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Sample records for controls cellular proliferation

  1. Adenovirus type 5 exerts genome-wide control over cellular programs governing proliferation, quiescence, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel L; Myers, Chad L; Rickards, Brenden; Coller, Hilary A; Flint, S Jane

    2007-01-01

    Background Human adenoviruses, such as serotype 5 (Ad5), encode several proteins that can perturb cellular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis, as well as those that mediate mRNA production and translation. However, a global view of the effects of Ad5 infection on such programs in normal human cells is not available, despite widespread efforts to develop adenoviruses for therapeutic applications. Results We used two-color hybridization and oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor changes in cellular RNA concentrations as a function of time after Ad5 infection of quiescent, normal human fibroblasts. We observed that the expression of some 2,000 genes, about 10% of those examined, increased or decreased by a factor of two or greater following Ad5 infection, but were not altered in mock-infected cells. Consensus k-means clustering established that the temporal patterns of these changes were unexpectedly complex. Gene Ontology terms associated with cell proliferation were significantly over-represented in several clusters. The results of comparative analyses demonstrate that Ad5 infection induces reversal of the quiescence program and recapitulation of the core serum response, and that only a small subset of the observed changes in cellular gene expression can be ascribed to well characterized functions of the viral E1A and E1B proteins. Conclusion These findings establish that the impact of adenovirus infection on host cell programs is far greater than appreciated hitherto. Furthermore, they provide a new framework for investigating the molecular functions of viral early proteins and information relevant to the design of conditionally replicating adenoviral vectors. PMID:17430596

  2. Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry Does Not Control Proliferation in Primary Cultures of Human Metastatic Renal Cellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Ilaria; Potenza, Duilio Michele; Bottino, Cinzia; Glasnov, Toma N.; Ferulli, Federica; Mosca, Alessandra; Guerra, Germano; Rosti, Vittorio; Luinetti, Ombretta; Porta, Camillo; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is activated following depletion of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive Ca2+ pool to regulate proliferation in immortalized cell lines established from either primary or metastatic lesions. The molecular nature of SOCE may involve both Stim1, which senses Ca2+ levels within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ reservoir, and a number of a Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membrane, including Orai1, Orai3, and members of the canonical transient receptor (TRPC1–7) family of ion channels. The present study was undertaken to assess whether SOCE is expressed and controls proliferation in primary cultures isolated from secondary lesions of heavily pretreated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. SOCE was induced following pharmacological depletion of the ER Ca2+ store, but not by InsP3-dependent Ca2+ release. Metastatic RCC cells express Stim1-2, Orai1–3, and TRPC1–7 transcripts and proteins. In these cells, SOCE was insensitive to BTP-2, 10 µM Gd3+ and Pyr6, while it was inhibited by 100 µM Gd3+, 2-APB, and carboxyamidotriazole (CAI). Neither Gd3+ nor 2-APB or CAI impaired mRCC cell proliferation. Consistently, no detectable Ca2+ signal was elicited by growth factor stimulation. Therefore, a functional SOCE is expressed but does not control proliferation of mRCC cells isolated from patients resistant to multikinase inhibitors. PMID:25126575

  3. Control of cellular proliferation by modulation of oxidative phosphorylation in human and rodent fast-growing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Enriquez, Sara . E-mail: rodsar@mail.cardiologia.org.mx; Vital-Gonzalez, Paola A.; Flores-Rodriguez, Fanny L.; Marin-Hernandez, Alvaro; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Moreno-Sanchez, Rafael

    2006-09-01

    The relationship between cell proliferation and the rates of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in HeLa (human) and AS-30D (rodent) tumor cells was evaluated. In glutamine plus glucose medium, both tumor lines grew optimally. Mitochondria were the predominant source of ATP in both cell types (66-75%), despite an active glycolysis. In glucose-free medium with glutamine, proliferation of both lines diminished by 30% but oxidative phosphorylation and the cytosolic ATP level increased by 50%. In glutamine-free medium with glucose, proliferation, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP concentration diminished drastically, although the cells were viable. Oligomycin, in medium with glutamine plus glucose, abolished growth of both tumor lines, indicating an essential role of mitochondrial ATP for tumor progression. The presumed mitochondrial inhibitors rhodamines 123 and 6G, and casiopeina II-gly, inhibited tumor cell proliferation and oxidative phosphorylation, but also glycolysis. In contrast, gossypol, iodoacetate and arsenite strongly blocked glycolysis; however, they did not affect tumor proliferation or mitochondrial metabolism. Growth of both tumor lines was highly sensitive to rhodamines and casiopeina II-gly, with IC{sub 5} values for HeLa cells lower than 0.5 {mu}M, whereas viability and proliferation of human lymphocytes were not affected by these drugs (IC{sub 5} > 30 {mu}M). Moreover, rhodamine 6G and casiopeina II-gly, at micromolar doses, prolonged the survival of animals bearing i.p. implanted AS-30D hepatoma. It is concluded that fast-growing tumor cells have a predominantly oxidative type of metabolism, which might be a potential therapeutic target.

  4. The human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 controls cellular proliferation through regulation of p27{sup Kip1} protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, Nicole; Ruetz, Stephan; Natt, Francois; Hall, Jonathan; Weiler, Jan; Mestan, Juergen; Ducarre, Monique; Grossenbacher, Rita; Hauser, Patrick; Kempf, Dominique; Hofmann, Francesco . E-mail: francesco.hofmann@pharma.novartis.com

    2005-02-15

    Ubiquitin-mediated degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27{sup Kip1} was shown to be required for the activation of key cyclin-dependent kinases, thereby triggering the onset of DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Although the SCF{sup Skp2} ubiquitin ligase has been reported to mediate p27{sup Kip1} degradation, the nature of the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme involved in this process has not yet been determined at the cellular level. Here, we show that antisense oligonucleotides targeting the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 downregulate its expression, inhibit the degradation of p27{sup Kip1}, and prevent cellular proliferation. Elevation of p27{sup Kip1} protein level is found to be the sole requirement for the inhibition of cellular proliferation induced upon downregulation of Cdc34. Indeed, reducing the expression of p27{sup Kip1} with a specific antisense oligonucleotide is sufficient to reverse the anti-proliferative phenotype elicited by the Cdc34 antisense. Furthermore, downregulation of Cdc34 is found to specifically increase the abundance of the SCF{sup Skp2} ubiquitin ligase substrate p27{sup Kip1}, but has no concomitant effect on the level of IkB{alpha} and {beta}-catenin, which are known substrates of a closely related SCF ligase.

  5. Cellular proliferation after experimental glaucoma filtration surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jampel, H.D.; McGuigan, L.J.; Dunkelberger, G.R.; L'Hernault, N.L.; Quigley, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    We used light microscopic autoradiography to determine the time course of cellular incorporation of tritiated thymidine (a correlate of cell division) following glaucoma filtration surgery in seven eyes of four cynomolgus monkeys with experimental glaucoma. Incorporation of tritiated thymidine was detected as early as 24 hours postoperatively. Peak incorporation occurred five days postoperatively and had returned to baseline levels by day 11. Cells incorporating tritiated thymidine included keratocytes, episcleral cells, corneal and capillary endothelial cells, and conjunctival and corneal epithelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy was correlated with the autoradiographic results to demonstrate that fibroblasts were dividing on the corneoscleral margin. These findings have potential clinical implications for the use of antiproliferative agents after filtration surgery.

  6. hTR RNA component as a marker of cellular proliferation in oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Flatharta, Cathal O; Flint, Stephen; Toner, Mary; Mabruk, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that the telomerase RNA component hTR is highly expressed in the epithelium of non-dysplastic Oral Lichen Planus (OLP) lesions (11). We concluded that it is possible that this high expression might be related to the increased cellular proliferation seen in OLP rather than being an indicator of potential malignant transformation. In the present study, and in order to confirm our finding in the previous study that hTR might be a marker for cellular proliferation in OLP, we analysed OLP biopsies known to be positive for RNA component of Telomerase (hTR) for the expression of Ki-67 as a marker for cellular proliferation. Fourteen OLP tissue biopsies known to be positive for telomerase RNA component hTR, were investigated using an immunohistochemical approach to determine the rate of cellular proliferation in OLP, looking at the expression of Ki-67 protein as a marker for cellular proliferation. A statistically significant increase was found between Ki-67 expression in OLP in comparison to normal control buccal mucosa samples. The expression of hTR component in OLP might thus be a marker for cellular proliferation.

  7. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Adams, Matthew; High, Alec S; Johnson, Colin A; Robinson, Philip A

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies.

  8. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Adams, Matthew; High, Alec S.; Johnson, Colin A.; Robinson, Philip A.

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ► We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ► HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ► We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ► Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

  9. The Wnt signaling pathway in cellular proliferation and differentiation: A tale of two coactivators.

    PubMed

    Teo, Jia-Ling; Kahn, Michael

    2010-09-30

    Wnt signaling pathways play divergent roles during development, normal homeostasis and disease. The responses that result from the activation of the pathway control both proliferation and differentiation. Tight regulation and controlled coordination of the Wnt signaling cascade is required to maintain the balance between proliferation and differentiation. The non-redundant roles of the coactivator proteins CBP and p300, within the context of Wnt signaling are discussed. We highlight their roles as integrators of the various inputs that a cell receives to elicit the correct and coordinated response. We propose that essentially all cellular information - i.e. from other signaling pathways, nutrient levels, etc. - is funneled down into a choice of coactivators usage, either CBP or p300, by their interacting partner beta-catenin (or catenin-like molecules in the absence of beta-catenin) to make the critical decision to either remain quiescent, or once entering cycle to proliferate without differentiation or to initiate the differentiation process.

  10. Primitive control of cellular metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitz, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    It is pointed out that control substances must have existed from the earliest times in the evolution of life and that the same control mechanisms must exist today. The investigation reported is concerned with the concept that carbon dioxide is a primitive regulator of cell function. The effects of carbon dioxide on cellular materials are examined, taking into account questions of solubilization, dissociation, changes of charge, stabilization, structural changes, wettability, the exclusion of other gases, the activation of compounds, changes in plasticity, and changes in membrane permeability.

  11. Selective transcription and cellular proliferation induced by PDGF require histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Catania, Annunziata; Iavarone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Stella M.; Chiariello, Mario . E-mail: chiariel@unina.it

    2006-05-05

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are key regulatory enzymes involved in the control of gene expression and their inhibition by specific drugs has been widely correlated to cell cycle arrest, terminal differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether HDAC activity was required for PDGF-dependent signal transduction and cellular proliferation. Exposure of PDGF-stimulated NIH3T3 fibroblasts to the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) potently repressed the expression of a group of genes correlated to PDGF-dependent cellular growth and pro-survival activity. Moreover, we show that TSA interfered with STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity induced by PDGF. Still, neither phosphorylation nor nuclear translocation and DNA-binding in vitro and in vivo of STAT3 were affected by using TSA to interfere with PDGF stimulation. Finally, TSA treatment resulted in the suppression of PDGF-dependent cellular proliferation without affecting cellular survival of NIH3T3 cells. Our data indicate that inhibition of HDAC activity antagonizes the mitogenic effect of PDGF, suggesting that these drugs may specifically act on the expression of STAT-dependent, PDGF-responsive genes.

  12. Modulation of 17β-Estradiol Signaling on Cellular Proliferation by Caveolin-2.

    PubMed

    Totta, Pierangela; Gionfra, Fabio; Busonero, Claudia; Acconcia, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    The sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) exerts pleiotropic effects by binding to the ligand-activated transcription factor estrogen receptor α (ERα). The E2:ERα complex regulates several physiological processes, including cell survival and proliferation, through transcriptional effects (i.e., estrogen responsive element [ERE]-based gene transcription) and non-transcriptional membrane-initiated effects (i.e., the activation of extra-nuclear signaling cascades), which derive from the activation of the pool of ERα that is localized to plasma membrane caveolae. Caveolae are ω-shaped membrane sub-domains that are composed of scaffold proteins named caveolins (i.e., caveolin-1, caveolin-2, and caveolin-3). Although caveolin-3 is exclusively expressed in muscles, caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 are co-expressed in all human tissues. From a functional point of view, caveolin-2 can operate both dependently on and independently of caveolin-1, which is the main coat component of caveolae. Interestingly, while a functional interplay between caveolin-1 and ERα has been reported in the control of E2-induced physiological effects, the role of caveolin-2 in E2:ERα signaling within the cell remains poorly understood. This study shows that siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion in breast ductal carcinoma cells (MCF-7) reduces E2-induced ERα phosphorylation at serine residue 118 (S118), controls intracellular receptor levels, precludes ERα-mediated extra-nuclear activation of signaling pathways, reduces ERα transcriptional activity, and prevents cellular proliferation. Meanwhile, the impact of caveolin-1 depletion on ERα signaling in MCF-7 cells is shown to be similar to that elicited by siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion. Altogether, these data demonstrate that caveolin-2 expression is necessary for the control of E2-dependent cellular proliferation.

  13. ETO2 coordinates cellular proliferation and differentiation during erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Goardon, Nicolas; Lambert, Julie A; Rodriguez, Patrick; Nissaire, Philippe; Herblot, Sabine; Thibault, Pierre; Dumenil, Dominique; Strouboulis, John; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Hoang, Trang

    2006-01-01

    The passage from proliferation to terminal differentiation is critical for normal development and is often perturbed in malignancies. To define the molecular mechanisms that govern this process during erythropoiesis, we have used tagging/proteomics approaches and characterized protein complexes nucleated by TAL-1/SCL, a basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor that specifies the erythrocytic lineage. In addition to known TAL-1 partners, GATA-1, E2A, HEB, LMO2 and Ldb1, we identify the ETO2 repressor as a novel component recruited to TAL-1 complexes through interaction with E2A/HEB. Ectopic expression and siRNA knockdown experiments in hematopoietic progenitor cells show that ETO2 actively represses erythroid TAL-1 target genes and governs the expansion of erythroid progenitors. At the onset of erythroid differentiation, a change in the stoichiometry of ETO2 within the TAL-1 complex activates the expression of known erythroid-specific TAL-1 target genes and of Gfi-1b and p21Cip, encoding two essential regulators of erythroid cell proliferation. These results suggest that the dynamics of ETO2 recruitment within nuclear complexes couple cell proliferation to cell differentiation and determine the onset of terminal erythroid maturation. PMID:16407974

  14. Commonly consumed and specialty dietary mushrooms reduce cellular proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R; Brophy, Sara K

    2010-11-01

    Worldwide, over one million women will be newly diagnosed with breast cancer in the next year. Moreover, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the USA. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that consumption of dietary mushrooms can protect against breast cancer. In this study, we tested and compared the ability of five commonly consumed or specialty mushrooms to modulate cell number balance in the cancer process using MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Hot water extracts (80°C for 2 h) of maitake (MT, Grifola frondosa), crimini (CRIM, Agaricus bisporus), portabella (PORT, Agaricus bisporus), oyster (OYS, Pleurotus ostreatus) and white button (WB, Agaricus bisporus) mushrooms or water alone (5% v/v) were incubated for 24 h with MCF-7 cells. Cellular proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced up to 33% by all mushrooms, with MT and OYS being the most effective. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction, an often used mitochondrion-dependent marker of proliferation, was unchanged although decreased (P > 0.05) by 15% with OYS extract. Lactate dehydrogenase release, as a marker of necrosis, was significantly increased after incubation with MT but not with other test mushrooms. Furthermore, MT extract significantly increased apoptosis, or programmed cell death, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl end labeling method, whereas other test mushrooms displayed trends of ∼15%. The total numbers of cells per flask, determined by hemacytometry, were not different from control cultures. Overall, all test mushrooms significantly suppressed cellular proliferation, with MT further significantly inducing apoptosis and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. This suggests that both common and specialty mushrooms may be chemoprotective against breast cancer.

  15. Structure and biochemical characterization of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen from a parasitic protozoon

    SciTech Connect

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Brieba, Luis G.

    2012-02-08

    Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a toroidal-shaped protein that is involved in cell-cycle control, DNA replication and DNA repair. Parasitic protozoa are early-diverged eukaryotes that are responsible for neglected diseases. In this work, a PCNA from a parasitic protozoon was identified, cloned and biochemically characterized and its crystal structure was determined. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that PCNA from Entamoeba histolytica assembles as a homotrimer that is able to interact with and stimulate the activity of a PCNA-interacting peptide-motif protein from E. histolytica, EhDNAligI. The data indicate a conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of PCNA-mediated interactions between metazoa, yeast and parasitic protozoa.

  16. Multistructural biomimetic substrates for controlled cellular differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orza, Anamaria I.; Mihu, Carmen; Soritau, Olga; Diudea, Mircea; Florea, Adrian; Matei, Horea; Balici, Stefana; Mudalige, Thilak; Kanarpardy, Ganesh K.; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2014-02-01

    Multidimensional scaffolds are considered to be ideal candidates for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering based on their potential to provide an excellent microenvironment and direct the fate of the cultured cells. More recently, the use of stem cells in medicine has opened a new technological opportunity for controlled tissue formation. However, the mechanism through which the substrate directs the differentiation of stem cells is still rather unclear. Data concerning its specific surface chemistry, topology, and its signaling ability need to be further understood and analyzed. In our study, atomic force microscopy was used to study the stiffness, roughness, and topology of the collagen (Coll) and metallized collagen (MC) substrates, proposed as an excellent substrate for regenerative medicine. The importance of signaling molecules was studied by constructing a new hybrid signaling substrate that contains both collagen and laminin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The cellular response—such as attachment capability, proliferation and cardiac and neuronal phenotype expression on the metallized and non-metallized hybrid substrates (collagen + laminin)—was studied using MTT viability assay and immunohistochemistry studies. Our findings indicate that such hybrid materials could play an important role in the regeneration of complex tissues.

  17. Radiation effects on cellularity, proliferation and EGFR expression in mouse bladder urothelium.

    PubMed

    Jaal, Jana; Dörr, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    This study was designed to determine changes in cell numbers, proliferation (using Ki-67) and EGFR expression in mouse bladder urothelium during the early and late radiation response. Groups of mice were irradiated with a single dose of 20 Gy and assayed 0-360 days later. Urothelial cells were counted. After immunohistochemistry, the absolute and relative numbers of Ki-67(+) and EGFR(+) cells were analyzed. Radiation exposure resulted in a decrease in total urothelial cell numbers to 49% by day 31, with restoration of cellularity by day 180. In contrast, at day 360, an increase in total cell number (143%) was seen. Slightly increased Ki-67 expression was found at days 120 and 180 after treatment, followed by a pronounced elevation at days 240 and 360. Compared to controls, higher EGFR expression was detected up to day 360 after irradiation. A positive correlation was found between total urothelial cells numbers and Ki-67 as well as EGFR expression. Radiation exposure results in an increased urothelial expression of EGFR that precedes urothelial restoration, indicating a contribution of the EGF/EGFR system to urothelial proliferation and differentiation. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of EGFR inhibition on radiation effects in the urinary bladder.

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi induces cellular proliferation in the trophoblastic cell line BeWo.

    PubMed

    Droguett, Daniel; Carrillo, Ileana; Castillo, Christian; Gómez, Fresia; Negrete, Miguel; Liempi, Ana; Muñoz, Lorena; Galanti, Norbel; Maya, Juan Diego; Kemmerling, Ulrike

    2017-02-01

    Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) is partially responsible for the progressive globalization of Chagas disease. During congenital transmission the parasite must cross the placental barrier where the trophoblast, a continuous renewing epithelium, is the first tissue in contact with the parasite. The trophoblast turnover implies cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic cell death. The epithelial turnover is considered part of innate immunity. We previously demonstrated that T. cruzi induces cellular differentiation and apoptosis in this tissue. Here we demonstrate that T. cruzi induces cellular proliferation in a trophoblastic cell line. We analyzed the cellular proliferation in BeWo cells by determining DNA synthesis by BrdU incorporation assays, mitotic index, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry, as well as quantification of nucleolus organizer regions by histochemistry and expression of the proliferation markers PCNA and Ki67 by Western blotting and/or immunofluorescence. Additionally, we determined the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway activation by the parasite by Western blotting.

  19. Tetraspanin CD9 modulates human lymphoma cellular proliferation via histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Herr, Michael J.; Longhurst, Celia M.; Baker, Benjamin; Homayouni, Ramin; Speich, Henry E.; Kotha, Jayaprakash; Jennings, Lisa K.

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD9 is differentially expressed in human Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. • We found that CD9 expression promotes these cells proliferation. • CD9 expression also increases HDAC activity. • HDAC inhibition decreased both cell proliferation and importantly CD9 expression. • CD9 may dictate HDAC efficacy and play a role in HDAC regulation. - Abstract: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a type of hematological malignancy that affects two percent of the overall population in the United States. Tetraspanin CD9 is a cell surface protein that has been thoroughly demonstrated to be a molecular facilitator of cellular phenotype. CD9 expression varies in two human lymphoma cell lines, Raji and BJAB. In this report, we investigated the functional relationship between CD9 and cell proliferation regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in these two cell lines. Introduction of CD9 expression in Raji cells resulted in significantly increased cell proliferation and HDAC activity compared to Mock transfected Raji cells. The increase in CD9–Raji cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) treatment. Pretreatment of BJAB cells with HDAC inhibitors resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous CD9 mRNA and cell surface expression. BJAB cells also displayed decreased cell proliferation after HDACi treatment. These results suggest a significant relationship between CD9 expression and cell proliferation in human lymphoma cells that may be modulated by HDAC activity.

  20. The antiproliferative effects of agmatine correlate with the rate of cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Isome, Masato; Lortie, Mark J; Murakami, Yasuko; Parisi, Eva; Matsufuji, Senya; Satriano, Joseph

    2007-08-01

    Polyamines are small cationic molecules required for cellular proliferation. Agmatine is a biogenic amine unique in its capacity to arrest proliferation in cell lines by depleting intracellular polyamine levels. We previously demonstrated that agmatine enters mammalian cells via the polyamine transport system. As polyamine transport is positively correlated with the rate of cellular proliferation, the current study examines the antiproliferative effects of agmatine on cells with varying proliferative kinetics. Herein, we evaluate agmatine transport, intracellular accumulation, and its effects on antizyme expression and cellular proliferation in nontransformed cell lines and their transformed variants. H-ras- and Src-transformed murine NIH/3T3 cells (Ras/3T3 and Src/3T3, respectively) that were exposed to exogenous agmatine exhibit increased uptake and intracellular accumulation relative to the parental NIH/3T3 cell line. Similar increases were obtained for human primary foreskin fibroblasts relative to a human fibrosarcoma cell line, HT1080. Agmatine increases expression of antizyme, a protein that inhibits polyamine biosynthesis and transport. Ras/3T3 and Src/3T3 cells demonstrated augmented increases in antizyme protein expression relative to NIH/3T3 in response to agmatine. All transformed cell lines were significantly more sensitive to the antiproliferative effects of agmatine than nontransformed lines. These effects were attenuated in the presence of exogenous polyamines or inhibitors of polyamine transport. In conclusion, the antiproliferative effects of agmatine preferentially target transformed cell lines due to the increased agmatine uptake exhibited by cells with short cycling times.

  1. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges and inhibition of cellular proliferation in vitro. I. Caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Guglielmi, G.E.; Vogt, T.F.; Tice, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    While many agents have been examined for their ability to induce SCE's, complete dose-response information has often been lacking. We have reexamined the ability of one such compound - caffeine - to induce SCEs and also to inhibit cellular proliferation in human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro. An acute exposure to caffeine prior to the DNA synthetic period did not affect either SCE frequency or the rate of cellular proliferation. Chronic exposure to caffeine throughout the culture period lead to both a dose-dependent increase in SCEs (SCE/sub d/ or doubling dose = 2.4 mM; SCE/sub 10/ or the dose capable of inducing 10 SCE = 1.4 mM) and a dose-dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation (IC/sub 50/ or the 50% inhibition concentration = 2.6 mM). The relative proportion of first generation metaphase cells, an assessment of proliferative inhibiton, increased linearly with increasing caffeine concentrations. However, SCE frequency increased nonlinearly over the same range of caffeine concentrations. Examination of the ratio of nonsymmetrical to symmetrical SCEs in third generation metaphase cells indicated that caffeine induced SCEs in equal frequency in each of three successive generations. The dependency of SCE induction and cellular proliferative inhibition on caffeine's presence during the DNA synthetic period suggests that caffeine may act as an antimetabolite in normal human cells.

  2. Cellular automata model for human articular chondrocytes migration, proliferation and cell death: An in vitro validation.

    PubMed

    Vaca-González, J J; Gutiérrez, M L; Guevara, J M; Garzón-Alvarado, D A

    2016-01-07

    Articular cartilage is characterized by low cell density of only one cell type, chondrocytes, and has limited self-healing properties. When articular cartilage is affected by traumatic injuries, a therapeutic strategy such as autologous chondrocyte implantation is usually proposed for its treatment. This approach requires in vitro chondrocyte expansion to yield high cell number for cell transplantation. To improve the efficiency of this procedure, it is necessary to assess cell dynamics such as migration, proliferation and cell death during culture. Computational models such as cellular automata can be used to simulate cell dynamics in order to enhance the result of cell culture procedures. This methodology has been implemented for several cell types; however, an experimental validation is required for each one. For this reason, in this research a cellular automata model, based on random-walk theory, was devised in order to predict articular chondrocyte behavior in monolayer culture during cell expansion. Results demonstrated that the cellular automata model corresponded to cell dynamics and computed-accurate quantitative results. Moreover, it was possible to observe that cell dynamics depend on weighted probabilities derived from experimental data and cell behavior varies according to the cell culture period. Thus, depending on whether cells were just seeded or proliferated exponentially, culture time probabilities differed in percentages in the CA model. Furthermore, in the experimental assessment a decreased chondrocyte proliferation was observed along with increased passage number. This approach is expected to having other uses as in enhancing articular cartilage therapies based on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  3. LED illumination effects on proliferation and survival of meningioma cellular cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efrain; Urrea, Hernan; Criollo, William; Gutierrez, Oscar

    2010-02-01

    Meningioma cell cultures were prepared from frozen cell samples in 96 wells culture plates. Semiconductor light sources (LED) in seven different wavelength ranges were used to illuminate the wells, three different irradiation doses were selected per LED. Control cultures using three different concentrations of FBS were processed for comparison. Cell proliferation, viability, and cytotoxicity were measured every 24 hours for 6 days, using the XTT colorimetric assay (RocheR). None of the irradiated cultures exhibit cytotoxicity; but some of them exhibit proliferation inhibition. The larger proliferation was detected at a 0.05J/cm2 dose, for all LEDs; but for the orange and violet LEDs generated the bigger proliferation rate was measured. Results show the improvement of meningioma cell proliferation using illumination in some given wavelength ranges.

  4. Induction of vascular endothelial phenotype and cellular proliferation from human cord blood stem cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Brian; Z-M Wan, Jim; Abley, Doris; Akabutu, John

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that stem cells derived from adult hematopoietic tissues are capable of trans-differentiation into non-hematopoietic cells, and that the culture in microgravity ( μg) may modulate the proliferation and differentiation. We investigated the application of μg to human umbilical cord blood stem cells (CBSC) in the induction of vascular endothelial phenotype expression and cellular proliferation. CD34+ mononuclear cells were isolated from waste human umbilical cord blood samples and cultured in simulated μg for 14 days. The cells were seeded in rotary wall vessels (RWV) with or without microcarrier beads (MCB) and vascular endothelial growth factor was added during culture. Controls consisted of culture in 1 G. The cell cultures in RWV were examined by inverted microscopy. Cell counts, endothelial cell and leukocyte markers performed by flow-cytometry and FACS scan were assayed at days 1, 4, 7 and at the termination of the experiments. Culture in RWV revealed significantly increased cellular proliferation with three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like aggregates. At day 4, CD34+ cells cultured in RWV bioreactor without MCB developed vascular tubular assemblies and exhibited endothelial phenotypic markers. These data suggest that CD34+ human umbilical cord blood progenitors are capable of trans-differentiation into vascular endothelial cell phenotype and assemble into 3D tissue structures. Culture of CBSC in simulated μg may be potentially beneficial in the fields of stem cell biology and somatic cell therapy.

  5. Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 increases cellular proliferation and migration in human foreskin fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Piltti, Juha; Varjosalo, Markku; Qu, Chengjuan; Häyrinen, Jukka; Lammi, Mikko J

    2015-09-01

    The idea of direct differentiation of somatic cells into other differentiated cell types has attracted a great interest recently. Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 (ROCKi) is a potential drug molecule, which has been reported to support the gene expressions typical for the chondrocytes, thus restricting their phenotypic conversion to fibroblastic cells upon the cellular expansion. In this study, we have investigated the short-term biological responses of ROCKi to human primary foreskin fibroblasts. The fibroblast cells were exposed to 1 and 10 μM ROCKi treatments. A proteomics analysis revealed expression changes of 56 proteins, and a further protein pathway analysis suggested their association with the cell morphology, the organization, and the increased cellular movement and the proliferation. These functional responses were confirmed by a Cell-IQ time-lapse imaging analysis. Rho-kinase inhibitor treatment increased the cellular proliferation up to twofold during the first 12 h, and a wound model based migration assay showed 50% faster filling of the mechanically generated wound area. Additionally, significantly less vinculin-associated focal adhesions were present in the ROCKi-treated cells. Despite the marked changes in the cell behavior, ROCKi was not able to induce the expression of the chondrocyte-specific genes, such as procollagen α1 (II) and aggrecan.

  6. Modeling hormonal control of cambium proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Oles, Vladyslav; Panchenko, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Rise of atmospheric CO2 is one of the main causes of global warming. Catastrophic climate change can be avoided by reducing emissions and increasing sequestration of CO2. Trees are known to sequester CO2 during photosynthesis, and then store it as wood biomass. Thus, breeding of trees with higher wood yield would mitigate global warming as well as augment production of renewable construction materials, energy, and industrial feedstock. Wood is made of cellulose-rich xylem cells produced through proliferation of a specialized stem cell niche called cambium. Importance of cambium in xylem cells production makes it an ideal target for the tree breeding programs; however our knowledge about control of cambium proliferation remains limited. The morphology and regulation of cambium are different from those of stem cell niches that control axial growth. For this reason, translating the knowledge about axial growth to radial growth has limited use. Furthermore, genetic approaches cannot be easily applied because overlaying tissues conceal cambium from direct observation and complicate identification of mutants. To overcome the paucity of experimental tools in cambium biology, we constructed a Boolean network CARENET (CAmbium REgulation gene NETwork) for modelling cambium activity, which includes the key transcription factors WOX4 and HD-ZIP III as well as their potential regulators. Our simulations predict that: (1) auxin, cytokinin, gibberellin, and brassinosteroids act cooperatively in promoting transcription of WOX4 and HD-ZIP III; (2) auxin and cytokinin pathways negatively regulate each other; (3) hormonal pathways act redundantly in sustaining cambium activity; (4) individual cambium cells can have diverse molecular identities. CARENET can be extended to include components of other signalling pathways and be integrated with models of xylem and phloem differentiation. Such extended models would facilitate breeding trees with higher wood yield. PMID:28187161

  7. Modeling hormonal control of cambium proliferation.

    PubMed

    Oles, Vladyslav; Panchenko, Alexander; Smertenko, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Rise of atmospheric CO2 is one of the main causes of global warming. Catastrophic climate change can be avoided by reducing emissions and increasing sequestration of CO2. Trees are known to sequester CO2 during photosynthesis, and then store it as wood biomass. Thus, breeding of trees with higher wood yield would mitigate global warming as well as augment production of renewable construction materials, energy, and industrial feedstock. Wood is made of cellulose-rich xylem cells produced through proliferation of a specialized stem cell niche called cambium. Importance of cambium in xylem cells production makes it an ideal target for the tree breeding programs; however our knowledge about control of cambium proliferation remains limited. The morphology and regulation of cambium are different from those of stem cell niches that control axial growth. For this reason, translating the knowledge about axial growth to radial growth has limited use. Furthermore, genetic approaches cannot be easily applied because overlaying tissues conceal cambium from direct observation and complicate identification of mutants. To overcome the paucity of experimental tools in cambium biology, we constructed a Boolean network CARENET (CAmbium REgulation gene NETwork) for modelling cambium activity, which includes the key transcription factors WOX4 and HD-ZIP III as well as their potential regulators. Our simulations predict that: (1) auxin, cytokinin, gibberellin, and brassinosteroids act cooperatively in promoting transcription of WOX4 and HD-ZIP III; (2) auxin and cytokinin pathways negatively regulate each other; (3) hormonal pathways act redundantly in sustaining cambium activity; (4) individual cambium cells can have diverse molecular identities. CARENET can be extended to include components of other signalling pathways and be integrated with models of xylem and phloem differentiation. Such extended models would facilitate breeding trees with higher wood yield.

  8. The p44/wdr77-dependent cellular proliferation process during lung development is re-activated in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhongping; Zhang, Fahao; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Ma, Wencai; Davis, Richard E.; Wang, Zhengxin

    2014-01-01

    During lung development, cells proliferate for a defined length of time before they begin to differentiate. Factors that control this proliferative process and how this growth process is related to lung cancer are currently unknown. Here, we found that the WD40-containing protein (p44/wdr77) was expressed in growing epithelial cells at the early stages of lung development. In contrast, p44/wdr77 expression was diminished in fully differentiated epithelial cells in the adult lung. Loss of p44/wdr77 gene expression led to cell growth arrest and differentiation. Re-expression of p44/wdr77 caused terminally differentiated cells to re-enter the cell cycle. Our findings suggest that p44/wdr77 is essential and sufficient for proliferation of lung epithelial cells. P44/Wdr77 was re-expressed in lung cancer, and silencing p44/wdr77 expression strongly inhibited growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells in tissue culture and abolished growth of lung adenocarcinoma tumor xenografts in mice. The growth arrest induced by loss of p44/wdr77 expression was partially through the p21-Rb signaling. Our results suggest that p44/wdr77 controls cellular proliferation during lung development and this growth process is re-activated during lung tumorigenesis. PMID:22665061

  9. Feasibility of obtaining breast epithelial cells from healthy women for studies of cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Miller, N A; Thomas, M; Martin, L J; Hedley, D W; Michal, S; Boyd, N F

    1997-05-01

    Increased dietary fat intake and rate of breast epithelial cell proliferation have each been associated with the development of breast cancer. The goal of this study was to measure the effect of a low fat, high carbohydrate diet on the rate of breast epithelial cell proliferation in women at high risk for breast cancer. Women were recruited from the intervention and control groups of a randomized low fat dietary intervention trial, breast epithelial cells were obtained by fine needle aspiration, and cell proliferation was assessed in these samples using immunofluorescent detection of Ki-67 and PCNA. The effects of needle size and study group on cell yield and cytologic features of the cells were also examined. Fifty three women (20 in the intervention group and 33 in the control group) underwent the biopsy procedure. Slides from 38 subjects were stained for Ki-67 and from 14 subjects for PCNA. No cell proliferation (fluorescence) was detected for either Ki-67 or PCNA in any of the slides. Epithelial cell yield and number of stromal fragments were greater with a larger needle size. Numbers of stromal fragments and bipolar naked nuclei were greater in the low fat as compared to the control group but no differences in epithelial cell yield were observed between the two groups. This study confirms that fine needle aspiration biopsy is a feasible method of obtaining epithelial cells from women without discrete breast masses, but suggests that cell proliferation cannot be assessed using Ki-67 and PCNA in such samples.

  10. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T Antigen Disrupts Host Genomic Integrity and Inhibits Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wang, Xin; Diaz, Jason; Tsang, Sabrina H.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Clonal integration of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) DNA into the host genome has been observed in at least 80% of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). The integrated viral genome typically carries mutations that truncate the C-terminal DNA binding and helicase domains of the MCV large T antigen (LT), suggesting a selective pressure to remove this MCV LT region during tumor development. In this study, we show that MCV infection leads to the activation of host DNA damage responses (DDR). This activity was mapped to the C-terminal helicase-containing region of the MCV LT. The MCV LT-activated DNA damage kinases, in turn, led to enhanced p53 phosphorylation, upregulation of p53 downstream target genes, and cell cycle arrest. Compared to the N-terminal MCV LT fragment that is usually preserved in mutants isolated from MCC tumors, full-length MCV LT shows a decreased potential to support cellular proliferation, focus formation, and anchorage-independent cell growth. These apparently antitumorigenic effects can be reversed by a dominant-negative p53 inhibitor. Our results demonstrate that MCV LT-induced DDR activates p53 pathway, leading to the inhibition of cellular proliferation. This study reveals a key difference between MCV LT and simian vacuolating virus 40 LT, which activates a DDR but inhibits p53 function. This study also explains, in part, why truncation mutations that remove the MCV LT C-terminal region are necessary for the oncogenic progression of MCV-associated cancers. PMID:23760247

  11. Diffusion kurtosis imaging can efficiently assess the glioma grade and cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rifeng; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhao, Lingyun; Zhang, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Shun; Yao, Yihao; Yang, Shiqi; Shi, Jingjing; Shen, Nanxi; Su, Changliang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Wenzhen

    2015-12-08

    Conventional diffusion imaging techniques are not sufficiently accurate for evaluating glioma grade and cellular proliferation, which are critical for guiding glioma treatment. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), an advanced non-Gaussian diffusion imaging technique, has shown potential in grading glioma; however, its applications in this tumor have not been fully elucidated. In this study, DKI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) were performed on 74 consecutive patients with histopathologically confirmed glioma. The kurtosis and conventional diffusion metric values of the tumor were semi-automatically obtained. The relationships of these metrics with the glioma grade and Ki-67 expression were evaluated. The diagnostic efficiency of these metrics in grading was further compared. It was demonstrated that compared with the conventional diffusion metrics, the kurtosis metrics were more promising imaging markers in distinguishing high-grade from low-grade gliomas and distinguishing among grade II, III and IV gliomas; the kurtosis metrics also showed great potential in the prediction of Ki-67 expression. To our best knowledge, we are the first to reveal the ability of DKI to assess the cellular proliferation of gliomas, and to employ the semi-automatic method for the accurate measurement of gliomas. These results could have a significant impact on the diagnosis and subsequent therapy of glioma.

  12. Arecoline augments cellular proliferation in the prostate gland of male Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Indraneel; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Mondal, Anushree; Maiti, Bishwa Ranjan; Chatterji, Urmi

    2011-09-01

    Areca nut chewing is the fourth most popular habit in the world due to its effects as a mild stimulant, causing a feeling of euphoria and slightly heightened alertness. Areca nuts contain several alkaloids and tannins, of which arecoline is the most abundant and known to have several adverse effects in humans, specially an increased risk of oral cancer. On evaluating the effects of arecoline on the male endocrine physiology in Wistar rats, it was found that arecoline treatment led to an overall enlargement and increase in the wet weight of the prostate gland, and a two-fold increase in serum gonadotropin and testosterone levels. Since the prostate is a major target for testosterone, the consequences of arecoline consumption were studied specifically in the prostate gland. Arecoline treatment led to an increase in the number of rough endoplasmic reticulum and reduction of secretory vesicles, signifying a hyperactive state of the prostate. Increased expression of androgen receptors in response to arecoline allowed for enhanced effect of testosterone in the prostate of treated animals, which augmented cell proliferation, subsequently confirmed by an increase in the expression of Ki-67 protein. Cellular proliferation was also the outcome of concomitant over expression of the G{sub 1}-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and CDK4, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. Taken together, the findings provide the first evidence that regular use of arecoline may lead to prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and eventually to disorders associated with prostate enlargement. - Highlights: > Effect of arecoline was investigated on the endocrine physiology of male Wistar rats. > Increase observed in prostate size, wet weight, serum testosterone and gonadotropins. > Arecoline increased RER, expression of androgen receptor and cellular proliferation. > Upregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 seen at transcriptional and translational levels. > It may cause

  13. Optogenetic control of cellular forces and mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Valon, Léo; Marín-Llauradó, Ariadna; Wyatt, Thomas; Charras, Guillaume; Trepat, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Contractile forces are the end effectors of cell migration, division, morphogenesis, wound healing and cancer invasion. Here we report optogenetic tools to upregulate and downregulate such forces with high spatiotemporal accuracy. The technology relies on controlling the subcellular activation of RhoA using the CRY2/CIBN light-gated dimerizer system. We fused the catalytic domain (DHPH domain) of the RhoA activator ARHGEF11 to CRY2-mCherry (optoGEF-RhoA) and engineered its binding partner CIBN to bind either to the plasma membrane or to the mitochondrial membrane. Translocation of optoGEF-RhoA to the plasma membrane causes a rapid and local increase in cellular traction, intercellular tension and tissue compaction. By contrast, translocation of optoGEF-RhoA to mitochondria results in opposite changes in these physical properties. Cellular changes in contractility are paralleled by modifications in the nuclear localization of the transcriptional regulator YAP, thus showing the ability of our approach to control mechanotransductory signalling pathways in time and space. PMID:28186127

  14. Optogenetic control of cellular forces and mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Valon, Léo; Marín-Llauradó, Ariadna; Wyatt, Thomas; Charras, Guillaume; Trepat, Xavier

    2017-02-10

    Contractile forces are the end effectors of cell migration, division, morphogenesis, wound healing and cancer invasion. Here we report optogenetic tools to upregulate and downregulate such forces with high spatiotemporal accuracy. The technology relies on controlling the subcellular activation of RhoA using the CRY2/CIBN light-gated dimerizer system. We fused the catalytic domain (DHPH domain) of the RhoA activator ARHGEF11 to CRY2-mCherry (optoGEF-RhoA) and engineered its binding partner CIBN to bind either to the plasma membrane or to the mitochondrial membrane. Translocation of optoGEF-RhoA to the plasma membrane causes a rapid and local increase in cellular traction, intercellular tension and tissue compaction. By contrast, translocation of optoGEF-RhoA to mitochondria results in opposite changes in these physical properties. Cellular changes in contractility are paralleled by modifications in the nuclear localization of the transcriptional regulator YAP, thus showing the ability of our approach to control mechanotransductory signalling pathways in time and space.

  15. Cellular proliferation and infiltration following interstitial irradiation of normal dog brain is altered by an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fike, J.R.; Gobbel, G.T.; Chou, D.

    1995-07-15

    The objectives of this study were to quantitatively define proliferative and infiltrative cell responses after focal {sup 125}I irradiation of normal brain, and to determine the effects of an intravenous infusion of {alpha}-defluoromethylornithine (DFMO) on those responses. Adult beagle dogs were irradiated using high activity {sup 125}I sources. Cellular responses were quantified using a histomorphometric analysis. After radiation alone, cellular events included a substantial acute inflammatory response followed by increased BrdU labeling and progressive increases in numbers of capillaries and astrocytes. {alpha}-Difluoromethylornithine treatment significantly affected the measured cell responses. As in controls, an early inflammatory response was measured, but after 2 weeks there were more PMNs/unit area than in controls. The onset of measurable BrdU labeling was delayed in DFMO-treated animals, and the magnitude of labeling was significantly reduced. Increases in astrocyte and vessel numbers/mm{sup 2} were observed after a 2-week delay. At the site of implant, astrocytes from DFMO-treated dogs were significantly smaller than those from controls. There is substantial cell proliferation and infiltration in response to interstitial irradiation of normal brain, and these responses are significantly altered by DFMO treatment. Although the precise mechanisms by which DFMO exerts its effects in this model are not known, the results from this study suggest that modification of radiation injury may be possible by manipulating the response of normal cells to injury. 57 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Cellular proliferation markers in peripheral and central fibromas: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    GARCIA, Bruna Gonçalves; CALDEIRA, Patrícia Carlos; JOHANN, Aline Cristina Batista Rodrigues; de SOUSA, Suzana Cantanhede Orsini Machado; CALIARI, Marcelo Vidigal; do CARMO, Maria Auxiliadora Vieira; MESQUITA, Ricardo Alves

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To perform a comparative study of the cellular proliferation in the peripheral and central fibromas. Material and Methods: Immunohistochemistry for PCNA and the AgNOR technique were performed in 9 cases of peripheral odontogenic fibroma (POF), in 4 cases of odontogenic fibroma (OdF), in 8 cases of peripheral ossifying fibroma (PEOF) and 7 cases of ossifying fibroma (OsF). The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used for the statistical analyses. Results: Mesenchymal component of the central lesions presented a higher mean number of AgNOR per nucleus and PCNA index than did the peripheral lesions (P≤0.05). The mean number of AgNOR per nucleus in the epithelial component proved to be higher in the OdF than in the POF (P≤0.05). The mesenchymal and epithelial components presented similar mean numbers of AgNOR per nucleus and PCNA index in the OdF, as well as a similar mean number of AgNOR per nucleus in the POF. Conclusions: The mesenchymal component may well play a role in the differences between the biological behaviour of the central lesions as compared to the peripheral lesions. Moreover, considering that the epithelial and mesenchymal components in odontogenic fibromas presented a similar proliferation index, more research is warranted to understand the true role of the epithelial components, which are believed to be inactive in nature, as well as in the development and biological behaviour of these lesions. PMID:23739858

  17. Structural Development, Cellular Differentiation and Proliferation of the Respiratory Epithelium in the Bovine Fetal Lung.

    PubMed

    Drozdowska, J; Cousens, C; Finlayson, J; Collie, D; Dagleish, M P

    2016-01-01

    Fetal bovine lung samples of 11 different gestational ages were assigned to a classical developmental stage based on histological morphology. Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize the morphology of forming airways, proliferation rate of airway epithelium and the presence of epithelial cell types (i.e. ciliated cells, club cells, neuroepithelial cells (NECs) and type II pneumocytes). Typical structural organization of pseudoglandular (84-98 days gestational age [DGA]), canalicular (154-168 DGA) and alveolar (224-266 DGA) stages was recognized. In addition, transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular (112-126 DGA) and canalicular-saccular (182 DGA) morphologies were present. The embryonic stage was not observed. A significantly (P <0.05) higher proliferation rate of pulmonary epithelium, on average 5.5% and 4.4% in bronchi and bronchioles, respectively, was present in the transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular phase (112-126 DGA) compared with all other phases, while from 8 weeks before term (224-266 DGA) proliferation had almost ceased. The first epithelial cells identified by specific marker proteins in the earliest samples available for study (84 DGA) were ciliated cells and NECs. Club cells were present initially at 112 DGA and type II pneumocytes at 224 DGA. At the latest time points (224-226 DGA) these latter cell types were still present at a much lower percentage compared with adult cattle. This study characterized bovine fetal lung development by histological morphology and cellular composition of the respiratory epithelium and suggests that the apparent structural anatomical maturity of the bovine lung at term is not matched by functional maturity of the respiratory epithelium.

  18. Lycopene modulates cellular proliferation, glycolysis and hepatic ultrastructure during hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prachi; Bhatia, Nisha; Bansal, Mohinder Pal; Koul, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effect of lycopene extracted from tomatoes (LycT) on ultrastructure, glycolytic enzymes, cell proliferation markers and hypoxia during N-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. METHODS Female BALB/c mice were randomly divided into four groups: The Control, NDEA (200 mg NDEA/kg b.w. given i.p.), LycT (5 mg/kg b.w. given orally on alternate days) and LycT + NDEA group. The mRNA and protein expression of various cell proliferation markers (PCNA, Cyclin D1, and p21) were assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The ultrastructure of hepatic tissue was analyzed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The enzymatic activity of glycolytic enzymes was estimated using standardized protocols, while glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity level was estimated using a kit obtained from Reckon Diagnostic P. Ltd. (India). RESULTS Uncontrolled proliferation in the liver of NDEA (P ≤ 0.001) mice was evident from the high expression of cell-proliferation associated genes (PCNA, Cyclin D1, and p21) when compared to control and LycT mice. In addition, enhanced activities of hexokinase, phosphoglucoisomerase, aldolase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α were observed in NDEA mice as compared to control (P ≤ 0.001) and LycT (P ≤ 0.001) mice. The alterations in hepatic ultrastructure observed in the NDEA group correlated with the changes in the above parameters. LycT pre-treatment in NDEA-challenged mice ameliorated the investigated pathways disrupted by NDEA treatment. Moreover, hepatic electron micrographs from the LycT + NDEA group showed increased macrophages, apoptotic bodies and well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in comparison to undifferentiated HCC as observed in the NDEA treated group. CONCLUSION This study demonstrates that dietary supplementation with LycT has a multidimensional role in preventing

  19. Proliferation Control Regimes: Background and Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-18

    functions of the various federal agencies are outlined below. • The National Security Council coordinates nonproliferation, counterproliferation...NCPC) that coordinates intelligence on proliferation issues within the intelligence community. • The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has a WMD...the need to meet state and federal environmental requirements and from both local and congressional concerns over the means of destruction

  20. Changes in cellular proliferation and plasma products are associated with liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Melgaço, Juliana Gil; Soriani, Frederico Marianetti; Sucupira, Pedro Henrique Ferreira; Pinheiro, Leonardo Assaf; Vieira, Yasmine Rangel; de Oliveira, Jaqueline Mendes; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Araújo, Cristina Carvalho Vianna; Pacheco-Moreira, Lúcio Filgueiras; Menezes, Gustavo Batista; Cruz, Oswaldo Gonçalves; Vitral, Claudia Lamarca; Pinto, Marcelo Alves

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the differences in immune response and cytokine profile between acute liver failure and self-limited acute hepatitis. METHODS Forty-six patients with self-limited acute hepatitis (AH), sixteen patients with acute liver failure (ALF), and twenty-two healthy subjects were involved in this study. The inflammatory and anti-inflammatory products in plasma samples were quantified using commercial enzyme-linked immunoassays and quantitative real-time PCR. The cellular immune responses were measured by proliferation assay using flow cytometry. The groups were divided into viral- and non-viral-induced self-limited AH and ALF. Thus, we worked with five groups: Hepatitis A virus (HAV)-induced self-limited acute hepatitis (HAV-AH), HAV-induced ALF (HAV-ALF), non-viral-induced self-limited acute hepatitis (non-viral AH), non-viral-induced acute liver failure (non-viral ALF), and healthy subjects (HC). Comparisons among HAV and non-viral-induced AH and ALF were performed. RESULTS The levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the cytokines investigated [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon gamma, and tumor necrosis factor] were significantly increased in ALF patients, independently of etiology (P < 0.05). High plasma mtDNA and IL-10 were the best markers associated with ALF [mtDNA: OR = 320.5 (95%CI: 14.42-7123.33), P < 0.0001; and IL-10: OR = 18.8 (95%CI: 1.38-257.94), P = 0.028] and death [mtDNA: OR = 12.1 (95%CI: 2.57-57.07), P = 0.002; and IL-10: OR = 8.01 (95%CI: 1.26-50.97), P = 0.027]. In the cellular proliferation assay, NKbright, NKT and regulatory T cells (TReg) predominated in virus-specific stimulation in HAV-induced ALF patients with an anergic behavior in the cellular response to mitotic stimulation. Therefore, in non-viral-induced ALF, anergic behavior of activated T cells was not observed after mitotic stimulation, as expected and as described by the literature. CONCLUSION mtDNA and IL-10 may be predictors of ALF and death. TReg cells are

  1. Stochastic cellular automata model of cell migration, proliferation and differentiation: validation with in vitro cultures of muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Garijo, N; Manzano, R; Osta, R; Perez, M A

    2012-12-07

    Cell migration and proliferation has been modelled in the literature as a process similar to diffusion. However, using diffusion models to simulate the proliferation and migration of cells tends to create a homogeneous distribution in the cell density that does not correlate to empirical observations. In fact, the mechanism of cell dispersal is not diffusion. Cells disperse by crawling or proliferation, or are transported in a moving fluid. The use of cellular automata, particle models or cell-based models can overcome this limitation. This paper presents a stochastic cellular automata model to simulate the proliferation, migration and differentiation of cells. These processes are considered as completely stochastic as well as discrete. The model developed was applied to predict the behaviour of in vitro cell cultures performed with adult muscle satellite cells. Moreover, non homogeneous distribution of cells has been observed inside the culture well and, using the above mentioned stochastic cellular automata model, we have been able to predict this heterogeneous cell distribution and compute accurate quantitative results. Differentiation was also incorporated into the computational simulation. The results predicted the myotube formation that typically occurs with adult muscle satellite cells. In conclusion, we have shown how a stochastic cellular automata model can be implemented and is capable of reproducing the in vitro behaviour of adult muscle satellite cells.

