect of prior dietary exposure to cows' milk protein on antigen-specific and nonspecific cellular proliferation in mice.

    PubMed

    Brix, Susanne; Magyar, Orit H; Barkholt, Vibeke; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2005-05-01

    The impact of dietary components on the immune system is gaining increased attention in the effort to develop safe food products, some even with health-promoting potential, as well as to improve the basic understanding of the immunomodulatory potential of common food components. In such studies, which are mainly based on experiments in vitro, it is important to be able to differentiate nonspecific activation of immune cells induced by dietary components from ex vivo restimulation of antigen-specific cells that might be present in cell cultures owing to prior dietary exposure to the antigens in cell donors. Focusing on the immunostimulatory potential of cows' milk proteins and peptides, we studied the impact of prior dietary exposure to cows' milk on proliferation of murine immune cells upon ex vivo stimulation with bovine milk proteins. Nonspecific proliferation induced by beta-casein peptides was further assessed on cells from mice bred on a cows'-milk-free diet. Regarding the dietary effect, we found that prior oral intake of cows' milk proteins affected cell proliferation induced by culturing with cows' milk proteins in vitro, as spleen cells from mice fed a milk-containing diet showed a significantly greater proliferative response than did cells from mice bred on a cows'-milk-free diet. Studies of immune enhancing potentials of beta-casein peptides showed that some peptides stimulate proliferation of immune cells nonspecifically. In conclusion, these findings stress the importance of employing immune cells from mice unexposed to cows' milk for studies of the immunomodulating capacity of cows' milk proteins and peptides, in order to rule out the interference caused by antigen-specific immune responses. By using such cells, we here show that some beta-casein peptides possess the potential to induce proliferation in immune cells in a nonspecific manner. PMID:15909688

  7. Disentangling cellular proliferation and differentiation in the embryonic stem cell test, and its impact on the experimental protocol.

    PubMed

    van Dartel, Dorien A M; Zeijen, Nicole J L; de la Fonteyne, Liset J J; van Schooten, Frederik J; Piersma, Aldert H

    2009-09-01

    The mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST) was designed to predict embryotoxicity based on the inhibition of the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) into beating cardiomyocytes in combination with cytotoxicity data in monolayer ESC cultures and 3T3 cells. In the present study, we have tested a diverse group of chemicals in the EST, applying different exposure durations, in an attempt to discriminate between effects on proliferation and differentiation within the EST protocol. Chemicals tested were monobutyl phthalate (MBP), 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). We showed that 5-FU and BrdU behaved principally different from MBP and 6-AN. 5-FU and BrdU specifically affected cell proliferation during the first three days of the EST protocol, as shown by EB size, protein concentration and cell cycle stage analysis. In addition, we studied the differentiation state of cells in the EST protocol with time to elucidate the transition of pluripotent ESC to more differentiated cell types. Analysis by flow cytometry of the pluripotency marker SSEA-1 in EST showed that although total SSEA-1 positive cells remained unchanged up to and including day 5, the signal intensity already decreased from day 3 onwards. Furthermore, RT-PCR data showed an upregulation of the mesodermal marker T at day 3, whereas the cardiac muscle marker Myh6 was upregulated from day 5 onwards. These findings confirm that proliferation and differentiation of ESC in the EST are highly intertwined processes. Based on these findings we suggest an amended EST protocol which could more clearly discriminate between proliferation and differentiation effects of chemicals within the same EST differentiation protocol. This proposal includes a cytotoxicity assessment in EB at day 3 of the EST after day 0-3 exposure, and cardiac muscle foci counts after exposure from day 3-10 in the EST.

  8. Dual Biochemical Oscillators May Control Cellular Reversals in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Eckhert, Erik; Rangamani, Padmini; Davis, Annie E.; Oster, George; Berleman, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram-negative, soil-dwelling bacterium that glides on surfaces, reversing direction approximately once every 6 min. Motility in M. xanthus is governed by the Che-like Frz pathway and the Ras-like Mgl pathway, which together cause the cell to oscillate back and forth. Previously, Igoshin et al. (2004) suggested that the cellular oscillations are caused by cyclic changes in concentration of active Frz proteins that govern motility. In this study, we present a computational model that integrates both the Frz and Mgl pathways, and whose downstream components can be read as motor activity governing cellular reversals. This model faithfully reproduces wildtype and mutant behaviors by simulating individual protein knockouts. In addition, the model can be used to examine the impact of contact stimuli on cellular reversals. The basic model construction relies on the presence of two nested feedback circuits, which prompted us to reexamine the behavior of M. xanthus cells. We performed experiments to test the model, and this cell analysis challenges previous assumptions of 30 to 60 min reversal periods in frzCD, frzF, frzE, and frzZ mutants. We demonstrate that this average reversal period is an artifact of the method employed to record reversal data, and that in the absence of signal from the Frz pathway, Mgl components can occasionally reverse the cell near wildtype periodicity, but frz- cells are otherwise in a long nonoscillating state. PMID:25468349

  9. The regulatory network controlling the proliferation-meiotic entry decision in the Caenorhabditis elegans germ line.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Dave; Schedl, Tim

    2006-01-01

    The germ line of sexually reproducing animals, at some point in development, consists of both proliferating and differentiating cells. Proliferation is needed to increase cell number, ensuring that a sufficient quantity of gametes is produced. Meiotic development is needed to produce gametes that can support embryogenesis, each with half the ploidy of the somatic cells. For the reproductive strategy of a given species, regulating the timing and number of gametes, and thus controlling the timing of differentiation and the extent of proliferation, is very important for reproductive fitness. Therefore, animals have evolved regulatory mechanisms that tightly control and balance the proliferation-initiation of meiotic development (meiotic entry) decision. Genetic analysis has identified signaling mechanisms involved in controlling this balance in some animals, including mice, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans. In this chapter, we present our understanding of the genetic hierarchy controlling the proliferation-meiotic entry decision in C. elegans. A core regulatory network controls the decision under all known conditions (developmental stage, sex, and growth temperature). It consists of a canonical Notch signaling pathway promoting proliferation by inhibiting two redundant mRNA regulatory pathways, the GLD-1 and GLD-2 pathways, which promote meiotic entry. Superimposed on the core network is a complex set of factors, some yet to be identified, and many with regulatory relationships still poorly understood, which control the activities of the GLD-1 and GLD-2 pathways and possibly parallel pathways. Some of the complexity arises from these regulators acting only under certain conditions. We also highlight major areas where we lack knowledge. For example, it is unknown if the entire population of proliferating cells are stem cells capable of self-renewal or if only a small portion are stem cells and the rest are transit amplifying cells.

  10. CD1d-dependent expansion of NKT follicular helper cells in vivo and in vitro is a product of cellular proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rampuria, Pragya; Lang, Mark L

    2015-05-01

    NKT follicular helper cells (NKTfh cells) are a recently discovered functional subset of CD1d-restricted NKT cells. Given the potential for NKTfh cells to promote specific antibody responses and germinal center reactions, there is much interest in determining the conditions under which NKTfh cells proliferate and/or differentiate in vivo and in vitro. We confirm that NKTfh cells expressing the canonical semi-invariant Vα14 TCR were CXCR5(+)/ICOS(+)/PD-1(+)/Bcl6(+) and increased in number following administration of the CD1d-binding glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC) to C57Bl/6 mice. We show that the α-GC-stimulated increase in NKTfh cells was CD1d-dependent since the effect was diminished by reduced CD1d expression. In vivo and in vitro treatment with α-GC, singly or in combination with IL-2, showed that NKTfh cells increased in number to a greater extent than total NKT cells, but proliferation was near-identical in both populations. Acquisition of the NKTfh phenotype from an adoptively transferred PD-1-depleted cell population was also evident, showing that peripheral NKT cells differentiated into NKTfh cells. Therefore, the α-GC-stimulated, CD1d-dependent increase in peripheral NKTfh cells is a result of cellular proliferation and differentiation. These findings advance our understanding of the immune response following immunization with CD1d-binding glycolipids.

  11. Probiotics prevent the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic tumorigenesis through suppressed colonic mucosa cellular proliferation and increased stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Foo, Ning-Ping; Ou Yang, Hui; Chiu, Hsueh-Huei; Chan, Hing-Yuen; Liao, Chii-Cherng; Yu, Chung-Keung; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2011-12-28

    Probiotics modulate immunity and inhibit colon carcinogenesis in experimental models, but these effects largely depend on the bacterial strain, and the precise mechanisms are not well understood. Therefore, we studied the effect of Bifidobacterium longum and/or Lactobacillus gasseri on the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic precancerous lesions and tumors in mice while delineating the possible mechanisms involved. The results suggest that dietary consumption of probiotics (B. longum and L. gasseri) resulted in a significant inhibition of DMH-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation in male ICR mice. Long-term (24 weeks) dietary consumption of probiotics resulted in a reduction of colon tumor multiplicity and the size of the tumors. Administration of B. longum and L. gasseri suppressed the rate of colonic mucosa cellular proliferation in a manner correlating with the inhibition of tumor induction by DMH. In addition, the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages was significantly increased in the DMH-treated mice that were fed various doses of B. longum, but not with L. gasseri or combined probiotics (B. longum + L. gasseri). We also found that L. gasseri significantly increased the proliferation of RAW264.7 macrophage cells through an increase in S phase DNA synthesis, which was related to the up-regulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin A. Taken together, these results demonstrate the in vivo chemopreventive efficacy and the immune stimulating mechanisms of dietary probiotics against DMH-induced colonic tumorigenesis.

  12. Probiotics prevent the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic tumorigenesis through suppressed colonic mucosa cellular proliferation and increased stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Foo, Ning-Ping; Ou Yang, Hui; Chiu, Hsueh-Huei; Chan, Hing-Yuen; Liao, Chii-Cherng; Yu, Chung-Keung; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2011-12-28

    Probiotics modulate immunity and inhibit colon carcinogenesis in experimental models, but these effects largely depend on the bacterial strain, and the precise mechanisms are not well understood. Therefore, we studied the effect of Bifidobacterium longum and/or Lactobacillus gasseri on the development of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic precancerous lesions and tumors in mice while delineating the possible mechanisms involved. The results suggest that dietary consumption of probiotics (B. longum and L. gasseri) resulted in a significant inhibition of DMH-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation in male ICR mice. Long-term (24 weeks) dietary consumption of probiotics resulted in a reduction of colon tumor multiplicity and the size of the tumors. Administration of B. longum and L. gasseri suppressed the rate of colonic mucosa cellular proliferation in a manner correlating with the inhibition of tumor induction by DMH. In addition, the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages was significantly increased in the DMH-treated mice that were fed various doses of B. longum, but not with L. gasseri or combined probiotics (B. longum + L. gasseri). We also found that L. gasseri significantly increased the proliferation of RAW264.7 macrophage cells through an increase in S phase DNA synthesis, which was related to the up-regulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin A. Taken together, these results demonstrate the in vivo chemopreventive efficacy and the immune stimulating mechanisms of dietary probiotics against DMH-induced colonic tumorigenesis. PMID:22049926

  13. Effects of 5-Fluorouracil in Nuclear and Cellular Morphology, Proliferation, Cell Cycle, Apoptosis, Cytoskeletal and Caveolar Distribution in Primary Cultures of Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Filgueiras, Marcelo de Carvalho; Morrot, Alexandre; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes; Costa, Manoel Luis; Mermelstein, Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in the world and is one of the leading causes of cancer death. The anti-metabolite 5- fluorouracil (5-FU) is widely used in the treatment of patients with colon cancer and other cancer types. 5-FU-based chemotherapy has been shown to be very efficient in the improvement of overall survival of the patients and for the eradication of the disease. Unfortunately, common side effects of 5-FU include severe alterations in the motility of the gastrointestinal tissues. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle cells are poorly understood. Primary smooth muscle cell cultures are an important tool for studies of the biological consequences of 5-FU at the cellular level. The avian gizzard is one of the most robust organs of smooth muscle cells. Here we studied the molecular and cellular effects of the chemotherapic drug 5-FU in a primary culture of chick gizzard smooth muscle cells. We found that treatment of smooth muscle cells with 5-FU inhibits cell proliferation by the arrest of cells in the G1 phase of cell cycle and induce apoptosis. 5-FU induced a decrease in the percentage of histone H3-positive cells. Treatment of cells with 5-FU induced changes in cellular and nuclear morphology, a decrease in the number of stress fibers and a major decrease in the number of caveolin-3 positive cells. Our results suggest that the disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and the reduction of caveolin-3 expression could explain the alterations in contractility observed in patients treated with 5-FU. These findings might have an impact in the understanding of the cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle tissues and might help the improvement of new therapeutic protocols for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:23646193

  14. Effects of 5-fluorouracil in nuclear and cellular morphology, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, cytoskeletal and caveolar distribution in primary cultures of smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras, Marcelo de Carvalho; Morrot, Alexandre; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes; Costa, Manoel Luis; Mermelstein, Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in the world and is one of the leading causes of cancer death. The anti-metabolite 5- fluorouracil (5-FU) is widely used in the treatment of patients with colon cancer and other cancer types. 5-FU-based chemotherapy has been shown to be very efficient in the improvement of overall survival of the patients and for the eradication of the disease. Unfortunately, common side effects of 5-FU include severe alterations in the motility of the gastrointestinal tissues. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle cells are poorly understood. Primary smooth muscle cell cultures are an important tool for studies of the biological consequences of 5-FU at the cellular level. The avian gizzard is one of the most robust organs of smooth muscle cells. Here we studied the molecular and cellular effects of the chemotherapic drug 5-FU in a primary culture of chick gizzard smooth muscle cells. We found that treatment of smooth muscle cells with 5-FU inhibits cell proliferation by the arrest of cells in the G1 phase of cell cycle and induce apoptosis. 5-FU induced a decrease in the percentage of histone H3-positive cells. Treatment of cells with 5-FU induced changes in cellular and nuclear morphology, a decrease in the number of stress fibers and a major decrease in the number of caveolin-3 positive cells. Our results suggest that the disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and the reduction of caveolin-3 expression could explain the alterations in contractility observed in patients treated with 5-FU. These findings might have an impact in the understanding of the cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle tissues and might help the improvement of new therapeutic protocols for the treatment of colon cancer.

  15. Nitrogen dioxide regulates organ growth by controlling cell proliferation and enlargement in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Misa; Furuhashi, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Naoko; Horiguchi, Gorou; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Morikawa, Hiromichi

    2014-03-01

    • To gain more insight into the physiological function of nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), we investigated the effects of exogenous NO₂ on growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. • Plants were grown in air without NO₂ for 1 wk after sowing and then grown for 1-4 wk in air with (designated treated plants) or without (control plants) NO₂. Plants were irrigated semiweekly with a nutrient solution containing 19.7 mM nitrate and 10.3 mM ammonium. • Five-week-old plants treated with 50 ppb NO₂ showed a ≤ 2.8-fold increase in biomass relative to controls. Treated plants also showed early flowering. The magnitude of the effects of NO₂ on leaf expansion, cell proliferation and enlargement was greater in developing than in maturing leaves. Leaf areas were 1.3-8.4 times larger on treated plants than corresponding leaves on control plants. The NO₂-induced increase in leaf size was largely attributable to cell proliferation in developing leaves, but was attributable to both cell proliferation and enlargement in maturing leaves. The expression of different sets of genes for cell proliferation and/or enlargement was induced by NO₂, but depended on the leaf developmental stage. • Collectively, these results indicated that NO₂ regulates organ growth by controlling cell proliferation and enlargement.

  16. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent regulation of miR-196a expression controls lung fibroblast apoptosis but not proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, Emelia; Zago, Michela; Sarill, Miles; Rico de Souza, Angela; Gomez, Alvin; Matthews, Jason; Hamid, Qutayba; Eidelman, David H.; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2014-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor implicated in the regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Although activation of the AhR by xenobiotics such as dioxin inhibits the cell cycle and control apoptosis, paradoxically, AhR expression also promotes cell proliferation and survival independent of exogenous ligands. The microRNA (miRNA) miR-196a has also emerged as a regulator of proliferation and apoptosis but a relationship between the AhR and miR-196a is not known. Therefore, we hypothesized that AhR-dependent regulation of endogenous miR-196a expression would promote cell survival and proliferation. Utilizing lung fibroblasts from AhR deficient (AhR{sup −/−}) and wild-type (AhR{sup +/+}) mice, we show that there is ligand-independent regulation of miRNA, including low miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} cells. Validation by qRT-PCR revealed a significant decrease in basal expression of miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} compared to AhR{sup +/+} cells. Exposure to AhR agonists benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and FICZ as well as AhR antagonist CH-223191 decreased miR-196a expression in AhR{sup +/+} fibroblasts concomitant with decreased AhR protein levels. There was increased proliferation only in AhR{sup +/+} lung fibroblasts in response to serum, corresponding to a decrease in p27{sup KIP1} protein, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Increasing the cellular levels of miR-196a had no effect on proliferation or expression of p27{sup KIP1} in AhR{sup −/−} fibroblasts but attenuated cigarette smoke-induced apoptosis. This study provides the first evidence that AhR expression is essential for the physiological regulation of cellular miRNA levels- including miR-196a. Future experiments designed to elucidate the functional relationship between the AhR and miR-196a may delineate additional novel ligand-independent roles for the AhR. - Highlights: • The AhR controls proliferation and apoptosis in lung cells. • The AhR regulates the

  17. Cellular Cations Control Conformational Switching of Inositol Pyrophosphate Analogues.

    PubMed

    Hager, Anastasia; Wu, Mingxuan; Wang, Huanchen; Brown, Nathaniel W; Shears, Stephen B; Veiga, Nicolás; Fiedler, Dorothea

    2016-08-22

    The inositol pyrophosphate messengers (PP-InsPs) are emerging as an important class of cellular regulators. These molecules have been linked to numerous biological processes, including insulin secretion and cancer cell migration, but how they trigger such a wide range of cellular responses has remained unanswered in many cases. Here, we show that the PP-InsPs exhibit complex speciation behaviour and propose that a unique conformational switching mechanism could contribute to their multifunctional effects. We synthesised non-hydrolysable bisphosphonate analogues and crystallised the analogues in complex with mammalian PPIP5K2 kinase. Subsequently, the bisphosphonate analogues were used to investigate the protonation sequence, metal-coordination properties, and conformation in solution. Remarkably, the presence of potassium and magnesium ions enabled the analogues to adopt two different conformations near physiological pH. Understanding how the intrinsic chemical properties of the PP-InsPs can contribute to their complex signalling outputs will be essential to elucidate their regulatory functions. PMID:27460418

  18. Magnetogenetics: Remote Control of Cellular Signaling with Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Jeremy P.

    Means for temporally regulating gene expression and cellular activity are invaluable for elucidating the underlying physiological processes and have therapeutic implications. Here we report the development of a system for remote regulation of gene expression by low frequency radiowaves (RF) or by a static magnetic field. We accomplished this by first adding iron oxide nanoparticles - either exogenously or as genetically encoded ferritin/ferric oxyhydroxide particle. These particles have been designed with affinity to the plasma membrane ion channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by a conjugated antibody. Application of a magnetic field stimulates the particle to gate the ion channel and this, in turn, initiates calcium-dependent transgene expression. We first demonstrated in vitro that TRPV1 can be actuated to cause calcium flux into the cell by directly applying a localized magnetic field. In mice expressing these genetically encoded components, application of external magnetic field caused remote stimulation of insulin transgene expression and significantly lowered blood glucose. In addition, we are investigating mechanisms by which iron oxide nanoparticles can absorb RF, and transduce this energy to cause channel opening. This robust, repeatable method for remote cellular regulation in vivo may ultimately have applications in basic science, as well as in technology and therapeutics.

  19. Osteoblasts and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Migration and Proliferation in 3D In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Ana Paula D. N.; Takiya, Christina M.; Garzoni, Luciana R.; Leal-Ferreira, Mona Lisa; Dutra, Hélio S.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Meirelles, Maria Nazareth; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D) bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC) and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. Methodology/Principal Findings A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34+ cells was decreased. Conclusions/Significance Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation. PMID:20161704

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor-dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation in dexamethasone-resistant and hypersensitive rat hepatoma cell variants.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, P W; Swanson, K T; Edwards, C P; Firestone, G L

    1988-01-01

    Exposure of the Fu5 rat hepatoma cell line to glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone and hydrocortisone, suppressed the growth rate and final density of cells grown in the presence of serum. This hormonal effect was proportional to receptor occupancy and affinity and, in addition, the glucocorticoid antagonist RU38486 prevented this response. Two classes of dexamethasone-resistant variants that failed to be growth inhibited were recovered from ethyl methylsulfonate-mutagenized populations by continuous culture in the presence of 1 microM dexamethasone. The first class, represented by the EDR3 subclone, was completely glucocorticoid unresponsive and failed to express receptor transcripts. The second class, represented by the EDR1, EDR5, and EDR7 subclones, possessed significant levels of glucocorticoid receptor but were only partially glucocorticoid responsive when stimulated with saturating levels of hormone. Introduction of functional glucocorticoid receptor genes into both classes of dexamethasone-resistant variants by a recombinant retrovirus expression vector restored glucocorticoid responsiveness and suppression of cell growth. A hypersensitive variant (BDS1), recovered by bromodeoxyuridine selection, was fully glucocorticoid responsive, and its inhibition of proliferation was more acutely regulated by dexamethasone. Taken together, our results established that the inhibition of proliferation in Fu5 rat hepatoma cells represents a new glucocorticoid response that requires the expression of a functional glucocorticoid receptor. Images PMID:3380086

  1. Krüppel-like factor 9 is a circadian transcription factor in human epidermis that controls proliferation of keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Spörl, Florian; Korge, Sandra; Jürchott, Karsten; Wunderskirchner, Minetta; Schellenberg, Katja; Heins, Sven; Specht, Aljona; Stoll, Claudia; Klemz, Roman; Maier, Bert; Wenck, Horst; Schrader, Annika; Kunz, Dieter; Blatt, Thomas; Kramer, Achim

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks govern a wide range of cellular and physiological functions in various organisms. Recent evidence suggests distinct functions of local clocks in peripheral mammalian tissues such as immune responses and cell cycle control. However, studying circadian action in peripheral tissues has been limited so far to mouse models, leaving the implication for human systems widely elusive. In particular, circadian rhythms in human skin, which is naturally exposed to strong daytime-dependent changes in the environment, have not been investigated to date on a molecular level. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of circadian gene expression in human epidermis. Whole-genome microarray analysis of suction-blister epidermis obtained throughout the day revealed a functional circadian clock in epidermal keratinocytes with hundreds of transcripts regulated in a daytime-dependent manner. Among those, we identified a circadian transcription factor, Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9), that is substantially up-regulated in a cortisol and differentiation-state-dependent manner. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments showed strong antiproliferative effects of Klf9. Putative Klf9 target genes include proliferation/differentiation markers that also show circadian expression in vivo, suggesting that Klf9 affects keratinocyte proliferation/differentiation by controlling the expression of target genes in a daytime-dependent manner. PMID:22711835

  2. Phosphorylation of p62 by cdk1 Controls the Timely Transit of Cells through Mitosis and Tumor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Juan F.; Amanchy, Ramars; Diaz-Meco, Maria T.; Moscat, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The protein scaffold and signaling regulator p62 is important in critical cellular functions, including bone homeostasis, obesity, and cancer, because of its interactions with various signaling intermediaries. p62 is overexpressed in human cancers and is induced during cell transformation. Its genetic ablation inhibits lung tumorigenesis in vivo and cell proliferation in culture by regulating the TRAF6/NF-κB signaling cascade to control reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis. Here we show that cdk1 phosphorylates p62 in vitro and in vivo at T269 and S272, which is necessary for the maintenance of appropriate cyclin B1 levels and the levels of cdk1 activity necessary to allow cells to properly enter and exit mitosis. The lack of cdk1-mediated phosphorylation of p62 leads to a faster exit from mitosis, which translates into enhanced cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in response to Ras-induced transformation. Therefore, p62 emerges as a node for the control of not only cell survival but also cell transit through mitosis. PMID:20974803

  3. MicroRNA-103a-3p controls proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Sol Kim, Da; Young Lee, Sun; Hee Lee, Jung; Chan Bae, Yong; Sup Jung, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation and proliferation of human adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (hADSCs) represents a critical step in the development of hADSCs-based cellular therapies. To examine the role of the microRNA-103a-3p (miR-103a-3p) in hADSCs functions, miR-103a-3p mimics were transfected into hADSCs in order to overexpress miR-103a-3p. Osteogenic differentiation was induced for 14 days in an osetogenic differentiation medium and assessed by using an Alizarin Red S stain. The regulation of the expression of CDK6 (cyclin-dependent kinase 6), a predicted target of miR-103a-3p, was determined by western blot, real-time PCR and luciferase reporter assays. Overexpression of miR-103a-3p inhibited the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hADSCs. In addition, it downregulated protein and mRNA levels of predicted target of miR-103a-3p (CDK6 and DICER1). In contrast, inhibition of miR-103a-3p with 2′O methyl antisense RNA increased the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hADSCs. The luciferase reporter activity of the construct containing the miR-103a-3p target site within the CDK6 and DICER1 3′-untranslated regions was lower in miR-103a-3p-transfected hADSCs than in control miRNA-transfected hADSCs. RNA interference-mediated downregulation of CDK6 and DICER1 in hADSCs inhibited their proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. The results of the current study indicate that miR-103a-3p regulates the osteogenic differentiation of hADSCs and proliferation of hADSCs by direct targeting of CDK6 and DICER1 partly. These findings further elucidate the molecular mechanisms governing the differentiation and proliferation of hADSCs. PMID:26160438

  4. Sensitivity to methylmercury toxicity is enhanced in oxoguanine glycosylase 1 knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts and is dependent on cellular proliferation capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Ondovcik, Stephanie L.; Tamblyn, Laura; McPherson, John Peter; Wells, Peter G.

    2013-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a persistent environmental contaminant with potent neurotoxic action for which the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be conclusively delineated. Our objectives herein were twofold: first, to corroborate our previous findings of an increased sensitivity of spontaneously-immortalized oxoguanine glycosylase 1-null (Ogg1{sup −/−}) murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to MeHg through generation of Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen-immortalized wild-type and Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs; and second, to determine whether MeHg toxicity is proliferation-dependent. As with the spontaneously-immortalized cells used previously, the SV40 large T antigen-immortalized cells exhibited similar tendencies to undergo MeHg-initiated cell cycle arrest, with increased sensitivity in the Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs as measured by clonogenic survival and DNA damage. Compared to exponentially growing cells, those seeded at a higher density exhibited compromised proliferation, which proved protective against MeHg-mediated cell cycle arrest and induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), measured by phosphorylation of the core histone H2A variant (H2AX) on serine 139 (γH2AX), and by its functional confirmation by micronucleus assessment. This enhanced sensitivity of Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs to MeHg toxicity using discrete SV40 immortalization corroborates our previous studies, and suggests a novel role for OGG1 in minimizing MeHg-initiated DNA lesions that trigger replication-associated DSBs. Furthermore, proliferative capacity may determine MeHg toxicity in vivo and in utero. Accordingly, variations in cellular proliferative capacity and interindividual variability in repair activity may modulate the risk of toxicological consequences following MeHg exposure. - Highlights: • SV40 large T antigen-immortalized Ogg1{sup −/−} cells are more sensitive to MeHg. • Sensitivity to MeHg is dependent on cellular proliferation capacity. • OGG1 maintains genomic

  5. Intranuclear bacteria: inside the cellular control center of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Frederik; Horn, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Intracellular bacteria including major pathogens live in the cytoplasm or in cytoplasmic vacuoles within their host cell. However, some can invade more unusual intracellular niches such as the eukaryotic nucleus. Phylogenetically diverse intranuclear bacteria have been discovered in various protist, arthropod, marine invertebrate, and mammalian hosts. Although targeting the same cellular compartment, they have apparently developed fundamentally-different infection strategies. The nucleus provides a rich pool of nutrients and protection against host cytoplasmic defense mechanisms; intranuclear bacteria can directly manipulate the host by interfering with nuclear processes. The impact on their host cells ranges from stable associations with a neutral or beneficial effect on host fitness to rapid host lysis. The analysis of the intranuclear lifestyle will extend our current framework for understanding host-pathogen interactions.

  6. Control of proliferation rate of N27 dopaminergic neurons using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yiwen; Hadimani, Ravi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to investigate possible treatments for a variety of neurological disorders. However, the effect that magnetic fields have on neurons has not been well documented in the literature. We have investigated the effect of different orientation of magnetic field generated by TMS coils with a monophasic stimulator on the proliferation rate of N27 neuronal cells cultured in flasks and multi-well plates. The proliferation rate of neurons would increase by exposed horizontally adherent N27 cells to a magnetic field pointing upward through the neuronal proliferation layer compared with the control group. On the other hand, proliferation rate would decrease in cells exposed to a magnetic field pointing downward through the neuronal growth layer compared with the control group. We confirmed results obtained from the Trypan-blue and automatic cell counting methods with those from the CyQuant and MTS cell viability assays. Our findings could have important implications for the preclinical development of TMS treatments of neurological disorders and represents a new method to control the proliferation rate of neuronal cells.

  7. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Kaori; Taketomi, Takaharu; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Arai, Shinsaku; Sanui, Terukazu; Yoshiga, Daigo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nakamura, Seiji

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  8. Acetyl-keto-β-boswellic acid inhibits cellular proliferation through a p21-dependent pathway in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Huang, Baohua; Hooi, Shing Chuan

    2006-01-01

    Although there is increasing evidence showing that boswellic acid might be a potential anticancer agent, the mechanisms involved in its action are unclear. In the present study, we showed that acetyl-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) inhibited cellular growth in several colon cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that cells were arrested at the G1 phase after AKBA treatment. Further analysis showed that cyclin D1 and E, CDK 2 and 4 and phosphorylated Rb were decreased in AKBA-treated cells while p21 expression was increased. The growth inhibitory effect of AKBA was dependent on p21 but not p53. HCT-116 p53−/− cells were sensitized to the apoptotic effect of AKBA, suggesting that p21 may have protected cells against apoptosis by inducing a G1 arrest. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that AKBA inhibited cellular growth in colon cancer cells. These findings may have implications to the use of boswellic acids as potential anticancer agents in colon cancer. PMID:16783403

  9. Epithelial restitution and cellular proliferation after gastric mucosal damage caused by hypertonic NaCl in rats.

    PubMed

    Sørbye, H; Svanes, C; Stangeland, L; Kvinnsland, S; Svanes, K

    1988-01-01

    Hypertonic NaCl enhances gastric cancer in rats induced by N-nitroso compounds. This study was designed to examine the structural changes and alterations in mitotic activity occurring after mucosal exposure to hypertonic NaCl. Wistar rats were given one ml of 4.5 M NaCl by gastric tube and groups of 4-5 animals were sacrificed at different time intervals up to 120 h. An i.p. injection of thymidine was given 1 h before death. Samples of antral and corpus mucosa were prepared for microscopy and autoradiography. Hypertonic NaCl caused uniform destruction of surface mucous cells and pits in the corpus and antrum. Epithelial restitution with the formation of a thin epithelial layer occurred within one h of damage. The mucosa changed towards normal within 24-48 h. The distance between mucosal surface and the replicating cells decreased during the first 2 h. The proliferation zone remained in the middle of the glandular layer throughout the experiment. The proliferative activity increased during the first 24 h after mucosal damage. The number of labelled cells per unit area of mucosa was somewhat larger in the corpus than the antrum, but in the corpus the distance between proliferating cells and mucosal surface was double that of the antrum. Hypertonic NaCl causes a series of changes in the gastric mucosa. The increased mitotic activity can only partly explain the cocarcinogenic effect, since N-nitroso-induced adenocarcinomas occur predominantly in the antrum while the mitotic activity is maximal in the corpus.

  10. Modelling mammalian cellular quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Cellular quiescence is a reversible non-proliferating state. The reactivation of ‘sleep-like’ quiescent cells (e.g. fibroblasts, lymphocytes and stem cells) into proliferation is crucial for tissue repair and regeneration and a key to the growth, development and health of higher multicellular organisms, such as mammals. Quiescence has been a primarily phenotypic description (i.e. non-permanent cell cycle arrest) and poorly studied. However, contrary to the earlier thinking that quiescence is simply a passive and dormant state lacking proliferating activities, recent studies have revealed that cellular quiescence is actively maintained in the cell and that it corresponds to a collection of heterogeneous states. Recent modelling and experimental work have suggested that an Rb-E2F bistable switch plays a pivotal role in controlling the quiescence–proliferation balance and the heterogeneous quiescent states. Other quiescence regulatory activities may crosstalk with and impinge upon the Rb-E2F bistable switch, forming a gene network that controls the cells’ quiescent states and their dynamic transitions to proliferation in response to noisy environmental signals. Elucidating the dynamic control mechanisms underlying quiescence may lead to novel therapeutic strategies that re-establish normal quiescent states, in a variety of hyper- and hypo-proliferative diseases, including cancer and ageing. PMID:24904737

  11. Control of cell proliferation in Arabidopsis thaliana by microRNA miR396.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ramiro E; Mecchia, Martin A; Debernardi, Juan M; Schommer, Carla; Weigel, Detlef; Palatnik, Javier F

    2010-01-01

    Cell proliferation is an important determinant of plant form, but little is known about how developmental programs control cell division. Here, we describe the role of microRNA miR396 in the coordination of cell proliferation in Arabidopsis leaves. In leaf primordia, miR396 is expressed at low levels that steadily increase during organ development. We found that miR396 antagonizes the expression pattern of its targets, the GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR (GRF) transcription factors. miR396 accumulates preferentially in the distal part of young developing leaves, restricting the expression of GRF2 to the proximal part of the organ. This, in turn, coincides with the activity of the cell proliferation marker CYCLINB1;1. We show that miR396 attenuates cell proliferation in developing leaves, through the repression of GRF activity and a decrease in the expression of cell cycle genes. We observed that the balance between miR396 and the GRFs controls the final number of cells in leaves. Furthermore, overexpression of miR396 in a mutant lacking GRF-INTERACTING FACTOR 1 severely compromises the shoot meristem. We found that miR396 is expressed at low levels throughout the meristem, overlapping with the expression of its target, GRF2. In addition, we show that miR396 can regulate cell proliferation and the size of the meristem. Arabidopsis plants with an increased activity of the transcription factor TCP4, which reduces cell proliferation in leaves, have higher miR396 and lower GRF levels. These results implicate miR396 as a significant module in the regulation of cell proliferation in plants.

  12. Spatial control of cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation using ion-beam induced thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiaki

    2014-08-01

    In this study, cellular films were fabricated by ion-beam irradiation into poly-L-lactic acid sheets and cell culture. The cellular film shapes can be controlled by pattern masks. We performed spatial cell patterning using three types of cells: fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and nerve-like cells. First, multi-layered cellular construct was fabricated by stacking fibroblast cellular films. When three cellular films were stacked and incubated, these films firmly attached to each other. Second, tubular constructs were fabricated by endothelial cell culture on linearly patterned surfaces with wide widths of 80, 120, 160, and 200 μm. The patterned cellular films were rounded into vessel-like structure. The diameters of the constructs depend upon the pattern widths. Finally, we controlled cell attachment and nerve growth of nerve-like cells by using linearly patterned surfaces with narrow widths of 10, 30, and 50 μm. Nerve growth direction was controlled by varying the pattern widths. In the case of 10 μm, the attached cells and nerve growth were straight on the patterned thin films. These cell patterning techniques are expected to have applications in tissue engineering, cell transplantation, and in vitro tissue modeling.

  13. Control of cellular function by reversible photoregulation of translation.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Shinzi

    2014-12-15

    The use of light as an external stimulus offers the potential for spatiotemporal control and is thus ideal for controlling gene expression in living cells. In commonly used caging systems, once the caging compound is removed, protein expression cannot be stopped, due to the irreversibility of the uncaging reaction. We have developed a reversible method for regulating protein expression with the aid of a photoresponsive cap that can control the translation of mRNA in a reversible manner through triggering of cis-trans photoisomerization of the cap. In its trans form, the photoresponsive cap completely inhibited translation, whereas the cis form yielded protein (12.7 times more translated protein than in the trans form). Moreover, we succeeded in controlling the levels, timing and duration of protein expression in living mammalian cells. Additionally, neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells was photoinduced by controlling constitutively active H-Ras 61L protein expression.

  14. Rac1 Protein Regulates Glycogen Phosphorylase Activation and Controls Interleukin (IL)-2-dependent T Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Arrizabalaga, Onetsine; Lacerda, Hadriano M.; Zubiaga, Ana M.; Zugaza, José L.

    2012-01-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family have been implicated in important cellular processes such as cell migration and adhesion, protein secretion, and/or gene transcription. In the lymphoid system, these GTPases participate in the signaling cascades that are activated after engagement of antigen receptors. However, little is known about the role that Rho GTPases play in IL-2-mediated responses. Here, we show that IL-2 induces Rac1 activation in Kit 225 T cells. We identified by mass spectrometry the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM) as a novel Rac1 effector molecule in IL-2-stimulated cells. The interaction between the active form of Rac1 (Rac1-GTP) and PYGM was established directly through a domain comprising amino acids 191–270 of PYGM that exhibits significant homology with the Rac binding domain of PAK1. The integrity of this region was crucial for PYGM activation. Importantly, IL-2-dependent cellular proliferation was inhibited upon blocking both the activation of Rac1 and the activity of PYGM. These results reveal a new role for Rac1 in cell signaling, showing that this GTPase triggers T cell proliferation upon IL-2 stimulation by associating with PYGM and modulating its enzymatic activity. PMID:22337875

  15. Controlling the Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons: Study Guide for Teachers and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Institute of Peace, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this teaching guide are: (1) to increase student understanding of the prevalence and spread of nuclear weapons; (2) to familiarize students with historic and contemporary measures to control nuclear proliferation and stimulate their thinking of potential strategies for doing so in the future; (3) to develop students' analytical…

  16. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luciana O; Garcia, Cristiana B; Matos-Silva, Flavia A; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2014-02-28

    SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET-hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  17. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Garcia, Cristiana B.; Matos-Silva, Flavia A.; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M.

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • hnRNPK is a new target of SET. • SET regulates hnRNPK. • SET and hnRNPK accumulation promotes tumorigenesis. • SET accumulation is a potential model to study genes regulated by SET-hnRNPK. - Abstract: SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET–hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  18. An Integrated Gene Regulatory Network Controls Stem Cell Proliferation in Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Felszeghy, Szabolcs; Zelarayan, Laura C; Alonso, Maria T; Plikus, Maksim V; Maas, Richard L; Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Schimmang, Thomas; Thesleff, Irma

    2007-01-01

    Epithelial stem cells reside in specific niches that regulate their self-renewal and differentiation, and are responsible for the continuous regeneration of tissues such as hair, skin, and gut. Although the regenerative potential of mammalian teeth is limited, mouse incisors grow continuously throughout life and contain stem cells at their proximal ends in the cervical loops. In the labial cervical loop, the epithelial stem cells proliferate and migrate along the labial surface, differentiating into enamel-forming ameloblasts. In contrast, the lingual cervical loop contains fewer proliferating stem cells, and the lingual incisor surface lacks ameloblasts and enamel. Here we have used a combination of mouse mutant analyses, organ culture experiments, and expression studies to identify the key signaling molecules that regulate stem cell proliferation in the rodent incisor stem cell niche, and to elucidate their role in the generation of the intrinsic asymmetry of the incisors. We show that epithelial stem cell proliferation in the cervical loops is controlled by an integrated gene regulatory network consisting of Activin, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and Follistatin within the incisor stem cell niche. Mesenchymal FGF3 stimulates epithelial stem cell proliferation, and BMP4 represses Fgf3 expression. In turn, Activin, which is strongly expressed in labial mesenchyme, inhibits the repressive effect of BMP4 and restricts Fgf3 expression to labial dental mesenchyme, resulting in increased stem cell proliferation and a large, labial stem cell niche. Follistatin limits the number of lingual stem cells, further contributing to the characteristic asymmetry of mouse incisors, and on the basis of our findings, we suggest a model in which Follistatin antagonizes the activity of Activin. These results show how the spatially restricted and balanced effects of specific components of a signaling network can regulate stem cell proliferation in

  19. Immunohistochemical analysis of factors related to apoptosis and cellular proliferation in relation to inflammation in dentigerous and odontogenic keratocyst

    PubMed Central

    Sreedhar, Gadiputi; Raju, M. Vijaya; Metta, Kiran Kumar; Manjunath, SM; Shetty, Sujan; Agarwal, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The effect of inflammation on pathogenesis and biological behavior of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) and dentigerous cyst (DC) is not completely understood. Hence, we aimed to analyze the effect of inflammation on biological behavior of OKC and DC using a proliferative and anti-apoptotic marker, i.e., proliferative cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Bcl-2, respectively. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining was performed using anti-PCNA and Bcl-2 antibody in 10 cases each of classical OKC, inflamed OKC and classical DC and inflamed DC. Results: Inflamed OKC and DC showed a significant increase in PCNA expression and decrease in Bcl-2 expression when compared with non-inflamed cyst. Correlation between inflammation and proliferative and anti-apoptotic activity was found to be statistically non-significant. Conclusion: Inflammation is responsible for change in behavior of neoplastic epithelium of OKC and hence should be treated meticulously, whereas in DC it is responsible for changes in the epithelial lining. PMID:24678208

  20. Cellular control lies in the balance of forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicurel, M. E.; Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    Mechanical tension generated within the cytoskeleton of living cells is emerging as a critical regulator of biological function in diverse situations ranging from the control of chromosome movement to the morphogenesis of the vertebrate brain. In this article, we review recent advances that have been made in terms of understanding how cells generate, transmit and sense mechanical tension, as well as how they use these forces to control their shape and behavior. An integrated view of cell regulation that incorporates mechanics and structure as well as chemistry is beginning to emerge.

  1. Reciprocal Control of the Circadian Clock and Cellular Redox State - a Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Putker, Marrit; O'Neill, John Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Redox signalling comprises the biology of molecular signal transduction mediated by reactive oxygen (or nitrogen) species. By specific and reversible oxidation of redox-sensitive cysteines, many biological processes sense and respond to signals from the intracellular redox environment. Redox signals are therefore important regulators of cellular homeostasis. Recently, it has become apparent that the cellular redox state oscillates in vivo and in vitro, with a period of about one day (circadian). Circadian time-keeping allows cells and organisms to adapt their biology to resonate with the 24-hour cycle of day/night. The importance of this innate biological time-keeping is illustrated by the association of clock disruption with the early onset of several diseases (e.g. type II diabetes, stroke and several forms of cancer). Circadian regulation of cellular redox balance suggests potentially two distinct roles for redox signalling in relation to the cellular clock: one where it is regulated by the clock, and one where it regulates the clock. Here, we introduce the concepts of redox signalling and cellular timekeeping, and then critically appraise the evidence for the reciprocal regulation between cellular redox state and the circadian clock. We conclude there is a substantial body of evidence supporting circadian regulation of cellular redox state, but that it would be premature to conclude that the converse is also true. We therefore propose some approaches that might yield more insight into redox control of cellular timekeeping.

  2. Reciprocal Control of the Circadian Clock and Cellular Redox State - a Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Putker, Marrit; O’Neill, John Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Redox signalling comprises the biology of molecular signal transduction mediated by reactive oxygen (or nitrogen) species. By specific and reversible oxidation of redox-sensitive cysteines, many biological processes sense and respond to signals from the intracellular redox environment. Redox signals are therefore important regulators of cellular homeostasis. Recently, it has become apparent that the cellular redox state oscillates in vivo and in vitro, with a period of about one day (circadian). Circadian time-keeping allows cells and organisms to adapt their biology to resonate with the 24-hour cycle of day/night. The importance of this innate biological time-keeping is illustrated by the association of clock disruption with the early onset of several diseases (e.g. type II diabetes, stroke and several forms of cancer). Circadian regulation of cellular redox balance suggests potentially two distinct roles for redox signalling in relation to the cellular clock: one where it is regulated by the clock, and one where it regulates the clock. Here, we introduce the concepts of redox signalling and cellular timekeeping, and then critically appraise the evidence for the reciprocal regulation between cellular redox state and the circadian clock. We conclude there is a substantial body of evidence supporting circadian regulation of cellular redox state, but that it would be premature to conclude that the converse is also true. We therefore propose some approaches that might yield more insight into redox control of cellular timekeeping. PMID:26810072

  3. The effects of low-level laser irradiation on cellular viability and proliferation of human skin fibroblasts cultured in high glucose mediums.

    PubMed

    Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Bayat, Mohammad; Darbandi, Hasan; Bayat, Mehrnoush; Mosaffa, Nariman

    2014-01-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the most challenging complications of diabetes mellitus (DM) in clinical medicine. This study has aimed to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) cultured in a high glucose concentration. HSFs were cultured either in a concentration of physiologic glucose (5.5 mM/l) or high glucose media (11.1 and 15 mM/l) for either 1 or 2 weeks after which they were subsequently cultured in either the physiologic glucose or high concentration glucose media during laser irradiation. LLLT was carried out with a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser unit at energy densities of 0.5, 1, and 2 J/cm(2), and power density of 0.66 mW/cm(2) on 3 consecutive days. HSFs' viability and proliferation rate were evaluated with the dimethylthiazol-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The LLLT at densities of 0.5 and 1 J/cm(2) had stimulatory effects on the viability and proliferation rate of HSFs cultured in physiologic glucose (5.5 mM/l) medium compared to their control cultures (p = 0.002 and p = 0.046, respectively). All three doses of 0.5, 1, and 2 J/cm(2) had stimulatory effects on the proliferation rate of HSFs cultured in high glucose concentrations when compared to their control cultures (p = 0.042, p = 0.000, and p = 0.000, respectively). This study showed that HSFs originally cultured for 2 weeks in high glucose concentration followed by culture in physiologic glucose during laser irradiation showed enhanced cell viability and proliferation. Thus, LLLT had a stimulatory effect on these HSFs. PMID:23455657

  4. High-order sliding mode control of a DC motor drive via a switched controlled multi-cellular converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djemaï, M.; Busawon, K.; Benmansour, K.; Marouf, A.

    2011-11-01

    In this article, we present a high-order sliding mode controller of a DC motor drive connected to a multi-cellular converter. More specifically, we design a second-order (super-twisting) control algorithm for the speed regulation of a DC motor. For this, a switching control for the multi-cellular converter is derived in order to supply the correct reference value for the speed regulation. A practical implementation of the controller is realised using a laboratory set-up. The performance and the validity of the controller are shown experimentally.

  5. [Effects of resveratrol-induced cellular autophagy in control of neurodegenerative diseases].

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen; Wang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Cellular autophagy is a major degradative pathway for clearance of aggregate-prone proteins and damaged organelles. It plays an important role in regulating cellular homeostasis, cell growth and development, and disease development. Dysfunctional autophagy contributes to the pathology of various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease, in which specific pathological protein accumulation occurs. A growing body of evidence suggests that resveratrol plays a significantly role in the regulation of autophagy and clearance of pathological proteins. Resveratrol is a potential drug for neurodegenerative diseases therapy. This review focuses on the effects of resveratrol on cellular autophagy and clinical application in the control of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27405156

  6. Controlled inflation of voids in cellular polymer ferroelectrets: Optimizing electromechanical transducer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, M.; Wirges, W.; Gerhard-Multhaupt, R.; Dansachmüller, M.; Schwödiauer, R.; Bauer-Gogonea, S.; Bauer, S.; Paajanen, M.; Minkkinen, H.; Raukola, J.

    2004-01-01

    When exposed to sufficiently high electric fields, polymer-foam electret materials with closed cells exhibit ferroelectric-like behavior and may therefore be called ferroelectrets. In cellular ferroelectrets, the influence of the cell size and shape distributions on the application-relevant properties is not yet understood. Therefore, controlled inflation experiments were carried out on cellular polypropylene films, and the resulting elastical and electromechanical parameters were determined. The elastic modulus in the thickness direction shows a minimum with a corresponding maximum in the electromechanical transducer coefficient. The resonance frequency shifts as a function of the elastic modulus and the relative density of the inflated cellular films. Therefore, the transducer properties of cellular ferroelectrets can be optimized by means of controlled inflation.

  7. Cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling the migration of neocortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Marín, Oscar

    2013-07-01

    The discovery, approximately 15 years ago, that cortical GABAergic interneurons originate outside the pallium has revolutionized our understanding of the development of the cerebral cortex. It is now clear that glutamatergic pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons follow largely distinct development programs, a notion that has challenged our views on how these neurons assemble to form precise neural circuits. In this review, I summarize our current knowledge of the mechanisms that control the migration of neocortical interneurons, a process that can be subdivided into three consecutive phases: migration to the cortex, intracortical dispersion, and layering.

  8. Utilizing Fibronectin Integrin-Binding Specificity to Control Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Haylee; Nicosia, John; Dysart, Marilyn; Barker, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Cells communicate with the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibronectin (Fn) through integrin receptors on the cell surface. Controlling integrin–Fn interactions offers a promising approach to directing cell behavior, such as adhesion, migration, and differentiation, as well as coordinated tissue behaviors such as morphogenesis and wound healing. Recent Advances: Several different groups have developed recombinant fragments of Fn that can control epithelial to mesenchymal transition, sequester growth factors, and promote bone and wound healing. It is thought that these physiological responses are, in part, due to specific integrin engagement. Furthermore, it has been postulated that the integrin-binding domain of Fn is a mechanically sensitive switch that drives binding of one integrin heterodimer over another. Critical Issues: Although computational simulations have predicted the mechano-switch hypothesis and recent evidence supports the existence of varying strain states of Fn in vivo, experimental evidence of the Fn integrin switch is still lacking. Future Directions: Evidence of the integrin mechano-switch will enable the development of new Fn-based peptides in tissue engineering and wound healing, as well as deepen our understanding of ECM pathologies, such as fibrosis. PMID:26244106

  9. The Intermediate Conductance Calcium-activated Potassium Channel KCa3.1 Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation via Controlling Calcium-dependent Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Dan; Toyama, Kazuyoshi; Lemaître, Vincent; Takai, Jun; Fan, Fan; Jenkins, David P.; Wulff, Heike; Gutterman, David D.; Park, Frank; Miura, Hiroto

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 contributes to a variety of cell activation processes in pathologies such as inflammation, carcinogenesis, and vascular remodeling. We examined the electrophysiological and transcriptional mechanisms by which KCa3.1 regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF)-induced proliferation of human coronary artery VSMCs was attenuated by lowering intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and was enhanced by elevating [Ca2+]i. KCa3.1 blockade or knockdown inhibited proliferation by suppressing the rise in [Ca2+]i and attenuating the expression of phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), c-Fos, and neuron-derived orphan receptor-1 (NOR-1). This antiproliferative effect was abolished by elevating [Ca2+]i. KCa3.1 overexpression induced VSMC proliferation, and potentiated PDGF-induced proliferation, by inducing CREB phosphorylation, c-Fos, and NOR-1. Pharmacological stimulation of KCa3.1 unexpectedly suppressed proliferation by abolishing the expression and activity of KCa3.1 and PDGF β-receptors and inhibiting the rise in [Ca2+]i. The stimulation also attenuated the levels of phosphorylated CREB, c-Fos, and cyclin expression. After KCa3.1 blockade, the characteristic round shape of VSMCs expressing high l-caldesmon and low calponin-1 (dedifferentiation state) was maintained, whereas KCa3.1 stimulation induced a spindle-shaped cellular appearance, with low l-caldesmon and high calponin-1. In conclusion, KCa3.1 plays an important role in VSMC proliferation via controlling Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways, and its modulation may therefore constitute a new therapeutic target for cell proliferative diseases such as atherosclerosis. PMID:23609438

  10. On Window Control Algorithm over Wireless Cellular Networks with Large Delay Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho-Jin; Byun, Hee-Jung; Lim, Jong-Tae

    In addition to high bit error rates, large and sudden variations in delay often occur in wireless cellular networks. The delay can be several times the typical round-trip time, which can cause the spurious timeout. In this letter, we propose a new window control algorithm to improve TCP performance in wireless cellular networks with large delay variation and high bit error rates. Simulation results illustrate that our proposal improves the performance of TCP in terms of fairness and link utilization.

  11. Hydrogels with Spatially and Temporally Controlled Properties to Control Cellular Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, Jason

    2011-03-01

    Stem cells (e.g., mesenchymal stem cells, MSCs) respond to many cues from their microenvironment, which may include chemical signals, mechanics, and topography. Importantly, these cues may be incorporated into scaffolding to control stem cell differentiation and optimize their ability to produce tissues in regenerative medicine. Despite the significant amount of work in this area, the materials have been primarily static and uniform. To this end, we have developed a sequential crosslinking process that relies on our ability to crosslinked functional biopolymers (e.g., methacrylated hyaluronic acid, HA) in two steps, namely a Michael-type addition reaction to partially consume reactive groups and then a light-initiated free-radical polymerization to further crosslink the material. With light exposure during the second step comes control over the material in space (via masks and lasers) and time (via intermittent light exposure). We are applying this technique for numerous applications. For example, when the HA hydrogels are crosslinked with MMP degradable peptides with thiol termini during the first step, a material that can be degraded by cells is obtained. However, cell-mediated degradation is obstructed with the introduction of kinetic chains during the second step, leading to spatially controlled cell degradability. Due to the influence of cellular spreading on MSC differentiation, we have controlled cell fates by controlling their spread ability, for instance towards osteoblasts in spread areas and adipocytes when cell remained rounded. We are also using the process of stiffening with time to investigate mechanically induced differentiation, particularly in materials with evolving mechanics. Overall, these advanced HA hydrogels provide us the opportunity to investigate diverse and controlled material properties on MSC interactions.

  12. A self-learning call admission control scheme for CDMA cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Huaguang

    2005-09-01

    In the present paper, a call admission control scheme that can learn from the network environment and user behavior is developed for code division multiple access (CDMA) cellular networks that handle both voice and data services. The idea is built upon a novel learning control architecture with only a single module instead of two or three modules in adaptive critic designs (ACDs). The use of adaptive critic approach for call admission control in wireless cellular networks is new. The call admission controller can perform learning in real-time as well as in offline environments and the controller improves its performance as it gains more experience. Another important contribution in the present work is the choice of utility function for the present self-learning control approach which makes the present learning process much more efficient than existing learning control methods. The performance of our algorithm will be shown through computer simulation and compared with existing algorithms. PMID:16252828

  13. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3A promotes cellular proliferation by repression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1.

    PubMed

    Tursiella, Melissa L; Bowman, Emily R; Wanzeck, Keith C; Throm, Robert E; Liao, Jason; Zhu, Junjia; Sample, Clare E

    2014-10-01

    Latent infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly associated with the endemic form of Burkitt lymphoma (eBL), which typically limits expression of EBV proteins to EBNA-1 (Latency I). Interestingly, a subset of eBLs maintain a variant program of EBV latency - Wp-restricted latency (Wp-R) - that includes expression of the EBNA-3 proteins (3A, 3B and 3C), in addition to EBNA-1. In xenograft assays, Wp-R BL cell lines were notably more tumorigenic than their counterparts that maintain Latency I, suggesting that the additional latency-associated proteins expressed in Wp-R influence cell proliferation and/or survival. Here, we evaluated the contribution of EBNA-3A. Consistent with the enhanced tumorigenic potential of Wp-R BLs, knockdown of EBNA-3A expression resulted in abrupt cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 that was concomitant with conversion of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) to its hypophosphorylated state, followed by a loss of Rb protein. Comparable results were seen in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), consistent with the previous observation that EBNA-3A is essential for sustained growth of these cells. In agreement with the known ability of EBNA-3A and EBNA-3C to cooperatively repress p14(ARF) and p16(INK4a) expression, knockdown of EBNA-3A in LCLs resulted in rapid elevation of p14(ARF) and p16I(NK4a). By contrast, p16(INK4a) was not detectably expressed in Wp-R BL and the low-level expression of p14(ARF) was unchanged by EBNA-3A knockdown. Amongst other G1/S regulatory proteins, only p21(WAF1/CIP1), a potent inducer of G1 arrest, was upregulated following knockdown of EBNA-3A in Wp-R BL Sal cells and LCLs, coincident with hypophosphorylation and destabilization of Rb and growth arrest. Furthermore, knockdown of p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression in Wp-R BL correlated with an increase in cellular proliferation. This novel function of EBNA-3A is distinct from the functions previously described that are shared with EBNA-3C, and likely contributes to the

  14. The effect of thiamine supplementation on tumour proliferation. A metabolic control analysis study.

    PubMed

    Comín-Anduix, B; Boren, J; Martinez, S; Moro, C; Centelles, J J; Trebukhina, R; Petushok, N; Lee, W N; Boros, L G; Cascante, M

    2001-08-01

    Thiamine deficiency frequently occurs in patients with advanced cancer and therefore thiamine supplementation is used as nutritional support. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is metabolized to thiamine pyrophosphate, the cofactor of transketolase, which is involved in ribose synthesis, necessary for cell replication. Thus, it is important to determine whether the benefits of thiamine supplementation outweigh the risks of tumor proliferation. Using oxythiamine (an irreversible inhibitor of transketolase) and metabolic control analysis (MCA) methods, we measured an in vivo tumour growth control coefficient of 0.9 for the thiamine-transketolase complex in mice with Ehrlich's ascites tumour. Thus, transketolase enzyme and thiamine clearly determine cell proliferation in the Ehrlich's ascites tumour model. This high control coefficient allows us to predict that in advanced tumours, which are commonly thiamine deficient, supplementation of thiamine could significantly increase tumour growth through transketolase activation. The effect of thiamine supplementation on tumour proliferation was demonstrated by in vivo experiments in mice with the ascites tumour. Thiamine supplementation in doses between 12.5 and 250 times the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for mice were administered starting on day four of tumour inoculation. We observed a high stimulatory effect on tumour growth of 164% compared to controls at a thiamine dose of 25 times the RDA. This growth stimulatory effect was predicted on the basis of correction of the pre-existing level of thiamine deficiency (42%), as assayed by the cofactor/enzyme ratio. Interestingly, at very high overdoses of thiamine, approximately 2500 times the RDA, thiamine supplementation had the opposite effect and caused 10% inhibition of tumour growth. This effect was heightened, resulting in a 36% decrease, when thiamine supplementation was administered from the 7th day prior to tumour inoculation. Our results show that thiamine supplementation

  15. Smurf1 regulation of DAB2IP controls cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lixin; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Sun, Liankun; North, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell proliferation, survival and migration are regulated by the deletion of ovarian carcinoma 2/disabled homolog 2 (DOC-2/DAB2) interacting protein (DAB2IP), a tumor suppressor that serves as a scaffold protein for H-Ras and TRAF2. Importantly, the oncogenic histone methyl-transferase EZH2 epigenetically down-regulates DAB2IP in a variety of tumors. Recently, we demonstrated that DAB2IP is negatively regulated by Akt-dependent phosphorylation and SCFFbw7-mediated degradation. Here, we further identify the oncoprotein Smurf1, an E3-ubiquitin ligase, as a novel negative regulator of DAB2IP. Smurf1-mediated cellular proliferation and migration are largely dependent on the presence of DAB2IP, suggesting that DAB2IP is a key effector molecule of Smurf1 oncogenic function. Additionally, we identify that similar to DAB2IP, Smurf1 is also a target of phosphorylation by both Akt1 and Akt2 kinases, which enhances Smurf1 abundance, leading to a reduction in DAB2IP. Given the role of DAB2IP in tumorigenesis and metastasis, our data identify Smurf1 as an upstream oncogenic factor that negatively regulates DAB2IP to govern aberrant cell growth and migration. PMID:27036023

  16. Tolerance to Gamma Radiation in the Tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini from Embryo to Adult Correlate Inversely with Cellular Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Pardo, Eliana; Jönsson, K Ingemar; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Haghdoost, Siamak; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are highly tolerant to desiccation and ionizing radiation but the mechanisms of this tolerance are not well understood. In this paper, we report studies on dose responses of adults and eggs of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini exposed to gamma radiation. In adults the LD50/48h for survival was estimated at ~ 4200 Gy, and doses higher than 100 Gy reduced both fertility and hatchability of laid eggs drastically. We also evaluated the effect of radiation (doses 50 Gy, 200 Gy, 500 Gy) on eggs in the early and late embryonic stage of development, and observed a reduced hatchability in the early stage, while no effect was found in the late stage of development. Survival of juveniles from irradiated eggs was highly affected by a 500 Gy dose, both in the early and the late stage. Juveniles hatched from eggs irradiated at 50 Gy and 200 Gy developed into adults and produced offspring, but their fertility was reduced compared to the controls. Finally we measured the effect of low temperature during irradiation at 4000 Gy and 4500 Gy on survival in adult tardigrades, and observed a slight delay in the expressed mortality when tardigrades were irradiated on ice. Since H. dujardini is a freshwater tardigrade with lower tolerance to desiccation compared to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, the high radiation tolerance in adults, similar to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, is unexpected and seems to challenge the idea that desiccation and radiation tolerance rely on the same molecular mechanisms. We suggest that the higher radiation tolerance in adults and late stage embryos of H. dujardini (and in other studied tardigrades) compared to early stage embryos may partly be due to limited mitotic activity, since tardigrades have a low degree of somatic cell division (eutely), and dividing cells are known to be more sensitive to radiation.

  17. Tolerance to Gamma Radiation in the Tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini from Embryo to Adult Correlate Inversely with Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Pardo, Eliana; Jönsson, K. Ingemar; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Haghdoost, Siamak; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are highly tolerant to desiccation and ionizing radiation but the mechanisms of this tolerance are not well understood. In this paper, we report studies on dose responses of adults and eggs of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini exposed to gamma radiation. In adults the LD50/48h for survival was estimated at ~ 4200 Gy, and doses higher than 100 Gy reduced both fertility and hatchability of laid eggs drastically. We also evaluated the effect of radiation (doses 50 Gy, 200 Gy, 500 Gy) on eggs in the early and late embryonic stage of development, and observed a reduced hatchability in the early stage, while no effect was found in the late stage of development. Survival of juveniles from irradiated eggs was highly affected by a 500 Gy dose, both in the early and the late stage. Juveniles hatched from eggs irradiated at 50 Gy and 200 Gy developed into adults and produced offspring, but their fertility was reduced compared to the controls. Finally we measured the effect of low temperature during irradiation at 4000 Gy and 4500 Gy on survival in adult tardigrades, and observed a slight delay in the expressed mortality when tardigrades were irradiated on ice. Since H. dujardini is a freshwater tardigrade with lower tolerance to desiccation compared to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, the high radiation tolerance in adults, similar to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, is unexpected and seems to challenge the idea that desiccation and radiation tolerance rely on the same molecular mechanisms. We suggest that the higher radiation tolerance in adults and late stage embryos of H. dujardini (and in other studied tardigrades) compared to early stage embryos may partly be due to limited mitotic activity, since tardigrades have a low degree of somatic cell division (eutely), and dividing cells are known to be more sensitive to radiation. PMID:26208275

  18. Tolerance to Gamma Radiation in the Tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini from Embryo to Adult Correlate Inversely with Cellular Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Pardo, Eliana; Jönsson, K Ingemar; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Haghdoost, Siamak; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are highly tolerant to desiccation and ionizing radiation but the mechanisms of this tolerance are not well understood. In this paper, we report studies on dose responses of adults and eggs of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini exposed to gamma radiation. In adults the LD50/48h for survival was estimated at ~ 4200 Gy, and doses higher than 100 Gy reduced both fertility and hatchability of laid eggs drastically. We also evaluated the effect of radiation (doses 50 Gy, 200 Gy, 500 Gy) on eggs in the early and late embryonic stage of development, and observed a reduced hatchability in the early stage, while no effect was found in the late stage of development. Survival of juveniles from irradiated eggs was highly affected by a 500 Gy dose, both in the early and the late stage. Juveniles hatched from eggs irradiated at 50 Gy and 200 Gy developed into adults and produced offspring, but their fertility was reduced compared to the controls. Finally we measured the effect of low temperature during irradiation at 4000 Gy and 4500 Gy on survival in adult tardigrades, and observed a slight delay in the expressed mortality when tardigrades were irradiated on ice. Since H. dujardini is a freshwater tardigrade with lower tolerance to desiccation compared to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, the high radiation tolerance in adults, similar to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, is unexpected and seems to challenge the idea that desiccation and radiation tolerance rely on the same molecular mechanisms. We suggest that the higher radiation tolerance in adults and late stage embryos of H. dujardini (and in other studied tardigrades) compared to early stage embryos may partly be due to limited mitotic activity, since tardigrades have a low degree of somatic cell division (eutely), and dividing cells are known to be more sensitive to radiation. PMID:26208275

  19. ING5 Is Phosphorylated by CDK2 and Controls Cell Proliferation Independently of p53

    PubMed Central

    Linzen, Ulrike; Lilischkis, Richard; Pandithage, Ruwin; Schilling, Britta; Ullius, Andrea; Lüscher-Firzlaff, Juliane; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Lüscher, Bernhard; Vervoorts, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of growth (ING) proteins have multiple functions in the control of cell proliferation, mainly by regulating processes associated with chromatin regulation and gene expression. ING5 has been described to regulate aspects of gene transcription and replication. Moreover deregulation of ING5 is observed in different tumors, potentially functioning as a tumor suppressor. Gene transcription in late G1 and in S phase and replication is regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) in complex with cyclin E or cyclin A. CDK2 complexes phosphorylate and regulate several substrate proteins relevant for overcoming the restriction point and promoting S phase. We have identified ING5 as a novel CDK2 substrate. ING5 is phosphorylated at a single site, threonine 152, by cyclin E/CDK2 and cyclin A/CDK2 in vitro. This site is also phosphorylated in cells in a cell cycle dependent manner, consistent with it being a CDK2 substrate. Furthermore overexpression of cyclin E/CDK2 stimulates while the CDK2 inhibitor p27KIP1 represses phosphorylation at threonine 152. This site is located in a bipartite nuclear localization sequence but its phosphorylation was not sufficient to deregulate the subcellular localization of ING5. Although ING5 interacts with the tumor suppressor p53, we could not establish p53-dependent regulation of cell proliferation by ING5 and by phospho-site mutants. Instead we observed that the knockdown of ING5 resulted in a strong reduction of proliferation in different tumor cell lines, irrespective of the p53 status. This inhibition of proliferation was at least in part due to the induction of apoptosis. In summary we identified a phosphorylation site at threonine 152 of ING5 that is cell cycle regulated and we observed that ING5 is necessary for tumor cell proliferation, without any apparent dependency on the tumor suppressor p53. PMID:25860957

  20. BTG2 bridges PABPC1 RNA-binding domains and CAF1 deadenylase to control cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Stupfler, Benjamin; Birck, Catherine; Séraphin, Bertrand; Mauxion, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    While BTG2 plays an important role in cellular differentiation and cancer, its precise molecular function remains unclear. BTG2 interacts with CAF1 deadenylase through its APRO domain, a defining feature of BTG/Tob factors. Our previous experiments revealed that expression of BTG2 promoted mRNA poly(A) tail shortening through an undefined mechanism. Here we report that the APRO domain of BTG2 interacts directly with the first RRM domain of the poly(A)-binding protein PABPC1. Moreover, PABPC1 RRM and BTG2 APRO domains are sufficient to stimulate CAF1 deadenylase activity in vitro in the absence of other CCR4–NOT complex subunits. Our results unravel thus the mechanism by which BTG2 stimulates mRNA deadenylation, demonstrating its direct role in poly(A) tail length control. Importantly, we also show that the interaction of BTG2 with the first RRM domain of PABPC1 is required for BTG2 to control cell proliferation. PMID:26912148

  1. Therapeutic intervention at cellular quality control systems in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Daniela M; Esteves, A Raquel; Silva, Diana F F; Martins-Branco, Diogo; Santos, Daniel; Pimentel, Diana F Gomes; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2011-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis relies on quality control systems so that damaged biologic structures are either repaired or degraded and entirely replaced by newly formed proteins or even organelles. The clearance of dysfunctional cellular structures in long-lived postmitotic cells, like neurons, is essential to eliminate, per example, defective mitochondria, lipofuscin-loaded lysosomes and oxidized proteins. Short-lived proteins are degraded mainly by proteases and proteasomes whether most long-lived proteins and all organelles are digested by autophagy in the lysosomes. Recently, it an interplay was established between the ubiquitin-proteasome system and macroautophagy, so that both degradative mechanisms compensate for each other. In this article we describe each of these clearance systems and their contribution to neuronal quality control. We will highlight some of the findings that provide evidence for the dysfunction of these systems in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Ultimately, we provide an outline on potential therapeutic interventions based on the modulation of cellular degradative systems.

  2. miR-965 controls cell proliferation and migration during tissue morphogenesis in the Drosophila abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Pushpa; Cohen, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Formation of the Drosophila adult abdomen involves a process of tissue replacement in which larval epidermal cells are replaced by adult cells. The progenitors of the adult epidermis are specified during embryogenesis and, unlike the imaginal discs that make up the thoracic and head segments, they remain quiescent during larval development. During pupal development, the abdominal histoblast cells proliferate and migrate to replace the larval epidermis. Here, we provide evidence that the microRNA, miR-965, acts via string and wingless to control histoblast proliferation and migration. Ecdysone signaling downregulates miR-965 at the onset of pupariation, linking activation of the histoblast nests to the hormonal control of metamorphosis. Replacement of the larval epidermis by adult epidermal progenitors involves regulation of both cell-intrinsic events and cell communication. By regulating both cell proliferation and cell migration, miR-965 contributes to the robustness of this morphogenetic system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07389.001 PMID:26226636

  3. Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: The non-proliferation experiment. First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Staehle, G.; Stull, S.; Talaber, C.

    1994-05-01

    In this issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies we present the initial findings of the recent Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), conducted by the Department of Energy at the Nevada Test Site. Through an introduction and pictorial walk-through, Marv Denny and Jay Zucca of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory describe the overall experiment. This is followed by scientific and technical abstracts of the complex suite of experiments and analyses, which were presented at the Symposium on Non-Proliferation Experiment Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, April 19--21, 1994. Questions regarding the ongoing analysis and conclusions from the NPE should be directed to Leslie Casey in the Office of Research and Development within the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security of DOE. Her phone number is 202-586-2151.

  4. Tubulin glycylases are required for primary cilia, control of cell proliferation and tumor development in colon

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Cecilia; Papon, Laura; Cacheux, Wulfran; Marques Sousa, Patricia; Lascano, Valeria; Tort, Olivia; Giordano, Tiziana; Vacher, Sophie; Lemmers, Benedicte; Mariani, Pascale; Meseure, Didier; Medema, Jan Paul; Bièche, Ivan; Hahne, Michael; Janke, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    TTLL3 and TTLL8 are tubulin glycine ligases catalyzing posttranslational glycylation of microtubules. We show here for the first time that these enzymes are required for robust formation of primary cilia. We further discover the existence of primary cilia in colon and demonstrate that TTLL3 is the only glycylase in this organ. As a consequence, colon epithelium shows a reduced number of primary cilia accompanied by an increased rate of cell division in TTLL3-knockout mice. Strikingly, higher proliferation is compensated by faster tissue turnover in normal colon. In a mouse model for tumorigenesis, lack of TTLL3 strongly promotes tumor development. We further demonstrate that decreased levels of TTLL3 expression are linked to the development of human colorectal carcinomas. Thus, we have uncovered a novel role for tubulin glycylation in primary cilia maintenance, which controls cell proliferation of colon epithelial cells and plays an essential role in colon cancer development. PMID:25180231

  5. Fibrosarcoma versus fibromatoses and cellular nodular fasciitis. A comparative study of their proliferative activity using proliferating cell nuclear antigen, DNA flow cytometry, and p53.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Y; Fukuda, T; Tsuneyoshi, M

    1994-07-01

    We analyzed the proliferative activities, immunoreactivity of the p53 protein, and aneuploidy in patients with benign and malignant fibrous lesions, including 19 with nodular fasciitis (cellular type) (6-88 years old, mean 42.9), 11 with abdominal fibromatoses (22-74 years old, mean 37.9), 13 with extraabdominal fibromatoses (2-38 years old, mean 19.5), and 23 with fibrosarcomas (adult type: 16-71 years old, mean 47.3; infantile type: 3 months to 9 years, mean 2.9) using immunohistochemistry to determine proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PC10) and p53 protein (CM1) as well as performing DNA flow cytometry. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) score was measured as the ratio of PCNA-positive nuclear size/total nuclear size determined by an image analysis computer system. The distribution pattern of the PCNA-positive cells was uneven in each instance of nodular fasciitis, in contrast to the distribution in abdominal fibromatosis, extraabdominal fibromatosis, and fibrosarcoma. Both fibrosarcoma (28.4 +/- 20.0) and nodular fasciitis (33.6 +/- 20.9) exhibited a larger value and a greater variation in the PCNA score than did either abdominal (13.5 +/- 14.5) or extraabdominal fibromatosis (19.9 +/- 21.5). Abdominal fibromatosis exhibited a smaller value and less variation in the score. In short, the PCNA score did not correlate with the malignant potential. The proliferative index (S + G2 + M fraction) in fibrosarcoma was significantly higher than in either nodular fasciitis or abdominal fibromatosis. Aneuploidy was detected in five cases (26%) of fibrosarcoma, while six (26%) fibrosarcomas showed p53 positivity. Furthermore, p53-positive patients had a worse survival (0.01 < p < 0.05), and p53 positivity correlated with the proliferative index (p < 0.01). In conclusion, the PCNA score simply indicates the proliferative activity independent of malignant potential. On the other hand, p53 positivity, proliferative index, and aneuploidy are all indicators of

  6. Translationally controlled tumor protein supplemented chitosan modified glass ionomer cement promotes osteoblast proliferation and function.

    PubMed

    Sangsuwan, Jiraporn; Wanichpakorn, Supreya; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) supplemented in a novel glass ionomer cement (BIO-GIC) on normal human osteoblasts (NHost cells). BIO-GIC was a glass ionomer cement (GIC) modified by adding chitosan and albumin to promote the release of TCTP. NHost cells were seeded on specimens of GIC, GIC+TCTP, BIO-GIC and BIO-GIC+TCTP. Cell proliferation was determined by BrdU assay. It was found that BIO-GIC+TCTP had significantly higher proliferation of cells than other specimens. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and osteopontin (OPN) gene expressions assessed by quantitative real time PCR and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were used to determine cell differentiation. Bone cell function was investigated by calcium deposition using alizarin assay. Both BMP-2 and OPN gene expressions of cells cultured on specimens with added TCTP increased gradually up-regulation after day 1 and reached the highest on day 3 then down-regulation on day 7. The ALP activity of cells cultured on BIO-GIC+TCTP for 7 days and calcium content after 14 days were significantly higher than other groups. BIO-GIC+TCTP can promote osteoblast cells proliferation, differentiation and function.

  7. Two-stage control of cell proliferation induced in rat liver by alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Hermann, R

    1977-01-01

    Determinants of the timing of DNA synthesis in rat liver were studied, using alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane as a tool for stimulation of cell proliferation. One determinant is the time of alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane administration. The increase in DNA synthesis starts after a lag phase (prereplicative phase) of minimally 20 hr. Use of animals adapted to a controlled feeding and lighting schedule revealed a second determinant provided by food consumption. Initiation of DNA synthesis is suppressed by fasting or protein deprivation and occurs 5 to 8 hr after readministration of a protein-containing diet. The light-dark rhythm has no direct influence on the timing of DNA synthesis. Stimulation of hepatic DNA synthesis, therefore appears to require two different sequential signals. The first is provided by alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane, and the second is provided by protein intake. In the absence of the second signal, committed cells are arrested at a critical point of the prereplicative phase and accumulate. Protein intake permits release from the block, and the accumulated cells enter the S period almost synchronously after completion of the remaining 5 to 8 hr of the prereplicative phase. These observations provide a means of synchronizing, in the living animal, a proliferating population of hepatocytes. In addition, they offer an explanation for the diurnal rhythmicity in the rate of hepatic cell proliferation. PMID:63327

  8. Prokineticin Receptor 1 as a Novel Suppressor of Preadipocyte Proliferation and Differentiation to Control Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Messaddeq, Nadia; Valet, Phillippe; Boulberdaa, Mounia; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Adipocyte renewal from preadipocytes occurs throughout the lifetime and contributes to obesity. To date, little is known about the mechanisms that control preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. Prokineticin-2 is an angiogenic and anorexigenic hormone that activate two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): PKR1 and PKR2. Prokineticin-2 regulates food intake and energy metabolism via central mechanisms (PKR2). The peripheral effect of prokineticin-2 on adipocytes/preadipocytes has not been studied yet. Methodology/Principal Findings Since adipocytes and preadipocytes express mainly prokineticin receptor-1 (PKR1), here, we explored the role of PKR1 in adipose tissue expansion, generating PKR1-null (PKR1−/−) and adipocyte-specific (PKR1ad−/−) mutant mice, and using murine and human preadipocyte cell lines. Both PKR1−/− and PKR1ad−/− had excessive abdominal adipose tissue, but only PKR1−/− mice showed severe obesity and diabetes-like syndrome. PKR1ad−/−) mice had increased proliferating preadipocytes and newly formed adipocyte levels, leading to expansion of adipose tissue. Using PKR1-knockdown in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, we show that PKR1 directly inhibits preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. These PKR1 cell autonomous actions appear targeted at preadipocyte cell cycle regulatory pathways, through reducing cyclin D, E, cdk2, c-Myc levels. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest PKR1 to be a crucial player in the preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. Our data should facilitate studies of both the pathogenesis and therapy of obesity in humans. PMID:24324673

  9. Diagnostic and prognostic value of cellular proliferation assessment with Ki-67 protein in dogs suffering from benign and malignant perianal tumors.

    PubMed

    Brodzki, Adam; Łopuszyński, Wojciech; Brodzki, Piotr; Tatara, Marcin R

    2014-01-01

    In the perianal region of carnivores, skin consists of modified sebaceous glands called perianal glands. Tumors originating from perianal glands are the third most frequent type of neoplasm in male dogs after neoplastic diseases of testes and skin. Ki-67 is a nuclear non-histone protein considered a proliferation marker in normal and neoplastic proliferating cells. Previous investigations revealed that Ki-67 expression may be used as a prognostic factor for breast cancer in humans. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic and prognostic value of Ki-67 evaluation in dogs suffering from benign and malignant perianal tumors. The highest value of the Ki-67 index was obtained in the carcinoma group (18.50% ± 2.68), significantly higher compared to the values obtained in the control tissue (7.63% ± 2.12) and adenoma (7.33% ± 1.06; all P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences in the Ki-67 index were not found between the epithelioma group (11.95% ± 1.96) and all other groups (P < 0.05). This investigation on dogs with perianal gland tumors has shown significantly increased expression of Ki-67 antigen in carcinoma cells, while the expression of this protein was similar in the case of control tissues, adenoma and epithelioma. Thus, it may be postulated that Ki-67 evaluation in perianal gland tumors in dogs may serve as a useful marker possessing high diagnostic and prognostic value and enabling differentiation of malignant and benign tumors. PMID:25412511

  10. Control of Drosophila Type I and Type II central brain neuroblast proliferation by bantam microRNA.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ruifen; Cohen, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of stem cell self-renewal by microRNAs is emerging as an important mechanism controlling tissue homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence that bantam microRNA controls neuroblast number and proliferation in the Drosophila central brain. Bantam also supports proliferation of transit-amplifying intermediate neural progenitor cells in type II neuroblast lineages. The stem cell factors brat and prospero are identified as bantam targets acting on different aspects of these processes. Thus, bantam appears to act in multiple regulatory steps in the maintenance and proliferation of neuroblasts and their progeny to regulate growth of the central brain.

  11. Control of Drosophila Type I and Type II central brain neuroblast proliferation by bantam microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Ruifen; Cohen, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of stem cell self-renewal by microRNAs is emerging as an important mechanism controlling tissue homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence that bantam microRNA controls neuroblast number and proliferation in the Drosophila central brain. Bantam also supports proliferation of transit-amplifying intermediate neural progenitor cells in type II neuroblast lineages. The stem cell factors brat and prospero are identified as bantam targets acting on different aspects of these processes. Thus, bantam appears to act in multiple regulatory steps in the maintenance and proliferation of neuroblasts and their progeny to regulate growth of the central brain. PMID:26395494

  12. Kindlin-1 controls Wnt and TGF-β availability to regulate cutaneous epithelial stem cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rognoni, Emanuel; Widmaier, Moritz; Jakobson, Madis; Ruppert, Raphael; Ussar, Siegfried; Katsougkri, Despoina; Böttcher, Ralph T.; Lai-Cheong, Joey E.; Rifkin, Daniel B.; McGrath, John A.; Fässler, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Kindlin-1 is an integrin tail binding protein that controls integrin activation. Mutations in the FERMT-1 gene lead to Kindler Syndrome in man, which is characterized by skin blistering, premature skin ageing and skin cancer of unknown etiology. Here we show that loss of Kindlin-1 in mouse keratinocytes recapitulates Kindler Syndrome, and in addition produces enlarged and hyperactive stem cell compartments, which lead to hyperthickened epidermis, ectopic hair follicle development and increased skin tumor susceptibility. Mechanistically, Kindlin-1 controls keratinocyte adhesion through β1-class integrins and proliferation and differentiation of cutaneous epithelial stem cells by promoting αvβ6 integrin-mediated TGFβ activation and by inhibiting Wnt-β-catenin signaling through an integrin-independent regulation of Wnt ligand expression. Our findings assign Kindlin-1 the novel and essential task to control cutaneous epithelial stem cell homeostasis by balancing TGFβ mediated growth inhibitory and Wnt-β-catenin mediated growth-promoting signals. PMID:24681597

  13. Force control of ionic polymer-metal composite actuators with cellular actuator method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Yushiro; Kamamichi, Norihiro

    2014-03-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) is one of the electro-active polymer materials which respond to electric stimuli with shape change. IPMC actuators can be activated with simple driving circuit and common control approach; however, dynamic characteristics change from environmental conditions such as the temperature or humidity. The output force of IPMC is very small, and the stress relaxation exists depending on the type of the counter-ions in the electrolyte. Therefore, it is desirable to construct robust controllers and connection of multiple actuator units to obtain stable and large output force. In this study, we apply a control method for cellular actuators to solve above problems. The cellular actuator is a concept of the actuators which consist of multiple actuator units. The actuator units connect in parallel or series, and each unit is controlled by distributed controllers, which are switched ON/OFF state stochastically depending on the broadcast error signal which is generated in the central controller. In this paper, we verify the control performance of the cellular actuator method through numerical simulations. In the simulations, we assume that the one hundred units of IPMC connected in parallel, the output force is controlled to the desired value. The control performance is investigated in the case of some mixed ratio of units whose counter-ions are Sodium (Na) ion or Tetraethylammonium (TEA). As a result of simulation, it was confirmed that the tracking performance is improved by combining the fast response actuator units of Na ions and the large output actuator units of TEA ions.

  14. Genetic characterization of p27(kip1) and stathmin in controlling cell proliferation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Berton, Stefania; Pellizzari, Ilenia; Fabris, Linda; D'Andrea, Sara; Segatto, Ilenia; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Marconi, Daniela; Schiappacassi, Monica; Benevol, Sara; Gattei, Valter; Colombatti, Alfonso; Belletti, Barbara; Baldassarre, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The CDK inhibitor p27(kip1) is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression, but the mechanisms by which p27(kip1) controls cell proliferation in vivo are still not fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated that the microtubule destabilizing protein stathmin is a relevant p27(kip1) binding partner. To get more insights into the in vivo significance of this interaction, we generated p27(kip1) and stathmin double knock-out (DKO) mice. Interestingly, thorough characterization of DKO mice demonstrated that most of the phenotypes of p27(kip1) null mice linked to the hyper-proliferative behavior, such as the increased body and organ weight, the outgrowth of the retina basal layer and the development of pituitary adenomas, were reverted by co-ablation of stathmin. In vivo analyses showed a reduced proliferation rate in DKO compared to p27(kip1) null mice, linked, at molecular level, to decreased kinase activity of CDK4/6, rather than of CDK1 and CDK2. Gene expression profiling of mouse thymuses confirmed the phenotypes observed in vivo, showing that DKO clustered with WT more than with p27 knock-out tissue. Taken together, our results demonstrate that stathmin cooperates with p27(kip1) to control the early phase of G1 to S phase transition and that this function may be of particular relevance in the context of tumor progression. PMID:25486569

  15. Cellular oxido-reductive proteins of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii control the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Elucidation of molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) biosynthesis is important to control its size, shape and monodispersity. The evaluation of molecular mechanism of biosynthesis of SNPs is of prime importance for the commercialization and methodology development for controlling the shape and size (uniform distribution) of SNPs. The unicellular algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was exploited as a model system to elucidate the role of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Results The C. reinhardtii cell free extract (in vitro) and in vivo cells mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles reveals SNPs of size range 5 ± 1 to 15 ± 2 nm and 5 ± 1 to 35 ± 5 nm respectively. In vivo biosynthesized SNPs were localized in the peripheral cytoplasm and at one side of flagella root, the site of pathway of ATP transport and its synthesis related enzymes. This provides an evidence for the involvement of oxidoreductive proteins in biosynthesis and stabilization of SNPs. Alteration in size distribution and decrease of synthesis rate of SNPs in protein-depleted fractions confirmed the involvement of cellular proteins in SNPs biosynthesis. Spectroscopic and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate the association of various proteins on C. reinhardtii mediated in vivo and in vitro biosynthesized SNPs. We have identified various cellular proteins associated with biosynthesized (in vivo and in vitro) SNPs by using MALDI-MS-MS, like ATP synthase, superoxide dismutase, carbonic anhydrase, ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase, histone etc. However, these proteins were not associated on the incubation of pre-synthesized silver nanoparticles in vitro. Conclusion Present study provides the indication of involvement of molecular machinery and various cellular proteins in the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles. In this report, the study is mainly focused towards understanding the role of diverse cellular protein in the synthesis and capping of silver nanoparticles using C. reinhardtii as

  16. Control of lactotrop proliferation by dopamine: Essential role of signaling through D2 receptors and ERKs

    PubMed Central

    Iaccarino, Ciro; Samad, Tarek A.; Mathis, Carole; Kercret, Henri; Picetti, Roberto; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2002-01-01

    Dopamine is thought to exert a negative control on lactotrop cell proliferation and prolactin production. Indeed, mice lacking the D2 receptor develop pituitary tumors of lactotrop origin. Because lactotrops express two isoforms of D2R, D2L, and D2S, in a specific ratio, we decided to explore the physiological importance of their relative abundance in vivo. Thus, we generated transgenic animals overexpressing either D2L or D2S in lactotrops. Increased expression of D2S, but not of D2L, leads to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induction, which results in pituitary hypoplasia. On the other hand, levels of phosphorylated MAPKs are drastically reduced in pituitary tumors generated by the absence of D2-dependent signaling. These results underline a critical role of D2-mediated MAPK activation in lactotrop proliferation. Furthermore, whereas D2S overexpression results to a drastic reduction of prolactin, D2L overexpression elevates it. Our findings underscore a different role of the two D2R isoforms in the pituitary gland physiology. PMID:12391292

  17. TFEB controls cellular lipid metabolism through a starvation-induced autoregulatory loop.

    PubMed

    Settembre, Carmine; De Cegli, Rossella; Mansueto, Gelsomina; Saha, Pradip K; Vetrini, Francesco; Visvikis, Orane; Huynh, Tuong; Carissimo, Annamaria; Palmer, Donna; Klisch, Tiemo Jürgen; Wollenberg, Amanda C; Di Bernardo, Diego; Chan, Lawrence; Irazoqui, Javier E; Ballabio, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    The lysosomal-autophagic pathway is activated by starvation and plays an important role in both cellular clearance and lipid catabolism. However, the transcriptional regulation of this pathway in response to metabolic cues is uncharacterized. Here we show that the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy, is induced by starvation through an autoregulatory feedback loop and exerts a global transcriptional control on lipid catabolism via Ppargc1α and Ppar1α. Thus, during starvation a transcriptional mechanism links the autophagic pathway to cellular energy metabolism. The conservation of this mechanism in Caenorhabditis elegans suggests a fundamental role for TFEB in the evolution of the adaptive response to food deprivation. Viral delivery of TFEB to the liver prevented weight gain and metabolic syndrome in both diet-induced and genetic mouse models of obesity, suggesting a new therapeutic strategy for disorders of lipid metabolism.

  18. The lysosome as a command-and-control center for cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun-Yan; Zoncu, Roberto

    2016-09-12

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles found in every eukaryotic cell. They are widely known as terminal catabolic stations that rid cells of waste products and scavenge metabolic building blocks that sustain essential biosynthetic reactions during starvation. In recent years, this classical view has been dramatically expanded by the discovery of new roles of the lysosome in nutrient sensing, transcriptional regulation, and metabolic homeostasis. These discoveries have elevated the lysosome to a decision-making center involved in the control of cellular growth and survival. Here we review these recently discovered properties of the lysosome, with a focus on how lysosomal signaling pathways respond to external and internal cues and how they ultimately enable metabolic homeostasis and cellular adaptation. PMID:27621362

  19. LKB1 Regulates Cerebellar Development by Controlling Sonic Hedgehog-mediated Granule Cell Precursor Proliferation and Granule Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yuqin; Zhang, Aizhen; Li, Haixiang; Jin, Yecheng; Sun, Xiaoyang; Li, Huashun; Gao, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    The Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1) gene plays crucial roles in cell differentiation, proliferation and the establishment of cell polarity. We created LKB1 conditional knockout mice (LKB1Atoh1 CKO) to investigate the function of LKB1 in cerebellar development. The LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice displayed motor dysfunction. In the LKB1Atoh1 CKO cerebellum, the overall structure had a larger volume and morelobules. LKB1 inactivationled to an increased proliferation of granule cell precursors (GCPs), aberrant granule cell migration and overproduction of unipolar brush cells. To investigate the mechanism underlying the abnormal foliation, we examined sonic hedgehog signalling (Shh) by testing its transcriptional mediators, the Gli proteins, which regulate the GCPs proliferation and cerebellar foliation during cerebellar development. The expression levels of Gli genes were significantly increased in the mutant cerebellum. In vitro assays showed that the proliferation of cultured GCPs from mutant cerebellum significantly increased, whereas the proliferation of mutant GCPs significantly decreased in the presence of a Shh inhibitor GDC-0049. Thus, LKB1 deficiency in the LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice enhanced Shh signalling, leading to the excessive GCP proliferation and the formation of extra lobules. We proposed that LKB1 regulates cerebellar development by controlling GCPs proliferation through Shh signalling during cerebellar development. PMID:26549569

  20. Effect of Chaihu-Shugan-San on the mRNA expression of the 5-HT1A receptor and cellular proliferation in the hippocampus of epileptic rats with depression

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PING; LI, LIANG; LIU, XUE-JUN; CAI, XIONG; SUN, MEI-ZHEN; HE, JUN-FENG; ZENG, GUANG; HUANG, HUI-YONG

    2016-01-01

    Chaihu-Shugan-San (CHSGS) is a herbal preparation that has been shown to effectively relieve neurologic impairment and reduce depression. However, the efficacy of CHSGS in the treatment of patients with epilepsy with depression is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, adult rats were exposed to chronic mild stress following the establishment of chronic pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Subsequently, a sucrose consumption test and open-field test (OFT) were performed to assess depression-like behavior. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control, model, fluoxetine (1.8 g/kg) and CHSGS (2.7 g/kg) groups. The control and model groups received normal saline. The mRNA expression levels of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptor and the number of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis, respectively. Treatment administration was conducted by once daily intragastric perfusion for 28 days. The mRNA expression levels of the 5-HT1A receptor, the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, the consumption of sucrose, and frequency of vertical and horizontal movement scores in the OFT were enhanced in the fluoxetine and CHSGS groups compared with the model group (P<0.05). However, no statistically significant difference was detected between the fluoxetine and CHSGS groups. These data suggest that CHSGS is able to increase the expression of 5-HT1A receptor mRNA and cellular proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in epileptic rats with depression, and thus effectively improve certain symptoms of depression. PMID:26889228

  1. Molecular and cellular control of cell death and defense signaling in pepper.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) provides a good experimental system for studying the molecular and functional genomics underlying the ability of plants to defend themselves against microbial pathogens. Cell death is a genetically programmed response that requires specific host cellular factors. Hypersensitive response (HR) is defined as rapid cell death in response to a pathogen attack. Pepper plants respond to pathogen attacks by activating genetically controlled HR- or disease-associated cell death. HR cell death, specifically in incompatible interactions between pepper and Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria, is mediated by the molecular genetics and biochemical machinery that underlie pathogen-induced cell death in plants. Gene expression profiles during the HR-like cell death response, virus-induced gene silencing and transient and transgenic overexpression approaches are used to isolate and identify HR- or disease-associated cell death genes in pepper plants. Reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, cytosolic calcium ion and defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, ethylene and abscisic acid are involved in the execution of pathogen-induced cell death in plants. In this review, we summarize recent molecular and cellular studies of the pepper cell death-mediated defense response, highlighting the signaling events of cell death in disease-resistant pepper plants. Comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the cellular functions of pepper cell death response genes will aid the development of novel practical approaches to enhance disease resistance in pepper, thereby helping to secure the future supply of safe and nutritious pepper plants worldwide.

  2. Control of leucocyte function-associated antigen-1-dependent cellular conjugation by divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, A M; Alexandroff, A B; Lappin, M B; Esuvaranathan, K; James, K; Chisholm, G D

    1994-01-01

    The control of integrin activation is fundamental to an understanding of the integrin-dependent cellular adhesion thought to be important for a plethora of basic cellular functions. Using a cell-cell conjugation assay the role of divalent cations in leucocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-dependent cellular adhesion was further investigated. The conjugation of interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes to tumour cells was found to be energy dependent and required the presence of various divalent cations, removal of which decreased the level of conjugation. Increased concentrations of calcium, magnesium and manganese ions resulted in a corresponding increase in levels of conjugation. This increase in conjugation was LFA-1 dependent. Interestingly, when calcium ions were first removed from LFA-1, treatment of lymphocytes with magnesium and manganese ions gave significantly higher levels of conjugation than in the presence of calcium. Using a simple displacement study, calcium ions were shown to displace magnesium ions resulting in decreased conjugation. However, calcium ions were unable to displace manganese ions for binding to LFA-1. That manganese was exerting its effect via an LFA-1-dependent mechanism was confirmed using monoclonal antibodies to CD11a which negated the increased conjugation frequency due to manganese. PMID:7907574

  3. Lck/PLCγ control migration and proliferation of interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T cells via the Rac1 GTPase/glycogen phosphorylase pathway.

    PubMed

    Llavero, Francisco; Artaso, Alain; Lacerda, Hadriano M; Parada, Luis A; Zugaza, José L

    2016-11-01

    Recently, we have reported that the IL-2-stimulated T cells activate PKCθ in order to phosphorylate the serine residues of αPIX-RhoGEF, and to switch on the Rac1/PYGM pathway resulting in T cell migration and proliferation. However, the molecular mechanism connecting the activated IL-2-R with the PKCθ/αPIX/Rac1/PYGM pathway is still unknown. In this study, the use of a combined pharmacological and genetic approach identified Lck, a Src family member, as the tyrosine kinase phosphorylating PLCγ leading to Rac1 and PYGM activation in the IL-2-stimulated Kit 225 T cells via the PKCθ/αPIX pathway. The PLCγ tyrosine phosphorylation was required to activate first PKCθ, and then αPIX and Rac1/PYGM. The results presented here delineate a novel signalling pathway ranking equally in importance to the three major pathways controlled by the IL-2-R, i.e. PI3K, Ras/MAPK and JAK/STAT pathways. The overall evidence strongly indicates that the central biological role of the novel IL-2-R/Lck/PLCγ/PKCθ/αPIX/Rac1/PYGM signalling pathway is directly related to the control of fundamental cellular processes such as T cell migration and proliferation. PMID:27519475

  4. Leishmania Induces Survival, Proliferation and Elevated Cellular dNTP Levels in Human Monocytes Promoting Acceleration of HIV Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Daddacha, Waaqo; Overstreet, Michael G.; Lazarski, Chris A.; Fowell, Deborah J.; Kim, Baek

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease that is widely prevalent in many tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Infection with Leishmania has been recognized to induce a striking acceleration of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) infection in coinfected individuals through as yet incompletely understood mechanisms. Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage are the predominant cell types coinfected by both pathogens. Monocytes and macrophages contain extremely low levels of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) due to their lack of cell cycling and S phase, where dNTP biosynthesis is specifically activated. Lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, are unique among retroviruses in their ability to replicate in these non-dividing cells due, at least in part, to their highly efficient reverse transcriptase (RT). Nonetheless, viral replication progresses more efficiently in the setting of higher intracellular dNTP concentrations related to enhanced enzyme kinetics of the viral RT. In the present study, in vitro infection of CD14+ peripheral blood-derived human monocytes with Leishmania major was found to induce differentiation, marked elevation of cellular p53R2 ribonucleotide reductase subunit and R2 subunit expression. The R2 subunit is restricted to the S phase of the cell cycle. Our dNTP assay demonstrated significant elevation of intracellular monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) dNTP concentrations in Leishmania-infected cell populations as compared to control cells. Infection of Leishmania-maturated MDMs with a pseudotyped GFP expressing HIV-1 resulted in increased numbers of GFP+ cells in the Leishmania-maturated MDMs as compared to control cells. Interestingly, a sub-population of Leishmania-maturated MDMs was found to have re-entered the cell cycle, as demonstrated by BrdU labeling. In conclusion, Leishmania infection of primary human monocytes promotes the induction of an S phase environment and elevated dNTP levels with notable elevation of HIV-1 expression

  5. 2D spatially controlled polymer micro patterning for cellular behavior studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, V.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Paraico, I.; Lippert, T.; Wokaun, A.; Dinescu, M.

    2011-04-01

    A simple and effective method to functionalize glass surfaces that enable polymer micropatterning and subsequent spatially controlled adhesion of cells is reported in this paper. The method involves the application of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) to achieve polymer patterning in a single step onto cell repellent substrates (i.e. polyethyleneglycol (PEG)). This approach was used to produce micron-size polyethyleneimine (PEI)-patterns alternating with cell-repellent areas. The focus of this work is the ability of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells to orient, migrate, and produce organized cellular arrangements on laser generated PEI patterns.