  2. LETM1-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ flux modulates cellular bioenergetics and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Doonan, Patrick J.; Chandramoorthy, Harish C.; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Zhang, Xueqian; Cárdenas, César; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Rajan, Sudarsan; Vallem, Sandhya; Chen, Xiongwen; Foskett, J. Kevin; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Houser, Steven R.; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of mitochondrial Ca2+-dependent bioenergetics has been implicated in various pathophysiological settings, including neurodegeneration and myocardial infarction. Although mitochondrial Ca2+ transport has been characterized, and several molecules, including LETM1, have been identified, the functional role of LETM1-mediated Ca2+ transport remains unresolved. This study examines LETM1-mediated mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and bioenergetics in multiple cell types, including fibroblasts derived from patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS). The results show that both mitochondrial Ca2+ influx and efflux rates are impaired in LETM1 knockdown, and similar phenotypes were observed in ΔEF hand, D676A D688KLETM1 mutant-overexpressed cells, and in cells derived from patients with WHS. Although LETM1 levels were lower in WHS-derived fibroblasts, the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter components MCU, MCUR1, and MICU1 remain unaltered. In addition, the MCU mitoplast patch-clamp current (IMCU) was largely unaffected in LETM1-knockdown cells. Silencing of LETM1 also impaired basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption, possibly via complex IV inactivation and ATP production. Remarkably, LETM1 knockdown also resulted in increased reactive oxygen species production. Further, LETM1 silencing promoted AMPK activation, autophagy, and cell cycle arrest. Reconstitution of LETM1 or antioxidant overexpression rescued mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and bioenergetics. These findings reveal the role of LETM1-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ flux in shaping cellular bioenergetics.—Doonan, P J., Chandramoorthy, H. C., Hoffman, N. E., Zhang, X., Cárdenas, C., Shanmughapriya, S., Rajan, S., Vallem, S., Chen, X., Foskett, J. K., Cheung, J. Y., Houser, S. R., Madesh, M. LETM1-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ flux modulates cellular bioenergetics and proliferation. PMID:25077561

  3. PROX1 Gene is Differentially Expressed in Oral Cancer and Reduces Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria F.S.D.; de Oliveira Rodini, Camila; de Aquino Xavier, Flávia C.; Paiva, Katiúcia B.; Severino, Patrícia; Moyses, Raquel A.; López, Rossana M.; DeCicco, Rafael; Rocha, Lília A.; Carvalho, Marcos B.; Tajara, Eloiza H.; Nunes, Fabio D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Homeobox genes are a family of transcription factors that play a pivotal role in embryogenesis. Prospero homeobox 1 (PROX1) has been shown to function as a tumor suppressor gene or oncogene in various types of cancer, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We have previously identified PROX1 as a downregulated gene in OSCC. The aim of this study is to clarify the underlying mechanism by which PROX1 regulates tumorigenicity of OSCC cells. PROX1 mRNA and protein expression levels were first investigated in 40 samples of OSCC and in nontumor margins. Methylation and amplification analysis was also performed to assess the epigenetic and genetic mechanisms involved in controlling PROX1 expression. OSCC cell line SCC9 was also transfected to stably express the PROX1 gene. Next, SCC9-PROX1-overexpressing cells and controls were subjected to proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion assays in vitro. OSCC samples showed reduced PROX1 expression levels compared with nontumor margins. PROX1 amplification was associated with better overall survival. PROX1 overexpression reduces cell proliferation and downregulates cyclin D1. PROX1-overexpressing cells also exhibited reduced CK18 and CK19 expression and transcriptionally altered the expression of WISP3, GATA3, NOTCH1, and E2F1. Our results suggest that PROX1 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in oral carcinogenesis. PMID:25526434

  4. Proliferation of nuclear weapons: opportunities for control and abolition.

    PubMed

    Sidel, Victor W; Levy, Barry S

    2007-09-01

    Nuclear weapons pose a particularly destructive threat. Prevention of the proliferation and use of nuclear weapons is urgently important to public health. "Horizontal" proliferation refers to nation-states or nonstate entities that do not have, but are acquiring, nuclear weapons or developing the capability and materials for producing them. "Vertical" proliferation refers to nation-states that do possess nuclear weapons and are increasing their stockpiles of these weapons, improving the technical sophistication or reliability of their weapons, or developing new weapons. Because nation-states or other entities that wish to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons need methods for delivering those weapons, proliferation of delivery mechanisms must also be prevented. Controlling proliferation--and ultimately abolishing nuclear weapons--involves national governments, intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental and professional organizations, and society at large.

  5. 14-3-3σ regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by modulating Yap1 cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Sumitha A.T.; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Xue, Lei; Dean, Douglas C.; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2015-01-01

    The homozygous repeated epilation (Er/Er) mouse mutant of the gene encoding 14-3-3σ displays an epidermal phenotype characterized by hyperproliferative keratinocytes and undifferentiated epidermis. Heterozygous Er/+ mice develop spontaneous skin tumors and are highly sensitive to tumor-promoting DMBA/TPA induction. The molecular mechanisms underlying 14-3-3σ regulation of epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and tumor formation have not been well elucidated. In the present study, we found that Er/Er keratinocytes failed to sequester Yap1 in the cytoplasm, leading to its nuclear localization during epidermal development in vivo and under differentiation-inducing culture conditions in vitro. In addition, enhanced Yap1 nuclear localization was also evident in DMBA/TPA-induced tumors from Er/+ skin. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Yap1 expression in Er/Er keratinocytes inhibited their proliferation, suggesting that YAP1 functions as a downstream effector of 14-3-3σ controlling epidermal proliferation. We then demonstrated that keratinocytes express all seven 14-3-3 protein isoforms, some of which form heterodimers with 14-3-3σ, either full-length WT or the mutant form found in Er/Er mice. However Er 14-3-3σ does not interact with Yap1, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. We conclude that Er 14-3-3σ disrupts the interaction between 14-3-3 and Yap1, thus fails to block Yap1 nuclear transcriptional function, causing continued progenitor expansion and inhibition of differentiation in Er/Er epidermis. PMID:25668240

  6. Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons: Opportunities for Control and Abolition

    PubMed Central

    Sidel, Victor W.; Levy, Barry S.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear weapons pose a particularly destructive threat. Prevention of the proliferation and use of nuclear weapons is urgently important to public health. “Horizontal” proliferation refers to nation-states or nonstate entities that do not have, but are acquiring, nuclear weapons or developing the capability and materials for producing them. “Vertical” proliferation refers to nation-states that do possess nuclear weapons and are increasing their stockpiles of these weapons, improving the technical sophistication or reliability of their weapons, or developing new weapons. Because nation-states or other entities that wish to use or threaten to use nuclear weapons need methods for delivering those weapons, proliferation of delivery mechanisms must also be prevented. Controlling proliferation—and ultimately abolishing nuclear weapons—involves national governments, intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental and professional organizations, and society at large. PMID:17666690

  7. Early-life environmental intervention may increase the number of neurons, astrocytes, and cellular proliferation in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann-Duarte, Elisa C; Padilha-Hoffmann, Camila B; Martins, Daniel F; Schuh, Artur F S; Fernandes, Marilda C; Santin, Ricardo; Merlo, Suelen; Sanvitto, Gilberto L; Lucion, Aldo B

    2011-11-01

    Neonatal handling reduces the stress response in adulthood due to a feedback mechanism. The present study analyzed the effects of repeated neonatal environmental intervention (daily handling during the first 10 days after birth) on neuron-, astroglial cell density, and cellular proliferation of the hippocampal (CA1, CA2, and CA3) pyramidal cell layers in female rats. Pups were divided into two groups, nonhandled and handled, which were submitted to repeated handling sessions between postnatal days 1 and 10. Histological and immunohistochemical procedures were used to determine changes in neuron density, astroglial cell density, and cellular proliferation. We found an increase in neuron density in each pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, and CA3) in female rats (11 and 90 day old) that were handled during the neonatal period. Furthermore, we found an increase in astroglial cell density in both hemispheres of the brain in the handled group. Finally, we observed an increase in cellular proliferation in both hippocampi (CA1, CA2, and CA3) of the brain in female pups (11 days old) handled during the neonatal period. This study demonstrates that an early-life environmental intervention may induce morphological changes in a structure involved with several functions, including the stress response. The results of the current study suggest that neonatal handling may influence the animals' responses to environmental adversities later in life.

  8. Fluidic control over cell proliferation and chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groisman, Alex

    2006-03-01

    Microscopic flows are almost always stable and laminar that allows precise control of chemical environment in micro-channels. We describe design and operation of several microfluidic devices, in which various types of environments are created for different experimental assays with live cells. In a microfluidic chemostat, colonies of non-adherent bacterial and yeast cells are trapped in micro-chambers with walls permeable for chemicals. Fast chemical exchange between the chambers and nearby flow-through channels creates essentially chemostatic medium conditions in the chambers and leads to exponential growth of the colonies up to very high cell densities. Another microfluidic device allows creation of linear concentration profiles of a pheromone (α-factor) across channels with non-adherent yeast cells, without exposure of the cells to flow or other mechanical perturbation. The concentration profile remains stable for hours enabling studies of chemotropic response of the cells to the pheromone gradient. A third type of the microfluidic devices is used to study chemotaxis of human neutrophils exposed to gradients of a chemoattractant (fMLP). The devices generate concentration profiles of various shapes, with adjustable steepness and mean concentration. The ``gradient'' of the chemoattractant can be imposed and reversed within less than a second, allowing repeated quantitative experiments.

  9. Immunohistochemical characterization of cellular proliferation in small intestinal hyperplasia of rats with hepatic Strobilocercus fasciolaris infection.

    PubMed

    Lagapa, J T; Oku, Y; Kamiya, M

    2008-07-01

    Rats infected with the larvae of Taenia taeniaeformis harbour the intermediate stage of the parasite Strobilocercus fasciolaris within the liver. Affected animals also develop gastric and intestinal hyperplasia. The pathogenesis of the gastric hyperplasia has been extensively investigated, but few studies have addressed the nature of the intestinal changes. This study characterizes the proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells by immunohistochemical labelling for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake. At 6 weeks post-infection (wpi) there was an increase in villous length but crypt depth was normal. At 9 wpi there was evidence of epithelial hyperplasia, increased villous length and crypt depth, and expansion of zones of epithelial proliferation. Immunohistochemical labelling indicated that an increase in the number of proliferating cells produced a greater number of progeny cells. Intestinal hyperplasia during experimental infection with T. taeniaeformis larvae is likely to be related to the associated gastropathy, although the mechanisms underlying both changes remain undefined.

  10. Controlling Cellular Endocytosis at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2011-03-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of drug delivery is the intra-cellular delivery of active agents. Several drugs and especially nucleic acids all need to be delivered within the cell interior to exert their therapeutic action. Small hydrophobic molecules can permeate cell membranes with relative ease, but hydrophilic molecules and especially large macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids require a vector to assist their transport across the cell membrane. This must be designed so as to ensure intracellular delivery without compromising cell viability. We have recently achieved this by using pH-sensitive poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-phosphorylcholine)- co -poly(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PMPC-PDPA) and poly(ethylene oxide)-co- poly(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PEO-PDPA) diblock copolymers that self-assemble to form vesicles in aqueous solution. These vesicles combine a non-fouling PMPC or PEO block with a pH-sensitive PDPA block and have the ability to encapsulate both hydrophobic molecules within the vesicular membrane and hydrophilic molecules within their aqueous cores. The pH sensitive nature of the PDPA blocks make the diblock copolymers forming stable vesicles at physiological pH but that rapid dissociation of these vesicles occurs between pH 5 and pH 6 to form molecularly dissolved copolymer chains (unimers). We used these vesicles to encapsulate small and large macromolecules and these were successfully delivered intracellularly including nucleic acid, drugs, quantum dots, and antibodies. Dynamic light scattering, zeta potential measurements, and transmission electron microscopy were used to study and optimise the encapsulation processes. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, fluorescence flow cytometry and lysates analysis were used to quantify cellular uptake and to study the kinetics of this process in vitro and in vivo. We show the effective cytosolic delivery of nucleic acids, proteins, hydrophobic molecules

  11. Depolarization of Cellular Resting Membrane Potential Promotes Neonatal Cardiomyocyte Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jen-Yu; Williams, Corin; Levin, Michael; Black, Lauren Deems

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) undergo a rapid transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth soon after birth, which is a major challenge to the development of engineered cardiac tissue for pediatric patients. Resting membrane potential (Vmem) has been shown to play an important role in cell differentiation and proliferation during development. We hypothesized that depolarization of neonatal CMs would stimulate or maintain CM proliferation in vitro. To test our hypothesis, we isolated postnatal day 3 neonatal rat CMs and subjected them to sustained depolarization via the addition of potassium gluconate or Ouabain to the culture medium. Cell density and CM percentage measurements demonstrated an increase in mitotic CMs along with a ~2 fold increase in CM numbers with depolarization. In addition, depolarization led to an increase in cells in G2 and S phase, indicating increased proliferation, as measured by flow cytometry. Surprisingly depolarization of Vmem with either treatment led to inhibition of proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. This effect is abrogated when the study was carried out on postnatal day 7 neonatal CMs, which are less proliferative, indicating that the likely mechanism of depolarization is the maintenance of the proliferating CM population. In summary, our findings suggest that depolarization maintains postnatal CM proliferation and may be a novel approach to encourage growth of engineered tissue and cardiac regeneration in pediatric patients. PMID:25295125

  12. Fish oil supplementation associated with decreased cellular degeneration and increased cellular proliferation 6 weeks after middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Michaela C; Howells, David W; Crewther, David P; Carey, Leeanne M; Crewther, Sheila G

    2015-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-LC-PUFAs) are both neuroprotective and have antidepressive effects. However the influence of dietary supplemented n-3-LC-PUFAs on inflammation-related cell death and proliferation after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo)-induced stroke is unknown. We have previously demonstrated that anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors are reduced in n-3-LC-PUFA-fed MCAo animals. Thus in the present study, male hooded Wistar rats were exposed to MCAo or sham surgeries and examined behaviorally 6 weeks later, prior to euthanasia and examination of lesion size, cell death and proliferation in the dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis region of the hippocampus of the ipsilesional hemispheres, and the thalamus of the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres. Markers of cell genesis and cell degeneration in the hippocampus or thalamus of the ipsilesional hemisphere did not differ between surgery and diet groups 6 weeks post MCAo. Dietary supplementation with n-3-LC-PUFA decreased cell degeneration and increased cell proliferation in the thalamic region of the contralesional hemisphere. MCAo-associated cell degeneration in the hippocampus and thalamus positively correlated with anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors previously reported in these animals. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory n-3-LC-PUFA supplementation appears to have cellular protective effects after MCAo in the rat, which may affect behavioral outcomes.

  13. Enhanced cellular uptake and anti-proliferating effect of chitosan hydrochlorides modified genistein loaded NLC on human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenji; Liu, Jinlu; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xuedong; Yu, Shihui; Yang, Xinggang; Kong, Jun; Pan, Weisan

    2014-08-25

    This study was attempted to increase the cellular uptake of developed genistein loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) into human lens epithelial (HLE) cells by chitosan hydrochlorides coatings when applied in post lens capsule (PCO) treatment, and to provide further understanding of the uptake and anti-proliferation mechanisms inside. NLCs were produced using melt-emulsification method and were subsequently coated with chitosan hydrochlorides by adsorption. The uptake of various particle sizes were evaluated and visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), showing a size-dependent manner. The uptake of NLC was proved to be endocytosed in an energy dependent and clathrin-mediated endocytosis to HLE cells by the decrease in uptake at lower temperature, when pre-saturated by blank NLC and in the presence of NaN3 and sucrose. CH coating improved the uptake percentage of NLC irrespective of the particle size, without influencing the uptake mechanism. Cell apoptosis was tested using PI and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, followed by flow cytometer analysis. Higher anti-proliferation effect was observed for CH-NLC in inhibiting the growth of HLE cells by causing more apoptosis. Results above indicate that GEN-NLC surface modified by chitosan hydrochlorides could enhance the trans-cellular performance and anti-proliferating effect as PCO therapy.

  14. Control of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by p63.

    PubMed

    Truong, Amy B; Khavari, Paul A

    2007-02-01

    The p53 family member p63 has been implicated in both the development and maintenance of stratified epithelial tissues, including the epidermis. Increasing data support p63 function in the regenerative capacity of basal keratinocytes by maintaining cell proliferation. Recent studies further suggest this regulation relies on inhibition of p53 activity. In addition, p63 appears to exert separate control over epidermal differentiation, which may involve control of such key signaling molecules as IKKalpha and Notch. While studies over the past decade have greatly expanded our knowledge of p63 function, much remains to be understood regarding how p63 regulates epidermal homeostasis. Future efforts to identify and validate direct p63 target genes as well as to understand the expression and function of individual p63 isoforms will be important to further define how p63 functions in the control of keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

  15. Control of cell proliferation by microRNAs in plants.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ramiro E; Schommer, Carla; Palatnik, Javier F

    2016-12-01

    Plants have the ability to generate different and new organs throughout their life cycle. Organ growth is mostly determined by the combinatory effects of cell proliferation and cell expansion. Still, organ size and shape are adjusted constantly by environmental conditions and developmental timing. The plasticity of plant development is further illustrated by the diverse organ forms found in nature. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to control key biological processes in plants. In this review, we will discuss recent findings showing the participation of miRNA networks in the regulation of cell proliferation and organ growth. It has become clear that miRNA networks play both integrative and specific roles in the control of organ development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, recent work in different species demonstrated a broad role for miR396 in the control of organ size, and that specific tuning of the miR396 network can improve crop yield.

  16. Epidermal cellular proliferation and differentiation in sexually mature male Salmo salar with androgen levels depressed by oil.

    PubMed

    Burton, D; Burton, M P; Truscott, B; Idler, D R

    1985-07-22

    Sexually mature male Salmo salar exhibit epidermal thickening and an increase in goblet cell concentration during the spawning season. The ventral skin, which is likely to experience most abrasive contact during the spawning period, has the thickest epidermis and the greatest goblet cell concentration. Following exposure to crude oil there is inhibition of cellular proliferation and elongation associated with epidermal thickening, and also inhibition of mucigenesis. Data on the androgen levels in these fish, and data from earlier studies involving treatment with hormones, indicate that oil-related epidermal effects during the spawning period are most likely systemic in origin, probably arising from reduced plasmatic androgen levels.

  17. Enhancing the cellular anti-proliferation activity of pyridazinones as c-met inhibitors using docking analysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Weiqiang; Ai, Jing; Jin, Shiyu; Shi, Zhangxing; Peng, Xia; Wang, Lang; Ji, Yinchun; Lu, Dong; Liu, Yang; Geng, Meiyu; Hu, Youhong

    2015-05-05

    A series of 2, 6-disubstituted pyridazinone derivatives were evaluated and optimized for their c-Met inhibitory activity in enzyme and cellular assay. An analysis of the SAR results arising from computer modeling analysis of members of the library led to the proposal that in order to obtain optimal inhibitory activity in cellular systems the lipophilic/hydrophilic properties of individual structural fragments in the inhibitors need to match those of corresponding binding pockets in the enzyme. Guided by this proposal, the quinoline-pyridazinone 8a, containing hydrophobic 6-indolyl pyridazinone and quinoline moieties along with a hydrophilic morpholine terminal group, was designed and synthesized. The results of studies with this substance showed that it is a selective c-Met inhibitor with both a high enzyme inhibition IC50 value of 4.2 nM and a high EBC-1 cell proliferation inhibition IC50 value of 17 nM.

  18. Tart cherry juice induces differential dose-dependent effects on apoptosis, but not cellular proliferation, in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R; Wooden, Alissa

    2012-11-01

    Consumption of polyphenol-rich fruits, for example, tart cherries, is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. This is due, in large part, to the diverse myriad bioactive agents, that is, polyphenol anthocyanins, present in fruits. Anthocyanin-rich tart cherries purportedly modulate numerous cellular processes associated with oncogenesis such as apoptosis, cellular proliferation (CP), and cell cycle progression, although the effective concentrations eliciting these effects are unclear. We hypothesized that several dose-dependent effects over a large concentration range of 100% tart cherry juice (TCJ) would exist and affect these processes differentially with the potential for cellular protection and cellular death either by apoptosis or by necrosis. In this in vitro study, we tested the dose response of TCJ on CP and cell death in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. TCJ was added at 0.03-30% (v/v) to cells and incubated overnight with the medium alone or with increasing TCJ. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly reduced by 20% at ≥10% (v/v) TCJ and associated with necrosis, but was not different between the control and treatment groups at <10% TCJ. MTT reduction was also significantly reduced by 27% and 80% at 10% and 30% TCJ, respectively, and associated with necrosis. Apoptosis, but not necrosis, was increased ∼63% at 3% TCJ (∼307 nM monomeric anthocyanins), yet significantly decreased (P<.05) by 20% at 1% TCJ (920 nM) both of which were physiologically relevant concentrations of anthocyanins. The data support a biphasic effect on apoptosis and no effect on proliferation.

  19. Noncoding RNA Control of Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Senescent cells accumulate in normal tissues with advancing age and arise by long-term culture of primary cells. Senescence develops following exposure to a range of stress-causing agents and broadly influences the physiology and pathology of tissues, organs, and systems in the body. While many proteins are known to control senescence, numerous noncoding (nc)RNAs are also found to promote or repress the senescent phenotype. Here, we review the regulatory ncRNAs (primarily microRNAs and lncRNAs) identified to-date as key modulators of senescence. We highlight the major senescent pathways (p53/p21 and pRB/p16), as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) and other senescence-associated events governed by ncRNAs, and discuss the importance of understanding comprehensively the ncRNAs implicated in cell senescence. PMID:26331977

  20. Signalling Pathways Controlling Cellular Actin Organization.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Anika; Stradal, Theresia E B; Rottner, Klemens

    2017-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is essential for morphogenesis and virtually all types of cell shape changes. Reorganization is per definition driven by continuous disassembly and re-assembly of actin filaments, controlled by major, ubiquitously operating machines. These are specifically employed by the cell to tune its activities in accordance with respective environmental conditions or to satisfy specific needs.Here we sketch some fundamental signalling pathways established to contribute to the reorganization of specific actin structures at the plasma membrane. Rho-family GTPases are at the core of these pathways, and dissection of their precise contributions to actin reorganization in different cell types and tissues will thus continue to improve our understanding of these important signalling nodes. Furthermore, we will draw your attention to the emerging theme of actin reorganization on intracellular membranes, its functional relation to Rho-GTPase signalling, and its relevance for the exciting phenomenon autophagy.

  1. Cellular Mechanisms of Ciliary Length Control

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Jacob; Tsiokas, Leonidas; Maskey, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are evolutionarily conserved, membrane-bound, microtubule-based organelles on the surface of most eukaryotic cells. They play important roles in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways during growth, development, cell mobility, and tissue homeostasis. Defects in ciliary structure or function are associated with multiple human disorders called ciliopathies. These diseases affect diverse tissues, including, but not limited to the eyes, kidneys, brain, and lungs. Many processes must be coordinated simultaneously in order to initiate ciliogenesis. These include cell cycle, vesicular trafficking, and axonemal extension. Centrioles play a central role in both cell cycle progression and ciliogenesis, making the transition between basal bodies and mitotic spindle organizers integral to both processes. The maturation of centrioles involves a functional shift from cell division toward cilium nucleation which takes place concurrently with its migration and fusion to the plasma membrane. Several proteinaceous structures of the distal appendages in mother centrioles are required for this docking process. Ciliary assembly and maintenance requires a precise balance between two indispensable processes; so called assembly and disassembly. The interplay between them determines the length of the resulting cilia. These processes require a highly conserved transport system to provide the necessary substances at the tips of the cilia and to recycle ciliary turnover products to the base using a based microtubule intraflagellar transport (IFT) system. In this review; we discuss the stages of ciliogenesis as well as mechanisms controlling the lengths of assembled cilia. PMID:26840332

  2. In Vivo Bystander Effect: Cranial X-Irradiation Leads to Elevated DNA Damage, Altered Cellular Proliferation and Apoptosis, and Increased p53 Levels in Shielded Spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Koturbash, Igor; Loree, Jonathan; Kutanzi, Kristy; Koganow, Clayton; Pogribny, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: It is well accepted that irradiated cells may 'forward' genome instability to nonirradiated neighboring cells, giving rise to the 'bystander effect' phenomenon. Although bystander effects were well studied by using cell cultures, data for somatic bystander effects in vivo are relatively scarce. Methods and Materials: We set out to analyze the existence and molecular nature of bystander effects in a radiation target-organ spleen by using a mouse model. The animal's head was exposed to X-rays while the remainder of the body was completely protected by a medical-grade shield. Using immunohistochemistry, we addressed levels of DNA damage, cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and p53 protein in the spleen of control animals and completely exposed and head-exposed/body bystander animals. Results: We found that localized head radiation exposure led to the induction of bystander effects in the lead-shielded distant spleen tissue. Namely, cranial irradiation led to increased levels of DNA damage and p53 expression and also altered levels of cellular proliferation and apoptosis in bystander spleen tissue. The observed bystander changes were not caused by radiation scattering and were observed in two different mouse strains; C57BL/6 and BALB/c. Conclusion: Our study proves that bystander effects occur in the distant somatic organs on localized exposures. Additional studies are required to characterize the nature of an enigmatic bystander signal and analyze the long-term persistence of these effects and possible contribution of radiation-induced bystander effects to secondary radiation carcinogenesis.

  3. Evaluation of Pharmacologic Agents to Suppress Intraocular Cellular Proliferation Following Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    Treatment of intraocular proliferation with intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide . Am J Ophthalmol 90:810, 1980. 9. Trese MT, Spitznas M... injected in the fashion for tractional retinal detachment model. The effects of triamcinolone seemed very comparable to dexamethasone with an...PG E 1 Prostaglandin PGE1 was injected in a 2 mg suspension into the vitreous cavity. Prostaglandin is a very unstable compound, and we assume has a

  4. Epithelial Xbp1 Is Required for Cellular Proliferation and Differentiation during Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Calvo, Veronica; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Lade, Abigale; Chou, Hsin-I; Lee, Youngmin A.; Farias, Eduardo F.; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2015-01-01

    Xbp1, a key mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), is activated by IRE1α-mediated splicing, which results in a frameshift to encode a protein with transcriptional activity. However, the direct function of Xbp1 in epithelial cells during mammary gland development is unknown. Here we report that the loss of Xbp1 in the mammary epithelium through targeted deletion leads to poor branching morphogenesis, impaired terminal end bud formation, and spontaneous stromal fibrosis during the adult virgin period. Additionally, epithelial Xbp1 deletion induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the epithelium and dramatically inhibits epithelial proliferation and differentiation during lactation. The synthesis of milk and its major components, α/β-casein and whey acidic protein (WAP), is significantly reduced due to decreased prolactin receptor (Prlr) and ErbB4 expression in Xbp1-deficient mammary epithelium. Reduction of Prlr and ErbB4 expression and their diminished availability at the cell surface lead to reduced phosphorylated Stat5, an essential regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation during lactation. As a result, lactating mammary glands in these mice produce less milk protein, leading to poor pup growth and postnatal death. These findings suggest that the loss of Xbp1 induces a terminal UPR which blocks proliferation and differentiation during mammary gland development. PMID:25713103

  5. PUMILIO-2 Is Involved in the Positive Regulation of Cellular Proliferation in Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shigunov, Patrícia; Kuligovski, Crisciele; de Aguiar, Alessandra Melo; Rebelatto, Carmen K.; Moutinho, José A.; Brofman, Paulo S.; Krieger, Marco A.; Goldenberg, Samuel; Munroe, David; Correa, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells can either differentiate into more specialized cells or undergo self-renewal. Several lines of evidence from different organisms suggest that these processes depend on the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. The presence of the PUF [Pumilio/FBF (fem-3 binding factor)] domain defines a conserved family of RNA binding proteins involved in repressing gene expression. It has been suggested that a conserved function of PUF proteins is to repress differentiation and sustain the mitotic proliferation of stem cells. In humans, Pumilio-2 (PUM2) is expressed in embryonic stem cells and adult germ cells. Here we show that PUM2 is expressed in a subpopulation of adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) cultures, with a granular pattern of staining in the cytoplasm. Protein levels of PUM2 showed no changes during the differentiation of ASCs into adipocytes. Moreover, RNAi knockdown of pum2 did not alter the rate of adipogenic differentiation compared with wild-type control cells. A ribonomic approach was used to identify PUM2-associated mRNAs. Microarray analysis showed that PUM2-bound mRNAs are part of gene networks involved in cell proliferation and gene expression control. We studied pum2 expression in cell cultures with low or very high levels of proliferation and found that changes in pum2 production were dependent on the proliferation status of the cell. Transient knockdown of pum2 expression by RNAi impaired proliferation of ASCs in vitro. Our results suggest that PUM2 does not repress differentiation of ASCs but rather is involved in the positive control of ASCs division and proliferation. PMID:21649561

  6. Reprogramming cellular behavior with RNA controllers responsive to endogenous proteins.

    PubMed

    Culler, Stephanie J; Hoff, Kevin G; Smolke, Christina D

    2010-11-26

    Synthetic genetic devices that interface with native cellular pathways can be used to change natural networks to implement new forms of control and behavior. The engineering of gene networks has been limited by an inability to interface with native components. We describe a class of RNA control devices that overcome these limitations by coupling increased abundance of particular proteins to targeted gene expression events through the regulation of alternative RNA splicing. We engineered RNA devices that detect signaling through the nuclear factor κB and Wnt signaling pathways in human cells and rewire these pathways to produce new behaviors, thereby linking disease markers to noninvasive sensing and reprogrammed cellular fates. Our work provides a genetic platform that can build programmable sensing-actuation devices enabling autonomous control over cellular behavior.

  7. Downregulation of cellular prion protein inhibited the proliferation and invasion and induced apoptosis of Marek's disease virus-transformed avian T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xuerui; Yang, Runxia; Liu, Guilin; Zhu, Manling; Zhang, Tianliang; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is ubiquitously expressed in the cytomembrane of a considerable number of eukaryotic cells. Although several studies have investigated the functions of PrPC in cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and tumorigenesis of mammals, the correlated functions of chicken PrPC (chPrPC) remain unknown. In this study, stable chPrPC-downregulated Marek's disease (MD) virus-transformed avian T cells (MSB1-SiRNA-3) were established by introducing short interfering RNA (SiRNA) targeting chicken prion protein genes. We found that downregulation of chPrPC inhibits proliferation, invasion, and migration, and induces G1 cell cycle phase arrest and apoptosis of MSB1-SiRNA-3 cells compared with Marek's disease virus-transformed avian T cells (MSB1) and negative control cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first evidence supporting the positive correlation between the expression level of chPrPC and the proliferation, migration, and invasion ability of MSB1 cells, but appears to protect MSB1 cells from apoptosis, which suggests it functions in the formation and development of MD tumors. This evidence may contribute to future research into the specific molecular mechanisms of chPrPC in the formation and development of MD tumors. PMID:26243599

  8. Cellular proliferation in the skin of X-rayed newt limbs (with a note on x-ray-induced limb regression)

    SciTech Connect

    Wertz, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    Left hind limbs, including the pelvis, of adult newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) were locally irradiated with a dose of x-rays that inhibited regeneration (2,000 R). This x-ray dose and other doses (700-2,000 R) capable of inhibiting limb regeneration also cause limb regression prior to amputation. Before limb regression occurred, there was a latent period of 3 to 6 weeks. Limb regression was characterized by necrotic wasting and resorption of distal elements. The degree of loss was variable and dependent upon dosage. After this further degenerative changes were not noted. Proliferation of epidermal cells was examined 4 days after irradiation prior to limb regression or after x-ray-induced degeneration of the limbs had ended. Proliferative activity in x-rayed limbs was also compared at various stages of contralateral control limb regeneration. Limbs examined after x-ray-induced limb regression had ended showed levels of (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA comparable to normal epidermis. In contrast, limbs examined 4 days after irradiation had lower levels of DNA synthesis (P much less than 0.01). Amputation of limbs in both groups caused an increase in DNA synthesis (P much less than 0.01). Histological examination showed that cellular proliferation was associated primarily with the epidermis. These results indicate that epidermal cell proliferation was not resistant to x-rays. However, levels of normal cell division were observed after amputation of after cessation of x-ray-induced limb regression.

  9. Modulation of Estrogen Response Element-Driven Gene Expressions and Cellular Proliferation with Polar Directions by Designer Transcription Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Muyan, Mesut; Güpür, Gizem; Yaşar, Pelin; Ayaz, Gamze; User, Sırma Damla; Kazan, Hasan Hüseyin; Huang, Yanfang

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα), as a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates 17β-estradiol (E2) effects. ERα is a modular protein containing a DNA binding domain (DBD) and transcription activation domains (AD) located at the amino- and carboxyl-termini. The interaction of the E2-activated ERα dimer with estrogen response elements (EREs) of genes constitutes the initial step in the ERE-dependent signaling pathway necessary for alterations of cellular features. We previously constructed monomeric transcription activators, or monotransactivators, assembled from an engineered ERE-binding module (EBM) using the ERα-DBD and constitutively active ADs from other transcription factors. Monotransactivators modulated cell proliferation by activating and repressing ERE-driven gene expressions that simulate responses observed with E2-ERα. We reasoned here that integration of potent heterologous repression domains (RDs) into EBM could generate monotransrepressors that alter ERE-bearing gene expressions and cellular proliferation in directions opposite to those observed with E2-ERα or monotransactivators. Consistent with this, monotransrepressors suppressed reporter gene expressions that emulate the ERE-dependent signaling pathway. Moreover, a model monotransrepressor regulated DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression and proliferation of recombinant adenovirus infected ER-negative cells through decreasing as well as increasing gene expressions with polar directions compared with E2-ERα or monotransactivator. Our results indicate that an ‘activator’ or a ‘repressor’ possesses both transcription activating/enhancing and repressing/decreasing abilities within a chromatin context. Offering a protein engineering platform to alter signal pathway-specific gene expressions and cell growth, our approach could also be used for the development of tools for epigenetic modifications and for clinical interventions wherein multigenic de-regulations are an issue. PMID:26295471

  10. Annexin A1 sustains tumor metabolism and cellular proliferation upon stable loss of HIF1A

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Christina; Lin, Suling J.; Wappler, Jessica; Klinger, Bertram; Blüthgen, Nils; Du Bois, Ilona; Schmeck, Bernd; Lehrach, Hans; de Graauw, Marjo; Goncalves, Emanuel; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Tan, Patrick; Grabsch, Heike I.; Prigione, Alessandro; Kempa, Stefan; Cramer, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Despite the approval of numerous molecular targeted drugs, long-term antiproliferative efficacy is rarely achieved and therapy resistance remains a central obstacle of cancer care. Combined inhibition of multiple cancer-driving pathways promises to improve antiproliferative efficacy. HIF-1 is a driver of gastric cancer and considered to be an attractive target for therapy. We noted that gastric cancer cells are able to functionally compensate the stable loss of HIF-1α. Via transcriptomics we identified a group of upregulated genes in HIF-1α-deficient cells and hypothesized that these genes confer survival upon HIF-1α loss. Strikingly, simultaneous knock-down of HIF-1α and Annexin A1 (ANXA1), one of the identified genes, resulted in complete cessation of proliferation. Using stable isotope-resolved metabolomics, oxidative and reductive glutamine metabolism was found to be significantly impaired in HIF-1α/ANXA1-deficient cells, potentially explaining the proliferation defect. In summary, we present a conceptually novel application of stable gene inactivation enabling in-depth deconstruction of resistance mechanisms. In theory, this experimental approach is applicable to any cancer-driving gene or pathway and promises to identify various new targets for combination therapies. PMID:26760764

  11. A cellular control architecture for compliant artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Odhner, Lael U; Ueda, Jun; Asada, H Harry

    2006-01-01

    Dividing an artificial muscle material into a network of small cells could provide performance benefits and eliminate unwanted behaviors such as hysteresis. This paper presents a scheme for the position control or compliance control of an artificial muscle having this kind of cellular structure. Each cell contracts or relaxes probabilistically in response to a global feedback control loop, which measures only the aggregate force and displacement of the muscle. The stochastic nature of the cells produces smooth, reliable global behavior in the artificial muscle. By choosing a control law such that the expected response of the artificial muscle is equal to the desired response, good tracking control is achieved.

  12. Cesium reversibly suppresses HeLa cell proliferation by inhibiting cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kakinouchi, Kei; Nagae, Tomoki; Nagai, Toshihiko; Shimura, Kiyohito; Hazama, Akihiro

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of Cs(+) on cultured human cells. We find that HeLa cell growth is suppressed by the addition of 10 mm CsCl into the culture media. In the Cs(+) -treated cells, the intracellular Cs(+) and K(+) concentrations are increased and decreased, respectively. This leads to a decrease in activity of the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase, which uses K(+) as a cofactor. Cs(+) -treated cells show an intracellular pH shift towards alkalization. Based on these results, CsCl presumably suppresses HeLa cell proliferation by inducing an intracellular cation imbalance that affects cell metabolism. Our findings may have implications for the use of Cs(+) in cancer therapy.

  13. MicroRNA-124 inhibits cellular proliferation and invasion by targeting Ets-1 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Zang, Wenqiao; Liu, Pei; Wang, Yuanyuan; Du, Yuwen; Chen, Xiaonan; Deng, Meng; Sun, Wencong; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Guoqiang; Zhai, Baoping

    2014-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that, by targeting certain messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for translational repression or cleavage, can regulate the expression of these genes. In addition, miRNAs may also function as oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes, as the abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with various human tumors. However, the effects of the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer remain unclear. The present study was conducted to study the expression of miR-124 in breast cancer, paying particular attention to miR-124's relation to the proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis in breast cancer cell MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to identify miR-124 that was down-regulated in breast cancer tissues. We also showed E26 transformation specific-1 (Ets-1) and miR-124 expression levels in breast cancer tissues that were associated with lymph node metastases. With transfected synthetic miR-124 agomir into MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, a significant reduction (P < 0.05) in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and colony forming potential was observed after treatment with miR-124. Apoptosis and migration rates were found to be significantly higher in two breast-derived cell lines transfected with a miR-124 agomir (P < 0.05). Luciferase reporter assay and Western blot were used to verify Ets-1 as a potential major target gene of miR-124, and the result showed that miR-124 can bind to putative binding sites within the Ets-1 mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR) to reduce its expression. Based on these findings, we propose that miR-124 and Ets-1 may serve as a therapeutic agent in breast cancer.

  14. Amantadine inhibits cellular proliferation and induces the apoptosis of hepatocellular cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lan, Zengmei; Chong, Zhaoyang; Liu, Cong; Feng, Danyang; Fang, Dihai; Zang, Weijin; Zhou, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies worldwide, and its incidence associated with viral infection has increased in recent years. Amantadine is a tricyclic symmetric amine that can effectively protect against the hepatitis C virus. However, its antitumor properties remain unclear. In the present study, the effects of amantadine on tumor cell viability, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis were investigated. The growth of HepG2 and SMMC‑7721 cells (HCC cell lines) was detected by an MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to investigate cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were also performed to examine the expression of cell cycle‑ and apoptosis‑related genes and proteins, including cyclin E, cyclin D1, cyclin‑dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bax. Our results demonstrated that amantadine markedly inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 and SMMC‑7721 cells in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner and arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase. The levels of the cell cycle‑related genes and proteins (cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK2) were reduced by amantadine, and apoptosis was significantly induced. Amantadine treatment also reduced Bcl‑2 and increased the Bax protein and mRNA levels. Additionally, Bcl‑2/Bax ratios were lower in the two HCC cell lines following amantadine treatment. Collectively, these results emphasize the role of amantadine in suppressing proliferation and inducing apoptosis in HCC cells, advocating its use as a novel tumor-suppressive therapeutic candidate.

  15. Identification of glucocorticoid-regulated genes that control cell proliferation during murine respiratory development

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Anthony D; Tan, Kheng H; Olsson, P Fredrik; Zieba, Malgorzata; Flecknoe, Sharon J; Liddicoat, Douglas R; Mollard, Richard; Hooper, Stuart B; Cole, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoids play a vital role in fetal respiratory development and act via the intracellular glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to regulate transcription of key target genes. GR-null mice die at birth due to respiratory dysfunction associated with hypercellularity and atelectasis. To identify events associated with this lung phenotype we examined perinatal cellular proliferation rates and apoptotic indices. We demonstrate that compared to wild-type controls, day 18.5 postcoitum (p.c.) GR-null mouse lungs display significantly increased cell proliferation rates (1.8-fold P < 0.05) and no change in apoptosis. To examine underlying molecular mechanisms, we compared whole genome expression profiles by microarray analysis at 18.5 days p.c. Pathways relating to cell proliferation, division and cell cycle were significantly down-regulated while pathways relating to carbohydrate metabolism, kinase activities and immune responses were significantly up-regulated. Differential levels of gene expression were verified by quantitative-RT-PCR and/or Northern analysis. Key regulators of proliferation differentially expressed in the lung of 18.5 p.c. GR-null lungs included p21CIP1 (decreased 2.9-fold, P < 0.05), a negative regulator of the cell cycle, and Mdk (increased 6.0-fold, P < 0.05), a lung growth factor. The more under-expressed genes in 18.5 p.c. GR-null lungs included Chi3l3 (11-fold, P < 0.05), a macrophage inflammatory response gene and Ela1 (9.4-fold, P < 0.05), an extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme. Our results demonstrate that GR affects the transcriptional status of a number of regulatory processes during late fetal lung development. Amongst these processes is cell proliferation whereby GR induces expression of cell cycle repressors while suppressing induction of a well characterized cell cycle stimulator. PMID:17901120

  16. Expression of R132H mutational IDH1 in human U87 glioblastoma cells affects the SREBP1a pathway and induces cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian; Cui, Gang; Chen, Ming; Xu, Qinian; Wang, Xiuyun; Zhou, Dai; Lv, Shengxiang; Fu, Linshan; Wang, Zhong; Zuo, Jianling

    2013-05-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a (SREBP1a) is a member of the SREBP family of transcription factors, which mainly controls homeostasis of lipids. SREBP1a can also activate the transcription of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) by binding to its promoter region. IDH1 mutations, especially R132H mutation of IDH1, are a common feature of a major subset of human gliomas. There are few data available on the relationship between mutational IDH1 expression and SREBP1a pathway. In this study, we investigated cellular effects and SREBP1a pathway alterations caused by R132H mutational IDH1 expression in U87 cells. Two glioma cell lines, stably expressing mutational (U87/R132H) or wild type (U87/wt) IDH1, were established. A cell line, stably transfected with pcDNA3.1(+) (U87/vector), was generated as a control. Click-iT EdU assay, sulforhodamine B assay, and wound healing assay respectively showed that the expression of R132H induced cellular proliferation, cell growth, and cell migration. Western blot revealed that SREBP1 was increased in U87/R132H compared with that in U87/wt. Elevated SREBP1a and several its target genes, but not SREBP1c, were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction in U87/R132H. All these findings indicated that R132H mutational IDH1 is involved in the regulation of proliferation, growth, and migration of glioma cells. These effects may partially be mediated by SREBP1a pathway.

  17. Linkage between cellular communications, energy utilization, and proliferation in metastatic neuroendocrine cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ippolito, Joseph E.; Merritt, Matthew E.; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Moulder, Krista L.; Mennerick, Steven; Manchester, Jill K.; Gammon, Seth T.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    To identify metabolic features that support the aggressive behavior of human neuroendocrine (NE) cancers, we examined metastatic prostate NE tumors and derived prostate NE cancer (PNEC) cell lines from a transgenic mouse model using a combination of magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, in silico predictions of biotransformations that observed metabolites may undergo, biochemical tests of these predictions, and electrophysiological/calcium imaging studies. Malignant NE cells undergo excitation and increased proliferation when their GABAA, glutamate, and/or glycine receptors are stimulated, use glutamate and GABA as substrates for NADH biosynthesis, and produce propylene glycol, a precursor of pyruvate derived from glycine that increases levels of circulating free fatty acids through extra-NE cell effects. Treatment of nude mice containing PNEC tumor xenografts with (i) amiloride, a diuretic that inhibits Abp1, an enzyme involved in NE cell GABA metabolism, (ii) carbidopa, an inhibitor of dopa decarboxylase which functions upstream of Abp1, plus (iii) flumazenil, a benzodiazepine antagonist that binds to GABAA receptors, leads to significant reductions in tumor growth. These findings may be generally applicable: GeneChip data sets from 471 human neoplasms revealed that components of GABA metabolic pathways, including ABP1, exhibit statistically significant increases in their expression in NE and non-NE cancers. PMID:16895983

  18. Balanced cell proliferation and expansion is essential for flowering stem growth control.

    PubMed

    Ferjani, Ali; Hanai, Kenya; Gunji, Shizuka; Maeda, Saori; Sawa, Shinichiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    The postembryonic development of aboveground plant organs relies on a continuous supply of cells from the shoot apical meristem. Previous studies of developmental regulation in leaves and flowers have revealed the crucial role of coordinated cell proliferation and differentiation during organogenesis. However, the importance of this coordination has not been examined in flowering stems. Very recently, we attempted to identify regulatory factors that maintain flowering stem integrity. We found that the increased cell number in clavata (clv) mutants and the decreased cell size in de-etiolated (det)3-1 resulted in flowering stems that were thicker and thinner, respectively, than in wild-type (WT) plants. Interestingly, in the cell proliferation- and cell expansion-defective double mutant clv det3-1, the flowering stems often exhibited severe cracking, resulting in exposure of their inner tissues. In this study, further quantification of the cellular phenotypes in the cotyledons and leaves revealed no differences between det3-1 and clv3 det3-1. Together, the above findings suggest that the clv3 mutation in a det3-1 background primarily affects flowering stems, while its effect on other organs is likely negligible. We propose that the coordination between cell proliferation and differentiation is not only important during leaf development, but also plays a role in the growth control of Arabidopsis flowering stems.

  19. Balanced cell proliferation and expansion is essential for flowering stem growth control

    PubMed Central

    Ferjani, Ali; Hanai, Kenya; Gunji, Shizuka; Maeda, Saori; Sawa, Shinichiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    The postembryonic development of aboveground plant organs relies on a continuous supply of cells from the shoot apical meristem. Previous studies of developmental regulation in leaves and flowers have revealed the crucial role of coordinated cell proliferation and differentiation during organogenesis. However, the importance of this coordination has not been examined in flowering stems. Very recently, we attempted to identify regulatory factors that maintain flowering stem integrity. We found that the increased cell number in clavata (clv) mutants and the decreased cell size in de-etiolated (det)3-1 resulted in flowering stems that were thicker and thinner, respectively, than in wild-type (WT) plants. Interestingly, in the cell proliferation- and cell expansion-defective double mutant clv det3-1, the flowering stems often exhibited severe cracking, resulting in exposure of their inner tissues. In this study, further quantification of the cellular phenotypes in the cotyledons and leaves revealed no differences between det3-1 and clv3 det3-1. Together, the above findings suggest that the clv3 mutation in a det3-1 background primarily affects flowering stems, while its effect on other organs is likely negligible. We propose that the coordination between cell proliferation and differentiation is not only important during leaf development, but also plays a role in the growth control of Arabidopsis flowering stems. PMID:25831425

  20. Cellular and molecular phenotypes of proliferating stromal cells from human carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kopantzev, E P; Vayshlya, N A; Kopantseva, M R; Egorov, V I; Pikunov, M; Zinovyeva, M V; Vinogradova, T V; Zborovskaya, I B; Sverdlov, E D

    2010-01-01

    Background: Stromal cells are a functionally important component of human carcinomas. The aim of this study was to obtain and characterise primary cultures of stromal cells from human carcinomas and the corresponding surrounding normal tissue. Methods: Primary stromal cell cultures from tumours of lung, oesophagus and pancreas were obtained using a mild tissue dissociation method and a medium for culturing mesenchymal cells. Immunofluorescence staining and western blotting were used to analyse the expression of differentiation markers and selected known oncoproteins in the cell cultures obtained. Results: A panel of stromal primary cultures was prepared from different human tumours and from matched normal cancer-free tissues. The in vitro proliferative potential of tumour-associated fibroblasts was shown to be higher than that of matched normal stromal cells. A mutational analysis of the TP53 and KRAS2 genes in a number of stromal cultures did not reveal known mutations in most cells of the cultures studied. Western blot analysis showed that stromal cells of lung tumours were characterised by a statistically significantly lower expression level of the p16 protein as compared with that in normal lung stromal cells. An important finding of our study was that, according to immunofluorescence assay, a fraction of fibroblast-like vimentin-positive cells in some tumour and normal stromal cell cultures expressed an epithelial marker – cytokeratins. Conclusions: Proliferating stromal cells from the carcinomas studied proved to be genetically normal cells with altered expression profiles of some genes involved in carcinogenesis, as compared with normal stromal cells. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition may lead to the emergence of transdifferentiated fibroblast-like cells in tumour stroma and in the tumour-surrounding tissue. PMID:20407446

  1. BRCA1 haploinsufficiency leads to altered expression of genes involved in cellular proliferation and development.

    PubMed

    Feilotter, Harriet E; Michel, Claire; Uy, Paolo; Bathurst, Lauren; Davey, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequences to identify pathogenic mutations associated with inherited breast/ovarian cancer syndrome has provided a method to identify high-risk individuals, allowing them to seek preventative treatments and strategies. However, the current test is expensive, and cannot differentiate between pathogenic variants and those that may be benign. Focusing only on one of the two BRCA partners, we have developed a biological assay for haploinsufficiency of BRCA1. Using a series of EBV-transformed cell lines, we explored gene expression patterns in cells that were BRCA1 wildtype compared to those that carried (heterozygous) BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. We identified a subset of 43 genes whose combined expression pattern is a sensitive predictor of BRCA1 status. The gene set was disproportionately made up of genes involved in cellular differentiation, lending credence to the hypothesis that single copy loss of BRCA1 function may impact differentiation, rendering cells more susceptible to undergoing malignant processes.

  2. Fisetin inhibits cellular proliferation and induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sabarwal, Akash; Agarwal, Rajesh; Singh, Rana P

    2017-02-01

    The anticancer effects of fisetin, a dietary agent, are largely unknown against human gastric cancer. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms of fisetin-induced inhibition of growth and survival of human gastric carcinoma AGS and SNU-1 cells. Fisetin (25-100 μM) caused significant decrease in the levels of G1 phase cyclins and CDKs, and increased the levels of p53 and its S15 phosphorylation in gastric cancer cells. We also observed that growth suppression and death of non-neoplastic human intestinal FHs74int cells were minimally affected by fisetin. Fisetin strongly increased apoptotic cells and showed mitochondrial membrane depolarization in gastric cancer cells. DNA damage was observed as early as 3 h after fisetin treatment which was accompanied with gamma-H2A.X(S139) phosphorylation and cleavage of PARP. Fisetin-induced apoptosis was observed to be independent of p53. DCFDA and MitoSOX analyses showed an increase in mitochondrial ROS generation in time- and dose-dependent fashion. It also increased cellular nitrite and superoxide generation. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) inhibited ROS generation and also caused protection from fisetin-induced DNA damage. The formation of comets were observed in only fisetin treated cells which was blocked by NAC pre-treatment. Further investigation of the source of ROS, using mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complex inhibitors, suggested that fisetin caused ROS generation specifically through complex I. Collectively, these results for the first time demonstrated that fisetin possesses anticancer potential through ROS production most likely via MRC complex I leading to apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Amino acids and autophagy: cross-talk and co-operation to control cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Bernadette; Korolchuk, Viktor I; Sarkar, Sovan

    2015-10-01

    Maintenance of amino acid homeostasis is important for healthy cellular function, metabolism and growth. Intracellular amino acid concentrations are dynamic; the high demand for protein synthesis must be met with constant dietary intake, followed by cellular influx, utilization and recycling of nutrients. Autophagy is a catabolic process via which superfluous or damaged proteins and organelles are delivered to the lysosome and degraded to release free amino acids into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, autophagy is specifically activated in response to amino acid starvation via two key signaling cascades: the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) and the general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2) pathways. These pathways are key regulators of the integration between anabolic (amino acid depleting) and catabolic (such as autophagy which is amino acid replenishing) processes to ensure intracellular amino acid homeostasis. Here, we discuss the key roles that amino acids, along with energy (ATP, glucose) and oxygen, are playing in cellular growth and proliferation. We further explore how sophisticated methods are employed by cells to sense intracellular amino acid concentrations, how amino acids can act as a switch to dictate the temporal and spatial activation of anabolic and catabolic processes and how autophagy contributes to the replenishment of free amino acids, all to ensure cell survival. Relevance of these molecular processes to cellular and organismal physiology and pathology is also discussed.

  4. The adaptive cruise control vehicles in the cellular automata model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rui; Wu, Qing-Song

    2006-11-01

    This Letter presented a cellular automata model where the adaptive cruise control vehicles are modelled. In this model, the constant time headway policy is adopted. The fundamental diagram is presented. The simulation results are in good agreement with the analytical ones. The mixture of ACC vehicles with manually driven vehicles is investigated. It is shown that with the introduction of ACC vehicles, the jam can be suppressed.

  5. Evaluation of Pharmacologic Agents to Suppress Intraocular Cellular Proliferation Following Trauma. Revision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    following enucleation e.q . . .. - .° -15- TABLE 3 METHYLTREXATE 2 m& 2 day post pharm. Clinical Tractional Detacnent* animal op uveiti agent- # (1-4) or...op uveiti agent - - # (1-4) or control 1 wk 2 wk 4 wk 6 wk 12 wk Grogs "aam** __. editta njection of’ drug Orange 31 3 C Reflex / S 2 C R IF 1 C E D...1.0 mg *2 day pobt pharm. Clinical Tractional Detachment* animal op uveitis agent Si (1-4) or control 1 wk 2 wk 4 wk 6 wk 12 wk Groud Exum** Imeie

  6. In search of cellular control: signal transduction in context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D.

    1998-01-01

    The field of molecular cell biology has experienced enormous advances over the last century by reducing the complexity of living cells into simpler molecular components and binding interactions that are amenable to rigorous biochemical analysis. However, as our tools become more powerful, there is a tendency to define mechanisms by what we can measure. The field is currently dominated by efforts to identify the key molecules and sequences that mediate the function of critical receptors, signal transducers, and molecular switches. Unfortunately, these conventional experimental approaches ignore the importance of supramolecular control mechanisms that play a critical role in cellular regulation. Thus, the significance of individual molecular constituents cannot be fully understood when studied in isolation because their function may vary depending on their context within the structural complexity of the living cell. These higher-order regulatory mechanisms are based on the cell's use of a form of solid-state biochemistry in which molecular components that mediate biochemical processing and signal transduction are immobilized on insoluble cytoskeletal scaffolds in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Key to the understanding of this form of cellular regulation is the realization that chemistry is structure and hence, recognition of the the importance of architecture and mechanics for signal integration and biochemical control. Recent work that has unified chemical and mechanical signaling pathways provides a glimpse of how this form of higher-order cellular control may function and where paths may lie in the future.