  6. Integration of UPRER and oxidative stress signaling in the control of intestinal stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifen; Zeng, Xiankun; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-08-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response of the endoplasmic reticulum (UPRER) controls proteostasis by adjusting the protein folding capacity of the ER to environmental and cell-intrinsic conditions. In metazoans, loss of proteostasis results in degenerative and proliferative diseases and cancers. The cellular and molecular mechanisms causing these phenotypes remain poorly understood. Here we show that the UPRER is a critical regulator of intestinal stem cell (ISC) quiescence in Drosophila melanogaster. We find that ISCs require activation of the UPRER for regenerative responses, but that a tissue-wide increase in ER stress triggers ISC hyperproliferation and epithelial dysplasia in aging animals. These effects are mediated by ISC-specific redox signaling through Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) and the transcription factor CncC. Our results identify a signaling network of proteostatic and oxidative stress responses that regulates ISC function and regenerative homeostasis in the intestinal epithelium. PMID:25166757

  7. Integration of UPRER and oxidative stress signaling in the control of intestinal stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifen; Zeng, Xiankun; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-08-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response of the endoplasmic reticulum (UPRER) controls proteostasis by adjusting the protein folding capacity of the ER to environmental and cell-intrinsic conditions. In metazoans, loss of proteostasis results in degenerative and proliferative diseases and cancers. The cellular and molecular mechanisms causing these phenotypes remain poorly understood. Here we show that the UPRER is a critical regulator of intestinal stem cell (ISC) quiescence in Drosophila melanogaster. We find that ISCs require activation of the UPRER for regenerative responses, but that a tissue-wide increase in ER stress triggers ISC hyperproliferation and epithelial dysplasia in aging animals. These effects are mediated by ISC-specific redox signaling through Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) and the transcription factor CncC. Our results identify a signaling network of proteostatic and oxidative stress responses that regulates ISC function and regenerative homeostasis in the intestinal epithelium.

  8. TERT Promotes Epithelial Proliferation through Transcriptional Control of a Myc- and Wnt-Related Developmental Program

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinkuk; Southworth, Lucinda K; Sarin, Kavita Y; Venteicher, Andrew S; Ma, Wenxiu; Chang, Woody; Cheung, Peggie; Jun, Sohee; Artandi, Maja K; Shah, Naman; Kim, Stuart K; Artandi, Steven E

    2008-01-01

    Telomerase serves a critical role in stem cell function and tissue homeostasis. This role depends on its ability to synthesize telomere repeats in a manner dependent on the reverse transcriptase (RT) function of its protein component telomerase RT (TERT), as well as on a novel pathway whose mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we use a TERT mutant lacking RT function (TERTci) to study the mechanism of TERT action in mammalian skin, an ideal tissue for studying progenitor cell biology. We show that TERTci retains the full activities of wild-type TERT in enhancing keratinocyte proliferation in skin and in activating resting hair follicle stem cells, which triggers initiation of a new hair follicle growth phase and promotes hair synthesis. To understand the nature of this RT-independent function for TERT, we studied the genome-wide transcriptional response to acute changes in TERT levels in mouse skin. We find that TERT facilitates activation of progenitor cells in the skin and hair follicle by triggering a rapid change in gene expression that significantly overlaps the program controlling natural hair follicle cycling in wild-type mice. Statistical comparisons to other microarray gene sets using pattern-matching algorithms revealed that the TERT transcriptional response strongly resembles those mediated by Myc and Wnt, two proteins intimately associated with stem cell function and cancer. These data show that TERT controls tissue progenitor cells via transcriptional regulation of a developmental program converging on the Myc and Wnt pathways. PMID:18208333

  9. Organ size control is dominant over Rb family inactivation to restrict proliferation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ehmer, Ursula; Zmoos, Anne-Flore; Auerbach, Raymond K.; Vaka, Dedeepya; Butte, Atul J.; Kay, Mark A.; Sage, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Summary In mammals, a cell’s decision to divide is thought to be under the control of the Rb/E2F pathway. We previously found that inactivation of the Rb family of cell cycle inhibitors (Rb, p107, and p130) in quiescent liver progenitors leads to uncontrolled division and cancer initiation. Here we show that, in contrast, deletion of the entire Rb gene family in mature hepatocytes is not sufficient for their long-term proliferation. The cell cycle block in Rb family mutant hepatocytes is independent of the Arf/p53/p21 checkpoint but can be abrogated upon decreasing liver size. At the molecular level, we identify YAP, a transcriptional regulator involved in organ size control, as a factor required for the sustained expression of cell cycle genes in hepatocytes. These experiments identify a novel, higher level of regulation of the cell cycle in vivo, in which signals regulating organ size are dominant regulators of the core cell cycle machinery. PMID:25017070

  10. Testosterone control of nucleic acid content and proliferation of epithelium and stroma in rat seminal vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, S J; Burchell, J M; Mainwaring, W I

    1976-01-01

    Tissue wet weight, nucleic acid content and epithelial and stromal cell numbers were measured in the seminal vesicles of sexually mature male rats. After castration, tissue weight and RNA decreased rapidly and in aprallel to reach, after 14 days, values only 15-20% of those in control (not castrated) animals. During this period, DNA decreased to a much lesser extent (by about 40%), but this change in DNA correlates well with the observed loss of cells from the epithelium. Testosterone in vivo promoted an immediate resynthesis of RNA, the value characteristic of control animals being reached within 80h. Delays occurred in the hormone-induced regain of tissue weight (30h) and DNA (40h), each of which preceded proliferation of the epithelium (40--50h). The cells of the stroma were unaffected by these changes in the androgenic statls of the animal. It is suggested that these proliferative changes in the epithelium cannot account for the previously reported induction by testosterone of basic secretory proteins in this tissue. PMID:1008845

  11. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14712.001 PMID:27183270

  12. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants.

    PubMed

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-05-16

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control.

  13. Nerve Regeneration Potential of Protocatechuic Acid in RSC96 Schwann Cells by Induction of Cellular Proliferation and Migration through IGF-IR-PI3K-Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ju, Da-Tong; Liao, Hung-En; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chung, Li-Chin; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Lin, Chien-Chung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-12-31

    Peripheral nerve injuries, caused by accidental trauma, acute compression or surgery, often result in temporary or life-long neuronal dysfunctions and inflict great economic or social burdens on the patients. Nerve cell proliferation is an essential process to restore injured nerves of adults. Schwann cells play a crucial role in endogenous repair of peripheral nerves due to their ability to proliferate, migrate and provide trophic support to axons via expression of various neurotrophic factors, such as the nerve growth factor (NGF), especially after nerve injury. Protocatechuic acid (PCA) is a dihydroxybenzoic acid, a type of phenolic acid, isolated from the kernels of Alpinia oxyphylla Miq (AOF), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine the fruits of which are widely used as a tonic, aphrodisiac, anti-salivation and anti-diarrheatic. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms by which PCA induces Schwann cell proliferation by activating IGF-IR-PI3K-Akt pathway. Treatment with PCA induces phosphorylation of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/serine - threonine kinase (PI3K/Akt) pathway, and activates expression of cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis after 18 h of treatment showed that proliferation of the RSC96 cells was enhanced by PCA treatment. The PCA induced proliferation was accompanied by modulation in the expressions of cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E and cyclin A. Knockdown of PI3K using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and inhibition of IGF-IR receptor resulted in the reduction in cell survival proteins. The results collectively showed that PCA treatment promoted cell proliferation and cell survival via IGF-I signaling. PMID:26717920

  14. Embryonic MicroRNA-369 Controls Metabolic Splicing Factors and Urges Cellular Reprograming.

    PubMed

    Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Dewi, Dyah Laksmi; Ozaki, Miyuki; Noguchi, Yuko; Mimori, Koshi; Gotoh, Noriko; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Shima, Hiroshi; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Noncoding microRNAs inhibit translation and lower the transcript stability of coding mRNA, however miR-369 s, in aberrant silencing genomic regions, stabilizes target proteins under cellular stress. We found that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells led to chromatin methylation of histone H3K4 at the miR-369 region on chromosome 12qF in mice, which is expressed in embryonic cells and is critical for pluripotency. Proteomic analyses revealed that miR-369 stabilized translation of pyruvate kinase (Pkm2) splicing factors such as HNRNPA2B1. Overexpression of miR-369 stimulated Pkm2 splicing and enhanced induction of cellular reprogramming by induced pluripotent stem cell factors, whereas miR-369 knockdown resulted in suppression. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the Argonaute complex contained the fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 and HNRNPA2B1 in a miR-369-depedent manner. Our findings demonstrate a unique role of the embryonic miR-369-HNRNPA2B1 axis in controlling metabolic enzyme function, and suggest a novel pathway linking epigenetic, transcriptional, and metabolic control in cell reprogramming. PMID:26176628

  15. Quality controls in cellular immunotherapies: rapid assessment of clinical grade dendritic cells by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Zhao, Yingdong; Tumaini, Barbara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Ping, Jin; Wang, Ena; Wood, Lauren V; Marincola, Francesco M; Puri, Raj K; Stroncek, David F

    2013-02-01

    Cell-based immunotherapies are among the most promising approaches for developing effective and targeted immune response. However, their clinical usefulness and the evaluation of their efficacy rely heavily on complex quality control assessment. Therefore, rapid systematic methods are urgently needed for the in-depth characterization of relevant factors affecting newly developed cell product consistency and the identification of reliable markers for quality control. Using dendritic cells (DCs) as a model, we present a strategy to comprehensively characterize manufactured cellular products in order to define factors affecting their variability, quality and function. After generating clinical grade human monocyte-derived mature DCs (mDCs), we tested by gene expression profiling the degrees of product consistency related to the manufacturing process and variability due to intra- and interdonor factors, and how each factor affects single gene variation. Then, by calculating for each gene an index of variation we selected candidate markers for identity testing, and defined a set of genes that may be useful comparability and potency markers. Subsequently, we confirmed the observed gene index of variation in a larger clinical data set. In conclusion, using high-throughput technology we developed a method for the characterization of cellular therapies and the discovery of novel candidate quality assurance markers.

  16. Embryonic MicroRNA-369 Controls Metabolic Splicing Factors and Urges Cellular Reprograming

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Dewi, Dyah Laksmi; Ozaki, Miyuki; Noguchi, Yuko; Mimori, Koshi; Gotoh, Noriko; Tanuma, Nobuhiro; Shima, Hiroshi; Doki, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Noncoding microRNAs inhibit translation and lower the transcript stability of coding mRNA, however miR-369 s, in aberrant silencing genomic regions, stabilizes target proteins under cellular stress. We found that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells led to chromatin methylation of histone H3K4 at the miR-369 region on chromosome 12qF in mice, which is expressed in embryonic cells and is critical for pluripotency. Proteomic analyses revealed that miR-369 stabilized translation of pyruvate kinase (Pkm2) splicing factors such as HNRNPA2B1. Overexpression of miR-369 stimulated Pkm2 splicing and enhanced induction of cellular reprogramming by induced pluripotent stem cell factors, whereas miR-369 knockdown resulted in suppression. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the Argonaute complex contained the fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 and HNRNPA2B1 in a miR-369-depedent manner. Our findings demonstrate a unique role of the embryonic miR-369-HNRNPA2B1 axis in controlling metabolic enzyme function, and suggest a novel pathway linking epigenetic, transcriptional, and metabolic control in cell reprogramming. PMID:26176628

  17. Genetic control of estrogen-regulated transcriptional and cellular responses in mouse uterus

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma H.; Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Liu, Liwen; del Rio, Roxana; Case, Laure K.; Lin, Chin-Yo; Korach, Kenneth S.; Teuscher, Cory

    2013-01-01

    The uterotropic response of the uterus to 17β-estradiol (E2) is genetically controlled, with marked variation observed depending on the mouse strain studied. Previous genetic studies from our laboratory using inbred mice that are high [C57BL/6J (B6)] or low [C3H/HeJ (C3H)] responders to E2 led to the identification of quantitative trait (QT) loci associated with phenotypic variation in uterine growth and leukocyte infiltration. The mechanisms underlying differential responsiveness to E2, and the genes involved, are unknown. Therefore, we used a microarray approach to show association of distinct E2-regulated transcriptional signatures with genetically controlled high and low responses to E2 and their segregation in (C57BL/6J×C3H/HeJ) F1 hybrids. Among the 6664 E2-regulated transcripts, analysis of cellular functions of those that were strain specific indicated C3H-selective enrichment of apoptosis, consistent with a 7-fold increase in the apoptosis indicator CASP3, and a 2.4-fold decrease in the apoptosis inhibitor Naip1 (Birc1a) in C3H vs. B6 following treatment with E2. In addition, several differentially expressed transcripts reside within our previously identified QT loci, including the ERα-tethering factor Runx1, demonstrated to enhance E2-mediated transcript regulation. The level of RUNX1 in uterine epithelial cells was shown to be 3.5-fold greater in B6 compared to C3H. Our novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the genetic control of tissue sensitivity to estrogen have great potential to advance understanding of individualized effects in physiological and disease states.—Wall, E. H., Hewitt, S. C., Liu, L., del Rio, R., Case, L. K., Lin, C.-Y., Korach, K. S., Teuscher, C. Genetic control of estrogen-regulated transcriptional and cellular responses in mouse uterus. PMID:23371066

  18. Ectopic Expression of a Maize Hybrid Down-Regulated Gene ZmARF25 Decreases Organ Size by Affecting Cellular Proliferation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingxue; Xing, Jiewen; Wang, Tianya; Yang, Hua; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Hu, Zhaorong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-01-01

    Heterosis is associated with differential gene expression between hybrids and their parental lines, and the genes involved in cell proliferation played important roles. AtARF2 is a general cell proliferation repressor in Arabidopsis. In our previous study, two homologues (ZmARF10 and ZmARF25) of AtARF2 were identified in maize, but their relationship with heterosis was not elucidated. Here, the expression patterns of ZmARF10 and ZmARF25 in seedling leaves of maize hybrids and their parental lines were analyzed. The results of qRT-PCR exhibited that ZmARF25 was down-regulated in leaf basal region of hybrids. Moreover, overexpression of ZmARF25 led to reduced organ size in Arabidopsis, which was mainly due to the decrease in cell number, not cell size. In addition, the cell proliferation related genes AtANT, AtGIF1 and AtGRF5 were down-regulated in 35S::ZmARF25 transgenic lines. Collectively, we proposed that the down-regulation of ZmARF25 in maize hybrid may accelerate cell proliferation and promote leaf development, which, in turn, contributes to the observed leaf size heterosis in maize. PMID:24756087

  19. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation, but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained fro...

  20. Dual transcriptional-translational cascade permits cellular level tuneable expression control

    PubMed Central

    Morra, Rosa; Shankar, Jayendra; Robinson, Christopher J.; Halliwell, Samantha; Butler, Lisa; Upton, Mathew; Hay, Sam; Micklefield, Jason; Dixon, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The ability to induce gene expression in a small molecule dependent manner has led to many applications in target discovery, functional elucidation and bio-production. To date these applications have relied on a limited set of protein-based control mechanisms operating at the level of transcription initiation. The discovery, design and reengineering of riboswitches offer an alternative means by which to control gene expression. Here we report the development and characterization of a novel tunable recombinant expression system, termed RiboTite, which operates at both the transcriptional and translational level. Using standard inducible promoters and orthogonal riboswitches, a multi-layered modular genetic control circuit was developed to control the expression of both bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and recombinant gene(s) of interest. The system was benchmarked against a number of commonly used E. coli expression systems, and shows tight basal control, precise analogue tunability of gene expression at the cellular level, dose-dependent regulation of protein production rates over extended growth periods and enhanced cell viability. This novel system expands the number of E. coli expression systems for use in recombinant protein production and represents a major performance enhancement over and above the most widely used expression systems. PMID:26405200

  1. Dual transcriptional-translational cascade permits cellular level tuneable expression control.

    PubMed

    Morra, Rosa; Shankar, Jayendra; Robinson, Christopher J; Halliwell, Samantha; Butler, Lisa; Upton, Mathew; Hay, Sam; Micklefield, Jason; Dixon, Neil

    2016-02-18

    The ability to induce gene expression in a small molecule dependent manner has led to many applications in target discovery, functional elucidation and bio-production. To date these applications have relied on a limited set of protein-based control mechanisms operating at the level of transcription initiation. The discovery, design and reengineering of riboswitches offer an alternative means by which to control gene expression. Here we report the development and characterization of a novel tunable recombinant expression system, termed RiboTite, which operates at both the transcriptional and translational level. Using standard inducible promoters and orthogonal riboswitches, a multi-layered modular genetic control circuit was developed to control the expression of both bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and recombinant gene(s) of interest. The system was benchmarked against a number of commonly used E. coli expression systems, and shows tight basal control, precise analogue tunability of gene expression at the cellular level, dose-dependent regulation of protein production rates over extended growth periods and enhanced cell viability. This novel system expands the number of E. coli expression systems for use in recombinant protein production and represents a major performance enhancement over and above the most widely used expression systems. PMID:26405200

  2. Cryptococcus neoformans Intracellular Proliferation and Capsule Size Determines Early Macrophage Control of Infection.

    PubMed

    Bojarczuk, Aleksandra; Miller, Katie A; Hotham, Richard; Lewis, Amy; Ogryzko, Nikolay V; Kamuyango, Alfred A; Frost, Helen; Gibson, Rory H; Stillman, Eleanor; May, Robin C; Renshaw, Stephen A; Johnston, Simon A

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Many questions remain regarding the function of macrophages in normal clearance of cryptococcal infection and the defects present in uncontrolled cryptococcosis. Two current limitations are: 1) The difficulties in interpreting studies using isolated macrophages in the context of the progression of infection, and 2) The use of high resolution imaging in understanding immune cell behavior during animal infection. Here we describe a high-content imaging method in a zebrafish model of cryptococcosis that permits the detailed analysis of macrophage interactions with C. neoformans during infection. Using this approach we demonstrate that, while macrophages are critical for control of C. neoformans, a failure of macrophage response is not the limiting defect in fatal infections. We find phagocytosis is restrained very early in infection and that increases in cryptococcal number are driven by intracellular proliferation. We show that macrophages preferentially phagocytose cryptococci with smaller polysaccharide capsules and that capsule size is greatly increased over twenty-four hours of infection, a change that is sufficient to severely limit further phagocytosis. Thus, high-content imaging of cryptococcal infection in vivo demonstrates how very early interactions between macrophages and cryptococci are critical in the outcome of cryptococcosis. PMID:26887656

  3. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors under epigenetic control in placental metabolism and fetal development.

    PubMed

    Lendvai, Ágnes; Deutsch, Manuel J; Plösch, Torsten; Ensenauer, Regina

    2016-05-15

    The placental metabolism can adapt to the environment throughout pregnancy to both the demands of the fetus and the signals from the mother. Such adaption processes include epigenetic mechanisms, which alter gene expression and may influence the offspring's health. These mechanisms are linked to the diversity of prenatal environmental exposures, including maternal under- or overnutrition or gestational diabetes. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors that contribute to the developmental plasticity of the placenta by regulating lipid and glucose metabolism pathways, including lipogenesis, steroidogenesis, glucose transporters, and placental signaling pathways, thus representing a link between energy metabolism and reproduction. Among the PPAR isoforms, PPARγ appears to be the main modulator of mammalian placentation. Certain fatty acids and lipid-derived moieties are the natural activating PPAR ligands. By controlling the amounts of maternal nutrients that go across to the fetus, the PPARs play an important regulatory role in placenta metabolism, thereby adapting to the maternal nutritional status. As demonstrated in animal studies, maternal nutrition during gestation can exert long-term influences on the PPAR methylation pattern in offspring organs. This review underlines the current state of knowledge on the relationship between environmental factors and the epigenetic regulation of the PPARs in placenta metabolism and offspring development. PMID:26860983

  4. mTOR Controls Ovarian Follicle Growth by Regulating Granulosa Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, James; Yaba, Aylin; Kasiman, Corinna; Thomson, Travis; Johnson, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    We have shown that inhibition of mTOR in granulosa cells and ovarian follicles results in compromised granulosa proliferation and reduced follicle growth. Further analysis here using spontaneously immortalized rat granulosa cells has revealed that mTOR pathway activity is enhanced during M-phase of the cell cycle. mTOR specific phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP, and expression of Raptor are all enhanced during M-phase. The predominant effect of mTOR inhibition by the specific inhibitor Rapamycin (RAP) was a dose-responsive arrest in the G1 cell cycle stage. The fraction of granulosa cells that continued to divide in the presence of RAP exhibited a dose-dependent increase in aberrant mitotic figures known as anaphase bridges. Strikingly, estradiol consistently decreased the incidence of aberrant mitotic figures. In mice treated with RAP, the mitotic index was reduced compared to controls, and a similar increase in aberrant mitotic events was noted. RAP injected during a superovulation regime resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the numbers of eggs ovulated. Implications for the real-time regulation of follicle growth and dominance, including the consequences of increased numbers of aneuploid granulosa cells, are discussed. PMID:21750711

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans Intracellular Proliferation and Capsule Size Determines Early Macrophage Control of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bojarczuk, Aleksandra; Miller, Katie A.; Hotham, Richard; Lewis, Amy; Ogryzko, Nikolay V.; Kamuyango, Alfred A.; Frost, Helen; Gibson, Rory H.; Stillman, Eleanor; May, Robin C.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Johnston, Simon A.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Many questions remain regarding the function of macrophages in normal clearance of cryptococcal infection and the defects present in uncontrolled cryptococcosis. Two current limitations are: 1) The difficulties in interpreting studies using isolated macrophages in the context of the progression of infection, and 2) The use of high resolution imaging in understanding immune cell behavior during animal infection. Here we describe a high-content imaging method in a zebrafish model of cryptococcosis that permits the detailed analysis of macrophage interactions with C. neoformans during infection. Using this approach we demonstrate that, while macrophages are critical for control of C. neoformans, a failure of macrophage response is not the limiting defect in fatal infections. We find phagocytosis is restrained very early in infection and that increases in cryptococcal number are driven by intracellular proliferation. We show that macrophages preferentially phagocytose cryptococci with smaller polysaccharide capsules and that capsule size is greatly increased over twenty-four hours of infection, a change that is sufficient to severely limit further phagocytosis. Thus, high-content imaging of cryptococcal infection in vivo demonstrates how very early interactions between macrophages and cryptococci are critical in the outcome of cryptococcosis. PMID:26887656

  6. Mechanical stimuli differentially control stem cell behavior: morphology, proliferation, and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Timothy M.; Chew, Douglas W.; Nieponice, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy has demonstrated applications in vascular regenerative medicine. Although blood vessels exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, there has been no rigorous, systematic analysis of mechanical stimulation on stem cell differentiation. We hypothesize that mechanical stimuli, relevant to the vasculature, can differentiate MSCs toward smooth muscle (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs). This was tested using a unique experimental platform to differentially apply various mechanical stimuli in parallel. Three forces, cyclic stretch, cyclic pressure, and laminar shear stress, were applied independently to mimic several vascular physiologic conditions. Experiments were conducted using subconfluent MSCs for 5 days and demonstrated significant effects on morphology and proliferation depending upon the type, magnitude, frequency, and duration of applied stimulation. We have defined thresholds of cyclic stretch that potentiate SMC protein expression, but did not find EC protein expression under any condition tested. However, a second set of experiments performed at confluence and aimed to elicit the temporal gene expression response of a select magnitude of each stimulus revealed that EC gene expression can be increased with cyclic pressure and shear stress in a cell-contact-dependent manner. Further, these MSCs also appear to express genes from multiple lineages simultaneously which may warrant further investigation into post-transcriptional mechanisms for controlling protein expression. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic examination of the effects of mechanical stimulation on MSCs and has implications for the understanding of stem cell biology, as well as potential bioreactor designs for tissue engineering and cell therapy applications. PMID:21253809

  7. A nucleolar mechanism controlling cell proliferation in stem cells and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Robert Y.L.; McKay, Ronald D.G.

    2002-01-01

    The unique property of stem cells to self-renew suggests specific mechanisms that regulate their cell-cycle progression. In the present study, we identify a novel protein, nucleostemin, found in the nucleoli of CNS stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and several cancer cell lines and preferentially expressed by other stem cell-enriched populations. It contains an N-terminal basic domain and two GTP-binding motifs. When stem cells differentiate, nucleostemin expression decreases rapidly prior to cell-cycle exit both in vitro and in vivo. Depletion or overexpression of nucleostemin reduces cell proliferation in CNS stem cells and transformed cells. Mutation analysis indicates that excessive nucleostemin, particularly mutants that lack the GTP-regulatory domain, prevents cells from entering mitosis and causes apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. The N-terminal basic domain specifies nucleolar localization, the p53 interaction, and is required for the cell death caused by overexpression. This work describes a novel nucleolar mechanism that controls the cell-cycle progression in CNS stem cells and cancer cells. PMID:12464630

  8. A Celiac Cellular Phenotype, with Altered LPP Sub-Cellular Distribution, Is Inducible in Controls by the Toxic Gliadin Peptide P31-43

    PubMed Central

    Nanayakkara, Merlin; Kosova, Roberta; Lania, Giuliana; Sarno, Marco; Gaito, Alessandra; Galatola, Martina; Greco, Luigi; Cuomo, Marialaura; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides P31-43 and P57-68 induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses, respectively. Alterations in the cell shape and actin cytoskeleton are present in celiac enterocytes, and gliadin peptides induce actin rearrangements in both the CD mucosa and cell lines. Cell shape is maintained by the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, sites of membrane attachment to the extracellular matrix. The locus of the human Lipoma Preferred Partner (LPP) gene was identified as strongly associated with CD using genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The LPP protein plays an important role in focal adhesion architecture and acts as a transcription factor in the nucleus. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a constitutive alteration of the cell shape and the cytoskeleton, involving LPP, occurs in a cell compartment far from the main inflammation site in CD fibroblasts from skin explants. We analyzed the cell shape, actin organization, focal adhesion number, focal adhesion proteins, LPP sub-cellular distribution and adhesion to fibronectin of fibroblasts obtained from CD patients on a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD) and controls, without and with treatment with A-gliadin peptide P31-43. We observed a “CD cellular phenotype” in these fibroblasts, characterized by an altered cell shape and actin organization, increased number of focal adhesions, and altered intracellular LPP protein distribution. The treatment of controls fibroblasts with gliadin peptide P31-43 mimics the CD cellular phenotype regarding the cell shape, adhesion capacity, focal adhesion number and LPP sub-cellular distribution, suggesting a close association between these alterations and CD pathogenesis. PMID:24278174

  9. The potential functional interaction of biglycan and WISP-1 in controlling differentiation and proliferation of osteogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Inkson, Colette A; Ono, Mitsuaki; Bi, Yanming; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Fisher, Larry W; Young, Marian F

    2009-01-01

    Biglycan (BGN) and WISP-1 are 2 extracellular matrix proteins that bind to each other and colocalize in mineralizing tissue. Here we show that WISP-1 abrogates the repression of proliferation in bone marrow stromal cells induced by BGN. We also demonstrate that WISP-1 and its variant WISP-1va can alleviate the repressed osteogenic differentiation caused by the absence of BGN. These preliminary data suggest that WISP-1 and BGN may functionally interact and control each other's activity, thus regulating the differentiation and proliferation of osteogenic cells.

  10. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    PubMed

    Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial-encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisingly, found to act as regulators of mitochondrial translation. In turn, translation in mitochondria controls cellular proliferation, and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits contribute to the cytoplasmic stress response. Thus, translation in mitochondria is apparently integrated into cellular processes. PMID:26535422

  11. Control of in vivo (cellular) phleomycin sensitivity by nuclear genotype, growth phase, and metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.W.

    1982-03-01

    Nuclear genotype, growth phase, and the presence of metal ions all proved to be important in controlling the lethal effects of phleomycin in eukaryotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Among 120 normal and radiation-sensitive strains compared for their sensitivities to lethal effects of phleomycin, all mutant strains exhibiting enhanced sensitivities to phleomycin killing were also sensitive to killing by ionizing radiation. Mutants exhibiting sensitivities to phleomycin similar to normal strains of the same ploidy were sensitive to ultraviolet radiation. We conclude that cellular recovery from phleomycin-induced damage in yeast depends upon the function of some or all of 13 independent genes and upon at least some of the same steps in cellular pathways for the biological repair of damage by ionizing radiation. In this respect, the action of phleomycin is similar to the action of its structurally similar analog, bleomycin, even though phleomycin was substantially more cytotoxic. Stationary-phase haploid yeast cells were more sensitive than exponentially growing cells to killing by phleomycin. Survival of stationary-phase yeast was reduced to 0.3 +/- 0.07% (S.E.) after 20-min exposures to phleomycin (1 microgram/ml; approximately 6.7 x 10(-7) M), but lethal effects of phleomycin were completely eradicated (98% survival) by the presence of 0.05 M ethylenediaminetetraacetate during the treatment period. The inactivation indicates an important role for one or more metal ion(s) in the in vivo toxicity of the phleomycin-bleomycin group of anticancer antibiotics.

  12. The E1A transcriptional control region is efficiently activated in proliferating tissues of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann, A; Krippl, B

    1994-08-01

    To study the in vivo regulation of the adenovirus E1A transcriptional regulatory region in transgenic mice, we have constructed two hybrid genes in which the viral control element regulates the expression of the CAT and the lacZ reporter gene. The fusion constructs were introduced into the mouse germline. The expression of the transgenes were monitored during embryogenesis and during postnatal development as well as in adult organs. We show that the E1A regulatory region is recognized and activated in undifferentiated cells during early embryonic cleavage, in the morula, in the inner cell mass and in the trophectoderm of the blastocyst. Transcription initiation at the E1A promoter leads to higher marker gene expression in proliferative centers in postimplantation embryos at the beginning of the neural tube closure. Analysing marker gene expression during postnatal development, a correlation of transcriptional activity of the E1A regulatory region and cell proliferation could be demonstrated. The expression profile of the transgene in different adult organs parallels with DNA synthesis. Marker gene expression was high in cells of organs known to have a high mitotic rate, such as the intestine, the stomach, the skin and the bone marrow, whereas little activity of the E1A control region was observed in the post-proliferative brain. These results are consistent with the finding that activation of the viral cis-regulating elements dramatically increased in the kidney after mitotic stimulation by folic acid. These observations strongly suggests a cell cycle regulated expression from the E1A enhancer/promoter in the absence of the E1A autoregulatory proteins in the living animal. PMID:8036008

  13. Cell membrane CD44v6 levels in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung: association with high cellular proliferation and high concentrations of EGFR and CD44v5.

    PubMed

    Ruibal, Álvaro; Aguiar, Pablo; Del Río, María Carmen; Nuñez, Matilde Isabel; Pubul, Virginia; Herranz, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Membranous CD44v6 levels in tumors and surrounding samples obtained from 94 patients with squamous cell lung carcinomas were studied and compared to clinical stage, cellular proliferation, membranous CD44v5 levels, epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and cytoplasmatic concentrations of CYFRA 21.1. CD44v6 positive values were observed in 33/38 non-tumor samples and in 76/94 tumor samples, but there were not statistically significant differences between both subgroups. In CD44v6 positive tumor samples, CD44v6 was not associated with clinical stage, histological grade, ploidy and lymph node involvement, but significant association was found with high cellular proliferation. Likewise, CD44v6 positive tumors had significantly higher levels of EGFR and CD44v5. In patients with squamous cell lung carcinomas and clinical stage I, positive CD44v6 cases were associated with the same parameters. Furthermore, positive CD44v5 squamous tumors were associated significantly with histological grade III and lower levels of CYFRA21.1. Our findings support the value of CD44v6 as a possible indicator of poor outcome in patients with squamous lung carcinomas. PMID:25809603

  14. Hepatitis C virus E2 protein promotes human hepatoma cell proliferation through the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway via cellular receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lanjuan; Wang Lu; Ren Hao; Cao Jie; Li Li; Ke Jinshan; Qi Zhongtian . E-mail: qizt53@hotmail.com

    2005-04-15

    Dysregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways by various viruses has been shown to be responsible for viral pathogenicity. The molecular mechanism by which hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection caused human liver diseases has been investigated on the basis of abnormal intracellular signal events. Current data are very limited involved in transmembrane signal transduction triggered by HCV E2 protein. Here we explored regulation of the MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway by E2 expressed in Chinese hamster oval cells. In human hepatoma Huh-7 cells, E2 specifically activated the MAPK/ERK pathway including downstream transcription factor ATF-2 and greatly promoted cell proliferation. CD81 and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) on the cell surface mediated binding of E2 to Huh-7 cells. The MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation driven by E2 were suppressed by blockage of CD81 as well as LDLR. Furthermore, pretreatment with an upstream kinase MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 also impaired the MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation induced by E2. Our results suggest that the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway triggered by HCV E2 via its receptors maintains survival and growth of target cells.

  15. Six family genes control the proliferation and differentiation of muscle satellite cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yajima, Hiroshi; Motohashi, Norio; Ono, Yusuke; Sato, Shigeru; Ikeda, Keiko; Masuda, Satoru; Yada, Erica; Kanesaki, Hironori; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2010-10-15

    Muscle satellite cells are essential for muscle growth and regeneration and their morphology, behavior and gene expression have been extensively studied. However, the mechanisms involved in their proliferation and differentiation remain elusive. Six1 and Six4 proteins were expressed in the nuclei of myofibers of adult mice and the numbers of myoblasts positive for Six1 and Six4 increased during regeneration of skeletal muscles. Six1 and Six4 were expressed in quiescent, activated and differentiated muscle satellite cells isolated from adult skeletal muscle. Overexpression of Six4 and Six5 repressed the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. Conversely, knockdown of Six5 resulted in augmented proliferation, and that of Six4 inhibited differentiation. Muscle satellite cells isolated from Six4{sup +/-}Six5{sup -/-} mice proliferated to higher cell density though their differentiation was not altered. Meanwhile, overproduction of Six1 repressed proliferation and promoted differentiation of satellite cells. In addition, Six4 and Six5 repressed, while Six1 activated myogenin expression, suggesting that the differential regulation of myogenin expression is responsible for the differential effects of Six genes. The results indicated the involvement of Six genes in the behavior of satellite cells and identified Six genes as potential target for manipulation of proliferation and differentiation of muscle satellite cells for therapeutic applications.

  16. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C W

    2016-02-19

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments. PMID:26912892

  17. Adaptive call admission control and resource allocation in multi server wireless/cellular network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Madhu; Mittal, Ragini

    2016-11-01

    The ever increasing demand of the subscribers has put pressure on the capacity of wireless networks around the world. To utilize the scare resources, in the present paper we propose an optimal allocation scheme for an integrated wireless/cellular model with handoff priority and handoff guarantee services. The suggested algorithm optimally allocates the resources in each cell and dynamically adjust threshold to control the admission. To give the priority to handoff calls over the new calls, the provision of guard channels and subrating scheme is taken into consideration. The handoff voice call may balk and renege from the system while waiting in the buffer. An iterative algorithm is implemented to generate the arrival rate of the handoff calls in each cell. Various performance indices are established in term of steady state probabilities. The sensitivity analysis has also been carried out to examine the tractability of algorithms and to explore the effects of system descriptors on the performance indices.

  18. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-02-01

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments.

  19. Polymeric IgA1 controls erythroblast proliferation and accelerates erythropoiesis recovery in anemia.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Séverine; Dussiot, Michaël; Grapton, Damien; Maciel, Thiago Trovati; Wang, Pamella Huey Mei; Callens, Celine; Tiwari, Meetu Kaushik; Agarwal, Saurabh; Fricot, Aurelie; Vandekerckhove, Julie; Tamouza, Houda; Zermati, Yael; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Djedaini, Kamel; Oruc, Zeliha; Pascal, Virginie; Courtois, Geneviève; Arnulf, Bertrand; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Mayeux, Patrick; Leanderson, Tomas; Benhamou, Marc; Cogné, Michel; Monteiro, Renato C; Hermine, Olivier; Moura, Ivan C

    2011-10-23

    Anemia because of insufficient production of and/or response to erythropoietin (Epo) is a major complication of chronic kidney disease and cancer. The mechanisms modulating the sensitivity of erythroblasts to Epo remain poorly understood. We show that, when cultured with Epo at suboptimal concentrations, the growth and clonogenic potential of erythroblasts was rescued by transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1)-bound polymeric IgA1 (pIgA1). Under homeostatic conditions, erythroblast numbers were increased in mice expressing human IgA1 compared to control mice. Hypoxic stress of these mice led to increased amounts of pIgA1 and erythroblast expansion. Expression of human IgA1 or treatment of wild-type mice with the TfR1 ligands pIgA1 or iron-loaded transferrin (Fe-Tf) accelerated recovery from acute anemia. TfR1 engagement by either pIgA1 or Fe-Tf increased cell sensitivity to Epo by inducing activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathways. These cellular responses were mediated through the TfR1-internalization motif, YXXΦ. Our results show that pIgA1 and TfR1 are positive regulators of erythropoiesis in both physiological and pathological situations. Targeting this pathway may provide alternate approaches to the treatment of ineffective erythropoiesis and anemia.

  20. Differences in cytokinin control on cellular dynamics of zucchini cotyledons cultivated in two experimental systems.

    PubMed

    Stoynova-Bakalova, E; Petrov, P; Gigova, L; Ivanova, N

    2011-01-01

    The effect of endogenous cytokinins on the pattern of palisade cell division post-germination does not depend on the conditions of cotyledon development -in planta (attached to seedlings) or in vitro (isolated from dry zucchini seeds and cultured on water). In cotyledons originating from 4-day-old seedlings (experimental system 1), exogenous cytokinin temporarily (in the first 2 day of cultivation) enhanced post-mitotic cell enlargement of palisade cells, mainly due to enhanced water uptake and use of cell storage compounds, all of which lead to cotyledon senescence. Cytokinin is not able to resume the completed palisade cell division on day 5. As a result, the number of cells and the final areas of treated and control cotyledons are quite similar. By contrast, the effects of cytokinin on cotyledons isolated from dry seeds (experimental system 2) are better expressed, promoting an increase in number of palisade cells accompanied by additional cotyledon area enlargement. However, the prolonged post-mitotic cell expansion in control cotyledons compensates for the reduced speed of cell growth and division activity and decreases differences in final cotyledon area between treatments. The results define cell division as the primary target of cytokinin stimulation in cotyledon tissues competent for division, and determine the temporal patterns of palisade cell cycling related to cotyledon age. This knowledge permits a better choice of experimental system to study effects on cell proliferation and cell growth, as well as cell enlargement and senescence-related events using physiologically homogeneous material.

  1. Sequential CCR5-Tropic HIV-1 Reactivation from Distinct Cellular Reservoirs following Perturbation of Elite Control

    PubMed Central

    Watters, Sarah A.; Mlcochova, Petra; Maldarelli, Frank; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Pillay, Deenan; Gupta, Ravindra K.

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV Elite Controllers may reveal insights into virus persistence given they harbour small reservoir sizes, akin to HIV non-controllers treated early with combination antiretroviral therapy. Both groups of patients represent the most promising candidates for interventions aimed at sustained remission or ‘cure’. Analytic treatment interruption (ATI) in the latter group leads to stochastic rebound of virus, though it is unclear whether loss of elite control is also associated with similar rebound characteristics. Methods We studied three discrete periods of virus rebound during myeloma related immune disruption over 2.5 years in an elite controller who previously underwent autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in the absence of any antiretroviral therapy. Single genome sequencing of the V1-V4 region of env in PBMC and plasma was performed and phylogenies reconstructed. Average pairwise distance (APD) was calculated and non-parametric methods used to assess compartmentalisation. Coreceptor usage was predicted based on genotypic algorithms. Results 122 single genome sequences were obtained (median 26 sequences per rebound). The initial rebounding plasma env sequences following ASCT represented two distinct lineages, and clustered with proviral DNA sequences isolated prior to ASCT. One of the lineages was monophyletic, possibly indicating reactivation from clonally expanded cells. The second rebound occurred 470 days after spontaneous control of the first rebound and was phylogenetically distinct from the first, confirmed by compartmentalisation analysis, with a different cellular origin rather than ongoing replication. By contrast, third rebound viruses clustered with second rebound viruses, with evidence for ongoing evolution that was associated with lymphopenia and myeloma progression. Following ASCT a shift in tropism from CXCR4-tropic viruses to a CCR5-tropic population was observed to persist through to the third rebound. Conclusions Our data

  2. Ephrin-B1 forward signaling regulates craniofacial morphogenesis by controlling cell proliferation across Eph–ephrin boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Jeffrey O.; Soriano, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked human EPHRIN-B1 gene result in cleft palate and other craniofacial anomalies as part of craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), but the molecular and developmental mechanisms by which ephrin-B1 controls the underlying developmental processes are not clear. Here we demonstrate that ephrin-B1 plays an intrinsic role in palatal shelf outgrowth in the mouse by regulating cell proliferation in the anterior palatal shelf mesenchyme. In ephrin-B1 heterozygous mutants, X inactivation generates ephrin-B1-expressing and -nonexpressing cells that sort out, resulting in mosaic ephrin-B1 expression. We now show that this process leads to mosaic disruption of cell proliferation and post-transcriptional up-regulation of EphB receptor expression through relief of endocytosis and degradation. The alteration in proliferation rates resulting from ectopic Eph–ephrin expression boundaries correlates with the more severe dysmorphogenesis of ephrin-B1+/− heterozygotes that is a hallmark of CFNS. Finally, by integrating phosphoproteomic and transcriptomic approaches, we show that ephrin-B1 controls proliferation in the palate by regulating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) signal transduction pathway. PMID:20844017

  3. Control of Neural Daughter Cell Proliferation by Multi-level Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bivik, Caroline; MacDonald, Ryan B.; Gunnar, Erika; Mazouni, Khalil; Schweisguth, Francois; Thor, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Notch pathway controls proliferation during development and in adulthood, and is frequently affected in many disorders. However, the genetic sensitivity and multi-layered transcriptional properties of the Notch pathway has made its molecular decoding challenging. Here, we address the complexity of Notch signaling with respect to proliferation, using the developing Drosophila CNS as model. We find that a Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH cascade specifically controls daughter, but not progenitor proliferation. Additionally, we find that different E(spl)-HLH genes are required in different neuroblast lineages. The Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH cascade alters daughter proliferation by regulating four key cell cycle factors: Cyclin E, String/Cdc25, E2f and Dacapo (mammalian p21CIP1/p27KIP1/p57Kip2). ChIP and DamID analysis of Su(H) and E(spl)-HLH indicates direct transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle genes, and of the Notch pathway itself. These results point to a multi-level signaling model and may help shed light on the dichotomous proliferative role of Notch signaling in many other systems. PMID:27070787

  4. Control of Neural Daughter Cell Proliferation by Multi-level Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bivik, Caroline; MacDonald, Ryan B; Gunnar, Erika; Mazouni, Khalil; Schweisguth, Francois; Thor, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Notch pathway controls proliferation during development and in adulthood, and is frequently affected in many disorders. However, the genetic sensitivity and multi-layered transcriptional properties of the Notch pathway has made its molecular decoding challenging. Here, we address the complexity of Notch signaling with respect to proliferation, using the developing Drosophila CNS as model. We find that a Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH cascade specifically controls daughter, but not progenitor proliferation. Additionally, we find that different E(spl)-HLH genes are required in different neuroblast lineages. The Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH cascade alters daughter proliferation by regulating four key cell cycle factors: Cyclin E, String/Cdc25, E2f and Dacapo (mammalian p21CIP1/p27KIP1/p57Kip2). ChIP and DamID analysis of Su(H) and E(spl)-HLH indicates direct transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle genes, and of the Notch pathway itself. These results point to a multi-level signaling model and may help shed light on the dichotomous proliferative role of Notch signaling in many other systems. PMID:27070787

  5. Long-Term Calorie Restriction Enhances Cellular Quality-Control Processes in Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Licastro, Danilo; Cava, Edda; Veronese, Nicola; Spelta, Francesco; Rizza, Wanda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Villareal, Dennis T; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Holloszy, John O; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-01-26

    Calorie restriction (CR) retards aging, acts as a hormetic intervention, and increases serum corticosterone and HSP70 expression in rodents. However, less is known regarding the effects of CR on these factors in humans. Serum cortisol and molecular chaperones and autophagic proteins were measured in the skeletal muscle of subjects on CR diets for 3-15 years and in control volunteers. Serum cortisol was higher in the CR group than in age-matched sedentary and endurance athlete groups (15.6 ± 4.6 ng/dl versus 12.3 ± 3.9 ng/dl and 11.2 ± 2.7 ng/dl, respectively; p ≤ 0.001). HSP70, Grp78, beclin-1, and LC3 mRNA and/or protein levels were higher in the skeletal muscle of the CR group compared to controls. Our data indicate that CR in humans is associated with sustained rises in serum cortisol, reduced inflammation, and increases in key molecular chaperones and autophagic mediators involved in cellular protein quality control and removal of dysfunctional proteins and organelles. PMID:26774472

  6. Long-Term Calorie Restriction Enhances Cellular Quality-Control Processes in Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Licastro, Danilo; Cava, Edda; Veronese, Nicola; Spelta, Francesco; Rizza, Wanda; Bertozzi, Beatrice; Villareal, Dennis T; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Holloszy, John O; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-01-26

    Calorie restriction (CR) retards aging, acts as a hormetic intervention, and increases serum corticosterone and HSP70 expression in rodents. However, less is known regarding the effects of CR on these factors in humans. Serum cortisol and molecular chaperones and autophagic proteins were measured in the skeletal muscle of subjects on CR diets for 3-15 years and in control volunteers. Serum cortisol was higher in the CR group than in age-matched sedentary and endurance athlete groups (15.6 ± 4.6 ng/dl versus 12.3 ± 3.9 ng/dl and 11.2 ± 2.7 ng/dl, respectively; p ≤ 0.001). HSP70, Grp78, beclin-1, and LC3 mRNA and/or protein levels were higher in the skeletal muscle of the CR group compared to controls. Our data indicate that CR in humans is associated with sustained rises in serum cortisol, reduced inflammation, and increases in key molecular chaperones and autophagic mediators involved in cellular protein quality control and removal of dysfunctional proteins and organelles.

  7. RanBP3 Regulates Melanoma Cell Proliferation via Selective Control of Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Pathria, Gaurav; Garg, Bhavuk; Wagner, Christine; Garg, Kanika; Gschaider, Melanie; Jalili, Ahmad; Wagner, Stephan N

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome region maintenance 1-mediated nucleocytoplasmic transport has been shown as a potential anticancer target in various malignancies. However, the role of the most characterized chromosome region maintenance 1 cofactor ran binding protein 3 (RanBP3) in cancer cell biology has never been investigated. Utilizing a loss-of-function experimental setting in a vast collection of genetically varied melanoma cell lines, we observed the requirement of RanBP3 in melanoma cell proliferation and survival. Mechanistically, we suggest the reinstatement of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-Smad2/3-p21(Cip1) tumor-suppressor axis as part of the RanBP3 silencing-associated antiproliferative program. Employing extensive nuclear export sequence analyses and immunofluorescence-based protein localization studies, we further present evidence suggesting the requirement of RanBP3 function for the nuclear exit of the weak nuclear export sequence-harboring extracellular signal-regulated kinase protein, although it is dispensable for general CRM1-mediated nuclear export of strong nuclear export sequence-harboring cargoes. Rendering mechanistic support to RanBP3 silencing-mediated apoptosis, consequent to extracellular signal-regulated kinase nuclear entrapment, we observed increased levels of cytoplasmically restricted nonphosphorylated/active proapoptotic Bcl-2-antagonist of cell death (BAD) protein. Last, we present evidence suggesting the frequently activated mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in melanoma as a potential founding basis for a deregulated post-translational control of RanBP3 activity. Collectively, the presented data suggest RanBP3 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in human melanoma.

  8. SUMOylation of KLF4 acts as a switch in transcriptional programs that control VSMC proliferation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chan-Juan; Li, Yong Hui; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Wei-Na; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Hui-Jing; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Cui-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Guo-Liang; Zheng, Bin; Wen, Jin-Kun

    2016-03-01

    The regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is an important issue due to its major implications for the prevention of pathological vascular conditions. The objective of this work was to assess the function of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)ylated Krϋppel-like transcription factor 4 (KLF4) in the regulation of VSMC proliferation in cultured cells and in animal models with balloon injury. We found that under basal conditions, binding of non-SUMOylated KLF4 to p300 activated p21 (p21(WAF1/CIP1))transcription, leading to VSMC growth arrest. PDGF-BB promoted the interaction between Ubc9 and KLF4 and the SUMOylation of KLF4, which in turn recruited transcriptional corepressors to the p21 promoter. The reduction in p21 enhanced VSMC proliferation. Additionally, the SUMOylated KLF4 did not affect the expression of KLF4, thereby forming a positive feedback loop enhancing cell proliferation. These results demonstrated that SUMOylated KLF4 plays an important role in cell proliferation by reversing the transactivation action of KLF4 on p21 induced with PDGF-BB. PMID:26945917

  9. Enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular drug controlled release of VESylated gemcitabine prodrug nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yanfen; Du, Fang; Xu, Yanyun; Meng, Haijing; Huang, Jin; Zhang, Xiongwen; Lu, Wei; Liu, Shiyuan; Yu, Jiahui

    2015-04-01

    Gemcitabine, 2',2'-difluoro-2'-deoxycytidine (dFdC), is the first-line antitumor agent in the treatment of pancreatic tumors. However, it possesses certain drawbacks, such as poor biological half-life resulted from rapid metabolism and the induction of resistance, leading to its restricted therapeutic potential. With the purpose of overcoming the above drawbacks, we developed a novel VESylated gemcitabine (VES-dFdC) prodrug by coupling the N4-amino group of the pyrimidine ring of dFdC to the carboxylic group of vitamin E succinate (VES). The resulting amphiphilic compound could protect the N4-amino group of the pyrimidine ring of dFdC from being degraded by cytidine deaminase. What is more, the prodrug was able to form nanocapsules in aqueous media (similar to the structure of cytomembrane), confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Their average particle size is about 107 nm with zeta potential of -33.4 mV measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). VES-dFdC nanocapsules showed accelerated accumulative drug release profile in simulated lysosome environment (sodium acetate buffer pH 5+cathepsin B, an enzyme in lysosome), due to the easily hydrolyzed property of amide bond by cathepsin B, while rather stable in PBS (pH 7.4) or sodium acetate buffer (pH 5.0) without cathepsin B, indicating their enhanced intracellular drug controlled release manner. Besides, VES-dFdC prodrug nanocapsules showed enhanced cellular uptake ability, and the amount of cellular uptake of the nanocapsules by the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3 is seventy times higher than that of native gemcitabine in the first 1.5 h. Compared with free gemcitabine, VES-dFdC nanocapsules showed essentially increased growth inhibition activity against BxPC-3 cells, indicating its great potential as prodrug for pancreatic tumor therapy with improved antitumor activity.

  10. Distinct Cellular Locations of Carbonic Anhydrases Mediate Carbon Dioxide Control of Stomatal Movements.

    PubMed

    Hu, Honghong; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Occhipinti, Rossana; Ries, Amber; Böhmer, Maik; You, Lei; Xiao, Chuanlei; Engineer, Cawas B; Boron, Walter F; Schroeder, Julian I

    2015-10-01

    Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) in leaves closes stomatal apertures. Research has shown key functions of the β-carbonic anhydrases (βCA1 and βCA4) in rapid CO2-induced stomatal movements by catalytic transmission of the CO2 signal in guard cells. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, because initial studies indicate that these Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) βCAs are targeted to distinct intracellular compartments upon expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) cells. Which cellular location of these enzymes plays a key role in native guard cells in CO2-regulated stomatal movements remains unknown. Here, we express fluorescently tagged CAs in guard cells of ca1ca4 double-mutant plants and show that the specific locations of βCA4 at the plasma membrane and βCA1 in native guard cell chloroplasts each can mediate rapid CO2 control of stomatal movements. Localization and complementation analyses using a mammalian αCAII-yellow fluorescent protein in guard cells further show that cytoplasmic localization is also sufficient to restore CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance. Mathematical modeling of cellular CO2 catalysis suggests that the dynamics of the intracellular HCO3 (-) concentration change in guard cells can be driven by plasma membrane and cytoplasmic localizations of CAs but not as clearly by chloroplast targeting. Moreover, modeling supports the notion that the intracellular HCO3 (-) concentration dynamics in guard cells are a key mechanism in mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements but that an additional chloroplast role of CAs exists that has yet to be identified. PMID:26243620

  11. The TREX1 C-terminal Region Controls Cellular Localization through Ubiquitination*

    PubMed Central

    Orebaugh, Clinton D.; Fye, Jason M.; Harvey, Scott; Hollis, Thomas; Wilkinson, John C.; Perrino, Fred W.

    2013-01-01

    TREX1 is an autonomous 3′-exonuclease that degrades DNA to prevent inappropriate immune activation. The TREX1 protein is composed of 314 amino acids; the N-terminal 242 amino acids contain the catalytic domain, and the C-terminal region (CTR) localizes TREX1 to the cytosolic compartment. In this study, we show that TREX1 modification by ubiquitination is controlled by a highly conserved sequence in the CTR to affect cellular localization. Transfection of TREX1 deletion constructs into human cells demonstrated that this sequence is required for ubiquitination at multiple lysine residues through a “non-canonical” ubiquitin linkage. A proteomic approach identified ubiquilin 1 as a TREX1 CTR-interacting protein, and this interaction was verified in vitro and in vivo. Cotransfection studies indicated that ubiquilin 1 localizes TREX1 to cytosolic punctate structures dependent upon the TREX1 CTR and lysines within the TREX1 catalytic core. Several TREX1 mutants linked to the autoimmune diseases Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus that exhibit full catalytic function were tested for altered ubiquitin modification and cellular localization. Our data show that these catalytically competent disease-causing TREX1 mutants exhibit differential levels of ubiquitination relative to WT TREX1, suggesting a novel mechanism of dysfunction. Furthermore, these differentially ubiquitinated disease-causing mutants also exhibit altered ubiquilin 1 co-localization. Thus, TREX1 post-translational modification indicates an additional mechanism by which mutations disrupt TREX1 biology, leading to human autoimmune disease. PMID:23979357

  12. Distinct Cellular Locations of Carbonic Anhydrases Mediate Carbon Dioxide Control of Stomatal Movements1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Honghong; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Occhipinti, Rossana; Ries, Amber; Böhmer, Maik; You, Lei; Xiao, Chuanlei; Engineer, Cawas B.; Boron, Walter F.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) in leaves closes stomatal apertures. Research has shown key functions of the β-carbonic anhydrases (βCA1 and βCA4) in rapid CO2-induced stomatal movements by catalytic transmission of the CO2 signal in guard cells. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, because initial studies indicate that these Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) βCAs are targeted to distinct intracellular compartments upon expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) cells. Which cellular location of these enzymes plays a key role in native guard cells in CO2-regulated stomatal movements remains unknown. Here, we express fluorescently tagged CAs in guard cells of ca1ca4 double-mutant plants and show that the specific locations of βCA4 at the plasma membrane and βCA1 in native guard cell chloroplasts each can mediate rapid CO2 control of stomatal movements. Localization and complementation analyses using a mammalian αCAII-yellow fluorescent protein in guard cells further show that cytoplasmic localization is also sufficient to restore CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance. Mathematical modeling of cellular CO2 catalysis suggests that the dynamics of the intracellular HCO3− concentration change in guard cells can be driven by plasma membrane and cytoplasmic localizations of CAs but not as clearly by chloroplast targeting. Moreover, modeling supports the notion that the intracellular HCO3− concentration dynamics in guard cells are a key mechanism in mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements but that an additional chloroplast role of CAs exists that has yet to be identified. PMID:26243620

  13. Recombinant Phage Coated 1D Al2O3 Nanostructures for Controlling the Adhesion and Proliferation of Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juseok; Jeon, Hojeong; Haidar, Ayman; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Veith, Michael; Kim, Youngjun

    2015-01-01

    A novel synthesis of a nanostructured cell adhesive surface is investigated for future stent developments. One-dimensional (1D) Al2O3 nanostructures were prepared by chemical vapor deposition of a single source precursor. Afterwards, recombinant filamentous bacteriophages which display a short binding motif with a cell adhesive peptide (RGD) on p3 and p8 proteins were immobilized on these 1D Al2O3 nanostructures by a simple dip-coating process to study the cellular response of human endothelial EA hy.926. While the cell density decreased on as-deposited 1D Al2O3 nanostructures, we observed enhanced cell proliferation and cell-cell interaction on recombinant phage overcoated 1D Al2O3 nanostructures. The recombinant phage overcoating also supports an isotropic cell spreading rather than elongated cell morphology as we observed on as-deposited Al2O3 1D nanostructures. PMID:26090458

  14. Open-air direct current plasma jet: Scaling up, uniformity, and cellular control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S.; Wang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Lu, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets are commonly used in many fields from medicine to nanotechnology, yet the issue of scaling the discharges up to larger areas without compromising the plasma uniformity remains a major challenge. In this paper, we demonstrate a homogenous cold air plasma glow with a large cross-section generated by a direct current power supply. There is no risk of glow-to-arc transitions, and the plasma glow appears uniform regardless of the gap between the nozzle and the surface being processed. Detailed studies show that both the position of the quartz tube and the gas flow rate can be used to control the plasma properties. Further investigation indicates that the residual charges trapped on the inner surface of the quartz tube may be responsible for the generation of the air plasma plume with a large cross-section. The spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy reveals that the air plasma plume is uniform as it propagates out of the nozzle. The remarkable improvement of the plasma uniformity is used to improve the bio-compatibility of a glass coverslip over a reasonably large area. This improvement is demonstrated by a much more uniform and effective attachment and proliferation of human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells on the plasma-treated surface.

  15. Open-air direct current plasma jet: Scaling up, uniformity, and cellular control

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.; Wang, Z.; Huang, Q.; Lu, X.; Ostrikov, K.

    2012-10-15

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma jets are commonly used in many fields from medicine to nanotechnology, yet the issue of scaling the discharges up to larger areas without compromising the plasma uniformity remains a major challenge. In this paper, we demonstrate a homogenous cold air plasma glow with a large cross-section generated by a direct current power supply. There is no risk of glow-to-arc transitions, and the plasma glow appears uniform regardless of the gap between the nozzle and the surface being processed. Detailed studies show that both the position of the quartz tube and the gas flow rate can be used to control the plasma properties. Further investigation indicates that the residual charges trapped on the inner surface of the quartz tube may be responsible for the generation of the air plasma plume with a large cross-section. The spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy reveals that the air plasma plume is uniform as it propagates out of the nozzle. The remarkable improvement of the plasma uniformity is used to improve the bio-compatibility of a glass coverslip over a reasonably large area. This improvement is demonstrated by a much more uniform and effective attachment and proliferation of human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells on the plasma-treated surface.

  16. The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex modulates peripheral T cell activation and proliferation by controlling AP-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Min; Lee, Changjin; Lee, Sung Kyu; Kim, Jieun; Seong, Rho Hyun

    2010-01-22

    The SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex has been implicated in the activation and proliferation of T cells. After T cell receptor signaling, the SWI/SNF complex rapidly associates with chromatin and controls gene expression in T cells. However, the process by which the SWI/SNF complex regulates peripheral T cell activation has not been elucidated. In this study, we show that the SWI/SNF complex regulates cytokine production and proliferation of T cells. During T cell activation, the SWI/SNF complex is recruited to the promoter of the transcription factor AP-1, and it increases the expression of AP-1. Increased expression of the SWI/SNF complex resulted in enhanced AP-1 activity, cytokine production, and proliferation of peripheral T cells, whereas knockdown of the SWI/SNF complex expression impaired the AP-1 expression and reduced the activation and proliferation of T cells. Moreover, mice that constitutively expressed the SWI/SNF complex in T cells were much more susceptible to experimentally induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis than the normal mice were. These results suggest that the SWI/SNF complex plays a critical role during T cell activation and subsequent immune responses.

  17. EGFR/Ras Signaling Controls Drosophila Intestinal Stem Cell Proliferation via Capicua-Regulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yinhua; Ha, Nati; Forés, Marta; Xiang, Jinyi; Gläßer, Christine; Maldera, Julieta; Jiménez, Gerardo; Edgar, Bruce A

    2015-12-01

    Epithelial renewal in the Drosophila intestine is orchestrated by Intestinal Stem Cells (ISCs). Following damage or stress the intestinal epithelium produces ligands that activate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in ISCs. This promotes their growth and division and, thereby, epithelial regeneration. Here we demonstrate that the HMG-box transcriptional repressor, Capicua (Cic), mediates these functions of EGFR signaling. Depleting Cic in ISCs activated them for division, whereas overexpressed Cic inhibited ISC proliferation and midgut regeneration. Epistasis tests showed that Cic acted as an essential downstream effector of EGFR/Ras signaling, and immunofluorescence showed that Cic's nuclear localization was regulated by EGFR signaling. ISC-specific mRNA expression profiling and DNA binding mapping using DamID indicated that Cic represses cell proliferation via direct targets including string (Cdc25), Cyclin E, and the ETS domain transcription factors Ets21C and Pointed (pnt). pnt was required for ISC over-proliferation following Cic depletion, and ectopic pnt restored ISC proliferation even in the presence of overexpressed dominant-active Cic. These studies identify Cic, Pnt, and Ets21C as critical downstream effectors of EGFR signaling in Drosophila ISCs.

  18. Control of cell proliferation and elongation by miR396.

    PubMed

    Ercoli, María Florencia; Rojas, Arantxa M L; Debernardi, Juan Manuel; Palatnik, Javier F; Rodriguez, Ramiro E

    2016-06-01

    The combinatory effects of cell proliferation and cell elongation determines the rate at which organs growth. In the root meristematic zone cells both divide and expand, while post-mitotic cells in the elongation zone only expands until they reach their final size. The transcription factors of the GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR (GRF) class promote cell proliferation in various plant organs. Their expression is restricted to cells with a high proliferative capacity, yet strong downregulation of the GRF activity compromise the plant survival. Part of expression pattern of the GRFs is ensured by the post-transcriptional repression mediated by the conserved microRNA miR396. Here we show the quantitative effects in root growth caused by GRF depletion in a series of transgenic lines with different miR396 levels. We show that high miRNA levels affect cell elongation and proliferation in roots. Detailed analysis suggests that cell proliferation is restricted due to a reduction in cell cycle speed that might result from defects in the accumulation of mitotic cyclins. The results provide insights into the participation of the miRNA-GRF regulatory network in root development. PMID:27172373

  19. Factors controlling proliferation and progesterone production by bovine granulosa cells in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Savion, N; Lui, G M; Laherty, R; Gospodarowicz, D

    1981-08-01

    Bovine granulosa cells seeded in the presence of serum on extracellular matrix-coated dishes proliferate actively when exposed to serum-free medium supplemented with insulin (2 microgram/ml), fibroblast growth factor (FGF, 100 ng/ml), and high density lipoprotein (HDL, 30 microgram protein/ml). The final density of the cultures is 80-120% that of cultures grown in the presence of medium supplemented with optimal concentration (10%) of calf serum. Insulin has the greatest effect on cell proliferation when added alone to serum-free medium, since it induced an increase in cell number that was 35-60% that observed with optimal serum concentration. Somatomedin C can replace insulin when added alone. FGF, epidermal growth factor, or HDL had no significant effect on cell proliferation by themselves. When these factors were added together with insulin, they acted synergistically in stimulating cell proliferation. When cultures were seeded in the total absence of serum, the addition of transferrin (10 microgram/ml) to serum-free medium was required in order for insulin and FGF to be mitogenic. Cultures maintained on extracellular matrix and exposed to serum-free medium alone have a lifespan in culture of 4 generations. Addition of insulin, FGF, and HDL increases the lifespan of the cultures to 12 generations. Bovine granulosa cells, which proliferate in a defined medium, respond to dibutyryl cAMP by releasing progesterone into the medium. Addition of FSH to the defined medium resulted in a 30% decrease in cell proliferation and in a 2.1-fold increase in the amount of progesterone released into the medium in response to dibutyryl cAMP. This release of progesterone reached a level similar to that observed with cultures grown in medium supplemented with optimal concentration of serum and exposed or not to FSH during their growth phase and at confluence. These results demonstrate that bovine granulosa cells can actively proliferate in a serum-free medium and maintain their

  20. Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) controls tumor-associated cell proliferation through the interaction with MARCKSL1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Boh-Ram; Dong, Seung Myung; Seo, Seung Hee; Lee, Ji-Hae; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Rho, Seung Bae

    2014-09-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) is a member of the lysyl oxidase gene family that contributes to the invasiveness and metastasis in tumor progression. However, the role of LOXL2 in cellular signaling is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated a possible mechanism of LOXL2 function in tumor metastases in vitro, using a human breast carcinoma cell line. Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate-like 1 (MARCKSL1), a modulator in the regulation of cellular homeostasis, was identified as a LOXL2 interacting protein. We examined the binding domains that are required for the interaction between LOXL2 and MARCKSL1. The scavenger-receptor domain of LOXL2 was shown to interact with the N-terminal domain of MARCKSL1. Luciferase activity was noticeably reduced by the transfection of MARCKSL1 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, over-expression of LOXL2 activates cell growth by inhibiting MARCKSL1-induced apoptosis. The effect of LOXL2 on cell cycle and apoptosis-related components was also confirmed through the silencing of LOXL2 expression. LOXL2 activates the FAK/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways, and MARCKSL1 suppresses LOXL2-induced oncogenesis. These insights supply evidence that LOXL2 promotes cell proliferation and inhibits apoptotic cell death. Taken together, our results indicate an underlying mechanism for an increase of LOXL2-related activity in breast tumor cells.

  1. Vitamin C and E supplementation hampers cellular adaptation to endurance training in humans: a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Gøran; Cumming, Kristoffer T; Holden, Geir; Hallén, Jostein; Rønnestad, Bent Ronny; Sveen, Ole; Skaug, Arne; Paur, Ingvild; Bastani, Nasser E; Østgaard, Hege Nymo; Buer, Charlotte; Midttun, Magnus; Freuchen, Fredrik; Wiig, Håvard; Ulseth, Elisabeth Tallaksen; Garthe, Ina; Blomhoff, Rune; Benestad, Haakon B; Raastad, Truls

    2014-01-01

    In this double-blind, randomised, controlled trial, we investigated the effects of vitamin C and E supplementation on endurance training adaptations in humans. Fifty-four young men and women were randomly allocated to receive either 1000 mg of vitamin C and 235 mg of vitamin E or a placebo daily for 11 weeks. During supplementation, the participants completed an endurance training programme consisting of three to four sessions per week (primarily of running), divided into high-intensity interval sessions [4–6 × 4–6 min; >90% of maximal heart rate (HRmax)] and steady state continuous sessions (30–60 min; 70–90% of HRmax). Maximal oxygen uptake (), submaximal running and a 20 m shuttle run test were assessed and blood samples and muscle biopsies were collected, before and after the intervention. Participants in the vitamin C and E group increased their (mean ± s.d.: 8 ± 5%) and performance in the 20 m shuttle test (10 ± 11%) to the same degree as those in the placebo group (mean ± s.d.: 8 ± 5% and 14 ± 17%, respectively). However, the mitochondrial marker cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (COX4) and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1 α (PGC-1α) increased in the m. vastus lateralis in the placebo group by 59 ± 97% and 19 ± 51%, respectively, but not in the vitamin C and E group (COX4: −13 ± 54%; PGC-1α: −13 ± 29%; P ≤ 0.03, between groups). Furthermore, mRNA levels of CDC42 and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) in the trained muscle were lower in the vitamin C and E group than in the placebo group (P ≤ 0.05). Daily vitamin C and E supplementation attenuated increases in markers of mitochondrial biogenesis following endurance training. However, no clear interactions were detected for improvements in and running performance. Consequently, vitamin C and E supplementation hampered cellular adaptations in the exercised muscles, and although this did not translate to

  2. Cellular Nonlinear Networks for the emergence of perceptual states: application to robot navigation control.

    PubMed

    Arena, Paolo; De Fiore, Sebastiano; Patané, Luca

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a new general purpose perceptual control architecture, based on nonlinear neural lattices, is presented and applied to solve robot navigation tasks. Insects show the ability to react to certain stimuli with simple reflexes, using direct sensory-motor pathways, which can be considered as basic behaviors, inherited and pre-wired. Relevant brain centres, known as Mushroom Bodies (MB) and Central Complex (CX) were recently identified in insects: though their functional details are not yet fully understood, it is known that they provide secondary pathways allowing the emergence of cognitive behaviors. These are gained through the coordination of the basic abilities to satisfy the insect's needs. Taking inspiration from this evidence, our architecture modulates, through a reinforcement learning, a set of competitive and concurrent basic behaviors in order to accomplish the task assigned through a reward function. The core of the architecture is constituted by the so-called Representation layer, used to create a concise picture of the current environment situation, fusing together different stimuli for the emergence of perceptual states. These perceptual states are steady state solutions of lattices of Reaction-Diffusion Cellular Nonlinear Networks (RD-CNN), designed to show Turing patterns. The exploitation of the dynamics of the multiple equilibria of the network is emphasized through the adaptive shaping of the basins of attraction for each emerged pattern. New experimental campaigns on standard robotic platforms are reported to demonstrate the potentiality and the effectiveness of the approach. PMID:19596552

  3. Cellular Nonlinear Networks for the emergence of perceptual states: application to robot navigation control.

    PubMed

    Arena, Paolo; De Fiore, Sebastiano; Patané, Luca

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a new general purpose perceptual control architecture, based on nonlinear neural lattices, is presented and applied to solve robot navigation tasks. Insects show the ability to react to certain stimuli with simple reflexes, using direct sensory-motor pathways, which can be considered as basic behaviors, inherited and pre-wired. Relevant brain centres, known as Mushroom Bodies (MB) and Central Complex (CX) were recently identified in insects: though their functional details are not yet fully understood, it is known that they provide secondary pathways allowing the emergence of cognitive behaviors. These are gained through the coordination of the basic abilities to satisfy the insect's needs. Taking inspiration from this evidence, our architecture modulates, through a reinforcement learning, a set of competitive and concurrent basic behaviors in order to accomplish the task assigned through a reward function. The core of the architecture is constituted by the so-called Representation layer, used to create a concise picture of the current environment situation, fusing together different stimuli for the emergence of perceptual states. These perceptual states are steady state solutions of lattices of Reaction-Diffusion Cellular Nonlinear Networks (RD-CNN), designed to show Turing patterns. The exploitation of the dynamics of the multiple equilibria of the network is emphasized through the adaptive shaping of the basins of attraction for each emerged pattern. New experimental campaigns on standard robotic platforms are reported to demonstrate the potentiality and the effectiveness of the approach.

  4. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals dynamic paracrine control of cellular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalek, Alex K.; Satija, Rahul; Shuga, Joe; Trombetta, John J.; Gennert, Dave; Lu, Diana; Chen, Peilin; Gertner, Rona S.; Gaublomme, Jellert T.; Yosef, Nir; Schwartz, Schraga; Fowler, Brian; Weaver, Suzanne; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaohui; Ding, Ruihua; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Friedman, Nir; Hacohen, Nir; Park, Hongkun; May, Andrew P.; Regev, Aviv

    2014-06-01

    High-throughput single-cell transcriptomics offers an unbiased approach for understanding the extent, basis and function of gene expression variation between seemingly identical cells. Here we sequence single-cell RNA-seq libraries prepared from over 1,700 primary mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells spanning several experimental conditions. We find substantial variation between identically stimulated dendritic cells, in both the fraction of cells detectably expressing a given messenger RNA and the transcript's level within expressing cells. Distinct gene modules are characterized by different temporal heterogeneity profiles. In particular, a `core' module of antiviral genes is expressed very early by a few `precocious' cells in response to uniform stimulation with a pathogenic component, but is later activated in all cells. By stimulating cells individually in sealed microfluidic chambers, analysing dendritic cells from knockout mice, and modulating secretion and extracellular signalling, we show that this response is coordinated by interferon-mediated paracrine signalling from these precocious cells. Notably, preventing cell-to-cell communication also substantially reduces variability between cells in the expression of an early-induced `peaked' inflammatory module, suggesting that paracrine signalling additionally represses part of the inflammatory program. Our study highlights the importance of cell-to-cell communication in controlling cellular heterogeneity and reveals general strategies that multicellular populations can use to establish complex dynamic responses.

  5. Genetic controls and cellular behaviors in branching morphogenesis of the renal collecting system

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian kidney, which at maturity contains thousands of nephrons joined to a highly branched collecting duct system, is an important model system for studying the development of a complex organ. Furthermore, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract, often resulting from defects in ureteric bud branching morphogenesis, are relatively common human birth defects. Kidney development is initiated by interactions between the nephric duct and the metanephric mesenchyme, leading to the outgrowth and repeated branching of the ureteric bud epithelium, which gives rise to the entire renal collecting duct (CD) system. Meanwhile, signals from the ureteric bud induce the mesenchyme cells to form the nephron epithelia. This review focuses on development of the collecting duct system, with emphasis on the mouse as an experimental system. The major topics covered include the origin and development of the nephric duct, formation of the ureteric bud, branching morphogenesis of the ureteric bud and elongation of the collecting ducts. The signals, receptors, transcription factors and other regulatory molecules implicated in these processes are discussed. In addition, our current knowledge of cellular behaviors that are controlled by these genes and underlie development of the collecting system is reviewed. PMID:22942910

  6. The small Rho GTPase Rac1 controls normal human dermal fibroblasts proliferation with phosphorylation of the oncoprotein c-myc

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolova, Ekaterina; Mitev, Vanio; Zhelev, Nikolai; Deroanne, Christophe F. . E-mail: yves.poumay@fundp.ac.be

    2007-08-03

    Proliferation of dermal fibroblasts is crucial for the maintenance of skin. The small Rho GTPase, Rac1, has been identified as a key transducer of proliferative signals in various cell types, but in normal human dermal fibroblasts its significance to cell growth control has not been studied. In this study, we applied the method of RNA interference to suppress endogenous Rac1 expression and examined the consequences on human skin fibroblasts. Rac1 knock-down resulted in inhibition of DNA synthesis. This effect was not mediated by inhibition of the central transducer of proliferative stimuli, ERK1/2 or by activation of the pro-apoptotic p38. Rather, as a consequence of the suppressed Rac1 expression we observed a significant decrease in phosphorylation of c-myc, revealing for the first time that in human fibroblasts Rac1 exerts control on proliferation through c-myc phosphorylation. Thus Rac1 activates proliferation of normal fibroblasts through stimulation of c-myc phosphorylation without affecting ERK1/2 activity.

  7. Impact of Malaria Preexposure on Antiparasite Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses after Controlled Human Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Obiero, Joshua M.; Shekalaghe, Seif; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Mpina, Maxmillian; Bijker, Else M.; Roestenberg, Meta; Teelen, Karina; Billingsley, Peter F.; Sim, B. Kim Lee; James, Eric R.; Daubenberger, Claudia A.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Abdulla, Salim

    2015-01-01

    To understand the effect of previous malaria exposure on antiparasite immune responses is important for developing successful immunization strategies. Controlled human malaria infections (CHMIs) using cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites provide a unique opportunity to study differences in acquisition or recall of antimalaria immune responses in individuals from different transmission settings and genetic backgrounds. In this study, we compared antiparasite humoral and cellular immune responses in two cohorts of malaria-naive Dutch volunteers and Tanzanians from an area of low malarial endemicity, who were subjected to the identical CHMI protocol by intradermal injection of P. falciparum sporozoites. Samples from both trials were analyzed in parallel in a single center to ensure direct comparability of immunological outcomes. Within the Tanzanian cohort, we distinguished one group with moderate levels of preexisting antibodies to asexual P. falciparum lysate and another that, based on P. falciparum serology, resembled the malaria-naive Dutch cohort. Positive P. falciparum serology at baseline was associated with a lower parasite density at first detection by quantitative PCR (qPCR) after CHMI than that for Tanzanian volunteers with negative serology. Post-CHMI, both Tanzanian groups showed a stronger increase in anti-P. falciparum antibody titers than Dutch volunteers, indicating similar levels of B-cell memory independent of serology. In contrast to the Dutch, Tanzanians failed to increase P. falciparum-specific in vitro recall gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production after CHMI, and innate IFN-γ responses were lower in P. falciparum lysate-seropositive individuals than in seronegative individuals. In conclusion, positive P. falciparum lysate serology can be used to identify individuals with better parasite control but weaker IFN-γ responses in circulating lymphocytes, which may help to stratify volunteers in future CHMI trials in areas where malaria is

  8. The Indefinite Extension of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty: A Hinderence or Help to Future Arms Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pella, Peter J.

    1996-05-01

    The indefinite and "unconditional" extension of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) was achieved almost one year ago today. This outcome was a major foreign policy goal of the Clinton Administration. Some critics of the NPT's indefinite extension claim that nuclear weapons states parties to the NPT have now legitimized their possession of nuclear weapons for all time and that there is no incentive for future nuclear arms control and disarmament measures. A discussion of how the indefinite extension of the NPT has affected the nuclear arms control landscape and the prospects for future disarmament measures will be discussed.

  9. Cellular population dynamics control the robustness of the stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Adam L.; Kirk, Paul D. W.; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Within populations of cells, fate decisions are controlled by an indeterminate combination of cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic factors. In the case of stem cells, the stem cell niche is believed to maintain ‘stemness’ through communication and interactions between the stem cells and one or more other cell-types that contribute to the niche conditions. To investigate the robustness of cell fate decisions in the stem cell hierarchy and the role that the niche plays, we introduce simple mathematical models of stem and progenitor cells, their progeny and their interplay in the niche. These models capture the fundamental processes of proliferation and differentiation and allow us to consider alternative possibilities regarding how niche-mediated signalling feedback regulates the niche dynamics. Generalised stability analysis of these stem cell niche systems enables us to describe the stability properties of each model. We find that although the number of feasible states depends on the model, their probabilities of stability in general do not: stem cell–niche models are stable across a wide range of parameters. We demonstrate that niche-mediated feedback increases the number of stable steady states, and show how distinct cell states have distinct branching characteristics. The ecological feedback and interactions mediated by the stem cell niche thus lend (surprisingly) high levels of robustness to the stem and progenitor cell population dynamics. Furthermore, cell–cell interactions are sufficient for populations of stem cells and their progeny to achieve stability and maintain homeostasis. We show that the robustness of the niche – and hence of the stem cell pool in the niche – depends only weakly, if at all, on the complexity of the niche make-up: simple as well as complicated niche systems are capable of supporting robust and stable stem cell dynamics. PMID:26453624

  10. Control of the Proliferation of Mammalian Cells by the Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae June; Ha, Chang Seung; Ma, Yonghao; Lee, Jungyeol; Song, Kiwon

    2012-10-01

    Recent development of the atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs) reported dramatic achievement on the applications to sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and so on. These effects are coming from the abundant electrons, various ions, radicals, and neutral atoms which cause specific interactions with cells. However, the application of APPs to human cells has been mainly focused on cell death, but not so much on cell proliferation. In this study, the effects of a non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) were investigated for three different human cell lines. It was observed that the exposure of APP to human adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) and the primary lung fibroblast IMR-90 cells induced increased cell proliferation in a specific condition. On the other hand, the same exposure of APP to HeLa cells dramatically decreased their viability. These observations suggest that different types of human cells differentially respond to the exposure of APP.

  11. MAPKs and Signal Transduction in the Control of Gastrointestinal Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Luciana H.; Gama, Patrícia

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways are activated by several stimuli and transduce the signal inside cells, generating diverse responses including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Each MAPK cascade comprises a series of molecules, and regulation takes place at different levels. They communicate with each other and with additional pathways, creating a signaling network that is important for cell fate determination. In this review, we focus on ERK, JNK, p38 and ERK5, the major MAPKs, and their interactions with PI3K-Akt, TGFβ/Smad and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. More importantly, we describe how MAPKs regulate cell proliferation and differentiation in the rapidly renewing epithelia that lines the gastrointestinal tract and, finally, we highlight the recent findings on nutritional aspects that affect MAPK transduction cascades. PMID:23670595

  12. Cdk4 functions in multiple cell types to control Drosophila intestinal stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Adlesic, Mojca; Frei, Christian; Frew, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and differentiation of enteroblasts to form mature enteroendocrine cells and enterocytes in the Drosophila intestinal epithelium must be tightly regulated to maintain homeostasis. We show that genetic modulation of CyclinD/Cdk4 activity or mTOR-dependent signalling cell-autonomously regulates enterocyte growth, which influences ISC proliferation and enteroblast differentiation. Increased enterocyte growth results in higher numbers of ISCs and defective enterocyte growth reduces ISC abundance and proliferation in the midgut. Adult midguts deficient for Cdk4 show severe disruption of intestinal homeostasis characterised by decreased ISC self-renewal, enteroblast differentiation defects and low enteroendocrine cell and enterocyte numbers. The ISC/enteroblast phenotypes result from a combination of cell autonomous and non-autonomous requirements for Cdk4 function. One non-autonomous consequence of Cdk4-dependent deficient enterocyte growth is high expression of Delta in ISCs and Delta retention in enteroblasts. We postulate that aberrant activation of the Delta-Notch pathway is a possible partial cause of lost ISC stemness. These results support the idea that enterocytes contribute to a putative stem cell niche that maintains intestinal homeostasis in the Drosophila anterior midgut. PMID:26879465

  13. Cdk4 functions in multiple cell types to control Drosophila intestinal stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Adlesic, Mojca; Frei, Christian; Frew, Ian J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and differentiation of enteroblasts to form mature enteroendocrine cells and enterocytes in the Drosophila intestinal epithelium must be tightly regulated to maintain homeostasis. We show that genetic modulation of CyclinD/Cdk4 activity or mTOR-dependent signalling cell-autonomously regulates enterocyte growth, which influences ISC proliferation and enteroblast differentiation. Increased enterocyte growth results in higher numbers of ISCs and defective enterocyte growth reduces ISC abundance and proliferation in the midgut. Adult midguts deficient for Cdk4 show severe disruption of intestinal homeostasis characterised by decreased ISC self-renewal, enteroblast differentiation defects and low enteroendocrine cell and enterocyte numbers. The ISC/enteroblast phenotypes result from a combination of cell autonomous and non-autonomous requirements for Cdk4 function. One non-autonomous consequence of Cdk4-dependent deficient enterocyte growth is high expression of Delta in ISCs and Delta retention in enteroblasts. We postulate that aberrant activation of the Delta–Notch pathway is a possible partial cause of lost ISC stemness. These results support the idea that enterocytes contribute to a putative stem cell niche that maintains intestinal homeostasis in the Drosophila anterior midgut. PMID:26879465

  14. Farnesoid X receptor activation promotes cell proliferation via PDK4-controlled metabolic reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yang; Wang, Hong; Cheng, Xuefang; Wu, Yuzheng; Cao, Lijuan; Wu, Mengqiu; Xie, Wen; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of various metabolic pathways as well as liver regeneration. However, the casual link between cell proliferative effects during liver regeneration and metabolic regulation of FXR was elusive. In this study, we found that FXR activation significantly promotes HepG2 cell proliferation accompanied with metabolic switch towards the excessive accumulation of aerobic glycolytic intermediates including lactic acid, pyruvate and the subsequently increased biosynthesis of glycine. This FXR-induced metabolic switch was found dependent on an up-regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenate kinase 4 (PDK4), a FXR target gene. FXR agonists were found to promote liver regeneration in the murine model of APAP induced liver injury, which was associated with a metabolic switch favoring the accumulation of glycolytic intermediates as precursors for generation of biomass. However, FXR activation has little effect on the glycolytic metabolism in healthy primary hepatocytes in vitro and the liver of healthy mice in vivo. Therefore, we conclude that FXR may promote the proliferation of tumor cells and the hepatocytes in the process of liver regeneration by activating the PDK4-mediated metabolic reprogramming to generate glycolytic intermediates essential for rapid biomass generation, establishing a mechanistic link between cell proliferation and metabolic switch. PMID:26728993

  15. The role of VipAlbumin® as an immunostimulatory agent for controlling homeostasis and proliferation of lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Djati, Muhammad Sasmito; Rifa'I, Muhaimin

    2016-01-01

    VipAlbumin® is a supplement from snakehead fish (Ophiocephalus striatus) which has high content of albumin that is very important to develop new cells. The aims of this study were to know the effect of VipAlbumin® to cell proliferation, expression level of CD4+CD62L+ T cell, regulatory T cell, and B220+ cell, and immunocompetent cell cycle. Cell isolated from spleen of pathogen free mice were cultured in RPMI 1640 with 10% FBS, 1% Pen/Strep 10×, 2-Mercaptoetanol, anti-CD3 and LPS. The concentrations of VipAlbumin ® used were 0 µg/ml; 0.33 µg/ml; 33.3 µg/ml; and 3333.3 µg/ml. The cell was incubated in CO2 5% incubator 37°C for 3 days for cell cycle and 5 days for proliferation analysis and cell expression. FACS analysis was done to know cell proliferation profile, status of cell, and cell cycle. Concentration 33.3 µg/ml and 3333.3 µg/ml significantly can increase cell proliferation and induce cell enter G2/M phase (p < 0.05) compared to control. VipAlbumin can significantly increase the relative number of CD4+CD62L+ T cell, regulatory T cell, and B220+ cell (p < 0.05) compared to control. This study gives scientific evidence that VipAlbumin can be used as an immunostimulant which accelerates immunocompetent cells growth. PMID:27095920

  16. Selective control of fibroblast proliferation and its effect on cardiac muscle differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Clark, W A

    1976-09-01

    The stability of the differentiated state of cardiac myocytes in vitro was examined under culture conditions which selectively stimulated or inhibited proliferation of fibroblasts. Regulation of fibroblast proliferation in cultures of myocardial cells from 8-day embryonic chicks was achieved by adjustment of the glutamine (Gln) concentration in the culture medium (Ham's F-12 medium containing 2 x amino acids and 5% fetal calf serum). Myocardial cells, when plated at 80 cells/mm2 in Gln- medium, maintained a stable density of approximately 40% of the plating density for more than 30 days. When Gln was added to the medium (292 micrograms/ml) fibroblast proliferation was stimulated, and by 5-6 days after this addition cell densities had increased to confluency. The selective action of glutamine on fibroblast proliferation was determined by labeling cultures with tritiated thymidine ([3H]TdR) and scoring its incorporation into myocytes and fibroblasts by radioautography. After 2 weeks in Gln- medium, the mitotic index was 0.3% and the [3H]TdR-labeling index (1.5-hr pulse) was 6.4%. In addition, the proportion of myocytes in the population was constant at 64.2% for at least 30 days in vitro, and contractile activity was observed for up to 6 months. After 5 days of Gln replacement, the cells exhibited a labeling index of 25%, the proportion of myocytes decreased to less than 10% and contractile activity was rarely observed. Although the [3H]TdR-labeling index of fibroblasts and myocytes was nearly identical in Gln- medium, the addition of Gln produced a fivefold stimulation in the fibroblast labeling index, but did not affect myocyte proliferation or DNA synthesis. A unique phenomenon of myocyte congregation was observed only in Gln- medium which resulted in the formation of myocyte colonies from which fibroblasts were largely absent. It is suggested that this process with the resultant establishment of a functional electrical syncytium plays a significant role in the

  17. Synthesis of silica vesicles with controlled entrance size for high loading, sustained release, and cellular delivery of therapeutical proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Karmakar, Surajit; Yu, Meihua; Mitter, Neena; Zou, Jin; Yu, Chengzhong

    2014-12-29

    A rationally designed two-step synthesis of silica vesicles is developed with the formation of vesicular structure in the first step and fine control over the entrance size by tuning the temperature in the second step. The silica vesicles have a uniform size of ≈50 nm with excellent cellular uptake performance. When the entrance size is equal to the wall thickness, silica vesicles after hydrophobic modification show the highest loading amount (563 mg/g) towards Ribonuclease A with a sustained release behavior. Consequently, the silica vesicles are excellent nano-carriers for cellular delivery applications of therapeutical biomolecules. PMID:25060135

  18. Notch1–STAT3–ETBR signaling axis controls reactive astrocyte proliferation after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    LeComte, Matthew D.; Shimada, Issei S.; Sherwin, Casey; Spees, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Defining the signaling network that controls reactive astrogliosis may provide novel treatment targets for patients with diverse CNS injuries and pathologies. We report that the radial glial cell antigen RC2 identifies the majority of proliferating glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive (GFAP+) reactive astrocytes after stroke. These cells highly expressed endothelin receptor type B (ETBR) and Jagged1, a Notch1 receptor ligand. To study signaling in adult reactive astrocytes, we developed a model based on reactive astrocyte-derived neural stem cells isolated from GFAP-CreER-Notch1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice. By loss- and gain-of-function studies and promoter activity assays, we found that Jagged1/Notch1 signaling increased ETBR expression indirectly by raising the level of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a previously unidentified EDNRB transcriptional activator. Similar to inducible transgenic GFAP-CreER-Notch1-cKO mice, GFAP-CreER-ETBR-cKO mice exhibited a defect in reactive astrocyte proliferation after cerebral ischemia. Our results indicate that the Notch1–STAT3–ETBR axis connects a signaling network that promotes reactive astrocyte proliferation after brain injury. PMID:26124113

  19. Occurrence and control of sporadic proliferation in growth arrested Swiss 3T3 feeder cells.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Rishi Man; Chaturvedi, Madhusudan; Yerneni, Lakshmana Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Growth arrested Swiss mouse embryonic 3T3 cells are used as feeders to support the growth of epidermal keratinocytes and several other target cells. The 3T3 cells have been extensively subcultured owing to their popularity and wide distribution in the world and, as a consequence selective inclusion of variants is a strong possibility in them. Inadvertently selected variants expressing innate resistance to mitomycin C may continue to proliferate even after treatment with such growth arresting agents. The failure of growth arrest can lead to a serious risk of proliferative feeder contamination in target cell cultures. In this study, we passaged Swiss 3T3 cells (CCL-92, ATCC) by different seeding densities and incubation periods. We tested the resultant cultures for differences in anchorage-independent growth, resumption of proliferation after mitomycin C treatment and occurrence of proliferative feeder contaminants in an epidermal keratinocyte co-culture system. The study revealed subculture dependent differential responses. The cultures of a particular subculture procedure displayed unique cell size distribution and disintegrated completely in 6 weeks following mitomycin C treatment, but their repeated subculture resulted in feeder regrowth as late as 11 weeks after the growth arrest. In contrast, mitomycin C failed to inhibit cell proliferation in cultures of the other subculture schemes and also in a clone that was established from a transformation focus of super-confluent culture. The resultant proliferative feeder cells contaminated the keratinocyte cultures. The anchorage-independent growth appeared in late passages as compared with the expression of mitomycin C resistance in earlier passages. The feeder regrowth was prevented by identifying a safe subculture protocol that discouraged the inclusion of resistant variants. We advocate routine anchorage-independent growth assay and absolute confirmation of feeder disintegration to qualify feeder batches and

  20. Glutamate signals through mGluR2 to control Schwann cell differentiation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Fuminori; Wakatsuki, Shuji; Tokunaga, Shinji; Fujieda, Hiroki; Araki, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid saltatory nerve conduction is facilitated by myelin structure, which is produced by Schwann cells (SC) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Proper development and degeneration/regeneration after injury requires regulated phenotypic changes of SC. We have previously shown that glutamate can induce SC proliferation in culture. Here we show that glutamate signals through metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) to induce Erk phosphorylation in SC. mGluR2-elicited Erk phosphorylation requires ErbB2/3 receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation to limit the signaling cascade that promotes phosphorylation of Erk, but not Akt. We found that Gβγ and Src are involved in subcellular signaling downstream of mGluR2. We also found that glutamate can transform myelinating SC to proliferating SC, while inhibition of mGluR2 signaling can inhibit demyelination of injured nerves in vivo. These data suggest pathophysiological significance of mGluR2 signaling in PNS and its possible therapeutic importance to combat demyelinating disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. PMID:27432639

  1. Glutamate signals through mGluR2 to control Schwann cell differentiation and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Saitoh, Fuminori; Wakatsuki, Shuji; Tokunaga, Shinji; Fujieda, Hiroki; Araki, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Rapid saltatory nerve conduction is facilitated by myelin structure, which is produced by Schwann cells (SC) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Proper development and degeneration/regeneration after injury requires regulated phenotypic changes of SC. We have previously shown that glutamate can induce SC proliferation in culture. Here we show that glutamate signals through metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) to induce Erk phosphorylation in SC. mGluR2-elicited Erk phosphorylation requires ErbB2/3 receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation to limit the signaling cascade that promotes phosphorylation of Erk, but not Akt. We found that Gβγ and Src are involved in subcellular signaling downstream of mGluR2. We also found that glutamate can transform myelinating SC to proliferating SC, while inhibition of mGluR2 signaling can inhibit demyelination of injured nerves in vivo. These data suggest pathophysiological significance of mGluR2 signaling in PNS and its possible therapeutic importance to combat demyelinating disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. PMID:27432639

  2. High-throughput study of alpha-synuclein expression in yeast using microfluidics for control of local cellular microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Patrícia; Tenreiro, Sandra; Chu, Virginia; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Conde, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Microfluidics is an emerging technology which allows the miniaturization, integration, and automation of fluid handling processes. Microfluidic systems offer low sample consumption, significantly reduced processing time, and the prospect of massive parallelization. A microfluidic platform was developed for the control of the soluble cellular microenvironment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, which enabled high-throughput monitoring of the controlled expression of alpha-synuclein (aSyn), a protein involved in Parkinson’s disease. Y-shaped structures were fabricated using particle desorption mass spectrometry-based soft-lithography techniques to generate biomolecular gradients along a microchannel. Cell traps integrated along the microchannel allowed the positioning and monitoring of cells in precise locations, where different, well-controlled chemical environments were established. S. cerevisiae cells genetically engineered to encode the fusion protein aSyn-GFP (green fluorescent protein) under the control of GAL1, a galactose inducible promoter, were loaded in the microfluidic structure. A galactose concentration gradient was established in the channel and a time-dependent aSyn-GFP expression was obtained as a function of the positioning of cells along the galactose gradient. Our results demonstrate the applicability of this microfluidic platform to the spatiotemporal control of cellular microenvironment and open a range of possibilities for the study of cellular processes based on single-cell analysis. PMID:22662094

  3. Epithelial Proliferation on Curved Toroidal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Cruz, Ricardo; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros; Marquez, Samantha; Garcia, Andres; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Cellular environment influences a multitude of cellular functions by providing chemical and physical signals that modulate cell behavior, dynamics, development, and eventually survival. In strongly interacting epithelial cells, cells coordinate their behavior to respond to mechanical constraints in 2D. Local differences in tissue tension has also been shown to impact cell reproduction within an epithelial-cell sheet. Much less is known about how cells respond to out-of-plane curvatures. Here, we describe the proliferation of MDCK on toroidal hydrogel substrates, which unlike spheres or planes, have regions of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. Additionally, the range of curvatures can be controlled by varying the size and aspect ratio of the torus, allowing us to quantify the relation between substrate curvature and cell proliferation.

  4. Roles of cell volume in molecular and cellular biology.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jean-Marc; Rouzaire-Dubois, Béatrice

    2012-04-01

    Extracellular tonicity and volume regulation control a great number of molecular and cellular functions including: cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, hormone and neuromediator release, gene expression, ion channel and transporter activity and metabolism. The aim of this review is to describe these effects and to determine if they are direct or are secondarily the result of the activity of second messengers. PMID:22192789

  5. Integrating mechanical and biological control of cell proliferation through bioinspired multieffector materials.

    PubMed

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Tatkiewicz, Witold I; Vazquez, Esther; García-Fruitós, Elena; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume; Villaverde, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In nature, cells respond to complex mechanical and biological stimuli whose understanding is required for tissue construction in regenerative medicine. However, the full replication of such bimodal effector networks is far to be reached. Engineering substrate roughness and architecture allows regulating cell adhesion, positioning, proliferation, differentiation and survival, and the external supply of soluble protein factors (mainly growth factors and hormones) has been long applied to promote growth and differentiation. Further, bioinspired scaffolds are progressively engineered as reservoirs for the in situ sustained release of soluble protein factors from functional topographies. We review here how research progresses toward the design of integrative, holistic scaffold platforms based on the exploration of individual mechanical and biological effectors and their further combination. PMID:25816885

  6. Integrating mechanical and biological control of cell proliferation through bioinspired multieffector materials.

    PubMed

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Tatkiewicz, Witold I; Vazquez, Esther; García-Fruitós, Elena; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume; Villaverde, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In nature, cells respond to complex mechanical and biological stimuli whose understanding is required for tissue construction in regenerative medicine. However, the full replication of such bimodal effector networks is far to be reached. Engineering substrate roughness and architecture allows regulating cell adhesion, positioning, proliferation, differentiation and survival, and the external supply of soluble protein factors (mainly growth factors and hormones) has been long applied to promote growth and differentiation. Further, bioinspired scaffolds are progressively engineered as reservoirs for the in situ sustained release of soluble protein factors from functional topographies. We review here how research progresses toward the design of integrative, holistic scaffold platforms based on the exploration of individual mechanical and biological effectors and their further combination.

  7. Inhibitory role of ERβ on anterior pituitary cell proliferation by controlling the expression of proteins related to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Pablo A; Petiti, Juan P; Wagner, Ignacio A; Sabatino, Maria E; Sasso, Corina V; De Paul, Ana L; Torres, Alicia I; Gutiérrez, Silvina

    2015-11-01

    Considering that the role of ERβ in the growth of pituitary cells is not well known, the aim of this work was to determine the expression of ERβ in normal and tumoral cells and to investigate its implications in the proliferative control of this endocrine gland, by analyzing the participation of cyclin D1, Cdk4 and p21. Our results showed that the expression of ERβ decreased during pituitary tumoral development induced by chronic E2 stimulation. The 20 ± 1.6% of normal adenohypophyseal cells expressed ERβ, with this protein being reduced in the hyperplastic/adenomatous pituitary: at 20 days the ERβ+ population was 10.7 ± 2.2%, while after 40 and 60 days of treatment an almost complete loss in the ERβ expression was observed (40 d: 1 ± 0.6%; 60 d: 2 ± 0.6%). The ERα/β ratio increased starting from tumors at 40 days, mainly due to the loss of ERβ expression. The cell proliferation was analyzed in normal and hyperplastic pituitary and also in GH3β- and GH3β+ which contained different levels of ERβ expression, and therefore different ERα/β ratios. The over-expression of ERβ inhibited the GH3 cell proliferation and expression of cyclin D1 and ERα. Also, the ERβ activation by its agonist DPN changed the subcellular localization of p21, inducing an increase in the p21 nuclear expression, where it acts as a tumoral suppressor. These results show that ERβ exerts an inhibitory role on pituitary cell proliferation, and that this effect may be partially due to the modulation of some key regulators of the cell cycle, such as cyclin D1 and p21. These data contribute significantly to the understanding of the ER effects in the proliferative control of pituitary gland, specifically related to the ERβ function in the E2 actions on this endocrine gland.