  7. Memo interacts with c-Src to control Estrogen Receptor alpha sub-cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Frei, Anna; MacDonald, Gwen; Lund, Ingrid; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Hynes, Nancy E; Nalvarte, Ivan

    2016-08-30

    Understanding the complex interaction between growth factor and steroid hormone signaling pathways in breast cancer is key to identifying suitable therapeutic strategies to avoid progression and therapy resistance. The interaction between these two pathways is of paramount importance for the development of endocrine resistance. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms behind their crosstalk are still largely obscure. We previously reported that Memo is a small redox-active protein that controls heregulin-mediated migration of breast cancer cells. Here we report that Memo sits at the intersection between heregulin and estrogen signaling, and that Memo controls Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) sub-cellular localization, phosphorylation, and function downstream of heregulin and estrogen in breast cancer cells. Memo facilitates ERα and c-Src interaction, ERα Y537 phosphorylation, and has the ability to control ERα extra-nuclear localization. Thus, we identify Memo as an important key mediator between the heregulin and estrogen signaling pathways, which affects both breast cancer cell migration and proliferation.

  8. Proliferation control in neural stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Homem, Catarina CF; Repic, Marko; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuit function can be drastically affected by variations in the number of cells that are produced during development or by a reduction in adult cell number due to disease. Unlike many other organs, the brain is unable to compensate for such changes by increasing cell numbers or altering the size of the cells. For this reason, unique cell cycle and cell growth control mechanisms operate in the developing and adult brain. In Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian neural stem and progenitor cells these mechanisms are intricately coordinated with the developmental age and the nutritional, metabolic and hormonal state of the animal. Defects in neural stem cell proliferation that result in the generation of incorrect cell numbers or defects in neural stem cell differentiation can cause microcephaly or megalencephaly. PMID:26420377

  9. Circadian Clock Control of the Cellular Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Sancar, Aziz; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A.; Kang, Tae-Hong; Reardon, Joyce T.; Lee, Jin Hyup; Ozturk, Nuri

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian cells possess a cell-autonomous molecular clock which controls the timing of many biochemical reactions and hence the cellular response to environmental stimuli including genotoxic stress. The clock consists of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop made up of four genes/proteins, BMal1, Clock, Cryptochrome, and Period. The circadian clock has an intrinsic period of about 24 hours, and it dictates the rates of many biochemical reactions as a function of the time of the day. Recently, it has become apparent that the circadian clock plays an important role in determining the strengths of cellular responses to DNA damage including repair, checkpoints, and apoptosis. These new insights are expected to guide development of novel mechanism-based chemotherapeutic regimens. PMID:20227409

  10. Microfluidic Device for Studying Controllable Hydrodynamic Flow Induced Cellular Responses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chunhong; Zhang, Xiannian; Li, Chunmei; Pang, Yuhong; Huang, Yanyi

    2017-03-07

    Hydrodynamic flow is an essential stimulus in many cellular functions, regulating many mechanical sensitive pathways and closely associating with human health status and diseases. The flow pattern of blood in vessels is the key factor in causing atherosclerosis. Hemodynamics has great effect on endothelial cells' gene expression and biological functions. There are various tools that can be used for studying flow-induced cellular responses but most of them are either bulky or lack precise controllability. We develop an integrated microfluidic device that can precisely generate different flow patterns to human endothelial cells cultured on-chip. We monitored cell morphology and used small-input RNA-seq technology to depict the transcriptome profiles of human umbilical vein endothelial cells under uni- or bidirectional flow. Such integrated and miniatured device has greatly facilitated our understanding of endothelial functions with shear stimulus, not only providing new data on the transcriptomic scale but also building the connection between cell phenotypic changes and expression alternations.

  11. Controlled cellular energy conversion in brown adipose tissue thermogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Plant, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue serves as a model system for nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) since a) it has as a primary physiological function the conversion of chemical energy to heat; and b) preliminary data from other tissues involved in NST (e.g., muscle) indicate that parallel mechanisms may be involved. Now that biochemical pathways have been proposed for brown fat thermogenesis, cellular models consistent with a thermodynamic representation can be formulated. Stated concisely, the thermogenic mechanism in a brown fat cell can be considered as an energy converter involving a sequence of cellular events controlled by signals over the autonomic nervous system. A thermodynamic description for NST is developed in terms of a nonisothermal system under steady-state conditions using network thermodynamics. Pathways simulated include mitochondrial ATP synthesis, a Na+/K+ membrane pump, and ionic diffusion through the adipocyte membrane.

  12. Cellular Metabolic and Autophagic Pathways: Traffic Control by Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    It has been established that the key metabolic pathways of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are intimately related to redox biology through control of cell signaling. Under physiological conditions glucose metabolism is linked to control of the NADH/NAD redox couple, as well as providing the major reductant, NADPH, for thiol-dependent antioxidant defenses. Retrograde signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus or cytosol controls cell growth and differentiation. Under pathological conditions mitochondria are targets for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and are critical in controlling apoptotic cell death. At the interface of these metabolic pathways, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway functions to maintain mitochondrial quality, and generally serves an important cytoprotective function. In this review we will discuss the autophagic response to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are generated from perturbations of cellular glucose metabolism and bioenergetic function. PMID:23702245

  13. Cellular metabolic and autophagic pathways: traffic control by redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-10-01

    It has been established that the key metabolic pathways of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are intimately related to redox biology through control of cell signaling. Under physiological conditions glucose metabolism is linked to control of the NADH/NAD redox couple, as well as providing the major reductant, NADPH, for thiol-dependent antioxidant defenses. Retrograde signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus or cytosol controls cell growth and differentiation. Under pathological conditions mitochondria are targets for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and are critical in controlling apoptotic cell death. At the interface of these metabolic pathways, the autophagy-lysosomal pathway functions to maintain mitochondrial quality and generally serves an important cytoprotective function. In this review we will discuss the autophagic response to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are generated from perturbations of cellular glucose metabolism and bioenergetic function.

  14. Inhibition of cellular proliferation and enhancement of hydrogen peroxide production in fibrosarcoma cell line by weak radio frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Castello, Pablo R; Hill, Iain; Sivo, Frank; Portelli, Lucas; Barnes, Frank; Usselman, Robert; Martino, Carlos F

    2014-12-01

    This study presents experimental data for the effects of weak radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and cellular growth rates of fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells in vitro. Cells were exposed either to 45 µT static magnetic fields (SMFs)-oriented vertical to the plane of growth or to SMFs combined with weak 5 and 10 MHz RF magnetic fields of 10 µTRMS intensity perpendicular to the static field. Cell numbers were reduced up to 30% on Day 2 for the cells exposed to the combination of SMF and a 10 MHz RF magnetic field compared with the SMF control cells. In addition, cells exposed to 10 MHz RF magnetic fields for 8 h increased H2O2 production by 55%. The results demonstrate an overall magnetic field-induced biological effect that shows elevated H2O2 levels with accompanying decrease in cellular growth rates.

  15. Mitochondrial function controls intestinal epithelial stemness and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Emanuel; Rath, Eva; Yuan, Detian; Waldschmitt, Nadine; Khaloian, Sevana; Allgäuer, Michael; Staszewski, Ori; Lobner, Elena M.; Schöttl, Theresa; Giesbertz, Pieter; Coleman, Olivia I.; Prinz, Marco; Weber, Achim; Gerhard, Markus; Klingenspor, Martin; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Haller, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Control of intestinal epithelial stemness is crucial for tissue homeostasis. Disturbances in epithelial function are implicated in inflammatory and neoplastic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report that mitochondrial function plays a critical role in maintaining intestinal stemness and homeostasis. Using intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific mouse models, we show that loss of HSP60, a mitochondrial chaperone, activates the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (MT-UPR) and results in mitochondrial dysfunction. HSP60-deficient crypts display loss of stemness and cell proliferation, accompanied by epithelial release of WNT10A and RSPO1. Sporadic failure of Cre-mediated Hsp60 deletion gives rise to hyperproliferative crypt foci originating from OLFM4+ stem cells. These effects are independent of the MT-UPR-associated transcription factor CHOP. In conclusion, compensatory hyperproliferation of HSP60+ escaper stem cells suggests paracrine release of WNT-related factors from HSP60-deficient, functionally impaired IEC to be pivotal in the control of the proliferative capacity of the stem cell niche. PMID:27786175

  16. Effects of nicotine on cellular proliferation, macromolecular synthesis and cell cycle phase distribution in human and murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, S.; Chiao, J.; Rossi, J.; Wang, C.H.; Wu, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Addition of nicotine causes a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth in established human and murine cells. In the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemic cells, 3 mM nicotine results in a 50% inhibition of cellular proliferation after 80 h. Nicotine was also found to affect the cell cycle distribution of HL-60 cells. Treatment with 4 mM nicotine for 20 h causes an increase in proportion of Gl-phase cells (from 49% to 57%) and a significant decrease in the proportion of S-phase cells (from 41% to 32%). These results suggest that nicotine causes cell arrest in the Gl-phase which may in part account for its effects on cell growth. To determine whether nicotine has a primary effect on the uptake/transport of macromolecular precursors into cells, HL-60 cells were treated with 2-6 mM nicotine for 30 h/sub 3/ at the end of which time cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine, (/sup 3/H)uridine, (/sup 14/C)lysine and (/sup 35/S)methionine, the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) soluble and insoluble radioactivities from each of the labeling conditions were determined. These studies show that nicotine primarily affect the synthesis of proteins.

  17. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2012-08-15

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  18. Effects of epidermal growth factor and dimethylhydrazine on crypt size, cell proliferation, and crypt fission in the rat colon. Cell proliferation and crypt fission are controlled independently.

    PubMed Central

    Park, H. S.; Goodlad, R. A.; Ahnen, D. J.; Winnett, A.; Sasieni, P.; Lee, C. Y.; Wright, N. A.

    1997-01-01

    increases crypt fission in crypts of normal size in the distal colon without significantly increasing cell proliferation. These results suggest that increasing crypt cellularity by proliferation is not sufficient to induce crypt fission, and factors other than increased crypt size by proliferation can control crypt fission. It is also probable that cell proliferation and crypt fission are independently regulated. Crypt fission appears to play a considerable role in the intestinal response to carcinogens. Images Figure 1 PMID:9284833

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and the control of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, A; Laguna, J C; Vázquez, M

    2002-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors which form a subfamily of the nuclear receptor gene family. This subfamily consists of three isotypes, alpha (NR1C1), gamma (NR1C3), and beta/delta (NRC1C2) with a differential tissue distribution. PPARalpha is expressed primarily in tissues with a high level of fatty acid catabolism such as liver, brown fat, kidney, heart and skeletal muscle. PPARbeta is ubiquitously expressed, and PPARgamma has a restricted pattern of expression, mainly in white and brown adipose tissues, whereas other tissues such as skeletal muscle and heart contain limited amounts. Furthermore, PPARalpha and gamma isotypes are expressed in vascular cells including endothelial and smooth muscle cells and macrophages/foam cells. PPARs are activated by ligands, such as naturally occurring fatty acids, which are activators of all three PPAR isotypes. In addition to fatty acids, several synthetic compounds, such as fibrates and thiazolidinediones, bind and activate PPARalpha and PPARgamma, respectively. In order to be transcriptionally active, PPARs need to heterodimerize with the retinoid-X-receptor (RXR). Upon activation, PPAR-RXR heterodimers bind to DNA specific sequences called peroxisome proliferator-response elements (PPRE) and stimulate transcription of target genes. PPARs play a critical role in lipid and glucose homeostasis, but lately they have been implicated as regulators of inflammatory responses. The first evidence of the involvement of PPARs in the control of inflammation came from the PPARalpha null mice, which showed a prolonged inflammatory response. PPARalpha activation results in the repression of NF-kappaB signaling and inflammatory cytokine production in different cell-types. A role for PPARgamma in inflammation has also been reported in monocyte/macrophages, where ligands of this receptor inhibited the activation of macrophages and the production of inflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha

  20. Ki-1/57 and CGI-55 ectopic expression impact cellular pathways involved in proliferation and stress response regulation.

    PubMed

    Costa, Fernanda C; Saito, Angela; Gonçalves, Kaliandra A; Vidigal, Pedro M; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Bressan, Gustavo C; Kobarg, Jörg

    2014-12-01

    Ki-1/57 (HABP4) and CGI-55 (SERBP1) are regulatory proteins and paralogs with 40.7% amino acid sequence identity and 67.4% similarity. Functionally, they have been implicated in the regulation of gene expression on both the transcriptional and mRNA metabolism levels. A link with tumorigenesis is suggested, since both paralogs show altered expression levels in tumor cells and the Ki-1/57 gene is found in a region of chromosome 9q that represents a haplotype for familiar colon cancer. However, the target genes regulated by Ki-1/57 and CGI-55 are unknown. Here, we analyzed the alterations of the global transcriptome profile after Ki-1/57 or CGI-55 overexpression in HEK293T cells by DNA microchip technology. We were able to identify 363 or 190 down-regulated and 50 or 27 up-regulated genes for Ki-1/57 and CGI-55, respectively, of which 20 were shared between both proteins. Expression levels of selected genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR both after protein overexpression and siRNA knockdown. The majority of the genes with altered expression were associated to proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle control processes, prompting us to further explore these contexts experimentally. We observed that overexpression of Ki-1/57 or CGI-55 results in reduced cell proliferation, mainly due to a G1 phase arrest, whereas siRNA knockdown of CGI-55 caused an increase in proliferation. In the case of Ki-1/57 overexpression, we found protection from apoptosis after treatment with the ER-stress inducer thapsigargin. Together, our data give important new insights that may help to explain these proteins putative involvement in tumorigenic events.

  1. Nuclear EGFR characterize still controlled proliferation retained in better differentiated clear cell RCC.

    PubMed

    Ahel, J; Dordevic, G; Markic, D; Mozetic, V; Spanjol, J; Grahovac, B; Stifter, S

    2015-08-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common solid kidney tumor representing 2-3% of all cancers, with the highest frequency occurring in Western countries. There was a worldwide and European annual increase in incidence of approximately 2% although incidence has been stabilized in last few years. One third of the patients already have metastases in the time of the diagnosis with poor prognosis because RCC are radio and chemoresistant. The prognostic value of EGFR over-expression in RCC is a controversial issue that could be explained by different histological types of study tumors and non-standardized criteria for evaluation of expression. Recent evidences points to a new mode of EGFR signaling pathway in which activated EGFR undergoes nuclear translocalization and then, as transcription factor, mediates gene expression and other cellular events required for highly proliferating activities. According to our observations, the membranous expression of EGFR associates with high nuclear grade and poor differentiated tumors. On the other hand, nuclear EGFR expression was high in low nuclear graded and well differentiated tumors with good prognosis. We hypothesize that this mode of EGFR signaling characterizes still controlled proliferation retained in well differentiated RCC with Furhman nuclear grade I or II.

  2. SIRT1 controls cell proliferation by regulating contact inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Elizabeth H; Dai, Yan

    2016-09-16

    Contact inhibition keeps cell proliferation in check and serves as a built-in protection against cancer development by arresting cell division upon cell-cell contact. Yet the complete mechanism behind this anti-cancer process remains largely unclear. Here we present SIRT1 as a novel regulator of contact inhibition. SIRT1 performs a wide variety of functions in biological processes, but its involvement in contact inhibition has not been explored to date. We used NIH3T3 cells, which are sensitive to contact inhibition, and H460 and DU145 cancer cells, which lack contact inhibition, to investigate the relationship between SIRT1 and contact inhibition. We show that SIRT1 overexpression in NIH3T3 cells overcomes contact inhibition while SIRT1 knockdown in cancer cells restores their lost contact inhibition. Moreover, we demonstrate that p27 protein expression is controlled by SIRT1 in contact inhibition. Overall, our findings underline the critical role of SIRT1 in contact inhibition and suggest SIRT1 inhibition as a potential strategy to suppress cancer cell growth by restoring contact inhibition.

  3. Fatty acid synthase as a factor required for exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and dentate gyrus cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chorna, Nataliya E; Santos-Soto, Iván J; Carballeira, Nestor M; Morales, Joan L; de la Nuez, Janneliz; Cátala-Valentin, Alma; Chornyy, Anatoliy P; Vázquez-Montes, Adrinel; De Ortiz, Sandra Peña

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN), the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis.

  4. Fatty Acid Synthase as a Factor Required for Exercise-Induced Cognitive Enhancement and Dentate Gyrus Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chorna, Nataliya E.; Santos-Soto, Iván J.; Carballeira, Nestor M.; Morales, Joan L.; de la Nuez, Janneliz; Cátala-Valentin, Alma; Chornyy, Anatoliy P.; Vázquez-Montes, Adrinel; De Ortiz, Sandra Peña

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN), the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis. PMID:24223732

  5. A chimera embryo assay reveals a decrease in embryonic cellular proliferation induced by sperm from X-irradiated male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Raabe, O.; Overstreet, J.W.

    1989-05-01

    Male mice were divided into three experimental groups and a control group. Mice in the experimental groups received one of three doses of acute X irradiation (1.73, 0.29, and 0.05 Gy) and together with the control unirradiated mice were then mated weekly to unirradiated female mice for a 9-week experimental period. Embryos were recovered from the weekly matings at the four-cell stage and examined by the chimera assay for proliferative disadvantage. Aggregation chimeras were constructed of embryos from female mice mated to irradiated males (experimental embryos) and embryos from females mated to unexposed males (control embryos) and contained either one experimental embryo and one control embryo (heterologous chimera) or two control embryos (control chimera). The control embryo in heterologous chimeras and either embryo in control chimeras were prelabeled with the vital dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h and viewed under phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution from the FITC-labeled embryo. Experimental and control embryos that were cultured singly were also examined for embryo cell number at the end of the 40-h culture period. In control chimeras, the mean ratio of the unlabeled cells:total chimera cell number (henceforth referred to as ''mean ratio'') was 0.50 with little or no weekly variation over the 9-week experimental period. During Weeks 4-7, the mean ratios of heterologous chimeras differed significantly from the mean ratio of control chimeras with the greatest differences occurring during Week 7 (0.41 for chimeras of 0.05 Gy dose group, 0.40 for chimeras of the 0.29 Gy dose group, and 0.17 for chimeras of the 1.73 Gy dose group).

  6. Recovery of cellular E-cadherin precedes replenishment of estrogen receptor and estrogen-dependent proliferation of breast cancer cells rescued from a death stimulus.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Claudia; Rossini, Gian Paolo

    2002-08-01

    Loss of estrogen-responsiveness and impaired E-cadherin expression/function has been linked to increased metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. In this study, we report that proliferation of breast cancer cells can resume following removal of a toxic stimulus causing severe impairment of cell adhesion and estrogen responsiveness. This type of response was induced by okadaic acid (OA) in MCF-7 cells, and was accompanied by an almost complete block of DNA synthesis, loss of cell-cell contact and cell detachment from culture dishes, loss of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and E-cadherin, whereas only a weak, if any, inhibition of protein synthesis could be observed. These responses were detected in MCF-7 cells after a 1-day treatment with 50 nM OA, and could be reversed if OA-treated cells were recovered in a culture medium devoid of the toxin, so that rescued cells resumed growth 8-12 days after replating. By pulse-chase experiments, we found that protein synthesis was not significantly affected in rescued cells, whose DNA synthesis, instead, was almost completely blocked during the first days of MCF-7 cell rescue from OA treatment. We also analyzed E-cadherin, mitogen activated protein kinase isoforms ERK1 and ERK2, Bcl-2 and BAX proteins during the rescue of MCF-7 cells from OA-induced cell death, and found that their expression followed temporally defined patterns. Cellular levels of E-cadherin returned to control levels within the first days of the rescue, followed by ER, ERK1, and ERK2, and finally by Bcl-2 and BAX proteins. Under our experimental conditions, restoration of cell adhesion did not require a functional ER system, but recovery of a normal ER pool accompanied resumption of estrogen-dependent proliferation of OA-treated MCF-7 cells.

  7. Adaptive Posttranslational Control in Cellular Stress Response Pathways and Its Relationship to Toxicity Testing and Safety Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Pi, Jingbo; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Carmichael, Paul L.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2015-01-01

    Although transcriptional induction of stress genes constitutes a major cellular defense program against a variety of stressors, posttranslational control directly regulating the activities of preexisting stress proteins provides a faster-acting alternative response. We propose that posttranslational control is a general adaptive mechanism operating in many stress pathways. Here with the aid of computational models, we first show that posttranslational control fulfills two roles: (1) handling small, transient stresses quickly and (2) stabilizing the negative feedback transcriptional network. We then review the posttranslational control pathways for major stress responses—oxidative stress, metal stress, hyperosmotic stress, DNA damage, heat shock, and hypoxia. Posttranslational regulation of stress protein activities occurs by reversible covalent modifications, allosteric or non-allosteric enzymatic regulations, and physically induced protein structural changes. Acting in feedback or feedforward networks, posttranslational control may establish a threshold level of cellular stress. Sub-threshold stresses are handled adequately by posttranslational control without invoking gene transcription. With supra-threshold stress levels, cellular homeostasis cannot be maintained and transcriptional induction of stress genes and other gene programs, eg, those regulating cell metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, takes place. The loss of homeostasis with consequent changes in cellular function may lead to adverse cellular outcomes. Overall, posttranslational and transcriptional control pathways constitute a stratified cellular defense system, handling stresses coherently across time and intensity. As cell-based assays become a focus for chemical testing anchored on toxicity pathways, examination of proteomic and metabolomic changes as a result of posttranslational control occurring in the absence of transcriptomic alterations deserves more attention. PMID:26408567

  8. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  9. Proteomic analysis of lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus: Mechanisms for aquaporin 2 down-regulation and cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Jakob; Hoffert, Jason D.; Knepper, Mark A.; Agre, Peter; Nielsen, Søren; Fenton, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Lithium is a commonly prescribed mood-stabilizing drug. However, chronic treatment with lithium induces numerous kidney-related side effects, such as dramatically reduced aquaporin 2 (AQP2) abundance, altered renal function, and structural changes. As a model system, inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCD) isolated from rats treated with lithium for either 1 or 2 weeks were subjected to differential 2D gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis to identify (i) signaling pathways affected by lithium and (ii) unique candidate proteins for AQP2 regulation. After 1 or 2 weeks of lithium treatment, we identified 6 and 74 proteins with altered abundance compared with controls, respectively. We randomly selected 17 proteins with altered abundance caused by lithium treatment for validation by immunoblotting. Bioinformatics analysis of the data indicated that proteins involved in cell death, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and morphology are highly affected by lithium. We demonstrate that members of several signaling pathways are activated by lithium treatment, including the PKB/Akt-kinase and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), such as extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Lithium treatment increased the intracellular accumulation of β-catenin in association with increased levels of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase type 3β (GSK3β). This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the proteins affected by lithium treatment in the IMCD and, as such, provides clues to potential lithium targets in the brain. PMID:18296634

  10. Flame synthesis and in vitro biocompatibility assessment of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: cellular uptake, toxicity and proliferation studies.

    PubMed

    Buyukhatipoglu, K; Miller, T A; Clyne, A Morss

    2009-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used in diverse applications, such as targeted drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermic malignant cell therapy. In the current work, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were produced by flame synthesis, which has improved nanoparticle property control and is capable of commercial production rates with minimal post-processing. The iron oxide nanoparticle material characteristics were analyzed by electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Finally, flame synthesized iron oxide nanoparticle interaction with endothelial cells was compared to commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles. Flame synthesis produced a heterogeneous mixture of 6-12 nm diameter hematite and magnetite nanoparticles with superparamagnetic properties. Endothelial cell scanning electron microscopy, confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy, demonstrated that flame synthesized nanoparticles are ingested into cells in a similar manner to commercially available nanoparticles. The flame synthesized particles showed no statistically significant toxicity difference from commercially available nanoparticles, as measured by Live/Dead assay, Alamar blue, and lactase dehydrogenase release. Neither type of nanoparticle affected cell proliferation induced by fibroblast growth factor-2. These data suggest that combustion synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to commercially available nanoparticles for biological applications, yet flame synthesis is a simpler process with higher purity products and lower manufacturing costs. Future work will include functionalizing nanoparticles for specific cell targeting and bioactive factor delivery.

  11. Control of cell proliferation in human glioma by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Freshney, R I; Sherry, A; Hassanzadah, M; Freshney, M; Crilly, P; Morgan, D

    1980-06-01

    Survival and proliferation of cell cultures from human anaplastic astrocytomas were shown to be enhanced by glucocorticoids with an optimal concentration of approximately 2.5 x 10(-5)M (10 micrograms/ml). The stimulation of proliferation was only observed in a clonal growth assay and was reversed as the size of individual colonies reached approximately 50 cells. Above this size, and in regular monolayer cultures, glucocorticoids were found to inhibit cell proliferation as measured by direct cell counting and incorporation of [3H] thymidine. Cultures grown to maximum cell densities in non-limiting medium conditions reached a lower terminal cell density, and had a reduced labelling index with [3H] thymidine in the presence of glucocorticoids. Although there was little difference between the actions of beta-methasone, dexamethasone and ethyl prednisolone, methyl prednisolone was found to be more effective, both in terms of stimulation of clonal growth and inhibition of growth at high cell densities. There was no evidence of cytotoxicity with glucocorticoids up to 5 x 10(-5)M (20 micrograms/ml) and it is suggested that glucocorticoids act via a normal regulatory process, perhaps enhancing cell-cell recognition.

  12. Control of cell proliferation in human glioma by glucocorticoids.

    PubMed Central

    Freshney, R. I.; Sherry, A.; Hassanzadah, M.; Freshney, M.; Crilly, P.; Morgan, D.

    1980-01-01

    Survival and proliferation of cell cultures from human anaplastic astrocytomas were shown to be enhanced by glucocorticoids with an optimal concentration of approximately 2.5 x 10(-5)M (10 micrograms/ml). The stimulation of proliferation was only observed in a clonal growth assay and was reversed as the size of individual colonies reached approximately 50 cells. Above this size, and in regular monolayer cultures, glucocorticoids were found to inhibit cell proliferation as measured by direct cell counting and incorporation of [3H] thymidine. Cultures grown to maximum cell densities in non-limiting medium conditions reached a lower terminal cell density, and had a reduced labelling index with [3H] thymidine in the presence of glucocorticoids. Although there was little difference between the actions of beta-methasone, dexamethasone and ethyl prednisolone, methyl prednisolone was found to be more effective, both in terms of stimulation of clonal growth and inhibition of growth at high cell densities. There was no evidence of cytotoxicity with glucocorticoids up to 5 x 10(-5)M (20 micrograms/ml) and it is suggested that glucocorticoids act via a normal regulatory process, perhaps enhancing cell-cell recognition. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7426310

  13. Cellular and Humoral Mechanisms Involved in the Control of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zuñiga, Joaquin; Torres-García, Diana; Santos-Mendoza, Teresa; Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Granados, Julio; Yunis, Edmond J.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is a major international public health problem. One-third of the world's population is thought to have latent tuberculosis, a condition where individuals are infected by the intracellular bacteria without active disease but are at risk for reactivation, if their immune system fails. Here, we discuss the role of nonspecific inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines and chemokines induced by interaction of innate receptors expressed in macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). We also review current information regarding the importance of several cytokines including IL-17/IL-23 in the development of protective cellular and antibody-mediated protective responses against Mtb and their influence in containment of the infection. Finally, in this paper, emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of failure of Mtb control, including the immune dysregulation induced by the treatment with biological drugs in different autoimmune diseases. Further functional studies, focused on the mechanisms involved in the early host-Mtb interactions and the interplay between host innate and acquired immunity against Mtb, may be helpful to improve the understanding of protective responses in the lung and in the development of novel therapeutic and prophylactic tools in TB. PMID:22666281

  14. HER2 drives Mucin-like 1 to control proliferation in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Conley, S J; Bosco, E E; Tice, D A; Hollingsworth, R E; Herbst, R; Xiao, Z

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-like 1 (MUCL1) was first identified as a breast-specific gene over a decade ago. Based on its highly restricted mRNA expression in breast tissue and continued expression during breast tumorigenesis and progression, MUCL1 is an attractive tumor-associated antigen and a potential therapeutic target. However, very little is known about the cellular location, biological functions and regulation of the MUCL1 protein, which will have a major impact on its druggability. Here we describe our efforts to fully characterize the cellular localization of MUCL1, investigate its regulation by key breast cancer oncogenes such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and discover its functional roles in breast cancer. Although some mucins are membrane bound, our data indicate that MUCL1 is secreted by some breast cancer cells, whereas others only express high levels of intracellular MUCL1. MUCL1 expression is highest in HER2-amplified breast tumors and inhibiting HER2 activity in tumor cells resulted in a decreased MUCL1 expression. In-depth investigation demonstrated that phosphoinositide3-kinase/Akt pathway, but not Ras/MEK pathway, controls MUCL1 expression downstream of HER2. Phenotypic assays revealed a strong dependence of HER2-positive cells on MUCL1 for cell proliferation. We further identified the mechanism by which MUCL1 regulates cell growth. Knockdown of MUCL1 induced a G1/S phase arrest concomitant with decreased cyclin D and increased p21 and p27 levels. Finally, we investigated the impact of MUCL1 loss on kinase signaling pathways in breast cancer cells through phospho-kinase array profiling. MUCL1 silencing abrogated phospho-focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun signals, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase or Akt pathway activities, thereby pointing to FAK/JNK pathway as the downstream effector of MUCL1 signaling. We are the first to identify an important role for MUCL1 in the proliferation of breast cancer

  15. Disorder of G2-M Checkpoint Control in Aniline-Induced Cell Proliferation in Rat Spleen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianling; Wang, Gangduo; Khan, M Firoze

    2015-01-01

    Aniline, a toxic aromatic amine, is known to cause hemopoietic toxicity both in humans and animals. Aniline exposure also leads to toxic response in spleen which is characterized by splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and the eventual formation of tumors on chronic in vivo exposure. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative DNA damage, and increased cell proliferation, which could eventually contribute to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. Despite our demonstration that cell proliferation was associated with deregulation of G1 phase cyclins and increased expression of G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), molecular mechanisms, especially the regulation of G2 phase and contribution of epigenetic mechanisms in aniline-induced splenic cellular proliferation remain largely unclear. This study therefore, mainly focused on the regulation of G2 phase in an animal model preceding a tumorigenic response. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day) in drinking water or drinking water only (controls) for 30 days, and expression of G2 phase cyclins, CDK1, CDK inhibitors and miRNAs were measured in the spleen. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in cell cycle regulatory proteins, including cyclins A, B and CDK1, particularly phosphor-CDK1, and decreases in CDK inhibitors p21 and p27, which could promote the splenocytes to go through G2/M transition. Our data also showed upregulation of tumor markers Trx-1 and Ref-1 in rats treated with aniline. More importantly, we observed lower expression of miRNAs including Let-7a, miR-15b, miR24, miR-100 and miR-125, and greater expression of CDK inhibitor regulatory miRNAs such as miR-181a, miR-221 and miR-222 in the spleens of aniline-treated animals. Our findings suggest that significant increases in the expression of cyclins, CDK1 and aberrant regulation of miRNAs could lead to an accelerated G2/M transition of the splenocytes, and potentially to a

  16. Motility, Survival and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Gerthoffer, William T.; Schaafsma, Dedmer; Sharma, Pawan; Ghavami, Saeid; Halayko, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle has classically been of interest for its contractile response linked to bronchoconstriction. However, terminally differentiated smooth muscle cells are phenotypically plastic and have multifunctional capacity for proliferation, cellular hypertrophy, migration, and the synthesis of extracellular matrix and inflammatory mediators. These latter properties of airway smooth muscle are important in airway remodeling which is a structural alteration that compounds the impact of contractile responses on limiting airway conductance. In this overview we describe the important signaling components and the functional evidence supporting a view of smooth muscle cells at the core of fibroproliferative remodeling of hollow organs. Signal transduction components and events are summarized that control the basic cellular processes of proliferation, cell survival, apoptosis and cellular migration. We delineate known intracellular control mechanisms and suggest future areas of interest to pursue to more fully understand factors that regulate normal myocyte function and airway remodeling in obstructive lung diseases. PMID:23728975

  17. Challenges in Characterizing and Controlling Complex Cellular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikswo, John

    2011-03-01

    Multicellular dynamic biological processes such as developmental differentiation, wound repair, disease, aging, and even homeostasis can be represented by trajectories through a phase space whose extent reflects the genetic, post-translational, and metabolic complexity of the process - easily extending to tens of thousands of dimensions. Intra- and inter-cellular sensing and regulatory systems and their nested, redundant, and non-linear feed-forward and feed-back controls create high-dimensioned attractors in this phase space. Metabolism provides free energy to drive non-equilibrium processes and dynamically reconfigure attractors. Studies of single molecules and cells provide only minimalist projections onto a small number of axes. It may be difficult to infer larger-scale emergent behavior from linearized experiments that perform only small amplitude perturbations on a limited number of the dimensions. Complete characterization may succeed for bounded component problems, such as an individual cell cycle or signaling cascade, but larger systems problems will require a coarse-grained approach. Hence a new experimental and analytical framework is needed. Possibly one could utilize high-amplitude, multi-variable driving of the system to infer coarse-grained, effective models, which in turn can be tested by their ability to control systems behavior. Navigation at will between attractors in a high-dimensioned dynamical system will provide not only detailed knowledge of the shape of attractor basins, but also measures of underlying stochastic events such as noise in gene expression or receptor binding and how both affect system stability and robustness. Needed for this are wide-bandwidth methods to sense and actuate large numbers of intracellular and extracellular variables and automatically and rapidly infer dynamic control models. The success of this approach may be determined by how broadly the sensors and actuators can span the full dimensionality of the phase space

  18. The administration`s non-proliferation and export control policy

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    On September 27, during his speech to the United Nations, President Bill Clinton outlined his administration`s arm control policies, urging tighter restraints on international export control policies and measures to enhance nuclear non-proliferation. That same day, the White House released a fact sheet summarizing the framework for U.S. efforts to prevent proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and missiles that deliver them.

  19. Stress-responsive JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates aspirin-induced suppression of B16 melanoma cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ordan, Orly; Rotem, Ronit; Jaspers, Ilona; Flescher, Eliezer

    2003-01-01

    Available anticancer drugs do not seem to modify the prognosis of metastatic melanoma. Salicylate and acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) were found to suppress growth in a number of transformed cells, that is, prostate and colon. Therefore, we studied the direct effects of aspirin on metastatic B16 melanoma cells. Aspirin at a plasma-attainable and nontoxic level suppressed the proliferation of B16 cells. Aspirin induced the activation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinases. Inhibition of JNK, but not p38, decreased the suppressive effect of aspirin upon the proliferation of B16 cells. The aspirin-induced reduction in B16 proliferation was cumulative over time. Aspirin and the chemotherapeutic drug 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) induced B16 cell death synergistically. In addition to the murine B16 cell line, the proliferation of SK-28 human melanoma cells was also suppressed by aspirin. In conclusion, aspirin suppresses the proliferation of metastatic B16 cells in a JNK-dependent mechanism. PMID:12684272

  20. Polycomb proteins control proliferation and transformation independently of cell cycle checkpoints by regulating DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Piunti, Andrea; Rossi, Alessandra; Cerutti, Aurora; Albert, Mareike; Jammula, Sriganesh; Scelfo, Andrea; Cedrone, Laura; Fragola, Giulia; Olsson, Linda; Koseki, Haruhiko; Testa, Giuseppe; Casola, Stefano; Helin, Kristian; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio; Pasini, Diego

    2014-04-14

    The ability of PRC1 and PRC2 to promote proliferation is a main feature that links polycomb (PcG) activity to cancer. PcGs silence the expression of the tumour suppressor locus Ink4a/Arf, whose products positively regulate pRb and p53 functions. Enhanced PcG activity is a frequent feature of human tumours, and PcG inhibition has been proposed as a strategy for cancer treatment. However, the recurrent inactivation of pRb/p53 responses in human cancers raises a question regarding the ability of PcG proteins to affect cellular proliferation independently from this checkpoint. Here we demonstrate that PRCs regulate cellular proliferation and transformation independently of the Ink4a/Arf-pRb-p53 pathway. We provide evidence that PRCs localize at replication forks, and that loss of their function directly affects the progression and symmetry of DNA replication forks. Thus, we have identified a novel activity by which PcGs can regulate cell proliferation independently of major cell cycle restriction checkpoints.

  1. Diverse FGF receptor signaling controls astrocyte specification and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyungjun; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2010-05-07

    During CNS development, pluripotency neuronal progenitor cells give rise in succession to neurons and glia. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), a major signal that maintains neural progenitors in the undifferentiated state, is also thought to influence the transition from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. Here we present evidence that FGF receptors and underlying signaling pathways transmit the FGF-2 signals that regulate astrocyte specification aside from its mitogenic activity. Application of FGF-2 to cortical progenitors suppressed neurogenesis whereas treatment with an FGFR antagonist in vitro promoted neurogenesis. Introduction of chimeric FGFRs with mutated tyrosine residues into cortical progenitors and drug treatments to specifically block individual downstream signaling pathways revealed that the overall activity of FGFR rather than individual autophosphorylation sites is important for delivering signals for glial specification. In contrast, a signal for cell proliferation by FGFR was mainly delivered by MAPK pathway. Together our findings indicate that FGFR activity promotes astrocyte specification in the developing CNS.

  2. The expression of S100P increases and promotes cellular proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Luyan; Chen, Shuqin; Jiang, Hongye; Huang, Jiaming; Jin, Wenyan; Yao, Shuzhong

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that S100P has a significant role in cancer, and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer and normal endometrium tissues was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we reduced the expression of S100P in HEC-1A and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines by siRNA transfection. Based on the reduced S100P mRNA expression, we measured the effects of S100P on cellular proliferation by the cell-counting kit-8. Nuclear β-catenin protein level was detected by western blotting. Cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA expression regulated by β-catenin was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We found that the expression of S100P mRNA and protein increased in endometrial cancer tissues compared with the normal endometrium. Local S100P expression progressively increased from pathologic differenciation grade 1 to 3. After reducing the S100P expression, the cellular proliferation ability, nuclear β-catenin protein level, cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA levels reduced. It indicated that S100P could promote cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer significantly increased and is associated with pathologic differenciation grade. S100P may promote endometrial cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin.

  3. Mapping cellular processes in the mesenchyme during palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 reveals complex proliferation changes and perturbed cell packing and polarity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Lara J; Economou, Andrew D; Cobourne, Martyn T; Green, Jeremy B A

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndromes represent a spectrum of overlapping conditions including cardiac defects and craniofacial malformations. Amongst the craniofacial anomalies that are seen, cleft of the secondary palate is a common feature. Haploinsufficiency of TBX1 is believed to be a major contributor toward many of the developmental structural anomalies that occur in these syndromes, and targeted deletion of Tbx1 in the mouse reproduces many of these malformations, including cleft palate. However, the cellular basis of this defect is only poorly understood. Here, palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 has been analysed, focusing on cellular properties within the whole mesenchymal volume of the palatal shelves. Novel image analyses and data presentation tools were applied to quantify cell proliferation rates, including regions of elevated as well as reduced proliferation, and cell packing in the mesenchyme. Also, cell orientations (nucleus-Golgi axis) were mapped as a potential marker of directional cell movement. Proliferation differed only subtly between wild-type and mutant until embryonic day (E)15.5 when proliferation in the mutant was significantly lower. Tbx1(-/-) palatal shelves had slightly different cell packing than wild-type, somewhat lower before elevation and higher at E15.5 when the wild-type palate has elevated and fused. Cell orientation is biased towards the shelf distal edge in the mid-palate of wild-type embryos but is essentially random in the Tbx1(-/-) mutant shelves, suggesting that polarised processes such as directed cell rearrangement might be causal for the cleft phenotype. The implications of these findings in the context of further understanding Tbx1 function during palatogenesis and of these methods for the more general analysis of genotype-phenotype functional relationships are discussed.

  4. Expression and cellular distribution of estrogen and progesterone receptors and the real-time proliferation of porcine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Bartosz; Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Ciesiółka, Sylwia; Piotrowska, Hanna; Antosik, Paweł; Bukowska, Dorota; Brüssow, Klaus P; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Although the expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors within porcine ovary and cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) is well recognized, still little information is known regarding expression of the progesterone receptor (PGR), PGR membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) and of estrogen-related receptors (ERRγ and ERRβ/γ) in separated cumulus cells in relation to real-time proliferation. In this study, a model of oocytes-separated cumulus cells was used to analyze the cell proliferation index and the expression PGR, PGRMC1 and of ERRγ and ERRβ/γ during 96-h cultivation in vitro using real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and confocal microscopic observation. We found that PGR protein expression was increased at 0 h, compared with PGR protein expression after 96 h of culture (P < 0.001). The expression of PGRMC1, ERRγ and ERRβ/γ was unchanged. After using qRT-PCR we did not found statistical differences in expression of PGR, PGRMC1, ERRγ and ERRβ/γ during 96 h of cumulus cells in vitro culture (IVC). We supposed that the differential expression of the PGR protein at 0 h and after 96 h is related to a time-dependent down-regulation, which may activate a negative feedback. The distribution of PGR, PGRMC1 proteins may be linked with the translocation of receptors to the cytoplasm after the membrane binding of respective agonists and intra-cytoplasmic signal transduction. Furthermore, cumulus cells analyzed at 0 h were characterized by decreased proliferation index, whereas those after 96 h of culture revealed a significant increase of proliferation index, which may be associated with differentiation/luteinization of these cells during real-time proliferation.

  5. Drosophila p53 controls Notch expression and balances apoptosis and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Simón, Rocío; Aparicio, Ricardo; Housden, Ben E; Bray, Sarah; Busturia, Ana

    2014-10-01

    A balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis is important for normal development and tissue homeostasis. Under stress conditions, the conserved tumor suppressor and transcription factor Dp53 induces apoptosis to contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis. However, in some cases Dp53-induced apoptosis results in the proliferation of surrounding non-apoptotic cells. To gain insight into the Dp53 function in the control of apoptosis and proliferation, we studied the interaction between the Drosophila Dp53 and Notch genes. We present evidence that simultaneous reduction of Dp53 and Notch function synergistically increases the wing phenotype of Notch heterozygous mutant flies. Further, we found that a Notch cis-regulatory element is responsive to loss and gain of Dp53 function and that over-expression of Dp53 up-regulates Notch mRNA and protein expression. These findings suggest not only that Dp53 and Notch act together to control wing development but also indicate that Dp53 transcriptionally regulates Notch expression. Moreover, using Notch  gain and loss of function mutations we examined the relevance of Dp53 and Notch interactions in the process of Dp53-apoptosis induced proliferation. Results show that proliferation induced by Dp53 over-expression is dependent on Notch, thus identifying Notch as a new player in Dp53-induced proliferation. Interestingly, we found that Dp53-induced Notch activation and proliferation occurs even under conditions where apoptosis was inhibited. Our findings highlight the conservation between flies and vertebrates of the Dp53 and Notch cross-talk and suggest that Dp53 has a dual role regulating cell death and proliferation gene networks to control the homeostatic balance between apoptosis and proliferation.

  6. Cellular Automaton Models of Highway Traffic Flow Considering Lane-Control and Speed-Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yong-Sheng; Li, Wen-Jun; Zeng, Jun-Wei; Wang, Min; Du, Jia-Wei; Guang, Xiao-Ping

    2011-10-01

    As two kinds of management modes of highway traffic control, lane-control, and speed-control produce different effect under different conditions. In this paper, traffic flow cellular automaton models for four-lane highway system with two opposing directions under the above two modes are established considering car and truck mixed running. Through computer numerical simulating, the fundamental diagrams with different parameters are obtained, and after the analysis of density-flux diagrams, the variation discipline of flux with traffic density under different control models is gained. The results indicate that, compared with lane-control, utilization ratio of road can be further improved with speed-control when the truck number increases. The research result is of great significance for reasonable providing theoretical guidance for highway traffic control.

  7. Leo Szilard Lectureship Award: Science Matters - Technical Dimensions of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Agreements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timbie, James

    2017-01-01

    Agreements to reduce nuclear arms and prevent proliferation of nuclear weapons are technical as well as political documents. They must be both technically sound and politically acceptable. This presentation illustrates technical aspects of arms control and non-proliferation agreements, with examples from SALT I, INF, the HEU Agreement, START, and the Iran nuclear negotiations, drawing on 44 years of personal experience in the negotiation of these agreements. The lecture is designed to convey an appreciation of the role that individuals with technical training can play in diplomatic efforts to reduce nuclear forces and prevent nuclear proliferation.

  8. Effects of antiinflammatory agents on mouse skin tumor promotion, epidermal DNA synthesis, phorbol ester-induced cellular proliferation, and production of plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Viaje, A; Slaga, T J; Wigler, M; Weinstein, I B

    1977-05-01

    The antinflammatory ateroids fluocinoine acetonide, fluocinonide, and fluclorolone acetonide were found to be very effectiveinhibitory agents of mouse skin tumor promotion. These steroids also drastically inhibited epidermal DNA synthesis and epidermal cellular proliferation induced by a phorbal ester tumor promoter. In addition, these compounds were potent inhibitors, of plasminogen activator production in tumor cell cultures. The clinically used non-steroidal antiinflammatory agents oxyphenbutazone, indomethacin, and Seclazone also inhibite tumor promotion but were much less effective. Although these agents are useful against inflammatory disorders in general when given p.o., in our studies they had little effect on inflammation and epidermal cellular proliferation induced by a phorbol ester tumor promoter when given topically. The afore mentioned nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents also had little effect on epidermal DNA synthesis. Oxyphenbutazone and indomethacin were less potent inhibitors of plasminogen activator production in tumor cells than were the antiinflammatory steroids, and Seclazone produced a negligible inhibition. There is, therefore, a general correlation in the potencies of a series of steroidal antiinflammatory agents for inhibition of tumor promotion and their ability to inhibit plasminogen activator production by tumor cell cultures and epidermal DNA synthesis.

  9. Integrin α5 Suppresses the Phosphorylation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Its Cellular Signaling of Cell Proliferation via N-Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Hang, Qinglei; Isaji, Tomoya; Hou, Sicong; Im, Sanghun; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Gu, Jianguo

    2015-12-04

    Integrin α5β1-mediated cell adhesion regulates a multitude of cellular responses, including cell proliferation, survival, and cross-talk between different cellular signaling pathways. Integrin α5β1 is known to convey permissive signals enabling anchorage-dependent receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. However, the effects of integrin α5β1 on cell proliferation are controversial, and the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation between integrin α5β1 and receptor tyrosine kinase remain largely unclear. Here we show that integrin α5 functions as a negative regulator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling through its N-glycosylation. Expression of WT integrin α5 suppresses the EGFR phosphorylation and internalization upon EGF stimulation. However, expression of the N-glycosylation mutant integrin α5, S3-5, which contains fewer N-glycans, reversed the suppression of the EGFR-mediated signaling and cell proliferation. In a mechanistic manner, WT but not S3-5 integrin α5 forms a complex with EGFR and glycolipids in the low density lipid rafts, and the complex formation is disrupted upon EGF stimulation, suggesting that the N-glycosylation of integrin α5 suppresses the EGFR activation through promotion of the integrin α5-glycolipids-EGFR complex formation. Furthermore, consistent restoration of those N-glycans on the Calf-1,2 domain of integrin α5 reinstated the inhibitory effects as well as the complex formation with EGFR. Taken together, these data are the first to demonstrate that EGFR activation can be regulated by the N-glycosylation of integrin α5, which is a novel molecular paradigm for the cross-talk between integrins and growth factor receptors.

  10. Integrin α5 Suppresses the Phosphorylation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Its Cellular Signaling of Cell Proliferation via N-Glycosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Qinglei; Isaji, Tomoya; Hou, Sicong; Im, Sanghun; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Gu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Integrin α5β1-mediated cell adhesion regulates a multitude of cellular responses, including cell proliferation, survival, and cross-talk between different cellular signaling pathways. Integrin α5β1 is known to convey permissive signals enabling anchorage-dependent receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. However, the effects of integrin α5β1 on cell proliferation are controversial, and the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation between integrin α5β1 and receptor tyrosine kinase remain largely unclear. Here we show that integrin α5 functions as a negative regulator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling through its N-glycosylation. Expression of WT integrin α5 suppresses the EGFR phosphorylation and internalization upon EGF stimulation. However, expression of the N-glycosylation mutant integrin α5, S3–5, which contains fewer N-glycans, reversed the suppression of the EGFR-mediated signaling and cell proliferation. In a mechanistic manner, WT but not S3–5 integrin α5 forms a complex with EGFR and glycolipids in the low density lipid rafts, and the complex formation is disrupted upon EGF stimulation, suggesting that the N-glycosylation of integrin α5 suppresses the EGFR activation through promotion of the integrin α5-glycolipids-EGFR complex formation. Furthermore, consistent restoration of those N-glycans on the Calf-1,2 domain of integrin α5 reinstated the inhibitory effects as well as the complex formation with EGFR. Taken together, these data are the first to demonstrate that EGFR activation can be regulated by the N-glycosylation of integrin α5, which is a novel molecular paradigm for the cross-talk between integrins and growth factor receptors. PMID:26483551

  11. Dual Biochemical Oscillators May Control Cellular Reversals in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Eckhert, Erik; Rangamani, Padmini; Davis, Annie E.; Oster, George; Berleman, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram-negative, soil-dwelling bacterium that glides on surfaces, reversing direction approximately once every 6 min. Motility in M. xanthus is governed by the Che-like Frz pathway and the Ras-like Mgl pathway, which together cause the cell to oscillate back and forth. Previously, Igoshin et al. (2004) suggested that the cellular oscillations are caused by cyclic changes in concentration of active Frz proteins that govern motility. In this study, we present a computational model that integrates both the Frz and Mgl pathways, and whose downstream components can be read as motor activity governing cellular reversals. This model faithfully reproduces wildtype and mutant behaviors by simulating individual protein knockouts. In addition, the model can be used to examine the impact of contact stimuli on cellular reversals. The basic model construction relies on the presence of two nested feedback circuits, which prompted us to reexamine the behavior of M. xanthus cells. We performed experiments to test the model, and this cell analysis challenges previous assumptions of 30 to 60 min reversal periods in frzCD, frzF, frzE, and frzZ mutants. We demonstrate that this average reversal period is an artifact of the method employed to record reversal data, and that in the absence of signal from the Frz pathway, Mgl components can occasionally reverse the cell near wildtype periodicity, but frz- cells are otherwise in a long nonoscillating state. PMID:25468349

  12. Dual biochemical oscillators may control cellular reversals in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Eckhert, Erik; Rangamani, Padmini; Davis, Annie E; Oster, George; Berleman, James E

    2014-12-02

    Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram-negative, soil-dwelling bacterium that glides on surfaces, reversing direction approximately once every 6 min. Motility in M. xanthus is governed by the Che-like Frz pathway and the Ras-like Mgl pathway, which together cause the cell to oscillate back and forth. Previously, Igoshin et al. (2004) suggested that the cellular oscillations are caused by cyclic changes in concentration of active Frz proteins that govern motility. In this study, we present a computational model that integrates both the Frz and Mgl pathways, and whose downstream components can be read as motor activity governing cellular reversals. This model faithfully reproduces wildtype and mutant behaviors by simulating individual protein knockouts. In addition, the model can be used to examine the impact of contact stimuli on cellular reversals. The basic model construction relies on the presence of two nested feedback circuits, which prompted us to reexamine the behavior of M. xanthus cells. We performed experiments to test the model, and this cell analysis challenges previous assumptions of 30 to 60 min reversal periods in frzCD, frzF, frzE, and frzZ mutants. We demonstrate that this average reversal period is an artifact of the method employed to record reversal data, and that in the absence of signal from the Frz pathway, Mgl components can occasionally reverse the cell near wildtype periodicity, but frz- cells are otherwise in a long nonoscillating state.

  13. Effects of 5-fluorouracil in nuclear and cellular morphology, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, cytoskeletal and caveolar distribution in primary cultures of smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras, Marcelo de Carvalho; Morrot, Alexandre; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes; Costa, Manoel Luis; Mermelstein, Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in the world and is one of the leading causes of cancer death. The anti-metabolite 5- fluorouracil (5-FU) is widely used in the treatment of patients with colon cancer and other cancer types. 5-FU-based chemotherapy has been shown to be very efficient in the improvement of overall survival of the patients and for the eradication of the disease. Unfortunately, common side effects of 5-FU include severe alterations in the motility of the gastrointestinal tissues. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle cells are poorly understood. Primary smooth muscle cell cultures are an important tool for studies of the biological consequences of 5-FU at the cellular level. The avian gizzard is one of the most robust organs of smooth muscle cells. Here we studied the molecular and cellular effects of the chemotherapic drug 5-FU in a primary culture of chick gizzard smooth muscle cells. We found that treatment of smooth muscle cells with 5-FU inhibits cell proliferation by the arrest of cells in the G1 phase of cell cycle and induce apoptosis. 5-FU induced a decrease in the percentage of histone H3-positive cells. Treatment of cells with 5-FU induced changes in cellular and nuclear morphology, a decrease in the number of stress fibers and a major decrease in the number of caveolin-3 positive cells. Our results suggest that the disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and the reduction of caveolin-3 expression could explain the alterations in contractility observed in patients treated with 5-FU. These findings might have an impact in the understanding of the cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle tissues and might help the improvement of new therapeutic protocols for the treatment of colon cancer.