  8. MicroRNA-222 Controls Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line Capan-2 Proliferation by P57 Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yingying; Wang, Yuqiong; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Jingqi; Song, Yang; Cao, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Wenzhuo; Wang, Fei; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhaoshen; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers and has a poor prognosis due to late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic multimodality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are a group of non-coding, small RNAs with active biological activities. In our investigation, human pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-2 were transfected with miR-222 mimics, inhibitors or their negative controls. Cell proliferation was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), EdU incorporation assay and cell cycle determination by flow cytometry. MiR-222 and putative target gene expression levels including p27, p57 and PTEN were determined using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions and Western blotting. Our results showed that miR-222 could lead to increased vitality and proliferative rate of Capan-2 cells, and also higher S-phase and lower G1-phase of cell cycle. Further, we found p57 at protein level, but not p27 nor PTEN, was regulated by miR-222 in Capan-2 cells. Finally, we co-transfected miR-222 inhibitor and p57 si-RNA into Capan-2 cells, and found that proliferation-suppressing effects of miR-222 inhibitor on Capan-2 cells could be partially reversed by silencing p57. Our results indicate that miR-222 controls Capan-2 cell proliferation by targeting p57. This study provides a novel idea for developing effective therapeutic strategy for PC patients through inhibiting miR-222. PMID:26535064

  9. Lysophosphatidic acid and bFGF control different modes in proliferating myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Myogenic cells provide excellent in vitro models for studying the cell growth and differentiation. In this study we report that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive phospholipid contained in serum, stimulates the growth and inhibits the differentiation of mouse C2C12 myoblast cells, in a distinct manner from basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) whose mitotic and anti-differentiation actions have been well investigated. These actions of LPA were both blocked by pertussis toxin, suggesting the involvement of Gi class of G proteins, whereas bFGF acts through receptor tyrosine kinases. Detailed analysis revealed that LPA and bFGF act differently in regulating the myogenic basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins, the key players in myogenic differentiation process. LPA stimulates the proliferation of undifferentiated myoblasts allowing the continued expression of MyoD, but in contrast, bFGF does so with the MyoD expression suppressed at the mRNA level. Both compounds maintain the myf-5 expression, and suppress the myogenin expression. In addition, while LPA did not inhibit cell-cell contact-induced differentiation, bFGF strongly inhibited this process. Furthermore, LPA and bFGF act cooperatively in their mitogenic and anti-differentiation abilities. These findings indicate that LPA and bFGF differently stimulate intracellular signaling pathways, resulting in proliferating myoblasts each bearing a distinct expression pattern of myogenic bHLH proteins and distinct differentiation potentials in response to cell-cell contact, and illustrate the biological significance of Gi-mediated and tyrosine kinase-mediated signals. PMID:8567722

  10. Cell cycle gene-specific control of transcription has a critical role in proliferation of primordial germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Daiji; Maeda, Ikuma; Taniguchi, Hirofumi; Tokitake, Yuko; Ikeda, Makiko; Ozato, Keiko; Mise, Nathan; Abe, Kuniya; Noce, Toshiaki; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Matsui, Yasuhisa

    2012-01-01

    Transcription elongation is stimulated by positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), for which activity is repressed in the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (7SK snRNP) complex. We show here a critical role of 7SK snRNP in growth control of primordial germ cells (PGCs). The expression of p15INK4b, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) gene, in PGCs is selectively activated by P-TEFb and its recruiting molecule, Brd4, when the amount of active P-TEFb is increased due to reduction of the 7SK snRNP, and PGCs consequently undergo growth arrest. These results indicate that CDKI gene-specific control of transcription by 7SK snRNP plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of PGC proliferation. PMID:23154982

  11. Enhanced lymphocyte proliferation in patients with adrenoleukodystrophy treated with erucic acid (22:1)-rich triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Pour, R B; Stöckler-Ipsiroglu, S; Hunneman, D H; Gahr, M; Korenke, G C; Pabst, W; Hanefeld, F; Peters, A

    2000-03-01

    Lymphocytopenia and depression of natural killer cells have been observed in patients with adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) treated with glycerol trioleate and glycerol trierucate ('Lorenzo's oil'). To investigate possible alterations of cellular immunoreactivity, we measured lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens (PHA, Con A, PWM, OKT3) in 27 patients on treatment and in 14 patients without treatment. In patients on treatment, lymphocyte proliferation in response to the mitogens PHA and Con A was significantly higher than in patients without treatment. Lymphocyte proliferation in patients without treatment was comparable to that of normal control lymphocytes. Additionally, we found increased concentrations of erucic acid, C22:1, in lymphocytes from patients with treatment. The enhanced proliferation of lymphocytes in response to mitogens is an indication of increased reactivity of cellular immunity to unspecific immunological stimuli. Long-term side-effects on cellular immunoreactivity have to be considered in ALD patients treated with Lorenzo's oil.

  12. Quality control of extracorporeal photochemotherapy: Proliferation assay using CFSE validated according to ISO 15189:2007 standards.

    PubMed

    Lionel, Faivre; Lucie, Lecouflet; Wang-Qing, Liu; Isabelle, Khadher; Camille, Lahaie; Michel, Vidal; Sabine, Legouvello; Jean-Louis, Beaumont; Philippe, Bierling; Hélène, Rouard; Brigitte, Birebent

    2014-09-01

    Background: For the last 40 years, the technique of extracorporeal photopheresis has constantly developed. Among irradiation systems, those called 'off-line' allow the validation of the quality of the cell therapy product. The inhibition of the proliferation of lymphocytes after UVA irradiation is usually verified by the tritiated thymidine assay as in vitro proliferation assay. The document presented here describes the results obtained while performing the setting up of an alternative proliferation assay using flow cytometry according to ISO 15189:2007 Standard. Methods: Cells samples taken before and after UVA irradiation were labeled with CFSE and then cultured with phytohemagglutinin. After 3 days, an analysis of the CFSE staining was realized by flow cytometry. In order to validate the shift in the method used according to Standard, the following tests were performed: 1) comparison with the reference method, 2) robustness test, 3) reagents stability. Results: Comparison method demonstrated that the sensitivity of the CFSE test is 100%, the specificity is 89% and the concordance is almost complete. The CFSE test is robust regarding parameters like cell concentration or PHA concentration. PHA and CFSE are stable for 6 months and one year, respectively. Conclusion: Validation of this alternative test, according to the ISO 15189:2007 Standard, has demonstrated good concordance with reference method. The results of the robustness and stability of reagents are appropriate for its routine use. Thus, the benefits of alternative technique make it a wise choice for the quality control of ECP in a cell therapy laboratory. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  13. JAK/STAT signaling in Drosophila muscles controls the cellular immune response against parasitoid infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hairu; Kronhamn, Jesper; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Korkut, Gül Gizem; Hultmark, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The role of JAK/STAT signaling in the cellular immune response of Drosophila is not well understood. Here, we show that parasitoid wasp infection activates JAK/STAT signaling in somatic muscles of the Drosophila larva, triggered by secretion of the cytokines Upd2 and Upd3 from circulating hemocytes. Deletion of upd2 or upd3, but not the related os (upd1) gene, reduced the cellular immune response, and suppression of the JAK/STAT pathway in muscle cells reduced the encapsulation of wasp eggs and the number of circulating lamellocyte effector cells. These results suggest that JAK/STAT signaling in muscles participates in a systemic immune defense against wasp infection.

  14. The proteoglycan Trol controls proliferation and differentiation of blood progenitors in the Drosophila lymph gland

    PubMed Central

    Grigorian, Melina; Liu, Ting; Banerjee, Utpal; Hartenstein, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The heparin sulfate proteoglycan Trol (Terribly Reduced Optic Lobes) is the D. melanogaster homolog of the vertebrate protein Perlecan. Trol is expressed as part of the extracellular matrix (ECM) found in the hematopoietic organ, called the lymph gland. In the normal lymph gland, the ECM forms thin basement membranes around individual or small groups of blood progenitors. The pattern of basement membranes, reported by Trol expression, is spatio-temporally correlated to hematopoiesis. The central, medullary zone which contain undifferentiated hematopoietic progenitors has many, closely spaced membranes. Fewer basement membranes are present in the outer, cortical zone, where differentiation of blood cells takes place. Loss of trol causes a dramatic change of the ECM into a three-dimensional, spongy mass that fills wide spaces scattered throughout the lymph gland. At the same time proliferation is reduced, leading to a significantly smaller lymph gland. Interestingly, differentiation of blood progenitors in trol mutants is precocious, resulting in the break-down of the usual zonation of the lymph gland which normally consists of an immature center (medullary zone) where cells remain undifferentiated, and an outer cortical zone, where differentiation sets in. We present evidence that the effect of Trol on blood cell differentiation is mediated by Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which is known to be required to maintain an immature medullary zone. Overexpression of hh in the background of a trol mutation is able to rescue the premature differentiation phenotype. Our data provide novel insight into the role of the ECM component Perlecan during Drosophila hematopoiesis. PMID:23510717

  15. Microcephaly gene links trithorax and REST/NRSF to control neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yawei J; Baltus, Andrew E; Mathew, Rebecca S; Murphy, Elisabeth A; Evrony, Gilad D; Gonzalez, Dilenny M; Wang, Estee P; Marshall-Walker, Christine A; Barry, Brenda J; Murn, Jernej; Tatarakis, Antonis; Mahajan, Muktar A; Samuels, Herbert H; Shi, Yang; Golden, Jeffrey A; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Shenhav, Ruthie; Walsh, Christopher A

    2012-11-21

    Microcephaly is a neurodevelopmental disorder causing significantly reduced cerebral cortex size. Many known microcephaly gene products localize to centrosomes, regulating cell fate and proliferation. Here, we identify and characterize a nuclear zinc finger protein, ZNF335/NIF-1, as a causative gene for severe microcephaly, small somatic size, and neonatal death. Znf335 null mice are embryonically lethal, and conditional knockout leads to severely reduced cortical size. RNA-interference and postmortem human studies show that ZNF335 is essential for neural progenitor self-renewal, neurogenesis, and neuronal differentiation. ZNF335 is a component of a vertebrate-specific, trithorax H3K4-methylation complex, directly regulating REST/NRSF, a master regulator of neural gene expression and cell fate, as well as other essential neural-specific genes. Our results reveal ZNF335 as an essential link between H3K4 complexes and REST/NRSF and provide the first direct genetic evidence that this pathway regulates human neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. PMID:23178126

  16. Nuclear Control of the Inflammatory Response in Mammals by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mandard, Stéphane; Patsouris, David

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of a very large number of biological processes including inflammation. Using specific examples, this paper focuses on the interplay between PPARs and innate immunity/inflammation and, when possible, compares it among species. We focus on recent discoveries establishing how inflammation and PPARs interact in the context of obesity-induced inflammation and type 2 diabetes, mostly in mouse and humans. We illustrate that PPARγ ability to alleviate obesity-associated inflammation raises an interesting pharmacologic potential. In the light of recent findings, the protective role of PPARα and PPARβ/δ against the hepatic inflammatory response is also addressed. While PPARs agonists are well-established agents that can treat numerous inflammatory issues in rodents and humans, surprisingly very little has been described in other species. We therefore also review the implication of PPARs in inflammatory bowel disease; acute-phase response; and central, cardiac, and endothelial inflammation and compare it along different species (mainly mouse, rat, human, and pig). In the light of the data available in the literature, there is no doubt that more studies concerning the impact of PPAR ligands in livestock should be undertaken because it may finally raise unconsidered health and sanitary benefits. PMID:23577023

  17. NAD+-dependent deacetylase Hst1p controls biosynthesis and cellular NAD+ levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bedalov, Antonio; Hirao, Maki; Posakony, Jeffrey; Nelson, Melisa; Simon, Julian A

    2003-10-01

    Nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) performs key roles in electron transport reactions, as a substrate for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases. In the latter two processes, NAD(+) is consumed and converted to ADP-ribose and nicotinamide. NAD(+) levels can be maintained by regeneration of NAD(+) from nicotinamide via a salvage pathway or by de novo synthesis of NAD(+) from tryptophan. Both pathways are conserved from yeast to humans. We describe a critical role of the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase Hst1p as a sensor of NAD(+) levels and regulator of NAD(+) biosynthesis. Using transcript arrays, we show that low NAD(+) states specifically induce the de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis genes while the genes in the salvage pathway remain unaffected. The NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase activity of Hst1p represses de novo NAD(+) biosynthesis genes in the absence of new protein synthesis, suggesting a direct effect. The known Hst1p binding partner, Sum1p, is present at promoters of highly inducible NAD(+) biosynthesis genes. The removal of HST1-mediated repression of the NAD(+) de novo biosynthesis pathway leads to increased cellular NAD(+) levels. Transcript array analysis shows that reduction in cellular NAD(+) levels preferentially affects Hst1p-regulated genes in comparison to genes regulated with other NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases (Sir2p, Hst2p, Hst3p, and Hst4p). In vitro experiments demonstrate that Hst1p has relatively low affinity toward NAD(+) in comparison to other NAD(+)-dependent enzymes. These findings suggest that Hst1p serves as a cellular NAD(+) sensor that monitors and regulates cellular NAD(+) levels. PMID:12972620

  18. Cellular reprogramming for pancreatic β-cell regeneration: clinical potential of small molecule control.

    PubMed

    Pandian, Ganesh N; Taniguchi, Junichi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-03-27

    Recent scientific breakthroughs in stem cell biology suggest that a sustainable treatment approach to cure diabetes mellitus (DM) can be achieved in the near future. However, the transplantation complexities and the difficulty in obtaining the stem cells from adult cells of pancreas, liver, bone morrow and other cells is a major concern. The epoch-making strategy of transcription-factor based cellular reprogramming suggest that these barriers could be overcome, and it is possible to reprogram any cells into functional β cells. Contemporary biological and analytical techniques help us to predict the key transcription factors needed for β-cell regeneration. These β cell-specific transcription factors could be modulated with diverse reprogramming protocols. Among cellular reprogramming strategies, small molecule approach gets proclaimed to have better clinical prospects because it does not involve genetic manipulation. Several small molecules targeting certain epigenetic enzymes and/or signaling pathways have been successful in helping to induce pancreatic β-cell specification. Recently, a synthetic DNA-based small molecule triggered targeted transcriptional activation of pancreas-related genes to suggest the possibility of achieving desired cellular phenotype in a precise mode. Here, we give a brief overview of treating DM by regenerating pancreatic β-cells from various cell sources. Through a comprehensive overview of the available transcription factors, small molecules and reprogramming strategies available for pancreatic β-cell regeneration, this review compiles the current progress made towards the generation of clinically relevant insulin-producing β-cells.

  19. Myocyte proliferation in the developing heart

    PubMed Central

    Sedmera, David; Thompson, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of organ growth is critical during embryogenesis. At the cellular level, mechanisms controlling the size of individual embryonic organs include cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and attrition through cell death. All these mechanisms play a role in cardiac morphogenesis, but experimental studies have shown that the major determinant of cardiac size during prenatal development is myocyte proliferation. As this proliferative capacity becomes severely restricted after birth, the number of cell divisions that occur during embryogenesis limits the growth potential of the postnatal heart. We summarize here current knowledge concerning regional control of myocyte proliferation as related to cardiac morphogenesis and dysmorphogenesis. There are significant spatial and temporal differences in rates of cell division, peaking during the pre-septation period and then gradually decreasing towards birth. Analysis of regional rates of proliferation helps to explain the mechanics of ventricular septation, chamber morphogenesis, and the development of the cardiac conduction system. Proliferation rates are influenced by hemodynamic loading, and transduced by autocrine and paracrine signaling via growth factors. Understanding the biological response of the developing heart to such factors and physical forces will further our progress in engineering artificial myocardial tissues for heart repair and designing optimal treatment strategies for congenital heart disease. PMID:21538685

  20. Inhibition of Lon blocks cell proliferation, enhances chemosensitivity by promoting apoptosis and decreases cellular bioenergetics of bladder cancer: potential roles of Lon as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target in baldder cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongzhang; Lan, Linhua; Huang, Kate; Wang, Rongrong; Xu, Cuicui; Shi, Yang; Wu, Xiaoyi; Wu, Zhi; Zhang, Jiliang; Chen, Lin; Wang, Lu; Yu, Xiaomin; Zhu, Haibo; Lu, Bin

    2014-11-30

    ATP-dependent Lon protease within mitochondrial matrix contributes to the degradation of abnormal proteins. The oxidative or hypoxic stress which represents the stress phenotype of cancer leads to up-regulation of Lon. However, the role of Lon in bladder cancer remains undefined. Here, we found that Lon expression in bladder cancer tissues was significantly higher than those in noncancerous tissues; down-regulation of Lon in bladder cancer cells significantly blocked cancer cell proliferation via suppression c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation due to decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and enhanced the sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents by promoting apoptosis. We further found that Lon down-regulation in bladder cancer cells decreased cellular bioenergetics as determined by measuring aerobic respiration and glycolysis using extracellular flux analyzer. The tissue microarray (TMA) results showed that high expression of Lon was related to the T and TNM stage, as well as histological grade of bladder cancer patients. We also demonstrated that Lon was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of bladder cancer. Taken together, our data suggest that Lon could serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target for treatment of bladder cancer, as well as for prediction of the effectiveness of chemotherapy.

  1. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA-binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq, we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation.

  2. How ERK1/2 Activation Controls Cell Proliferation and Cell Death Is Subcellular Localization the Answer?

    PubMed Central

    Mebratu, Yohannes; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) are members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase super family that can mediate cell proliferation and apoptosis. The Ras–Raf–MEK–ERK signaling cascade controlling cell proliferation has been well studied but the mechanisms involved in ERK1/2-mediated cell death are largely unknown. This review focuses on recent papers that define ERK1/2 translocation to the nucleus and the proteins involved in the cytosolic retention of activated ERK1/2. Cytosolic retention of ERK1/2 denies access to the transcription factor substrates that are responsible for the mitogenic response. In addition, cytosolic ERK1/2, besides inhibiting survival and proliferative signals in the nucleus, potentiates the catalytic activity of some proapoptotic proteins such as DAP kinase in the cytoplasm. Studies that further define the function of cytosolic ERK1/2 and its cytosolic substrates that enhance cell death will be essential to harness this pathway for developing effective treatments for cancer and chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:19282669

  3. Role of interleukin-1beta in the control of neuroepithelial proliferation and differentiation of the spinal cord during development.

    PubMed

    de la Mano, A; Gato, A; Alonso, M I; Carnicero, E; Martín, C; Moro, J A

    2007-02-01

    Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is an important trophic factor in the nervous system (NS). IL-1beta is ubiquitously expressed from very early stages during the development of the amphibian NS and its action has been demonstrated in vitro on survival, proliferation and differentiation in mammalian embryos. In this report, we show that IL-1beta is immunocytochemically expressed in embryonic spinal cord from early stages, both in rat (embryonic day 12) and in chicken (stage 17-HH), in neuroepithelial cells and nerve fibres, dorsal root ganglia, anterior and posterior roots of the spinal nerves, and in the fibres of these nerves. Our in vivo experiments on chick embryos, with microbeads impregnated with IL-1beta implanted laterally to the spinal cord at the level of the wing anlage, demonstrate that this cytokine produces a statistically significant increase in nuclear incorporation of BrdU at the dorsal level and a reduction of this at the ventral level, whereas local immunoblocking with anti-IL-1beta antibodies causes a dorsal reduction of BrdU incorporation and alters ventral differentiation. These data demonstrate that IL-1beta plays a part in controlling proliferation and early differentiation during the development of the spinal cord in chick embryos. PMID:17449272

  4. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk regulated cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The C-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk regulated cell proliferation. PMID:24452013

  5. Estrogenic regulation of S6K1 expression creates a positive regulatory loop in control of breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Maruani, D M; Spiegel, T N; Harris, E N; Shachter, A S; Unger, H A; Herrero-González, S; Holz, M K

    2012-12-01

    The 40S ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) is an important regulator of cell growth. Expression of S6K1 is often elevated in breast cancer cells. However, the transcriptional mechanism of S6K1 overexpression is not understood. In this report, we demonstrate that estrogen activates expression of S6K1 via estrogen receptor (ER)α in ER-positive breast cancer cells. We also show that estrogen acts on the proximal promoter of the S6K1 gene in a mechanism involving the transcriptional factor GATA-3. Finally, we provide data that support the importance of estrogenic regulation of S6K1 expression in breast cancer cell proliferation. S6K1 directly phosphorylates and regulates ligand-independent activity of ERα, while ERα upregulates S6K1 expression. This S6K1-ERα relationship creates a positive feed-forward loop in control of breast cancer cell proliferation. Furthermore, the co-dependent association between S6K1 and ERα may be exploited in the development of targeted breast cancer therapies.

  6. In vitro control release, cytotoxicity assessment and cellular uptake of methotrexate loaded liquid-crystalline folate nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Misra, Rahul; Upadhyay, Mohita; Perumal, Vivekanandan; Mohanty, Sanat

    2015-02-01

    Folate molecules self-assemble in the form of stacks to form liquid-crystalline solutions. Nanocarriers from self-assembled folates are composed of highly ordered structures, which offer high encapsulation of drug (95-98%), controlled drug release rates, active cellular uptake and biocompatibility. Recently, we have shown that the release rates of methotrexate can be controlled by varying the size of nanoparticles, cross-linking cation and cross-linking concentration. The present study reports the in vitro cytotoxic behavior of methotrexate loaded liquid-crystalline folate nanoparticles on cultured HeLa cells. Changing drug release rates can influence cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Therefore, to study the correlation of release rate and cytotoxic behavior, the effect of release controlling parameters on HeLa cells was studied through MTT assay. It is reported that by controlling the methotrexate release, the survival rates of HeLa cells can be controlled. Released methotrexate kills HeLa cells as effectively as free methotrexate solution. The co-culture based in vitro cellular uptake study through fluorescence microscopy on folate receptor positive and negative cancer cells shows that the present nanocarrier has the potential to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells. Overall, the present study reports the in vitro performance of self-assembled liquid-crystalline folate nanoparticles, which will be a platform for further in vivo studies and clinical trials. PMID:25661345

  7. In vitro control release, cytotoxicity assessment and cellular uptake of methotrexate loaded liquid-crystalline folate nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Misra, Rahul; Upadhyay, Mohita; Perumal, Vivekanandan; Mohanty, Sanat

    2015-02-01

    Folate molecules self-assemble in the form of stacks to form liquid-crystalline solutions. Nanocarriers from self-assembled folates are composed of highly ordered structures, which offer high encapsulation of drug (95-98%), controlled drug release rates, active cellular uptake and biocompatibility. Recently, we have shown that the release rates of methotrexate can be controlled by varying the size of nanoparticles, cross-linking cation and cross-linking concentration. The present study reports the in vitro cytotoxic behavior of methotrexate loaded liquid-crystalline folate nanoparticles on cultured HeLa cells. Changing drug release rates can influence cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Therefore, to study the correlation of release rate and cytotoxic behavior, the effect of release controlling parameters on HeLa cells was studied through MTT assay. It is reported that by controlling the methotrexate release, the survival rates of HeLa cells can be controlled. Released methotrexate kills HeLa cells as effectively as free methotrexate solution. The co-culture based in vitro cellular uptake study through fluorescence microscopy on folate receptor positive and negative cancer cells shows that the present nanocarrier has the potential to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells. Overall, the present study reports the in vitro performance of self-assembled liquid-crystalline folate nanoparticles, which will be a platform for further in vivo studies and clinical trials.

  8. The involvement of the interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases (IRAKs) in cellular signaling networks controlling inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ringwood, Lorna; Li, Liwu

    2008-01-01

    Innate immunity and inflammation plays a key role in host defense and wound healing. However, Excessive or altered inflammatory processes can contribute to severe and diverse human diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer. The interleukin-1 receptor associated kinases (IRAKs) are critically involved in the regulation of intra-cellular signaling networks controlling inflammation. Collective studies indicate that IRAKs are present in many cell types, and can mediate signals from various cell receptors including Toll-Like-Receptors (TLRs). Consequently, diverse downstream signaling processes can be elicited following the activation of various IRAKs. Given the critical and complex roles IRAK proteins play, it is not surprising that genetic variations in human IRAK genes have been found to be linked with various human inflammatory diseases. This review intends to summarize the recent advances regarding the regulations of various IRAK proteins and their cellular functions in mediating inflammatory signaling processes. PMID:18249132

  9. Monoaminergic Control of Cellular Glucose Utilization by Glycogenolysis in Neocortex and Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Maraviglia, Bruno; Mangia, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    Brainstem nuclei are the principal sites of monoamine (MA) innervation to major forebrain structures. In the cortical grey matter, increased secretion of MA neuromodulators occurs in response to a wealth of environmental and homeostatic challenges, whose onset is associated with rapid, preparatory changes in neural activity as well as with increases in energy metabolism. Blood-borne glucose is the main substrate for energy production in the brain. Once entered the tissue, interstitial glucose is equally accessible to neurons and astrocytes, the two cell types accounting for most of cellular volume and energy metabolism in neocortex and hippocampus. Astrocytes also store substantial amounts of glycogen, but non-stimulated glycogen turnover is very small. The rate of cellular glucose utilization in the brain is largely determined by hexokinase, which under basal conditions is more than 90 % inhibited by its product glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P). During rapid increases in energy demand, glycogen is a primary candidate in modulating the intracellular level of Glc-6-P, which can occur only in astrocytes. Glycogenolysis can produce Glc-6-P at a rate higher than uptake and phosphorylation of glucose. MA neurotransmitter are released extrasinaptically by brainstem neurons projecting to neocortex and hippocampus, thus activating MA receptors located on both neuronal and astrocytic plasma membrane. Importantly, MAs are glycogenolytic agents and thus they are exquisitely suitable for regulation of astrocytic Glc-6-P concentration, upstream substrate flow through hexokinase and hence cellular glucose uptake. Conforming to such mechanism, Gerald A. Dienel and Nancy F. Cruz recently suggested that activation of noradrenergic locus coeruleus might reversibly block astrocytic glucose uptake by stimulating glycogenolysis in these cells, thereby anticipating the rise in glucose need by active neurons. In this paper, we further develop the idea that the whole monoaminergic system

  10. Monoaminergic Control of Cellular Glucose Utilization by Glycogenolysis in Neocortex and Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Maraviglia, Bruno; Mangia, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    Brainstem nuclei are the principal sites of monoamine (MA) innervation to major forebrain structures. In the cortical grey matter, increased secretion of MA neuromodulators occurs in response to a wealth of environmental and homeostatic challenges, whose onset is associated with rapid, preparatory changes in neural activity as well as with increases in energy metabolism. Blood-borne glucose is the main substrate for energy production in the brain. Once entered the tissue, interstitial glucose is equally accessible to neurons and astrocytes, the two cell types accounting for most of cellular volume and energy metabolism in neocortex and hippocampus. Astrocytes also store substantial amounts of glycogen, but non-stimulated glycogen turnover is very small. The rate of cellular glucose utilization in the brain is largely determined by hexokinase, which under basal conditions is more than 90 % inhibited by its product glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P). During rapid increases in energy demand, glycogen is a primary candidate in modulating the intracellular level of Glc-6-P, which can occur only in astrocytes. Glycogenolysis can produce Glc-6-P at a rate higher than uptake and phosphorylation of glucose. MA neurotransmitter are released extrasinaptically by brainstem neurons projecting to neocortex and hippocampus, thus activating MA receptors located on both neuronal and astrocytic plasma membrane. Importantly, MAs are glycogenolytic agents and thus they are exquisitely suitable for regulation of astrocytic Glc-6-P concentration, upstream substrate flow through hexokinase and hence cellular glucose uptake. Conforming to such mechanism, Gerald A. Dienel and Nancy F. Cruz recently suggested that activation of noradrenergic locus coeruleus might reversibly block astrocytic glucose uptake by stimulating glycogenolysis in these cells, thereby anticipating the rise in glucose need by active neurons. In this paper, we further develop the idea that the whole monoaminergic system

  11. The cell cycle inhibitor p21 controls T-cell proliferation and sex-linked lupus development.

    PubMed

    Balomenos, D; Martín-Caballero, J; García, M I; Prieto, I; Flores, J M; Serrano, M; Martínez-A, C

    2000-02-01

    Here we show that the cell-cycle regulator p21 is involved in immune system function. T lymphocytes from p21-/- mice exhibit significant proliferative advantage over wild-type cells following prolonged stimulation, but not after primary activation. Consistent with this, p21-deficient mice accumulate abnormal amounts of CD4+ memory cells, and develop loss of tolerance towards nuclear antigens. Similar to human lupus, female p21-deficient mice develop antibodies against dsDNA, lymphadenopathy, and glomerulonephritis, leading to decreased viability. These data demonstrate a specialized role for p21 in the control of T-cell proliferation, tolerance to nuclear antigens, and female-prone lupus. These findings could be the basis for new therapeutic approaches to lupus.

  12. Genetic control of adult neurogenesis: interplay of differentiation, proliferation and survival modulates new neurons function, and memory circuits

    PubMed Central

    Tirone, Felice; Farioli-Vecchioli, Stefano; Micheli, Laura; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Leonardi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Within the hippocampal circuitry, the basic function of the dentate gyrus is to transform the memory input coming from the enthorinal cortex into sparse and categorized outputs to CA3, in this way separating related memory information. New neurons generated in the dentate gyrus during adulthood appear to facilitate this process, allowing a better separation between closely spaced memories (pattern separation). The evidence underlying this model has been gathered essentially by ablating the newly adult-generated neurons. This approach, however, does not allow monitoring of the integration of new neurons into memory circuits and is likely to set in motion compensatory circuits, possibly leading to an underestimation of the role of new neurons. Here we review the background of the basic function of the hippocampus and of the known properties of new adult-generated neurons. In this context, we analyze the cognitive performance in mouse models generated by us and others, with modified expression of the genes Btg2 (PC3/Tis21), Btg1, Pten, BMP4, etc., where new neurons underwent a change in their differentiation rate or a partial decrease of their proliferation or survival rate rather than ablation. The effects of these modifications are equal or greater than full ablation, suggesting that the architecture of circuits, as it unfolds from the interaction between existing and new neurons, can have a greater functional impact than the sheer number of new neurons. We propose a model which attempts to measure and correlate the set of cellular changes in the process of neurogenesis with the memory function. PMID:23734097

  13. Zygotically controlled F-actin establishes cortical compartments to stabilize furrows during Drosophila cellularization

    PubMed Central

    Sokac, Anna Marie; Wieschaus, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cortical compartments partition proteins and membrane at the cell surface to define regions of specialized function. Here we ask how cortical compartments arise along the plasma membrane furrows that cellularize the early Drosophila embryo, and investigate the influence that this compartmentalization has on furrow ingression. We find that the zygotic gene product Nullo aids the establishment of discrete cortical compartments, called furrow canals, which form at the tip of incipient furrows. Upon nullo loss-of-function, proteins that are normally restricted to adjacent lateral regions of the furrow, such as Neurotactin and Discs large, spread into the furrow canals. At the same time, cortical components that should concentrate in furrow canals, such as Myosin 2 (Zipper) and Anillin (Scraps), are missing from some furrows. Depletion of these cortical components from the furrow canal compartments precipitates furrow regression. Contrary to previous models, we find that furrow compartmentalization does not require cell-cell junctions that border the furrow canals. Instead, compartmentalization is disrupted by treatments that reduce levels of cortical F-actin. Because the earliest uniform phenotype detected in nullo mutants is reduced levels of F-actin at furrow canals, we propose that Nullo compartmentalizes furrows via its regulation of Factin, thus stabilizing furrows and insuring their ingression to complete cellularization. PMID:18460582

  14. A gene involved in control of human cellular senescence on human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, P.J.; Pereira-Smith, O.M. ); Annab, L.A.; Barrett, J.C. )

    1994-04-01

    Normal cells in culture exhibit limited division potential and have been used as a model for cellular senescence. In contrast, tumor-derived or carcinogen- or virus-transformed cells are capable of indefinite division. Fusion of normal human diploid fibroblasts with immortal human cells yielded hybrids having limited life spans, indicating that cellular senescence was dominant. Fusions of various immortal human cell lines with each other led to the identification of four complementation groups for indefinite division. The purpose of this study was to determine whether human chromosome 1 could complement the recessive immortal defect of human cell lines assigned to one of the four complementation groups. Using microcell fusion, the authors introduced a single normal human chromosome 1 into immortal human cell lines representing the complementation groups and determined that it caused loss of proliferative potential of an osteosarcoma-derived cell line (TE85), a cytomegalovirus-transformed lung fibroblast cell line (CMV-Mj-HEL-1), and a Ki-ras[sup +]-transformed derivative of TE85 (143B TK[sup [minus

  15. Control of cell proliferation, endoreduplication, cell size, and cell death by the retinoblastoma-related pathway in maize endosperm.

    PubMed

    Sabelli, Paolo A; Liu, Yan; Dante, Ricardo A; Lizarraga, Lucina E; Nguyen, Hong N; Brown, Sara W; Klingler, John P; Yu, Jingjuan; LaBrant, Evan; Layton, Tracy M; Feldman, Max; Larkins, Brian A

    2013-05-01

    The endosperm of cereal grains is one of the most valuable products of modern agriculture. Cereal endosperm development comprises different phases characterized by mitotic cell proliferation, endoreduplication, the accumulation of storage compounds, and programmed cell death. Although manipulation of these processes could maximize grain yield, how they are regulated and integrated is poorly understood. We show that the Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) pathway controls key aspects of endosperm development in maize. Down-regulation of RBR1 by RNAi resulted in up-regulation of RBR3-type genes, as well as the MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE 2-7 gene family and PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN, which encode essential DNA replication factors. Both the mitotic and endoreduplication cell cycles were stimulated. Developing transgenic endosperm contained 42-58% more cells and ∼70% more DNA than wild type, whereas there was a reduction in cell and nuclear sizes. In addition, cell death was enhanced. The DNA content of mature endosperm increased 43% upon RBR1 down-regulation, whereas storage protein content and kernel weight were essentially not affected. Down-regulation of both RBR1 and CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE A (CDKA);1 indicated that CDKA;1 is epistatic to RBR1 and controls endoreduplication through an RBR1-dependent pathway. However, the repressive activity of RBR1 on downstream targets was independent from CDKA;1, suggesting diversification of RBR1 activities. Furthermore, RBR1 negatively regulated CDK activity, suggesting the presence of a feedback loop. These results indicate that the RBR1 pathway plays a major role in regulation of different processes during maize endosperm development and suggest the presence of tissue/organ-level regulation of endosperm/seed homeostasis. PMID:23610440

  16. Imaging Cellular Proliferation During Chemo-Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study of Serial {sup 18}F-FLT Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Everitt, Sarah; Hicks, Rodney J.; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Walter, Tania; Binns, David; Mac Manus, Michael

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To establish whether {sup 18}F-3'-deoxy-3'-fluoro-L-thymidine ({sup 18}F-FLT) can monitor changes in cellular proliferation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during radical chemo-radiotherapy (chemo-RT). Methods and Materials: As part of a prospective pilot study, 5 patients with locally advanced NSCLC underwent serial {sup 18}F-FLT positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans during treatment. Baseline {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT scans were compared with routine staging {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans. Two on-treatment {sup 18}F-FLT scans were performed for each patient on Days 2, 8, 15 or 29, providing a range of time points for response assessment. Results: In all 5 patients, baseline lesional uptake of {sup 18}F-FLT on PET/CT corresponded to staging {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT abnormalities. {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in tumor was observed on five of nine (55%) on-treatment scans, on Days 2, 8 and 29, but not Day 15. A 'flare' of {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in the primary tumor of one case was observed after 2 Gy of radiation (1.22 x baseline). The remaining eight on-treatment scans demonstrated a mean reduction in {sup 18}F-FLT tumor uptake of 0.58 x baseline. A marked reduction of {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in irradiated bone marrow was observed for all cases. This reduction was observed even after only 2 Gy, and all patients demonstrated a complete absence of proliferating marrow after 10 Gy. Conclusions: This proof of concept study indicates that {sup 18}F-FLT uptake can monitor the distinctive biologic responses of epithelial cancers and highly radiosensitive normal tissue changes during radical chemo-RT. Further studies of {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT imaging during therapy may suggest that this tracer is useful in developing response-adapted RT for NSCLC.

  17. A Truncated Progesterone Receptor (PR-M) Localizes to the Mitochondrion and Controls Cellular Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qunsheng; Shah, Anish A.; Garde, Rachana V.; Yonish, Bryan A.; Zhang, Li; Medvitz, Neil A.; Miller, Sara E.; Hansen, Elizabeth L.; Dunn, Carrie N.

    2013-01-01

    The cDNA for a novel truncated progesterone receptor (PR-M) was previously cloned from human adipose and aortic cDNA libraries. The predicted protein sequence contains 16 unique N-terminal amino acids, encoded by a sequence in the distal third intron of the progesterone receptor PR gene, followed by the same amino acid sequence encoded by exons 4 through 8 of the nuclear PR. Thus, PR-M lacks the N terminus A/B domains and the C domain for DNA binding, whereas containing the hinge and hormone-binding domains. In this report, we have localized PR-M to mitochondria using immunofluorescent localization of a PR-M-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein and in Western blot analyses of purified human heart mitochondrial protein. Removal of the putative N-terminal mitochondrial localization signal obviated association of PR-M with mitochondria, whereas addition of the mitochondrial localization signal to green fluorescent protein resulted in mitochondrial localization. Immunoelectron microscopy and Western blot analysis after mitochondrial fractionation identified PR-M in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Antibody specificity was shown by mass spectrometry identification of a PR peptide in a mitochondrial membrane protein isolation. Cell models of overexpression and gene silencing of PR-M demonstrated a progestin-induced increase in mitochondrial membrane potential and an increase in oxygen consumption consistent with an increase in cellular respiration. This is the first example of a truncated steroid receptor, lacking a DNA-binding domain that localizes to the mitochondrion and initiates direct non-nuclear progesterone action. We hypothesize that progesterone may directly affect cellular energy production to meet the increased metabolic demands of pregnancy. PMID:23518922

  18. Chemopreventive apigenin controls UVB-induced cutaneous proliferation and angiogenesis through HuR and thrombospondin-1.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Mirzoeva, Salida; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bridgeman, Bryan B; Fitchev, Philip; Cornwell, Mona L; Crawford, Susan E; Pelling, Jill C; Volpert, Olga V

    2014-11-30

    Plant flavonoid apigenin prevents and inhibits UVB-induced carcinogenesis in the skin and has strong anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic properties. Here we identify mechanisms, by which apigenin controls these oncogenic events. We show that apigenin acts, at least in part, via endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor, thrombospondin-1 (TSP1). TSP1 expression by the epidermal keratinocytes is potently inhibited by UVB. It inhibits cutaneous angiogenesis and UVB-induced carcinogenesis. We show that apigenin restores TSP1 in epidermal keratinocytes subjected to UVB and normalizes proliferation and angiogenesis in UVB-exposed skin. Importantly, reconstituting TSP1 anti-angiogenic function in UVB-irradiated skin with a short bioactive peptide mimetic representing exclusively its anti-angiogenic domain reproduced the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects of apigenin. Cox-2 and HIF-1α are important mediators of angiogenesis. Both apigenin and TSP1 peptide mimetic attenuated their induction by UVB. Finally we identified the molecular mechanism, whereby apigenin did not affect TSP1 mRNA, but increased de novo protein synthesis. Knockdown studies implicated the RNA-binding protein HuR, which controls mRNA stability and translation. Apigenin increased HuR cytoplasmic localization and physical association with TSP1 mRNA causing de novo TSP1 synthesis. HuR cytoplasmic localization was, in turn, dependent on CHK2 kinase. Together, our data provide a new mechanism, by which apigenin controls UVB-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25526033

  19. Contribution of glutathione to the control of cellular redox homeostasis under toxic metal and metalloid stress.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Luis E; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Carrasco-Gil, Sandra; Flores-Cáceres, M Laura; Ortega-Villasante, Cristina; Escobar, Carolina

    2015-05-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals and metalloids, such as cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or arsenic (As), as a consequence of various anthropogenic activities, poses a serious threat to the environment and human health. The ability of plants to take up mineral nutrients from the soil can be exploited to develop phytoremediation technologies able to alleviate the negative impact of toxic elements in terrestrial ecosystems. However, we must select plant species or populations capable of tolerating exposure to hazardous elements. The tolerance of plant cells to toxic elements is highly dependent on glutathione (GSH) metabolism. GSH is a biothiol tripeptide that plays a fundamental dual role: first, as an antioxidant to mitigate the redox imbalance caused by toxic metal(loid) accumulation, and second as a precursor of phytochelatins (PCs), ligand peptides that limit the free ion cellular concentration of those pollutants. The sulphur assimilation pathway, synthesis of GSH, and production of PCs are tightly regulated in order to alleviate the phytotoxicity of different hazardous elements, which might induce specific stress signatures. This review provides an update on mechanisms of tolerance that depend on biothiols in plant cells exposed to toxic elements, with a particular emphasis on the Hg-triggered responses, and considering the contribution of hormones to their regulation.

  20. Contribution of glutathione to the control of cellular redox homeostasis under toxic metal and metalloid stress.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Luis E; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Carrasco-Gil, Sandra; Flores-Cáceres, M Laura; Ortega-Villasante, Cristina; Escobar, Carolina

    2015-05-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals and metalloids, such as cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or arsenic (As), as a consequence of various anthropogenic activities, poses a serious threat to the environment and human health. The ability of plants to take up mineral nutrients from the soil can be exploited to develop phytoremediation technologies able to alleviate the negative impact of toxic elements in terrestrial ecosystems. However, we must select plant species or populations capable of tolerating exposure to hazardous elements. The tolerance of plant cells to toxic elements is highly dependent on glutathione (GSH) metabolism. GSH is a biothiol tripeptide that plays a fundamental dual role: first, as an antioxidant to mitigate the redox imbalance caused by toxic metal(loid) accumulation, and second as a precursor of phytochelatins (PCs), ligand peptides that limit the free ion cellular concentration of those pollutants. The sulphur assimilation pathway, synthesis of GSH, and production of PCs are tightly regulated in order to alleviate the phytotoxicity of different hazardous elements, which might induce specific stress signatures. This review provides an update on mechanisms of tolerance that depend on biothiols in plant cells exposed to toxic elements, with a particular emphasis on the Hg-triggered responses, and considering the contribution of hormones to their regulation. PMID:25750419

  1. Epidermal TRPM8 channel isoform controls the balance between keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in a cold-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bidaux, Gabriel; Borowiec, Anne-sophie; Gordienko, Dmitri; Beck, Benjamin; Shapovalov, George G.; Lemonnier, Loïc; Flourakis, Matthieu; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Slomianny, Christian; Dewailly, Etienne; Delcourt, Philippe; Desruelles, Emilie; Ritaine, Abigaël; Polakowska, Renata; Lesage, Jean; Chami, Mounia; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Deviation of the ambient temperature is one of the most ubiquitous stimuli that continuously affect mammals’ skin. Although the role of the warmth receptors in epidermal homeostasis (EH) was elucidated in recent years, the mystery of the keratinocyte mild-cold sensor remains unsolved. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a new functional epidermal isoform of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) mild-cold receptor, dubbed epidermal TRPM8 (eTRPM8), which is localized in the keratinocyte endoplasmic reticulum membrane and controls mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m). In turn, [Ca2+]m modulates ATP and superoxide (O2•−) synthesis in a cold-dependent manner. We report that this fine tuning of ATP and O2•− levels by cooling controls the balance between keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Finally, to ascertain eTRPM8’s role in EH in vivo we developed a new functional knockout mouse strain by deleting the pore domain of TRPM8 and demonstrated that eTRPM8 knockout impairs adaptation of the epidermis to low temperatures. PMID:26080404

  2. Epidermal TRPM8 channel isoform controls the balance between keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in a cold-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Bidaux, Gabriel; Borowiec, Anne-sophie; Gordienko, Dmitri; Beck, Benjamin; Shapovalov, George G; Lemonnier, Loïc; Flourakis, Matthieu; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Slomianny, Christian; Dewailly, Etienne; Delcourt, Philippe; Desruelles, Emilie; Ritaine, Abigaël; Polakowska, Renata; Lesage, Jean; Chami, Mounia; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2015-06-30

    Deviation of the ambient temperature is one of the most ubiquitous stimuli that continuously affect mammals' skin. Although the role of the warmth receptors in epidermal homeostasis (EH) was elucidated in recent years, the mystery of the keratinocyte mild-cold sensor remains unsolved. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a new functional epidermal isoform of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) mild-cold receptor, dubbed epidermal TRPM8 (eTRPM8), which is localized in the keratinocyte endoplasmic reticulum membrane and controls mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]m). In turn, [Ca(2+)]m modulates ATP and superoxide (O2(·-)) synthesis in a cold-dependent manner. We report that this fine tuning of ATP and O2(·-) levels by cooling controls the balance between keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Finally, to ascertain eTRPM8's role in EH in vivo we developed a new functional knockout mouse strain by deleting the pore domain of TRPM8 and demonstrated that eTRPM8 knockout impairs adaptation of the epidermis to low temperatures. PMID:26080404

  3. Aiolos transcription factor controls cell death in T cells by regulating Bcl-2 expression and its cellular localization.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, F; Martínez-A, C; Camonis, J; Rebollo, A

    1999-01-01

    We searched for proteins that interact with Ras in interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated or IL-2-deprived cells, and found that the transcription factor Aiolos interacts with Ras. The Ras-Aiolos interaction was confirmed in vitro and in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation. Indirect immunofluorescence shows that IL-2 controls the cellular distribution of Aiolos and induces its tyrosine phosphorylation, required for dissociation from Ras. We also identified functional Aiolos-binding sites in the Bcl-2 promoter, which are able to activate the luciferase reporter gene. Mutation of Aiolos-binding sites within the Bcl-2 promoter inhibits transactivation of the reporter gene luciferase, suggesting direct control of Bcl-2 expression by Aiolos. Co-transfection experiments confirm that Aiolos induces Bcl-2 expression and prevents apoptosis in IL-2-deprived cells. We propose a model for the regulation of Bcl-2 expression via Aiolos. PMID:10369681

  4. The Past, Present, and Future of Real-Time Control in Cellular Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Jennifer. A.; Lambert, Katherine. M.; White, John A.

    2014-01-01

    For over 60 years, real-time control has been an important technique in the study of excitable cells. Two such control-based technologies are reviewed here. First, voltage-clamp methods revolutionized the study of excitable cells. In this family of techniques, membrane potential is controlled, allowing one to parameterize a powerful class of models that describe the voltage-current relationship of cell membranes simply, flexibly, and accurately. Second, dynamic-clamp methods allow the addition of new, ‘virtual’ membrane mechanisms to living cells. Dynamic clamp allows researchers unprecedented ways of testing computationally based hypotheses in biological preparations. The review ends with predictions of how control-based technologies will be improved and adapted for new uses in the near future. PMID:24710815

  5. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-03-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains.

  6. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains. PMID:26972968

  7. Naringenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: preparation, controlled delivery, cellular uptake, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Peng; Yu, Tong; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Jie; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Qiu, Yang; Zhao, Wenming; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Naringenin (NRG), a flavonoid compound, had been reported to exhibit extensive pharmacological effects, but its water solubility and oral bioavailability are only~46±6 µg/mL and 5.8%, respectively. The purpose of this study is to design and develop NRG-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (NRG-SLNs) to provide prolonged and sustained drug release, with improved stability, involving nontoxic nanocarriers, and increase the bioavailability by means of pulmonary administration. Initially, a group contribution method was used to screen the best solid lipid matrix for the preparation of SLNs. NRG-SLNs were prepared by an emulsification and low-temperature solidification method and optimized using an orthogonal experiment approach. The morphology was examined by transmission electron microscopy, and the particle size and zeta potential were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. The total drug content of NRG-SLNs was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the encapsulation efficiency (EE) was determined by Sephadex gel-50 chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro NRG release studies were carried out using a dialysis bag. The best cryoprotectant to prepare NRG-SLN lyophilized powder for future structural characterization was selected using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The short-term stability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cellular uptake, and pharmacokinetics in rats were studied after pulmonary administration of NRG-SLN lyophilized powder. Glycerol monostearate was selected to prepare SLNs, and the optimal formulation of NRG-SLNs was spherical in shape, with a particle size of 98 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.258, a zeta potential of −31.4 mV, a total drug content of 9.76 mg, an EE of 79.11%, and a cumulative drug release of 80% in 48 hours with a sustained profile. In addition, 5% mannitol (w

  8. Naringenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: preparation, controlled delivery, cellular uptake, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peng; Yu, Tong; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Jie; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Qiu, Yang; Zhao, Wenming; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Naringenin (NRG), a flavonoid compound, had been reported to exhibit extensive pharmacological effects, but its water solubility and oral bioavailability are only~46±6 µg/mL and 5.8%, respectively. The purpose of this study is to design and develop NRG-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (NRG-SLNs) to provide prolonged and sustained drug release, with improved stability, involving nontoxic nanocarriers, and increase the bioavailability by means of pulmonary administration. Initially, a group contribution method was used to screen the best solid lipid matrix for the preparation of SLNs. NRG-SLNs were prepared by an emulsification and low-temperature solidification method and optimized using an orthogonal experiment approach. The morphology was examined by transmission electron microscopy, and the particle size and zeta potential were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. The total drug content of NRG-SLNs was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the encapsulation efficiency (EE) was determined by Sephadex gel-50 chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro NRG release studies were carried out using a dialysis bag. The best cryoprotectant to prepare NRG-SLN lyophilized powder for future structural characterization was selected using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The short-term stability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cellular uptake, and pharmacokinetics in rats were studied after pulmonary administration of NRG-SLN lyophilized powder. Glycerol monostearate was selected to prepare SLNs, and the optimal formulation of NRG-SLNs was spherical in shape, with a particle size of 98 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.258, a zeta potential of -31.4 mV, a total drug content of 9.76 mg, an EE of 79.11%, and a cumulative drug release of 80% in 48 hours with a sustained profile. In addition, 5% mannitol (w

  9. Thioredoxin-1 Regulates Cellular Heme Insertion by Controlling S-Nitrosation of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    NO generated by inducible NOS (iNOS) causes buildup of S-nitrosated GAPDH (SNO-GAPDH) in cells, which then inhibits further iNOS maturation by limiting the heme insertion step (Chakravarti, R., Aulak, K. S., Fox, P. L., and Stuehr, D. J. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 18004–18009). We investigated what regulates this process utilizing a slow-release NO donor (NOC-18) and studying changes in cellular SNO-GAPDH levels during and after NO exposure. Culturing macrophage-like cells with NOC-18 during cytokine activation caused buildup of heme-free (apo) iNOS and SNO-GAPDH. Upon NOC-18 removal, the cells quickly recovered their heme insertion capacity in association with rapid SNO-GAPDH denitrosation, implying that these processes are linked. We then altered cell expression of thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) or S-nitrosoglutathione reductase, both of which can function as a protein denitrosylase. Trx1 knockdown increased SNO-GAPDH levels in cells, made heme insertion hypersensitive to NO, and increased the recovery time, whereas Trx1 overexpression greatly diminished SNO-GAPDH buildup and protected heme insertion from NO inhibition. In contrast, knockdown of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase expression had little effect on these parameters. Experiments utilizing C152S GAPDH confirmed that the NO effects are all linked to S-nitrosation of GAPDH at Cys-152. We conclude (i) that NO inhibition of heme insertion and its recovery can be rapid and dynamic processes and are inversely linked to the S-nitrosation of GAPDH and (ii) that the NO sensitivity of heme insertion can vary depending on the Trx1 expression level due to Trx1 acting as an SNO-GAPDH denitrosylase. Together, our results identify a new way that cells regulate heme protein maturation during inflammation. PMID:22457359

  10. Cellular Decomposition Based Hybrid-Hierarchical Control Systems with Applications to Flight Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caines, P. E.

    1999-01-01

    The work in this research project has been focused on the construction of a hierarchical hybrid control theory which is applicable to flight management systems. The motivation and underlying philosophical position for this work has been that the scale, inherent complexity and the large number of agents (aircraft) involved in an air traffic system imply that a hierarchical modelling and control methodology is required for its management and real time control. In the current work the complex discrete or continuous state space of a system with a small number of agents is aggregated in such a way that discrete (finite state machine or supervisory automaton) controlled dynamics are abstracted from the system's behaviour. High level control may then be either directly applied at this abstracted level, or, if this is in itself of significant complexity, further layers of abstractions may be created to produce a system with an acceptable degree of complexity at each level. By the nature of this construction, high level commands are necessarily realizable at lower levels in the system.

  11. Thermodynamic-based computational profiling of cellular regulatory control in hepatocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Beard, Daniel A; Qian, Hong

    2005-03-01

    Thermodynamic-based constraints on biochemical fluxes and concentrations are applied in concert with mass balance of fluxes in glycogenesis and glycogenolysis in a model of hepatic cell metabolism. Constraint-based modeling methods that facilitate predictions of reactant concentrations, reaction potentials, and enzyme activities are introduced to identify putative regulatory and control sites in biological networks by computing the minimal control scheme necessary to switch between metabolic modes. Computational predictions of control sites in glycogenic and glycogenolytic operational modes in the hepatocyte network compare favorably with known regulatory mechanisms. The developed hepatic metabolic model is used to computationally analyze the impairment of glucose production in von Gierke's and Hers' diseases, two metabolic diseases impacting glycogen metabolism. The computational methodology introduced here can be generalized to identify downstream targets of agonists, to systematically probe possible drug targets, and to predict the effects of specific inhibitors (or activators) on integrated network function. PMID:15507536

  12. 3D Conducting Polymer Platforms for Electrical Control of Protein Conformation and Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Alwin Ming-Doug; Inal, Sahika; Williams, Tiffany; Wang, Karin; Leleux, Pierre; Estevez, Luis; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Fischbach, Claudia; Malliaras, George G.; Gourdon, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) macroporous scaffolds made from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) via an ice-templating method. The scaffolds offer tunable pore size and morphology, and are electrochemically active. When a potential is applied to the scaffolds, reversible changes take place in their electrical doping state, which in turn enables precise control over the conformation of adsorbed proteins (e.g., fibronectin). Additionally, the scaffolds support the growth of mouse fibroblasts (3T3-L1) for 7 days, and are able to electrically control cell adhesion and pro-angiogenic capability. These 3D matrix-mimicking platforms offer precise control of protein conformation and major cell functions, over large volumes and long cell culture times. As such, they represent a new tool for biological research with many potential applications in bioelectronics, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. PMID:26413300

  13. Differential Control of Interleukin-6 mRNA Levels by Cellular Distribution of YB-1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sujin; Lee, Taeyun A.; Ra, Eun A.; Lee, Eunhye; Choi, Hyun jin; Lee, Sungwook; Park, Boyoun

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine production is essential for innate and adaptive immunity against microbial invaders and must be tightly controlled. Cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) is in constant flux between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and in transcription, splicing, or decay; such processes must be tightly controlled. Here, we report a novel function of Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) in modulating interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA levels in a cell type-specific manner. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages, YB-1 interacts with IL-6 mRNA and actively transports it to the extracellular space by YB-1-enriched vesicles, resulting in the proper maintenance of intracellular IL-6 mRNA levels. YB-1 secretion occurs in a cell type-specific manner. Whereas macrophages actively secret YB-1, dendritic cells maintain it predominantly in the cytoplasm even in response to LPS. Intracellular YB-1 has the distinct function of regulating IL-6 mRNA stability in dendritic cells. Moreover, because LPS differentially regulates the expression of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) in macrophages and dendritic cells, this stimulus might control YB-1 acetylation differentially in both cell types. Taken together, these results suggest a unique feature of YB-1 in controlling intracellular IL-6 mRNA levels in a cell type-specific manner, thereby leading to functions that are dependent on the extracellular and intracellular distribution of YB-1. PMID:25398005

  14. Dynamical Allocation of Cellular Resources as an Optimal Control Problem: Novel Insights into Microbial Growth Strategies.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Nils; Mairet, Francis; Gouzé, Jean-Luc; Geiselmann, Johannes; de Jong, Hidde

    2016-03-01

    Microbial physiology exhibits growth laws that relate the macromolecular composition of the cell to the growth rate. Recent work has shown that these empirical regularities can be derived from coarse-grained models of resource allocation. While these studies focus on steady-state growth, such conditions are rarely found in natural habitats, where microorganisms are continually challenged by environmental fluctuations. The aim of this paper is to extend the study of microbial growth strategies to dynamical environments, using a self-replicator model. We formulate dynamical growth maximization as an optimal control problem that can be solved using Pontryagin's Maximum Principle. We compare this theoretical gold standard with different possible implementations of growth control in bacterial cells. We find that simple control strategies enabling growth-rate maximization at steady state are suboptimal for transitions from one growth regime to another, for example when shifting bacterial cells to a medium supporting a higher growth rate. A near-optimal control strategy in dynamical conditions is shown to require information on several, rather than a single physiological variable. Interestingly, this strategy has structural analogies with the regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis by ppGpp in the enterobacterium Escherichia coli. It involves sensing a mismatch between precursor and ribosome concentrations, as well as the adjustment of ribosome synthesis in a switch-like manner. Our results show how the capability of regulatory systems to integrate information about several physiological variables is critical for optimizing growth in a changing environment.

  15. Dynamical Allocation of Cellular Resources as an Optimal Control Problem: Novel Insights into Microbial Growth Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Nils; Mairet, Francis; Gouzé, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Microbial physiology exhibits growth laws that relate the macromolecular composition of the cell to the growth rate. Recent work has shown that these empirical regularities can be derived from coarse-grained models of resource allocation. While these studies focus on steady-state growth, such conditions are rarely found in natural habitats, where microorganisms are continually challenged by environmental fluctuations. The aim of this paper is to extend the study of microbial growth strategies to dynamical environments, using a self-replicator model. We formulate dynamical growth maximization as an optimal control problem that can be solved using Pontryagin’s Maximum Principle. We compare this theoretical gold standard with different possible implementations of growth control in bacterial cells. We find that simple control strategies enabling growth-rate maximization at steady state are suboptimal for transitions from one growth regime to another, for example when shifting bacterial cells to a medium supporting a higher growth rate. A near-optimal control strategy in dynamical conditions is shown to require information on several, rather than a single physiological variable. Interestingly, this strategy has structural analogies with the regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis by ppGpp in the enterobacterium Escherichia coli. It involves sensing a mismatch between precursor and ribosome concentrations, as well as the adjustment of ribosome synthesis in a switch-like manner. Our results show how the capability of regulatory systems to integrate information about several physiological variables is critical for optimizing growth in a changing environment. PMID:26958858

  16. The mTOR Pathway Controls Cell Proliferation by Regulating the FoxO3a Transcription Factor via SGK1 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shunsuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Kimura, Hironobu; Tajima, Shoji; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kitamura, Ayaka; Oneyama, Chitose; Okada, Masato

    2014-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) functions as a component of two large complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, which play crucial roles in regulating cell growth and homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms by which mTOR controls cell proliferation remain elusive. Here we show that the FoxO3a transcription factor is coordinately regulated by mTORC1 and mTORC2, and plays a crucial role in controlling cell proliferation. To dissect mTOR signaling, mTORC1 was specifically inactivated by depleting p18, an essential anchor of mTORC1 on lysosomes. mTORC1 inactivation caused a marked retardation of cell proliferation, which was associated with upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs). Although Akt was activated by mTORC1 inactivation, FoxO3a was upregulated via an epigenetic mechanism and hypophosphorylated at Ser314, which resulted in its nuclear accumulation. Consistently, mTORC1 inactivation induced downregulation of serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1), the kinase responsible for Ser314 phosphorylation. Expression of FoxO3a mutated at Ser314 suppressed cell proliferation by inducing CDKI expression. SGK1 overexpression suppressed CDKI expression in p18-deficient cells, whereas SGK1 knockdown induced CDKI expression in wild-type cells, resulting in the suppression of cell proliferation. These results suggest that mTORC1, in coordination with mTORC2, controls cell proliferation by regulating FoxO3a gene expression and SGK1-mediated phosphorylation of FoxO3a at Ser314. PMID:24558442

  17. HIC1 controls cellular- and HIV-1- gene transcription via interactions with CTIP2 and HMGA1

    PubMed Central

    Le Douce, Valentin; Forouzanfar, Faezeh; Eilebrecht, Sebastian; Van Driessche, Benoit; Ait-Ammar, Amina; Verdikt, Roxane; Kurashige, Yoshihito; Marban, Céline; Gautier, Virginie; Candolfi, Ermanno; Benecke, Arndt G.; Van Lint, Carine; Rohr, Olivier; Schwartz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Among many cellular transcriptional regulators, Bcl11b/CTIP2 and HGMA1 have been described to control the establishment and the persistence of HIV-1 latency in microglial cells, the main viral reservoir in the brain. In this present work, we identify and characterize a transcription factor i.e. HIC1, which physically interacts with both Bcl11b/CTIP2 and HMGA1 to co-regulate specific subsets of cellular genes and the viral HIV-1 gene. Our results suggest that HIC1 represses Tat dependent HIV-1 transcription. Interestingly, this repression of Tat function is linked to HIC1 K314 acetylation status and to SIRT1 deacetylase activity. Finally, we show that HIC1 interacts and cooperates with HGMA1 to regulate Tat dependent HIV-1 transcription. Our results also suggest that HIC1 repression of Tat function happens in a TAR dependent manner and that this TAR element may serve as HIC1 reservoir at the viral promoter to facilitate HIC1/TAT interaction. PMID:27725726

  18. Adiponectin, a downstream target gene of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, controls hepatitis B virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sarah; Jung, Jaesung; Kim, Taeyeung; Park, Sun; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2011-01-20

    In this study, HepG2-hepatitis B virus (HBV)-stable cells that did not overexpress HBx and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells were analyzed for their expression of HBV-induced, upregulated adipogenic and lipogenic genes. The mRNAs of CCAAT enhancer binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), adiponectin, liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were expressed at higher levels in HepG2-HBV and lamivudine-treated stable cells and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells than in the HepG2 cells. Lamivudine treatment reduced the mRNA levels of PPAR{gamma} and C/EBP{alpha}. Conversely, HBV replication was upregulated by adiponectin and PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone treatments and was downregulated by adiponectin siRNAs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that HBV replication and/or protein expression, even in the absence of HBx, upregulated adipogenic or lipogenic genes, and that the control of adiponectin might prove useful as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

  19. Distinct Stromal Cell Factor Combinations Can Separately Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Survival, Proliferation, and Self-Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Wohrer, Stefan; Knapp, David J.H.F.; Copley, Michael R.; Benz, Claudia; Kent, David G.; Rowe, Keegan; Babovic, Sonja; Mader, Heidi; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.; Eaves, Connie J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are identified by their ability to sustain prolonged blood cell production in vivo, although recent evidence suggests that durable self-renewal (DSR) is shared by HSC subtypes with distinct self-perpetuating differentiation programs. Net expansions of DSR-HSCs occur in vivo, but molecularly defined conditions that support similar responses in vitro are lacking. We hypothesized that this might require a combination of factors that differentially promote HSC viability, proliferation, and self-renewal. We now demonstrate that HSC survival and maintenance of DSR potential are variably supported by different Steel factor (SF)-containing cocktails with similar HSC-mitogenic activities. In addition, stromal cells produce other factors, including nerve growth factor and collagen 1, that can antagonize the apoptosis of initially quiescent adult HSCs and, in combination with SF and interleukin-11, produce >15-fold net expansions of DSR-HSCs ex vivo within 7 days. These findings point to the molecular basis of HSC control and expansion. PMID:24910437

  20. Control of flux by narrow passages and hidden targets in cellular biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcman, D.; Schuss, Z.

    2013-07-01

    Critical biological processes, such as synaptic plasticity and transmission, activation of genes by transcription factors, or double-strained DNA break repair, are controlled by diffusion in structures that have both large and small spatial scales. These may be small binding sites inside or on the surface of the cell, or narrow passages between subcellular compartments. The great disparity in spatial scales is the key to controlling cell function by structure. We report here recent progress on resolving analytical and numerical difficulties in extracting properties from experimental data, from biophysical models, and from Brownian dynamics simulations of diffusion in multi-scale structures. This progress is achieved by developing an analytical approximation methodology for solving the model equations. The reported results are applied to analysis and simulations of subcellular processes and to the quantification of their biological functions.

  1. Pirin inhibits cellular senescence in melanocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-05-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  2. Pirin Inhibits Cellular Senescence in Melanocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  3. Arms control and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction: How will they impact US deterrence in the new world order. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, R.R.

    1996-04-01

    In the absence of a superpower balance, Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) are rapidly proliferating. As U.S. defense resources shrink, options to address the new WMD threat are also shrinking. These dynamics are changing the role of Arms Control (AC) and U.S. deterrent strategy. This paper analyzes the relationship between proliferation of WMD, AC, and the status of U.S. deterrent forces in the new world order. It argues that motives to proliferate are to strong to be overcome by AC, but that AC can play a positive role in improving U.S. and International security. Further it argues that regardless of its efficacy that AC is unavoidable; and that U.S force structure decisions are driven by our perception of the threat, not AC agreements or actions.

  4. Interaction between peroxisome proliferator- activated receptor gamma polymorphism and overweight on diabetic retinopathy in a Chinese case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Xin-Hua; Li, Ruo-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors γ (PPAR γ) and overweight were both associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR), so the aim of this study was to investigate the association of four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of PPAR γ with DR and additional role of gene-BMI interaction. Methods: A total of 500 patients with T2DM (236 men, 264 women), with a mean age of 54.3 ± 15.8 years old, were selected, including 247 diabetic retinopathy patients and 253 controls. Four SNPs were selected for genotyping in the case-control study: rs1805192, rs709158, rs3856806, rs4684847. Logistic regression model was used to examine the interaction between SNP and overweight on DR, odds ratio (OR) and 95% confident interval (95% CI) were calculated. Results: The carriers of C allele of the rs1805192 polymorphism revealed decreased DR risk than those with Pro/Pro variants (Pro/Ala+Ala/Ala versus Pro/Pro, adjusted OR (95% CI)=0.86 (0.65-0.96), P=0.012), after adjusting for covariates. We also found that obese subjects with Pro/Ala or Ala/Ala variants genotype have lowest DR risk, compared to obese subjects with Pro/Pro genotype or non- obese subjects with Pro/Ala or Ala/Ala (OR=0.40, 95% CI=0.32-0.63), after covariates adjustment. Conclusions: Our results support an important association between rs1805192 minor allele (Ala allele) of PPAR γ and DR, the interaction analysis shown a combined effect of Ala- BMI interaction on DR. PMID:26885119

  5. ABO desensitization affects cellular immunity and infection control after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schachtner, Thomas; Stein, Maik; Reinke, Petra

    2015-10-01

    The impact of ABO desensitization on overall immunity, infectious control, and alloreactivity remains unknown. We compared 35 ABO-incompatible kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) to a control of 62 ABO compatible KTRs. Samples were collected before, at +1, +2, +3, +6, and +12 months post-transplantation. CMV-, BKV-specific, and alloreactive T cells were measured using an interferon-γ ELISPOT assay. The extent of immunosuppression was quantified by enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations and cytokines. No differences were observed for 5-year allograft survival and function between both groups (P > 0.05). However, ABO-incompatible KTRs were more likely to develop CMV infection, BKV-associated nephropathy, and severe sepsis (P = 0.001). Interestingly, ABO-incompatible KTRs with poor HLA-match showed the highest rates of infections and inferior allograft function (P < 0.05). CD3+, CD4+ T-cell counts, interferon-γ and IL-10 levels were lower in ABO-incompatible KTRs early post-transplantation (P < 0.05). Likewise, ABO-incompatible KTRs showed impaired BKV- and CMV-specific T-cell immunity (P < 0.05). ABO-incompatible KTRs showed lower frequencies of alloreactive T cells (P < 0.05). Our data suggest T-cell depletion due to ABO desensitization, which may contribute to the increased risk of T-cell-dependent infections. Elimination of B cells serving as antigen-presenting cells, thereby causing impaired T-cell activation, plays a significant role in both impaired infection control and reduced alloreactive T-cell activation.

  6. Temporal association of cellular immune responses with the initial control of viremia in primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Koup, R A; Safrit, J T; Cao, Y; Andrews, C A; McLeod, G; Borkowsky, W; Farthing, C; Ho, D D

    1994-01-01

    Virologic and immunologic studies were performed on five patients presenting with primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursors specific for cells expressing antigens of HIV-1 Gag, Pol, and Env were detected at or within 3 weeks of presentation in four of the five patients and were detected in all five patients by 3 to 6 months after presentation. The one patient with an absent initial CTL response had prolonged symptoms, persistent viremia, and low CD4+ T-cell count. Neutralizing antibody activity was absent at the time of presentation in all five patients. These findings suggest that cellular immunity is involved in the initial control of virus replication in primary HIV-1 infection and indicate a role for CTL in protective immunity to HIV-1 in vivo. PMID:8207839

  7. Cellular Requirements for Systemic Control of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bedoui, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    The rational design of vaccines requires an understanding of the contributions of individual immune cell subsets to immunity. With this understanding, targeted vaccine delivery approaches and adjuvants can be developed to maximize vaccine efficiency and to minimize side effects (S. H. E. Kaufmann et al., Immunity 33:555–577, 2010; T. Ben-Yedidia and R. Arnon, Hum. Vaccines 1:95–101, 2005). We have addressed the contributions of different immune cell subsets and their ability to contribute to the control and clearance of the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in a murine model. Using a systematic and reproducible model of experimental attenuated S. Typhimurium infection, we show that distinct lymphocyte deficiencies lead to one of four different infection outcomes: clearance, chronic infection, early death, or late death. Our study demonstrates a high level of functional redundancy in the ability of different lymphocyte subsets to provide interferon gamma (IFN-γ), a critical cytokine in Salmonella immunity. Whereas early control of the infection was entirely dependent on IFN-γ but not on any particular lymphocyte subset, clearance of the infection critically required CD4+ T cells but appeared to be independent of IFN-γ. These data reinforce the idea of a bimodal immune response against Salmonella: an early T cell-independent but IFN-γ-dependent phase and a late T cell-dependent phase that may be IFN-γ independent. PMID:25225248

  8. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system. PMID:26703587

  9. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system. PMID:26703587

  10. Protein quality control in time and space - links to cellular aging.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Thomas; Liu, Beidong

    2014-02-01

    The evolutionary theory of aging regards aging as an evolved characteristic of the soma, and proponents of the theory state that selection does not allow the evolution of aging in unicellular species lacking a soma-germ demarcation. However, the life history of some microorganisms, reproducing vegetatively by either budding or binary fission, has been demonstrated to encompass an ordered, polar-dependent, segregation of damage leading to an aging cell lineage within the clonal population. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the bacterium Escherichia coli, such segregation is under genetic control and includes an asymmetrical inheritance of protein aggregates and inclusions. Herein, the ultimate and proximate causation for such an asymmetrical inheritance, with special emphasis on damaged/aggregated proteins in budding yeast, is reviewed.

  11. Depolymerizing kinesins Kip3 and MCAK shape cellular microtubule architecture by differential control of catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Melissa K; Zanic, Marija; Gell, Christopher; Bormuth, Volker; Howard, Jonathon

    2011-11-23

    Microtubules are dynamic filaments whose ends alternate between periods of slow growth and rapid shortening as they explore intracellular space and move organelles. A key question is how regulatory proteins modulate catastrophe, the conversion from growth to shortening. To study this process, we reconstituted microtubule dynamics in the absence and presence of the kinesin-8 Kip3 and the kinesin-13 MCAK. Surprisingly, we found that, even in the absence of the kinesins, the microtubule catastrophe frequency depends on the age of the microtubule, indicating that catastrophe is a multistep process. Kip3 slowed microtubule growth in a length-dependent manner and increased the rate of aging. In contrast, MCAK eliminated the aging process. Thus, both kinesins are catastrophe factors; Kip3 mediates fine control of microtubule length by narrowing the distribution of maximum lengths prior to catastrophe, whereas MCAK promotes rapid restructuring of the microtubule cytoskeleton by making catastrophe a first-order random process.

  12. Protein quality control in time and space - links to cellular aging.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Thomas; Liu, Beidong

    2014-02-01

    The evolutionary theory of aging regards aging as an evolved characteristic of the soma, and proponents of the theory state that selection does not allow the evolution of aging in unicellular species lacking a soma-germ demarcation. However, the life history of some microorganisms, reproducing vegetatively by either budding or binary fission, has been demonstrated to encompass an ordered, polar-dependent, segregation of damage leading to an aging cell lineage within the clonal population. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the bacterium Escherichia coli, such segregation is under genetic control and includes an asymmetrical inheritance of protein aggregates and inclusions. Herein, the ultimate and proximate causation for such an asymmetrical inheritance, with special emphasis on damaged/aggregated proteins in budding yeast, is reviewed. PMID:24103195

  13. TRIB2 regulates normal and stress-induced thymocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kai Ling; O’Connor, Caitriona; Veiga, J Pedro; McCarthy, Tommie V; Keeshan, Karen

    2016-01-01

    TRIB2, a serine/threonine pseudokinase identified as an oncogene, is expressed at high levels in the T-cell compartment of hematopoiesis. The proliferation of developing thymocytes is tightly controlled to prevent leukemic transformation of T cells. Here we examine Trib2 loss in murine hematopoiesis under steady state and proliferative stress conditions, including genotoxic and oncogenic stress. Trib2−/− developing thymocytes show increased proliferation, and Trib2−/− mice have significantly higher thymic cellularity at steady state. During stress hematopoiesis, Trib2−/− developing thymocytes undergo accelerated proliferation and demonstrate hypersensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced cell death. Despite the increased cell death post 5-FU-induced proliferative stress, Trib2−/− mice exhibit accelerated thymopoietic recovery post treatment due to increased cell division kinetics of developing thymocytes. The increased proliferation in Trib2−/− thymocytes was exacerbated under oncogenic stress. In an experimental murine T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) model, Trib2−/− mice had reduced latency in vivo, which associated with impaired MAP kinase (MAPK) activation. High and low expression levels of Trib2 correlate with immature and mature subtypes of human T-ALL, respectively, and associate with MAPK. Thus, TRIB2 emerges as a novel regulator of thymocyte cellular proliferation, important for the thymopoietic response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress, and possessing tumor suppressor function. PMID:27462446

  14. Transcriptional control of fungal cell cycle and cellular events by Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor in an insect pathogen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Qing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the cell cycle by forkhead (Fkh) transcription factors is likely associated with fungal adaptation to host and environment. Here we show that Fkh2, an ortholog of yeast Fkh1/2, orchestrates cell cycle and many cellular events of Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of Fkh2 in B. bassiana resulted in dramatic down-regulation of the cyclin-B gene cluster and hence altered cell cycle (longer G2/M and S, but shorter G0/G1, phases) in unicellular blastospores. Consequently, ΔFkh2 produced twice as many, but smaller, blastospores than wild-type under submerged conditions, and formed denser septa and shorter/broader cells in aberrantly branched hyphae. In these hyphae, clustered genes required for septation and conidiation were remarkedly up-regulated, followed by higher yield and slower germination of aerial conidia. Moreover, ΔFkh2 displayed attenuated virulence and decreased tolerance to chemical and environmental stresses, accompanied with altered transcripts and activities of phenotype-influencing proteins or enzymes. All the changes in ΔFkh2 were restored by Fkh2 complementation. All together, Fkh2-dependent transcriptional control is vital for the adaptation of B. bassiana to diverse habitats of host insects and hence contributes to its biological control potential against arthropod pests. PMID:25955538

  15. Trans-Membrane Area Asymmetry Controls the Shape of Cellular Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Pilyugin, Sergei S.; Geerts, Willie J. C.; Kozlov, Michael M.; Burger, Koert N. J.; Luini, Alberto; Derganc, Jure; Mironov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane organelles often have complicated shapes and differ in their volume, surface area and membrane curvature. The ratio between the surface area of the cytosolic and luminal leaflets (trans-membrane area asymmetry (TAA)) determines the membrane curvature within different sites of the organelle. Thus, the shape of the organelle could be critically dependent on TAA. Here, using mathematical modeling and stereological measurements of TAA during fast transformation of organelle shapes, we present evidence that suggests that when organelle volume and surface area are constant, TAA can regulate transformation of the shape of the Golgi apparatus, endosomal multivesicular bodies, and microvilli of brush borders of kidney epithelial cells. Extraction of membrane curvature by small spheres, such as COPI-dependent vesicles within the Golgi (extraction of positive curvature), or by intraluminal vesicles within endosomes (extraction of negative curvature) controls the shape of these organelles. For instance, Golgi tubulation is critically dependent on the fusion of COPI vesicles with Golgi cisternae, and vice versa, for the extraction of membrane curvature into 50–60 nm vesicles, to induce transformation of Golgi tubules into cisternae. Also, formation of intraluminal ultra-small vesicles after fusion of endosomes allows equilibration of their TAA, volume and surface area. Finally, when microvilli of the brush border are broken into vesicles and microvilli fragments, TAA of these membranes remains the same as TAA of the microvilli. Thus, TAA has a significant role in transformation of organelle shape when other factors remain constant. PMID:25761238

  16. Trans-membrane area asymmetry controls the shape of cellular organelles.

    PubMed

    Beznoussenko, Galina V; Pilyugin, Sergei S; Geerts, Willie J C; Kozlov, Michael M; Burger, Koert N J; Luini, Alberto; Derganc, Jure; Mironov, Alexander A

    2015-01-01

    Membrane organelles often have complicated shapes and differ in their volume, surface area and membrane curvature. The ratio between the surface area of the cytosolic and luminal leaflets (trans-membrane area asymmetry (TAA)) determines the membrane curvature within different sites of the organelle. Thus, the shape of the organelle could be critically dependent on TAA. Here, using mathematical modeling and stereological measurements of TAA during fast transformation of organelle shapes, we present evidence that suggests that when organelle volume and surface area are constant, TAA can regulate transformation of the shape of the Golgi apparatus, endosomal multivesicular bodies, and microvilli of brush borders of kidney epithelial cells. Extraction of membrane curvature by small spheres, such as COPI-dependent vesicles within the Golgi (extraction of positive curvature), or by intraluminal vesicles within endosomes (extraction of negative curvature) controls the shape of these organelles. For instance, Golgi tubulation is critically dependent on the fusion of COPI vesicles with Golgi cisternae, and vice versa, for the extraction of membrane curvature into 50-60 nm vesicles, to induce transformation of Golgi tubules into cisternae. Also, formation of intraluminal ultra-small vesicles after fusion of endosomes allows equilibration of their TAA, volume and surface area. Finally, when microvilli of the brush border are broken into vesicles and microvilli fragments, TAA of these membranes remains the same as TAA of the microvilli. Thus, TAA has a significant role in transformation of organelle shape when other factors remain constant. PMID:25761238

  17. Mitigating Handoff Call Dropping in Wireless Cellular Networks: A Call Admission Control Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekpenyong, Moses Effiong; Udoh, Victoria Idia; Bassey, Udoma James

    2016-06-01

    Handoff management has been an important but challenging issue in the field of wireless communication. It seeks to maintain seamless connectivity of mobile users changing their points of attachment from one base station to another. This paper derives a call admission control model and establishes an optimal step-size coefficient (k) that regulates the admission probability of handoff calls. An operational CDMA network carrier was investigated through the analysis of empirical data collected over a period of 1 month, to verify the performance of the network. Our findings revealed that approximately 23 % of calls in the existing system were lost, while 40 % of the calls (on the average) were successfully admitted. A simulation of the proposed model was then carried out under ideal network conditions to study the relationship between the various network parameters and validate our claim. Simulation results showed that increasing the step-size coefficient degrades the network performance. Even at optimum step-size (k), the network could still be compromised in the presence of severe network crises, but our model was able to recover from these problems and still functions normally.

  18. Overview of cellular CDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, William C. Y.

    1991-05-01

    A general description of code division multiple access (CDMA) is presented. This overview of CDMA highlights the potential of increasing capacity in future cellular communications. The author describes the mobile radio environment and its impact on narrowband and wideband propagation. The advantage of having CDMA in cellular systems is discussed, and the concept of radio capacity in cellular is introduced. The power control schemes in CDMA are analyzed in detail.

  19. Inferring Growth Control Mechanisms in Growing Multi-cellular Spheroids of NSCLC Cells from Spatial-Temporal Image Data

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Margareta; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.; Drasdo, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantitative single cell-based mathematical model for multi-cellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) of SK-MES-1 cells, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, growing under various nutrient conditions: we confront the simulations performed with this model with data on the growth kinetics and spatial labeling patterns for cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM), cell distribution and cell death. We start with a simple model capturing part of the experimental observations. We then show, by performing a sensitivity analysis at each development stage of the model that its complexity needs to be stepwise increased to account for further experimental growth conditions. We thus ultimately arrive at a model that mimics the MCTS growth under multiple conditions to a great extent. Interestingly, the final model, is a minimal model capable of explaining all data simultaneously in the sense, that the number of mechanisms it contains is sufficient to explain the data and missing out any of its mechanisms did not permit fit between all data and the model within physiological parameter ranges. Nevertheless, compared to earlier models it is quite complex i.e., it includes a wide range of mechanisms discussed in biological literature. In this model, the cells lacking oxygen switch from aerobe to anaerobe glycolysis and produce lactate. Too high concentrations of lactate or too low concentrations of ATP promote cell death. Only if the extracellular matrix density overcomes a certain threshold, cells are able to enter the cell cycle. Dying cells produce a diffusive growth inhibitor. Missing out the spatial information would not permit to infer the mechanisms at work. Our findings suggest that this iterative data integration together with intermediate model sensitivity analysis at each model development stage, provide a promising strategy to infer predictive yet minimal (in the above sense) quantitative models of tumor growth, as prospectively of other tissue

  20. Specific β-containing Integrins Exert Differential Control on Proliferation and Two-dimensional Collective Cell Migration in Mammary Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Jeanes, Alexa I.; Wang, Pengbo; Moreno-Layseca, Paulina; Paul, Nikki; Cheung, Julia; Tsang, Ricky; Akhtar, Nasreen; Foster, Fiona M.; Brennan, Keith; Streuli, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how cell cycle is regulated in normal mammary epithelia is essential for deciphering defects of breast cancer and therefore for developing new therapies. Signals provided by both the extracellular matrix and growth factors are essential for epithelial cell proliferation. However, the mechanisms by which adhesion controls cell cycle in normal epithelia are poorly established. In this study, we describe the consequences of removing the β1-integrin gene from primary cultures of mammary epithelial cells in situ, using CreER. Upon β1-integrin gene deletion, the cells were unable to progress efficiently through S-phase, but were still able to undergo collective two-dimensional migration. These responses are explained by the presence of β3-integrin in β1-integrin-null cells, indicating that integrins containing different β-subunits exert differential control on mammary epithelial proliferation and migration. β1-Integrin deletion did not inhibit growth factor signaling to Erk or prevent the recruitment of core adhesome components to focal adhesions. Instead the S-phase arrest resulted from defective Rac activation and Erk translocation to the nucleus. Rac inhibition prevented Erk translocation and blocked proliferation. Activated Rac1 rescued the proliferation defect in β1-integrin-depleted cells, indicating that this GTPase is essential in propagating proliferative β1-integrin signals. These results show that β1-integrins promote cell cycle in mammary epithelial cells, whereas β3-integrins are involved in migration. PMID:22511753

  1. Inseparable tandem: evolution chooses ATP and Ca2+ to control life, death and cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    unholy alliance into a fascinating success story.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377729

  2. Inseparable tandem: evolution chooses ATP and Ca2+ to control life, death and cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    unholy alliance into a fascinating success story.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'.

  3. Cellularized Bilayer Pullulan-Gelatin Hydrogel for Skin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-05-01

    Skin substitutes significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of patients with burn injuries and chronic wounds. However, current skin substitutes have disadvantages related to high costs and inadequate skin regeneration due to highly inflammatory wounds. Thus, new skin substitutes are needed. By combining two polymers, pullulan, an inexpensive polysaccharide with antioxidant properties, and gelatin, a derivative of collagen with high water absorbency, we created a novel inexpensive hydrogel-named PG-1 for "pullulan-gelatin first generation hydrogel"-suitable for skin substitutes. After incorporating human fibroblasts and keratinocytes onto PG-1 using centrifugation over 5 days, we created a cellularized bilayer skin substitute. Cellularized PG-1 was compared to acellular PG-1 and no hydrogel (control) in vivo in a mouse excisional skin biopsy model using newly developed dome inserts to house the skin substitutes and prevent mouse skin contraction during wound healing. PG-1 had an average pore size of 61.69 μm with an ideal elastic modulus, swelling behavior, and biodegradability for use as a hydrogel for skin substitutes. Excellent skin cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and morphology were visualized through live/dead assays, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation assays, and confocal microscopy. Trichrome and immunohistochemical staining of excisional wounds treated with the cellularized skin substitute revealed thicker newly formed skin with a higher proportion of actively proliferating cells and incorporation of human cells compared to acellular PG-1 or control. Excisional wounds treated with acellular or cellularized hydrogels showed significantly less macrophage infiltration and increased angiogenesis 14 days post skin biopsy compared to control. These results show that PG-1 has ideal mechanical characteristics and allows ideal cellular characteristics. In vivo evidence suggests that cellularized PG-1 promotes skin regeneration and may

  4. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  5. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  6. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  7. A role for antizyme inhibitor in cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tania M; Cirenajwis, Helena; Wallace, Heather M; Oredsson, Stina; Persson, Lo

    2015-07-01

    The polyamines are important for a variety of cellular functions, including cell growth. Their intracellular concentrations are controlled by a complex network of regulatory mechanisms, in which antizyme (Az) has a key role. Az reduces the cellular polyamine content by down-regulating both the enzyme catalysing polyamine biosynthesis, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and the uptake of polyamines. The activity of Az is repressed by the binding of a protein, named Az inhibitor (AzI), which is an enzymatically inactive homologue of ODC. Two forms of AzI have been described: AzI1, which is ubiquitous, and AzI2 which is expressed in brain and testis. In the present study, we have investigated the role of AzI1 in polyamine homeostasis and cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. The results obtained showed that the cellular content of AzI increased transiently after induction of cell proliferation by diluting cells in fresh medium. Inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis induced an even larger increase in the cellular AzI content, which remained significantly elevated during the 7-day experimental period. However, this increase was not a consequence of changes in cell cycle progression, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. Instead, the increase appeared to correlate with the cellular depletion of polyamines. Moreover, induced overexpression of AzI resulted in an increased cell proliferation with a concomitant increase in ODC activity and putrescine content. During mitosis, AzI1 was localised in a pattern that resembled that of the two centrosomes, confirming earlier observations. Taken together, the results indicate that AzI fulfils an essential regulatory function in polyamine homeostasis and cell proliferation. PMID:25813938

  8. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Thormann, Kai M.; Duttler, Stefanie; Saville, Renee; Hyodo, Mamoru; Shukla, Soni; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2006-04-01

    Stability and resilience against environmental perturbations are critical properties of medical and environmental biofilms and pose important targets for their control. Biofilm stability is determined by two mutually exclusive processes: attachment of cells to and detachment from the biofilm matrix. Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally versatile, Fe(III) and Mn(IV) mineral -reducing microorganism, we identified mxdABCD as a new set of genes essential for formation of a three-dimensional biofilm. Molecular analysis revealed that mxdA encodes a cyclic bis(3',5')guanylic acid (cyclic di-GMP)-forming enzyme with an unusual GGDEF motif, i.e., NVDEF, which is essential for its function. mxdB encodes a putative membrane-associated glycosyl transferase. Both genes are essential for matrix attachment. The attachment-deficient phenotype of a Delta mxdA mutant was rescued by ectopic expression of VCA0956, encoding another diguanylate cyclase. Interestingly, a rapid cellular detachment from the biofilm occurred upon induction of yhjH, a gene encoding an enzyme that has been shown to have phosphodiesterase activity. In this way, it was possible to bypass the previously identified sudden depletion of molecular oxygen as an environmental trigger to induce biofilm dissolution. We propose a model for c-di-GMP as a key intracellular regulator for controlling biofilm stability by shifting the state of a biofilm cell between attachment and detachment in a concentration-dependent manner.

  9. Hijacking cellular garbage cans.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Sonja; Locker, Jacomine Krijnse

    2010-06-25

    Viruses are perfect opportunists that have evolved to modify numerous cellular processes in order to complete their replication cycle in the host cell. An article by Reggiori and coworkers in this issue of Cell Host & Microbe reveals how coronaviruses can divert a cellular quality control pathway that normally functions in degradation of mis-folded proteins to replicate the viral genome. PMID:20542246

  10. Naturally-occurring altered peptide ligands control Salmonella-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation, IFN-γ production, and protective potency

    PubMed Central

    Johanns, Tanner M.; Ertelt, James M.; Lai, Joseph C.; Rowe, Jared H.; Avant, Ross A.; Way, Sing Sing

    2010-01-01

    T cell activation required for host defense against infection is an intricately regulated and precisely controlled process. Although in vitro studies indicate three distinct stimulatory signals are required for T cell activation, the precise contribution of each signal in regulating T cell proliferation and differentiation after in vivo infection is unknown. In this study, altered peptide ligands (APLs) derived from the protective Salmonella-specific FliC antigen and CD4+ T cells specific for the immune-dominant FliC431–439 peptide within this antigen were used to determine how changes in TCR stimulation impact CD4+ T cell proliferation, differentiation, and protective potency. To explore the prevalence and potential use of altered TCR stimulation by bacterial pathogens, naturally-occurring APLs containing single amino acid substitutions in putative TCR contact residues within the FliC431–439 peptide were identified and used for stimulation under both non-infection and infection conditions. Based on this analysis, naturally-occurring APLs that prime proliferation of FliC-specific CD4+ T cells either more potently or less potently compared with the wild-type FliC431–439 peptide were identified. Remarkably, despite these differences in proliferation, all APLs primed reduced IFN-γ production by FliC431–439-specific CD4+ T cells after stimulation in vivo. Moreover, after expression of the parental FliC431–439 peptide or each APL in recombinant Listeria monocytogenes, only CD4+ T cells stimulated with the wild-type FliC431–439 peptide conferred significant protection against challenge with virulent Salmonella. These results reveal important and unanticipated roles for TCR stimulation in controlling pathogen-specific CD4+ T cell proliferation, differentiation, and protective potency. PMID:20026741

  11. Matrix stiffness reverses the effect of actomyosin tension on cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mih, Justin D.; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Liu, Fei; Sharif, Asma S.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The stiffness of the extracellular matrix exerts powerful effects on cell proliferation and differentiation, but the mechanisms transducing matrix stiffness into cellular fate decisions remain poorly understood. Two widely reported responses to matrix stiffening are increases in actomyosin contractility and cell proliferation. To delineate their relationship, we modulated cytoskeletal tension in cells grown across a physiological range of matrix stiffnesses. On both synthetic and naturally derived soft matrices, and across a panel of cell types, we observed a striking reversal of the effect of inhibiting actomyosin contractility, switching from the attenuation of proliferation on rigid substrates to the robust promotion of proliferation on soft matrices. Inhibiting contractility on soft matrices decoupled proliferation from cytoskeletal tension and focal adhesion organization, but not from cell spread area. Our results demonstrate that matrix stiffness and actomyosin contractility converge on cell spreading in an unexpected fashion to control a key aspect of cell fate. PMID:23097048

  12. A novel IL-17 signaling pathway controlling keratinocyte proliferation and tumorigenesis via the TRAF4–ERK5 axis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling; Chen, Xing; Zhao, Junjie; Martin, Bradley; Zepp, Jarod A.; Ko, Jennifer S.; Gu, Chunfang; Cai, Gang; Ouyang, Wenjun; Sen, Ganes; Stark, George R.; Su, Bing; Vines, Charlotte M.; Tournier, Cathy; Hamilton, Thomas A.; Vidimos, Allison; Gastman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Although IL-17 is emerging as an important cytokine in cancer promotion and progression, the underlining molecular mechanism remains unclear. Previous studies suggest that IL-17 (IL-17A) sustains a chronic inflammatory microenvironment that favors tumor formation. Here we report a novel IL-17–mediated cascade via the IL-17R–Act1–TRAF4–MEKK3–ERK5 positive circuit that directly stimulates keratinocyte proliferation and tumor formation. Although this axis dictates the expression of target genes Steap4 (a metalloreductase for cell metabolism and proliferation) and p63 (a transcription factor for epidermal stem cell proliferation), Steap4 is required for the IL-17–induced sustained expansion of p63+ basal cells in the epidermis. P63 (a positive transcription factor for the Traf4 promoter) induces TRAF4 expression in keratinocytes. Thus, IL-17–induced Steap4-p63 expression forms a positive feedback loop through p63-mediated TRAF4 expression, driving IL-17–dependent sustained activation of the TRAF4–ERK5 axis for keratinocyte proliferation and tumor formation. PMID:26347473

  13. Oma1 Links Mitochondrial Protein Quality Control and TOR Signaling To Modulate Physiological Plasticity and Cellular Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Bohovych, Iryna; Kastora, Stavroula; Christianson, Sara; Topil, Danelle; Kim, Heejeong; Fangman, Teresa; Zhou, You J; Barrientos, Antoni; Lee, Jaekwon; Brown, Alistair J P; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2016-09-01

    A network of conserved proteases known as the intramitochondrial quality control (IMQC) system is central to mitochondrial protein homeostasis and cellular health. IMQC proteases also appear to participate in establishment of signaling cues for mitochondrion-to-nucleus communication. However, little is known about this process. Here, we show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inactivation of the membrane-bound IMQC protease Oma1 interferes with oxidative-stress responses through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during logarithmic growth and reduced stress signaling via the TORC1-Rim15-Msn2/Msn4 axis. Pharmacological or genetic prevention of ROS accumulation in Oma1-deficient cells restores this defective TOR signaling. Additionally, inactivation of the Oma1 ortholog in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans also alters TOR signaling and, unexpectedly, leads to increased resistance to neutrophil killing and virulence in the invertebrate animal model Galleria mellonella Our findings reveal a novel and evolutionarily conserved link between IMQC and TOR-mediated signaling that regulates physiological plasticity and pancellular oxidative-stress responses. PMID:27325672

  14. Oma1 Links Mitochondrial Protein Quality Control and TOR Signaling To Modulate Physiological Plasticity and Cellular Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Bohovych, Iryna; Kastora, Stavroula; Christianson, Sara; Topil, Danelle; Kim, Heejeong; Fangman, Teresa; Zhou, You J; Barrientos, Antoni; Lee, Jaekwon; Brown, Alistair J P; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2016-09-01

    A network of conserved proteases known as the intramitochondrial quality control (IMQC) system is central to mitochondrial protein homeostasis and cellular health. IMQC proteases also appear to participate in establishment of signaling cues for mitochondrion-to-nucleus communication. However, little is known about this process. Here, we show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inactivation of the membrane-bound IMQC protease Oma1 interferes with oxidative-stress responses through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during logarithmic growth and reduced stress signaling via the TORC1-Rim15-Msn2/Msn4 axis. Pharmacological or genetic prevention of ROS accumulation in Oma1-deficient cells restores this defective TOR signaling. Additionally, inactivation of the Oma1 ortholog in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans also alters TOR signaling and, unexpectedly, leads to increased resistance to neutrophil killing and virulence in the invertebrate animal model Galleria mellonella Our findings reveal a novel and evolutionarily conserved link between IMQC and TOR-mediated signaling that regulates physiological plasticity and pancellular oxidative-stress responses.

  15. Transmembrane voltage potential is an essential cellular parameter for the detection and control of tumor development in a Xenopus model.