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent regulation of miR-196a expression controls lung fibroblast apoptosis but not proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, Emelia; Zago, Michela; Sarill, Miles; Rico de Souza, Angela; Gomez, Alvin; Matthews, Jason; Hamid, Qutayba; Eidelman, David H.; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2014-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor implicated in the regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Although activation of the AhR by xenobiotics such as dioxin inhibits the cell cycle and control apoptosis, paradoxically, AhR expression also promotes cell proliferation and survival independent of exogenous ligands. The microRNA (miRNA) miR-196a has also emerged as a regulator of proliferation and apoptosis but a relationship between the AhR and miR-196a is not known. Therefore, we hypothesized that AhR-dependent regulation of endogenous miR-196a expression would promote cell survival and proliferation. Utilizing lung fibroblasts from AhR deficient (AhR{sup −/−}) and wild-type (AhR{sup +/+}) mice, we show that there is ligand-independent regulation of miRNA, including low miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} cells. Validation by qRT-PCR revealed a significant decrease in basal expression of miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} compared to AhR{sup +/+} cells. Exposure to AhR agonists benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and FICZ as well as AhR antagonist CH-223191 decreased miR-196a expression in AhR{sup +/+} fibroblasts concomitant with decreased AhR protein levels. There was increased proliferation only in AhR{sup +/+} lung fibroblasts in response to serum, corresponding to a decrease in p27{sup KIP1} protein, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Increasing the cellular levels of miR-196a had no effect on proliferation or expression of p27{sup KIP1} in AhR{sup −/−} fibroblasts but attenuated cigarette smoke-induced apoptosis. This study provides the first evidence that AhR expression is essential for the physiological regulation of cellular miRNA levels- including miR-196a. Future experiments designed to elucidate the functional relationship between the AhR and miR-196a may delineate additional novel ligand-independent roles for the AhR. - Highlights: • The AhR controls proliferation and apoptosis in lung cells. • The AhR regulates the

  15. A Cellular Automata Model of Infection Control on Medical Implants.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Langarica, Alicia; Kojouharov, Hristo; Chen-Charpentier, Benito; Tang, Liping

    2011-06-01

    S. epidermidis infections on medically implanted devices are a common problem in modern medicine due to the abundance of the bacteria. Once inside the body, S. epidermidis gather in communities called biofilms and can become extremely hard to eradicate, causing the patient serious complications. We simulate the complex S. epidermidis-Neutrophils interactions in order to determine the optimum conditions for the immune system to be able to contain the infection and avoid implant rejection. Our cellular automata model can also be used as a tool for determining the optimal amount of antibiotics for combating biofilm formation on medical implants.

  16. Long non-coding RNA CCAT2 functions as an oncogene in hepatocellular carcinoma, regulating cellular proliferation, migration and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, NING; SI, ZHONGZHOU; LI, TING; CHEN, GUANGSHUN; ZHANG, ZHONGQIANG; QI, HAIZHI

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that the dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may serve an important role in tumor progression. Previous studies have reported that the lncRNA, colon cancer associated transcript 2 (CCAT2), was highly expressed in various tumors. However, the function of CCAT2 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not yet been elucidated. The aim of the present study was to identify novel oncogene lncRNAs and investigate their physiological function and mechanism in HCC. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was observed that CCAT2 was upregulated in HCC tissues and human HCC cell lines. Furthermore, the impacts of CCAT2 on cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis were analyzed using cell migration, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis respectively. The overexpression of CCAT2 using a synthesized vector significantly promoted cell migration and proliferation, and inhibited apoptosis of HCC cells in vitro. The suppression of CCAT2 expression resulted in opposing effects. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that CCAT2 functions as a oncogene in HCC. Further investigation is required to clarify the molecular mechanisms of this lncRNA in HCC development. PMID:27347113

  17. Osteoblasts and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Migration and Proliferation in 3D In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Ana Paula D. N.; Takiya, Christina M.; Garzoni, Luciana R.; Leal-Ferreira, Mona Lisa; Dutra, Hélio S.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Meirelles, Maria Nazareth; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D) bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC) and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. Methodology/Principal Findings A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34+ cells was decreased. Conclusions/Significance Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation. PMID:20161704

  18. Cellular Cations Control Conformational Switching of Inositol Pyrophosphate Analogues.

    PubMed

    Hager, Anastasia; Wu, Mingxuan; Wang, Huanchen; Brown, Nathaniel W; Shears, Stephen B; Veiga, Nicolás; Fiedler, Dorothea

    2016-08-22

    The inositol pyrophosphate messengers (PP-InsPs) are emerging as an important class of cellular regulators. These molecules have been linked to numerous biological processes, including insulin secretion and cancer cell migration, but how they trigger such a wide range of cellular responses has remained unanswered in many cases. Here, we show that the PP-InsPs exhibit complex speciation behaviour and propose that a unique conformational switching mechanism could contribute to their multifunctional effects. We synthesised non-hydrolysable bisphosphonate analogues and crystallised the analogues in complex with mammalian PPIP5K2 kinase. Subsequently, the bisphosphonate analogues were used to investigate the protonation sequence, metal-coordination properties, and conformation in solution. Remarkably, the presence of potassium and magnesium ions enabled the analogues to adopt two different conformations near physiological pH. Understanding how the intrinsic chemical properties of the PP-InsPs can contribute to their complex signalling outputs will be essential to elucidate their regulatory functions.

  19. Magnetogenetics: Remote Control of Cellular Signaling with Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Jeremy P.

    Means for temporally regulating gene expression and cellular activity are invaluable for elucidating the underlying physiological processes and have therapeutic implications. Here we report the development of a system for remote regulation of gene expression by low frequency radiowaves (RF) or by a static magnetic field. We accomplished this by first adding iron oxide nanoparticles - either exogenously or as genetically encoded ferritin/ferric oxyhydroxide particle. These particles have been designed with affinity to the plasma membrane ion channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by a conjugated antibody. Application of a magnetic field stimulates the particle to gate the ion channel and this, in turn, initiates calcium-dependent transgene expression. We first demonstrated in vitro that TRPV1 can be actuated to cause calcium flux into the cell by directly applying a localized magnetic field. In mice expressing these genetically encoded components, application of external magnetic field caused remote stimulation of insulin transgene expression and significantly lowered blood glucose. In addition, we are investigating mechanisms by which iron oxide nanoparticles can absorb RF, and transduce this energy to cause channel opening. This robust, repeatable method for remote cellular regulation in vivo may ultimately have applications in basic science, as well as in technology and therapeutics.

  20. Controlled Delivery of Extracellular ROS Based on Hematoporphyrin-Incorporated Polyurethane Film for Enhanced Proliferation of Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Koo, Min-Ah; Kim, Bong-Jin; Lee, Mi Hee; Kwon, Byeong-Ju; Kim, Min Sung; Seon, Gyeung Mi; Kim, Dohyun; Nam, Ki Chang; Wang, Kangkyun; Kim, Yong-Rok; Park, Jong-Chul

    2016-10-04

    The principle of photodynamic treatment (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizer (PS) at diseased tissues, followed by light irradiation to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). In cells, a moderate increase in ROS plays an important role as signaling molecule to promote cell proliferation, whereas a severe increase of ROS causes cell damage. Previous studies have shown that low levels of ROS stimulate cell growth through PS drugs-treating PDT and non-thermal plasma treatment. However, these methods have side effects which are associated with low tissue selectivity and remaining of PS residues. To overcome such shortcomings, we designed hematoporphyrin-incorporated polyurethane (PU) film induced generation of extracellular ROS with singlet oxygen and free radicals. The film can easily control ROS production rate by regulating several parameters including light dose, PS dose. Also, its use facilitates targeted delivery of ROS to the specific lesion. Our study demonstrated that extracellular ROS could induce the formation of intracellular ROS. In vascular endothelial cells, a moderated increase in intracellular ROS also stimulated cell proliferation and cell cycle progression by accurate control of optimum levels of ROS with hematoporphyrin-incorporated polymer films. This modulation of cellular growth is expected to be an effective strategy for the design of next generation PDT.

  1. Phosphorylation of p62 by cdk1 Controls the Timely Transit of Cells through Mitosis and Tumor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Juan F.; Amanchy, Ramars; Diaz-Meco, Maria T.; Moscat, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The protein scaffold and signaling regulator p62 is important in critical cellular functions, including bone homeostasis, obesity, and cancer, because of its interactions with various signaling intermediaries. p62 is overexpressed in human cancers and is induced during cell transformation. Its genetic ablation inhibits lung tumorigenesis in vivo and cell proliferation in culture by regulating the TRAF6/NF-κB signaling cascade to control reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis. Here we show that cdk1 phosphorylates p62 in vitro and in vivo at T269 and S272, which is necessary for the maintenance of appropriate cyclin B1 levels and the levels of cdk1 activity necessary to allow cells to properly enter and exit mitosis. The lack of cdk1-mediated phosphorylation of p62 leads to a faster exit from mitosis, which translates into enhanced cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in response to Ras-induced transformation. Therefore, p62 emerges as a node for the control of not only cell survival but also cell transit through mitosis. PMID:20974803

  2. RB/PLK1-dependent induced pathway by SLAMF3 expression inhibits mitosis and control hepatocarcinoma cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bouhlal, Hicham; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Reignier, Aline; Hocini, Hakim; Fouquet, Gregory; Baghami, Mohammed Al; Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Marcq, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Polo-like kinase PLK1 is a cell cycle protein that plays multiple roles in promoting cell cycle progression. Among the many roles, the most prominent role of PLK1 is to regulate the mitotic spindle formation checkpoint at the M-phase. Recently we reported the expression of SLAMF3 in Hepatocytes and show that it is down regulated in tumor cells of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We also show that the forced high expression level of SLAMF3 in HCC cells controls proliferation by inhibiting the MAPK ERK/JNK and the mTOR pathways. In the present study, we provide evidence that the inhibitory effect of SLAMF3 on HCC proliferation occurs through Retinoblastoma (RB) factor and PLK1-dependent pathway. In addition to the inhibition of MAPK ERK/JNK and the mTOR pathways, expression of SLAMF3 in HCC retains RB factor in its hypophosphorylated active form, which in turn inactivates E2F transcription factor, thereby repressing the expression and activation of PLK1. A clear inverse correlation was also observed between SLAMF3 and PLK expression in patients with HCC. In conclusion, the results presented here suggest that the tumor suppressor potential of SLAMF3 occurs through activation of RB that represses PLK1. We propose that the induction of a high expression level of SLAMF3 in cancerous cells could control cellular mitosis and block tumor progression. PMID:26799423

  3. Study on connexin gene and protein expression and cellular distribution in relation to real-time proliferation of porcine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, B; Ziółkowska, A; Ciesiółka, S; Piotrowska, H; Antosik, P; Bukowska, D; Nowicki, M; Brüssow, K P; Zabel, M

    2014-01-01

    Granulosa cells (GCs) play an important role during follicle growth and development in preovulatory stage. Moreover, the proteins such as connexins are responsible for formation of protein channel between follicular-cumulus cells and oocyte. This study was aimed to investigate the role of connexin expression in porcine GCs in relation to their cellular distribution and real-time cell proliferation. In the present study, porcine GCs were isolated from the follicles of puberal gilts and then cultured in a real-time cellular analyzer (RTCA) system for 168 h. The expression levels of connexins (Cxs) Cx36, Cx37, Cx40 and Cx43 mRNA were measured by RQ-PCR analysis, and differences in the expression and distribution of Cx30, Cx31, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45 proteins were analyzed by confocal microscopic visualization. We found higher level of Cx36, Cx37, and Cx43 mRNA expression in GCs at recovery (at 0 h of in vitro culture, IVC) compared to all analyzed time periods of IVC (24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 h; P<0.001). On the other hand, the expression level of Cx40 transcripts was higher after 24 h of IVC compared to 0 h and the other times of IVC (P<0.001). Similarly to mRNAs, the expression levels of Cx31, Cx37 and Cx45 proteins were higher before (0 h) compared to after 168 h of IVC. The expression of Cx30 and Cx43, however, did not vary between the groups. In all, the proteins were distributed throughout the cell membrane rather than in the cytoplasm both before and after IVC. After 24 h of IVC, we observed a significant increase in the proliferation of GCs (log phase). We found differences in the proliferation index between 72-96 and 96- 140 h within the same population of GCs. In conclusion, the decrease in the expression of Cx mRNAs and proteins following IVC could be associated with a breakdown in gap-junction connections (GJCs), and leads to the decreased of their activity, which may be a reason of non-functional existence of connexon in follicular granulosa cells

  4. Sensitivity to methylmercury toxicity is enhanced in oxoguanine glycosylase 1 knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts and is dependent on cellular proliferation capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Ondovcik, Stephanie L.; Tamblyn, Laura; McPherson, John Peter; Wells, Peter G.

    2013-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a persistent environmental contaminant with potent neurotoxic action for which the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be conclusively delineated. Our objectives herein were twofold: first, to corroborate our previous findings of an increased sensitivity of spontaneously-immortalized oxoguanine glycosylase 1-null (Ogg1{sup −/−}) murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to MeHg through generation of Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen-immortalized wild-type and Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs; and second, to determine whether MeHg toxicity is proliferation-dependent. As with the spontaneously-immortalized cells used previously, the SV40 large T antigen-immortalized cells exhibited similar tendencies to undergo MeHg-initiated cell cycle arrest, with increased sensitivity in the Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs as measured by clonogenic survival and DNA damage. Compared to exponentially growing cells, those seeded at a higher density exhibited compromised proliferation, which proved protective against MeHg-mediated cell cycle arrest and induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), measured by phosphorylation of the core histone H2A variant (H2AX) on serine 139 (γH2AX), and by its functional confirmation by micronucleus assessment. This enhanced sensitivity of Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs to MeHg toxicity using discrete SV40 immortalization corroborates our previous studies, and suggests a novel role for OGG1 in minimizing MeHg-initiated DNA lesions that trigger replication-associated DSBs. Furthermore, proliferative capacity may determine MeHg toxicity in vivo and in utero. Accordingly, variations in cellular proliferative capacity and interindividual variability in repair activity may modulate the risk of toxicological consequences following MeHg exposure. - Highlights: • SV40 large T antigen-immortalized Ogg1{sup −/−} cells are more sensitive to MeHg. • Sensitivity to MeHg is dependent on cellular proliferation capacity. • OGG1 maintains genomic

  5. Control of proliferation rate of N27 dopaminergic neurons using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yiwen; Hadimani, Ravi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to investigate possible treatments for a variety of neurological disorders. However, the effect that magnetic fields have on neurons has not been well documented in the literature. We have investigated the effect of different orientation of magnetic field generated by TMS coils with a monophasic stimulator on the proliferation rate of N27 neuronal cells cultured in flasks and multi-well plates. The proliferation rate of neurons would increase by exposed horizontally adherent N27 cells to a magnetic field pointing upward through the neuronal proliferation layer compared with the control group. On the other hand, proliferation rate would decrease in cells exposed to a magnetic field pointing downward through the neuronal growth layer compared with the control group. We confirmed results obtained from the Trypan-blue and automatic cell counting methods with those from the CyQuant and MTS cell viability assays. Our findings could have important implications for the preclinical development of TMS treatments of neurological disorders and represents a new method to control the proliferation rate of neuronal cells.

  6. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Kaori; Taketomi, Takaharu; Yoshizaki, Keigo; Arai, Shinsaku; Sanui, Terukazu; Yoshiga, Daigo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nakamura, Seiji

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  7. MicroRNA-181b inhibits cellular proliferation and invasion of glioma cells via targeting Sal-like protein 4.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Peng, Yong; Liu, Min; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-11-17

    MicroRNAs (miRs), a class of 18-25 nucleotides in length non-coding RNAs, are able to suppress gene expression by targeting complementary regions of mRNAs and inhibiting protein translation Recently, miR-181b was found to playa suppressive role in glioma, but the regulatory mechanism of miR-181b in the malignant phenotypes of glioma cells remains largely unclear. Here we found that miR-181b was significantly downregulated in glioma tissues when compared with normal brain tissues, and decreased miR-181b levels were significantly associated with high pathology grade and poor prognosis of patients with glioma. Moreover, miR-181b was also downregulated in glioma cell lines (U87, SHG44, U373, and U251) compared to normal astrocytes. Overexpression of miR-181b significantly decreased the proliferation, migration, and invasion of glioma U251 cells. Sal-like protein 4 (SALL4) was identified as a novel target gene of miR-181b in U251 cells. The expression of SALL4 was significantly upregulated in glioma tissues and cell lines, and an inverse correlation was observed between the miR-181b and SALL4 expression levels in glioma. Further investigation showed that the protein expression of SALL4 was negatively regulated by miR-181b in U251 cells. Knockdown of SALL4 significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of U251 cells, while overexpression of SALL4 effectively reversed the suppressive effects of miR-181b on these malignant phenotypes of U251 cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that miR-181b has suppressive effects on the malignant phenotypes of glioma cells, partly at least, via directly targeting SALL4. Therefore, the miR-181b/SALL4 axis may become a potential therapeutic target for glioma.

  8. Imaging of cellular proliferation in liver metastasis by [18F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography: effect of therapy.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Kaiyumars; Challapalli, Amarnath; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Rosso, Lula; Wasan, Harpreet; Stebbing, Justin; Kenny, Laura; Mangar, Stephen; Riddle, Pippa; Palmieri, Carlo; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Sharma, Rohini; Turkheimer, Federico; Coombes, R Charles; Aboagye, Eric

    2012-06-07

    Although [(18)F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) permits estimation of tumor thymidine kinase-1 expression, and thus, cell proliferation, high physiological uptake of tracer in liver tissue can limit its utility. We evaluated FLT-PET combined with a temporal-intensity information-based voxel-clustering approach termed kinetic spatial filtering (FLT-PET(KSF)) for detecting drug response in liver metastases. FLT-PET and computed tomography data were collected from patients with confirmed breast or colorectal liver metastases before, and two weeks after the first cycle of chemotherapy. Changes in tumor FLT-PET and FLT-PET(KSF) variables were determined. Visual distinction between tumor and normal liver was seen in FLT-PET(KSF) images. Of the 33 metastases from 20 patients studied, 26 were visible after kinetic filtering. The net irreversible retention of the tracer (Ki; from unfiltered data) in the tumor, correlated strongly with tracer uptake when the imaging variable was an unfiltered average or maximal standardized uptake value, 60 min post-injection (SUV(60,av): r = 0.9, SUV(60,max): r = 0.7; p < 0.0001 for both) and occurrence of high intensity voxels derived from FLT-PET(KSF) (r = 0.7, p < 0.0001). Overall, a significant reduction in the imaging variables was seen in responders compared to non-responders; however, the two week time point selected for imaging was too early to allow prediction of long term clinical benefit from chemotherapy. FLT-PET and FLT-PET(KSF) detected changes in proliferation in liver metastases.

  9. Imaging of cellular proliferation in liver metastasis by [18F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography: effect of therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contractor, Kaiyumars; Challapalli, Amarnath; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Rosso, Lula; Wasan, Harpreet; Stebbing, Justin; Kenny, Laura; Mangar, Stephen; Riddle, Pippa; Palmieri, Carlo; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Sharma, Rohini; Turkheimer, Federico; Coombes, R. Charles; Aboagye, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Although [18F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) permits estimation of tumor thymidine kinase-1 expression, and thus, cell proliferation, high physiological uptake of tracer in liver tissue can limit its utility. We evaluated FLT-PET combined with a temporal-intensity information-based voxel-clustering approach termed kinetic spatial filtering (FLT-PETKSF) for detecting drug response in liver metastases. FLT-PET and computed tomography data were collected from patients with confirmed breast or colorectal liver metastases before, and two weeks after the first cycle of chemotherapy. Changes in tumor FLT-PET and FLT-PETKSF variables were determined. Visual distinction between tumor and normal liver was seen in FLT-PETKSF images. Of the 33 metastases from 20 patients studied, 26 were visible after kinetic filtering. The net irreversible retention of the tracer (Ki; from unfiltered data) in the tumor, correlated strongly with tracer uptake when the imaging variable was an unfiltered average or maximal standardized uptake value, 60 min post-injection (SUV60,av: r = 0.9, SUV60,max: r = 0.7; p < 0.0001 for both) and occurrence of high intensity voxels derived from FLT-PETKSF (r = 0.7, p < 0.0001). Overall, a significant reduction in the imaging variables was seen in responders compared to non-responders; however, the two week time point selected for imaging was too early to allow prediction of long term clinical benefit from chemotherapy. FLT-PET and FLT-PETKSF detected changes in proliferation in liver metastases.

  10. Physical Property Control on the Cellular Uptake Pathway and Spatial Distribution of Nanoparticles in Cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sungsook; Seo, Eunseok; Kim, Ki Hean; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles have been developed in broad biomedical research in terms of effective cellular interactions to treat and visualize diseased cells. Considering the charge and polar functional groups of proteins that are embedded in cellular membranes, charged nanoparticles have been strategically developed to enhance electrostatic cellular interactions. In this study, we show that cellular uptake efficiency, pathway, and spatial distribution of gold nanoparticles in a cell are significantly modulated based on the surface condition of gold nanoparticles and human cancer cells that were tuned by controlling the pH of the medium and by introducing an electron beam. Cellular uptake efficiency is increased when electrostatic attraction is induced between the cells and the gold nanoparticles. Cell surface modification changes the cellular uptake pathways of the gold nanoparticles and concentrates the gold nanoparticles at the membrane region. Surface modification of the gold nanoparticles also contributes to deep penetration and homogeneous spatial distributions in a cell.

  11. The Deubiquitylase USP37 Links REST to the Control of p27 Stability and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandra M.; Taylor, Pete; Gireud, Monica; Singh, Akanksha; Lee, Dean; Fuller, Greg; Ji, Lingyun; Fangusaro, Jason; Rajaram, Veena; Goldman, Stewart; Eberhart, Charles; Gopalakrishnan, Vidya

    2012-01-01

    The RE1 Silencing Transcription Factor (REST) is a repressor of neuronal differentiation and its elevated expression in neural cells blocks neuronal differentiation. In the present study, we demonstrate a role for REST in the control of proliferation of medulloblastoma cells. REST expression decreased the levels of CDKNIB/p27, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and a brake of cell proliferation in these cells. The reciprocal relationship between REST and p27 was validated in human tumor samples. REST knockdown in medulloblastoma cells derepessed a novel REST-target gene encoding the deubiquitylase ubiquitin-specific peptidase 37 (USP37). Ectopically expressed wild type USP37 formed a complex with p27, promoted its deubiquitination and stabilization and blocked cell proliferation. Knockdown of REST and USP37 prevented p27 stabilization and blocked the diminution in proliferative potential that normally accompanied REST loss. Unexpectedly, wild type USP37 expression also induced the expression of REST-target neuronal differentiation genes even though REST levels were unaffected. In contrast, a mutant of USP37 carrying a site-directed change in a conserved cysteine failed to rescue REST-mediated p27 destabilization, maintenance of cell proliferation and blockade to neuronal differentiation. Consistent with these findings, a significant correlation between USP37 and p27 was observed in patient tumors. Collectively, these findings provide a novel connection between REST and the proteasomal machinery in the control of p27 and cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. PMID:22665064

  12. FAM65B controls the proliferation of transformed and primary T cells

    PubMed Central

    Froehlich, Jeanne; Versapuech, Margaux; Megrelis, Laura; Largeteau, Quitterie; Meunier, Sylvain; Tanchot, Corinne; Bismuth, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Cell quiescence is controlled by regulated genome-encoded programs that actively express genes which are often down-regulated or inactivated in transformed cells. Among them is FoxO1, a transcription factor that imposes quiescence in several cell types, including T lymphocytes. In these cells, the FAM65B encoding gene is a major target of FOXO1. Here, we show that forced expression of FAM65B in transformed cells blocks their mitosis because of a defect of the mitotic spindle, leading to G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Upon cell proliferation arrest, FAM65B is engaged in a complex containing two proteins well known to be involved in cell proliferation i.e. the HDAC6 deacetylase and the 14.3.3 scaffolding protein. In primary T cells, FAM65B is down-regulated upon T cell receptor engagement, and maintaining its expression blocks their proliferation, establishing that the decrease of FAM65B expression is required for proliferation. Conversely, inhibiting FAM65B expression in naive T lymphocytes decreases their activation threshold. These results identify FAM65B as a potential new target for controlling proliferation of both transformed and normal cells. PMID:27556504

  13. Spatial control of cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation using ion-beam induced thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiaki

    2014-08-01

    In this study, cellular films were fabricated by ion-beam irradiation into poly-L-lactic acid sheets and cell culture. The cellular film shapes can be controlled by pattern masks. We performed spatial cell patterning using three types of cells: fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and nerve-like cells. First, multi-layered cellular construct was fabricated by stacking fibroblast cellular films. When three cellular films were stacked and incubated, these films firmly attached to each other. Second, tubular constructs were fabricated by endothelial cell culture on linearly patterned surfaces with wide widths of 80, 120, 160, and 200 μm. The patterned cellular films were rounded into vessel-like structure. The diameters of the constructs depend upon the pattern widths. Finally, we controlled cell attachment and nerve growth of nerve-like cells by using linearly patterned surfaces with narrow widths of 10, 30, and 50 μm. Nerve growth direction was controlled by varying the pattern widths. In the case of 10 μm, the attached cells and nerve growth were straight on the patterned thin films. These cell patterning techniques are expected to have applications in tissue engineering, cell transplantation, and in vitro tissue modeling.

  14. SETD6 controls the expression of estrogen-responsive genes and proliferation of breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Daniel J; Williamson, Stuart Charles; Alkharaif, Dhuha; Monteiro, Isabella Christina Mazzaro; Goudreault, Marilyn; Gaughan, Luke; Robson, Craig N; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Binda, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The lysine methyltransferase SETD6 modifies the histone variant H2AZ, a key component of nuclear receptor-dependent transcription. Herein, we report the identification of several factors that associate with SETD6 and are implicated in nuclear hormone receptor signaling. Specifically, SETD6 associates with the estrogen receptor α (ERα), histone deacetylase HDAC1, metastasis protein MTA2, and the transcriptional co-activator TRRAP. Luciferase reporter assays identify SETD6 as a transcriptional repressor, in agreement with its association with HDAC1 and MTA2. However, SETD6 behaves as a co-activator of several estrogen-responsive genes, such as PGR and TFF1. Consistent with these results, silencing of SETD6 in several breast carcinoma cell lines induced cellular proliferation defects accompanied by enhanced expression of the cell cycle inhibitor CDKN1A and induction of apoptosis. Herein, we have identified several chromatin proteins that associate with SETD6 and described SETD6 as an essential factor for nuclear receptor signaling and cellular proliferation. PMID:24751716

  15. Controlling the Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons: Study Guide for Teachers and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Institute of Peace, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of this teaching guide are: (1) to increase student understanding of the prevalence and spread of nuclear weapons; (2) to familiarize students with historic and contemporary measures to control nuclear proliferation and stimulate their thinking of potential strategies for doing so in the future; (3) to develop students' analytical…

  16. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luciana O; Garcia, Cristiana B; Matos-Silva, Flavia A; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M

    2014-02-28

    SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET-hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  17. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Garcia, Cristiana B.; Matos-Silva, Flavia A.; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M.

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • hnRNPK is a new target of SET. • SET regulates hnRNPK. • SET and hnRNPK accumulation promotes tumorigenesis. • SET accumulation is a potential model to study genes regulated by SET-hnRNPK. - Abstract: SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET–hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  18. Simplet controls cell proliferation and gene transcription during zebrafish caudal fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kizil, Caghan; Otto, Georg W; Geisler, Robert; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane; Antos, Christopher L

    2009-01-15

    Two hallmarks of vertebrate epimorphic regeneration are a significant increase in the proliferation of normally quiescent cells and a re-activation of genes that are active during embryonic development. It is unclear what the molecular determinants are that regulate these events and how they are coordinated. Zebrafish have the ability to regenerate several compound structures by regulating cell proliferation and gene transcription. We report that fam53b/simplet (smp) regulates both cell proliferation and the transcription of specific genes. In situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that amputation of zebrafish hearts and fins resulted in strong up-regulation of the smp gene. In regenerating adult fin, smp expression remained strong in the distal mesenchyme which later expanded to the basal layers of the distal epidermis and distal tip epithelium. Morpholino knockdown of smp reduced regenerative outgrowth by decreasing cell proliferation as measured by BrdU incorporation and histone H3 phosphorylation. In addition, smp knockdown increased the expression of msxb, msxc, and shh, as well as the later formation of ectopic bone. Taken together, these data indicate a requirement for smp in fin regeneration through control of cell proliferation, the regulation of specific genes and proper bone patterning.

  19. Cellular control lies in the balance of forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chicurel, M. E.; Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1998-01-01

    Mechanical tension generated within the cytoskeleton of living cells is emerging as a critical regulator of biological function in diverse situations ranging from the control of chromosome movement to the morphogenesis of the vertebrate brain. In this article, we review recent advances that have been made in terms of understanding how cells generate, transmit and sense mechanical tension, as well as how they use these forces to control their shape and behavior. An integrated view of cell regulation that incorporates mechanics and structure as well as chemistry is beginning to emerge.

  20. Controlled cellular fusion using optically trapped plasmonic nano-heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Azra; Lund, Andreas R.; Semsey, Szabolcs; Oddershede, Lene B.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2016-09-01

    Optically trapped plasmonic nano-heaters are used to mediate efficient and controlled fusion of biological membranes. The fusion method is demonstrated by optically trapping plasmonic nanoparticles located in between vesicle membranes leading to rapid lipid and content mixing. As an interesting application we show how direct control over fusion can be used for studying diffusion of peripheral membrane proteins and their interactions with membranes and for studying protein reactions. Membrane proteins encapsulated in an inert vesicle can be transferred to a vesicle composed of negative lipids by optically induced fusion. Mixing of the two membranes results in a fused vesicle with a high affinity for the protein and we observe immediate membrane tubulation due to the activity of the protein. Fusion of distinct membrane compartments also has applications in small scale chemistry for realizing pico-liter reactions and offers many exciting applications within biology which are discussed here.

  1. IRE1α controls cyclin A1 expression and promotes cell proliferation through XBP-1

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Jeffery A.

    2009-01-01

    IRE1 is a conserved dual endoribonuclease/protein kinase that is indispensable for directing the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in yeast, flies, and worms. In mammalian systems, however, the precise biological activities carried out by IRE1α are unclear. Here, molecular and chemical genetic approaches were used to control IRE1 activity in a number of prostate cancer cell lines and the resulting impact on gene transcription, cell survival, and proliferation was examined. Modulating IRE1α activity had no transcriptional effect on the induction of genes classically associated with the ER stress response (Grp78 and CHOP) or cell survival when confronted with ER stress agents. Rather, IRE1α activity was positively correlated to proliferation. Since Xbp-1 mRNA is the sole known substrate for IRE1 endoribonuclease activity, the role of this transcription factor in mediating proliferation was examined. Repressing total Xbp-1 levels by siRNA techniques effectively slowed proliferation. In an effort to identify IRE1/XBP-1 targets responsible for the cell cycle response, genome-wide differential mRNA expression analysis was performed. Consistent with its ability to sense ER stress, IRE1α induction led to an enrichment of ER-Golgi, plasma membrane, and secretory gene products. An increase in cyclin A1 expression was the only differentially expressed cell cycle regulatory gene found. Greater cyclin A protein levels were consistently observed in cells with active IRE1α and were dependent on XBP-1. We conclude that IRE1α activity controls a subset of the ER stress response and mediates proliferation through tight control of Xbp-1 splicing. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12192-009-0163-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20013084

  2. Retinoic acid signaling controls the formation, proliferation and survival of the blastema during adult zebrafish fin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Blum, Nicola; Begemann, Gerrit

    2012-01-01

    Adult teleosts rebuild amputated fins through a proliferation-dependent process called epimorphic regeneration, in which a blastema of cycling progenitor cells replaces the lost fin tissue. The genetic networks that control formation of blastema cells from formerly quiescent stump tissue and subsequent blastema function are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the cellular and molecular consequences of genetically interfering with retinoic acid (RA) signaling for the formation of the zebrafish blastema. We show that RA signaling is upregulated within the first few hours after fin amputation in the stump mesenchyme, where it controls Fgf, Wnt/β-catenin and Igf signaling. Genetic inhibition of the RA pathway at this stage blocks blastema formation by inhibiting cell cycle entry of stump cells and impairs the formation of the basal epidermal layer, a signaling center in the wound epidermis. In the established blastema, RA signaling remains active to ensure the survival of the highly proliferative blastemal population by controlling expression of the anti-apoptotic factor bcl2. In addition, RA signaling maintains blastema proliferation through the activation of growth-stimulatory signals mediated by Fgf and Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as by reducing signaling through the growth-inhibitory non-canonical Wnt pathway. The endogenous roles of RA in adult vertebrate appendage regeneration are uncovered here for the first time. They provide a mechanistic framework to understand previous observations in salamanders that link endogenous sources of RA to the regeneration process itself and support the hypothesis that the RA signaling pathway is an essential component of vertebrate tissue regeneration.

  3. Controlling cellular activity by manipulating silicone surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Babu R; Brook, Michael A; Smith, Terry; Zhao, Shigui; Chen, Yang; Sheardown, Heather; D'souza, Renita; Rochev, Yuri

    2010-07-01

    Silicone elastomers exhibit a broad range of beneficial properties that are exploited in biomaterials. In some cases, however, problems can arise at silicone elastomer interfaces. With breast implants, for example, the fibrous capsule that forms at the silicone interface can undergo contracture, which can lead to the need for revision surgery. The relationship between surface topography and wound healing--which could impact on the degree of contracture--has not been examined in detail. To address this, we prepared silicone elastomer samples with rms surface roughnesses varying from 88 to 650 nm and examined the growth of 3T3 fibroblasts on these surfaces. The PicoGreen assay demonstrated that fibroblast growth decreased with increases in surface roughness. Relatively smooth (approximately 88 nm) PDMS samples had ca. twice as much fibroblast DNA per unit area than the 'bumpy' (approximately 378 nm) and very rough (approximately 604 and approximately 650 nm) PDMS samples. While the PDMS sample with roughness of approximately 650 nm had significantly fewer fibroblasts at 24h than the TCP control, fibroblasts on the smooth silicone surprisingly reached confluence much more rapidly than on TCP, the gold standard for cell culture. Thus, increasing the surface roughness at the sub-micron scale could be a strategy worthy of consideration to help mitigate fibroblast growth and control fibrous capsule formation on silicone elastomer implants.

  4. Hydrogels with Spatially and Temporally Controlled Properties to Control Cellular Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, Jason

    2011-03-01

    Stem cells (e.g., mesenchymal stem cells, MSCs) respond to many cues from their microenvironment, which may include chemical signals, mechanics, and topography. Importantly, these cues may be incorporated into scaffolding to control stem cell differentiation and optimize their ability to produce tissues in regenerative medicine. Despite the significant amount of work in this area, the materials have been primarily static and uniform. To this end, we have developed a sequential crosslinking process that relies on our ability to crosslinked functional biopolymers (e.g., methacrylated hyaluronic acid, HA) in two steps, namely a Michael-type addition reaction to partially consume reactive groups and then a light-initiated free-radical polymerization to further crosslink the material. With light exposure during the second step comes control over the material in space (via masks and lasers) and time (via intermittent light exposure). We are applying this technique for numerous applications. For example, when the HA hydrogels are crosslinked with MMP degradable peptides with thiol termini during the first step, a material that can be degraded by cells is obtained. However, cell-mediated degradation is obstructed with the introduction of kinetic chains during the second step, leading to spatially controlled cell degradability. Due to the influence of cellular spreading on MSC differentiation, we have controlled cell fates by controlling their spread ability, for instance towards osteoblasts in spread areas and adipocytes when cell remained rounded. We are also using the process of stiffening with time to investigate mechanically induced differentiation, particularly in materials with evolving mechanics. Overall, these advanced HA hydrogels provide us the opportunity to investigate diverse and controlled material properties on MSC interactions.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3A promotes cellular proliferation by repression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1.

    PubMed

    Tursiella, Melissa L; Bowman, Emily R; Wanzeck, Keith C; Throm, Robert E; Liao, Jason; Zhu, Junjia; Sample, Clare E

    2014-10-01

    Latent infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly associated with the endemic form of Burkitt lymphoma (eBL), which typically limits expression of EBV proteins to EBNA-1 (Latency I). Interestingly, a subset of eBLs maintain a variant program of EBV latency - Wp-restricted latency (Wp-R) - that includes expression of the EBNA-3 proteins (3A, 3B and 3C), in addition to EBNA-1. In xenograft assays, Wp-R BL cell lines were notably more tumorigenic than their counterparts that maintain Latency I, suggesting that the additional latency-associated proteins expressed in Wp-R influence cell proliferation and/or survival. Here, we evaluated the contribution of EBNA-3A. Consistent with the enhanced tumorigenic potential of Wp-R BLs, knockdown of EBNA-3A expression resulted in abrupt cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 that was concomitant with conversion of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) to its hypophosphorylated state, followed by a loss of Rb protein. Comparable results were seen in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), consistent with the previous observation that EBNA-3A is essential for sustained growth of these cells. In agreement with the known ability of EBNA-3A and EBNA-3C to cooperatively repress p14(ARF) and p16(INK4a) expression, knockdown of EBNA-3A in LCLs resulted in rapid elevation of p14(ARF) and p16I(NK4a). By contrast, p16(INK4a) was not detectably expressed in Wp-R BL and the low-level expression of p14(ARF) was unchanged by EBNA-3A knockdown. Amongst other G1/S regulatory proteins, only p21(WAF1/CIP1), a potent inducer of G1 arrest, was upregulated following knockdown of EBNA-3A in Wp-R BL Sal cells and LCLs, coincident with hypophosphorylation and destabilization of Rb and growth arrest. Furthermore, knockdown of p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression in Wp-R BL correlated with an increase in cellular proliferation. This novel function of EBNA-3A is distinct from the functions previously described that are shared with EBNA-3C, and likely contributes to the

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3A Promotes Cellular Proliferation by Repression of the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1

    PubMed Central

    Tursiella, Melissa L.; Bowman, Emily R.; Wanzeck, Keith C.; Throm, Robert E.; Liao, Jason; Zhu, Junjia; Sample, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    Latent infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly associated with the endemic form of Burkitt lymphoma (eBL), which typically limits expression of EBV proteins to EBNA-1 (Latency I). Interestingly, a subset of eBLs maintain a variant program of EBV latency - Wp-restricted latency (Wp-R) - that includes expression of the EBNA-3 proteins (3A, 3B and 3C), in addition to EBNA-1. In xenograft assays, Wp-R BL cell lines were notably more tumorigenic than their counterparts that maintain Latency I, suggesting that the additional latency-associated proteins expressed in Wp-R influence cell proliferation and/or survival. Here, we evaluated the contribution of EBNA-3A. Consistent with the enhanced tumorigenic potential of Wp-R BLs, knockdown of EBNA-3A expression resulted in abrupt cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 that was concomitant with conversion of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) to its hypophosphorylated state, followed by a loss of Rb protein. Comparable results were seen in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), consistent with the previous observation that EBNA-3A is essential for sustained growth of these cells. In agreement with the known ability of EBNA-3A and EBNA-3C to cooperatively repress p14ARF and p16INK4a expression, knockdown of EBNA-3A in LCLs resulted in rapid elevation of p14ARF and p16INK4a. By contrast, p16INK4a was not detectably expressed in Wp-R BL and the low-level expression of p14ARF was unchanged by EBNA-3A knockdown. Amongst other G1/S regulatory proteins, only p21WAF1/CIP1, a potent inducer of G1 arrest, was upregulated following knockdown of EBNA-3A in Wp-R BL Sal cells and LCLs, coincident with hypophosphorylation and destabilization of Rb and growth arrest. Furthermore, knockdown of p21WAF1/CIP1 expression in Wp-R BL correlated with an increase in cellular proliferation. This novel function of EBNA-3A is distinct from the functions previously described that are shared with EBNA-3C, and likely contributes to the proliferation of

  7. Tolerance to Gamma Radiation in the Tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini from Embryo to Adult Correlate Inversely with Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Pardo, Eliana; Jönsson, K. Ingemar; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Haghdoost, Siamak; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are highly tolerant to desiccation and ionizing radiation but the mechanisms of this tolerance are not well understood. In this paper, we report studies on dose responses of adults and eggs of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini exposed to gamma radiation. In adults the LD50/48h for survival was estimated at ~ 4200 Gy, and doses higher than 100 Gy reduced both fertility and hatchability of laid eggs drastically. We also evaluated the effect of radiation (doses 50 Gy, 200 Gy, 500 Gy) on eggs in the early and late embryonic stage of development, and observed a reduced hatchability in the early stage, while no effect was found in the late stage of development. Survival of juveniles from irradiated eggs was highly affected by a 500 Gy dose, both in the early and the late stage. Juveniles hatched from eggs irradiated at 50 Gy and 200 Gy developed into adults and produced offspring, but their fertility was reduced compared to the controls. Finally we measured the effect of low temperature during irradiation at 4000 Gy and 4500 Gy on survival in adult tardigrades, and observed a slight delay in the expressed mortality when tardigrades were irradiated on ice. Since H. dujardini is a freshwater tardigrade with lower tolerance to desiccation compared to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, the high radiation tolerance in adults, similar to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, is unexpected and seems to challenge the idea that desiccation and radiation tolerance rely on the same molecular mechanisms. We suggest that the higher radiation tolerance in adults and late stage embryos of H. dujardini (and in other studied tardigrades) compared to early stage embryos may partly be due to limited mitotic activity, since tardigrades have a low degree of somatic cell division (eutely), and dividing cells are known to be more sensitive to radiation. PMID:26208275

  8. Tolerance to Gamma Radiation in the Tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini from Embryo to Adult Correlate Inversely with Cellular Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Pardo, Eliana; Jönsson, K Ingemar; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Haghdoost, Siamak; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are highly tolerant to desiccation and ionizing radiation but the mechanisms of this tolerance are not well understood. In this paper, we report studies on dose responses of adults and eggs of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini exposed to gamma radiation. In adults the LD50/48h for survival was estimated at ~ 4200 Gy, and doses higher than 100 Gy reduced both fertility and hatchability of laid eggs drastically. We also evaluated the effect of radiation (doses 50 Gy, 200 Gy, 500 Gy) on eggs in the early and late embryonic stage of development, and observed a reduced hatchability in the early stage, while no effect was found in the late stage of development. Survival of juveniles from irradiated eggs was highly affected by a 500 Gy dose, both in the early and the late stage. Juveniles hatched from eggs irradiated at 50 Gy and 200 Gy developed into adults and produced offspring, but their fertility was reduced compared to the controls. Finally we measured the effect of low temperature during irradiation at 4000 Gy and 4500 Gy on survival in adult tardigrades, and observed a slight delay in the expressed mortality when tardigrades were irradiated on ice. Since H. dujardini is a freshwater tardigrade with lower tolerance to desiccation compared to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, the high radiation tolerance in adults, similar to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, is unexpected and seems to challenge the idea that desiccation and radiation tolerance rely on the same molecular mechanisms. We suggest that the higher radiation tolerance in adults and late stage embryos of H. dujardini (and in other studied tardigrades) compared to early stage embryos may partly be due to limited mitotic activity, since tardigrades have a low degree of somatic cell division (eutely), and dividing cells are known to be more sensitive to radiation.

  9. With the Help of MOM: Mitochondrial Contributions to Cellular Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Braun, Ralf J; Westermann, Benedikt

    2017-03-10

    Mitochondria are essential organelles because they have key roles in cellular energy metabolism and many other metabolic pathways. Several quality control systems have evolved to ensure that dysfunctional mitochondria are either repaired or eliminated. The activities of these pathways are crucial for cellular health because they maintain functional mitochondria. In addition, the cytosolic ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and the mitochondria-associated degradation pathway (MAD) share some of their core components, are functionally tightly interconnected, and mutually modulate their activities. Thus, the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) actively supports quality control systems in extramitochondrial compartments. Furthermore, mitochondrial quality surveillance systems also act on cytosolic or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) substrates and modulate immune responses. Therefore, mitochondria contribute to cellular quality control and homeostasis on several levels.

  10. BTG2 bridges PABPC1 RNA-binding domains and CAF1 deadenylase to control cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Stupfler, Benjamin; Birck, Catherine; Séraphin, Bertrand; Mauxion, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    While BTG2 plays an important role in cellular differentiation and cancer, its precise molecular function remains unclear. BTG2 interacts with CAF1 deadenylase through its APRO domain, a defining feature of BTG/Tob factors. Our previous experiments revealed that expression of BTG2 promoted mRNA poly(A) tail shortening through an undefined mechanism. Here we report that the APRO domain of BTG2 interacts directly with the first RRM domain of the poly(A)-binding protein PABPC1. Moreover, PABPC1 RRM and BTG2 APRO domains are sufficient to stimulate CAF1 deadenylase activity in vitro in the absence of other CCR4–NOT complex subunits. Our results unravel thus the mechanism by which BTG2 stimulates mRNA deadenylation, demonstrating its direct role in poly(A) tail length control. Importantly, we also show that the interaction of BTG2 with the first RRM domain of PABPC1 is required for BTG2 to control cell proliferation. PMID:26912148

  11. Brn-2 expression controls melanoma proliferation and is directly regulated by beta-catenin.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Jane; Martinozzi, Silvia; Dexter, Timothy J; Champeval, Delphine; Carreira, Suzanne; Larue, Lionel; Goding, Colin R

    2004-04-01

    Constitutive activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway is a notable feature of a large minority of cases of malignant melanoma, an aggressive and increasingly common cancer. The identification of target genes downstream from this pathway is therefore crucial to our understanding of the disease. The POU domain transcription factor Brn-2 has been implicated in control of proliferation and melanoma survival, and its expression is strongly upregulated in melanoma. We show here that in vivo Brn-2 is expressed in melanocytes but not in embryonic day 11.5 melanoblasts and that its expression is directly controlled by the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway in melanoma cell lines and in transgenic mice. Moreover, silent interfering RNA-mediated inhibition of Brn-2 expression in melanoma cells overexpressing beta-catenin results in significantly decreased proliferation. These results, together with the observation that BRAF signaling also induces Brn-2 expression, reveal that Brn-2 is a focus for the convergence of two key melanoma-associated signaling pathways that are linked to cell proliferation.

  12. Hcm1 integrates signals from Cdk1 and calcineurin to control cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Heather E; Roy, Jagoree; Mapa, Claudine E; Cyert, Martha S; Benanti, Jennifer A

    2015-10-15

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1) orchestrates progression through the cell cycle by coordinating the activities of cell-cycle regulators. Although phosphatases that oppose Cdk1 are likely to be necessary to establish dynamic phosphorylation, specific phosphatases that target most Cdk1 substrates have not been identified. In budding yeast, the transcription factor Hcm1 activates expression of genes that regulate chromosome segregation and is critical for maintaining genome stability. Previously we found that Hcm1 activity and degradation are stimulated by Cdk1 phosphorylation of distinct clusters of sites. Here we show that, upon exposure to environmental stress, the phosphatase calcineurin inhibits Hcm1 by specifically removing activating phosphorylations and that this regulation is important for cells to delay proliferation when they encounter stress. Our work identifies a mechanism by which proliferative signals from Cdk1 are removed in response to stress and suggests that Hcm1 functions as a rheostat that integrates stimulatory and inhibitory signals to control cell proliferation.

  13. Arms control and nonproliferation technologies: The non-proliferation experiment. First quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Staehle, G.; Stull, S.; Talaber, C.

    1994-05-01

    In this issue of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies we present the initial findings of the recent Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), conducted by the Department of Energy at the Nevada Test Site. Through an introduction and pictorial walk-through, Marv Denny and Jay Zucca of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory describe the overall experiment. This is followed by scientific and technical abstracts of the complex suite of experiments and analyses, which were presented at the Symposium on Non-Proliferation Experiment Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, April 19--21, 1994. Questions regarding the ongoing analysis and conclusions from the NPE should be directed to Leslie Casey in the Office of Research and Development within the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security of DOE. Her phone number is 202-586-2151.

  14. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Regulates Airway Epithelium Differentiation by Controlling Basal Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Maouche, Kamel; Polette, Myriam; Jolly, Thomas; Medjber, Kahina; Cloëz-Tayarani, Isabelle; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Burlet, Henriette; Terryn, Christine; Coraux, Christelle; Zahm, Jean-Marie; Birembaut, Philippe; Tournier, Jean-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Airway epithelial basal cells are known to be critical for regenerating injured epithelium and maintaining tissue homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), which is highly permeable to Ca2+, is involved in lung morphogenesis. Here, we have investigated the potential role of the α7 nAChR in the regulation of airway epithelial basal cell proliferation and the differentiation of the human airway epithelium. In vivo during fetal development and in vitro during the regeneration of the human airway epithelium, α7 nAChR expression coincides with epithelium differentiation. Inactivating α7 nAChR function in vitro increases cell proliferation during the initial steps of the epithelium regeneration, leading to epithelial alterations such as basal cell hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia, remodeling observed in many bronchopulmonary diseases. The regeneration of the airway epithelium after injury in α7−/− mice is delayed and characterized by a transient hyperplasia of basal cells. Moreover, 1-year-old α7−/− mice more frequently present basal cells hyperplasia. Modulating nAChR function or expression shows that only α7 nAChR, as opposed to heteropentameric αxβy nAChRs, controls the proliferation of human airway epithelial basal cells. These findings suggest that α7 nAChR is a key regulator of the plasticity of the human airway epithelium by controlling basal cell proliferation and differentiation pathway and is involved in airway remodeling during bronchopulmonary diseases. PMID:19808646

  15. Therapeutic intervention at cellular quality control systems in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Daniela M; Esteves, A Raquel; Silva, Diana F F; Martins-Branco, Diogo; Santos, Daniel; Pimentel, Diana F Gomes; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2011-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis relies on quality control systems so that damaged biologic structures are either repaired or degraded and entirely replaced by newly formed proteins or even organelles. The clearance of dysfunctional cellular structures in long-lived postmitotic cells, like neurons, is essential to eliminate, per example, defective mitochondria, lipofuscin-loaded lysosomes and oxidized proteins. Short-lived proteins are degraded mainly by proteases and proteasomes whether most long-lived proteins and all organelles are digested by autophagy in the lysosomes. Recently, it an interplay was established between the ubiquitin-proteasome system and macroautophagy, so that both degradative mechanisms compensate for each other. In this article we describe each of these clearance systems and their contribution to neuronal quality control. We will highlight some of the findings that provide evidence for the dysfunction of these systems in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Ultimately, we provide an outline on potential therapeutic interventions based on the modulation of cellular degradative systems.

  16. Real-time proliferation of porcine cumulus cells is related to the protein levels and cellular distribution of Cdk4 and Cx43.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Bartosz; Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Piotrowska, Hanna; Zawierucha, Piotr; Antosik, Paweł; Bukowska, Dorota; Ciesiółka, Sylwia; Jaśkowski, Jędrzej M; Brüssow, Klaus P; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2013-09-01

    The proper maturation of cumulus somatic cells depends on bidirectional communication between the oocyte and the surrounding cumulus cells (CCs). The aim of this study was (i) to investigate maturation markers, such as Cx43 and Cdk4 protein levels, and (ii) to analyze the distribution of these two proteins in CCs cultured for 44, 88, 132, and 164 hours in both separated and cumulus-enclosed oocyte cultures. CCs were isolated from porcine ovarian follicles after the treatment of the recovered COCs with collagenase. Then, the separated CCs were cultured in TCM-199 for 0 to 164 hours, using a real-time cellular analyzer; however, the immunostaining was performed only after 44, 88, and 132 hours. The protein levels and distribution were analyzed using confocal microscopy. After the CCs underwent in vitro cultivation (IVC) for 25 hours, a logarithmically increasing normalized proliferation index was found throughout the entire 164 hours cultivation time. The Cx43 and Cdk4 proteins were observed at higher levels after 44 hours of culture than before IVC. After 88 and 132 hours of IVC, no significant alterations in either mRNA or protein levels of Cx43 and Cdk4 were found. Cx43 and Cdk4 were localized in the cell nucleus before IVC, whereas after 44, 88, and 132 hours of IVC, both proteins translocated to the cytoplasm. In cumulus-enclosed oocyte cultures, Cdk4 was localized both in the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas Cx43 was only in the cytoplasm. Additionally, only low levels of the cumulus expansion markers MIS and SNAT3 were observed. In summary, we could demonstrate that the in vitro cultivation of CCs was associated with cell proliferation and that Cx43 and Cdk4 gene expression was upregulated after IVC, resulting in significantly higher protein levels. Moreover, the two proteins translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of the CCs during IVC. The protein distribution is presumably related to different protein functions during bidirectional communication via

  17. The lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin L regulates keratinocyte proliferation by control of growth factor recycling.