    PubMed

    Chernet, Brook T; Levin, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Understanding mechanisms that orchestrate cell behavior into appropriately patterned tissues and organs within the organism is an essential element of preventing, detecting and treating cancer. Bioelectric signals (resting transmembrane voltage potential gradients in all cells) underlie an important and broadly conserved set of control mechanisms that regulate pattern formation. We tested the role of transmembrane potential in tumorigenesis mediated by canonical oncogenes in Xenopus laevis. Depolarized membrane potential (Vmem) was a characteristic of induced tumor-like structures (ITLSs) generated by overexpression of Gli1, Kras(G12D), Xrel3 or p53(Trp248). This bioelectric signature was also present in precursor ITLS sites. Vmem is a bioelectric marker that reveals ITLSs before they become histologically and morphologically apparent. Moreover, voltage was functionally important: overexpression of hyperpolarizing ion transporters caused a return to normal Vmem and significantly reduced ITLS formation in vivo. To characterize the molecular mechanism by which Vmem change regulates ITLS phenotypes, we performed a suppression screen. Vmem hyperpolarization was transduced into downstream events via Vmem-regulated activity of SLC5A8, a sodium-butyrate exchanger previously implicated in human cancer. These data indicate that butyrate, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, might be responsible for transcriptional events that mediate suppression of ITLSs by hyperpolarization. Vmem is a convenient cellular parameter by which tumors induced by human oncogenes can be detected in vivo and represents a new diagnostic modality. Moreover, control of resting membrane potential is functionally involved in the process by which oncogene-bearing cells depart from normal morphogenesis programs to form tumors. Modulation of Vmem levels is a novel and promising strategy for tumor normalization. PMID:23471912

  16. Engineering invitro cellular microenvironment using polyelectrolyte multilayer films to control cell adhesion and for drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidambi, Srivatsan

    Over the past decades, the development of new methods for fabricating thin films that provide precise control of the three-dimensional topography and cell adhesion has generated lots of interest. These films could lead to significant advances in the fields of tissue engineering, drug delivery and biosensors which have become increasingly germane areas of research in the field of chemical engineering. The ionic layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique called "Polyelectrolyte Multilayers (PEMs)", introduced by Decher in 1991, has emerged as a versatile and inexpensive method of constructing polymeric thin films, with nanometer-scale control of ionized species. PEMs have long been utilized in such applications as sensors, eletrochromics, and nanomechanical thin films but recently they have also been shown to be excellent candidates for biomaterial applications. In this thesis, we engineered these highly customizable PEM thin films to engineer in vitro cellular microenvironments to control cell adhesion and for drug delivery applications. PEM films were engineered to control the adhesion of primary hepatocytes and primary neurons without the aid of adhesive proteins/ligands. We capitalized upon the differential cell attachment and spreading of primary hepatocytes and neurons on poly(diallyldimethylammoniumchloride) (PDAC) and sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) surfaces to make patterned co-cultures of primary hepatocytes/fibroblasts and primary neurons/astrocytes on the PEM surfaces. In addition, we developed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) patterns of m-d-poly(ethylene glycol) (m-dPEG) acid molecules onto PEMs. The created m-dPEG acid monolayer patterns on PEMs acted as resistive templates, and thus prevented further deposits of consecutive poly(anion)/poly(cation) pairs of charged particles and resulted in the formation of three-dimensional (3-D) patterned PEM films or selective particle depositions atop the original multilayer thin films. These new patterned and structured

  17. Regulation of Srpr Expression by miR-330-5p Controls Proliferation of Mouse Epidermal Keratinocyte

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong-Kyu; Yoo, Hye-In; Choi, Keonwoo; Lee, Ah-Reum; Yoon, Sungjoo Kim

    2016-01-01

    Srpr is a gene encoding α subunit of the signal recognition particle receptor which is involved in the targeting and translocation of nascent secretory and membrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum. Previous studies showed aberrant expression of Srpr in several cell types with abnormal growth rate. Although Srpr is expressed in various tissues including skin, the role of Srpr in keratinocytes and regulation of its expression by miRNAs have not been studied. In this study, we investigated the role of SRPR and regulation of its expression by miRNA in skin keratinocytes. We found that SRPR was highly expressed in epidermal keratinocytes and regulated keratinocyte proliferation by affecting cell cycle progression. We also demonstrated that miR-330-5p directly inhibits Srpr expression. These data suggest that miR-330-5p-mediated regulation of the SRPR level is needed for the regulation of proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. PMID:27768721

  18. Metabolic and protein interaction sub-networks controlling the proliferation rate of cancer cells and their impact on patient survival.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Amir; Bordel, Sergio

    2013-10-24

    Cancer cells can have a broad scope of proliferation rates. Here we aim to identify the molecular mechanisms that allow some cancer cell lines to grow up to 4 times faster than other cell lines. The correlation of gene expression profiles with the growth rate in 60 different cell lines has been analyzed using several genome-scale biological networks and new algorithms. New possible regulatory feedback loops have been suggested and the known roles of several cell cycle related transcription factors have been confirmed. Over 100 growth-correlated metabolic sub-networks have been identified, suggesting a key role of simultaneous lipid synthesis and degradation in the energy supply of the cancer cells growth. Many metabolic sub-networks involved in cell line proliferation appeared also to correlate negatively with the survival expectancy of colon cancer patients.

  19. CDK2 differentially controls normal cell senescence and cancer cell proliferation upon exposure to reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Chae Young; Lee, Seung-Min; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} differently adjusted senescence and proliferation in normal and cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently decreased PCNA levels in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently increased CDK2 activity in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup Cip1} is likely dispensable when H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces senescence in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggestively, CDK2 and PCNA play critical roles in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell fate decision. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species modulate cell fate in a context-dependent manner. Sublethal doses of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreased the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in normal cells (including primary human dermal fibroblasts and IMR-90 cells) without affecting cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, leading to cell cycle arrest and subsequent senescence. In contrast, exposure of cancer cells (such as HeLa and MCF7 cells) to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased CDK2 activity with no accompanying change in the PCNA level, leading to cell proliferation. A CDK2 inhibitor, CVT-313, prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cancer cell proliferation. These results support the notion that the cyclin/CDK2/p21{sup Cip1}/PCNA complex plays an important role as a regulator of cell fate decisions.

  20. Long noncoding RNA H19 controls DUSP5/ERK1/2 axis in cardiac fibroblast proliferation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hui; Cao, Wei; Yang, Jing-Jing; Shi, Kai-Hu; Zhou, Xiao; Liu, Li-Ping; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Down-regulation of DUSP5 has been shown to increase cell proliferation. DUSP5 expression is regulated through epigenetic events involving LncRNA H19 human choriocarcinoma cell line. However, the molecular mechanisms of H19 modulating the DUSP5 expression in cardiac fibrosis remain largely unknown. Here, we identify H19 negatively regulation of DUSP5 gene expression in cardiac fibroblast and fibrosis tissues. In vivo, the expression levels of H19, DUSP5, α-SMA, p-ERK1/2, and ERK1/2 in cardiac fibrosis tissue were estimated by Western blotting, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. In vitro stimulation of freshly isolated rat cardiac fibroblasts with recombinant marine TGF-β1 was performed, followed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting to detect changes in H19, DUSP5, p-ERK1/2, and ERK1/2 levels. Cardiac fibroblasts were transfected with pEX-3-H19 overexpressing, H19-RNAi down-regulating, or pEGFP-C1-DUSP5 overexpressing. Finally, cell proliferation was assessed by the MTT assay and cell cycle. H19 endogenous expression is overexpressed in cardiac fibroblast and fibrosis tissues, and an opposite pattern is observed for DUSP5. H19 ectopic overexpression reduces DUSP5 abundance and increases the proliferation of cardiac fibroblast, whereas H19 silencing causes the opposite effects. In a broader perspective, these results demonstrated that LncRNA H19 contributes to cardiac fibroblast proliferation and fibrosis, which act in part through repression of DUSP5/ERK1/2. PMID:27318893

  1. Modeling and boundary force control of microcantilevers utilized in atomic force microscopy for cellular imaging and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Sohrab

    the proposed Euler-Bernoulli model, a more comprehensive model is developed by modeling the probe dynamics and including the effects of the rotary inertia and shear deformation under the same proposed tip-sample interaction force. An extensive comparative study between the Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam assumptions is conducted for different conditions including different base-excitation amplitudes and higher modes. The results underline that the comprehensive Timoshenko model unveils the effects of the nonlinear interaction force better than the Euler-Bernoulli beam model. In addition to extensive modeling efforts on the microcantilever and its interaction with sample, an adaptive control framework is developed in order to make the microcantilever's tip follow a desired trajectory. This trajectory can further be considered as an important path acquired by the path planning techniques to manipulate the nanoparticles. There is a base excitation considered for this model and can be considered as an input force control to excite the probe by taking advantage of flexibility of the cantilever despite its complexity and under existence of the external nonlinear interaction forces between the tip and sample's surface. When building such complicated controller on top of the proposed comprehensive model, the results could be extended to study a macro-micro hybrid rigid-flexible model of a microrobot to mimic the realistic behavior of the MM3ARTM microrobot. The MM3ARTM microrobot is equipped with a piezoresistive layer which functions as a force sensor and is capable of measuring very slight forces as small as micro to nano-Newton. Two types of controllers are investigated for the case of the tip force control. Lyapunov-based PD and robust adaptive controllers are developed for this purpose and their performances and stabilities are compared. In the experimental part, a platform for performing the automated nanomanipulation and real-time cellular imaging is developed by

  2. SnoN/SKIL modulates proliferation through control of hsa-miR-720 transcription in esophageal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozuka, Eriko; Miyashita, Masao; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Akagi, Ichiro; Kikuchi, Kunio; Makino, Hiroshi; Matsutani, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Nomura, Tsutomu; Uchida, Eiji; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SnoN modulated miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B expression levels in TE-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-720 and miR-1274A suppressed the expression of target proteins p63 and ADAM9. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Esophageal cancer tissues have lower SnoN expression levels than normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Esophageal cancer tissues have higher miR-720 expression levels than normal tissues. -- Abstract: It is now evident that changes in microRNA are involved in cancer progression, but the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of miRNAs remain unknown. Ski-related novel gene (SnoN/SKIL), a transcription co-factor, acts as a potential key regulator within a complex network of p53 transcriptional repressors. SnoN has pro- and anti-oncogenic functions in the regulation of cell proliferation, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation. We characterized the roles of SnoN in miRNA transcriptional regulation and its effects on cell proliferation using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells. Silencing of SnoN altered a set of miRNA expression profiles in TE-1cells, and the expression levels of miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B were modulated by SnoN. The expression of these miRNAs resulted in changes to the target protein p63 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 9 (ADAM9). Furthermore, silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells, indicating a potential anti-oncogenic function. These results support our observation that cancer tissues have lower expression levels of SnoN, miR-720, and miR-1274A compared to adjacent normal tissues from ESCC patients. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of miRNA regulation, leading to changes in cell proliferation.

  3. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92) oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Samer; Giraud, Guillaume; Morlé, François; Guyot, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  4. Control of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by the heterochronic genes and the cellular asymmetry machinery in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Harandi, Omid F; Ambros, Victor R

    2015-01-20

    Transitions between asymmetric (self-renewing) and symmetric (proliferative) cell divisions are robustly regulated in the context of normal development and tissue homeostasis. To genetically assess the regulation of these transitions, we used the postembryonic epithelial stem (seam) cell lineages of Caenorhabditis elegans. In these lineages, the timing of these transitions is regulated by the evolutionarily conserved heterochronic pathway, whereas cell division asymmetry is conferred by a pathway consisting of Wnt (Wingless) pathway components, including posterior pharynx defect (POP-1)/TCF, APC related/adenomatosis polyposis coli (APR-1)/APC, and LIT-1/NLK (loss of intestine/Nemo-like kinase). Here we explore the genetic regulatory mechanisms underlying stage-specific transitions between self-renewing and proliferative behavior in the seam cell lineages. We show that mutations of genes in the heterochronic developmental timing pathway, including lin-14 (lineage defect), lin-28, lin-46, and the lin-4 and let-7 (lethal defects)-family microRNAs, affect the activity of LIT-1/POP-1 cellular asymmetry machinery and APR-1 polarity during larval development. Surprisingly, heterochronic mutations that enhance LIT-1 activity in seam cells can simultaneously also enhance the opposing, POP-1 activity, suggesting a role in modulating the potency of the cellular polarizing activity of the LIT-1/POP-1 system as development proceeds. These findings illuminate how the evolutionarily conserved cellular asymmetry machinery can be coupled to microRNA-regulated developmental pathways for robust regulation of stem cell maintenance and proliferation during the course of development. Such genetic interactions between developmental timing regulators and cell polarity regulators could underlie transitions between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell fates in other systems and could be deregulated in the context of developmental disorders and cancer. PMID:25561544

  5. Control of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by the heterochronic genes and the cellular asymmetry machinery in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Omid F.; Ambros, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Transitions between asymmetric (self-renewing) and symmetric (proliferative) cell divisions are robustly regulated in the context of normal development and tissue homeostasis. To genetically assess the regulation of these transitions, we used the postembryonic epithelial stem (seam) cell lineages of Caenorhabditis elegans. In these lineages, the timing of these transitions is regulated by the evolutionarily conserved heterochronic pathway, whereas cell division asymmetry is conferred by a pathway consisting of Wnt (Wingless) pathway components, including posterior pharynx defect (POP-1)/TCF, APC related/adenomatosis polyposis coli (APR-1)/APC, and LIT-1/NLK (loss of intestine/Nemo-like kinase). Here we explore the genetic regulatory mechanisms underlying stage-specific transitions between self-renewing and proliferative behavior in the seam cell lineages. We show that mutations of genes in the heterochronic developmental timing pathway, including lin-14 (lineage defect), lin-28, lin-46, and the lin-4 and let-7 (lethal defects)-family microRNAs, affect the activity of LIT-1/POP-1 cellular asymmetry machinery and APR-1 polarity during larval development. Surprisingly, heterochronic mutations that enhance LIT-1 activity in seam cells can simultaneously also enhance the opposing, POP-1 activity, suggesting a role in modulating the potency of the cellular polarizing activity of the LIT-1/POP-1 system as development proceeds. These findings illuminate how the evolutionarily conserved cellular asymmetry machinery can be coupled to microRNA-regulated developmental pathways for robust regulation of stem cell maintenance and proliferation during the course of development. Such genetic interactions between developmental timing regulators and cell polarity regulators could underlie transitions between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell fates in other systems and could be deregulated in the context of developmental disorders and cancer. PMID:25561544

  6. The Control of Arabidopsis thaliana Growth by Cell Proliferation and Endoreplication Requires the F-Box Protein FBL17[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Marrocco, Katia; Masoud, Kinda; Thomann, Alexis; Gusti, Andi; Bitrian, Marta; Schnittger, Arp; Genschik, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    A key step of the cell cycle is the entry into the DNA replication phase that typically commits cells to divide. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating this transition in plants. Here, we investigated the function of FBL17 (F BOX-LIKE17), an Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein previously shown to govern the progression through the second mitosis during pollen development. Our work reveals that FBL17 function is not restricted to gametogenesis. FBL17 transcripts accumulate in both proliferating and postmitotic cell types of Arabidopsis plants. Loss of FBL17 function drastically reduces plant growth by altering cell division activity in both shoot and root apical meristems. In fbl17 mutant plants, DNA replication is severely impaired and endoreplication is fully suppressed. At the molecular level, lack of FBL17 increases the stability of the CDK (CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE) inhibitor KIP-RELATED PROTEIN2 known to switch off CDKA;1 kinase activity. Despite the strong inhibition of cell proliferation in fbl17, some cells are still able to enter S phase and eventually to divide, but they exhibit a strong DNA damage response and often missegregate chromosomes. Altogether, these data indicate that the F-box protein FBL17 acts as a master cell cycle regulator during the diploid sporophyte phase of the plant. PMID:25944099

  7. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) isoforms control lymphoid cancer cell proliferation through differentially regulating tumor suppressor p53 activity.

    PubMed

    Gardella, Kacie A; Muro, Israel; Fang, Gloria; Sarkar, Krishnakali; Mendez, Omayra; Wright, Casey W

    2016-03-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) is involved in xenobiotic and hypoxic responses, and we previously showed that ARNT also regulates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling by altering the DNA binding activity of the RelB subunit. However, our initial study of ARNT-mediated RelB modulation was based on simultaneous suppression of the two ARNT isoforms, isoform 1 and 3, and precluded the examination of their individual functions. We find here that while normal lymphocytes harbor equal levels of isoform 1 and 3, lymphoid malignancies exhibit a shift to higher levels of ARNT isoform 1. These elevated levels of ARNT isoform 1 are critical to the proliferation of these cancerous cells, as suppression of isoform 1 in a human multiple myeloma (MM) cell line, and an anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) cell line, triggered S-phase cell cycle arrest, spontaneous apoptosis, and sensitized cells to doxorubicin treatment. Furthermore, co-suppression of RelB or p53 with ARNT isoform 1 prevented cell cycle arrest and blocked doxorubicin induced apoptosis. Together our findings reveal that certain blood cancers rely on ARNT isoform 1 to potentiate proliferation by antagonizing RelB and p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Significantly, our results identify ARNT isoform 1 as a potential target for anticancer therapies.

  8. 14-3-3{sigma} controls corneal epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation through the Notch signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Ying; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2010-02-19

    14-3-3{sigma} (also called stratifin) is specifically expressed in the stratified squamous epithelium and its function was recently shown to be linked to epidermal stratification and differentiation in the skin. In this study, we investigated its role in corneal epithelium cell proliferation and differentiation. We showed that the 14-3-3{sigma} mutation in repeated epilation (Er) mutant mice results in a dominant negative truncated protein. Primary corneal epithelial cells expressing the dominant negative protein failed to undergo high calcium-induced cell cycle arrest and differentiation. We further demonstrated that blocking endogenous 14-3-3{sigma} activity in corneal epithelial cells by overexpressing dominative negative 14-3-3{sigma} led to reduced Notch activity and Notch1/2 transcription. Significantly, expression of the active Notch intracellular domain overcame the block in epithelial cell differentiation in 14-3-3{sigma} mutant-expressing corneal epithelial cells. We conclude that 14-3-3{sigma} is critical for regulating corneal epithelial proliferation and differentiation by regulating Notch signaling activity.

  9. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  10. Retinal pigment epithelial cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The human retinal pigment epithelium forms early in development and subsequently remains dormant, undergoing minimal proliferation throughout normal life. Retinal pigment epithelium proliferation, however, can be activated in disease states or by removing retinal pigment epithelial cells into culture. We review the conditions that control retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in culture, in animal models and in human disease and interpret retinal pigment epithelium proliferation in context of the recently discovered retinal pigment epithelium stem cell that is responsible for most in vitro retinal pigment epithelial proliferation. Retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated wound repair that occurs in selected macular diseases is contrasted with retinal pigment epithelial proliferation-mediated fibroblastic scar formation that underlies proliferative vitreoretinopathy. We discuss the role of retinal pigment epithelial proliferation in age-related macular degeneration which is reparative in some cases and destructive in others. Macular retinal pigment epithelium wound repair and regression of choroidal neovascularization are more pronounced in younger than older patients. We discuss the possibility that the limited retinal pigment epithelial proliferation and latent wound repair in older age-related macular degeneration patients can be stimulated to promote disease regression in age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26041390

  11. Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-04-20

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  12. Epstein–Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B.; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G.; Sinclair, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  13. Clustering Nuclear Receptors in Liver Regeneration Identifies Candidate Modulators of Hepatocyte Proliferation and Hepatocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Giusi; D'Orazio, Andria; Cariello, Marica; Massafra, Vittoria; Salvatore, Lorena; Martelli, Nicola; Murzilli, Stefania; Sasso, Giuseppe Lo; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Moschetta, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver regeneration (LR) is a valuable model for studying mechanisms modulating hepatocyte proliferation. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are key players in the control of cellular functions, being ideal modulators of hepatic proliferation and carcinogenesis. Methods & Results We used a previously validated RT-qPCR platform to profile modifications in the expression of all 49 members of the NR superfamily in mouse liver during LR. Twenty-nine NR transcripts were significantly modified in their expression during LR, including fatty acid (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, PPARs) and oxysterol (liver X receptors, Lxrs) sensors, circadian masters RevErbα and RevErbβ, glucocorticoid receptor (Gr) and constitutive androxane receptor (Car). In order to detect the NRs that better characterize proliferative status vs. proliferating liver, we used the novel Random Forest (RF) analysis to selected a trio of down-regulated NRs (thyroid receptor alpha, Trα; farsenoid X receptor beta, Fxrβ; Pparδ) as best discriminators of the proliferating status. To validate our approach, we further studied PPARδ role in modulating hepatic proliferation. We first confirmed the suppression of PPARδ both in LR and human hepatocellular carcinoma at protein level, and then demonstrated that PPARδ agonist GW501516 reduces the proliferative potential of hepatoma cells. Conclusions Our data suggest that NR transcriptome is modulated in proliferating liver and is a source of biomarkers and bona fide pharmacological targets for the management of liver disease affecting hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:25116592

  14. Synthetic modified N-POMC(1-28) controls in vivo proliferation and blocks apoptosis in rat adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Torres, Thompson Eusebio Pavan; de Mendonça, Pedro Omori Ribeiro; Lotfi, Claudimara Ferini Pacicco

    2010-08-01

    The identity of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived mitogen in the adrenal cortex has been historically controversial. We have used well-established in vivo models, viz., hypophysectomized (Hyp) or dexamethasone (Dex)-treated rats, to study the effect of the synthetic modified peptide N-terminal POMC (N-POMC(1-28)) on DNA synthesis in the adrenal cortex, as assessed by BrdU incorporation and compared with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). We evaluated the importance of disulfide bridges on proliferation by employing N-POMC(1-28) without disulfide bridges and with methionines replacing cysteines. Acute administration of synthetic modified N-POMC(1-28) distinctly increased DNA synthesis in the zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculata, but not in the zona reticularis in Hyp rats, whereas in Dex-treated rats, this peptide was effective in all adrenal zones. ACTH administration led to an increase of BrdU-positive cells in all adrenal zones irrespective of the depletion of Hyp or Dex-POMC peptides. The use of the ACTH antagonist, ACTH(7-38), confirmed the direct participation of ACTH in proliferation. Two different approaches to measure apoptosis revealed that both peptides similarly exerted a protective effect on all adrenocortical zones, blocking the apoptotic cell death induced by hypophysectomy. Thus, ACTH(1-39) and N-POMC(1-28) have similar actions suggesting that the disulfide bridges are important but not essential. Both peptides seem to be important factors determining adrenocortical cell survival throughout the adrenal cortex, reinforcing the idea that each zone can be renewed from within itself.

  15. Relationship between cell proliferation and eruption rate in the rat incisor.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J R; Omar, N F; Do Carmo, E R; Neves, J S; Soares, M A M; Narvaes, E A; Novaes, P D

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to further define the relationship between cell proliferation and the rate of tooth eruption in the rat incisor. Vinblastine is a drug that blocks cellular mitosis and was used to inhibit cell proliferation in the odontogenic region of rat incisors that were submitted to a shortening treatment or to higher masticatory forces. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: normofunctional (control group for incisor eruption), hypofunctional (incisor submitted to eruption acceleration), hyperfunctional (incisors under higher masticatory forces), hypofunctional with vinblastine and hyperfunctional with vinblastine. In incisors submitted to shortening procedures, a significant decrease in the eruption rate and cell proliferation was observed two days after vinblastine injection, suggesting that incisor eruption is dependent on cell proliferation.

  16. GCN5 Potentiates Glioma Proliferation and Invasion via STAT3 and AKT Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Zhang, Qing; Lan, Haitao; Wang, Liping; Mou, Pengfei; Shao, Wei; Liu, Dan; Yang, Wensheng; Lin, Zhen; Lin, Qingyuan; Ji, Tianhai

    2015-01-01

    The general control of nucleotide synthesis 5 (GCN5), which is one kind of lysine acetyltransferases, regulates a number of cellular processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA damage repair. However, its biological role in human glioma development remains elusive. In the present study, we firstly reported that GCN5 was frequently overexpressed in human glioma tissues and GCN5 was positively correlated with proliferation of cell nuclear antigen PCNA and matrix metallopeptidase MMP9. Meanwhile, down-regulation of GCN5 by siRNA interfering inhibited glioma cell proliferation and invasion. In addition, GCN5 knockdown reduced expression of p-STAT3, p-AKT, PCNA and MMP9 and increased the expression of p21 in glioma cells. In conclusion, GCN5 exhibited critical roles in glioma development by regulating cell proliferation and invasion, which suggested that GCN5 might be a potential molecular target for glioma treatment. PMID:26378521

  17. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review.

  18. Perfluorinated alginate for cellular encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Gattás-Asfura, Kerim M; Fraker, Christopher A; Stabler, Cherie L

    2012-08-01

    Molecules of pentadecafluorooctanoyl chloride (PFC) were grafted onto alginate (Alg) using a linear poly(ethylene glycol) linker and amide bonds. The resulting Alg-PFC material was characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopies. The degree of PFC functionalization significantly influenced the physical and chemical properties of Alg-PFC, particularly when the resulting polymer was ionically crosslinked into hydrogels. Alg-PFC hydrogel beads fabricated via Ba(2+) crosslinking were found to match the permeability properties of control alginate beads, except upon swelling over time in culture media. When used to encapsulate MIN6 cells, a beta cell line, Alg-PFC beads demonstrated enhanced cell proliferation over alginate control beads. These results indicate that Alg-PFC hydrogels retain some of the PFC's biological-relevant benefits, such as enhancement of mass transport and bioinertness, to enhance cellular viability within alginate three-dimensional hydrogel environments. We envision these functionalized hydrogels to be particularly useful in the encapsulation of cells with a high metabolic demand, such as pancreatic islets.

  19. Long-Term Upregulation of Inflammation and Suppression of Cell Proliferation in the Brain of Adult Rats Exposed to Traumatic Brain Injury Using the Controlled Cortical Impact Model

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Sandra A.; Tajiri, Naoki; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Grimmig, Bethany; Diamond, David; Sanberg, Paul R.; Bickford, Paula C.; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    The long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI), specifically the detrimental effects of inflammation on the neurogenic niches, are not very well understood. In the present in vivo study, we examined the prolonged pathological outcomes of experimental TBI in different parts of the rat brain with special emphasis on inflammation and neurogenesis. Sixty days after moderate controlled cortical impact injury, adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were euthanized and brain tissues harvested. Antibodies against the activated microglial marker, OX6, the cell cycle-regulating protein marker, Ki67, and the immature neuronal marker, doublecortin, DCX, were used to estimate microglial activation, cell proliferation, and neuronal differentiation, respectively, in the subventricular zone (SVZ), subgranular zone (SGZ), striatum, thalamus, and cerebral peduncle. Stereology-based analyses revealed significant exacerbation of OX6-positive activated microglial cells in the striatum, thalamus, and cerebral peduncle. In parallel, significant decrements in Ki67-positive proliferating cells in SVZ and SGZ, but only trends of reduced DCX-positive immature neuronal cells in SVZ and SGZ were detected relative to sham control group. These results indicate a progressive deterioration of the TBI brain over time characterized by elevated inflammation and suppressed neurogenesis. Therapeutic intervention at the chronic stage of TBI may confer abrogation of these deleterious cell death processes. PMID:23301065

  20. Dietary bovine lactoferrin increases intestinal cell proliferation in neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Elizabeth A; Comstock, Sarah S; Yi, Cuiyi; Contractor, Nikhat; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-09-01

    Lactoferrin is a bioactive milk protein that stimulates cell proliferation in vitro; however, limited in vivo evidence exists to allow lactoferrin to be incorporated into infant formula. Herein, the effect of dietary bovine lactoferrin (bLF) on neonatal intestinal growth and maturation was investigated guided by the hypothesis that bLF would increase cellular proliferation leading to functional differences in neonatal piglets. Colostrum-deprived piglets were fed formula containing 0.4 [control (Ctrl)], 1.0 (LF1), or 3.6 (LF3) g bLF/L for the first 7 or 14 d of life. To provide passive immunity, sow serum was provided orally during the first 36 h of life. Intestinal cell proliferation, histomorphology, mucosal DNA concentration, enzyme activity, gene expression, and fecal bLF content were measured. Intestinal enzyme activity, DNA concentration, and villus length were unaffected by bLF. However, crypt proliferation was 60% greater in LF1- and LF3-fed piglets than in Ctrl piglets, and crypt depth and area were 20% greater in LF3-fed piglets than in Ctrl piglets. Crypt cells from LF3-fed piglets had 3-fold higher β-catenin mRNA expression than did crypt cells from Ctrl piglets. Last, feces of piglets fed bLF contained intact bLF, suggesting that some bLF was resistant to digestion and could potentially affect intestinal proliferation through direct interaction with intestinal epithelial cells. This study is the first to our knowledge to show that dietary bLF stimulates crypt cell proliferation in vivo. The increased β-catenin expression indicates that Wnt signaling may in part mediate the stimulatory effect of bLF on intestinal cell proliferation. PMID:25056692

  1. Dynamic NF-κB and E2F interactions control the priority and timing of inflammatory signalling and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ankers, John M; Awais, Raheela; Jones, Nicholas A; Boyd, James; Ryan, Sheila; Adamson, Antony D; Harper, Claire V; Bridge, Lloyd; Spiller, David G; Jackson, Dean A; Paszek, Pawel; Sée, Violaine; White, Michael RH

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic cellular systems reprogram gene expression to ensure appropriate cellular fate responses to specific extracellular cues. Here we demonstrate that the dynamics of Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) signalling and the cell cycle are prioritised differently depending on the timing of an inflammatory signal. Using iterative experimental and computational analyses, we show physical and functional interactions between NF-κB and the E2 Factor 1 (E2F-1) and E2 Factor 4 (E2F-4) cell cycle regulators. These interactions modulate the NF-κB response. In S-phase, the NF-κB response was delayed or repressed, while cell cycle progression was unimpeded. By contrast, activation of NF-κB at the G1/S boundary resulted in a longer cell cycle and more synchronous initial NF-κB responses between cells. These data identify new mechanisms by which the cellular response to stress is differentially controlled at different stages of the cell cycle. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10473.001 PMID:27185527

  2. Dynamic NF-κB and E2F interactions control the priority and timing of inflammatory signalling and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ankers, John M; Awais, Raheela; Jones, Nicholas A; Boyd, James; Ryan, Sheila; Adamson, Antony D; Harper, Claire V; Bridge, Lloyd; Spiller, David G; Jackson, Dean A; Paszek, Pawel; Sée, Violaine; White, Michael Rh

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic cellular systems reprogram gene expression to ensure appropriate cellular fate responses to specific extracellular cues. Here we demonstrate that the dynamics of Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) signalling and the cell cycle are prioritised differently depending on the timing of an inflammatory signal. Using iterative experimental and computational analyses, we show physical and functional interactions between NF-κB and the E2 Factor 1 (E2F-1) and E2 Factor 4 (E2F-4) cell cycle regulators. These interactions modulate the NF-κB response. In S-phase, the NF-κB response was delayed or repressed, while cell cycle progression was unimpeded. By contrast, activation of NF-κB at the G1/S boundary resulted in a longer cell cycle and more synchronous initial NF-κB responses between cells. These data identify new mechanisms by which the cellular response to stress is differentially controlled at different stages of the cell cycle. PMID:27185527

  3. Cell proliferation inhibition in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Extended durations of spaceflight have been shown to be deleterious on an organismic level; however, mechanisms underlying cellular sensitivity to the gravitational environment remain to be elucidated. The majority of the gravitational studies to date indicates that cell regulatory pathways may be influenced by their gravitational environment. Still, few cell biology experiments have been performed in space flight and even fewer experiments have been repeated on subsequent flights. With flight opportunities on STS-50, 54, and 57, Sf9 cells were flown in the BioServe Fluids Processing Apparatus and cell proliferation was measured with and without exposure to a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor. Results from these flights indicate that the Sf9 cells grew comparable to ground controls, that the CeReS inhibitor bound to its specific receptor, and that its signal transduction cascade was not gravity sensitive.

  4. Modulation of cellular responses: The two-photon polymerization approach in the control of the physical micro/nanoenvironment.

    PubMed

    Marino, Attilio; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mattoli, Virgilio; Mazzolai, Barbara; Ciofani, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Cells and tissues are extremely sensitive to their physico-chemical surroundings: in regenerative medicine, as an example, the maintenance of culture conditions resembling the in vivo environment is essential for a correct tissue development. In this review, we summarize our results concerning the preparation and testing of micro/nanostructures for fostering peculiar cellular behavior, prepared by exploiting an innovative technique of high resolution 3D photolithography, the two-photon polymerization (2pp). PMID:26736645

  5. A Decade of Boon or Burden: What Has the CHIP Ever Done for Cellular Protein Quality Control Mechanism Implicated in Neurodegeneration and Aging?

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vibhuti; Amanullah, Ayeman; Upadhyay, Arun; Mishra, Ribhav; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Cells regularly synthesize new proteins to replace old and abnormal proteins for normal cellular functions. Two significant protein quality control pathways inside the cellular milieu are ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Autophagy is known for bulk clearance of cytoplasmic aggregated proteins, whereas the specificity of protein degradation by UPS comes from E3 ubiquitin ligases. Few E3 ubiquitin ligases, like C-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) not only take part in protein quality control pathways, but also plays a key regulatory role in other cellular processes like signaling, development, DNA damage repair, immunity and aging. CHIP targets misfolded proteins for their degradation through proteasome, as well as autophagy; simultaneously, with the help of chaperones, it also regulates folding attempts for misfolded proteins. The broad range of CHIP substrates and their associations with multiple pathologies make it a key molecule to work upon and focus for future therapeutic interventions. E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP interacts and degrades many protein inclusions formed in neurodegenerative diseases. The presence of CHIP at various nodes of cellular protein-protein interaction network presents this molecule as a potential candidate for further research. In this review, we have explored a wide range of functionality of CHIP inside cells by a detailed presentation of its co-chaperone, E3 and E4 enzyme like functions, with central focus on its protein quality control roles in neurodegenerative diseases. We have also raised many unexplored but expected fundamental questions regarding CHIP functions, which generate hopes for its future applications in research, as well as drug discovery. PMID:27757073

  6. Ubiquitin Carboxyl Terminal Hydrolyase L1 -Suppressed Autophagic Degradation of p21WAF1/Cip1 as a Novel Feedback Mechanism in the Control of Cardiac Fibroblast Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Guo, Linlin; Niu, Ting; Shao, Lei; Li, Huanjie; Wu, Weiwei; Wang, Wenjuan; Lv, Linmao; Qin, Qingyun; Wang, Fang; Tang, Dongqi; Wang, Xing Li; Cui, Taixing

    2014-01-01

    Aims Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) appear to be critical regulators of a multitude of processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and inflammation; however, the potential roles of DUBs in the heart remain to be determined. This study was aimed to explore the role of a DUB, ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolyase L1 (UCH-L1) in maladaptive cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. Methods and Results Maladaptive cardiac remodeling and dysfunction were induced in mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). UCH-L1 expression was transiently increased and then declined near to the basal level while impairment of cardiac function proceeded. The upregulation of UCH-L1 was observed in cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts. In primary culture of cardiac fibroblasts, UCH-L1 was upregulated by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and PDGF-DD. Adenoviral overexpession of UCH-L1 inhibited the PDGF-induced cardiac fibroblast proliferation without affecting the activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Akt, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). Further signaling dissection revealed that PDGF-BB posttranscriptional upregulated p21WAF1/Cip1 protein expression, which was inhibited by rapamycin, an activator of autophagy via suppressing mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), rather than MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. Overexpression of UCH-L1 enhanced PDGF-BB-induced mTOR phosphorylation and upregulation of p21WAF1/Cip1 protein expression while suppressed autophagic flux in cardiac fibroblasts. Conclusion UCH-L1 facilitates PDGF-BB-induced suppression of autophagic degradation of p21WAF1/Cip1 proteins in cardiac fibroblasts, which may serve as a novel negative feedback mechanism in the control of cardiac fibroblast proliferation contributing to cardiac fibrosis and dysfunction. PMID:24732420

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha control of lipid and glucose metabolism in human white adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ribet, Carole; Montastier, Emilie; Valle, Carine; Bezaire, Véronic; Mazzucotelli, Anne; Mairal, Aline; Viguerie, Nathalie; Langin, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    This work aimed at characterizing the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)alpha in human white adipocyte metabolism and at comparing PPAR alpha and PPAR gamma actions in these cells. Primary cultures of human fat cells were treated with the PPAR alpha agonist GW7647 or the PPAR gamma agonist rosiglitazone. Changes in gene expression were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Western blot and metabolic studies were performed to identify the biological effects elicited by PPAR agonist treatments. GW7647 induced an up-regulation of beta-oxidation gene expression and increased palmitate oxidation. Unexpectedly, glycolysis was strongly reduced at transcriptional and functional levels by GW7647 leading to a decrease in pyruvate and lactate production. Glucose oxidation was decreased. Triglyceride esterification and de novo lipogenesis were inhibited by the PPAR alpha agonist. GW7647-induced alterations were abolished by a treatment with a PPAR alpha antagonist. Small interfering RNA-mediated extinction of PPAR alpha gene expression in hMADS adipocytes attenuated GW7647 induction of palmitate oxidation. Rosiglitazone had no major impact on glycolysis and beta-oxidation. Altogether these results show that PPAR alpha can selectively up-regulate beta-oxidation and decrease glucose utilization in human white adipocytes.

  8. GLI3 Constrains Digit Number by Controlling Both Progenitor Proliferation and BMP-Dependent Exit to Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Rios, Javier; Speziale, Dario; Robay, Dimitri; Scotti, Martina; Osterwalder, Marco; Nusspaumer, Gretel; Galli, Antonella; Holländer, Georg A.; Kmita, Marie; Zeller, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Inactivation of Gli3, a key component of Hedgehog signaling in vertebrates, results in formation of additional digits (polydactyly) during limb bud development. The analysis of mouse embryos constitutively lacking Gli3 has revealed the essential GLI3 functions in specifying the anteroposterior (AP) limb axis and digit identities. We conditionally inactivated Gli3 during mouse hand plate development, which uncoupled the resulting preaxial polydactyly from known GLI3 functions in establishing AP and digit identities. Our analysis revealed that GLI3 directly restricts the expression of regulators of the G1–S cell-cycle transition such as Cdk6 and constrains S phase entry of digit progenitors in the anterior hand plate. Furthermore, GLI3 promotes the exit of proliferating progenitors toward BMP-dependent chondrogenic differentiation by spatiotemporally restricting and terminating the expression of the BMP antagonist Gremlin1. Thus, Gli3 is a negative regulator of the proliferative expansion of digit progenitors and acts as a gatekeeper for the exit to chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:22465667

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha control of lipid and glucose metabolism in human white adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ribet, Carole; Montastier, Emilie; Valle, Carine; Bezaire, Véronic; Mazzucotelli, Anne; Mairal, Aline; Viguerie, Nathalie; Langin, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    This work aimed at characterizing the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR)alpha in human white adipocyte metabolism and at comparing PPAR alpha and PPAR gamma actions in these cells. Primary cultures of human fat cells were treated with the PPAR alpha agonist GW7647 or the PPAR gamma agonist rosiglitazone. Changes in gene expression were determined using DNA microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR. Western blot and metabolic studies were performed to identify the biological effects elicited by PPAR agonist treatments. GW7647 induced an up-regulation of beta-oxidation gene expression and increased palmitate oxidation. Unexpectedly, glycolysis was strongly reduced at transcriptional and functional levels by GW7647 leading to a decrease in pyruvate and lactate production. Glucose oxidation was decreased. Triglyceride esterification and de novo lipogenesis were inhibited by the PPAR alpha agonist. GW7647-induced alterations were abolished by a treatment with a PPAR alpha antagonist. Small interfering RNA-mediated extinction of PPAR alpha gene expression in hMADS adipocytes attenuated GW7647 induction of palmitate oxidation. Rosiglitazone had no major impact on glycolysis and beta-oxidation. Altogether these results show that PPAR alpha can selectively up-regulate beta-oxidation and decrease glucose utilization in human white adipocytes. PMID:19887568

  10. DYRK1A controls the transition from proliferation to quiescence during lymphoid development by destabilizing Cyclin D3.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin J; Bhansali, Rahul; Diebold, Lauren; Cook, Daniel E; Stolzenburg, Lindsay; Casagrande, Anne-Sophie; Besson, Thierry; Leblond, Bertrand; Désiré, Laurent; Malinge, Sébastien; Crispino, John D

    2015-06-01

    Pre-B and pre-T lymphocytes must orchestrate a transition from a highly proliferative state to a quiescent one during development. Cyclin D3 is essential for these cells' proliferation, but little is known about its posttranslational regulation at this stage. Here, we show that the dual specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) restrains Cyclin D3 protein levels by phosphorylating T283 to induce its degradation. Loss of DYRK1A activity, via genetic inactivation or pharmacologic inhibition in mice, caused accumulation of Cyclin D3 protein, incomplete repression of E2F-mediated gene transcription, and failure to properly couple cell cycle exit with differentiation. Expression of a nonphosphorylatable Cyclin D3 T283A mutant recapitulated these defects, whereas inhibition of Cyclin D:CDK4/6 mitigated the effects of DYRK1A inhibition or loss. These data uncover a previously unknown role for DYRK1A in lymphopoiesis, and demonstrate how Cyclin D3 protein stability is negatively regulated during exit from the proliferative phases of B and T cell development. PMID:26008897

  11. Simvastatin Modulates Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zanette, Dalila Lucíola; Lorenzi, Julio Cesar Cetrulo; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Palma, Patricia Vianna Bonini; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Prata, Karen Lima; Silva, Wilson Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Statins are widely used hypocholesterolemic drugs that block the mevalonate pathway, responsible for the biosysnthesis of cholesterol. However, statins also have pleiotropic effects that interfere with several signaling pathways. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are a heterogeneous mixture of cells that can be isolated from a variety of tissues and are identified by the expression of a panel of surface markers and by their ability to differentiate in vitro into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC were isolated from amniotic membranes and bone marrows and characterized based on ISCT (International Society for Cell Therapy) minimal criteria. Simvastatin-treated cells and controls were directly assayed by CFSE (Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester) staining to assess their cell proliferation and their RNA was used for microarray analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR). These MSC were also evaluated for their ability to inhibit PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) proliferation. We show here that simvastatin negatively modulates MSC proliferation in a dose-dependent way and regulates the expression of proliferation-related genes. Importantly, we observed that simvastatin increased the percentage of a subset of smaller MSC, which also were actively proliferating. The association of MSC decreased size with increased pluripotency and the accumulating evidence that statins may prevent cellular senescence led us to hypothesize that simvastatin induces a smaller subpopulation that may have increased ability to maintain the entire pool of MSC and also to protect them from cellular senescence induced by long-term cultures/passages in vitro. These results may be important to better understand the pleiotropic effects of statins and its effects on the biology of cells with regenerative potential. PMID:25874574

  12. Tobacco Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Interacts with Ethylene Receptor Tobacco Histidine Kinase1 and Enhances Plant Growth through Promotion of Cell Proliferation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is an important phytohormone in the regulation of plant growth, development, and stress response throughout the lifecycle. Previously, we discovered that a subfamily II ethylene receptor tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Histidine Kinase1 (NTHK1) promotes seedling growth. Here, we identified an NTHK1-interacting protein translationally controlled tumor protein (NtTCTP) by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assay and further characterized its roles in plant growth. The interaction was further confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and the kinase domain of NTHK1 mediates the interaction with NtTCTP. The NtTCTP protein is induced by ethylene treatment and colocalizes with NTHK1 at the endoplasmic reticulum. Overexpression of NtTCTP or NTHK1 reduces plant response to ethylene and promotes seedling growth, mainly through acceleration of cell proliferation. Genetic analysis suggests that NtTCTP is required for the function of NTHK1. Furthermore, association of NtTCTP prevents NTHK1 from proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Our data suggest that plant growth inhibition triggered by ethylene is regulated by a unique feedback mechanism, in which ethylene-induced NtTCTP associates with and stabilizes ethylene receptor NTHK1 to reduce plant response to ethylene and promote plant growth through acceleration of cell proliferation. PMID:25941315

  13. Tobacco Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Interacts with Ethylene Receptor Tobacco Histidine Kinase1 and Enhances Plant Growth through Promotion of Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is an important phytohormone in the regulation of plant growth, development, and stress response throughout the lifecycle. Previously, we discovered that a subfamily II ethylene receptor tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Histidine Kinase1 (NTHK1) promotes seedling growth. Here, we identified an NTHK1-interacting protein translationally controlled tumor protein (NtTCTP) by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assay and further characterized its roles in plant growth. The interaction was further confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and the kinase domain of NTHK1 mediates the interaction with NtTCTP. The NtTCTP protein is induced by ethylene treatment and colocalizes with NTHK1 at the endoplasmic reticulum. Overexpression of NtTCTP or NTHK1 reduces plant response to ethylene and promotes seedling growth, mainly through acceleration of cell proliferation. Genetic analysis suggests that NtTCTP is required for the function of NTHK1. Furthermore, association of NtTCTP prevents NTHK1 from proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Our data suggest that plant growth inhibition triggered by ethylene is regulated by a unique feedback mechanism, in which ethylene-induced NtTCTP associates with and stabilizes ethylene receptor NTHK1 to reduce plant response to ethylene and promote plant growth through acceleration of cell proliferation.

  14. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP1) can regulate E2F1 transcription factor-mediated control of cyclin transcription.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Jessy; Berthelet, Jean; Marivin, Arthur; Gemble, Simon; Edmond, Valérie; Plenchette, Stéphanie; Lagrange, Brice; Hammann, Arlette; Dupoux, Alban; Delva, Laurent; Eymin, Béatrice; Solary, Eric; Dubrez, Laurence

    2011-07-29

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) is a potent regulator of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cytoplasm. However, in some primary cells and tumor cell lines, cIAP1 is expressed in the nucleus, and its nuclear function remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-terminal part of cIAP1 directly interacts with the DNA binding domain of the E2F1 transcription factor. cIAP1 dramatically increases the transcriptional activity of E2F1 on synthetic and CCNE promoters. This function is not conserved for cIAP2 and XIAP, which are cytoplasmic proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that cIAP1 is recruited on E2F binding sites of the CCNE and CCNA promoters in a cell cycle- and differentiation-dependent manner. cIAP1 silencing inhibits E2F1 DNA binding and E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of the CCNE gene. In cells that express a nuclear cIAP1 such as HeLa, THP1 cells and primary human mammary epithelial cells, down-regulation of cIAP1 inhibits cyclin E and A expression and cell proliferation. We conclude that one of the functions of cIAP1 when localized in the nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity.

  15. Electrohydrodynamic jet process for pore-structure-controlled 3D fibrous architecture as a tissue regenerative material: fabrication and cellular activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Seong; Kim, GeunHyung

    2014-07-22

    In this study, we propose a new scaffold fabrication method, "direct electro-hydrodynamic jet process," using the initial jet of an electrospinning process and ethanol media as a target. The fabricated three-dimensional (3D) fibrous structure was configured with multilayered microsized struts consisting of randomly entangled micro/nanofibrous architecture, similar to that of native extracellular matrixes. The fabrication of the structure was highly dependent on various processing parameters, such as the surface tension of the target media, and the flow rate and weight fraction of the polymer solution. As a tissue regenerative material, the 3D fibrous scaffold was cultured with preosteoblasts to observe the initial cellular activities in comparison with a solid-freeform fabricated 3D scaffold sharing a similar structural geometry. The cell-culture results showed that the newly developed scaffold provided outstanding microcellular environmental conditions to the seeded cells (about 3.5-fold better initial cell attachment and 2.1-fold better cell proliferation).

  16. Proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in a three- dimensional culture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S.; Hu, J.; Long, M.; Tao, Z.

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have multi-differentiation potential and retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in vitro, which in turn holds the promise of being able to repair or replace damaged cells or tissues. Since MSCs are rare in amount in vivo, abundant cells usually need be obtained in time in clinic. T herefore, proliferation and differentiation of MSCs in vitro are necessary and important for future applications. Most current studies o MSCs are focused on the cellular andn molecular biology using a two-dimension (2-D) static culture system at unit gravity. The gravity-induced 2D culture of MSCs could potentially not reflect cell-cell- contacts important for proliferation and differentiation of MSCs in vivo. Here we developed a method to proliferate MSCs by using the rotating three-dimensional (3- D) culture system, which can provide low shear, 3-D environment with simulated microgravity. MSCs from human bone marrow were prepared on microcarrier beads and then were seeded in the 3-D culture system. Various rotation conditions were tested to screen out the most suitable one for proliferation of MSCs. 2-D cultures were prepared in routine cell culture dishes as a control. All cultures were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Results were compared with microscopic and immunochemistrical techniques. The differentiation capacity of proliferated MSCs were also tested through induced differentiation experiments. It is found that simulated microgravity and three-dimensional culture condition is an active factor for proliferation of MSCs.

  17. The Fto Gene Regulates the Proliferation and Differentiation of Pre-Adipocytes in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Jingying; Lu, Lunjie; Xu, Jiaying; Qin, Liqiang

    2016-01-01

    The highly regulated differentiation and proliferation of pre-adipocytes play a key role in the initiation of obesity. Fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) is a novel gene strongly associated with the risk of obesity. A deficiency of FTO may cause growth retardation in addition to fat mass and adipocyte size reduction in vivo. To investigate the potential role of Fto gene on the proliferation and differentiation of pre-adipocytes, we generated Fto-knockdown and overexpressed 3T3-L1 cells. Using numerous proliferation assays our results suggest that Fto knockdown leads to suppression of proliferation, lower mitochondrial membrane potential, less cellular ATP, and decreased and smaller intracellular lipid droplets compared with controls (p < 0.05). Western blot analysis demonstrated that Fto knockdown can significantly suppress peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) expression and inhibit Akt phosphorylation. By contrast, overexpression of Fto had the opposing effect on proliferation, mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP generation, in vitro differentiation, Akt phosphorylation, and PPARγ and GLUT4 expression. Moreover, we demonstrated that Wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, could inhibit phospho-Akt in Fto overexpressed 3T3-L1 cells. Taken together, the results suggest that Fto regulates the proliferation and differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells via multiple mechanisms, including PPARγ and PI3K/Akt signaling. PMID:26907332

  18. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  19. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  20. Roles of cellular polyamines in mucosal healing in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gao, J-H; Guo, L-J; Huang, Z-Y; Rao, J N; Tang, C-W

    2013-12-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa is a rapidly self-renewing tissue in the body, and its integrity is preserved through the strict regulation of epithelial cell proliferation, growth arrest, and apoptosis. Polyamines are shown to play an important role in the regulation of gastrointestinal mucosal growth and healing after injury under physiological and various pathological conditions. In this review, we highlight the importance of cellular polyamines in the control GI mucosal proliferation, migration, apoptosis, angiogenesis and GI barrier function during mucosal repair after injury.

  1. Peroxiredoxins, oxidative stress, and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Immenschuh, Stephan; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2005-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a family of multifunctional antioxidant thioredoxin-dependent peroxidases that have been identified in a large variety of organisms. The major functions of Prxs comprise cellular protection against oxidative stress, modulation of intracellular signaling cascades that apply hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger molecule, and regulation of cell proliferation. In the present review, we discuss pertinent findings on the protein structure, the cell- and tissue-specific distribution, as well as the subcellular localization of Prxs. A particular emphasis is put on Prx I, which is the most abundant and ubiquitously distributed member of the mammalian Prxs. Major transcriptional and posttranslational regulatory mechanisms and signaling pathways that control Prx gene expression and activity are summarized. The interaction of Prx I with the oncogene products c-Abl and c-Myc and the regulatory role of Prx I for cell proliferation and apoptosis are highlighted. Recent findings on phenotypical alterations of mouse models with targeted disruptions of Prx genes are discussed, confirming the physiological functions of Prxs for antioxidant cell and tissue protection along with an important role as tumor suppressors.

  2. ERp57 as a novel cellular factor controlling prion protein biosynthesis: Therapeutic potential of protein disulfide isomerases.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Martin; Rozas, Pablo; Hetz, Claudio; Medinas, Danilo B

    2016-01-01

    Disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis is observed in Prion-related disorders (PrDs). The protein disulfide isomerase ERp57 is a stress-responsive ER chaperone up-regulated in the brain of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients. However, the actual role of ERp57 in prion protein (PrP) biogenesis and the ER stress response remained poorly defined. We have recently addressed this question using gain- and loss-of-function approaches in vitro and animal models, observing that ERp57 regulates steady-state levels of PrP. Our results revealed that ERp57 modulates the biosynthesis and maturation of PrP but, surprisingly, does not contribute to the global cellular reaction against ER stress in neurons. Here we discuss the relevance of ERp57 as a possible therapeutic target in PrDs and other protein misfolding disorders. PMID:26864548

  3. Tai Chi, Cellular Inflammation, and Transcriptome Dynamics in Breast Cancer Survivors With Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Witarama, Tuff; Carrillo, Carmen; Sadeghi, Nina; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Ma, Jeffrey; Nicassio, Perry; Ganz, Patricia A.; Bower, Julienne E.; Cole, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Background Mind–body therapies such as Tai Chi are widely used by breast cancer survivors, yet effects on inflammation are not known. This study hypothesized that Tai Chi Chih (TCC) would reduce systemic, cellular, and genomic markers of inflammation as compared with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Methods In this randomized trial for the treatment of insomnia, 90 breast cancer survivors with insomnia were assigned to TCC or CBT-I for 2-hour sessions weekly for 3 months. At baseline and postintervention, blood samples were obtained for measurement of C-reactive protein and toll-like receptor-4–activated monocyte production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), with a random subsample (n = 48) analyzed by genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Results Levels of C-reactive protein did not change in the TCC and CBT-I groups. Levels of toll-like receptor-4–activated monocyte production of IL-6 and TNF combined showed an overall reduction in TCC versus CBT-I (P < .02), with similar effects for IL-6 (P = .07) and TNF (P < .05) alone. For genome-wide transcriptional profiling of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells, expression of genes encoding proinflammatory mediators showed an overall reduction in TCC versus CBT-I (P = .001). TELiS promoter-based bioinformatics analyses implicated a reduction of activity of the proinflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB, in structuring these differences. Conclusions Among breast cancer survivors with insomnia, 3 months of TCC reduced cellular inflammatory responses, and reduced expression of genes encoding proinflammatory mediators. Given the link between inflammation and cancer, these findings provide an evidence-based molecular framework to understand the potential salutary effects of TCC on cancer survivorship. PMID:25749595

  4. Controlled Measurement and Comparative Analysis of Cellular Components in E. coli Reveals Broad Regulatory Changes in Response to Glucose Starvation

    PubMed Central

    Houser, John R.; Barnhart, Craig; Boutz, Daniel R.; Carroll, Sean M.; Dasgupta, Aurko; Michener, Joshua K.; Needham, Brittany D.; Papoulas, Ophelia; Sridhara, Viswanadham; Sydykova, Dariya K.; Marx, Christopher J.; Trent, M. Stephen; Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Marcotte, Edward M.; Wilke, Claus O.

    2015-01-01

    How do bacteria regulate their cellular physiology in response to starvation? Here, we present a detailed characterization of Escherichia coli growth and starvation over a time-course lasting two weeks. We have measured multiple cellular components, including RNA and proteins at deep genomic coverage, as well as lipid modifications and flux through central metabolism. Our study focuses on the physiological response of E. coli in stationary phase as a result of being starved for glucose, not on the genetic adaptation of E. coli to utilize alternative nutrients. In our analysis, we have taken advantage of the temporal correlations within and among RNA and protein abundances to identify systematic trends in gene regulation. Specifically, we have developed a general computational strategy for classifying expression-profile time courses into distinct categories in an unbiased manner. We have also developed, from dynamic models of gene expression, a framework to characterize protein degradation patterns based on the observed temporal relationships between mRNA and protein abundances. By comparing and contrasting our transcriptomic and proteomic data, we have identified several broad physiological trends in the E. coli starvation response. Strikingly, mRNAs are widely down-regulated in response to glucose starvation, presumably as a strategy for reducing new protein synthesis. By contrast, protein abundances display more varied responses. The abundances of many proteins involved in energy-intensive processes mirror the corresponding mRNA profiles while proteins involved in nutrient metabolism remain abundant even though their corresponding mRNAs are down-regulated. PMID:26275208

  5. Inositol trisphosphate, a novel second messenger in cellular signal transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berridge, Michael J.; Irvine, Robin F.

    1984-11-01

    There has recently been rapid progress in understanding receptors that generate intracellular signals from inositol lipids. One of these lipids, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, is hydrolysed to diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate as part of a signal transduction mechanism for controlling a variety of cellular processes including secretion, metabolism, phototransduction and cell proliferation. Diacylglycerol operates within the plane of the membrane to activate protein kinase C, whereas inositol trisphosphate is released into the cytoplasm to function as a second messenger for mobilizing intracellular calcium.

  6. Control of proliferation of human vascular endothelial cells. Characterization of the response of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and thrombin.

    PubMed

    Gospodarowicz, D; Brown, K D; Birdwell, C R; Zetter, B R

    1978-06-01

    Because the response of human endothelial cells to growth factors and conditioning agents has broad implications for our understanding of wound healing angiogenesis, and human atherogenesis, we have investigated the responses of these cells to the fibroblast (FGF) and epidermal growth factors (EGF), as well as to the protease thrombin, which has been previously shown to potentiate the growth response of other cell types of FGF and EGF. Because the vascular endothelial cells that form the inner lining of blood vessels may be expected to be exposed to high thrombin concentrations after trauma or in pathological states associated with thrombosis, they are of particular interest with respect to the physiological role of this protease in potentiating cell proliferation. Our results indicate that human vascular endothelial cells respond poorly to either FGF or thrombin alone. In contrast, when cells are maintained in the presence of thrombin, their proliferative response to FGF is greatly increased even in cultures seeded at a density as low as 3 cells/mm2. Human vascular endothelial cells also respond to EGF and thrombin, although their rate of proliferation is much slower than when maintained with FGF and thrombin. In contrast, bovine vascular endothelial cells derived from vascular territories as diverse as the bovine heart, aortic arch, and umbilical vein respond maximally to FGF alone and neither respond to nor bind EGF. Furthermore, the response of bovine vascular endothelial cells to FGF was not potentiated by thrombin, indicating that the set of factors controlling the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells could be species-dependent. The requirement of cultured human vascular endothelial cells for thrombin could explain why the human cells, in contrast to bovine endothelial cells, are so difficult to maintain in tissue culture. Our results demonstrate that by using FGF and thrombin one can develop cultures of human vascular endothelial cells capable of

  7. PTBP1 induces ADAR1 p110 isoform expression through IRES-like dependent translation control and influences cell proliferation in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Hu, Peishan; Lin, Xihua; Han, Wei; Zhu, Liyuan; Tan, Xiaochao; Ye, Fei; Wang, Guanzhou; Wu, Fan; Yin, Bin; Bao, Zhaoshi; Jiang, Tao; Yuan, Jiangang; Qiang, Boqin; Peng, Xiaozhong

    2015-11-01

    Internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation initiation is constitutively activated during stress conditions such as tumorigenesis and hypoxia. The RNA editing enzyme ADAR1 plays an important role in physiology and pathology. Initially, we found that the ADAR1 p150 or p110 transcript levels were decreased in glioma cells compared with normal astrocyte cells. In contrast, protein levels of ADAR1 p110 were significantly upregulated in glioma tissues and cells. This expression pattern indicated translationally controlled regulation. We identified an 885-nt sequence that was located between AUG1 and AUG2 within the ADAR1 mRNA that exhibited IRES-like activity. Furthermore, we confirmed that the translational mode of ADAR1 p110 was mediated by PTBP1 in glioma cells. The protein levels of PTBP1 and ADAR1 were cooperatively expressed in glioma tissues and cells. Knocking down ADAR1 p110 significantly decreased cell proliferation in three types of glioma cells (T98G, U87MG and A172). The removal of a minimal IRES-like sequence in a p150-overexpression construct could effectively abolish p110 induction and resulted in the slight suppression of cell proliferation compared with ADAR1-p150 overexpression in siPTBP1-treated T98G cells. In summary, our study revealed a mechanism whereby ADAR1 p110 can be activated by PTBP1 through an IRES-like element in glioma cells, and ADAR1 is essential for the maintenance of gliomagenesis. PMID:26047657

  8. The calcimimetic compound NPS R-568 suppresses parathyroid cell proliferation in rats with renal insufficiency. Control of parathyroid cell growth via a calcium receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, M; Furuya, Y; Sakiyama, J; Kobayashi, N; Miyata, S; Ishii, H; Nagano, N

    1997-01-01

    Parathyroid (PT) cell hyperplasia is a common consequence of chronic renal insufficiency (CRI). NPS R-568 is a phenylalkylamine compound that acts as an agonist (calcimimetic) at the cell surface calcium receptor (CaR). To test the hypothesis that the CaR plays a role in PT hyperplasia in CRI, we tested the effect of NPS R-568 on PT cell proliferation in rats with renal insufficiency. Rats were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy and then infused intraperitoneally with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label S-phase cells. Two groups of nephrectomized rats received NPS R-568 by gavage twice daily for 4 d (1.5 and 15 mg/kg body wt). On day 5, the number of BrdU-positive PT cells of vehicle-treated nephrectomized rats was 2.6-fold greater than that of the sham-operated control. Low and high doses of NPS R-568 reduced the number of BrdU-positive PT cells by 20 and 50%, respectively. No changes in staining, however, were observed in ileal epithelial cells (CaR-negative) or in thyroidal C-cells (CaR-positive). Furthermore, the effect of NPS R-568 could not be explained by changes in serum 1,25(OH)2D3 or phosphorus. These results indicate that NPS R-568 suppresses PT cell proliferation in rats with renal insufficiency, and lend support to the linkage between the CaR and PT hyperplasia in CRI. PMID:9399943

  9. Modulation of the Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome Using Computer-Controlled Bioreactors: Impact on Neuronal Cell Proliferation, Survival and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Fábio G.; Panchalingam, Krishna M.; Assunção-Silva, Rita; Serra, Sofia C.; Mendes-Pinheiro, Bárbara; Patrício, Patrícia; Jung, Sunghoon; Anjo, Sandra I.; Manadas, Bruno; Pinto, Luísa; Sousa, Nuno; Behie, Leo A.; Salgado, António J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has been shown that the therapeutic benefits of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) in the Central Nervous System (CNS) are mainly attributed to their secretome. The implementation of computer-controlled suspension bioreactors has shown to be a viable route for the expansion of these cells to large numbers. As hMSCs actively respond to their culture environment, there is the hypothesis that one can modulate its secretome through their use. Herein, we present data indicating that the use of computer-controlled suspension bioreactors enhanced the neuroregulatory profile of hMSCs secretome. Indeed, higher levels of in vitro neuronal differentiation and NOTCH1 expression in human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) were observed when these cells were incubated with the secretome of dynamically cultured hMSCs. A similar trend was also observed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of rat brains where, upon injection, an enhanced neuronal and astrocytic survival and differentiation, was observed. Proteomic analysis also revealed that the dynamic culturing of hMSCs increased the secretion of several neuroregulatory molecules and miRNAs present in hMSCs secretome. In summary, the appropriate use of dynamic culture conditions can represent an important asset for the development of future neuro-regenerative strategies involving the use of hMSCs secretome. PMID:27301770

  10. Modulation of the Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome Using Computer-Controlled Bioreactors: Impact on Neuronal Cell Proliferation, Survival and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Fábio G; Panchalingam, Krishna M; Assunção-Silva, Rita; Serra, Sofia C; Mendes-Pinheiro, Bárbara; Patrício, Patrícia; Jung, Sunghoon; Anjo, Sandra I; Manadas, Bruno; Pinto, Luísa; Sousa, Nuno; Behie, Leo A; Salgado, António J

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has been shown that the therapeutic benefits of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) in the Central Nervous System (CNS) are mainly attributed to their secretome. The implementation of computer-controlled suspension bioreactors has shown to be a viable route for the expansion of these cells to large numbers. As hMSCs actively respond to their culture environment, there is the hypothesis that one can modulate its secretome through their use. Herein, we present data indicating that the use of computer-controlled suspension bioreactors enhanced the neuroregulatory profile of hMSCs secretome. Indeed, higher levels of in vitro neuronal differentiation and NOTCH1 expression in human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) were observed when these cells were incubated with the secretome of dynamically cultured hMSCs. A similar trend was also observed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of rat brains where, upon injection, an enhanced neuronal and astrocytic survival and differentiation, was observed. Proteomic analysis also revealed that the dynamic culturing of hMSCs increased the secretion of several neuroregulatory molecules and miRNAs present in hMSCs secretome. In summary, the appropriate use of dynamic culture conditions can represent an important asset for the development of future neuro-regenerative strategies involving the use of hMSCs secretome. PMID:27301770

  11. ERα-XPO1 Cross Talk Controls Tamoxifen Sensitivity in Tumors by Altering ERK5 Cellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Kinga; Zhao, Yiru Chen; Kulkoyluoglu, Eylem; Chen, Karen Lee Ann; Hieronymi, Kadriye; Holloway, Jamie; Li, Sarah; Ray, Tania; Ray, Partha Sarathi; Landesman, Yosef; Lipka, Alexander Edward; Smith, Rebecca Lee

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancer deaths occur in women with recurrent, estrogen receptor (ER)-α(+), metastatic tumors. There is a critical need for therapeutic approaches that include novel, targetable mechanism-based strategies by which ERα (+) tumors can be resensitized to endocrine therapies. The objective of this study was to validate a group of nuclear transport genes as potential biomarkers to predict the risk of endocrine therapy failure and to evaluate the inhibition of XPO1, one of these genes as a novel means to enhance the effectiveness of endocrine therapies. Using advanced statistical methods, we found that expression levels of several of nuclear transport genes including XPO1 were associated with poor survival and predicted recurrence of tamoxifen-treated breast tumors in human breast cancer gene expression data sets. In mechanistic studies we showed that the expression of XPO1 determined the cellular localization of the key signaling proteins and the response to tamoxifen. We demonstrated that combined targeting of XPO1 and ERα in several tamoxifen-resistant cell lines and tumor xenografts with the XPO1 inhibitor, Selinexor, and tamoxifen restored tamoxifen sensitivity and prevented recurrence in vivo. The nuclear transport pathways have not previously been implicated in the development of endocrine resistance, and given the need for better strategies for selecting patients to receive endocrine modulatory reagents and improving therapy response of relapsed ERα(+) tumors, our findings show great promise for uncovering the role these pathways play in reducing cancer recurrences. PMID:27533791

  12. Preliminary study on forming microbubble-surrounded cells as carriers for cellular therapy and evaluation of ultrasound controllability by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demachi, Fumi; Murayama, Yuta; Hosaka, Naoto; Mochizuki, Takashi; Masuda, Kohji; Enosawa, Shin; Chiba, Toshio; Oda, Yusuke; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    Although various cellular immune therapies have been proposed and developed, because the therapeutic cells disperse upon injection into blood flow, there is a limitation on the accumulation of the cells to the target area. We previously reported our attempts to actively control microbubbles in artificial blood vessels, and here we propose a new method of carrying therapeutic cells for cellular therapy using microbubbles and ultrasound. When microbubbles and their aggregations attach to the surface of therapeutic cells, the acoustic force needed to propel the cells is increased because of the size expansion and the boundary in acoustic impedance on the cell surface. We fabricated a cylindrical chamber including two ultrasound transducers to emit a suspension of microbubbles (TF-BLs, transferrin-bubble liposomes) on the cells (Colon-26) to enhance the adhesion of microbubbles on the cells. We found that the optimum conditions for producing BL-surrounded cells were a sound pressure of 100 kPa-pp, an exposure time of 30 s, and a TF-BL concentration of 0.33 mg lipid/mL, when the cell concentration was constant at 0.77 × 105/mL in phosphate-buffered saline. Using these BL-surrounded cells, we confirmed the controllability of the cells under ultrasound exposure, where the displacement increased in proportion to the sound pressure and was not confirmed with the original cells.

  13. Optical control of biological processes by light-switchable proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Linlin Z.; Lin, Michael Z.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, or migration depend on precise spatiotemporal coordination of protein activities. Correspondingly, reaching a quantitative understanding of cellular behavior requires experimental approaches that enable spatial and temporal modulation of protein activity. Recently, a variety of light-sensitive protein domains have been engineered as optogenetic actuators to spatiotemporally control protein activity. In the present review, we discuss the principle of these optical control methods and examples of their applications in modulating signalling pathways. By controlling protein activity with spatiotemporal specificity, tunable dynamics, and quantitative control, light-controllable proteins promise to accelerate our understanding of cellular and organismal biology. PMID:25858669

  14. Blood cell gene expression associated with cellular stress defense is modulated by antioxidant-rich food in a randomised controlled clinical trial of male smokers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant-based diets rich in fruit and vegetables can prevent development of several chronic age-related diseases. However, the mechanisms behind this protective effect are not elucidated. We have tested the hypothesis that intake of antioxidant-rich foods can affect groups of genes associated with cellular stress defence in human blood cells. Trial registration number: NCT00520819 http://clinicaltrials.gov. Methods In an 8-week dietary intervention study, 102 healthy male smokers were randomised to either a diet rich in various antioxidant-rich foods, a kiwifruit diet (three kiwifruits/d added to the regular diet) or a control group. Blood cell gene expression profiles were obtained from 10 randomly selected individuals of each group. Diet-induced changes on gene expression were compared to controls using a novel application of the gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on transcription profiles obtained using Affymetrix HG-U133-Plus 2.0 whole genome arrays. Results Changes were observed in the blood cell gene expression profiles in both intervention groups when compared to the control group. Groups of genes involved in regulation of cellular stress defence, such as DNA repair, apoptosis and hypoxia, were significantly upregulated (GSEA, FDR q-values < 5%) by both diets compared to the control group. Genes with common regulatory motifs for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and AhR nuclear translocator (AhR/ARNT) were upregulated by both interventions (FDR q-values < 5%). Plasma antioxidant biomarkers (polyphenols/carotenoids) increased in both groups. Conclusions The observed changes in the blood cell gene expression profiles suggest that the beneficial effects of a plant-based diet on human health may be mediated through optimization of defence processes. PMID:20846424

  15. Proliferation/Quiescence: When to start? Where to stop? What to stock?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The cell cycle is a tightly controlled series of events that ultimately lead to cell division. The literature deciphering the molecular processes involved in regulating the consecutive cell cycle steps is colossal. By contrast, much less is known about non-dividing cellular states, even if they concern the vast majority of cells, from prokaryotes to multi-cellular organisms. Indeed, cells decide to enter the division cycle only if conditions are favourable. Otherwise they may enter quiescence, a reversible non-dividing cellular state. Recent studies in yeast have shed new light on the transition between proliferation and quiescence, re-questioning the notion of cell cycle commitment. They also indicate a predominant role for cellular metabolic status as a major regulator of quiescence establishment and exit. Additionally, a growing body of evidence indicates that environmental conditions, and notably the availability of various nutrients, by impinging on specific metabolic routes, directly regulate specific cellular re-organization that occurs upon proliferation/quiescence transitions. PMID:22152110

  16. Endothelial Cellular Responses to Biodegradable Metal Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable zinc (Zn) metals, a new generation of biomaterials, have attracted much attention due to their excellent biodegradability, bioabsorbability, and adaptability to tissue regeneration. Compared with magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe), Zn exhibits better corrosion and mechanical behaviors in orthopedic and stent applications. After implantation, Zn containing material will slowly degrade, and Zn ions (Zn2+) will be released to the surrounding tissue. For stent applications, the local Zn2+concentration near endothelial tissue/cells could be high. However, it is unclear how endothelia will respond to such high concentrations of Zn2+, which is pivotal to vascular remodeling and regeneration. Here, we evaluated the short-term cellular behaviors of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCECs) exposed to a concentration gradient (0−140 μM) of extracellular Zn2+. Zn2+ had an interesting biphasic effect on cell viability, proliferation, spreading, and migration. Generally, low concentrations of Zn2+ promoted viability, proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while high concentrations of Zn2+ had opposite effects. For gene expression profiles, the most affected functional genes were related to cell adhesion, cell injury, cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, vessel tone, and coagulation. These results provide helpful information and guidance for Zn-based alloy design as well as the controlled release of Zn2+in stent and other related medical applications. PMID:27689136

  17. Endothelial Cellular Responses to Biodegradable Metal Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable zinc (Zn) metals, a new generation of biomaterials, have attracted much attention due to their excellent biodegradability, bioabsorbability, and adaptability to tissue regeneration. Compared with magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe), Zn exhibits better corrosion and mechanical behaviors in orthopedic and stent applications. After implantation, Zn containing material will slowly degrade, and Zn ions (Zn2+) will be released to the surrounding tissue. For stent applications, the local Zn2+concentration near endothelial tissue/cells could be high. However, it is unclear how endothelia will respond to such high concentrations of Zn2+, which is pivotal to vascular remodeling and regeneration. Here, we evaluated the short-term cellular behaviors of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCECs) exposed to a concentration gradient (0−140 μM) of extracellular Zn2+. Zn2+ had an interesting biphasic effect on cell viability, proliferation, spreading, and migration. Generally, low concentrations of Zn2+ promoted viability, proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while high concentrations of Zn2+ had opposite effects. For gene expression profiles, the most affected functional genes were related to cell adhesion, cell injury, cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, vessel tone, and coagulation. These results provide helpful information and guidance for Zn-based alloy design as well as the controlled release of Zn2+in stent and other related medical applications.

  18. Myosin II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in three dimensions by minimizing cell-surface curvature.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert S; Myers, Kenneth A; Desai, Ravi A; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S; Adelstein, Robert S; Waterman, Clare M; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-02-01

    In many cases, cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We used endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell-surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell-surface curvature. Using microfabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between regulation of myosin II by curvature and control of curvature by myosin II drives cycles of localized cortical myosin II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration.

  19. Cell proliferation is reduced in the hippocampus in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Katherine M; Fung, Samantha J; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The molecular and cellular basis of structural and functional abnormalities of the hippocampus found in schizophrenia is currently unclear. Postnatal neurogenesis contributes to hippocampal function in animal models and is correlated with hippocampal volume in primates. Reduced hippocampal cell proliferation has been previously reported in schizophrenia, which may contribute to hippocampal dysfunction. Method: We measured the cell proliferation marker, Ki67, in post-mortem hippocampal tissue from patients with schizophrenia (n = 10) and matched controls (n = 16). Ki67-labelled cells were counted within the dentate gyrus and hilus on sections taken from the anterior hippocampus. Results: We replicated the finding of a significant reduction in Ki67+ cells/mm2 in schizophrenia cases compared to controls (t24 = 2.1, p = 0.023). In our relatively small sample, we did not find a relationship between Ki67+ cells and age overall, or between Ki67 + cells and duration of illness or antipsychotic treatment in people with schizophrenia. Conclusion: Our results confirm that reduced hippocampal cell proliferation may be present in schizophrenia. Restoring hippocampal neurogenesis may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:26113745

  20. An essential developmental function for murine phosphoglycolate phosphatase in safeguarding cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Segerer, Gabriela; Hadamek, Kerstin; Zundler, Matthias; Fekete, Agnes; Seifried, Annegrit; Mueller, Martin J.; Koentgen, Frank; Gessler, Manfred; Jeanclos, Elisabeth; Gohla, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PGP) is thought to target phosphoglycolate, a 2-deoxyribose fragment derived from the repair of oxidative DNA lesions. However, the physiological role of this activity and the biological function of the DNA damage product phosphoglycolate is unknown. We now show that knockin replacement of murine Pgp with its phosphatase-inactive PgpD34N mutant is embryonically lethal due to intrauterine growth arrest and developmental delay in midgestation. PGP inactivation attenuated triosephosphate isomerase activity, increased triglyceride levels at the expense of the cellular phosphatidylcholine content, and inhibited cell proliferation. These effects were prevented under hypoxic conditions or by blocking phosphoglycolate release from damaged DNA. Thus, PGP is essential to sustain cell proliferation in the presence of oxygen. Collectively, our findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism coupling a DNA damage repair product to the control of intermediary metabolism and cell proliferation. PMID:27731369

  1. SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is involved in a wide array of cellular processes, including glucose homeostasis, energy metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis, and immune response. However, it is un...

  2. Light-controlled cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of nucleic acid-binding agents. Studies in vitro and in zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Penas, Cristina; Sánchez, Mateo I.; Guerra-Varela, Jorge; Sanchez-Piñón, Laura; Vázquez, M. Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    We have synthesized oligoarginine conjugates of selected DNA-binding agents (a bisbenzamidine, acridine and thiazole orange) and demonstrated that the DNA binding and cell internalization properties of such conjugates can be inhibited by appending a negatively charged oligoglutamic tail through a photolabile linker. Irradiation with UV light releases the parent octaarginine conjugates, thus restoring their cell internalization and biological activity. Preliminary assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrates the potential of this prodrug strategy for controlling in vivo cytotoxicity. PMID:26534774

  3. Myosin-II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in 3D by minimizing cell surface curvature

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert A.; Myers, Kenneth A.; Desai, Ravi A.; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S.; Adelstein, Robert; Waterman, Clare M.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2014-01-01

    In many cases cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We utilized endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin-II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin-II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell surface curvature. Utilizing micro-fabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin-II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between myosin-II regulation by and control of curvature drives cycles of localized cortical myosin-II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration. PMID:25621949

  4. Enhanced delivery of daidzein into fibroblasts and neuronal cells with cationic derivatives of gamma-cyclodextrin for the control of cellular glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, Kamil; Kujdowicz, Monika; Kajta, Małgorzata; Nowakowska, Maria; Szczubiałka, Krzysztof

    2015-04-01

    Two cationic derivatives of γ-cyclodextrin (GCD) were synthesized by functionalization with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride (GTMAC) and ethylenediamine (EDA). Both these derivatives (GCD-GTMAC and GCD-EDA) have been shown to interact strongly with anionic biopolymers, unfractionated heparin (UFH) and mucin, the latter showing their mucoadhesive properties. They form inclusion complexes with daidzein (DAI), an isoflavone displaying a multitude of physiological effects, much more efficiently than the unmodified GCD. It was also shown that the complexes of these GCD derivatives with DAI and Nile Red penetrate human fibroblasts and murine hippocampal neuronal cells indicating that cationic GCD derivatives can be considered as potential delivery systems for isoflavones and other poorly water soluble compounds. Moreover, it was found that DAI delivered in cationic GCD complexes decreased the level of the cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in normal fibroblasts suggesting their possible application in the control of GAGs in mucopolysaccharidoses, lysosomal storage diseases caused by pathological accumulation of GAGs in the cells.

  5. Thermoresponsive Polymer Micropatterns Fabricated by Dip-Pen Nanolithography for a Highly Controllable Substrate with Potential Cellular Applications.

    PubMed

    Laing, Stacey; Suriano, Raffaella; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Smith, Carol-Anne; Dalby, Matthew J; Mabbott, Samuel; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2016-09-21

    We report a novel approach for patterning thermoresponsive hydrogels based on N,N-diethylacrylamide (DEAAm) and bifunctional Jeffamine ED-600 by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The direct writing of micron-sized thermoresponsive polymer spots was achieved with efficient control over feature size. A Jeffamine-based ink prepared through the combination of organic polymers, such as DEAAm, in an inorganic silica network was used to print thermosensitive arrays on a thiol-silanized silicon oxide substrate. The use of a Jeffamine hydrogel, acting as a carrier matrix, allowed a reduction in the evaporation of ink molecules with high volatility, such as DEAAm, and facilitated the transfer of ink from tip to substrate. The thermoresponsive behavior of polymer arrays which swell/deswell in aqueous solution in response to a change in temperature was successfully characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy: a thermally induced change in height and hydration state was observed, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate that cells can adhere to and interact with these dynamic features and exhibit a change in behavior when cultured on the substrates above and below the transition temperature of the Jeffamine/DEAAm thermoresponsive hydrogels. This demonstrates the potential of these micropatterned hydrogels to act as a controllable surface for cell growth.

  6. Thermoresponsive Polymer Micropatterns Fabricated by Dip-Pen Nanolithography for a Highly Controllable Substrate with Potential Cellular Applications.

    PubMed

    Laing, Stacey; Suriano, Raffaella; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Smith, Carol-Anne; Dalby, Matthew J; Mabbott, Samuel; Faulds, Karen; Graham, Duncan

    2016-09-21

    We report a novel approach for patterning thermoresponsive hydrogels based on N,N-diethylacrylamide (DEAAm) and bifunctional Jeffamine ED-600 by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The direct writing of micron-sized thermoresponsive polymer spots was achieved with efficient control over feature size. A Jeffamine-based ink prepared through the combination of organic polymers, such as DEAAm, in an inorganic silica network was used to print thermosensitive arrays on a thiol-silanized silicon oxide substrate. The use of a Jeffamine hydrogel, acting as a carrier matrix, allowed a reduction in the evaporation of ink molecules with high volatility, such as DEAAm, and facilitated the transfer of ink from tip to substrate. The thermoresponsive behavior of polymer arrays which swell/deswell in aqueous solution in response to a change in temperature was successfully characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy: a thermally induced change in height and hydration state was observed, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate that cells can adhere to and interact with these dynamic features and exhibit a change in behavior when cultured on the substrates above and below the transition temperature of the Jeffamine/DEAAm thermoresponsive hydrogels. This demonstrates the potential of these micropatterned hydrogels to act as a controllable surface for cell growth. PMID:27572916

  7. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conference’s failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  8. Cellular responses to a prolonged delay in mitosis are determined by a DNA damage response controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Colin, Didier J; Hain, Karolina O; Allan, Lindsey A; Clarke, Paul R

    2015-03-01

    Anti-cancer drugs that disrupt mitosis inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, although the mechanisms of these responses are poorly understood. Here, we characterize a mitotic stress response that determines cell fate in response to microtubule poisons. We show that mitotic arrest induced by these drugs produces a temporally controlled DNA damage response (DDR) characterized by the caspase-dependent formation of γH2AX foci in non-apoptotic cells. Following exit from a delayed mitosis, this initial response results in activation of DDR protein kinases, phosphorylation of the tumour suppressor p53 and a delay in subsequent cell cycle progression. We show that this response is controlled by Mcl-1, a regulator of caspase activation that becomes degraded during mitotic arrest. Chemical inhibition of Mcl-1 and the related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL by a BH3 mimetic enhances the mitotic DDR, promotes p53 activation and inhibits subsequent cell cycle progression. We also show that inhibitors of DDR protein kinases as well as BH3 mimetics promote apoptosis synergistically with taxol (paclitaxel) in a variety of cancer cell lines. Our work demonstrates the role of mitotic DNA damage responses in determining cell fate in response to microtubule poisons and BH3 mimetics, providing a rationale for anti-cancer combination chemotherapies.

  9. Effect of nucleosides and a nucleotide mixture on proliferation of human gastric cancer cells (KATO III).

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Usami, M; Yasuda, I; Kasahara, H; Kotani, G; Cao, Y; Zheng, J; Iso, A; Kanamaru, T; Ohyanagi, H

    1994-04-01

    The effect of the nucleotides and a nucleotide mixture (OG-VI), consisting of inosine, guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP), cytidine, uridine, thymidine (TdR) (4:4:4:3:1 in molar ratio), and TdR co-administration on proliferation of KATO III human gastric cancer cells in culture was evaluated. Consumption of purine and pyrimidine by cancer cells and changes in cell number with OG-VI or TdR were compared with the control culture medium (Williams E) after 72 hour-culture. Addition of OG-VI or TdR did not enhance the cellular proliferation, but inhibited growth when given in higher concentrations (0.3-3 mM inosine, 0.3-3 mM 5'-GMP, 0.22-2.2 mM uridine, 74-740 microM TdR). Consumption rate of TdR in the medium was less in the TdR group, 33.7%, than in the OG-VI group, 72.2% (p < 0.05). This suggests that TdR metabolism is modulated by other nucleosides and nucleotide included in OG-VI. Under the coadministration of 5-fluorouracil (FUra), addition of OG-VI or TdR suppressed cellular proliferation (p < 0.05). The inhibition rate of cellular proliferation in the OG-VI group was slightly higher than the TdR group, but there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The combination of FUra with OG-VI or TdR enhances the antitumor effect of FUra. It is concluded that the OG-VI does not enhance the tumor cell proliferation and it is a potential biochemical modulator of FUra metabolism in human cancer cells. PMID:7823535

  10. Dissection of signals controlling T cell function and activation: H7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, blocks induction of primary T cell proliferation by suppressing interleukin (IL)2 receptor expression without affecting IL2 production.

    PubMed

    Hengel, H; Allig, B; Wagner, H; Heeg, K

    1991-07-01

    T cell activation induced via cross-linking of the T cell receptor (TcR) stimulates hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol to the second messengers diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). DAG is necessary for the activation and function of protein kinase C (PKC) which is suggested to play a key role in the cascade of signal transduction when translocated from the cytosol to the cell membrane. In this report, we investigated responses of resting vs. activated Ly-2+ and L3T4+ T lymphocytes in the presence of the PKC inhibitor H7 [1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine]. H7 inhibited the induction of primary T cell proliferation, while interleukin 2 (IL 2) production was fully retained. The effect of the PKC inhibitor on primary T cells depended on the type of ligand interacting with the TcR: increasing doses of concanavalin A or of immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb), but not of anti-V beta 8 or of anti-TcR alpha/beta mAb, partly overcame the blockade, indicating a differential signaling compared to the former stimuli. The blockade of T cell proliferation by H7 was not due to an inhibition of PKC translocation, but occurred even 4-8 h after T cell induction and correlated with a significant reduction of IL 2 receptor (IL 2R) expression. In contrast, the mRNA levels of IL 2R and the cellular proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-myc were not affected. On activated T cells, H7 neither blocked proliferation nor IL2R expression. Consequently, H7 dissects the signal resulting in T cell proliferation from those governing the triggering of other T cell functions, i.e. IL 2 production, during primary responses of Ly-2+ or L3T4+ murine T lymphocytes.

  11. Evolutionary conservation of mechanisms for neural regionalization, proliferation and interconnection in brain development

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    Comparative studies of brain development in vertebrate and invertebrate model systems demonstrate remarkable similarities in expression and action of developmental control genes during embryonic patterning, neural proliferation and circuit formation in the brain. Thus, comparable sets of developmental control genes are involved in specifying the early brain primordium as well as in regionalized patterning along its anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes. Furthermore, similar cellular and molecular mechanisms underlie the formation and proliferation of neural stem cell-like progenitors that generate the neurons in the central nervous systems. Finally, neural identity and some complex circuit interconnections in specific brain domains appear to be comparable in vertebrates and invertebrates and may depend on similar developmental control genes. PMID:18755655

  12. Calcium and adenosine triphosphate control of cellular pathology: asparaginase-induced pancreatitis elicited via protease-activated receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shuang; Gerasimenko, Julia V.; Tsugorka, Tatiana; Gryshchenko, Oleksiy; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Gerasimenko, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Exocytotic secretion of digestive enzymes from pancreatic acinar cells is elicited by physiological cytosolic Ca2+ signals, occurring as repetitive short-lasting spikes largely confined to the secretory granule region, that stimulate mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. By contrast, sustained global cytosolic Ca2+ elevations decrease ATP levels and cause necrosis, leading to the disease acute pancreatitis (AP). Toxic Ca2+ signals can be evoked by products of alcohol and fatty acids as well as bile acids. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which l-asparaginase evokes AP. Asparaginase is an essential element in the successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, the most common type of cancer affecting children, but AP is a side-effect occurring in about 5–10% of cases. Like other pancreatitis-inducing agents, asparaginase evoked intracellular Ca2+ release followed by Ca2+ entry and also substantially reduced Ca2+ extrusion because of decreased intracellular ATP levels. The toxic Ca2+ signals caused extensive necrosis. The asparaginase-induced pathology depended on protease-activated receptor 2 and its inhibition prevented the toxic Ca2+ signals and necrosis. We tested the effects of inhibiting the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ entry by the Ca2+ channel inhibitor GSK-7975A. This markedly reduced asparaginase-induced Ca2+ entry and also protected effectively against the development of necrosis. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377732

  13. Propoxylation of cationic polymers provides a novel approach to controllable modulation of their cellular toxicity and interaction with nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Vesta D; Salakhieva, Diana V; Yergeshov, Abdulla A; Badeev, Yuriy V; Shtyrlin, Yurii G; Abdullin, Timur I

    2016-12-01

    An effective chemical approach to modulation of biological interactions of cationic polymers was proposed and tested using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a drug carrier. Branched 25kDa PEI was modified in the reaction with propylene oxide (PO) to produce a series of propoxylated PEIs with NH groups grafted by single or oligomer PO units. Clear relationships between the propoxylation degree and biological effects, such as interaction with plasmid DNA, hemolytic, cytotoxic, and pro-apoptotic activities were revealed for PEIs modified upon PO/NH molar ratio of 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 3.0. The partial modification of available cationic centers up to 100% is predominantly accompanied by a significant gradual reduction in polycation adverse effects, while ability of complex formation with plasmid DNA is being preserved. Grafted PEI with 0.75 PO/NH ratio provides better protection from nuclease degradation and transfection activity compared with other modified PEIs. Revealed relationships contribute to the development of safe polymeric systems with controllable physicochemical properties and biological interactions.

  14. On the Process of Cellular Division in Escherichia coli: Replication of the Bacterial Chromosome Under Control of Prophage P2*

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Gunnar; Hirota, Yukinori; Jacob, François

    1971-01-01

    The temperature-sensitive mutant CRT46 of Escherichia coli K12 is unable to initiate new rounds of DNA replication at 42°C. Mutants of bacteriophage P2 have been isolated, which, in the prophage state, allow mutant CRT46 to grow at 42°C. The lysogenic bacteria that grow at 42°C are apparently replicating under the control of prophage P2, which substitutes for the bacterial initiation system. The ability of prophage P2 cause this suppression phenomenon depends on the position of the prophage on the bacterial chromosome. Those lysogenic strains that are able to grow at 42°C all carry the prophage close to metE. The P2 mutants that allow CRT46 to grow at 42°C have insertions in the early region of the P2 genome. The suppression requires the cis-acting protein formed by gene A of P2. Images PMID:4944622

  15. Finite element analysis and cellular studies on advanced, controlled porous structures with subsurface continuity in bio-implantable titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Lambert, P; Ankem, S; Wyatt, Z; Ferlin, K M; Fisher, J

    2014-01-01

    Highly-porous metallic implant onlay materials (specifically those containing surface pores that intersect beneath the onlay surface) have been investigated recently for their potential to reduce bone resorption and to improve the overall stability of the implant. In the current study, sub-surface interconnectivity of high-aspect-ratio pores was created directly in the substrate of an implant material using wire electrical discharge machining (EDM). This technique was used to produce intersecting pores with diameters of 180-250 μm on a clinically relevant implant material—commercially pure (CP) Grade 4 Ti—with a very high degree of control over pore morphology. These pores resulted in no significant microstructural modification to the surrounding Ti, and the inner pore surfaces could be thermally oxidized to produce a microrough, bioactive TiO2 layer. Finite element analysis of Ti models containing these EDM-attainable intersecting pore geometries suggested they produce higher bone/implant interface strengths and lower susceptibility to stress shielding of the surrounding bone as compared with models containing simpler surface geometries. In vitro experiments using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) demonstrated mineralized tissue ingrowth of ∼ 300 μm into EDM-produced pores. This amount of ingrowth is expected to allow for full interlocking of mineralized tissue and implant given the proper pore structure design.

  16. Propoxylation of cationic polymers provides a novel approach to controllable modulation of their cellular toxicity and interaction with nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Vesta D; Salakhieva, Diana V; Yergeshov, Abdulla A; Badeev, Yuriy V; Shtyrlin, Yurii G; Abdullin, Timur I

    2016-12-01

    An effective chemical approach to modulation of biological interactions of cationic polymers was proposed and tested using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a drug carrier. Branched 25kDa PEI was modified in the reaction with propylene oxide (PO) to produce a series of propoxylated PEIs with NH groups grafted by single or oligomer PO units. Clear relationships between the propoxylation degree and biological effects, such as interaction with plasmid DNA, hemolytic, cytotoxic, and pro-apoptotic activities were revealed for PEIs modified upon PO/NH molar ratio of 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 3.0. The partial modification of available cationic centers up to 100% is predominantly accompanied by a significant gradual reduction in polycation adverse effects, while ability of complex formation with plasmid DNA is being preserved. Grafted PEI with 0.75 PO/NH ratio provides better protection from nuclease degradation and transfection activity compared with other modified PEIs. Revealed relationships contribute to the development of safe polymeric systems with controllable physicochemical properties and biological interactions. PMID:27612689

  17. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    PubMed

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  18. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  19. High content screening for non-classical peroxisome proliferators

    PubMed Central

    Sexton, Jonathan Z; He, Qingping; Forsberg, Lawrence J; Brenman, Jay E

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous cellular organelles that perform vital functions including fatty acid beta-oxidation, plasmalogen synthesis, and detoxification of harmful oxidative species. In rodents numerous compounds that increase peroxisome biogenesis also alleviate metabolic syndrome (MetS)/type 2 diabetes (T2D) symptoms. However, compounds that increase peroxisome biogenesis in rodents largely do not increase peroxisome biogenesis in humans. We designed a novel genetically encoded high throughput screening (HTS) high content assay to identify small molecule compounds that function as peroxisome proliferators in human cells. From this assay we have confirmed that 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), a PPAR independent peroxisome proliferator and chemical chaperone, increases peroxisome proliferation in human cells and serves as a positive control for our screen. We performed a small pilot and larger 15,000 compound production screen with an overall Z′ factor of 0.74 for 384-well plate format, providing a valuable screening tool for identifying peroxisome modulator compounds. From this screen we have identified 4 existing drugs and 10 novel compounds, some with common scaffolds 1000X more potent than PBA. It is hoped that these novel compounds may serve as scaffolds for testing for efficacy in alleviating MetS/T2D symptoms both in mouse models and ultimately human disease. PMID:21132080

  20. Director`s series on proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.C.; Price, M.E.

    1995-11-17

    This is an occasional publication of essays on the topics of nuclear, chemical, biological, and missile proliferation. The views represented are those of the author`s. Essay topics include: Nuclear Proliferation: Myth and Reality; Problems of Enforcing Compliance with Arms Control Agreements; The Unreliability of the Russian Officer Corps: Reluctant Domestic Warriors; and Russia`s Nuclear Legacy.

  1. [Stimulation of proliferation by carnosine: cellular and transcriptome approaches].

    PubMed

    Vishniakova, Kh S; Babizhaev, M A; Aliper, A M; Buzdin, A A; Kudriavtseva, A V; Egorov, E E

    2014-01-01

    Concentration of endogenous dipeptide carnosine in human muscle tissue reaches tens of millimoles. For more than 100 years of research, a lot of data concerning carnosine functions were accumulated, among which anti-aging effects are regarded most important. Heire, effect of carnosine in cell cultures was studied. It has been found that apart from the known action--an increase of the Hayflick limit and morphological rejuvenation--carnosine stimulates cell division in colony-forming assays and in the course of transition of cells to the quiescent state. The analysis of the transcriptome showed that carnosine-induced changes are mainly related to positive regulation of the cell cycle at all levels, from the onset of the DNA synthesis to chromosome condensation. One can suppose that the revealed stimulation of the cell cycle account for the carnosine-induced rejuvenation processes and a high concentration ofcarnosine in muscle tissue is required for the muscle recovery (regeneration) after excess loads. PMID:25842868

  2. Integrin alpha(5) controls osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation responses to titanium substrates presenting different roughness characteristics in a roughness independent manner.

    PubMed

    Keselowsky, B G; Wang, L; Schwartz, Z; Garcia, A J; Boyan, B D

    2007-03-01

    Integrin alpha(5)beta(1) regulates osteoblast proliferation and differentiation on smooth synthetic surfaces presenting different chemistries, but it is not known whether this integrin controls osteoblast behavior on surfaces that have micron-scale rough topographies. We cultured MG63 human osteoblast-like cells on titanium substrates with three different roughness characteristics: chemically polished (PT), grit blasted and acid etched with a complex topography consisting of 20-100 mum craters and 0.5-2 mum micropits (SLA), and plasma-sprayed Ti with irregular projections (TPS). Cells spread well on PT but displayed a smaller footprint on SLA or TPS. Nuclei were larger on PT as well. alpha(5)beta(1) binding and FAK phosphorylation were greater on the rougher surfaces (TPS > SLA > PT). Antibodies against the alpha(5)beta(1) binding site on fibronectin had no effect on cell number at 3 days, but [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation was increased, suggesting that binding to fibronectin was necessary for cell cycle regulation. Antibodies to the alpha(5) subunit reduced cell number at 3 days on PT and TPS and reduced DNA synthesis on all substrates in a surface microstructure-independent manner. At 7 days, cell numbers were reduced on PT, and DNA synthesis was reduced by 50% on all surfaces. At 7 days, anti-alpha(5) antibodies caused a partial reduction in alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity on all surfaces, but this effect was independent of surface microstructure. These results indicate that surface micron-scale topography modulates alpha(5)beta(1) integrin binding and FAK activation. Signaling via alpha(5)-dependent mechanisms is required for DNA synthesis and regulation of alkaline phosphatase, but this effect is independent of surface microstructure. PMID:17133443

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ controls ingestive behavior, agouti-related protein, and neuropeptide Y mRNA in the arcuate hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Garretson, John T; Teubner, Brett J W; Grove, Kevin L; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2015-03-18

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors.

  4. Regulatory T Cell Numbers in Inflamed Skin Are Controlled by Local Inflammatory Cues That Upregulate CD25 and Facilitate Antigen-Driven Local Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Billroth-MacLurg, Alison C; Ford, Jill; Rosenberg, Alexander; Miller, Jim; Fowell, Deborah J

    2016-09-15

    CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key immune suppressors that regulate immunity in diverse tissues. The tissue and/or inflammatory signals that influence the magnitude of the Treg response remain unclear. To define signals that promote Treg accumulation, we developed a simple system of skin inflammation using defined Ags and adjuvants that induce distinct cytokine milieus: OVA protein in CFA, aluminum salts (Alum), and Schistosoma mansoni eggs (Sm Egg). Polyclonal and Ag-specific Treg accumulation in the skin differed significantly between adjuvants. CFA and Alum led to robust Treg accumulation, with >50% of all skin CD4(+) T cells being Foxp3(+) In contrast, Tregs accumulated poorly in the Sm Egg-inflamed skin. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of inflammation-specific changes to the Treg gene program between adjuvant-inflamed skin types, suggesting a lack of selective recruitment or adaptation to the inflammatory milieu. Instead, Treg accumulation patterns were linked to differences in CD80/CD86 expression by APC and the regulation of CD25 expression, specifically in the inflamed skin. Inflammatory cues alone, without cognate Ag, differentially supported CD25 upregulation (CFA and Alum > Sm Egg). Only in inflammatory milieus that upregulated CD25 did the provision of Ag enhance local Treg proliferation. Reduced IL-33 in the Sm Egg-inflamed environment was shown to contribute to the failure to upregulate CD25. Thus, the magnitude of the Treg response in inflamed tissues is controlled at two interdependent levels: inflammatory signals that support the upregulation of the important Treg survival factor CD25 and Ag signals that drive local expansion. PMID:27511734

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ controls ingestive behavior, agouti-related protein, and neuropeptide Y mRNA in the arcuate hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Garretson, John T; Teubner, Brett J W; Grove, Kevin L; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2015-03-18

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors. PMID:25788674

  6. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Controls Ingestive Behavior, Agouti-Related Protein, and Neuropeptide Y mRNA in the Arcuate Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Garretson, John T.; Teubner, Brett J.W.; Grove, Kevin L.; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors. PMID:25788674

  7. Active Cellular Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  8. Oxidized (non)-regenerated cellulose affects fundamental cellular processes of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Wagenhäuser, M. U.; Mulorz, J.; Ibing, W.; Simon, F.; Spin, J. M.; Schelzig, H.; Oberhuber, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated how hemostats such as oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC, TABOTAMP) and oxidized non-regenerated cellulose (ONRC, RESORBA CELL) influence local cellular behavior and contraction of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Hum