    PubMed

    Reinheckel, Thomas; Hagemann, Sascha; Dollwet-Mack, Susanne; Martinez, Elke; Lohmüller, Tobias; Zlatkovic, Gordana; Tobin, Desmond J; Maas-Szabowski, Nicole; Peters, Christoph

    2005-08-01

    Mice deficient for cathepsin L (CTSL) show epidermal hyperplasia due to a hyperproliferation of basal keratinocytes. Here we show that the critical function of CTSL in the skin is keratinocyte specific. This is revealed by transgenic re-expression of CTSL in the keratinocytes of ctsl-/- mice, resulting in a rescue of the ctsl-/- skin phenotype. Cultivation of primary mouse keratinocytes with fibroblast- and keratinocyte-conditioned media, as well as heterologous organotypic co-cultures of mouse fibroblasts and human keratinocytes, showed that the altered keratinocyte proliferation is caused primarily by CTSL-deficiency in keratinocytes. In the absence of EGF, wild type and CTSL-knockout keratinocytes proliferate with the same rates, while in presence of EGF, ctsl-/- keratinocytes showed enhanced proliferation compared with controls. Internalization and degradation of radioactively labeled EGF was identical in both ctsl-/- and ctsl+/+ keratinocytes. However, ctsl-/- keratinocytes recycled more EGF to the cell surface, where it is bound to the EGF-receptor, which is also more abundant in ctsl-/- cells. We conclude that the hyperproliferation of keratinocytes in CTSL-knockout mice is caused by an enhanced recycling of growth factors and growth factor receptors from the endosomes to the keratinocyte plasma membrane, which result in sustained growth stimulation.

  18. Translationally controlled tumor protein supplemented chitosan modified glass ionomer cement promotes osteoblast proliferation and function.

    PubMed

    Sangsuwan, Jiraporn; Wanichpakorn, Supreya; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) supplemented in a novel glass ionomer cement (BIO-GIC) on normal human osteoblasts (NHost cells). BIO-GIC was a glass ionomer cement (GIC) modified by adding chitosan and albumin to promote the release of TCTP. NHost cells were seeded on specimens of GIC, GIC+TCTP, BIO-GIC and BIO-GIC+TCTP. Cell proliferation was determined by BrdU assay. It was found that BIO-GIC+TCTP had significantly higher proliferation of cells than other specimens. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and osteopontin (OPN) gene expressions assessed by quantitative real time PCR and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were used to determine cell differentiation. Bone cell function was investigated by calcium deposition using alizarin assay. Both BMP-2 and OPN gene expressions of cells cultured on specimens with added TCTP increased gradually up-regulation after day 1 and reached the highest on day 3 then down-regulation on day 7. The ALP activity of cells cultured on BIO-GIC+TCTP for 7 days and calcium content after 14 days were significantly higher than other groups. BIO-GIC+TCTP can promote osteoblast cells proliferation, differentiation and function.

  19. sequoia controls the type I>0 daughter proliferation switch in the developing Drosophila nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gunnar, Erika; Bivik, Caroline; Starkenberg, Annika; Thor, Stefan

    2016-10-15

    Neural progenitors typically divide asymmetrically to renew themselves, while producing daughters with more limited potential. In the Drosophila embryonic ventral nerve cord, neuroblasts initially produce daughters that divide once to generate two neurons/glia (type I proliferation mode). Subsequently, many neuroblasts switch to generating daughters that differentiate directly (type 0). This programmed type I>0 switch is controlled by Notch signaling, triggered at a distinct point of lineage progression in each neuroblast. However, how Notch signaling onset is gated was unclear. We recently identified Sequoia (Seq), a C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor with homology to Drosophila Tramtrack (Ttk) and the positive regulatory domain (PRDM) family, as important for lineage progression. Here, we find that seq mutants fail to execute the type I>0 daughter proliferation switch and also display increased neuroblast proliferation. Genetic interaction studies reveal that seq interacts with the Notch pathway, and seq furthermore affects expression of a Notch pathway reporter. These findings suggest that seq may act as a context-dependent regulator of Notch signaling, and underscore the growing connection between Seq, Ttk, the PRDM family and Notch signaling.

  20. Notch1-STAT3-ETBR signaling axis controls reactive astrocyte proliferation after brain injury.

    PubMed

    LeComte, Matthew D; Shimada, Issei S; Sherwin, Casey; Spees, Jeffrey L

    2015-07-14

    Defining the signaling network that controls reactive astrogliosis may provide novel treatment targets for patients with diverse CNS injuries and pathologies. We report that the radial glial cell antigen RC2 identifies the majority of proliferating glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive (GFAP(+)) reactive astrocytes after stroke. These cells highly expressed endothelin receptor type B (ETB(R)) and Jagged1, a Notch1 receptor ligand. To study signaling in adult reactive astrocytes, we developed a model based on reactive astrocyte-derived neural stem cells isolated from GFAP-CreER-Notch1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice. By loss- and gain-of-function studies and promoter activity assays, we found that Jagged1/Notch1 signaling increased ETB(R) expression indirectly by raising the level of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a previously unidentified EDNRB transcriptional activator. Similar to inducible transgenic GFAP-CreER-Notch1-cKO mice, GFAP-CreER-ETB(R)-cKO mice exhibited a defect in reactive astrocyte proliferation after cerebral ischemia. Our results indicate that the Notch1-STAT3-ETB(R) axis connects a signaling network that promotes reactive astrocyte proliferation after brain injury.

  1. The tumor-associated YB-1 protein: new player in the circadian control of cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Cristina; Martino, Orsola di; Ruggiero, Gennaro; Guarino, Andrea Maria; Mueller, Nathalie; Siauciunaite, Rima; Reischl, Markus; Foulkes, Nicholas Simon; Vallone, Daniela; Calabrò, Viola

    2017-01-01

    Correct spatial and temporal control of cell proliferation is of fundamental importance for tissue homeostasis. Its deregulation has been associated with several pathological conditions. In common with almost every aspect of plant and animal biology, cell proliferation is dominated by day-night rhythms generated by the circadian clock. However, our understanding of the crosstalk between the core clock and cell cycle control mechanisms remains incomplete. In this study, using zebrafish as a vertebrate model system, we show that the nuclear localization of the Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1), a regulator of cyclin expression and a hallmark of certain cancers, is robustly regulated by the circadian clock. We implicate clock-controlled changes in YB-1 SUMOylation as one of the mechanisms regulating its periodic nuclear entry at the beginning of the light phase. Furthermore, we demonstrate that YB-1 nuclear protein is able to downregulate cyclin A2 mRNA expression in zebrafish via its direct interaction with the cyclin A2 promoter. Thus, by acting as a direct target of cyclic posttranslational regulatory mechanisms, YB-1 serves as one bridge between the circadian clock and its cell cycle control. PMID:28008157

  2. Fat4-Dchs1 signalling controls cell proliferation in developing vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Kuta, Anna; Mao, Yaopan; Martin, Tina; Ferreira de Sousa, Catia; Whiting, Danielle; Zakaria, Sana; Crespo-Enriquez, Ivan; Evans, Philippa; Balczerski, Bartosz; Mankoo, Baljinder; Irvine, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    The protocadherins Fat4 and Dchs1 act as a receptor-ligand pair to regulate many developmental processes in mice and humans, including development of the vertebrae. Based on conservation of function between Drosophila and mammals, Fat4-Dchs1 signalling has been proposed to regulate planar cell polarity (PCP) and activity of the Hippo effectors Yap and Taz, which regulate cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. There is strong evidence for Fat regulation of PCP in mammals but the link with the Hippo pathway is unclear. In Fat4−/− and Dchs1−/− mice, many vertebrae are split along the midline and fused across the anterior-posterior axis, suggesting that these defects might arise due to altered cell polarity and/or changes in cell proliferation/differentiation. We show that the somite and sclerotome are specified appropriately, the transcriptional network that drives early chondrogenesis is intact, and that cell polarity within the sclerotome is unperturbed. We find that the key defect in Fat4 and Dchs1 mutant mice is decreased proliferation in the early sclerotome. This results in fewer chondrogenic cells within the developing vertebral body, which fail to condense appropriately along the midline. Analysis of Fat4;Yap and Fat4;Taz double mutants, and expression of their transcriptional target Ctgf, indicates that Fat4-Dchs1 regulates vertebral development independently of Yap and Taz. Thus, we have identified a new pathway crucial for the development of the vertebrae and our data indicate that novel mechanisms of Fat4-Dchs1 signalling have evolved to control cell proliferation within the developing vertebrae. PMID:27381226

  3. HOXA10 controls proliferation, migration and invasion in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Manoela; Bitu, Carolina C; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; Cervigne, Nilva K; Graner, Edgard; Manninen, Aki; Salo, Tuula; Coletta, Ricardo D

    2015-01-01

    Although HOX genes are best known for acting in the regulation of important events during embryogenesis, including proliferation, differentiation and migration, alterations in their expression patterns have been frequently described in cancers. In previous studies we analyzed the expression profile of the members of the HOX family of homeobox genes in oral samples of normal mucosa and squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and identified differently expressed genes such as HOXA10. The present study aimed to validate the increased expression of HOXA10 in OSCCs, and to investigate the effects arising from its knockdown in OSCC cells. The levels of HOXA10 mRNA were determined in human OSCC samples and cell lines by quantitative PCR, and HOXA10-mediated effects on proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), migration and invasion were studied in HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells by using retrovirus-mediated RNA interference. Higher expression of HOXA10 mRNA was observed in OSCC cell lines and in tumor tissues compared to normal controls. HOXA10 knockdown significantly reduced the proliferation of the tumor cells which was accompanied by increased levels of p21. HOXA10 silencing also significantly induced the expression of EMT markers and enhanced the adhesion, migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells. No effects on cell death were observed after HOXA10 knockdown. The results of the current study confirm the overexpression of HOXA10 in OSCCs, and further demonstrate that its expression is functionally associated with several important biological processes related to oral tumorigenesis, such as proliferation, migration and invasion. PMID:26097543

  4. Control of Drosophila Type I and Type II central brain neuroblast proliferation by bantam microRNA.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ruifen; Cohen, Stephen M

    2015-11-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of stem cell self-renewal by microRNAs is emerging as an important mechanism controlling tissue homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence that bantam microRNA controls neuroblast number and proliferation in the Drosophila central brain. Bantam also supports proliferation of transit-amplifying intermediate neural progenitor cells in type II neuroblast lineages. The stem cell factors brat and prospero are identified as bantam targets acting on different aspects of these processes. Thus, bantam appears to act in multiple regulatory steps in the maintenance and proliferation of neuroblasts and their progeny to regulate growth of the central brain.

  5. Control of Drosophila Type I and Type II central brain neuroblast proliferation by bantam microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Ruifen; Cohen, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of stem cell self-renewal by microRNAs is emerging as an important mechanism controlling tissue homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence that bantam microRNA controls neuroblast number and proliferation in the Drosophila central brain. Bantam also supports proliferation of transit-amplifying intermediate neural progenitor cells in type II neuroblast lineages. The stem cell factors brat and prospero are identified as bantam targets acting on different aspects of these processes. Thus, bantam appears to act in multiple regulatory steps in the maintenance and proliferation of neuroblasts and their progeny to regulate growth of the central brain. PMID:26395494

  6. A novel role for the 3′-5′ exoribonuclease Dis3L2 in controlling cell proliferation and tissue growth

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a complex organism, cell proliferation and apoptosis need to be precisely controlled in order for tissues to develop correctly. Excessive cell proliferation can lead to diseases such as cancer. We have shown that the exoribonuclease Dis3L2 is required for the correct regulation of proliferation in a natural tissue within the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. Dis3L2 is a member of a highly conserved family of exoribonucleases that degrade RNA in a 3′-5′ direction. We show that knockdown of dis3L2 in the Drosophila wing imaginal discs results in substantial wing overgrowth due to increased cellular proliferation rather than an increase in cell size. Imaginal discs are specified in the embryo before proliferating and differentiating to form the adult structures of the fly. Using RNA-seq we identified a small set of mRNAs that are sensitive to Dis3L2 activity. Of the mRNAs which increase in levels and are therefore potential targets of Dis3L2, we identified 2 that change at the post-transcriptional level but not at the transcriptional level, namely CG2678 (a transcription factor) and pyrexia (a TRP cation channel). We also demonstrate a compensatory effect between Dis3L2 and the 5′-3′ exoribonuclease Pacman demonstrating that these 2 exoribonucleases function to regulate opposing pathways within the developing tissue. This work provides the first description of the molecular and developmental consequences of Dis3L2 inactivation in a non-human animal model. The work is directly relevant to the understanding of human overgrowth syndromes such as Perlman syndrome. PMID:27630034

  7. Genetic characterization of p27kip1 and stathmin in controlling cell proliferation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Berton, Stefania; Pellizzari, Ilenia; Fabris, Linda; D'Andrea, Sara; Segatto, Ilenia; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Marconi, Daniela; Schiappacassi, Monica; Benevol, Sara; Gattei, Valter; Colombatti, Alfonso; Belletti, Barbara; Baldassarre, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The CDK inhibitor p27kip1 is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression, but the mechanisms by which p27kip1 controls cell proliferation in vivo are still not fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated that the microtubule destabilizing protein stathmin is a relevant p27kip1 binding partner. To get more insights into the in vivo significance of this interaction, we generated p27kip1 and stathmin double knock-out (DKO) mice. Interestingly, thorough characterization of DKO mice demonstrated that most of the phenotypes of p27kip1 null mice linked to the hyper-proliferative behavior, such as the increased body and organ weight, the outgrowth of the retina basal layer and the development of pituitary adenomas, were reverted by co-ablation of stathmin. In vivo analyses showed a reduced proliferation rate in DKO compared to p27kip1 null mice, linked, at molecular level, to decreased kinase activity of CDK4/6, rather than of CDK1 and CDK2. Gene expression profiling of mouse thymuses confirmed the phenotypes observed in vivo, showing that DKO clustered with WT more than with p27 knock-out tissue. Taken together, our results demonstrate that stathmin cooperates with p27kip1 to control the early phase of G1 to S phase transition and that this function may be of particular relevance in the context of tumor progression. PMID:25486569

  8. Genetic characterization of p27(kip1) and stathmin in controlling cell proliferation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Berton, Stefania; Pellizzari, Ilenia; Fabris, Linda; D'Andrea, Sara; Segatto, Ilenia; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Marconi, Daniela; Schiappacassi, Monica; Benevol, Sara; Gattei, Valter; Colombatti, Alfonso; Belletti, Barbara; Baldassarre, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The CDK inhibitor p27(kip1) is a critical regulator of cell cycle progression, but the mechanisms by which p27(kip1) controls cell proliferation in vivo are still not fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated that the microtubule destabilizing protein stathmin is a relevant p27(kip1) binding partner. To get more insights into the in vivo significance of this interaction, we generated p27(kip1) and stathmin double knock-out (DKO) mice. Interestingly, thorough characterization of DKO mice demonstrated that most of the phenotypes of p27(kip1) null mice linked to the hyper-proliferative behavior, such as the increased body and organ weight, the outgrowth of the retina basal layer and the development of pituitary adenomas, were reverted by co-ablation of stathmin. In vivo analyses showed a reduced proliferation rate in DKO compared to p27(kip1) null mice, linked, at molecular level, to decreased kinase activity of CDK4/6, rather than of CDK1 and CDK2. Gene expression profiling of mouse thymuses confirmed the phenotypes observed in vivo, showing that DKO clustered with WT more than with p27 knock-out tissue. Taken together, our results demonstrate that stathmin cooperates with p27(kip1) to control the early phase of G1 to S phase transition and that this function may be of particular relevance in the context of tumor progression.

  9. PAD4 regulates proliferation of multipotent haematopoietic cells by controlling c-myc expression

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Katsuhiko; Arai, Satoko; Suzuki, Akari; Nariai, Yuko; Urano, Takeshi; Nakayama, Manabu; Ohara, Osamu; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) functions as a transcriptional coregulator by catalyzing the conversion of histone H3 arginine residues to citrulline residues. Although the high level of PAD4 expression in bone marrow cells suggests its involvement in haematopoiesis, its precise contribution remains unclear. Here we show that PAD4, which is highly expressed in lineage− Sca-1+ c-Kit+ (LSK) cells of mouse bone marrow compared with other progenitor cells, controls c-myc expression by catalyzing the citrullination of histone H3 on its promoter. Furthermore, PAD4 is associated with lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 and histone deacetylase 1 at the upstream region of the c-myc gene. Supporting these findings, LSK cells, especially multipotent progenitors, in PAD4-deficient mice show increased proliferation in a cell-autonomous fashion compared with those in wild-type mice. Together, our results strongly suggest that PAD4 regulates the proliferation of multipotent progenitors in the bone marrow by controlling c-myc expression. PMID:23673621

  10. IL-4 directly signals tissue-resident macrophages to proliferate beyond homeostatic levels controlled by CSF-1

    PubMed Central

    Ruckerl, Dominik; Thomas, Graham D.; Hewitson, James P.; Duncan, Sheelagh; Brombacher, Frank; Maizels, Rick M.; Hume, David A.; Allen, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦs) colonize tissues during inflammation in two distinct ways: recruitment of monocyte precursors and proliferation of resident cells. We recently revealed a major role for IL-4 in the proliferative expansion of resident MΦs during a Th2-biased tissue nematode infection. We now show that proliferation of MΦs during intestinal as well as tissue nematode infection is restricted to sites of IL-4 production and requires MΦ-intrinsic IL-4R signaling. However, both IL-4Rα–dependent and –independent mechanisms contributed to MΦ proliferation during nematode infections. IL-4R–independent proliferation was controlled by a rise in local CSF-1 levels, but IL-4Rα expression conferred a competitive advantage with higher and more sustained proliferation and increased accumulation of IL-4Rα+ compared with IL-4Rα− cells. Mechanistically, this occurred by conversion of IL-4Rα+ MΦs from a CSF-1–dependent to –independent program of proliferation. Thus, IL-4 increases the relative density of tissue MΦs by overcoming the constraints mediated by the availability of CSF-1. Finally, although both elevated CSF1R and IL-4Rα signaling triggered proliferation above homeostatic levels, only CSF-1 led to the recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils. Thus, the IL-4 pathway of proliferation may have developed as an alternative to CSF-1 to increase resident MΦ numbers without coincident monocyte recruitment. PMID:24101381

  11. Generation and precise control of dynamic biochemical gradients for cellular assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, Yasushi; MacPherson, Murray; Giuraniuc, Claudiu V.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial gradients of diffusible signalling molecules play crucial roles in controlling diverse cellular behaviour such as cell differentiation, tissue patterning and chemotaxis. In this paper, we report the design and testing of a microfluidic device for diffusion-based gradient generation for cellular assays. A unique channel design of the device eliminates cross-flow between the source and sink channels, thereby stabilizing gradients by passive diffusion. The platform also enables quick and flexible control of chemical concentration that makes highly dynamic gradients in diffusion chambers. A model with the first approximation of diffusion and surface adsorption of molecules recapitulates the experimentally observed gradients. Budding yeast cells cultured in a gradient of a chemical inducer expressed a reporter fluorescence protein in a concentration-dependent manner. This microfluidic platform serves as a versatile prototype applicable to a broad range of biomedical investigations.

  12. Cellular prion protein controls stem cell-like properties of human glioblastoma tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Bajetto, Adriana; Thellung, Stefano; Begani, Giulia; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Solari, Agnese; Gatti, Monica; Pagano, Aldo; Würth, Roberto; Daga, Antonio; Barbieri, Federica; Florio, Tullio

    2016-01-01

    Prion protein (PrPC) is a cell surface glycoprotein whose misfolding is responsible for prion diseases. Although its physiological role is not completely defined, several lines of evidence propose that PrPC is involved in self-renewal, pluripotency gene expression, proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, PrPC regulates different biological functions in human tumors, including glioblastoma (GBM). We analyzed the role of PrPC in GBM cell pathogenicity focusing on tumor-initiating cells (TICs, or cancer stem cells, CSCs), the subpopulation responsible for development, progression and recurrence of most malignancies. Analyzing four GBM CSC-enriched cultures, we show that PrPC expression is directly correlated with the proliferation rate of the cells. To better define its role in CSC biology, we knocked-down PrPC expression in two of these GBM-derived CSC cultures by specific lentiviral-delivered shRNAs. We provide evidence that CSC proliferation rate, spherogenesis and in vivo tumorigenicity are significantly inhibited in PrPC down-regulated cells. Moreover, PrPC down-regulation caused loss of expression of the stemness and self-renewal markers (NANOG, Sox2) and the activation of differentiation pathways (i.e. increased GFAP expression). Our results suggest that PrPC controls the stemness properties of human GBM CSCs and that its down-regulation induces the acquisition of a more differentiated and less oncogenic phenotype. PMID:27229535

  13. LKB1 Regulates Cerebellar Development by Controlling Sonic Hedgehog-mediated Granule Cell Precursor Proliferation and Granule Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yuqin; Zhang, Aizhen; Li, Haixiang; Jin, Yecheng; Sun, Xiaoyang; Li, Huashun; Gao, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    The Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1) gene plays crucial roles in cell differentiation, proliferation and the establishment of cell polarity. We created LKB1 conditional knockout mice (LKB1Atoh1 CKO) to investigate the function of LKB1 in cerebellar development. The LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice displayed motor dysfunction. In the LKB1Atoh1 CKO cerebellum, the overall structure had a larger volume and morelobules. LKB1 inactivationled to an increased proliferation of granule cell precursors (GCPs), aberrant granule cell migration and overproduction of unipolar brush cells. To investigate the mechanism underlying the abnormal foliation, we examined sonic hedgehog signalling (Shh) by testing its transcriptional mediators, the Gli proteins, which regulate the GCPs proliferation and cerebellar foliation during cerebellar development. The expression levels of Gli genes were significantly increased in the mutant cerebellum. In vitro assays showed that the proliferation of cultured GCPs from mutant cerebellum significantly increased, whereas the proliferation of mutant GCPs significantly decreased in the presence of a Shh inhibitor GDC-0049. Thus, LKB1 deficiency in the LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice enhanced Shh signalling, leading to the excessive GCP proliferation and the formation of extra lobules. We proposed that LKB1 regulates cerebellar development by controlling GCPs proliferation through Shh signalling during cerebellar development. PMID:26549569

  14. YME1L controls the accumulation of respiratory chain subunits and is required for apoptotic resistance, cristae morphogenesis, and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Stiburek, Lukas; Cesnekova, Jana; Kostkova, Olga; Fornuskova, Daniela; Vinsova, Kamila; Wenchich, Laszlo; Houstek, Josef; Zeman, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA) proteases are involved in the quality control and processing of inner-membrane proteins. Here we investigate the cellular activities of YME1L, the human orthologue of the Yme1 subunit of the yeast i‑AAA complex, using stable short hairpin RNA knockdown and expression experiments. Human YME1L is shown to be an integral membrane protein that exposes its carboxy-terminus to the intermembrane space and exists in several complexes of 600–1100 kDa. The stable knockdown of YME1L in human embryonic kidney 293 cells led to impaired cell proliferation and apoptotic resistance, altered cristae morphology, diminished rotenone-sensitive respiration, and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial membrane protein carbonylation. Depletion of YME1L led to excessive accumulation of nonassembled respiratory chain subunits (Ndufb6, ND1, and Cox4) in the inner membrane. This was due to a lack of YME1L proteolytic activity, since the excessive accumulation of subunits was reversed by overexpression of wild-type YME1L but not a proteolytically inactive YME1L variant. Similarly, the expression of wild-type YME1L restored the lamellar cristae morphology of YME1L-deficient mitochondria. Our results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial inner-membrane proteostasis to both mitochondrial and cellular function and integrity and reveal a novel role for YME1L in the proteolytic regulation of respiratory chain biogenesis. PMID:22262461

  15. SIR-based call admission control for DS-CDMA cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao; Elzarki, Magda

    1994-05-01

    Signal-to-interference ratio (SIR)-based call admission control (CAC) algorithms are proposed and studied in a DS-CDMA cellular system. Residual capacity is introduced as the additional number of initial calls a base station can accept such that system-wide outage probability will be guaranteed to remain below a certain level. The residual capacity at each cell is updated dynamically according to the reverse-link SIR measurements at the base station. A 2(sup k) factorial experimental design and analysis via computer simulations is used to study the impact of the parameters used in the algorithms. The influence of these parameters on system performance, namely blocking probability and outage probability, is then examined via simulation. The performance of the algorithms is compared together with that of a fixed call admission control scheme (fixed CAC) under both homogeneous and hot spot traffic loadings. The results show that SIR-based CAC always outperforms fixed CAC even under overload situations, which is not the case in FDMA/TDMA cellular systems. The primary benefit of SIR-based CAC in DS-CDMA cellular systems, however, lies in improving the system performance under hot spot traffics.

  16. The lysosome as a command-and-control center for cellular metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles found in every eukaryotic cell. They are widely known as terminal catabolic stations that rid cells of waste products and scavenge metabolic building blocks that sustain essential biosynthetic reactions during starvation. In recent years, this classical view has been dramatically expanded by the discovery of new roles of the lysosome in nutrient sensing, transcriptional regulation, and metabolic homeostasis. These discoveries have elevated the lysosome to a decision-making center involved in the control of cellular growth and survival. Here we review these recently discovered properties of the lysosome, with a focus on how lysosomal signaling pathways respond to external and internal cues and how they ultimately enable metabolic homeostasis and cellular adaptation. PMID:27621362

  17. Relationship of carcinogenicity and cellular proliferation induced by mutagenic noncarcinogens vs carcinogens. III. Organophosphate pesticides vs tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosphate.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, M L; Elwell, M R; Matthews, H B

    1994-10-01

    Our laboratory has been examining the mechanisms whereby chemicals produce mutagenicity in short-term in vitro assays yet fail to produce carcinogenesis in 2-year rodent bioassays. Previous studies indicated that some mutagenic hepatocarcinogens increased cell proliferation in the target organ, the liver, while other structurally related mutagens that were noncarcinogenic failed to do so. We demonstrate in this report that another mutagenic carcinogen, tris(2,3-dibromopropyl phosphate), increased cell proliferation that was localized in the outer medulla of the kidney. This was also the target site for carcinogenesis in a 2-year bioassay and is another example of the association between chemically induced cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. This study also reports the absence of increased cell proliferation in the liver or kidney after exposure in the diet to the mutagenic organophosphate insecticides dimethoate, dioxathion, and dichlorvos following dietary exposure for 2 weeks at the same dose levels and routes of exposure that did not increase the tumor incidence in either organ in 2-year carcinogenesis assays. The present studies support the tenet that chemically induced cell proliferation may be a necessary prerequisite for chemical carcinogenesis, since in rat liver and kidney there was neither cell proliferation after 2 weeks nor tumor development after 2 years dietary exposure to the mutagenic organophosphate insecticides dimethoate, dioxathion, and dichlorvos.

  18. Bioinspired superhydrophobic poly(L-lactic acid) surfaces control bone marrow derived cells adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Alves, Natália M; Shi, Jun; Oramas, Elena; Santos, José L; Tomás, Helena; Mano, João F

    2009-11-01

    The aptitude of a cell to adhere, migrate, and differentiate on a compact substrate or scaffold is important in the field of tissue engineering and biomaterials. It is well known that cell behavior can be controlled and guided through the change in micro- and nano-scale topographic features. In this work, we intend to demonstrate that special topographic features that control wettability may also have an important role in the biological performance of biodegradable substrates. Poly(L-lactic acid) surfaces with superhydrophobic characteristics were produced, based on the so-called Lotus effect, exhibiting dual micro- and nano-scale roughness. The water contact angle could be higher than 150 degrees and a value of that order could be kept even upon immersion in a simulated body fluid solution for more than 20 days. Such water repellent surfaces were found to prevent adhesion and proliferation of bone marrow derived cells previously isolated from the femurs of 6-week-old male Wistar rats, when compared with smoother surfaces prepared by simple solvent casting. Such results demonstrate that these superhydrophobic surfaces may be used to control cell behavior onto biodegradable substrates.

  19. Cutting Edge: TFII-I controls B cell proliferation via regulating NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Todd; Roy, Ananda L

    2007-03-01

    The multifunctional transcription factor TFII-I physically and functionally interacts with Bruton's tyrosine kinase in murine B cells. However, the downstream functions of TFII-I in B cells are unknown. Toward achieving this goal, we established stable posttranscriptional silencing of TFII-I in WEHI-231 immature murine B cells, which undergoes growth arrest and apoptosis either upon anti-IgM or TGF-beta signaling. In this study, we show that TFII-I promotes growth arrest of cells in a signal-dependent manner. Unlike control cells, B cells exhibiting loss of TFII-I function fail to undergo arrest upon signaling due to up-regulation of c-Myc expression and concomitant down-regulation of both p21 and p27. Loss of TFII-I is also associated with simultaneous increase in nuclear c-rel and decrease in p50 homodimer binding. Thus, besides controlling c-myc transcription, TFII-I controls B cell proliferation by regulating both nuclear translocation of c-rel and DNA-binding activity of p50 NF-kappaB.

  20. Lck/PLCγ control migration and proliferation of interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T cells via the Rac1 GTPase/glycogen phosphorylase pathway.

    PubMed

    Llavero, Francisco; Artaso, Alain; Lacerda, Hadriano M; Parada, Luis A; Zugaza, José L

    2016-11-01

    Recently, we have reported that the IL-2-stimulated T cells activate PKCθ in order to phosphorylate the serine residues of αPIX-RhoGEF, and to switch on the Rac1/PYGM pathway resulting in T cell migration and proliferation. However, the molecular mechanism connecting the activated IL-2-R with the PKCθ/αPIX/Rac1/PYGM pathway is still unknown. In this study, the use of a combined pharmacological and genetic approach identified Lck, a Src family member, as the tyrosine kinase phosphorylating PLCγ leading to Rac1 and PYGM activation in the IL-2-stimulated Kit 225 T cells via the PKCθ/αPIX pathway. The PLCγ tyrosine phosphorylation was required to activate first PKCθ, and then αPIX and Rac1/PYGM. The results presented here delineate a novel signalling pathway ranking equally in importance to the three major pathways controlled by the IL-2-R, i.e. PI3K, Ras/MAPK and JAK/STAT pathways. The overall evidence strongly indicates that the central biological role of the novel IL-2-R/Lck/PLCγ/PKCθ/αPIX/Rac1/PYGM signalling pathway is directly related to the control of fundamental cellular processes such as T cell migration and proliferation.

  1. RAE-1 is expressed in the adult subventricular zone and controls cell proliferation of neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Popa, Natalia; Cedile, Oriane; Pollet-Villard, Xavier; Bagnis, Claude; Durbec, Pascale; Boucraut, José

    2011-01-01

    Improving and controlling the capacity of endogenous or grafted adult neural stem cells to repair the nervous system relies on a better knowledge of interactions between immune cells and neural stem cells. Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family members comprise numerous proteins playing either immune or nonimmune function. Among the latter, MHC functions in the central nervous system has started to receive recent interest. Here, our first goal was to investigate the potential relationship between MHC class I molecules and neurogenesis. For the first time, we report the expression of two MHC class I-related members by neural stem/progenitor cells: retinoic acid early induced transcript (RAE)-1 and CD1d. The expression of RAE-1 but not CD1d disappears when differentiation of neurosphere cells is induced. Interestingly, RAE-1 transcripts are expressed in the brain during development, and we demonstrate they persist in one of the main area of adult neurogenesis, the subventricular zone (SVZ). So far, RAE-1 is only known for its immune functions as a ligand of the activating receptor NKG2D expressed by natural killer (NK) cells, natural killer T, Tγδ, and some T CD8 lymphocytes. Here, we do not detect any NKG2D expression in the SVZ either in physiological or in pathological conditions. Interestingly, inhibition of RAE-1 expression in neurosphere cells reduces cell proliferation without alteration of cell viability, which argues for a nonimmune role for RAE-1. These results reveal an unexpected role of RAE-1 in regulating adult SVZ neurogenesis by supporting stem/progenitor cells proliferation.

  2. Integration of UPRER and oxidative stress signaling in the control of intestinal stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifen; Zeng, Xiankun; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-08-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response of the endoplasmic reticulum (UPRER) controls proteostasis by adjusting the protein folding capacity of the ER to environmental and cell-intrinsic conditions. In metazoans, loss of proteostasis results in degenerative and proliferative diseases and cancers. The cellular and molecular mechanisms causing these phenotypes remain poorly understood. Here we show that the UPRER is a critical regulator of intestinal stem cell (ISC) quiescence in Drosophila melanogaster. We find that ISCs require activation of the UPRER for regenerative responses, but that a tissue-wide increase in ER stress triggers ISC hyperproliferation and epithelial dysplasia in aging animals. These effects are mediated by ISC-specific redox signaling through Jun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) and the transcription factor CncC. Our results identify a signaling network of proteostatic and oxidative stress responses that regulates ISC function and regenerative homeostasis in the intestinal epithelium.

  3. 2D spatially controlled polymer micro patterning for cellular behavior studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinca, V.; Palla-Papavlu, A.; Paraico, I.; Lippert, T.; Wokaun, A.; Dinescu, M.

    2011-04-01

    A simple and effective method to functionalize glass surfaces that enable polymer micropatterning and subsequent spatially controlled adhesion of cells is reported in this paper. The method involves the application of laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) to achieve polymer patterning in a single step onto cell repellent substrates (i.e. polyethyleneglycol (PEG)). This approach was used to produce micron-size polyethyleneimine (PEI)-patterns alternating with cell-repellent areas. The focus of this work is the ability of SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells to orient, migrate, and produce organized cellular arrangements on laser generated PEI patterns.

  4. Optimal Control of One-dimensional Cellular Uptake in Tissue Engineering†

    PubMed Central

    Kishida, Masako; Ford Versypt, Ashlee N.; Pack, Daniel W.; Braatz, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A control problem motivated by tissue engineering is formulated and solved in which control of the uptake of growth factors (signaling molecules) is necessary to spatially and temporally regulate cellular processes for the desired growth or regeneration of a tissue. Four approaches are compared for determining 1D optimal boundary control trajectories for a distributed parameter model with reaction, diffusion, and convection: (i) basis function expansion, (ii) method of moments, (iii) internal model control (IMC), and (iv) model predictive control (MPC). The proposed method-of-moments approach is computationally efficient while enforcing a non-negativity constraint on the control input. While more computationally expensive than methods (i)–(iii), the MPC formulation significantly reduced the computational cost compared to simultaneous optimization of the entire control trajectory. A comparison of the pros and cons of each of the four approaches suggests that an algorithm that combines multiple approaches is most promising for solving the optimal control problem for multiple spatial dimensions. PMID:24634549

  5. RB1 dual role in proliferation and apoptosis: Cell fate control and implications for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Indovina, Paola; Pentimalli, Francesca; Casini, Nadia; Vocca, Immacolata; Giordano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma (RB1) tumor suppressor is one of the most frequent and early recognized molecular hallmarks of cancer. RB1, although mainly studied for its role in the regulation of cell cycle, emerged as a key regulator of many biological processes. Among these, RB1 has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, the alteration of which underlies both cancer development and resistance to therapy. RB1 role in apoptosis, however, is still controversial because, depending on the context, the apoptotic cues, and its own status, RB1 can act either by inhibiting or promoting apoptosis. Moreover, the mechanisms whereby RB1 controls both proliferation and apoptosis in a coordinated manner are only now beginning to be unraveled. Here, by reviewing the main studies assessing the effect of RB1 status and modulation on these processes, we provide an overview of the possible underlying molecular mechanisms whereby RB1, and its family members, dictate cell fate in various contexts. We also describe the current antitumoral strategies aimed at the use of RB1 as predictive, prognostic and therapeutic target in cancer. A thorough understanding of RB1 function in controlling cell fate determination is crucial for a successful translation of RB1 status assessment in the clinical setting. PMID:26160835

  6. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants.

    PubMed

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-05-16

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control.

  7. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14712.001 PMID:27183270

  8. Nerve Regeneration Potential of Protocatechuic Acid in RSC96 Schwann Cells by Induction of Cellular Proliferation and Migration through IGF-IR-PI3K-Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ju, Da-Tong; Liao, Hung-En; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chung, Li-Chin; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Lin, Chien-Chung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-12-31

    Peripheral nerve injuries, caused by accidental trauma, acute compression or surgery, often result in temporary or life-long neuronal dysfunctions and inflict great economic or social burdens on the patients. Nerve cell proliferation is an essential process to restore injured nerves of adults. Schwann cells play a crucial role in endogenous repair of peripheral nerves due to their ability to proliferate, migrate and provide trophic support to axons via expression of various neurotrophic factors, such as the nerve growth factor (NGF), especially after nerve injury. Protocatechuic acid (PCA) is a dihydroxybenzoic acid, a type of phenolic acid, isolated from the kernels of Alpinia oxyphylla Miq (AOF), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine the fruits of which are widely used as a tonic, aphrodisiac, anti-salivation and anti-diarrheatic. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms by which PCA induces Schwann cell proliferation by activating IGF-IR-PI3K-Akt pathway. Treatment with PCA induces phosphorylation of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/serine - threonine kinase (PI3K/Akt) pathway, and activates expression of cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis after 18 h of treatment showed that proliferation of the RSC96 cells was enhanced by PCA treatment. The PCA induced proliferation was accompanied by modulation in the expressions of cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E and cyclin A. Knockdown of PI3K using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and inhibition of IGF-IR receptor resulted in the reduction in cell survival proteins. The results collectively showed that PCA treatment promoted cell proliferation and cell survival via IGF-I signaling.

  9. Physiological electric fields control the G1/S phase cell cycle checkpoint to inhibit endothelial cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Entong; Yin, Yili; Zhao, Min; Forrester, John V; McCaig, Colin D

    2003-03-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (VEC) proliferation is a key event in angiogenesis and is tightly regulated. Electric potential differences exist around the vascular endothelium and give rise to endogenous electric fields (EFs), whether these EFs influence VEC proliferation is unclear. We exposed cultured VECs to applied EFs of physiological strengths for up to 72 h. EF at 50 or 100 mV/mm did not influence cell proliferation, but at 200 mV/mm, cell density, cell growth rate, and mitosis index decreased significantly. EF-induced reduction in VEC proliferation was not due to increased apoptosis, because caspase apoptosis inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK (20 microM), had no effect on this response. Rather, EF responses were mediated via decreased entry of cells into S phase from G1 phase, as shown by flow cytometry. Western blot showed that EFs decreased G1-specific cyclin E expression and increased cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complex inhibitor p27kipl expression. Thus EFs controlled VEC proliferation through induction of cell cycle arrest at G1 by down-regulation of cyclin E expression and up-regulation of p27kipl expression, rather than by promoting apoptosis. If control of the cell cycle by endogenous EFs extends beyond VECs, this would be of widespread biological significance in vivo.

  10. Quality Controls in Cellular Immunotherapies: Rapid Assessment of Clinical Grade Dendritic Cells by Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Castiello, Luciano; Sabatino, Marianna; Zhao, Yingdong; Tumaini, Barbara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Ping, Jin; Wang, Ena; Wood, Lauren V; Marincola, Francesco M; Puri, Raj K; Stroncek, David F

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based immunotherapies are among the most promising approaches for developing effective and targeted immune response. However, their clinical usefulness and the evaluation of their efficacy rely heavily on complex quality control assessment. Therefore, rapid systematic methods are urgently needed for the in-depth characterization of relevant factors affecting newly developed cell product consistency and the identification of reliable markers for quality control. Using dendritic cells (DCs) as a model, we present a strategy to comprehensively characterize manufactured cellular products in order to define factors affecting their variability, quality and function. After generating clinical grade human monocyte-derived mature DCs (mDCs), we tested by gene expression profiling the degrees of product consistency related to the manufacturing process and variability due to intra- and interdonor factors, and how each factor affects single gene variation. Then, by calculating for each gene an index of variation we selected candidate markers for identity testing, and defined a set of genes that may be useful comparability and potency markers. Subsequently, we confirmed the observed gene index of variation in a larger clinical data set. In conclusion, using high-throughput technology we developed a method for the characterization of cellular therapies and the discovery of novel candidate quality assurance markers. PMID:23147403

  11. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation, but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained fro...

  12. An Adaptive Control Method for Ros-Drill Cellular Microinjector with Low-Resolution Encoder

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Olgac, Nejat

    2013-01-01

    A novel control methodology which uses a low-resolution encoder is presented for a cellular microinjection technology called the Ros-Drill (rotationally oscillating drill). It is developed primarily for ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) operations, with the objective of generating a desired oscillatory motion at the tip of a micro glass pipette. It is an inexpensive setup, which creates high-frequency (higher than 500 Hz) and small-amplitude (around 0.2 deg) rotational oscillations at the tip of an injection pipette. These rotational oscillations enable the pipette to drill into cell membranes with minimum biological damage. Such a motion control procedure presents no particular difficulty when it uses sufficiently precise motion sensors. However, size, costs, and accessibility of technology to the hardware components severely constrain the sensory capabilities. Consequently, the control mission and the trajectory tracking are adversely affected. This paper presents two contributions: (a) a dedicated novel adaptive feedback control method to achieve a satisfactory trajectory tracking capability. We demonstrate via experiments that the tracking of the harmonic rotational motion is achieved with desirable fidelity; (b) some important analytical features and related observations associated with the controlled harmonic motion which is created by the low-resolution feedback control structure. PMID:27006914

  13. NEDD4 controls the expression of GUCD1, a protein upregulated in proliferating liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Bellet, Marina Maria; Piobbico, Danilo; Bartoli, Daniela; Castelli, Marilena; Pieroni, Stefania; Brunacci, Cinzia; Chiacchiaretta, Martina; Del Sordo, Rachele; Fallarino, Francesca; Sidoni, Angelo; Puccetti, Paolo; Romani, Luigina; Servillo, Giuseppe; Agnese Della Fazia, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Liver regeneration is a unique means of studying cell proliferation in vivo. Screening of a large cDNA library from regenerating liver has previously allowed us to identify and characterize a cluster of genes encoding proteins with important roles in proliferative processes. Here, by examining different rat and human tissues as well as cell lines, we characterized a highly conserved gene, guanylyl cyclase domain containing 1 (GUCD1), whose modulation occurs in liver regeneration and cell cycle progression in vitro. High-level expression of GUCD1 transcripts was observed in livers from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. A yeast two-hybrid interaction assay, aimed at identifying any relevant interaction partners of GUCD1, revealed direct interactions with NEDD4-1 (E3 ubiquitin protein ligase neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated gene 4), resulting in control of GUCD1 stability. Thus, we have characterized expression and function of a ubiquitous protein, GUCD1, which might have a role in regulating normal and abnormal cell growth in the liver. PMID:24743017

  14. Cryptococcus neoformans Intracellular Proliferation and Capsule Size Determines Early Macrophage Control of Infection.

    PubMed

    Bojarczuk, Aleksandra; Miller, Katie A; Hotham, Richard; Lewis, Amy; Ogryzko, Nikolay V; Kamuyango, Alfred A; Frost, Helen; Gibson, Rory H; Stillman, Eleanor; May, Robin C; Renshaw, Stephen A; Johnston, Simon A

    2016-02-18

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Many questions remain regarding the function of macrophages in normal clearance of cryptococcal infection and the defects present in uncontrolled cryptococcosis. Two current limitations are: 1) The difficulties in interpreting studies using isolated macrophages in the context of the progression of infection, and 2) The use of high resolution imaging in understanding immune cell behavior during animal infection. Here we describe a high-content imaging method in a zebrafish model of cryptococcosis that permits the detailed analysis of macrophage interactions with C. neoformans during infection. Using this approach we demonstrate that, while macrophages are critical for control of C. neoformans, a failure of macrophage response is not the limiting defect in fatal infections. We find phagocytosis is restrained very early in infection and that increases in cryptococcal number are driven by intracellular proliferation. We show that macrophages preferentially phagocytose cryptococci with smaller polysaccharide capsules and that capsule size is greatly increased over twenty-four hours of infection, a change that is sufficient to severely limit further phagocytosis. Thus, high-content imaging of cryptococcal infection in vivo demonstrates how very early interactions between macrophages and cryptococci are critical in the outcome of cryptococcosis.

  15. Lef1 controls patterning and proliferation in the posterior lateral line system of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gamba, Laurent; Cubedo, Nicolas; Lutfalla, Georges; Ghysen, Alain; Dambly-Chaudiere, Christine

    2010-12-01

    The embryonic development of the posterior lateral line of zebrafish involves the migration from head to tail of a primordium comprising approximately 100 cells, and the deposition at regular intervals of presumptive mechanosensory organs (neuromasts). Migration depends on the presence of chemokine SDF1 along the pathway, and on the asymmetrical distribution of chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 in the primordium. Primordium polarization depends on Wnt signaling in the leading region. Here, we examine the role of a major effector of Wnt signaling, lef1, in this system. We show that, although its inactivation has no overt effect on the expression of cxcr4b and cxcr7b, lef1 contributes to their control. We also show that cell proliferation, which ensures constant primordium size despite successive rounds of cell deposition, is reduced upon lef1 inactivation. Because of this defect, the primordium runs short of cells and vanishes before the line has been completed. We conclude that lef1-mediated Wnt signaling is involved in various aspects of primordium migration, although part of this implication is masked by a high level of developmental redundancy.

  16. Peptide-independent stabilization of MHC class I molecules breaches cellular quality control.

    PubMed

    Hein, Zeynep; Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Abualrous, Esam Tolba; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Janßen, Linda; Van Hateren, Andy; Wiek, Constanze; Hanenberg, Helmut; Momburg, Frank; Achour, Adnane; Elliott, Tim; Springer, Sebastian; Boulanger, Denise

    2014-07-01

    The intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins is directed by three quality control mechanisms that test for their structural integrity, which is correlated to the binding of high-affinity antigenic peptide ligands. To investigate which molecular features of MHC-I these quality control mechanisms detect, we have followed the hypothesis that suboptimally loaded MHC-I molecules are characterized by their conformational mobility in the F-pocket region of the peptide-binding site. We have created a novel variant of an MHC-I protein, K(b)-Y84C, in which two α-helices in this region are linked by a disulfide bond that mimics the conformational and dynamic effects of bound high-affinity peptide. K(b)-Y84C shows a remarkable increase in the binding affinity to its light chain, beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), and bypasses all three cellular quality control steps. Our data demonstrate (1) that coupling between peptide and β2m binding to the MHC-I heavy chain is mediated by conformational dynamics; (2) that the folded conformation of MHC-I, supported by β2m, plays a decisive role in passing the ER-to-cell-surface transport quality controls; and (3) that β2m association is also tested by the cell surface quality control that leads to MHC-I endocytosis.

  17. An Nkx2-5/Bmp2/Smad1 negative feedback loop controls second heart field progenitor specification and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Prall, Owen WJ; Menon, Mary K; Solloway, Mark J; Watanabe, Yusuke; Zaffran, Stéphane; Bajolle, Fanny; Biben, Christine; McBride, Jim J; Robertson, Bronwyn R; Chaulet, Hervé; Stennard, Fiona A; Wise, Natalie; Schaft, Daniel; Wolstein, Orit; Furtado, Milena B; Shiratori, Hidetaka; Chien, Kenneth R; Hamada, Hiroshi; Black, Brian L; Saga, Yumiko; Robertson, Elizabeth J; Buckingham, Margaret E; Harvey, Richard P

    2007-01-01

    Summary During heart development the second heart field (SHF) provides progenitor cells for most cardiomyocytes and expresses the homeodomain factor Nkx2-5. We now show that feedback repression of Bmp2/Smad1 signaling by Nkx2-5 critically regulates SHF proliferation and outflow tract (OFT) morphology. In the cardiac fields of Nkx2-5 mutants, genes controlling cardiac specification (including Bmp2) and maintenance of the progenitor state were up-regulated, leading initially to progenitor over-specification, but subsequently to failed SHF proliferation and OFT truncation. In Smad1 mutants, SHF proliferation and deployment to the OFT were increased, while Smad1 deletion in Nkx2-5 mutants rescued SHF proliferation and OFT development. In Nkx2-5 hypomorphic mice, which recapitulate human congenital heart disease (CHD), OFT anomalies were also rescued by Smad1 deletion. Our findings demonstrate that Nkx2-5 orchestrates the transition between periods of cardiac induction, progenitor proliferation and OFT morphogenesis via a Smad1-dependent negative feedback loop, which may be a frequent molecular target in CHD. PMID:17350578

  18. Molecular and cellular regulation of hypothalamic melanocortin neurons controlling food intake and energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Koch, M; Horvath, T L

    2014-07-01

    The brain receives and integrates environmental and metabolic information, transforms these signals into adequate neuronal circuit activities, and generates physiological behaviors to promote energy homeostasis. The responsible neuronal circuitries show lifetime plasticity and guaranty metabolic health and survival. However, this highly evolved organization has become challenged nowadays by chronic overload with nutrients and reduced physical activity, which results in an ever-increasing number of obese individuals worldwide. Research within the last two decades has aimed to decipher the responsible molecular and cellular mechanisms for regulation of the hypothalamic melanocortin neurons, which have a key role in the control of food intake and energy metabolism. This review maps the central connections of the melanocortin system and highlights its global position and divergent character in physiological and pathological metabolic events. Moreover, recently uncovered molecular and cellular processes in hypothalamic neurons and glial cells that drive plastic morphological and physiological changes in these cells, and account for regulation of food intake and energy metabolism, are brought into focus. Finally, potential functional interactions between metabolic disorders and psychiatric diseases are discussed.

  19. Adenine Nucleotides Control Proliferation In Vivo of Rat Retinal Progenitors by P2Y1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Pereira, Luana; Magalhães, Camila Feitosa; Repossi, Marinna Garcia; Thorstenberg, Maria Luiza Prates; Sholl-Franco, Alfred; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques; Fragel-Madeira, Lucianne

    2016-08-24

    Previous studies demonstrated that exogenous ATP is able to regulate proliferation of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) in vitro possibly via P2Y1 receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. Here, we evaluated the function of adenine nucleotides in vivo during retinal development of newborn rats. Intravitreal injection of apyrase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes nucleotides, reduced cell proliferation in retinas at postnatal day 2 (P2). This decrease was reversed when retinas were treated together with ATPγ-S or ADPβ-S, two hydrolysis-resistant analogs of ATP and ADP, respectively. During early postnatal days (P0 to P5), an increase in ectonucleotidase (E-NTPDase) activity was observed in the retina, suggesting a decrease in the availability of adenine nucleotides, coinciding with the end of proliferation. Interestingly, intravitreal injection of the E-NTPDase inhibitor ARL67156 increased proliferation by around 60 % at P5 rats. Furthermore, immunolabeling against P2Y1 receptor was observed overall in retina layers from P2 rats, including proliferating Ki-67-positive cells in the neuroblastic layer (NBL), suggesting that this receptor could be responsible for the action of adenine nucleotides upon proliferation of RPCs. Accordingly, intravitreal injection of MRS2179, a selective antagonist of P2Y1 receptors, reduced cell proliferation by approximately 20 % in P2 rats. Moreover, treatment with MRS 2179 caused an increase in p57(KIP2) and cyclin D1 expression, a reduction in cyclin E and Rb phosphorylated expression and in BrdU-positive cell number. These data suggest that the adenine nucleotides modulate the proliferation of rat RPCs via activation of P2Y1 receptors regulating transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle.

  20. Cell membrane CD44v6 levels in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung: association with high cellular proliferation and high concentrations of EGFR and CD44v5.

    PubMed

    Ruibal, Álvaro; Aguiar, Pablo; Del Río, María Carmen; Nuñez, Matilde Isabel; Pubul, Virginia; Herranz, Michel

    2015-02-18

    Membranous CD44v6 levels in tumors and surrounding samples obtained from 94 patients with squamous cell lung carcinomas were studied and compared to clinical stage, cellular proliferation, membranous CD44v5 levels, epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and cytoplasmatic concentrations of CYFRA 21.1. CD44v6 positive values were observed in 33/38 non-tumor samples and in 76/94 tumor samples, but there were not statistically significant differences between both subgroups. In CD44v6 positive tumor samples, CD44v6 was not associated with clinical stage, histological grade, ploidy and lymph node involvement, but significant association was found with high cellular proliferation. Likewise, CD44v6 positive tumors had significantly higher levels of EGFR and CD44v5. In patients with squamous cell lung carcinomas and clinical stage I, positive CD44v6 cases were associated with the same parameters. Furthermore, positive CD44v5 squamous tumors were associated significantly with histological grade III and lower levels of CYFRA21.1. Our findings support the value of CD44v6 as a possible indicator of poor outcome in patients with squamous lung carcinomas.

  1. Six family genes control the proliferation and differentiation of muscle satellite cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yajima, Hiroshi; Motohashi, Norio; Ono, Yusuke; Sato, Shigeru; Ikeda, Keiko; Masuda, Satoru; Yada, Erica; Kanesaki, Hironori; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2010-10-15

    Muscle satellite cells are essential for muscle growth and regeneration and their morphology, behavior and gene expression have been extensively studied. However, the mechanisms involved in their proliferation and differentiation remain elusive. Six1 and Six4 proteins were expressed in the nuclei of myofibers of adult mice and the numbers of myoblasts positive for Six1 and Six4 increased during regeneration of skeletal muscles. Six1 and Six4 were expressed in quiescent, activated and differentiated muscle satellite cells isolated from adult skeletal muscle. Overexpression of Six4 and Six5 repressed the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. Conversely, knockdown of Six5 resulted in augmented proliferation, and that of Six4 inhibited differentiation. Muscle satellite cells isolated from Six4{sup +/-}Six5{sup -/-} mice proliferated to higher cell density though their differentiation was not altered. Meanwhile, overproduction of Six1 repressed proliferation and promoted differentiation of satellite cells. In addition, Six4 and Six5 repressed, while Six1 activated myogenin expression, suggesting that the differential regulation of myogenin expression is responsible for the differential effects of Six genes. The results indicated the involvement of Six genes in the behavior of satellite cells and identified Six genes as potential target for manipulation of proliferation and differentiation of muscle satellite cells for therapeutic applications.

  2. Joint Mode Selection and Resource Allocation for Cellular Controlled Short-Range Communication in OFDMA Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hui; Tao, Xiaoming; Ge, Ning; Lu, Jianhua

    This letter studies cellular controlled short-range communication in OFDMA networks. The network needs to decide when to allow direct communication between a closely located device-to-device (D2D) pair instead of conveying data from one device to the other via the base station and when not to, in addition to subchannel and power allocation. Our goal is to maximize the total network throughput while guaranteeing the rate requirements of all users. For that purpose, we formulate an optimization problem subject to subchannel and power constraints. A scheme which combines a joint mode selection and subchannel allocation algorithm based on equal power allocation with a power reallocation scheme is proposed. Simulation results show that our proposed scheme can improve the network throughput and outage probability compared with other schemes.

  3. Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 in the Control of Cellular Responses to Genotoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young Joo; Park, Jong Ho; Chung, Chin Ha

    2017-01-01

    Error-free replication and repair of DNA are pivotal to organisms for faithful transmission of their genetic information. Cells orchestrate complex signaling networks that sense and resolve DNA damage. Post-translational protein modifications by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins, including SUMO and NEDD8, are critically involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA damage tolerance (DDT). The expression of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), the first identified ubiquitin-like protein, has recently been shown to be induced under various DNA damage conditions, such as exposure to UV, camptothecin, and doxorubicin. Here we overview the recent findings on the role of ISG15 and its conjugation to target proteins (e.g., p53, ΔNp63α, and PCNA) in the control of cellular responses to genotoxic stress, such as the inhibition of cell growth and tumorigenesis. PMID:28241406

  4. Adaptive call admission control and resource allocation in multi server wireless/cellular network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Madhu; Mittal, Ragini

    2016-11-01

    The ever increasing demand of the subscribers has put pressure on the capacity of wireless networks around the world. To utilize the scare resources, in the present paper we propose an optimal allocation scheme for an integrated wireless/cellular model with handoff priority and handoff guarantee services. The suggested algorithm optimally allocates the resources in each cell and dynamically adjust threshold to control the admission. To give the priority to handoff calls over the new calls, the provision of guard channels and subrating scheme is taken into consideration. The handoff voice call may balk and renege from the system while waiting in the buffer. An iterative algorithm is implemented to generate the arrival rate of the handoff calls in each cell. Various performance indices are established in term of steady state probabilities. The sensitivity analysis has also been carried out to examine the tractability of algorithms and to explore the effects of system descriptors on the performance indices.

  5. Traffic states and fundamental diagram in cellular automaton model of vehicular traffic controlled by signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2009-04-01

    We present a cellular automaton (CA) model for vehicular traffic controlled by traffic lights. The CA model is not described by a set of rules, but is given by a simple difference equation. The vehicular motion varies highly with both signals’ characteristics and vehicular density. The dependence of tour time on both cycle time and vehicular density is clarified. In the dilute limit of vehicles, the vehicular motion is compared with that by the nonlinear-map model. The fundamental diagrams are derived numerically. It is shown that the fundamental diagram depends highly on the signals’ characteristics. The traffic states are shown for various values of cycle time in the fundamental diagram. We also study the effect of a slow vehicle on the traffic flow.

  6. The role of VipAlbumin(®) as an immunostimulatory agent for controlling homeostasis and proliferation of lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Dwijayanti, Dinia Rizqi; Djati, Muhammad Sasmito; Rifa'I, Muhaimin

    2016-01-01

    VipAlbumin(®) is a supplement from snakehead fish (Ophiocephalus striatus) which has high content of albumin that is very important to develop new cells. The aims of this study were to know the effect of VipAlbumin(®) to cell proliferation, expression level of CD4(+)CD62L(+) T cell, regulatory T cell, and B220+ cell, and immunocompetent cell cycle. Cell isolated from spleen of pathogen free mice were cultured in RPMI 1640 with 10% FBS, 1% Pen/Strep 10×, 2-Mercaptoetanol, anti-CD3 and LPS. The concentrations of VipAlbumin (®) used were 0 µg/ml; 0.33 µg/ml; 33.3 µg/ml; and 3333.3 µg/ml. The cell was incubated in CO2 5% incubator 37°C for 3 days for cell cycle and 5 days for proliferation analysis and cell expression. FACS analysis was done to know cell proliferation profile, status of cell, and cell cycle. Concentration 33.3 µg/ml and 3333.3 µg/ml significantly can increase cell proliferation and induce cell enter G2/M phase (p < 0.05) compared to control. VipAlbumin can significantly increase the relative number of CD4(+)CD62L(+) T cell, regulatory T cell, and B220+ cell (p < 0.05) compared to control. This study gives scientific evidence that VipAlbumin can be used as an immunostimulant which accelerates immunocompetent cells growth.

  7. Control of Neural Daughter Cell Proliferation by Multi-level Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bivik, Caroline; MacDonald, Ryan B.; Gunnar, Erika; Mazouni, Khalil; Schweisguth, Francois; Thor, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Notch pathway controls proliferation during development and in adulthood, and is frequently affected in many disorders. However, the genetic sensitivity and multi-layered transcriptional properties of the Notch pathway has made its molecular decoding challenging. Here, we address the complexity of Notch signaling with respect to proliferation, using the developing Drosophila CNS as model. We find that a Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH cascade specifically controls daughter, but not progenitor proliferation. Additionally, we find that different E(spl)-HLH genes are required in different neuroblast lineages. The Notch/Su(H)/E(spl)-HLH cascade alters daughter proliferation by regulating four key cell cycle factors: Cyclin E, String/Cdc25, E2f and Dacapo (mammalian p21CIP1/p27KIP1/p57Kip2). ChIP and DamID analysis of Su(H) and E(spl)-HLH indicates direct transcriptional regulation of the cell cycle genes, and of the Notch pathway itself. These results point to a multi-level signaling model and may help shed light on the dichotomous proliferative role of Notch signaling in many other systems. PMID:27070787

  8. RanBP3 Regulates Melanoma Cell Proliferation via Selective Control of Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Pathria, Gaurav; Garg, Bhavuk; Wagner, Christine; Garg, Kanika; Gschaider, Melanie; Jalili, Ahmad; Wagner, Stephan N

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome region maintenance 1-mediated nucleocytoplasmic transport has been shown as a potential anticancer target in various malignancies. However, the role of the most characterized chromosome region maintenance 1 cofactor ran binding protein 3 (RanBP3) in cancer cell biology has never been investigated. Utilizing a loss-of-function experimental setting in a vast collection of genetically varied melanoma cell lines, we observed the requirement of RanBP3 in melanoma cell proliferation and survival. Mechanistically, we suggest the reinstatement of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-Smad2/3-p21(Cip1) tumor-suppressor axis as part of the RanBP3 silencing-associated antiproliferative program. Employing extensive nuclear export sequence analyses and immunofluorescence-based protein localization studies, we further present evidence suggesting the requirement of RanBP3 function for the nuclear exit of the weak nuclear export sequence-harboring extracellular signal-regulated kinase protein, although it is dispensable for general CRM1-mediated nuclear export of strong nuclear export sequence-harboring cargoes. Rendering mechanistic support to RanBP3 silencing-mediated apoptosis, consequent to extracellular signal-regulated kinase nuclear entrapment, we observed increased levels of cytoplasmically restricted nonphosphorylated/active proapoptotic Bcl-2-antagonist of cell death (BAD) protein. Last, we present evidence suggesting the frequently activated mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in melanoma as a potential founding basis for a deregulated post-translational control of RanBP3 activity. Collectively, the presented data suggest RanBP3 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in human melanoma.

  9. Active form of AKT controls cell proliferation and response to apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KUNTER, IMGE; ERDAL, ESRA; NART, DENIZ; YILMAZ, FUNDA; KARADEMIR, SEDAT; SAGOL, OZGUL; ATABEY, NESE

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Deregulation of the AKT signaling pathway has been found in HCC. However, the effect of AKT activation on the proliferation and apoptosis in HCC is not clear. Herein, expression of phosphorylated form of AKT (Ser 473) was investigated in HCC tumor (n=73), cirrhosis (n=17), normal liver (n=22) samples and in HCC cell lines (n=8). The results showed that expression of p-AKT was higher in tumor (53%) than in cirrhotic tissues (12%) while it was absent in normal liver (p<0.0001). p-AKT expression was also associated with number of tumor nodules and differentiation status (p<0.05). LY294002 induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in SNU-449 and Mahlavu cells by decreasing expression of CDK2, CDK4, CycD1, CycD3, CycE, CycA and increasing expression of p21 and p27 as well; it also caused a decrease in the E2F1 transcriptional activity through declining phosphorylated Rb. LY294002 did not affect the basal level of apoptosis; however, it amplified cisplatin-induced apoptosis in SNU-449 cells. When the p-AKT level was decreased specifically after transfection with the DN-AKT plasmid, SNU-449 cells became more sensitive to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. HuH-7 cells with no basal p-AKT, were markedly affected by the treatment of doxorubicin. Thus, Akt signaling controls growth and chemical-induced apoptosis in HCC and p-AKT may be a potential target for therapeutic interventions in HCC patients. PMID:24337632

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha controls hepatic heme biosynthesis through ALAS1.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Tatjana; Väisänen, Sami; Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Kersten, Sander; Carlberg, Carsten

    2009-05-01

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group of proteins involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism and nitric oxide production. ALAS1 (5-aminolevulinate synthase) is the rate-limiting enzyme in heme synthesis in the liver and is highly regulated to adapt to the metabolic demand of the hepatocyte. In the present study, we describe human hepatic ALAS1 as a new direct target for the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). In primary human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells, PPARalpha agonists induced an increase in ALAS1 mRNA levels, which was abolished by PPARalpha silencing. These effects are mediated by two functional PPAR binding sites at positions -9 and -2.3 kb relative to the ALAS1 transcription start site. PPARalpha ligand treatment also up-regulated the mRNA levels of the genes ALAD (5-aminolevulinate dehydratase), UROS (uroporphyrinogen III synthase), UROD (uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase), CPOX (coproporphyrinogen oxidase) and PPOX (protoporphyrinogen oxidase) encoding for enzymes controlling further steps in heme biosynthesis. In HepG2 cells treated with PPARalpha agonists and in mouse liver upon fasting, the association of PPARalpha, its partner retinoid X receptor, PPARgamma co-activator 1alpha and activated RNA polymerase II with the transcription start site region of all six genes was increased, leading to higher levels of the metabolite heme. In conclusion, these data strongly support a role of PPARalpha in the regulation of human ALAS1 and of five additional genes of the pathway, consequently leading to increased heme synthesis.

  11. Differences in cytokinin control on cellular dynamics of zucchini cotyledons cultivated in two experimental systems.

    PubMed

    Stoynova-Bakalova, E; Petrov, P; Gigova, L; Ivanova, N

    2011-01-01

    The effect of endogenous cytokinins on the pattern of palisade cell division post-germination does not depend on the conditions of cotyledon development -in planta (attached to seedlings) or in vitro (isolated from dry zucchini seeds and cultured on water). In cotyledons originating from 4-day-old seedlings (experimental system 1), exogenous cytokinin temporarily (in the first 2 day of cultivation) enhanced post-mitotic cell enlargement of palisade cells, mainly due to enhanced water uptake and use of cell storage compounds, all of which lead to cotyledon senescence. Cytokinin is not able to resume the completed palisade cell division on day 5. As a result, the number of cells and the final areas of treated and control cotyledons are quite similar. By contrast, the effects of cytokinin on cotyledons isolated from dry seeds (experimental system 2) are better expressed, promoting an increase in number of palisade cells accompanied by additional cotyledon area enlargement. However, the prolonged post-mitotic cell expansion in control cotyledons compensates for the reduced speed of cell growth and division activity and decreases differences in final cotyledon area between treatments. The results define cell division as the primary target of cytokinin stimulation in cotyledon tissues competent for division, and determine the temporal patterns of palisade cell cycling related to cotyledon age. This knowledge permits a better choice of experimental system to study effects on cell proliferation and cell growth, as well as cell enlargement and senescence-related events using physiologically homogeneous material.

  12. Sequential CCR5-Tropic HIV-1 Reactivation from Distinct Cellular Reservoirs following Perturbation of Elite Control

    PubMed Central

    Watters, Sarah A.; Mlcochova, Petra; Maldarelli, Frank; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Pillay, Deenan; Gupta, Ravindra K.

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV Elite Controllers may reveal insights into virus persistence given they harbour small reservoir sizes, akin to HIV non-controllers treated early with combination antiretroviral therapy. Both groups of patients represent the most promising candidates for interventions aimed at sustained remission or ‘cure’. Analytic treatment interruption (ATI) in the latter group leads to stochastic rebound of virus, though it is unclear whether loss of elite control is also associated with similar rebound characteristics. Methods We studied three discrete periods of virus rebound during myeloma related immune disruption over 2.5 years in an elite controller who previously underwent autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in the absence of any antiretroviral therapy. Single genome sequencing of the V1-V4 region of env in PBMC and plasma was performed and phylogenies reconstructed. Average pairwise distance (APD) was calculated and non-parametric methods used to assess compartmentalisation. Coreceptor usage was predicted based on genotypic algorithms. Results 122 single genome sequences were obtained (median 26 sequences per rebound). The initial rebounding plasma env sequences following ASCT represented two distinct lineages, and clustered with proviral DNA sequences isolated prior to ASCT. One of the lineages was monophyletic, possibly indicating reactivation from clonally expanded cells. The second rebound occurred 470 days after spontaneous control of the first rebound and was phylogenetically distinct from the first, confirmed by compartmentalisation analysis, with a different cellular origin rather than ongoing replication. By contrast, third rebound viruses clustered with second rebound viruses, with evidence for ongoing evolution that was associated with lymphopenia and myeloma progression. Following ASCT a shift in tropism from CXCR4-tropic viruses to a CCR5-tropic population was observed to persist through to the third rebound. Conclusions Our data

  13. Cyclosporin-A-induced prion protein aggresomes are dynamic quality-control cellular compartments.

    PubMed

    Ben-Gedalya, Tziona; Lyakhovetsky, Roman; Yedidia, Yifat; Bejerano-Sagie, Michal; Kogan, Natalya M; Karpuj, Marcela Viviana; Kaganovich, Daniel; Cohen, Ehud

    2011-06-01

    Despite the activity of cellular quality-control mechanisms, subsets of mature and newly synthesized polypeptides fail to fold properly and form insoluble aggregates. In some cases, protein aggregation leads to the development of human neurodegenerative maladies, including Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Aggregates of misfolded prion protein (PrP), which appear in cells after exposure to the drug cyclosporin A (CsA), and disease-linked PrP mutants have been found to accumulate in juxtanuclear deposition sites termed 'aggresomes'. Recently, it was shown that cells can contain at least two types of deposition sites for misfolded proteins: a dynamic quality-control compartment, which was termed 'JUNQ', and a site for terminally aggregated proteins called 'IPOD'. Here, we show that CsA-induced PrP aggresomes are dynamic structures that form despite intact proteasome activity, recruit chaperones and dynamically exchange PrP molecules with the cytosol. These findings define the CsA-PrP aggresome as a JUNQ-like dynamic quality-control compartment that mediates the refolding or degradation of misfolded proteins. Together, our data suggest that the formation of PrP aggresomes protects cells from proteotoxic stress.

  14. A simple cellular model to quantify controls on aeolian dune-field pattern development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastwood, E. N.; Nield, J. M.; Baas, A. C.; Kocurek, G.

    2009-12-01

    A second-generation, source-to-sink cellular automaton model captures and quantifies many of the factors controlling the evolution of aeolian dune-field patterns by varying only a small number of parameters. Our model quantifies the role of sediment supply, sediment availability, and transport capacity in the development and evolution of an aeolian dune-field pattern over long time scales. Simulation results produced by varying the sediment supply and transport capacity identified seven dune-field patterns. A new clustered dune-field pattern is identified and used to propose an alternative mechanism for the formation of superimposed dunes. Bedforms are hypothesized to cluster together, simultaneously forming two spatial scales of bedforms without first developing a large basal dune and small superimposed dunes. Sediment supply and transport capacity control the type and frequency of dune interactions, the sediment availability of the system, and ultimately the development of dune-field patterns. Our model allows predictions about the range of sediment supply and wind strengths required to produce many of the dune-field patterns seen in the real world. This simple model demonstrates the dominant control of aeolian sediment state on the construction and evolution of aeolian dune-field patterns.

  15. NaBC1 is a ubiquitous electrogenic Na+ -coupled borate transporter essential for cellular boron homeostasis and cell growth and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Park, Meeyoung; Li, Qin; Shcheynikov, Nikolay; Zeng, Weizong; Muallem, Shmuel

    2004-11-05

    Boron is a vital micronutrient in plants and may be essential for animal growth and development. Whereas the role of boron in the life cycle of plants is well documented, nothing is known about boron homeostasis and function in animal cells. NaBC1, the mammalian homolog of AtBor1, is a borate transporter. In the absence of borate, NaBC1 conducts Na(+) and OH(-) (H(+)), while in the presence of borate, NaBC1 functions as an electrogenic, voltage-regulated, Na(+)-coupled B(OH)(4)(-) transporter. At low concentrations, borate activated the MAPK pathway to stimulate cell growth and proliferation, and at high concentrations, it was toxic. Accordingly, overexpression of NaBC1 shifted both effects of borate to the left, whereas knockdown of NaBC1 halted cell growth and proliferation. These findings may reveal a previously unrecognized role for NaBC1 in borate homeostasis and open the way to better understanding of the many presumed physiological roles of borate in animals.

  16. The Cellular Prion Protein Controls Notch Signaling in Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Halliez, Sophie; Hirsch, Théo Z; Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Passet, Bruno; Tomkiewicz, Céline; Villa-Diaz, Ana; Torres, Juan-Maria; Launay, Jean-Marie; Béringue, Vincent; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie

    2017-03-01

    The prion protein is infamous for its involvement in a group of neurodegenerative diseases known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies. In the longstanding quest to decipher the physiological function of its cellular isoform, PrP(C) , the discovery of its participation to the self-renewal of hematopoietic and neural stem cells has cast a new spotlight on its potential role in stem cell biology. However, still little is known on the cellular and molecular mechanisms at play. Here, by combining in vitro and in vivo murine models of PrP(C) depletion, we establish that PrP(C) deficiency severely affects the Notch pathway, which plays a major role in neural stem cell maintenance. We document that the absence of PrP(C) in a neuroepithelial cell line or in primary neurospheres is associated with drastically reduced expression of Notch ligands and receptors, resulting in decreased levels of Notch target genes. Similar alterations of the Notch pathway are recovered in the neuroepithelium of Prnp(-/-) embryos during a developmental window encompassing neural tube closure. In addition, in line with Notch defects, our data show that the absence of PrP(C) results in altered expression of Nestin and Olig2 as well as N-cadherin distribution. We further provide evidence that PrP(C) controls the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) downstream from Notch. Finally, we unveil a negative feedback action of EGFR on both Notch and PrP(C) . As a whole, our study delineates a molecular scenario through which PrP(C) takes part to the self-renewal of neural stem and progenitor cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:754-765.

  17. Distinct Cellular Locations of Carbonic Anhydrases Mediate Carbon Dioxide Control of Stomatal Movements1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Honghong; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Occhipinti, Rossana; Ries, Amber; Böhmer, Maik; You, Lei; Xiao, Chuanlei; Engineer, Cawas B.; Boron, Walter F.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) in leaves closes stomatal apertures. Research has shown key functions of the β-carbonic anhydrases (βCA1 and βCA4) in rapid CO2-induced stomatal movements by catalytic transmission of the CO2 signal in guard cells. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, because initial studies indicate that these Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) βCAs are targeted to distinct intracellular compartments upon expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) cells. Which cellular location of these enzymes plays a key role in native guard cells in CO2-regulated stomatal movements remains unknown. Here, we express fluorescently tagged CAs in guard cells of ca1ca4 double-mutant plants and show that the specific locations of βCA4 at the plasma membrane and βCA1 in native guard cell chloroplasts each can mediate rapid CO2 control of stomatal movements. Localization and complementation analyses using a mammalian αCAII-yellow fluorescent protein in guard cells further show that cytoplasmic localization is also sufficient to restore CO2 regulation of stomatal conductance. Mathematical modeling of cellular CO2 catalysis suggests that the dynamics of the intracellular HCO3− concentration change in guard cells can be driven by plasma membrane and cytoplasmic localizations of CAs but not as clearly by chloroplast targeting. Moreover, modeling supports the notion that the intracellular HCO3− concentration dynamics in guard cells are a key mechanism in mediating CO2-regulated stomatal movements but that an additional chloroplast role of CAs exists that has yet to be identified. PMID:26243620

  18. Global microbial carbonate proliferation after the end-Devonian mass extinction: Mainly controlled by demise of skeletal bioconstructors.

    PubMed

    Yao, Le; Aretz, Markus; Chen, Jitao; Webb, Gregory E; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-12-23

    Microbial carbonates commonly flourished following mass extinction events. The end-Devonian (Hangenberg) mass extinction event is a first-order mass extinction on the scale of the 'Big Five' extinctions. However, to date, it is still unclear whether global microbial carbonate proliferation occurred after the Hangenberg event. The earliest known Carboniferous stromatolites on tidal flats are described from intertidal environments of the lowermost Tournaisian (Qianheishan Formation) in northwestern China. With other early Tournaisian microbe-dominated bioconstructions extensively distributed on shelves, the Qianheishan stromatolites support microbial carbonate proliferation after the Hangenberg extinction. Additional support comes from quantitative analysis of the abundance of microbe-dominated bioconstructions through the Famennian and early Tournaisian, which shows that they were globally distributed (between 40° latitude on both sides of the palaeoequator) and that their abundance increased distinctly in the early Tournaisian compared to the latest Devonian (Strunian). Comparison of variations in the relative abundance of skeleton- versus microbe-dominated bioconstructions across the Hangenberg and 'Big Five' extinctions suggests that changes in abundance of skeletal bioconstructors may play a first-order control on microbial carbonate proliferation during extinction transitions but that microbial proliferation is not a general necessary feature after mass extinctions.

  19. Global microbial carbonate proliferation after the end-Devonian mass extinction: Mainly controlled by demise of skeletal bioconstructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Le; Aretz, Markus; Chen, Jitao; Webb, Gregory E.; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-12-01

    Microbial carbonates commonly flourished following mass extinction events. The end-Devonian (Hangenberg) mass extinction event is a first-order mass extinction on the scale of the ‘Big Five’ extinctions. However, to date, it is still unclear whether global microbial carbonate proliferation occurred after the Hangenberg event. The earliest known Carboniferous stromatolites on tidal flats are described from intertidal environments of the lowermost Tournaisian (Qianheishan Formation) in northwestern China. With other early Tournaisian microbe-dominated bioconstructions extensively distributed on shelves, the Qianheishan stromatolites support microbial carbonate proliferation after the Hangenberg extinction. Additional support comes from quantitative analysis of the abundance of microbe-dominated bioconstructions through the Famennian and early Tournaisian, which shows that they were globally distributed (between 40° latitude on both sides of the palaeoequator) and that their abundance increased distinctly in the early Tournaisian compared to the latest Devonian (Strunian). Comparison of variations in the relative abundance of skeleton- versus microbe-dominated bioconstructions across the Hangenberg and ‘Big Five’ extinctions suggests that changes in abundance of skeletal bioconstructors may play a first-order control on microbial carbonate proliferation during extinction transitions but that microbial proliferation is not a general necessary feature after mass extinctions.

  20. Global microbial carbonate proliferation after the end-Devonian mass extinction: Mainly controlled by demise of skeletal bioconstructors

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Le; Aretz, Markus; Chen, Jitao; Webb, Gregory E.; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Microbial carbonates commonly flourished following mass extinction events. The end-Devonian (Hangenberg) mass extinction event is a first-order mass extinction on the scale of the ‘Big Five’ extinctions. However, to date, it is still unclear whether global microbial carbonate proliferation occurred after the Hangenberg event. The earliest known Carboniferous stromatolites on tidal flats are described from intertidal environments of the lowermost Tournaisian (Qianheishan Formation) in northwestern China. With other early Tournaisian microbe-dominated bioconstructions extensively distributed on shelves, the Qianheishan stromatolites support microbial carbonate proliferation after the Hangenberg extinction. Additional support comes from quantitative analysis of the abundance of microbe-dominated bioconstructions through the Famennian and early Tournaisian, which shows that they were globally distributed (between 40° latitude on both sides of the palaeoequator) and that their abundance increased distinctly in the early Tournaisian compared to the latest Devonian (Strunian). Comparison of variations in the relative abundance of skeleton- versus microbe-dominated bioconstructions across the Hangenberg and ‘Big Five’ extinctions suggests that changes in abundance of skeletal bioconstructors may play a first-order control on microbial carbonate proliferation during extinction transitions but that microbial proliferation is not a general necessary feature after mass extinctions. PMID:28009013

  1. Spatiotemporal control over molecular delivery and cellular encapsulation from electropolymerized micro- and nanopatterned surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Eric; Jay, Steven M.; Demento, Stacey L.; Murelli, Ryan P.; Reed, Mark A.; Malinski, Tadeusz; Spiegel, David A.; Mooney, David J.; Fahmy, Tarek M.

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive, patterned micro- and nanoscale surfaces that can be spatially engineered for three-dimensional ligand presentation and sustained release of signaling molecules represent a critical advance for the development of next-generation diagnostic and therapeutic devices. Lithography is ideally suited to patterning such surfaces due to its precise, easily scalable, high-throughput nature; however, to date polymers patterned by these techniques have not demonstrated the capacity for sustained release of bioactive agents. We demonstrate here a class of lithographically-defined, electropolymerized polymers with monodisperse micro- and nanopatterned features capable of sustained release of bioactive drugs and proteins. We show that precise control can be achieved over the loading capacity and release rates of encapsulated agents and illustrate this aspect using a fabricated surface releasing a model antigen (ovalbumin) and a cytokine (interleukin-2) for induction of a specific immune response. We further demonstrate the ability of this technique to enable three-dimensional control over cellular encapsulation. The efficacy of the described approach is buttressed by its simplicity, versatility, and reproducibility, rendering it ideally suited for biomaterials engineering. PMID:20445826

  2. Magnesium used in bioabsorbable stents controls smooth muscle cell proliferation and stimulates endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Katrin; Gratz, Matthias; Koeck, Kathleen; Mostertz, Joerg; Begunk, Robert; Loebler, Marian; Semmling, Beatrice; Seidlitz, Anne; Hildebrandt, Petra; Homuth, Georg; Grabow, Niels; Tuemmler, Conny; Weitschies, Werner; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Kroemer, Heyo K

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium-based bioabsorbable cardiovascular stents have been developed to overcome limitations of permanent metallic stents, such as late stent thrombosis. During stent degradation, endothelial and smooth muscle cells will be exposed to locally high magnesium concentrations with yet unknown physiological consequences. Here, we investigated the effects of elevated magnesium concentrations on human coronary artery endothelial and smooth muscle cell (HCAEC, HCASMC) growth and gene expression. In the course of 24 h after incubation with magnesium chloride solutions (1 or 10 mM) intracellular magnesium level in HCASMC raised from 0.55 ± 0.25 mM (1 mM) to 1.38 ± 0.95 mM (10 mM), while no increase was detected in HCAEC. Accordingly, a DNA microarray-based study identified 69 magnesium regulated transcripts in HCAEC, but 2172 magnesium regulated transcripts in HCASMC. Notably, a significant regulation of various growth factors and extracellular matrix components was observed. In contrast, viability and proliferation of HCAEC were increased at concentrations of up to 25 mM magnesium chloride, while in HCASMC viability and proliferation appeared to be unaffected. Taken together, our data indicate that magnesium halts smooth muscle cell proliferation and stimulates endothelial cell proliferation, which might translate into a beneficial effect in the setting of stent associated vascular injury.

  3. Red light, green light: Signals that control endothelial cell proliferation during embryonic vascular development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The proper regulation of endothelial cell proliferation is critical for vascular development in the embryo. VEGF-A and bFGF, which are important in the induction of mesodermal progenitors to form a capillary plexus, are also key mitogenic signals. Disruption in VEGF-A or bFGF decreases endothelial c...

  4. Altered RECQL5 expression in urothelial bladder carcinoma increases cellular proliferation and makes RECQL5 helicase activity a novel target for chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Karl; Arya, Lovleen; Bottomley, Sarah; Morgan, Susan; Cox, Angela; Catto, James; Bryant, Helen E.

    2016-01-01

    RECQ helicases are a family of enzymes with both over lapping and unique functions. Functional autosomal recessive loss of three members of the family BLM, WRN and RECQL4, results in hereditary human syndromes characterized by cancer predisposition and premature aging, but despite the finding that RECQL5 deficient mice are cancer prone, no such link has been made to human RECQL5. Here we demonstrate that human urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCC) has increased expression of RECQL5 compared to normal bladder tissue and that increasing RECQL5 expression can drive proliferation of normal bladder cells and is associated with poor prognosis. Further, by expressing a helicase dead RECQL5 and by depleting bladder cancer cells of RECQL5 we show that inhibition of RECQL5 activity has potential as a new target for treatment of UCC. PMID:27764811

  5. Development of uranium reference particles for nuclear safeguards and non-proliferation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kips, Ruth

    In the oversight of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and as part of the Additional Protocol of the International Atomic Energy Agency, environmental sampling has become an important tool for the detection of non-declared nuclear activities. One extensively developed technique in environmental sampling (ES) makes use of pieces of cotton cloth called swipes to wipe surfaces in and around a nuclear facility. The dust collected on these swipes typically contains micrometer-sized uranium particles with an isotopic composition characteristic for the processes at the inspected facility. Since its implementation in the 1990s, ES has proven to be a very effective tool in the detection of clandestine activities owing to a number of highly sensitive and selective techniques, including secondary ion mass spectrometry and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. However, considering the potential consequences of the analyses, these measurements need to be subjected to a rigorous quality management system. In a continuous effort to improve the accuracy and detection efficiency of the uranium isotope ratio measurements, uranium particle reference materials are being developed by different research groups. It was concluded however, that the existing methods for the production of particulate reference materials generally do not reproduce the particles recovered from swipe samples. For this reason, we developed the aerosol deposition chamber at the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements for the production of reference uranium particles that are representative of the particles collected at enrichment facilities. This method is based on the controlled hydrolysis of milligram amounts of uranium hexafluoride with a certified uranium isotopic composition. After optimization of the experimental set-up, the particles produced by the aerosol deposition chamber were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and

  6. Cytoskeletal protein Flightless (Flii) is elevated in chronic and acute human wounds and wound fluid: neutralizing its activity in chronic but not acute wound fluid improves cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ruzehaji, Nadira; Grose, Randall; Krumbiegel, Doreen; Zola, Heddy; Dasari, Pallave; Wallace, Hilary; Stacey, Michael; Fitridge, Robert; Cowin, Allison J

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds form a medical need which will expand as the population ages and the obesity epidemic grows. Whilst the complex mechanisms underlying wound repair are not fully understood, remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role. Elevated expression of the actin cytoskeletal protein Flightless I (Flii) is known to impair wound outcomes. To determine if Flii is involved in the impaired healing observed in chronic wounds, its expression in non-healing human wounds from patients with venous leg ulcers was determined and compared to its expression in acute wounds and unwounded skin. Increased expression of Flii was observed in both chronic and acute wounds with wound fluid and plasma also containing secreted Flii protein. Inflammation is a key aspect of wound repair and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis revealed Flii was located in neutrophils within the blood and that it co-localised with CD16+ neutrophils in chronic wounds. The function of secreted Flii was investigated as both chronic wound fluid and Flii have previously been shown to inhibit fibroblast proliferation. To determine if the inhibitory effect of wound fluid was due in part to the presence of Flii, wound fluids were depleted of Flii using Flii-specific neutralizing antibodies (FnAb). Flii depleted chronic wound fluid no longer inhibited fibroblast proliferation, suggesting that Flii may contribute to the inhibitory effect of chronic wound fluid on fibroblast function. Application of FnAbs to chronic wounds may therefore be a novel approach used to improve the local environment of non-healing wounds and potentially improve healing outcomes.

  7. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Inhibits Apoptosis and Promotes Proliferation of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Isolated from Patients with Type 2 Diabetes by Reducing Cellular Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic metabolic disorder affecting increasing number of people in developed countries. Therefore new strategies for treatment of T2D and its complications are of special interest. Nowadays, cellular therapies involving mesenchymal stromal cells that reside in adipose tissue (ASCs) constitute a promising approach; however, there are still many obstacles concerning safety and effectiveness that need to be overcome before ASCs could be engaged for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. One of the challenges is preventing ASCs from deterioration caused by elevated oxidative stress present in diabetes milieu. In the current study we investigated the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) treatment on ASCs isolated from patients with diagnosed T2D. We demonstrate here that cell exposition to bFGF in 5 and 10 ng/mL dosages results in improved morphology, increased proliferative activity, reduced cellular senescence and apoptosis, and decreased oxidative stress, indicating recovery of ASCs' function impaired by T2D. Therefore our results provide a support for bFGF as a potential therapeutic agent for improving stem cell-based approaches for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and its complications. PMID:28168007

  8. Complexes in context: attempting to control the cellular uptake and localisation of rhenium fac-tricarbonyl polypyridyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Balasingham, Rebeca G; Coogan, Michael P; Thorp-Greenwood, Flora L

    2011-11-28

    Transition metal lumophores are now well established as agents for cell imaging, but we are still not able to predict generally and with confidence their cellular localisation, or, for that matter, their uptake efficiencies. While many such complexes have been shown to illuminate cells, genuine applications in biomedical research will only be developed when their uptake and localisation are better understood. This perspective is not a comprehensive review of luminescence, but is an overview of attempts to control uptake and localisation, focussing on a personal account of this group's development of imaging agents based on the Re(CO)(3) bipyridine core, and our attempts to understand and control their cellular behaviour.

  9. The role of STATs in transcriptional control and their impact on cellular function.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, J; Darnell, J E

    2000-05-15

    The STAT proteins (Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription), were identified in the last decade as transcription factors which were critical in mediating virtually all cytokine driven signaling. These proteins are latent in the cytoplasm and become activated through tyrosine phosphorylation which typically occurs through cytokine receptor associated kinases (JAKs) or growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases. Recently a number of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (for example src and abl) have been found to cause STAT phosphorylation. Phosphorylated STATs form homo- or hetero-dimers, enter the nucleus and working coordinately with other transcriptional co-activators or transcription factors lead to increased transcriptional initiation. In normal cells and in animals, ligand dependent activation of the STATs is a transient process, lasting for several minutes to several hours. In contrast, in many cancerous cell lines and tumors, where growth factor dysregulation is frequently at the heart of cellular transformation, the STAT proteins (in particular Stats 1, 3 and 5) are persistently tyrosine phosphorylated or activated. The importance of STAT activation to growth control in experiments using anti-sense molecules or dominant negative STAT protein encoding constructs performed in cell lines or studies in animals lacking specific STATs strongly indicate that STATs play an important role in controlling cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Stat1 plays an important role in growth arrest, in promoting apoptosis and is implicated as a tumor suppressor; while Stats 3 and 5 are involved in promoting cell cycle progression and cellular transformation and preventing apoptosis. Many questions remain including: (1) a better understanding of how the STAT proteins through association with other factors increase transcription initiation; (2) a more complete definition of the sets of genes which are activated by different STATs and (3) how these sets of activated genes differ

  10. Cellular transport of l-arginine determines renal medullary blood flow in control rats, but not in diabetic rats despite enhanced cellular uptake capacity.

    PubMed

    Persson, Patrik; Fasching, Angelica; Teerlink, Tom; Hansell, Peter; Palm, Fredrik

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with decreased nitric oxide bioavailability thereby affecting renal blood flow regulation. Previous reports have demonstrated that cellular uptake of l-arginine is rate limiting for nitric oxide production and that plasma l-arginine concentration is decreased in diabetes. We therefore investigated whether regional renal blood flow regulation is affected by cellular l-arginine uptake in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Rats were anesthetized with thiobutabarbital, and the left kidney was exposed. Total, cortical, and medullary renal blood flow was investigated before and after renal artery infusion of increasing doses of either l-homoarginine to inhibit cellular uptake of l-arginine or N(ω)-nitro- l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase. l-Homoarginine infusion did not affect total or cortical blood flow in any of the groups, but caused a dose-dependent reduction in medullary blood flow. l-NAME decreased total, cortical and medullary blood flow in both groups. However, the reductions in medullary blood flow in response to both l-homoarginine and l-NAME were more pronounced in the control groups compared with the diabetic groups. Isolated cortical tubular cells displayed similar l-arginine uptake capacity whereas medullary tubular cells isolated from diabetic rats had increased l-arginine uptake capacity. Diabetics had reduced l-arginine concentrations in plasma and medullary tissue but increased l-arginine concentration in cortical tissue. In conclusion, the reduced l-arginine availability in plasma and medullary tissue in diabetes results in reduced nitric oxide-mediated regulation of renal medullary hemodynamics. Cortical blood flow regulation displays less dependency on extracellular l-arginine and the upregulated cortical tissue l-arginine may protect cortical hemodynamics in diabetes.

  11. Comparative analysis of mediastinal fat-associated lymphoid cluster development and lung cellular infiltration in murine autoimmune disease models and the corresponding normal control strains.

    PubMed

    Elewa, Yaser Hosny Ali; Ichii, Osamu; Kon, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We previously discovered mediastinal fat-associated lymphoid clusters (MFALCs) as novel lymphoid clusters associated with mediastinal fat tissue in healthy mice. However, no data about their morphology in immune-associated disease conditions, and their relationship with lung infiltration, is available to date. In the present study, we compared the morphological features of MFALCs in 4-month-old male murine autoimmune disease models (MRL/MpJ-lpr mice and BXSB/MpJ-Yaa mice) with those of the corresponding control strains (MRL/MpJ and BXSB/MpJ, respectively). In addition, we analysed their correlation with lung infiltration. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry for CD3, B220, Iba1, Gr1 and BrdU was performed to detect T cells and B cells, macrophages, granulocytes and proliferating cells, respectively. The spleen weight to body weight ratios and anti-double-stranded DNA autoantibody titres were found to be significantly higher in the autoimmune models than in the control strains. Furthermore, the autoimmune model presented prominent MFALCs, with a significantly greater ratio of lymphoid cluster area to total mediastinal fat tissue area, and more apparent diffused cellular infiltration into the lung lobes than the other studied strains. Higher numbers of T and B cells, macrophages and proliferating cells, but fewer granulocytes, were observed in the autoimmune models than in the control strains. Interestingly, a significant positive Pearson's correlation between the size of the MFALCs and the density of CD3-, B220- and Iba1-positive cells in the lung was observed. Therefore, our data suggest a potentially important role for MFALCs in the progression of lung disease. However, further investigation is required to clarify the pathological role of MFALCs in lung disease, especially in inflammatory disorders.

  12. The small Rho GTPase Rac1 controls normal human dermal fibroblasts proliferation with phosphorylation of the oncoprotein c-myc

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolova, Ekaterina; Mitev, Vanio; Zhelev, Nikolai; Deroanne, Christophe F. . E-mail: yves.poumay@fundp.ac.be

    2007-08-03

    Proliferation of dermal fibroblasts is crucial for the maintenance of skin. The small Rho GTPase, Rac1, has been identified as a key transducer of proliferative signals in various cell types, but in normal human dermal fibroblasts its significance to cell growth control has not been studied. In this study, we applied the method of RNA interference to suppress endogenous Rac1 expression and examined the consequences on human skin fibroblasts. Rac1 knock-down resulted in inhibition of DNA synthesis. This effect was not mediated by inhibition of the central transducer of proliferative stimuli, ERK1/2 or by activation of the pro-apoptotic p38. Rather, as a consequence of the suppressed Rac1 expression we observed a significant decrease in phosphorylation of c-myc, revealing for the first time that in human fibroblasts Rac1 exerts control on proliferation through c-myc phosphorylation. Thus Rac1 activates proliferation of normal fibroblasts through stimulation of c-myc phosphorylation without affecting ERK1/2 activity.

  13. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals dynamic paracrine control of cellular variation.

    PubMed

    Shalek, Alex K; Satija, Rahul; Shuga, Joe; Trombetta, John J; Gennert, Dave; Lu, Diana; Chen, Peilin; Gertner, Rona S; Gaublomme, Jellert T; Yosef, Nir; Schwartz, Schraga; Fowler, Brian; Weaver, Suzanne; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaohui; Ding, Ruihua; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Friedman, Nir; Hacohen, Nir; Park, Hongkun; May, Andrew P; Regev, Aviv

    2014-06-19

    High-throughput single-cell transcriptomics offers an unbiased approach for understanding the extent, basis and function of gene expression variation between seemingly identical cells. Here we sequence single-cell RNA-seq libraries prepared from over 1,700 primary mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells spanning several experimental conditions. We find substantial variation between identically stimulated dendritic cells, in both the fraction of cells detectably expressing a given messenger RNA and the transcript's level within expressing cells. Distinct gene modules are characterized by different temporal heterogeneity profiles. In particular, a 'core' module of antiviral genes is expressed very early by a few 'precocious' cells in response to uniform stimulation with a pathogenic component, but is later activated in all cells. By stimulating cells individually in sealed microfluidic chambers, analysing dendritic cells from knockout mice, and modulating secretion and extracellular signalling, we show that this response is coordinated by interferon-mediated paracrine signalling from these precocious cells. Notably, preventing cell-to-cell communication also substantially reduces variability between cells in the expression of an early-induced 'peaked' inflammatory module, suggesting that paracrine signalling additionally represses part of the inflammatory program. Our study highlights the importance of cell-to-cell communication in controlling cellular heterogeneity and reveals general strategies that multicellular populations can use to establish complex dynamic responses.

  14. Single-cell RNA-seq reveals dynamic paracrine control of cellular variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalek, Alex K.; Satija, Rahul; Shuga, Joe; Trombetta, John J.; Gennert, Dave; Lu, Diana; Chen, Peilin; Gertner, Rona S.; Gaublomme, Jellert T.; Yosef, Nir; Schwartz, Schraga; Fowler, Brian; Weaver, Suzanne; Wang, Jing; Wang, Xiaohui; Ding, Ruihua; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Friedman, Nir; Hacohen, Nir; Park, Hongkun; May, Andrew P.; Regev, Aviv

    2014-06-01

    High-throughput single-cell transcriptomics offers an unbiased approach for understanding the extent, basis and function of gene expression variation between seemingly identical cells. Here we sequence single-cell RNA-seq libraries prepared from over 1,700 primary mouse bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells spanning several experimental conditions. We find substantial variation between identically stimulated dendritic cells, in both the fraction of cells detectably expressing a given messenger RNA and the transcript's level within expressing cells. Distinct gene modules are characterized by different temporal heterogeneity profiles. In particular, a `core' module of antiviral genes is expressed very early by a few `precocious' cells in response to uniform stimulation with a pathogenic component, but is later activated in all cells. By stimulating cells individually in sealed microfluidic chambers, analysing dendritic cells from knockout mice, and modulating secretion and extracellular signalling, we show that this response is coordinated by interferon-mediated paracrine signalling from these precocious cells. Notably, preventing cell-to-cell communication also substantially reduces variability between cells in the expression of an early-induced `peaked' inflammatory module, suggesting that paracrine signalling additionally represses part of the inflammatory program. Our study highlights the importance of cell-to-cell communication in controlling cellular heterogeneity and reveals general strategies that multicellular populations can use to establish complex dynamic responses.

  15. Cellular components of probiotics control Yersinia ruckeri infection in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum).

    PubMed

    Abbass, A; Sharifuzzaman, S M; Austin, B

    2010-01-01

    Subcellular components of the probiotics Aeromonas sobria GC2 and Bacillus subtilis JB-1, when administered to rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, conferred protection against a new biogroup of Yersinia ruckeri. Thus, intraperitoneal or intramuscular injection of rainbow trout with cell wall proteins (CWPs), outer membrane proteins (OMPs), lipopolysaccharides (LPS), whole cell proteins (WCPs) and live cells followed by challenge on day 8 with Y. ruckeri led to 80-100% survival compared with 10% survival in the controls. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) profiles of WCPs and OMPs from GC2 had 10 and 5 variable protein bands in comparison to 11 and 5 bands in the WCPs and CWPs from JB-1. Proteomic analyses were employed following SDS-PAGE to categorize one dominant protein of 104.7 kDa from the CWPs of JB-1 and equated it with 'Bacillus spp. endoglucanase' with a Mascot score >69. These results point to the potential of using cellular components of probiotics for protection of fish against bacterial diseases.

  16. Control of the Proliferation of Mammalian Cells by the Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae June; Ha, Chang Seung; Ma, Yonghao; Lee, Jungyeol; Song, Kiwon

    2012-10-01

    Recent development of the atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs) reported dramatic achievement on the applications to sterilization, wound healing, blood coagulation, and so on. These effects are coming from the abundant electrons, various ions, radicals, and neutral atoms which cause specific interactions with cells. However, the application of APPs to human cells has been mainly focused on cell death, but not so much on cell proliferation. In this study, the effects of a non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) were investigated for three different human cell lines. It was observed that the exposure of APP to human adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) and the primary lung fibroblast IMR-90 cells induced increased cell proliferation in a specific condition. On the other hand, the same exposure of APP to HeLa cells dramatically decreased their viability. These observations suggest that different types of human cells differentially respond to the exposure of APP.

  17. The non-canonical Wnt receptor Ryk regulates hematopoietic stem cell repopulation in part by controlling proliferation and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Famili, Farbod; Perez, Laura Garcia; Naber, Brigitta AE; Noordermeer, Jasprina N; Fradkin, Lee G; Staal, Frank JT

    2016-01-01

    The development of blood and immune cells requires strict control by various signaling pathways in order to regulate self-renewal, differentiation and apoptosis in stem and progenitor cells. Recent evidence indicates critical roles for the canonical and non-canonical Wnt pathways in hematopoiesis. The non-canonical Wnt pathway is important for establishment of cell polarity and cell migration and regulates apoptosis in the thymus. We here investigate the role of the non-canonical Wnt receptor Ryk in hematopoiesis and lymphoid development. We show that there are dynamic changes in Ryk expression during development and in different hematopoietic tissues. Functionally, Ryk regulates NK cell development in a temporal fashion. Moreover, Ryk-deficient mice show diminished, but not absent self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), via effects on mildly increased proliferation and apoptosis. Thus, Ryk deficiency in HSCs from fetal liver reduces their quiescence, leading to proliferation-induced apoptosis and decreased self-renewal. PMID:27882948

  18. Poly (C)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) promotes the progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) through regulating cellular proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jinjun; Zhou, Guoren; Zhang, Zhi; Sun, Lei; He, Xia; Zhou, Jianwei

    2016-08-01

    PCBP2 (Poly(C)-binding protein 2) is a member of PCBP family, which has many functions including mRNA stabilization, translational silence and translational enhancement performed by their poly(C)-binding ability. The abnormal expression of PCBP2 was correlated with various carcinomas. However, the significance and mechanism of PCBP2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) progression remain unclear. In this study, Western Blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis revealed that PCBP2 was overexpressed in ESCC tissues and cell lines. Statistical results also indicated that PCBP2 expression level was significantly positively correlated with ESCC clinicopathological parameters such as tumor grade and tumor size. Furthermore, PCBP2 expression level could also be recognized as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients' overall survival. Serum starvation and refeeding assay along with PCBP2-shRNA transfection demonstrated that PCBP2 expression promoted proliferation of ESCC cells. The results above are partly due to growth arrest of cell cycle at G1/S phase. We also found that reduced PCBP2 expression might induce ESCC cell apoptosis with increased cleaved caspase3 expression. Overall, our findings indicated that PCBP2 might be involved in the ESCC progression and be considered as a new treatment target in ESCC.

  19. Bioreactor controlled by PI algorithm and operated with a perfusion chamber to support endothelial cell survival and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shkilnyy, Andriy; Dubois, Justin; Sabra, Georges; Sharp, Jamie; Gagnon, Serge; Proulx, Pierre; Vermette, Patrick

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports the optimization of a perfusion bioreactor system previously reported by us (Chouinard et al., 2009). The implementation of a proportional-integral (PI) controller algorithm to control oxygen concentration and pH is presented and discussed. P and I values used by the controller were first estimated using a First-Order-Plus-Dead-Time (FOPDT, Matlab Simulink) and then tuned manually. A new gas exchanger design compatible with the PI controller was introduced and validated to decrease interaction between the injected gases and overall inertia of the system. The gas exchanger was used to adjust both pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. This new bioreactor system allowed real-time PI control over pH and DO concentration at different flow rates (from 2 to 70 mL min(-1)). Cell viability and proliferation were investigated to validate the updated bioreactor design and performance.

  20. Analysis of voice change during cellular phone use: a blinded controlled study.

    PubMed

    Shewmaker, Marae B; Hapner, Edie R; Gilman, Marina; Klein, Adam M; Johns, Michael M

    2010-05-01

    It is a growing belief that cellular phone use may be hazardous to the voice. This study aims to assess voice production in different conversational scenarios to identify any changes in vocal production that may be specific to cellular phone use. Twenty healthy participants were randomized to seven conversational scenarios: quiet conditions face to face; quiet conditions over a landline; quiet conditions using a cellular phone (QCP); quiet conditions using cellular phone with earpiece (QCPE); noisy conditions face to face (NFF); noisy conditions using cellular phone (NCP); and noisy conditions using cellular phone with earpiece (NCPE). In each condition, participants performed spontaneous speech, a standardized reading passage, and sustained voicing. Sound pressure levels (dB SPL) and fundamental frequencies (F(0)[Hz]) were measured. Subjects completed a 100-mm visual analog scale measuring vocal effort after each speaking scenario. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). There was a significant difference in dB SPL and F(0) between all quiet conditions relative to all noisy conditions (P<0.001). There was no difference in cellular phone use relative to any other conversational condition in mean dB SPL, respective of ambient noise. Vocal effort was rated greater for noisy conditions compared with quiet conditions. Cellular phone use does not lead to a significant change in voice production relative to other speaking conditions. Voice problems associated with cellular phone use may simply be a function of the increased amount of voice use and increased vocal loudness (Lombard effect) associated with speaking in noisy situations rather than a variable inherent to the phone.

  1. Platelet-derived growth factor activity and mRNA expression in healing vascular grafts in baboons. Association in vivo of platelet-derived growth factor mRNA and protein with cellular proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Golden, M A; Au, Y P; Kirkman, T R; Wilcox, J N; Raines, E W; Ross, R; Clowes, A W

    1991-01-01

    In a baboon graft model of arterial intimal thickening, smooth muscle cells (SMC) have been observed to proliferate underneath an intact monolayer of endothelium and in the absence of platelet adherence. Because platelets are not present and therefore cannot be a major source of growth stimulus, we have proposed that the vascular wall cells in the graft intima express mitogens and regulate SMC proliferation. To test this hypothesis, we assayed the grafts for mitogenic activity and expression of growth factor genes. Segments of healing graft and of normal artery, when perfused ex vivo, released mitogenic activity into the perfusate. The graft released more mitogen than the normal arterial segment, and some of the activity was inhibitable with an antibody to human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). In addition, Northern analysis of total RNA demonstrated higher expression of PDGF-A chain mRNA in the graft intima compared to normal artery. PDGF-B chain mRNA was barely detectable in both tissues. PDGF mRNA levels within the graft interstices were not measured. In situ hybridization of 7.5- or 12-wk grafts indicated that some luminal endothelial cells and adjacent intimal SMC contained PDGF-A chain mRNA. By thymidine autoradiography, intimal SMC were observed to be proliferating in the inner third of the intima. These data demonstrate a difference in the pattern of PDGF transcript expression and luminal perfusate activity in graft as compared with control arteries. The association of intimal smooth muscle cell proliferation with intimal PDGF mRNA expression and release of PDGF-like protein supports the hypothesis that factors from cells that have grown into the graft or populated its surface rather than platelets may regulate intimal smooth muscle cell proliferation in this model. Images PMID:1825089

  2. Over-Expression of 60s Ribosomal L23a Is Associated with Cellular Proliferation in SAG Resistant Clinical Isolates of Leishmania donovani

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sanchita; Shah, Priyanka; Baharia, Rajendra K.; Tandon, Rati; Khare, Prashant; Sundar, Shyam; Sahasrabuddhe, Amogh A.; Siddiqi, M. I.; Dube, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Background Sodium antimony gluconate (SAG) unresponsiveness of Leishmania donovani (Ld) had effectively compromised the chemotherapeutic potential of SAG. 60s ribosomal L23a (60sRL23a), identified as one of the over-expressed protein in different resistant strains of L.donovani as observed with differential proteomics studies indicates towards its possible involvement in SAG resistance in L.donovani. In the present study 60sRL23a has been characterized for its probable association with SAG resistance mechanism. Methodology and principal findings The expression profile of 60s ribosomal L23a (60sRL23a) was checked in different SAG resistant as well as sensitive strains of L.donovani clinical isolates by real-time PCR and western blotting and was found to be up-regulated in resistant strains. Ld60sRL23a was cloned, expressed in E.coli system and purified for raising antibody in swiss mice and was observed to have cytosolic localization in L.donovani. 60sRL23a was further over-expressed in sensitive strain of L.donovani to check its sensitivity profile against SAG (Sb V and III) and was found to be altered towards the resistant mode. Conclusion/Significance This study reports for the first time that the over expression of 60sRL23a in SAG sensitive parasite decreases the sensitivity of the parasite towards SAG, miltefosine and paramomycin. Growth curve of the tranfectants further indicated the proliferative potential of 60sRL23a assisting the parasite survival and reaffirming the extra ribosomal role of 60sRL23a. The study thus indicates towards the role of the protein in lowering and redistributing the drug pressure by increased proliferation of parasites and warrants further longitudinal study to understand the underlying mechanism. PMID:24340105

  3. Notch1–STAT3–ETBR signaling axis controls reactive astrocyte proliferation after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    LeComte, Matthew D.; Shimada, Issei S.; Sherwin, Casey; Spees, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Defining the signaling network that controls reactive astrogliosis may provide novel treatment targets for patients with diverse CNS injuries and pathologies. We report that the radial glial cell antigen RC2 identifies the majority of proliferating glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive (GFAP+) reactive astrocytes after stroke. These cells highly expressed endothelin receptor type B (ETBR) and Jagged1, a Notch1 receptor ligand. To study signaling in adult reactive astrocytes, we developed a model based on reactive astrocyte-derived neural stem cells isolated from GFAP-CreER-Notch1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice. By loss- and gain-of-function studies and promoter activity assays, we found that Jagged1/Notch1 signaling increased ETBR expression indirectly by raising the level of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a previously unidentified EDNRB transcriptional activator. Similar to inducible transgenic GFAP-CreER-Notch1-cKO mice, GFAP-CreER-ETBR-cKO mice exhibited a defect in reactive astrocyte proliferation after cerebral ischemia. Our results indicate that the Notch1–STAT3–ETBR axis connects a signaling network that promotes reactive astrocyte proliferation after brain injury. PMID:26124113

  4. [Senescence and cellular immortality].

    PubMed

    Trentesaux, C; Riou, J-F

    2010-11-01

    Senescence was originally described from the observation of the limited ability of normal cells to grow in culture, and may be generated by telomere erosion, accumulation of DNA damages, oxidative stress and modulation of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. Senescence corresponds to a cellular response aiming to control tumor progression by limiting cell proliferation and thus constitutes an anticancer barrier. Senescence is observed in pre-malignant tumor stages and disappears from malignant tumors. Agents used in standard chemotherapy also have the potential to induce senescence, which may partly explain their therapeutic activities. It is possible to restore senescence in tumors using targeted therapies that triggers telomere dysfunction or reactivates suppressor genes functions, which are essential for the onset of senescence.

  5. Distinct signaling programs control human hematopoietic stem cell survival and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Colin A.; Aghaeepour, Nima; Miller, Paul H.; Pellacani, Davide; Beer, Philip A.; Sachs, Karen; Qiao, Wenlian; Wang, WeiJia; Humphries, R. Keith; Sauvageau, Guy; Zandstra, Peter W.; Bendall, Sean C.; Nolan, Garry P.; Hansen, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Several growth factors (GFs) that together promote quiescent human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion ex vivo have been identified; however, the molecular mechanisms by which these GFs regulate the survival, proliferation. and differentiation of human HSCs remain poorly understood. We now describe experiments in which we used mass cytometry to simultaneously measure multiple surface markers, transcription factors, active signaling intermediates, viability, and cell-cycle indicators in single CD34+ cord blood cells before and up to 2 hours after their stimulation with stem cell factor, Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand, interleukin-3, interleukin-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (5 GFs) either alone or combined. Cells with a CD34+CD38−CD45RA−CD90+CD49f+ (CD49f+) phenotype (∼10% HSCs with >6-month repopulating activity in immunodeficient mice) displayed rapid increases in activated STAT1/3/5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, AKT, CREB, and S6 by 1 or more of these GFs, and β-catenin only when the 5 GFs were combined. Certain minority subsets within the CD49f+ compartment were poorly GF-responsive and, among the more GF-responsive subsets of CD49f+ cells, different signaling intermediates correlated with the levels of the myeloid- and lymphoid-associated transcription factors measured. Phenotypically similar, but CD90−CD49f− cells (MPPs) contained lower baseline levels of multiple signaling intermediates than the CD90+CD49f+ cells, but showed similar response amplitudes to the same GFs. Importantly, we found activation or inhibition of AKT and β-catenin directly altered immediate CD49f+ cell survival and proliferation. These findings identify rapid signaling events that 5 GFs elicit directly in the most primitive human hematopoietic cell types to promote their survival and proliferation. PMID:27827829

  6. Distinct signaling programs control human hematopoietic stem cell survival and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Knapp, David J H F; Hammond, Colin A; Aghaeepour, Nima; Miller, Paul H; Pellacani, Davide; Beer, Philip A; Sachs, Karen; Qiao, Wenlian; Wang, WeiJia; Humphries, R Keith; Sauvageau, Guy; Zandstra, Peter W; Bendall, Sean C; Nolan, Garry P; Hansen, Carl; Eaves, Connie J

    2017-01-19

    Several growth factors (GFs) that together promote quiescent human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expansion ex vivo have been identified; however, the molecular mechanisms by which these GFs regulate the survival, proliferation. and differentiation of human HSCs remain poorly understood. We now describe experiments in which we used mass cytometry to simultaneously measure multiple surface markers, transcription factors, active signaling intermediates, viability, and cell-cycle indicators in single CD34(+) cord blood cells before and up to 2 hours after their stimulation with stem cell factor, Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand, interleukin-3, interleukin-6, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (5 GFs) either alone or combined. Cells with a CD34(+)CD38(-)CD45RA(-)CD90(+)CD49f(+) (CD49f(+)) phenotype (∼10% HSCs with >6-month repopulating activity in immunodeficient mice) displayed rapid increases in activated STAT1/3/5, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, AKT, CREB, and S6 by 1 or more of these GFs, and β-catenin only when the 5 GFs were combined. Certain minority subsets within the CD49f(+) compartment were poorly GF-responsive and, among the more GF-responsive subsets of CD49f(+) cells, different signaling intermediates correlated with the levels of the myeloid- and lymphoid-associated transcription factors measured. Phenotypically similar, but CD90(-)CD49f(-) cells (MPPs) contained lower baseline levels of multiple signaling intermediates than the CD90(+)CD49f(+) cells, but showed similar response amplitudes to the same GFs. Importantly, we found activation or inhibition of AKT and β-catenin directly altered immediate CD49f(+) cell survival and proliferation. These findings identify rapid signaling events that 5 GFs elicit directly in the most primitive human hematopoietic cell types to promote their survival and proliferation.

  7. Modular Design of Artificial Tissue Homeostasis: Robust Control through Synthetic Cellular Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Eduardo; Davidsohn, Noah; Subramanian, Sairam; Purnick, Priscilla E. M.; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Weiss, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology efforts have largely focused on small engineered gene networks, yet understanding how to integrate multiple synthetic modules and interface them with endogenous pathways remains a challenge. Here we present the design, system integration, and analysis of several large scale synthetic gene circuits for artificial tissue homeostasis. Diabetes therapy represents a possible application for engineered homeostasis, where genetically programmed stem cells maintain a steady population of β-cells despite continuous turnover. We develop a new iterative process that incorporates modular design principles with hierarchical performance optimization targeted for environments with uncertainty and incomplete information. We employ theoretical analysis and computational simulations of multicellular reaction/diffusion models to design and understand system behavior, and find that certain features often associated with robustness (e.g., multicellular synchronization and noise attenuation) are actually detrimental for tissue homeostasis. We overcome these problems by engineering a new class of genetic modules for ‘synthetic cellular heterogeneity’ that function to generate beneficial population diversity. We design two such modules (an asynchronous genetic oscillator and a signaling throttle mechanism), demonstrate their capacity for enhancing robust control, and provide guidance for experimental implementation with various computational techniques. We found that designing modules for synthetic heterogeneity can be complex, and in general requires a framework for non-linear and multifactorial analysis. Consequently, we adapt a ‘phenotypic sensitivity analysis’ method to determine how functional module behaviors combine to achieve optimal system performance. We ultimately combine this analysis with Bayesian network inference to extract critical, causal relationships between a module's biochemical rate-constants, its high level functional behavior in isolation

  8. Mitigating Cellular Inflammation in Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Tai Chi Chih

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Olmstead, Richard

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the effects of a behavioral intervention, Tai Chi Chih (TCC) on circulating markers of inflammation in older adults. DESIGN A prospective, randomized, controlled trial with allocation to two arms, TCC and health education (HE), 16 weeks of intervention administration, and 9 weeks follow-up. PARTICIPANTS A total of 83 healthy older adults, aged 59 to 86 years. MEASUREMENTS The primary endpoint was circulating levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6). Secondary outcomes were circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), soluble IL-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1RA), sIL-6R, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule (sICAM) and IL-18. Severity of depressive symptoms, sleep quality, and physical activity was also assessed over the treatment trial. RESULTS Among those older adults with high levels IL-6 at entry, a trend for a treatment group by time interaction was found (F(1,70)=3.48, P = .07), in which TCC produced a drop of IL-6 levels comparable to those found in TCC and HE subgroups who had low levels of IL-6 at entry (t’s(72)=0.80, 1.63, P’s>0.10), whereas IL-6 in HE remained higher than the TCC- and HE subgroups with low entry IL-6 (t(72)=2.47, P=0.02; t(72)=1.71, P=0.09). Decreases in depressive symptoms in the two treatment groups correlated with decreases of IL-6 (r=.28, P <.05). None of the other cellular markers of inflammation changed in TCC vs. HE. CONCLUSION TCC can be considered a useful behavioral intervention to reduce circulating levels of IL-6 in older adults who show elevated levels of this inflammatory marker and are at risk for inflammation-related morbidity. PMID:21934474

  9. Modular design of artificial tissue homeostasis: robust control through synthetic cellular heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Miles; Hafner, Marc; Sontag, Eduardo; Davidsohn, Noah; Subramanian, Sairam; Purnick, Priscilla E M; Lauffenburger, Douglas; Weiss, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology efforts have largely focused on small engineered gene networks, yet understanding how to integrate multiple synthetic modules and interface them with endogenous pathways remains a challenge. Here we present the design, system integration, and analysis of several large scale synthetic gene circuits for artificial tissue homeostasis. Diabetes therapy represents a possible application for engineered homeostasis, where genetically programmed stem cells maintain a steady population of β-cells despite continuous turnover. We develop a new iterative process that incorporates modular design principles with hierarchical performance optimization targeted for environments with uncertainty and incomplete information. We employ theoretical analysis and computational simulations of multicellular reaction/diffusion models to design and understand system behavior, and find that certain features often associated with robustness (e.g., multicellular synchronization and noise attenuation) are actually detrimental for tissue homeostasis. We overcome these problems by engineering a new class of genetic modules for 'synthetic cellular heterogeneity' that function to generate beneficial population diversity. We design two such modules (an asynchronous genetic oscillator and a signaling throttle mechanism), demonstrate their capacity for enhancing robust control, and provide guidance for experimental implementation with various computational techniques. We found that designing modules for synthetic heterogeneity can be complex, and in general requires a framework for non-linear and multifactorial analysis. Consequently, we adapt a 'phenotypic sensitivity analysis' method to determine how functional module behaviors combine to achieve optimal system performance. We ultimately combine this analysis with Bayesian network inference to extract critical, causal relationships between a module's biochemical rate-constants, its high level functional behavior in isolation, and

  10. Spatiotemporal effects of a controlled-release anti-inflammatory drug on the cellular dynamics of host response

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Tram T.; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; Bogatyrev, Said R.; Chen, Xiao Y.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    In general, biomaterials induce a non-specific host response when implanted in the body. This reaction has the potential to interfere with the function of the implanted materials. One method for controlling the host response is through local, controlled release of anti-inflammatory agents. Herein, we investigate the spatial and temporal effects of an anti-inflammatory drug on the cellular dynamics of the innate immune response to subcutaneously implanted poly(lactic-co-glycolic) microparticles. Noninvasive fluorescence imaging was used to investigate the influence of dexamethasone drug loading and release kinetics on the local and systemic inhibition of inflammatory cellular activities. Temporal monitoring of host response showed that inhibition of inflammatory proteases in the early phase was correlated with decreased cellular infiltration in the later phase of the foreign body response. We believe that using controlled-release anti-inflammatory platforms to modulate early cellular dynamics will be useful in reducing the foreign body response to implanted biomaterials and medical devices. PMID:21429573

  11. Glutamine activates STAT3 to control cancer cell proliferation independently of glutamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cacace, A; Sboarina, M; Vazeille, T; Sonveaux, P

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cells can use a variety of metabolic substrates to fulfill the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of their oncogenic program. Besides bioenergetics, cancer cell metabolism also directly influences genetic, epigenetic and signaling events associated with tumor progression. Many cancer cells are addicted to glutamine, and this addiction is observed in oxidative as well as in glycolytic cells. Although both oxidative and bioreductive glutamine metabolism can contribute to cancer progression and glutamine can further serve to generate peptides (including glutathione) and proteins, we report that glutamine promotes the proliferation of cancer cells independently of its use as a metabolic fuel or as a precursor of glutathione. Extracellular glutamine activates transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is necessary and sufficient to mediate the proliferative effects of glutamine on glycolytic and oxidative cancer cells. Glutamine also activates transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1, mammalian target of rapamycin and c-Myc, but these factors do not mediate the effects of glutamine on cancer cell proliferation. Our findings shed a new light on the anticancer effects of l-asparaginase that possesses glutaminase activity and converts glutamine into glutamate extracellularly. Conversely, cancer resistance to treatments that block glutamine metabolism could arise from glutamine-independent STAT3 reactivation.

  12. Decreased UDP-GlcNAc levels abrogate proliferation control in EMeg32-deficient cells

    PubMed Central

    Boehmelt, Guido; Wakeham, Andrew; Elia, Andrew; Sasaki, Takehiko; Plyte, Sue; Potter, Julia; Yang, Yingju; Tsang, Eric; Ruland, Jürgen; Iscove, Norman N.; Dennis, James W.; Mak, Tak W.

    2000-01-01

    The hexosamine pathway provides UDP-N-acetylhexosamine donor substrates used in cytosolic and Golgi-mediated glycosylation of proteins and for formation of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors, which tether proteins to the outer plasma membrane. We have recently identified the murine glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) acetyltransferase, EMeg32, as a developmentally regulated enzyme on the route to UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc). Here we describe embryos and cells that have the EMeg32 gene inactivated by homologous recombination. Homozygous mutant embryos die at around embryonic day (E) 7.5 with a general proliferative delay of development. In vitro differentiated EMeg32–/– ES cells show reduced proliferation. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for EMeg32 exhibit defects in proliferation and adhesiveness, which could be complemented by stable re-expression of EMeg32 or by nutritional restoration of intracellular UDP-GlcNAc levels. Reduced UDP-GlcNAc levels predominantly translated into decreased O-GlcNAc modifications of cytosolic and nuclear proteins. Interestingly, growth-impaired EMeg32–/– MEFs withstand a number of apoptotic stimuli and express activated PKB/AKT. Thus, EMeg32-dependent UDP-GlcNAc levels influence cell cycle progression and susceptibility to apoptotic stimuli. PMID:11013212

  13. Loss of TRPV2 Homeostatic Control of Cell Proliferation Drives Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Liberati, Sonia; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Amantini, Consuelo; Farfariello, Valerio; Santoni, Matteo; Conti, Alessandro; Nabissi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; Santoni, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Herein we evaluate the involvement of the TRPV2 channel, belonging to the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid channel family (TRPVs), in development and progression of different tumor types. In normal cells, the activation of TRPV2 channels by growth factors, hormones, and endocannabinoids induces a translocation of the receptor from the endosomal compartment to the plasma membrane, which results in abrogation of cell proliferation and induction of cell death. Consequently, loss or inactivation of TRPV2 signaling (e.g., glioblastomas), induces unchecked proliferation, resistance to apoptotic signals and increased resistance to CD95-induced apoptotic cell death. On the other hand, in prostate cancer cells, Ca2+-dependent activation of TRPV2 induced by lysophospholipids increases the invasion of tumor cells. In addition, the progression of prostate cancer to the castration-resistant phenotype is characterized by de novo TRPV2 expression, with higher TRPV2 transcript levels in patients with metastatic cancer. Finally, TRPV2 functional expression in tumor cells can also depend on the presence of alternative splice variants of TRPV2 mRNA that act as dominant-negative mutant of wild-type TRPV2 channels, by inhibiting its trafficking and translocation to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, as TRP channels are altered in human cancers, and their blockage impair tumor progression, they appear to be a very promising targets for early diagnosis and chemotherapy. PMID:24709905

  14. The PDK1–Rsk Signaling Pathway Controls Langerhans Cell Proliferation and Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Zaru, Rossana; Matthews, Stephen P.; Edgar, Alexander J.; Prescott, Alan R.; Gomez-Nicola, Diego; Hanauer, André

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LC), the dendritic cells of the epidermis, are distributed in a distinctive regularly spaced array. In the mouse, the LC array is established in the first few days of life from proliferating local precursors, but the regulating signaling pathways are not fully understood. We found that mice lacking the kinase phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 selectively lack LC. Deletion of the phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 target kinases, ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (Rsk1) and Rsk2, produced a striking perturbation in the LC network: LC density was reduced 2-fold, but LC size was increased by the same magnitude. Reduced LC numbers in Rsk1/2−/− mice was not due to accelerated emigration from the skin but rather to reduced proliferation at least in adults. Rsk1/2 were required for normal LC patterning in neonates, but not when LC were ablated in adults and replaced by bone marrow–derived cells. Increased LC size was an intrinsic response to reduced LC numbers, reversible on LC emigration, and could be observed in wild type epidermis where LC size also correlated inversely with LC density. Our results identify a key signaling pathway needed to establish a normal LC network and suggest that LC might maintain epidermal surveillance by increasing their “footprint” when their numbers are limited. PMID:26401001

  15. Epithelial Proliferation on Curved Toroidal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Cruz, Ricardo; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros; Marquez, Samantha; Garcia, Andres; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Cellular environment influences a multitude of cellular functions by providing chemical and physical signals that modulate cell behavior, dynamics, development, and eventually survival. In strongly interacting epithelial cells, cells coordinate their behavior to respond to mechanical constraints in 2D. Local differences in tissue tension has also been shown to impact cell reproduction within an epithelial-cell sheet. Much less is known about how cells respond to out-of-plane curvatures. Here, we describe the proliferation of MDCK on toroidal hydrogel substrates, which unlike spheres or planes, have regions of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. Additionally, the range of curvatures can be controlled by varying the size and aspect ratio of the torus, allowing us to quantify the relation between substrate curvature and cell proliferation.

  16. Development of mechano-responsive polymeric scaffolds using functionalized silica nano-fillers for the control of cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michelle; Nayyer, Leila; Butler, Peter E; Palgrave, Robert G; Seifalian, Alexander M; Kalaskar, Deepak M

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate an efficient method to produce mechano-responsive polymeric scaffolds which can alter cellular functions using two different functionalized (OH and NH2) silica nano-fillers. Fumed silica-hydroxyl and fumed silica-amine nano-fillers were mixed with a biocompatible polymer (POSS-PCU) at various wt% to produce scaffolds. XPS and mechanical testing demonstrate that bulk mechanical properties are modified without changing the scaffold's surface chemistry. Mechanical testing showed significant change in bulk properties of POSS-PCU scaffolds with an addition of silica nanofillers as low as 1% (P<0.01). Scaffolds modified with NH2 silica showed significantly higher bulk mechanical properties compared to the one modified with the OH group. Enhanced cell adhesion, proliferation and collagen production over 14days were observed on scaffolds with higher bulk mechanical properties (NH2) compared to those with lower ones (unmodified and OH modified) (P<0.05) during in vitro analysis. This study provides an effective method of manufacturing mechano-responsive polymeric scaffolds, which can help to customize cellular responses for biomaterial applications.

  17. Estrogen controls embryonic stem cell proliferation via store-operated calcium entry and the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT).

    PubMed

    Wong, Chun-Kit; So, Wing-Yan; Law, Sau-Kwan; Leung, Fung-Ping; Yau, Ka-Long; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Yu; Li, Xiangdong; Tsang, Suk-Ying

    2012-06-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can self-renew indefinitely and differentiate into all cell lineages. Calcium is a universal second messenger which regulates a number of cellular pathways. Previous studies showed that store-operated calcium channels (SOCCs) but not voltage-operated calcium channels are present in mouse ESCs (mESCs). In this study, store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) was found to exist in mESCs using confocal microscopy. SOCC blockers lanthanum, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and SKF-96365 reduced mESC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that SOCE is important for ESC proliferation. Pluripotent markers, Sox-2, Klf-4, and Nanog, were down-regulated by 2-APB, suggesting that self-renewal property of mESCs relies on SOCE. 17β-estradiol (E2) enhanced mESC proliferation. This enhanced proliferation was associated with an increment of SOCE. Both stimulated proliferation and increased SOCE could be reversed by SOCC blockers suggesting that E2 mediates its stimulatory effect on proliferation via enhancing SOCE. Also, cyclosporin A and INCA-6, inhibitors of calcineurin [phosphatase that de-phosphorylates and activates nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT)], reversed the proliferative effect of E2, indicating that NFAT is involved in E2-stimulated proliferation. Interestingly, E2 caused the nuclear translocation of NFATc4, and this could be reversed by 2-APB. These results suggested that NFATc4 is the downstream target of E2-induced SOCE. The present investigation provides the first line of evidence that SOCE and NFAT are crucial for ESCs to maintain their unique characteristics. In addition, the present investigation also provides novel information on the mechanisms of how E2, an important female sex hormone, affects ESC proliferation.

  18. A Regulatory Mechanism Involving TBP-1/Tat-Binding Protein 1 and Akt/PKB in the Control of Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tolino, Fabio; Bellucci, Luca; Sisto, Luca; Alfano, Daniela; Ragno, Pia; Calabrò, Viola; de Franciscis, Vittorio; La Mantia, Girolama; Pollice, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    TBP-1 /Tat-Binding Protein 1 (also named Rpt-5, S6a or PSMC3) is a multifunctional protein, originally identified as a regulator of HIV-1-Tat mediated transcription. It is an AAA-ATPase component of the 19S regulative subunit of the proteasome and, as other members of this protein family, fulfils different cellular functions including proteolysis and transcriptional regulation. We and others reported that over expression of TBP-1 diminishes cell proliferation in different cellular contexts with mechanisms yet to be defined. Accordingly, we demonstrated that TBP-1 binds to and stabilizes the p14ARF oncosuppressor increasing its anti-oncogenic functions. However, TBP-1 restrains cell proliferation also in the absence of ARF, raising the question of what are the molecular pathways involved. Herein we demonstrate that stable knock-down of TBP-1 in human immortalized fibroblasts increases cell proliferation, migration and resistance to apoptosis induced by serum deprivation. We observe that TBP-1 silencing causes activation of the Akt/PKB kinase and that in turn TBP-1, itself, is a downstream target of Akt/PKB. Moreover, MDM2, a known Akt target, plays a major role in this regulation. Altogether, our data suggest the existence of a negative feedback loop involving Akt/PKB that might act as a sensor to modulate TBP-1 levels in proliferating cells. PMID:21991300

  19. Signals for the lysosome: a control center for cellular clearance and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Settembre, Carmine; Fraldi, Alessandro; Medina, Diego L.

    2015-01-01

    Preface For a long time lysosomes were considered merely to be cellular “incinerators” involved in the degradation and recycling of cellular waste. However, there is now compelling evidence indicating that lysosomes have a much broader function and that they are involved in fundamental processes such as secretion, plasma membrane repair, signaling and energy metabolism. Furthermore, the essential role of lysosomes in the autophagic pathway puts these organelles at the crossroads of several cellular processes, with significant implications for health and disease. The identification of a master gene, transcription factor EB (TFEB), that regulates lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy, has revealed how the lysosome adapts to environmental cues, such as starvation, and suggests novel therapeutic strategies for modulating lysosomal function in human disease. PMID:23609508

  20. Selective control of human glioma cell proliferation by specific cell interaction.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, C M; Freshney, R I; Hart, E; Graham, D I

    1985-01-01

    Cells cultured from anaplastic astrocytoma (Kernohan and Sayre, grades III and IV) will proliferate on confluent monolayers of normal glia, while cells cultured from normal brain will not. The growth of a cell line containing a high proportion of well-differentiated glioma cells (G-CCM) was partially inhibited, though not as much as normal glia, while the growth of a cell line made up of less differentiated cells (G-UVW) was enhanced by the normal glia. Although non-glial confluent monolayers also inhibited the growth of normal glia, this was less specific, as one normal glial line (N-DUT) grew on fibroblasts and intestinal epithelium, although it was unable to do so on normal glia. It is suggested that this may be a useful method for examining reduced density limitation of growth, discriminating between normal and malignant glia, and for separating glioma cells from contaminating normal cells.

  1. Autophagy and modular restructuring of metabolism control germline tumor differentiation and proliferation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ligia C; Odedra, Devang; Dikic, Ivan; Pohl, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy can act either as a tumor suppressor or as a survival mechanism for established tumors. To understand how autophagy plays this dual role in cancer, in vivo models are required. By using a highly heterogeneous C. elegans germline tumor, we show that autophagy-related proteins are expressed in a specific subset of tumor cells, neurons. Inhibition of autophagy impairs neuronal differentiation and increases tumor cell number, resulting in a shorter life span of animals with tumors, while induction of autophagy extends their life span by impairing tumor proliferation. Fasting of animals with fully developed tumors leads to a doubling of their life span, which depends on modular changes in transcription including switches in transcription factor networks and mitochondrial metabolism. Hence, our results suggest that metabolic restructuring, cell-type specific regulation of autophagy and neuronal differentiation constitute central pathways preventing growth of heterogeneous tumors.

  2. MicroRNA-222 Controls Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line Capan-2 Proliferation by P57 Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yingying; Wang, Yuqiong; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Jingqi; Song, Yang; Cao, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Wenzhuo; Wang, Fei; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhaoshen; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers and has a poor prognosis due to late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic multimodality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are a group of non-coding, small RNAs with active biological activities. In our investigation, human pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-2 were transfected with miR-222 mimics, inhibitors or their negative controls. Cell proliferation was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), EdU incorporation assay and cell cycle determination by flow cytometry. MiR-222 and putative target gene expression levels including p27, p57 and PTEN were determined using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions and Western blotting. Our results showed that miR-222 could lead to increased vitality and proliferative rate of Capan-2 cells, and also higher S-phase and lower G1-phase of cell cycle. Further, we found p57 at protein level, but not p27 nor PTEN, was regulated by miR-222 in Capan-2 cells. Finally, we co-transfected miR-222 inhibitor and p57 si-RNA into Capan-2 cells, and found that proliferation-suppressing effects of miR-222 inhibitor on Capan-2 cells could be partially reversed by silencing p57. Our results indicate that miR-222 controls Capan-2 cell proliferation by targeting p57. This study provides a novel idea for developing effective therapeutic strategy for PC patients through inhibiting miR-222. PMID:26535064

  3. CLAVATA1 controls distinct signaling outputs that buffer shoot stem cell proliferation through a two-step transcriptional compensation loop

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The regulation of stem cell proliferation in plants is controlled by intercellular signaling pathways driven by the diffusible CLAVATA3 (CLV3p) peptide. CLV3p perception is thought to be mediated by an overlapping array of receptors in the stem cell niche including the transmembrane receptor kinase CLV1, Receptor-Like Protein Kinase 2 (RPK2), and a dimer of the receptor-like protein CLV2 and the CORYNE (CRN) pseudokinase. Mutations in these receptors have qualitatively similar effects on stem cell function but it is unclear if this represents common or divergent signaling outputs. Previous work in heterologous systems has suggested that CLV1, RPK2 and CLV2/CRN could form higher order complexes but it is also unclear what relevance these putative complexes have to in vivo receptor functions. Here I use the in vivo regulation of a specific transcriptional target of CLV1 signaling in Arabidopsis to demonstrate that, despite the phenotypic similarities between the different receptor mutants, CLV1 controls distinct signaling outputs in living stem cell niches independent of other receptors. This regulation is separable from stem cell proliferation driven by WUSCHEL, a proposed common transcriptional target of CLV3p signaling. In addition, in the absence of CLV1, CLV1-related receptor kinases are ectopically expressed but also buffer stem cell proliferation through the auto-repression of their own expression. Collectively these data reveal a unique in vivo role for CLV1 separable from other stem cell receptors and provides a framework for dissecting the signaling outputs in stem cell regulation. PMID:28355208

  4. Inhibitory role of ERβ on anterior pituitary cell proliferation by controlling the expression of proteins related to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Pablo A; Petiti, Juan P; Wagner, Ignacio A; Sabatino, Maria E; Sasso, Corina V; De Paul, Ana L; Torres, Alicia I; Gutiérrez, Silvina

    2015-11-05

    Considering that the role of ERβ in the growth of pituitary cells is not well known, the aim of this work was to determine the expression of ERβ in normal and tumoral cells and to investigate its implications in the proliferative control of this endocrine gland, by analyzing the participation of cyclin D1, Cdk4 and p21. Our results showed that the expression of ERβ decreased during pituitary tumoral development induced by chronic E2 stimulation. The 20 ± 1.6% of normal adenohypophyseal cells expressed ERβ, with this protein being reduced in the hyperplastic/adenomatous pituitary: at 20 days the ERβ+ population was 10.7 ± 2.2%, while after 40 and 60 days of treatment an almost complete loss in the ERβ expression was observed (40 d: 1 ± 0.6%; 60 d: 2 ± 0.6%). The ERα/β ratio increased starting from tumors at 40 days, mainly due to the loss of ERβ expression. The cell proliferation was analyzed in normal and hyperplastic pituitary and also in GH3β- and GH3β+ which contained different levels of ERβ expression, and therefore different ERα/β ratios. The over-expression of ERβ inhibited the GH3 cell proliferation and expression of cyclin D1 and ERα. Also, the ERβ activation by its agonist DPN changed the subcellular localization of p21, inducing an increase in the p21 nuclear expression, where it acts as a tumoral suppressor. These results show that ERβ exerts an inhibitory role on pituitary cell proliferation, and that this effect may be partially due to the modulation of some key regulators of the cell cycle, such as cyclin D1 and p21. These data contribute significantly to the understanding of the ER effects in the proliferative control of pituitary gland, specifically related to the ERβ function in the E2 actions on this endocrine gland.

  5. MicroRNA-222 Controls Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line Capan-2 Proliferation by P57 Targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingying; Wang, Yuqiong; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Jingqi; Song, Yang; Cao, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Wenzhuo; Wang, Fei; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhaoshen; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers and has a poor prognosis due to late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic multimodality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are a group of non-coding, small RNAs with active biological activities. In our investigation, human pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-2 were transfected with miR-222 mimics, inhibitors or their negative controls. Cell proliferation was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), EdU incorporation assay and cell cycle determination by flow cytometry. MiR-222 and putative target gene expression levels including p27, p57 and PTEN were determined using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions and Western blotting. Our results showed that miR-222 could lead to increased vitality and proliferative rate of Capan-2 cells, and also higher S-phase and lower G1-phase of cell cycle. Further, we found p57 at protein level, but not p27 nor PTEN, was regulated by miR-222 in Capan-2 cells. Finally, we co-transfected miR-222 inhibitor and p57 si-RNA into Capan-2 cells, and found that proliferation-suppressing effects of miR-222 inhibitor on Capan-2 cells could be partially reversed by silencing p57. Our results indicate that miR-222 controls Capan-2 cell proliferation by targeting p57. This study provides a novel idea for developing effective therapeutic strategy for PC patients through inhibiting miR-222.

  6. ΔNp63α regulates keratinocyte proliferation by controlling PTEN expression and localization.

    PubMed

    Leonard, M K; Kommagani, R; Payal, V; Mayo, L D; Shamma, H N; Kadakia, M P

    2011-12-01

    ΔNp63α, implicated as an oncogene, is upregulated by activated Akt, part of a well-known cell survival pathway. Inhibition of Akt activation by phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) and the presence of putative p63-binding sites in the pten promoter led us to investigate whether ΔNp63α regulates PTEN expression. Knockdown of ΔNp63α led to increases in PTEN levels and loss of activated Akt, while overexpression of ΔNp63α decreased PTEN levels and elevated active Akt. The repression of PTEN by ΔNp63α occurs independently of p53 status, as loss of ΔNp63α increases PTEN expression in cell lines with and without functional p53. In addition, decreased levels of ΔNp63α resulted in an increase in nuclear PTEN. Conversely, in vivo nuclear PTEN was absent in the proliferative basal layer of the epidermis where ΔNp63α expression is highest. Additionally, we show that in keratinocytes a balance between ΔNp63α and PTEN regulates Akt activation and maintains normal proliferation rates. This balance is disrupted in non-melanoma skin cancers through increased ΔNp63α levels, and could enhance proliferation and subsequent neoplastic development. Our studies show that ΔNp63α negatively regulates PTEN, thereby providing a feedback loop between PTEN, Akt and ΔNp63α, which has an integral role in skin cancer development.

  7. Conducting polymer scaffolds for electrical control of cellular functions (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inal, Sahika; Wan, Alwin M.; Williams, Tiffany V.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Fischbach-Teschl, Claudia; Gourdon, Delphine; Owens, Róisín. M.; Malliaras, George G.

    2016-09-01

    Considering the limited physiological relevance of 2D cell culture experiments, significant effort was devoted to the development of materials that could more accurately recreate the in vivo cellular microenvironment, and support 3D cell cultures in vitro. (1) One such class of materials is conducting polymers, which are promising due to their compliant mechanical properties, compatibility with biological systems, mixed electrical and ionic conductivity, and ability to form porous structures. (2) In this work, we report the fabrication of a single component, macroporous scaffold made from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) via an ice-templating method. (3) PEDOT:PSS scaffolds offer tunable pore size, morphology and shape through facile changes in preparation conditions, and are capable of supporting 3D cell cultures due to their biocompatibility and tissue-like elasticity. Moreover, these materials are functional: they exhibit excellent electrochemical switching behavior and significantly lower impedance compared to films. Their electrochemical activity enables their use in the active channel of a state of the art diagnostic tool in the field of bioelectronics, i.e., the organic electrochemical transistor (OECT). The inclusion of cells within the porous architecture affects the impedance of the electrically-conducting polymer network and, thus, may be used as a method to quantify cell growth. The adhesion and pro-angiogenic secretions of mouse fibroblasts cultured within the scaffolds can be controlled by switching the electrochemical state of the polymer prior to cell-seeding. In summary, these smart materials hold promise not only as extracellular matrix-mimicking structures for cell culture, but also as high-performance bioelectronic tools for diagnostic and signaling applications. References [1] M. Holzwarth, P. X. Ma, Journal of Materials Chemistry, 21, 10243-10251 (2011). [2] L. H. Jimison, J. Rivnay, R. M. Owens, in Organic

  8. A general formalism for tissue morphogenesis based on cellular dynamics and control system interactions.

    PubMed

    Forest, Loïc; Demongeot, Jacques

    2008-06-01

    Morphogenesis is a key process in developmental biology. An important issue is the understanding of the generation of shape and cellular organisation in tissues. Despite of their great diversity, morphogenetic processes share common features. This work is an attempt to describe this diversity using the same formalism based on a cellular description. Tissue is seen as a multi-cellular system whose behaviour is the result of all constitutive cells dynamics. Morphogenesis is then considered as a spatiotemporal organization of cells activities. We show how this formalism relies on Reaction-Diffusion/Positional Information approach and how it permits to generalize its modelling possibilities. Three quite different applications for concrete morphogenetic processes are presented. The first one is a model for epithelial invagination, the second is a model of cellular differentiation by local cell-cell signalling. The last example is the secondary radial growth of conifer trees. From the mathematical point of view, different modelling tools are used according to the specificity of each process.

  9. ErbB3 binding protein-1 (Ebp1) controls proliferation and myogenic differentiation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Figeac, Nicolas; Serralbo, Olivier; Marcelle, Christophe; Zammit, Peter S

    2014-02-01

    Satellite cells are resident stem cells of skeletal muscle, supplying myoblasts for post-natal muscle growth, hypertrophy and repair. Many regulatory networks control satellite cell function, which includes EGF signalling via the ErbB family of receptors. Here we investigated the role of ErbB3 binding protein-1 (Ebp1) in regulation of myogenic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Ebp1 is a well-conserved DNA/RNA binding protein that is implicated in cell growth, apoptosis and differentiation in many cell types. Of the two main Ebp1 isoforms, only p48 was expressed in satellite cells and C2C12 myoblasts. Although not present in quiescent satellite cells, p48 was strongly induced during activation, remaining at high levels during proliferation and differentiation. While retroviral-mediated over-expression of Ebp1 had only minor effects, siRNA-mediated Ebp1 knockdown inhibited both proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells and C2C12 myoblasts, with a clear failure of myotube formation. Ebp1-knockdown significantly reduced ErbB3 receptor levels, yet over-expression of ErbB3 in Ebp1 knockdown cells did not rescue differentiation. Ebp1 was also expressed by muscle cells during developmental myogenesis in mouse. Since Ebp1 is well-conserved between mouse and chick, we switched to chick to examine its role in muscle formation. In chick embryo, Ebp1 was expressed in the dermomyotome, and myogenic differentiation of muscle progenitors was inhibited by specific Ebp1 down-regulation using shRNA electroporation. These observations demonstrate a conserved function of Ebp1 in the regulation of embryonic muscle progenitors and adult muscle stem cells, which likely operates independently of ErbB3 signaling.

  10. Quality control of extracorporeal photochemotherapy: Proliferation assay using CFSE validated according to ISO 15189:2007 standards.

    PubMed

    Lionel, Faivre; Lucie, Lecouflet; Wang-Qing, Liu; Isabelle, Khadher; Camille, Lahaie; Michel, Vidal; Sabine, Legouvello; Jean-Louis, Beaumont; Philippe, Bierling; Hélène, Rouard; Brigitte, Birebent

    2014-09-01

    Background: For the last 40 years, the technique of extracorporeal photopheresis has constantly developed. Among irradiation systems, those called 'off-line' allow the validation of the quality of the cell therapy product. The inhibition of the proliferation of lymphocytes after UVA irradiation is usually verified by the tritiated thymidine assay as in vitro proliferation assay. The document presented here describes the results obtained while performing the setting up of an alternative proliferation assay using flow cytometry according to ISO 15189:2007 Standard. Methods: Cells samples taken before and after UVA irradiation were labeled with CFSE and then cultured with phytohemagglutinin. After 3 days, an analysis of the CFSE staining was realized by flow cytometry. In order to validate the shift in the method used according to Standard, the following tests were performed: 1) comparison with the reference method, 2) robustness test, 3) reagents stability. Results: Comparison method demonstrated that the sensitivity of the CFSE test is 100%, the specificity is 89% and the concordance is almost complete. The CFSE test is robust regarding parameters like cell concentration or PHA concentration. PHA and CFSE are stable for 6 months and one year, respectively. Conclusion: Validation of this alternative test, according to the ISO 15189:2007 Standard, has demonstrated good concordance with reference method. The results of the robustness and stability of reagents are appropriate for its routine use. Thus, the benefits of alternative technique make it a wise choice for the quality control of ECP in a cell therapy laboratory. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  11. Cellular phone use and risk of benign and malignant parotid gland tumors--a nationwide case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sadetzki, Siegal; Chetrit, Angela; Jarus-Hakak, Avital; Cardis, Elisabeth; Deutch, Yonit; Duvdevani, Shay; Zultan, Ahuva; Novikov, Ilya; Freedman, Laurence; Wolf, Michael

    2008-02-15

    The objective of this nationwide study was to assess the association between cellular phone use and development of parotid gland tumors (PGTs). The methods were based on the international INTERPHONE study that aimed to evaluate possible adverse effects of cellular phone use. The study included 402 benign and 58 malignant incident cases of PGTs diagnosed in Israel at age 18 years or more, in 2001-2003, and 1,266 population individually matched controls. For the entire group, no increased risk of PGTs was observed for ever having been a regular cellular phone user (odds ratio = 0.87; p = 0.3) or for any other measure of exposure investigated. However, analysis restricted to regular users or to conditions that may yield higher levels of exposure (e.g., heavy use in rural areas) showed consistently elevated risks. For ipsilateral use, the odds ratios in the highest category of cumulative number of calls and call time without use of hands-free devices were 1.58 (95% confidence interval: 1.11, 2.24) and 1.49 (95% confidence interval: 1.05, 2.13), respectively. The risk for contralateral use was not significantly different from 1. A positive dose-response trend was found for these measurements. Based on the largest number of benign PGT patients reported to date, our results suggest an association between cellular phone use and PGTs.

  12. Microcephaly gene links Trithorax and REST/NRSF to control neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yawei J.; Baltus, Andrew E.; Mathew, Rebecca S.; Murphy, Elisabeth A.; Evrony, Gilad D.; Gonzalez, Dilenny M.; Wang, Estee P.; Marshall-Walker, Christine A.; Barry, Brenda J.; Murn, Jernej; Tatarakis, Antonis; Mahajan, Muktar A.; Samuels, Herbert H.; Shi, Yang; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Shenhav, Ruthie; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Microcephaly is a neurodevelopmental disorder causing significantly reduced cerebral cortex size. Many known microcephaly gene products localize to centrosomes, regulating cell fate and proliferation. Here, we identify and characterize a nuclear zinc finger protein, ZNF335/NIF-1, as a causative gene for severe microcephaly, small somatic size, and neonatal death. Znf335-null mice are embryonically lethal and conditional knockout leads to severely reduced cortical size. RNA-interference and postmortem human studies show that Znf335 is essential for neural progenitor self-renewal, neurogenesis, and neuronal differentiation. ZNF335 is a component of a vertebrate-specific, trithorax H3K4-methylation complex, directly regulating REST/NRSF, a master regulator of neural gene expression and cell fate, as well as other essential neural-specific genes. Our results reveal ZNF335 as an essential link between H3K4 complexes and REST/NRSF, and provide the first direct genetic evidence that this pathway regulates human neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. PMID:23178126

  13. Nuclear Control of the Inflammatory Response in Mammals by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mandard, Stéphane; Patsouris, David

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of a very large number of biological processes including inflammation. Using specific examples, this paper focuses on the interplay between PPARs and innate immunity/inflammation and, when possible, compares it among species. We focus on recent discoveries establishing how inflammation and PPARs interact in the context of obesity-induced inflammation and type 2 diabetes, mostly in mouse and humans. We illustrate that PPARγ ability to alleviate obesity-associated inflammation raises an interesting pharmacologic potential. In the light of recent findings, the protective role of PPARα and PPARβ/δ against the hepatic inflammatory response is also addressed. While PPARs agonists are well-established agents that can treat numerous inflammatory issues in rodents and humans, surprisingly very little has been described in other species. We therefore also review the implication of PPARs in inflammatory bowel disease; acute-phase response; and central, cardiac, and endothelial inflammation and compare it along different species (mainly mouse, rat, human, and pig). In the light of the data available in the literature, there is no doubt that more studies concerning the impact of PPAR ligands in livestock should be undertaken because it may finally raise unconsidered health and sanitary benefits. PMID:23577023

  14. A paradigm shift in neurobiology: peripheral nerves deliver cellular material and control development.

    PubMed

    Ivashkin, Evgeny; Voronezhskaya, Elena E; Adameyko, Igor

    2014-10-01

    Living beings are extremely complex. Multiple structures, especially evolutionarily young ones, develop or take their final shape during late stages of embryonic development, when the body of an embryo is large and comprised of a huge number of cells. Yet, these late structures frequently need cellular sources from other locations and, sometimes, developmental stages. During recent years it became obvious that nerves provide a perfect solution for transporting and hosting multipotent cells that are later recruited to become new cellular sources in the innervated organs. Moreover, the role of nerves and nerve-dwelling cells in morphogenesis and regeneration seems to be much broader than was previously appreciated in invertebrate and vertebrate animals. In a broader view, nerves can provide material for morphological plasticity and evolutional diversity.

  15. JAK/STAT signaling in Drosophila muscles controls the cellular immune response against parasitoid infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hairu; Kronhamn, Jesper; Ekström, Jens-Ola; Korkut, Gül Gizem; Hultmark, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The role of JAK/STAT signaling in the cellular immune response of Drosophila is not well understood. Here, we show that parasitoid wasp infection activates JAK/STAT signaling in somatic muscles of the Drosophila larva, triggered by secretion of the cytokines Upd2 and Upd3 from circulating hemocytes. Deletion of upd2 or upd3, but not the related os (upd1) gene, reduced the cellular immune response, and suppression of the JAK/STAT pathway in muscle cells reduced the encapsulation of wasp eggs and the number of circulating lamellocyte effector cells. These results suggest that JAK/STAT signaling in muscles participates in a systemic immune defense against wasp infection.

  16. A critical role for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) in the cellular fasting response: the PPARalpha-null mouse as a model of fatty acid oxidation disorders.

    PubMed

    Leone, T C; Weinheimer, C J; Kelly, D P

    1999-06-22

    We hypothesized that the lipid-activated transcription factor, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), plays a pivotal role in the cellular metabolic response to fasting. Short-term starvation caused hepatic steatosis, myocardial lipid accumulation, and hypoglycemia, with an inadequate ketogenic response in adult mice lacking PPARalpha (PPARalpha-/-), a phenotype that bears remarkable similarity to that of humans with genetic defects in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation enzymes. In PPARalpha+/+ mice, fasting induced the hepatic and cardiac expression of PPARalpha target genes encoding key mitochondrial (medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase I) and extramitochondrial (acyl-CoA oxidase, cytochrome P450 4A3) enzymes. In striking contrast, the hepatic and cardiac expression of most PPARalpha target genes was not induced by fasting in PPARalpha-/- mice. These results define a critical role for PPARalpha in a transcriptional regulatory response to fasting and identify the PPARalpha-/- mouse as a potentially useful murine model of inborn and acquired abnormalities of human fatty acid utilization.

  17. Role of interleukin-1beta in the control of neuroepithelial proliferation and differentiation of the spinal cord during development.

    PubMed

    de la Mano, A; Gato, A; Alonso, M I; Carnicero, E; Martín, C; Moro, J A

    2007-02-01

    Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is an important trophic factor in the nervous system (NS). IL-1beta is ubiquitously expressed from very early stages during the development of the amphibian NS and its action has been demonstrated in vitro on survival, proliferation and differentiation in mammalian embryos. In this report, we show that IL-1beta is immunocytochemically expressed in embryonic spinal cord from early stages, both in rat (embryonic day 12) and in chicken (stage 17-HH), in neuroepithelial cells and nerve fibres, dorsal root ganglia, anterior and posterior roots of the spinal nerves, and in the fibres of these nerves. Our in vivo experiments on chick embryos, with microbeads impregnated with IL-1beta implanted laterally to the spinal cord at the level of the wing anlage, demonstrate that this cytokine produces a statistically significant increase in nuclear incorporation of BrdU at the dorsal level and a reduction of this at the ventral level, whereas local immunoblocking with anti-IL-1beta antibodies causes a dorsal reduction of BrdU incorporation and alters ventral differentiation. These data demonstrate that IL-1beta plays a part in controlling proliferation and early differentiation during the development of the spinal cord in chick embryos.

  18. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA-binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq, we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation.

  19. Differential regulation of cell proliferation in neurogenic zones in mice lacking cystine transport by xCT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Richard R.; Brown, Craig E.; Murphy, Timothy H.

    2007-12-21

    The cystine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) supplies intracellular cyst(e)ine for the production of glutathione, a major cellular anti-oxidant. xCT is enriched in brain regions associated with neurogenesis. Previous studies have shown that the malfunction of this protein greatly attenuates cell proliferation in vitro and is associated with brain atrophy in vivo. Using mice that are homozygous for a function-blocking deletion in xCT (Sut mice), we examined in vivo the role of xCT in cell proliferation in neurogenic regions of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and denate gyrus (DG) in the adult brain. Our results indicate that a high level of cellular proliferation in the adult brain persists even in the absence of functional xCT. Furthermore, in both young adult and middle-aged mice (3 and 11 months old), rates of SVZ cell proliferation were comparable between Sut and wild-type controls, although there was trend towards reduced proliferation in Sut mice (12% and 9% reduction, respectively). To our surprise, rates of cell proliferation in the DG were elevated in both 3- and 11-month-old Sut mice relative to controls (22% and 28% increase, respectively). These results demonstrate that xCT expression plays a role in regulating cellular proliferation in the DG, but not the SVZ of adult mice. Furthermore, unlike previous in vitro studies, our in vivo observations clearly indicate that xCT is not essential for ongoing cellular proliferation.

  20. Cellular insulin resistance disrupts leptin-mediated control of neuronal signaling and transcription.

    PubMed

    Nazarians-Armavil, Anaies; Menchella, Jonathan A; Belsham, Denise D

    2013-06-01

    Central resistance to the actions of insulin and leptin is associated with the onset of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, whereas leptin and insulin signaling is essential for both glucose and energy homeostasis. Although it is known that leptin resistance can lead to attenuated insulin signaling, whether insulin resistance can lead to or exacerbate leptin resistance is unknown. To investigate the molecular events underlying crosstalk between these signaling pathways, immortalized hypothalamic neuronal models, rHypoE-19 and mHypoA-2/10, were used. Prolonged insulin exposure was used to induce cellular insulin resistance, and thereafter leptin-mediated regulation of signal transduction and gene expression was assessed. Leptin directly repressed agouti-related peptide mRNA levels but induced urocortin-2, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1, IRS2, and IR transcription, through leptin-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt activation. Neuronal insulin resistance, as assessed by attenuated Akt phosphorylation, blocked leptin-mediated signal transduction and agouti-related peptide, urocortin-2, IRS1, IRS2, and insulin receptor synthesis. Insulin resistance caused a substantial decrease in insulin receptor protein levels, forkhead box protein 1 phosphorylation, and an increase in suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 protein levels. Cellular insulin resistance may cause or exacerbate neuronal leptin resistance and, by extension, obesity. It is essential to unravel the effects of neuronal insulin resistance given that both peripheral, as well as the less widely studied central insulin resistance, may contribute to the development of metabolic, reproductive, and cardiovascular disorders. This study provides improved understanding of the complex cellular crosstalk between insulin-leptin signal transduction that is disrupted during neuronal insulin resistance.

  1. Monoaminergic control of cellular glucose utilization by glycogenolysis in neocortex and hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Maraviglia, Bruno; Mangia, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Brainstem nuclei are the principal sites of monoamine (MA) innervation to major forebrain structures. In the cortical grey matter, increased secretion of MA neuromodulators occurs in response to a wealth of environmental and homeostatic challenges, whose onset is associated with rapid, preparatory changes in neural activity as well as with increases in energy metabolism. Blood-borne glucose is the main substrate for energy production in the brain. Once entered the tissue, interstitial glucose is equally accessible to neurons and astrocytes, the two cell types accounting for most of cellular volume and energy metabolism in neocortex and hippocampus. Astrocytes also store substantial amounts of glycogen, but non-stimulated glycogen turnover is very small. The rate of cellular glucose utilization in the brain is largely determined by hexokinase, which under basal conditions is more than 90% inhibited by its product glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P). During rapid increases in energy demand, glycogen is a primary candidate in modulating the intracellular level of Glc-6-P, which can occur only in astrocytes. Glycogenolysis can produce Glc-6-P at a rate higher than uptake and phosphorylation of glucose. MA neurotransmitter are released extrasinaptically by brainstem neurons projecting to neocortex and hippocampus, thus activating MA receptors located on both neuronal and astrocytic plasma membrane. Importantly, MAs are glycogenolytic agents and thus they are exquisitely suitable for regulation of astrocytic Glc-6-P concentration, upstream substrate flow through hexokinase and hence cellular glucose uptake. Conforming to such mechanism, Gerald A. Dienel and Nancy F. Cruz recently suggested that activation of noradrenergic locus coeruleus might reversibly block astrocytic glucose uptake by stimulating glycogenolysis in these cells, thereby anticipating the rise in glucose need by active neurons. In this paper, we further develop the idea that the whole monoaminergic system

  2. Monoaminergic Control of Cellular Glucose Utilization by Glycogenolysis in Neocortex and Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Giove, Federico; Maraviglia, Bruno; Mangia, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    Brainstem nuclei are the principal sites of monoamine (MA) innervation to major forebrain structures. In the cortical grey matter, increased secretion of MA neuromodulators occurs in response to a wealth of environmental and homeostatic challenges, whose onset is associated with rapid, preparatory changes in neural activity as well as with increases in energy metabolism. Blood-borne glucose is the main substrate for energy production in the brain. Once entered the tissue, interstitial glucose is equally accessible to neurons and astrocytes, the two cell types accounting for most of cellular volume and energy metabolism in neocortex and hippocampus. Astrocytes also store substantial amounts of glycogen, but non-stimulated glycogen turnover is very small. The rate of cellular glucose utilization in the brain is largely determined by hexokinase, which under basal conditions is more than 90 % inhibited by its product glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P). During rapid increases in energy demand, glycogen is a primary candidate in modulating the intracellular level of Glc-6-P, which can occur only in astrocytes. Glycogenolysis can produce Glc-6-P at a rate higher than uptake and phosphorylation of glucose. MA neurotransmitter are released extrasinaptically by brainstem neurons projecting to neocortex and hippocampus, thus activating MA receptors located on both neuronal and astrocytic plasma membrane. Importantly, MAs are glycogenolytic agents and thus they are exquisitely suitable for regulation of astrocytic Glc-6-P concentration, upstream substrate flow through hexokinase and hence cellular glucose uptake. Conforming to such mechanism, Gerald A. Dienel and Nancy F. Cruz recently suggested that activation of noradrenergic locus coeruleus might reversibly block astrocytic glucose uptake by stimulating glycogenolysis in these cells, thereby anticipating the rise in glucose need by active neurons. In this paper, we further develop the idea that the whole monoaminergic system

  3. Cellular factors controlling neuronal vulnerability in the brain: a lesson from the striatum.

    PubMed

    Calabresi, P; Centonze, D; Bernardi, G

    2000-11-14

    In many acute and chronic neurologic disorders, both deficits in energy metabolism and defects in glutamate-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission have been proposed as important pathogenic factors. Brain cells, however, express variable vulnerability to these insults, as indicated by the fact that certain brain areas and even different cell types in the same area are preferentially spared until the very late stages of various diseases. This can be clearly seen in the striatum, where GABAergic projection cells but not cholinergic interneurons are precociously damaged in the course of both acute metabolic insults (such as hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and ischemia) and chronic neurodegenerative disorders (such as Huntington's disease). A well-mapped pattern of cell loss, in fact, is a common finding in the striatum of patients suffering from these pathologic conditions. Physiologic and molecular studies have been directed in recent years to the identification of the cellular mechanisms underlying the cell-type specific vulnerability of striatal cells. These studied recognized that, in striatal spiny and aspiny cells, specific membrane ion channels, glutamate receptor subtypes and subunits, and intracellular enzymatic activities are involved in the cascade of events responsible for opposite responses and vulnerabilities to oxygen or glucose deprivation and to glutamate receptor-mediated toxicity. Specific molecules able to target these cellular factors might be employed as therapeutic agents during acute and chronic neurologic disorders affecting this brain area.

  4. A circuit-based gatekeeper for adult neural stem cell proliferation: Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons of the dentate gyrus control the activation and proliferation of quiescent adult neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Moss, Jonathan; Toni, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Newborn neurons are generated in the adult hippocampus from a pool of self-renewing stem cells located in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus. Their activation, proliferation, and maturation depend on a host of environmental and cellular factors but, until recently, the contribution of local neuronal circuitry to this process was relatively unknown. In their recent publication, Song and colleagues have uncovered a novel circuit-based mechanism by which release of the neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), from parvalbumin-expressing (PV) interneurons, can hold radial glia-like (RGL) stem cells of the adult SGZ in a quiescent state. This tonic GABAergic signal, dependent upon the activation of γ(2) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors of RGL stem cells, can thus prevent their proliferation and subsequent maturation or return them to quiescence if previously activated. PV interneurons are thus capable of suppressing neurogenesis during periods of high network activity and facilitating neurogenesis when network activity is low.

  5. Imaging Cellular Proliferation During Chemo-Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study of Serial {sup 18}F-FLT Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Everitt, Sarah; Hicks, Rodney J.; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Walter, Tania; Binns, David; Mac Manus, Michael

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To establish whether {sup 18}F-3'-deoxy-3'-fluoro-L-thymidine ({sup 18}F-FLT) can monitor changes in cellular proliferation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during radical chemo-radiotherapy (chemo-RT). Methods and Materials: As part of a prospective pilot study, 5 patients with locally advanced NSCLC underwent serial {sup 18}F-FLT positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans during treatment. Baseline {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT scans were compared with routine staging {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans. Two on-treatment {sup 18}F-FLT scans were performed for each patient on Days 2, 8, 15 or 29, providing a range of time points for response assessment. Results: In all 5 patients, baseline lesional uptake of {sup 18}F-FLT on PET/CT corresponded to staging {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT abnormalities. {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in tumor was observed on five of nine (55%) on-treatment scans, on Days 2, 8 and 29, but not Day 15. A 'flare' of {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in the primary tumor of one case was observed after 2 Gy of radiation (1.22 x baseline). The remaining eight on-treatment scans demonstrated a mean reduction in {sup 18}F-FLT tumor uptake of 0.58 x baseline. A marked reduction of {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in irradiated bone marrow was observed for all cases. This reduction was observed even after only 2 Gy, and all patients demonstrated a complete absence of proliferating marrow after 10 Gy. Conclusions: This proof of concept study indicates that {sup 18}F-FLT uptake can monitor the distinctive biologic responses of epithelial cancers and highly radiosensitive normal tissue changes during radical chemo-RT. Further studies of {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT imaging during therapy may suggest that this tracer is useful in developing response-adapted RT for NSCLC.

  6. Evaluation of polymeric nanoparticle formulations by effective imaging and quantitation of cellular uptake for controlled delivery of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Win, Khin Yin; Teng, Choon Peng; Ye, Enyi; Low, Michelle; Han, Ming-Yong

    2015-03-01

    Various polymeric nanoparticles have been extensively engineered for applications in controlled drug release delivery in the last decades. Currently, there is a great demand to develop a strategy to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate these polymeric nanoparticle formulations for producing innovative delivery systems. In this work, a screening platform is developed using luminescent quantum dots as drug model and imaging label to evaluate nanoparticle formulations incorporating either hydrophilic or hydrophobic drugs and imaging agents. It is validated that there is no influence of the incorporated entities on the cellular uptake profile. The use of quantum dots enables efficient detection and precise quantitation of cellular uptake of particles which occupy 25% of the cell volume. The correlation of quantum dot- and doxorubicin-incorporated nanoparticles is useful to develop an evaluation platform for nanoparticle formulations through imaging and quantitation. This platform is also used to observe the surface properties effect of other polymers such as chitosan and poly(ethylene) glycol on the cellular interaction and uptake. Moreover, quantum dots can be used to study microparticle theranostic delivery formulations by deliberately incorporating as visible ring surrounding the microparticles for their easy identifying and tracing in diagnostic and chemotherapeutic applications.

  7. Chemopreventive apigenin controls UVB-induced cutaneous proliferation and angiogenesis through HuR and thrombospondin-1.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Mirzoeva, Salida; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bridgeman, Bryan B; Fitchev, Philip; Cornwell, Mona L; Crawford, Susan E; Pelling, Jill C; Volpert, Olga V

    2014-11-30

    Plant flavonoid apigenin prevents and inhibits UVB-induced carcinogenesis in the skin and has strong anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic properties. Here we identify mechanisms, by which apigenin controls these oncogenic events. We show that apigenin acts, at least in part, via endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor, thrombospondin-1 (TSP1). TSP1 expression by the epidermal keratinocytes is potently inhibited by UVB. It inhibits cutaneous angiogenesis and UVB-induced carcinogenesis. We show that apigenin restores TSP1 in epidermal keratinocytes subjected to UVB and normalizes proliferation and angiogenesis in UVB-exposed skin. Importantly, reconstituting TSP1 anti-angiogenic function in UVB-irradiated skin with a short bioactive peptide mimetic representing exclusively its anti-angiogenic domain reproduced the anti-proliferative and anti-angiogenic effects of apigenin. Cox-2 and HIF-1α are important mediators of angiogenesis. Both apigenin and TSP1 peptide mimetic attenuated their induction by UVB. Finally we identified the molecular mechanism, whereby apigenin did not affect TSP1 mRNA, but increased de novo protein synthesis. Knockdown studies implicated the RNA-binding protein HuR, which controls mRNA stability and translation. Apigenin increased HuR cytoplasmic localization and physical association with TSP1 mRNA causing de novo TSP1 synthesis. HuR cytoplasmic localization was, in turn, dependent on CHK2 kinase. Together, our data provide a new mechanism, by which apigenin controls UVB-induced carcinogenesis.

  8. ECM Signaling Regulates Collective Cellular Dynamics to Control Pancreas Branching Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hung Ping; Panlasigui, Devin; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Sander, Maike

    2016-01-12

    During pancreas development, epithelial buds undergo branching morphogenesis to form an exocrine and endocrine gland. Proper morphogenesis is necessary for correct lineage allocation of pancreatic progenitors; however, the cellular events underlying pancreas morphogenesis are unknown. Here, we employed time-lapse microscopy and fluorescent labeling of cells to analyze cell behaviors associated with pancreas morphogenesis. We observed that outer bud cells adjacent to the basement membrane are pleomorphic and rearrange frequently; additionally, they largely remain in the outer cell compartment even after mitosis. These cell behaviors and pancreas branching depend on cell contacts with the basement membrane, which induce actomyosin cytoskeleton remodeling via integrin-mediated activation of FAK/Src signaling. We show that integrin signaling reduces E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion in outer cells and provide genetic evidence that this regulation is necessary for initiation of branching. Our study suggests that regulation of cell motility and adhesion by local niche cues initiates pancreas branching morphogenesis.

  9. Controlling Cellular Uptake and Toxicity of Polyphenylene Dendrimers by Chemical Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Brenton; Wu, Yuzhou; Fischer, Stephan; Liu, Weina; Weil, Tanja; Müllen, Klaus

    2017-02-21

    Polyphenylene dendrimers (PPDs) represent a unique class of macromolecules based on their monodisperse and shape-persistent nature. These characteristics have enabled the synthesis of a new genre of "patched" surface dendrimers where their exterior can be functionalized with a variety of polar and unpolar substituents to yield lipophilic binding sites in a site-specific way. While such materials have proven capable of complexing biologically relevant molecules, shown high cellular uptake in various cell lines, and low to no toxicity; there is minimal understanding of the driving forces to these characteristics. Therefore, the present work aims at investigating whether it is the specific chemical functionalities, relative quantities of each moiety, or the "patched" surface patterning on the dendrimers that more significantly influences their behavior in biological media.

  10. Tandem E2F Binding Sites in the Promoter of the p107 Cell Cycle Regulator Control p107 Expression and Its Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Burkhart, Deborah L.; Wirt, Stacey E.; Zmoos, Anne-Flore; Kareta, Michael S.; Sage, Julien

    2010-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (Rb) is a potent and ubiquitously expressed cell cycle regulator, but patients with a germline Rb mutation develop a very specific tumor spectrum. This surprising observation raises the possibility that mechanisms that compensate for loss of Rb function are present or activated in many cell types. In particular, p107, a protein related to Rb, has been shown to functionally overlap for loss of Rb in several cellular contexts. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this functional redundancy between Rb and p107 in vivo, we used gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to engineer point mutations in two consensus E2F binding sites in the endogenous p107 promoter. Analysis of normal and mutant cells by gene expression and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that members of the Rb and E2F families directly bound these two sites. Furthermore, we found that these two E2F sites controlled both the repression of p107 in quiescent cells and also its activation in cycling cells, as well as in Rb mutant cells. Cell cycle assays further indicated that activation of p107 transcription during S phase through the two E2F binding sites was critical for controlled cell cycle progression, uncovering a specific role for p107 to slow proliferation in mammalian cells. Direct transcriptional repression of p107 by Rb and E2F family members provides a molecular mechanism for a critical negative feedback loop during cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. These experiments also suggest novel therapeutic strategies to increase the p107 levels in tumor cells. PMID:20585628

  11. Effect of gamma-hydroxybutyrate on keratinocytes proliferation: A preliminary prospective controlled study in severe burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Anne-Françoise; Bargues, Laurent; Bever, Hervé Le; Vest, Philippe; Cavalier, Etienne; Ledoux, Didier; Piérard, Gérald E.; Damas, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypermetabolism and hyposomatotropism related to severe burns lead to impaired wound healing. Growth hormone (GH) boosts wound healing notably following stimulation of the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), a mitogen factor for keratinocytes. Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) stimulates endogenous GH secretion. Aim: To assess effects of GHB sedation on keratinocytes proliferation (based on immunohistochemical techniques). Design: Monocentric, prospective, controlled trial. Materials and Methods: Patients (aging 18-65 years, burn surface area >30%, expected to be sedated for at least one month) were alternately allocated, at the 5th day following injury, in three groups according to the intravenous GHB dose administered for 21 days: Evening bolus of 50 mg/kg (Group B), continuous infusion at the rate of 10 mg/kg/h (Group C), or absence of GHB (Group P). They all received local standard cares. Immunohistochemistry (Ki67/MIB-1, Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 and Mac 387 antibodies) was performed at D21 on adjacent unburned skin sample for assessing any keratinocyte activation. Serum IGF1 levels were measured at initiation and completion of the protocol. Statistical Analysis: Categorical variables were compared with Chi-square test. Comparisons of medians were made using Kruskal-Wallis test. Post hoc analyses were performed using Mann-Whitney test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. A P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: A total of 14 patients completed the study (Group B: n = 5, Group C: n = 5, Group P: n = 4). Continuous administration of GHB was associated with a significant higher Ki67 immunolabeling at D21 (P = 0.049) and with a significant higher increase in the IGF1 concentrations at D21 (P = 0.024). No adverse effects were disclosed. Conclusions: Our preliminary data support a positive effect of GHB on keratinocyte proliferation and are encouraging enough to warrant large prospective studies. PMID

  12. The Hippo Pathway Controls a Switch between Retinal Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Photoreceptor Cell Differentiation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Yoichi; Hata, Shoji; Namae, Misako; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of numbers and types of neurons through control of cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation is an essential aspect of neurogenesis. The Hippo signaling pathway has recently been identified as playing a crucial role in promoting cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation in multiple types of stem cells, including in retinal progenitor cells. When Hippo signaling is activated, the core Mst1/2 kinases activate the Lats1/2 kinases, which in turn phosphorylate and inhibit the transcriptional cofactor Yap. During mouse retinogenesis, overexpression of Yap prolongs progenitor cell proliferation, whereas inhibition of Yap decreases this proliferation and promotes retinal cell differentiation. However, to date, it remains unknown how the Hippo pathway affects the differentiation of distinct neuronal cell types such as photoreceptor cells. In this study, we investigated whether Hippo signaling regulates retinogenesis during early zebrafish development. Knockdown of zebrafish mst2 induced early embryonic defects, including altered retinal pigmentation and morphogenesis. Similar abnormal retinal phenotypes were observed in zebrafish embryos injected with a constitutively active form of yap [(yap (5SA)]. Loss of Yap’s TEAD-binding domain, two WW domains, or transcription activation domain attenuated the retinal abnormalities induced by yap (5SA), indicating that all of these domains contribute to normal retinal development. Remarkably, yap (5SA)-expressing zebrafish embryos displayed decreased expression of transcription factors such as otx5 and crx, which orchestrate photoreceptor cell differentiation by activating the expression of rhodopsin and other photoreceptor cell genes. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Rx1 is a novel interacting partner of Yap that regulates photoreceptor cell differentiation. Our results suggest that Yap suppresses the differentiation of photoreceptor cells from retinal progenitor cells by repressing Rx1

  13. Control of proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental-pulp-derived stem cells by distinct surface structures.

    PubMed

    Kolind, K; Kraft, D; Bøggild, T; Duch, M; Lovmand, J; Pedersen, F S; Bindslev, D A; Bünger, C E; Foss, M; Besenbacher, F

    2014-02-01

    The ability to control the behavior of stem cells provides crucial benefits, for example, in tissue engineering and toxicity/drug screening, which utilize the stem cell's capacity to engineer new tissues for regenerative purposes and the testing of new drugs in vitro. Recently, surface topography has been shown to influence stem cell differentiation; however, general trends are often difficult to establish due to differences in length scales, surface chemistries and detailed surface topographies. Here we apply a highly versatile screening approach to analyze the interplay of surface topographical parameters on cell attachment, morphology, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal dental-pulp-derived stem cells (DPSCs) cultured with and without osteogenic differentiation factors in the medium (ODM). Increasing the inter-pillar gap size from 1 to 6 μm for surfaces with small pillar sizes of 1 and 2 μm resulted in decreased proliferation and in more elongated cells with long pseudopodial protrusions. The same alterations of pillar topography, up to an inter-pillar gap size of 4 μm, also resulted in enhanced mineralization of DPSCs cultured without ODM, while no significant trend was observed for DPSCs cultured with ODM. Generally, cells cultured without ODM had a larger deposition of osteogenic markers on structured surfaces relative to the unstructured surfaces than what was found when culturing with ODM. We conclude that the topographical design of biomaterials can be optimized for the regulation of DPSC differentiation and speculate that the inclusion of ODM alters the ability of the cells to sense surface topographical cues. These results are essential in order to transfer the use of this highly proliferative, easily accessible stem cell into the clinic for use in cell therapy and regenerative medicine.

  14. Achaete-Scute Homolog 1 Expression Controls Cellular Differentiation of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kasim, Mumtaz; Heß, Vicky; Scholz, Holger; Persson, Pontus B.; Fähling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the major cause of infant cancer deaths, results from fast proliferation of undifferentiated neuroblasts. Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma includes differentiation with retinoic acid (RA); however, the resistance of many of these tumors to RA-induced differentiation poses a considerable challenge. Human achaete-scute homolog 1 (hASH1) is a proneural basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor essential for neurogenesis and is often upregulated in neuroblastoma. Here, we identified a novel function for hASH1 in regulating the differentiation phenotype of neuroblastoma cells. Global analysis of 986 human neuroblastoma datasets revealed a negative correlation between hASH1 and neuron differentiation that was independent of the N-myc (MYCN) oncogene. Using RA to induce neuron differentiation in two neuroblastoma cell lines displaying high and low levels of hASH1 expression, we confirmed the link between hASH1 expression and the differentiation defective phenotype, which was reversed by silencing hASH1 or by hypoxic preconditioning. We further show that hASH1 suppresses neuronal differentiation by inhibiting transcription at the RA receptor element. Collectively, our data indicate hASH1 to be key for understanding neuroblastoma resistance to differentiation therapy and pave the way for hASH1-targeted therapies for augmenting the response of neuroblastoma to differentiation therapy. PMID:28066180

  15. Nano-scale control of cellular environment to drive embryonic stem cells selfrenewal and fate.

    PubMed

    Blin, Guillaume; Lablack, Nassrine; Louis-Tisserand, Marianne; Nicolas, Claire; Picart, Catherine; Pucéat, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are pluripotent cells capable to give rise to any embryonic cell lineage. In culture, these cells form colonies creating their own niche. Depending upon the molecular and physico-chemical environment, the pluripotent cells oscillate between two metastable states of pluripotency either reminiscent of the inner cell mass of the embryo or the epiblast, a stage of development which give rise to the three embryonic layers, ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm. Herein, we used PLL/HA nanofilms cross-linked to various degrees to modulate the nanoenvironment of ESCs. Adhesion of ESC on nanofilms increased from native films to highly cross-linked films. The adhesion process was associated with cell proliferation. Expression of genes markers of the ICM decreased with adhesion of cells to cross-linked films. In parallel, genes more reminiscent of the epiblast, were turned on. ESC differentiation within embryoid bodies further revealed that cell pluripotency was better retained when cells did not adhere on native films. We further report that both the stiffness and the chemistry of nanofilms play a key role in modulating the niche of ESC and in turn govern their selfrenewal and fate.

  16. Epidermal TRPM8 channel isoform controls the balance between keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in a cold-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bidaux, Gabriel; Borowiec, Anne-sophie; Gordienko, Dmitri; Beck, Benjamin; Shapovalov, George G.; Lemonnier, Loïc; Flourakis, Matthieu; Vandenberghe, Matthieu; Slomianny, Christian; Dewailly, Etienne; Delcourt, Philippe; Desruelles, Emilie; Ritaine, Abigaël; Polakowska, Renata; Lesage, Jean; Chami, Mounia; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Deviation of the ambient temperature is one of the most ubiquitous stimuli that continuously affect mammals’ skin. Although the role of the warmth receptors in epidermal homeostasis (EH) was elucidated in recent years, the mystery of the keratinocyte mild-cold sensor remains unsolved. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a new functional epidermal isoform of the transient receptor potential M8 (TRPM8) mild-cold receptor, dubbed epidermal TRPM8 (eTRPM8), which is localized in the keratinocyte endoplasmic reticulum membrane and controls mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]m). In turn, [Ca2+]m modulates ATP and superoxide (O2•−) synthesis in a cold-dependent manner. We report that this fine tuning of ATP and O2•− levels by cooling controls the balance between keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. Finally, to ascertain eTRPM8’s role in EH in vivo we developed a new functional knockout mouse strain by deleting the pore domain of TRPM8 and demonstrated that eTRPM8 knockout impairs adaptation of the epidermis to low temperatures. PMID:26080404

  17. The Bromodomain protein BRD4 controls HOTAIR, a long noncoding RNA essential for glioblastoma proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pastori, Chiara; Kapranov, Philipp; Penas, Clara; Peschansky, Veronica; Volmar, Claude-Henry; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Bregy, Amade; Komotar, Ricardo; St. Laurent, Georges; Ayad, Nagi G.; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2015-01-01

    Bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain proteins have emerged as promising therapeutic targets in glioblastoma and many other cancers. Small molecule inhibitors of BET bromodomain proteins reduce expression of several oncogenes required for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) progression. However, the mechanism through which BET protein inhibition reduces GBM growth is not completely understood. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important epigenetic regulators with critical roles in cancer initiation and malignant progression, but mechanistic insight into their expression and regulation by BET bromodomain inhibitors remains elusive. In this study, we used Helicos single molecule sequencing to comprehensively profile lncRNAs differentially expressed in GBM, and we identified a subset of GBM-specific lncRNAs whose expression is regulated by BET proteins. Treatment of GBM cells with the BET bromdomain inhibitor I-BET151 reduced levels of the tumor-promoting lncRNA HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) and restored the expression of several other GBM down-regulated lncRNAs. Conversely, overexpression of HOTAIR in conjunction with I-BET151 treatment abrogates the antiproliferative activity of the BET bromodomain inhibitor. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated binding of Bromodomain Containing 4 (BRD4) to the HOTAIR promoter, suggesting that BET proteins can directly regulate lncRNA expression. Our data unravel a previously unappreciated mechanism through which BET proteins control tumor growth of glioblastoma cells and suggest that modulation of lncRNA networks may, in part, mediate the antiproliferative effects of many epigenetic inhibitors currently in clinical trials for cancer and other diseases. PMID:26111795

  18. Perspectives and implications for the proliferation of non-lethal weapons in the context of contemporary conflict, security interests and arms control.

    PubMed

    Lewer, N; Feakin, T

    2001-01-01

    This article briefly looks at the characteristics of contemporary conflict and the global political arena, particularly from 1989 and the end of the cold war. The development of and potential roles for second generation non-lethal weapons (NLWs) in war-fighting, peace support operations, and civil policing are discussed. There are arguments both for and against further and rapid development of NLWs. The question of proliferation and arms control is examined within the context of concepts such as the revolution in military affairs (RMA) and factors such as the increasing role of non-state actors, current security requirements and the problems concerning the implementation and enforcement of current and envisaged arms control regimes. Proliferation, which may be vertical or horizontal, may not always be seen as a malign process but rather one which requires specific ethical and operational perspectives. Proliferation is about both technology push and operational requirements. The effectiveness of legislative approaches to controlling proliferation, especially to countries which are considered to have poor human rights records, is discussed and issues about who wants to control NLWs, and why, are raised. Some technologies may be seen as less threatening to existing arms control and management treaties and the ethical debates which surround them. A concern regarding increasing use of non-lethal technologies for political oppression is part of this debate. The issues are illustrated using India as case study.

  19. Contribution of glutathione to the control of cellular redox homeostasis under toxic metal and metalloid stress.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Luis E; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Carrasco-Gil, Sandra; Flores-Cáceres, M Laura; Ortega-Villasante, Cristina; Escobar, Carolina

    2015-05-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals and metalloids, such as cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or arsenic (As), as a consequence of various anthropogenic activities, poses a serious threat to the environment and human health. The ability of plants to take up mineral nutrients from the soil can be exploited to develop phytoremediation technologies able to alleviate the negative impact of toxic elements in terrestrial ecosystems. However, we must select plant species or populations capable of tolerating exposure to hazardous elements. The tolerance of plant cells to toxic elements is highly dependent on glutathione (GSH) metabolism. GSH is a biothiol tripeptide that plays a fundamental dual role: first, as an antioxidant to mitigate the redox imbalance caused by toxic metal(loid) accumulation, and second as a precursor of phytochelatins (PCs), ligand peptides that limit the free ion cellular concentration of those pollutants. The sulphur assimilation pathway, synthesis of GSH, and production of PCs are tightly regulated in order to alleviate the phytotoxicity of different hazardous elements, which might induce specific stress signatures. This review provides an update on mechanisms of tolerance that depend on biothiols in plant cells exposed to toxic elements, with a particular emphasis on the Hg-triggered responses, and considering the contribution of hormones to their regulation.

  20. Magnetic steering control of multi-cellular bio-hybrid microswimmers.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Rika Wright; Edwards, Matthew R; Zhuang, Jiang; Pacoret, Cecile; Sitti, Metin

    2014-10-07

    Bio-hybrid devices, which integrate biological cells with synthetic components, have opened a new path in miniaturized systems with the potential to provide actuation and control for systems down to a few microns in size. Here, we address the challenge of remotely controlling bio-hybrid microswimmers propelled by multiple bacterial cells. These devices have been proposed as a viable method for targeted drug delivery but have also been shown to exhibit stochastic motion. We demonstrate a method of remote magnetic control that significantly reduces the stochasticity of the motion, enabling steering control. The demonstrated microswimmers consist of multiple Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) bacteria attached to a 6 μm-diameter superparamagnetic bead. We characterize their motion and define the parameters governing their controllability. We show that the microswimmers can be controlled along two-dimensional (2-D) trajectories using weak magnetic fields (≤10 mT) and can achieve 2-D swimming speeds up to 7.3 μm s(-1). This magnetic steering approach can be integrated with sensory-based steering in future work, enabling new control strategies for bio-hybrid microsystems.

  1. The Past, Present, and Future of Real-Time Control in Cellular Electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Jennifer. A.; Lambert, Katherine. M.; White, John A.

    2014-01-01

    For over 60 years, real-time control has been an important technique in the study of excitable cells. Two such control-based technologies are reviewed here. First, voltage-clamp methods revolutionized the study of excitable cells. In this family of techniques, membrane potential is controlled, allowing one to parameterize a powerful class of models that describe the voltage-current relationship of cell membranes simply, flexibly, and accurately. Second, dynamic-clamp methods allow the addition of new, ‘virtual’ membrane mechanisms to living cells. Dynamic clamp allows researchers unprecedented ways of testing computationally based hypotheses in biological preparations. The review ends with predictions of how control-based technologies will be improved and adapted for new uses in the near future. PMID:24710815

  2. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains. PMID:26972968

  3. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-03-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains.

  4. Naringenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: preparation, controlled delivery, cellular uptake, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Peng; Yu, Tong; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Jie; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Qiu, Yang; Zhao, Wenming; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Naringenin (NRG), a flavonoid compound, had been reported to exhibit extensive pharmacological effects, but its water solubility and oral bioavailability are only~46±6 µg/mL and 5.8%, respectively. The purpose of this study is to design and develop NRG-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (NRG-SLNs) to provide prolonged and sustained drug release, with improved stability, involving nontoxic nanocarriers, and increase the bioavailability by means of pulmonary administration. Initially, a group contribution method was used to screen the best solid lipid matrix for the preparation of SLNs. NRG-SLNs were prepared by an emulsification and low-temperature solidification method and optimized using an orthogonal experiment approach. The morphology was examined by transmission electron microscopy, and the particle size and zeta potential were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. The total drug content of NRG-SLNs was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the encapsulation efficiency (EE) was determined by Sephadex gel-50 chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro NRG release studies were carried out using a dialysis bag. The best cryoprotectant to prepare NRG-SLN lyophilized powder for future structural characterization was selected using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The short-term stability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cellular uptake, and pharmacokinetics in rats were studied after pulmonary administration of NRG-SLN lyophilized powder. Glycerol monostearate was selected to prepare SLNs, and the optimal formulation of NRG-SLNs was spherical in shape, with a particle size of 98 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.258, a zeta potential of -31.4 mV, a total drug content of 9.76 mg, an EE of 79.11%, and a cumulative drug release of 80% in 48 hours with a sustained profile. In addition, 5% mannitol (w

  5. Naringenin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: preparation, controlled delivery, cellular uptake, and pulmonary pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Peng; Yu, Tong; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Jie; Xu, Jie; Zhao, Ying; Hao, Yanna; Qiu, Yang; Zhao, Wenming; Wu, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Naringenin (NRG), a flavonoid compound, had been reported to exhibit extensive pharmacological effects, but its water solubility and oral bioavailability are only~46±6 µg/mL and 5.8%, respectively. The purpose of this study is to design and develop NRG-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (NRG-SLNs) to provide prolonged and sustained drug release, with improved stability, involving nontoxic nanocarriers, and increase the bioavailability by means of pulmonary administration. Initially, a group contribution method was used to screen the best solid lipid matrix for the preparation of SLNs. NRG-SLNs were prepared by an emulsification and low-temperature solidification method and optimized using an orthogonal experiment approach. The morphology was examined by transmission electron microscopy, and the particle size and zeta potential were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy. The total drug content of NRG-SLNs was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the encapsulation efficiency (EE) was determined by Sephadex gel-50 chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro NRG release studies were carried out using a dialysis bag. The best cryoprotectant to prepare NRG-SLN lyophilized powder for future structural characterization was selected using differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The short-term stability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cellular uptake, and pharmacokinetics in rats were studied after pulmonary administration of NRG-SLN lyophilized powder. Glycerol monostearate was selected to prepare SLNs, and the optimal formulation of NRG-SLNs was spherical in shape, with a particle size of 98 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.258, a zeta potential of −31.4 mV, a total drug content of 9.76 mg, an EE of 79.11%, and a cumulative drug release of 80% in 48 hours with a sustained profile. In addition, 5% mannitol (w

  6. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Personalized Cellular Phone Reminder System to Enhance Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vikram; Doros, Gheorghe; Farmer, Eric; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Rybin, Denis; Myung, Dan; Jackson, Jonathan; Backman, Elke; Stanic, Anela; Skolnik, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) represents one of the strongest predictors of progression to AIDS, yet it is difficult for most patients to sustain high levels of adherence. This study compares the efficacy of a personalized cell phone reminder system (ARemind) in enhancing adherence to ART versus a beeper. Twenty-three HIV-infected subjects on ART with self-reported adherence less than 85% were randomized to a cellular phone (CP) or beeper (BP). CP subjects received personalized text messages daily; in contrast, BP subjects received a reminder beep at the time of dosing. Interviews were scheduled at weeks 3 and 6. Adherence to ART was measured by self-report (SR, 7-day recall), pill count (PC, past 30 days at baseline, then past 3 weeks), Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS; cumulatively at 3 and 6 weeks), and via a composite adherence score constructed by combining MEMS, pill count, and self report. A mixed effects model adjusting for baseline adherence was used to compare adherence rates between the intervention groups at 3 and 6 weeks. Nineteen subjects completed all visits, 10 men and 9 females. The mean age was 42.7 ± 6.5 years, 37% of subjects were Caucasian and 89% acquired HIV heterosexually. The average adherence to ART was 79% by SR and 65% by PC at baseline in both arms; over 6 weeks adherence increased and remained significantly higher in the ARemind group using multiple measures of adherence. A larger and longer prospective study is needed to confirm these findings and to better understand optimal reminder messages and user fatigue. PMID:21323532

  7. Cellular Decomposition Based Hybrid-Hierarchical Control Systems with Applications to Flight Management Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caines, P. E.

    1999-01-01

    The work in this research project has been focused on the construction of a hierarchical hybrid control theory which is applicable to flight management systems. The motivation and underlying philosophical position for this work has been that the scale, inherent complexity and the large number of agents (aircraft) involved in an air traffic system imply that a hierarchical modelling and control methodology is required for its management and real time control. In the current work the complex discrete or continuous state space of a system with a small number of agents is aggregated in such a way that discrete (finite state machine or supervisory automaton) controlled dynamics are abstracted from the system's behaviour. High level control may then be either directly applied at this abstracted level, or, if this is in itself of significant complexity, further layers of abstractions may be created to produce a system with an acceptable degree of complexity at each level. By the nature of this construction, high level commands are necessarily realizable at lower levels in the system.

  8. The transcription factor Foxo1 controls germinal center B cell proliferation in response to T cell help.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takeshi; Shinnakasu, Ryo; Ise, Wataru; Kawai, Chie; Egawa, Takeshi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2017-04-03

    Germinal center (GC) B cells cycle between two states, the light zone (LZ) and the dark zone (DZ), and in the latter they proliferate and hypermutate their immunoglobulin genes. How this functional transition takes place is still controversial. In this study, we demonstrate that ablation of Foxo1 after GC development led to the loss of the DZ GC B cells and disruption of the GC architecture, which is consistent with recent studies. Mechanistically, even upon provision of adequate T cell help, Foxo1-deficient GC B cells showed less proliferative expansion than controls. Moreover, we found that the transcription factor BATF was transiently induced in LZ GC B cells in a Foxo1-dependent manner and that deletion of BATF similarly led to GC disruption. Thus, our results are consistent with a model where the switch from the LZ to the DZ is triggered after receipt of T cell help, and suggest that Foxo1-mediated BATF up-regulation is at least partly involved in this switch.

  9. Adiponectin, a downstream target gene of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, controls hepatitis B virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sarah; Jung, Jaesung; Kim, Taeyeung; Park, Sun; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2011-01-20

    In this study, HepG2-hepatitis B virus (HBV)-stable cells that did not overexpress HBx and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells were analyzed for their expression of HBV-induced, upregulated adipogenic and lipogenic genes. The mRNAs of CCAAT enhancer binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), adiponectin, liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were expressed at higher levels in HepG2-HBV and lamivudine-treated stable cells and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells than in the HepG2 cells. Lamivudine treatment reduced the mRNA levels of PPAR{gamma} and C/EBP{alpha}. Conversely, HBV replication was upregulated by adiponectin and PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone treatments and was downregulated by adiponectin siRNAs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that HBV replication and/or protein expression, even in the absence of HBx, upregulated adipogenic or lipogenic genes, and that the control of adiponectin might prove useful as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

  10. Distinct Stromal Cell Factor Combinations Can Separately Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Survival, Proliferation, and Self-Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Wohrer, Stefan; Knapp, David J.H.F.; Copley, Michael R.; Benz, Claudia; Kent, David G.; Rowe, Keegan; Babovic, Sonja; Mader, Heidi; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.; Eaves, Connie J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are identified by their ability to sustain prolonged blood cell production in vivo, although recent evidence suggests that durable self-renewal (DSR) is shared by HSC subtypes with distinct self-perpetuating differentiation programs. Net expansions of DSR-HSCs occur in vivo, but molecularly defined conditions that support similar responses in vitro are lacking. We hypothesized that this might require a combination of factors that differentially promote HSC viability, proliferation, and self-renewal. We now demonstrate that HSC survival and maintenance of DSR potential are variably supported by different Steel factor (SF)-containing cocktails with similar HSC-mitogenic activities. In addition, stromal cells produce other factors, including nerve growth factor and collagen 1, that can antagonize the apoptosis of initially quiescent adult HSCs and, in combination with SF and interleukin-11, produce >15-fold net expansions of DSR-HSCs ex vivo within 7 days. These findings point to the molecular basis of HSC control and expansion. PMID:24910437

  11. Dynamical Allocation of Cellular Resources as an Optimal Control Problem: Novel Insights into Microbial Growth Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Nils; Mairet, Francis; Gouzé, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Microbial physiology exhibits growth laws that relate the macromolecular composition of the cell to the growth rate. Recent work has shown that these empirical regularities can be derived from coarse-grained models of resource allocation. While these studies focus on steady-state growth, such conditions are rarely found in natural habitats, where microorganisms are continually challenged by environmental fluctuations. The aim of this paper is to extend the study of microbial growth strategies to dynamical environments, using a self-replicator model. We formulate dynamical growth maximization as an optimal control problem that can be solved using Pontryagin’s Maximum Principle. We compare this theoretical gold standard with different possible implementations of growth control in bacterial cells. We find that simple control strategies enabling growth-rate maximization at steady state are suboptimal for transitions from one growth regime to another, for example when shifting bacterial cells to a medium supporting a higher growth rate. A near-optimal control strategy in dynamical conditions is shown to require information on several, rather than a single physiological variable. Interestingly, this strategy has structural analogies with the regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis by ppGpp in the enterobacterium Escherichia coli. It involves sensing a mismatch between precursor and ribosome concentrations, as well as the adjustment of ribosome synthesis in a switch-like manner. Our results show how the capability of regulatory systems to integrate information about several physiological variables is critical for optimizing growth in a changing environment. PMID:26958858

  12. HIC1 controls cellular- and HIV-1- gene transcription via interactions with CTIP2 and HMGA1

    PubMed Central

    Le Douce, Valentin; Forouzanfar, Faezeh; Eilebrecht, Sebastian; Van Driessche, Benoit; Ait-Ammar, Amina; Verdikt, Roxane; Kurashige, Yoshihito; Marban, Céline; Gautier, Virginie; Candolfi, Ermanno; Benecke, Arndt G.; Van Lint, Carine; Rohr, Olivier; Schwartz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Among many cellular transcriptional regulators, Bcl11b/CTIP2 and HGMA1 have been described to control the establishment and the persistence of HIV-1 latency in microglial cells, the main viral reservoir in the brain. In this present work, we identify and characterize a transcription factor i.e. HIC1, which physically interacts with both Bcl11b/CTIP2 and HMGA1 to co-regulate specific subsets of cellular genes and the viral HIV-1 gene. Our results suggest that HIC1 represses Tat dependent HIV-1 transcription. Interestingly, this repression of Tat function is linked to HIC1 K314 acetylation status and to SIRT1 deacetylase activity. Finally, we show that HIC1 interacts and cooperates with HGMA1 to regulate Tat dependent HIV-1 transcription. Our results also suggest that HIC1 repression of Tat function happens in a TAR dependent manner and that this TAR element may serve as HIC1 reservoir at the viral promoter to facilitate HIC1/TAT interaction. PMID:27725726

  13. Solid lipid nanoparticles for oral drug delivery: chitosan coating improves stability, controlled delivery, mucoadhesion and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangchao; Teng, Zi; Li, Ying; Wang, Qin

    2015-05-20

    The poor stability of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) under acidic condition resulted in large aggregation in gastric environment, limiting their application as oral delivery systems. In this study, a series of SLN was prepared to investigate the effects of surfactant/cosurfactant and chitosan coating on their physicochemical properties as well as cellular uptake. SLN was prepared from Compritol 888 ATO using a low-energy method combining the solvent-diffusion and hot homogenization technique. Poloxamer 188 and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were effective emulsifiers to produce SLN with better physicochemical properties than SLN control. Chitosan-coated SLN exhibited the best stability under acidic condition by forming a thick layer around the lipid core, as clearly observed by transmission electron microscope. The intermolecular interactions in different formulations were monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Chitosan coating also significantly improved the mucoadhesive property of SLN as determined by Quartz Crystal Microbalance. In vitro drug delivery assays, cytotoxicity, and cellular uptake of SLN were studied by incorporating coumarin 6 as a fluorescence probe. Overall, chitosan-coated SLN was superior to other formulations and held promising features for its application as a potential oral drug delivery system for hydrophobic drugs.

  14. JPRS Report, Proliferation Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    Argentina To Import Reactor using chemical weapons. It informed a reporter from the NC2009075792 Cairo MENA in Arabic 1405 GMT Free Press Organization that...proliferation of chemical weapons as reflected pression system in which cool water under the reactor in the export control regime. The spokesman of the JPRS...This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical , and biological

  15. Sensitivity control through attenuation of signal transfer efficiency by negative regulation of cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Yu; Kakuda, Hiroaki; Fujita, Kazuhiro A; Uda, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Shinya

    2012-03-13

    Sensitivity is one of the hallmarks of biological and pharmacological responses. However, the principle of controlling sensitivity remains unclear. Here we theoretically analyse a simple biochemical reaction and find that the signal transfer efficiency of the transient peak amplitude attenuates depending on the strength of negative regulation. We experimentally find that many signalling pathways in various cell lines, including the Akt and ERK pathways, can be approximated by simple biochemical reactions and that the same property of the attenuation of signal transfer efficiency was observed for such pathways. Because of this property, a downstream molecule should show higher sensitivity to an activator and lower sensitivity to an inhibitor than an upstream molecule. Indeed, we experimentally verify that S6, which lies downstream of Akt, shows lower sensitivity to an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor than Akt. Thus, cells can control downstream sensitivity through the attenuation of signal transfer efficiency by changing the expression level of negative regulators.

  16. Pirin Inhibits Cellular Senescence in Melanocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  17. ABO desensitization affects cellular immunity and infection control after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schachtner, Thomas; Stein, Maik; Reinke, Petra

    2015-10-01

    The impact of ABO desensitization on overall immunity, infectious control, and alloreactivity remains unknown. We compared 35 ABO-incompatible kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) to a control of 62 ABO compatible KTRs. Samples were collected before, at +1, +2, +3, +6, and +12 months post-transplantation. CMV-, BKV-specific, and alloreactive T cells were measured using an interferon-γ ELISPOT assay. The extent of immunosuppression was quantified by enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations and cytokines. No differences were observed for 5-year allograft survival and function between both groups (P > 0.05). However, ABO-incompatible KTRs were more likely to develop CMV infection, BKV-associated nephropathy, and severe sepsis (P = 0.001). Interestingly, ABO-incompatible KTRs with poor HLA-match showed the highest rates of infections and inferior allograft function (P < 0.05). CD3+, CD4+ T-cell counts, interferon-γ and IL-10 levels were lower in ABO-incompatible KTRs early post-transplantation (P < 0.05). Likewise, ABO-incompatible KTRs showed impaired BKV- and CMV-specific T-cell immunity (P < 0.05). ABO-incompatible KTRs showed lower frequencies of alloreactive T cells (P < 0.05). Our data suggest T-cell depletion due to ABO desensitization, which may contribute to the increased risk of T-cell-dependent infections. Elimination of B cells serving as antigen-presenting cells, thereby causing impaired T-cell activation, plays a significant role in both impaired infection control and reduced alloreactive T-cell activation.

  18. Universal leukoreduction of cellular and plasma components: process control and performance of the leukoreduction process.

    PubMed

    Masse, M

    2001-06-01

    Many countries in Europe and over the world are currently or will be concerned in the near future, by the implementation of universal leukoreduction (ULR) for red blood cells (RBC), platelets (PT) and now also for plasma. Recommended by several advisory committees, this decision to implement ULR must be considered as a recognition of the benefit of early leukocyte removal, and also as a precautionary measure to increase blood safety. The leukodepletion technology for RBC, PT and plasma has become increasingly more elaborated and integrated in the collection or in the component preparation process. To reach this aim and to assure that the end-products meet local specifications (1 or 5 x 10(6) residual leukocytes), a process control and validation program for leukoreduction has been described in the specific guidelines. Tested on a wide scale by a group of centers, flow cytometry is emerging as reference method for residual leukocyte enumeration. Validation protocols (linearity, precision, accuracy) have been defined in numerous national or international studies (PSL and BEST Working Party). The sensitivity of the method is greatly improved by concentration of the sample, with a detection limit equivalent to 10 cells/mL for RBC or PT, and 0.5 cells/mL for plasma. Furthermore, monitoring of the performance of the leukoreduction process includes a quality control program based on a general statistical model with a parametric or non parametric approach, sampling plan, ongoing control, process capability assessment, confidence limit, detection of failure, and estimation of the non conforming units rate.

  19. The deiodinases and the control of intracellular thyroid hormone signaling during cellular differentiation☆

    PubMed Central

    Dentice, Monica; Marsili, Alessandro; Zavacki, AnnMarie; Larsen, P. Reed; Salvatore, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormone influences gene expression in virtually all vertebrates. Its action is initiated by the activation of T4 to T3, an outer ring deiodination reaction that is catalyzed by the type 1 or the type 2 iodothyronine selenodeiodinases (D1 or D2). Inactivation of T4 and T3 occurs via inner ring deiodination catalyzed by the type 3 iodothyronine selenodeiodinases (D3). The T4 concentration is generally quite stable in human plasma, with T3 levels also remaining constant. Deiodinase actions are tightly regulated in both pre- and post-natal life when they are required to make local adjustments of intracellular T3 concentrations in a precise spatio- and temporal manner. Although all the signals governing the dynamic expression of deiodinases in specific cell types are not known, many important regulatory factors have been deciphered. Scope of review This review provides striking examples from the recent literature illustrating how the expression of D2 and D3 is finely tuned during maturation of different organs, and how their action play a critical role in different settings to control intracellular T3 availability. Major conclusions Emerging evidence indicates that in various cell contexts, D2 and D3 are expressed in a dynamic balance, in which the expression of one enzyme is coordinately regulated with that of the other to tightly control intracellular T3 levels commensurate with cell requirements at that time. General significance Deiodinases control TH action in a precise spatio-temporal fashion thereby providing a novel mechanism for the local paracrine and autocrine regulation of TH action. This remarkable tissue-specific regulation of intracellular thyroid status remains hidden due to the maintenance of constant circulating TH concentrations by the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Thyroid hormone signalling. PMID:22634734

  20. Temporal association of cellular immune responses with the initial control of viremia in primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Koup, R A; Safrit, J T; Cao, Y; Andrews, C A; McLeod, G; Borkowsky, W; Farthing, C; Ho, D D

    1994-01-01

    Virologic and immunologic studies were performed on five patients presenting with primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursors specific for cells expressing antigens of HIV-1 Gag, Pol, and Env were detected at or within 3 weeks of presentation in four of the five patients and were detected in all five patients by 3 to 6 months after presentation. The one patient with an absent initial CTL response had prolonged symptoms, persistent viremia, and low CD4+ T-cell count. Neutralizing antibody activity was absent at the time of presentation in all five patients. These findings suggest that cellular immunity is involved in the initial control of virus replication in primary HIV-1 infection and indicate a role for CTL in protective immunity to HIV-1 in vivo. PMID:8207839

  1. The small GTPase ARF6 regulates protein trafficking to control cellular function during development and in disease.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Allie H; Zhao, Helong; Jenkins, Noah; Zhu, Weiquan; Richards, Jackson R; Yoo, Jae Hyuk; Winter, Jacob M; Rich, Bianca; Mleynek, Tara M; Li, Dean Y; Odelberg, Shannon J

    2016-12-21

    The activation of the small GTPase ARF6 has been implicated in promoting several pathological processes related to vascular instability and tumor formation, growth, and metastasis. ARF6 also plays a vital role during embryonic development. Recent studies have suggested that ARF6 carries out these disparate functions primarily by controlling protein trafficking within the cell. ARF6 helps direct proteins to intracellular or extracellular locations where they function in normal cellular responses during development and in pathological processes later in life. This transport of proteins is accomplished through a variety of mechanisms, including endocytosis and recycling, microvesicle release, and as yet uncharacterized processes. This Commentary will explore the functions of ARF6, while focusing on the role of this small GTPase in development and postnatal physiology, regulating barrier function and diseases associated with its loss, and tumor formation, growth, and metastasis.

  2. Specific Human and Candida Cellular Interactions Lead to Controlled or Persistent Infection Outcomes during Granuloma-Like Formation

    PubMed Central

    Misme-Aucouturier, Barbara; Albassier, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A delayed type of multicellular process could be crucial during chronic candidiasis in determining the course of infection. This reaction, consisting of organized immune cells surrounding the pathogen, initiates an inflammatory response to avoid fungal dissemination. The goal of the present study was to examine, at an in vitro cellular scale, Candida and human immune cell interaction dynamics during a long-term period. By challenging human peripheral blood immune cells from 10 healthy donors with 32 Candida albicans and non-albicans (C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. lusitaniae, C. krusei, and C. kefyr) clinical isolates, we showed that Candida spp. induced the formation of granuloma-like structures within 6 days after challenge, but their sizes and the respective fungal burdens differed according to the Candida species. These two parameters are positively correlated. Phenotypic characteristics, such as hypha formation and higher axenic growth rate, seem to contribute to yeast persistence within granuloma-like structures. We showed an interindividual variability of the human response against Candida spp. Higher proportions of neutrophils and elevated CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratios during the first days after challenge were correlated with early production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and associated with controlled infection. In contrast, the persistence of Candida could result from upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and a poor anti-inflammatory negative feedback (IL-10). Importantly, regulatory subsets of NK cells and CD4lo CD8hi doubly positive (DP) lymphocytes at late stage infiltrate granuloma-like structures and could correlate with the IL-10 and TNF-α production. These data offer a base frame to explain cellular events that guide infection control or fungal persistence. PMID:27799331

  3. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2015-12-22

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system.

  4. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system. PMID:26703587

  5. Regulation of cellular chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    The identity and functionality of eukaryotic cells is defined not just by their genomic sequence which remains constant between cell types, but by their gene expression profiles governed by epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic controls maintain and change the chromatin state throughout development, as exemplified by the setting up of cellular memory for the regulation and maintenance of homeotic genes in proliferating progenitors during embryonic development. Higher order chromatin structure in reversibly arrested adult stem cells also involves epigenetic regulation and in this review we highlight common trends governing chromatin states, focusing on quiescence and differentiation during myogenesis. Together, these diverse developmental modules reveal the dynamic nature of chromatin regulation providing fresh insights into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in potentiating development and differentiation. PMID:20592864

  6. miR-27a controls triacylglycerol synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells by targeting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Tang, K Q; Wang, Y N; Zan, L S; Yang, W C

    2017-03-08

    Growing evidence has revealed that microRNA are central elements in milk fat synthesis in mammary epithelial cells. A negative regulator of adipocyte fat synthesis, miR-27a has been reported to be involved in the regulation of milk fat synthesis in goat mammary epithelial cells; however, the regulatory role of miR-27a in bovine milk fat synthesis remains unclear. In the present study, primary bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMEC) were harvested from mid-lactation cows and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F-12 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum, 5 μg/mL of insulin, 1 μg/mL of hydrocortisone, 2 μg/mL of prolactin, 1 μg/mL of progesterone, 100 U/mL of penicillin, and 100 μg/mL of streptomycin. We found that the overexpression of miR-27a significantly suppressed lipid droplet formation and decreased the cellular triacylglycerol (TAG) levels, whereas inhibition of miR-27a resulted in a greater lipid droplet formation and TAG accumulation in BMEC. Meanwhile, overexpression of miR-27a inhibited mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ), perilipin 2 (PLIN2), and fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3), whereas miR-27a downregulation increased PPARG, C/EBPβ, FABP3, and CCAAT enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) mRNA expression. Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed the protein level of PPARG in miR-27a mimic and inhibitor transfection groups to be consistent with the mRNA expression response. Moreover, luciferase reporter assays verified that PPARG was the direct target of miR-27a. In summary, these results indicate that miR-27a has the ability to control TAG synthesis in BMEC via targeting PPARG, suggesting that miR-27a could potentially be used to improve beneficial milk components in dairy cows.

  7. Specific β-containing Integrins Exert Differential Control on Proliferation and Two-dimensional Collective Cell Migration in Mammary Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Jeanes, Alexa I.; Wang, Pengbo; Moreno-Layseca, Paulina; Paul, Nikki; Cheung, Julia; Tsang, Ricky; Akhtar, Nasreen; Foster, Fiona M.; Brennan, Keith; Streuli, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how cell cycle is regulated in normal mammary epithelia is essential for deciphering defects of breast cancer and therefore for developing new therapies. Signals provided by both the extracellular matrix and growth factors are essential for epithelial cell proliferation. However, the mechanisms by which adhesion controls cell cycle in normal epithelia are poorly established. In this study, we describe the consequences of removing the β1-integrin gene from primary cultures of mammary epithelial cells in situ, using CreER. Upon β1-integrin gene deletion, the cells were unable to progress efficiently through S-phase, but were still able to undergo collective two-dimensional migration. These responses are explained by the presence of β3-integrin in β1-integrin-null cells, indicating that integrins containing different β-subunits exert differential control on mammary epithelial proliferation and migration. β1-Integrin deletion did not inhibit growth factor signaling to Erk or prevent the recruitment of core adhesome components to focal adhesions. Instead the S-phase arrest resulted from defective Rac activation and Erk translocation to the nucleus. Rac inhibition prevented Erk translocation and blocked proliferation. Activated Rac1 rescued the proliferation defect in β1-integrin-depleted cells, indicating that this GTPase is essential in propagating proliferative β1-integrin signals. These results show that β1-integrins promote cell cycle in mammary epithelial cells, whereas β3-integrins are involved in migration. PMID:22511753

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of p21/CIP1 Cell Cycle Inhibitor by PDEF Controls Cell Proliferation and Mammary Tumor Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Jeremy S.; Sabherwal, Yamini; Shi, Heidi Y.; Sriraman, Venkataraman; Richards, JoAnne; Minella, Alex; Turner, David P.; Watson, Dennis K.; Zhang, Ming

    2010-01-01

    The Ets family of transcription factors control a myriad of cellular processes and contribute to the underlying genetic loss of cellular homeostasis resulting in cancer. PDEF (prostate-derived Ets factor) has been under investigation for its role in tumor development and progression. However, the role of PDEF in cancer development has been controversial. Some reports link PDEF to tumor promoter, and others show tumor-suppressing functions in various systems under different conditions. So far, there has been no conclusive evidence from in vivo experiments to prove the role of PDEF. We have used both in vitro and in vivo systems to provide a conclusive role of PDEF in the progression process. PDEF-expressing cells block the cell growth rate, and this retardation was reversible when PDEF expression was silenced with PDEF-specific small interfering RNA. When these PDEF-expressing cells were orthotopically implanted into the mouse mammary gland, tumor incidence and growth rate were significantly retarded. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PDEF expression partially blocked cell cycle progression at G1/S without an effect on apoptosis. PDEF overexpression resulted in an increase in p21/CIP1 at both the mRNA and protein levels, resulting in decreased Cdk2 activity. Promoter deletion analysis, electrophoresis mobility shift assays, and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies identified the functional Ets DNA binding site at −2118 bp of the p21/CIP1 gene promoter. This site is capable of binding and responding to PDEF. Furthermore, we silenced p21/CIP1 expression in PDEF-overexpressing cells by small interfering RNA. p21-silenced PDEF cells exhibited significantly increased cell growth in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the p21 regulation by PDEF as a key player. These experiments identified PDEF as a new transcription factor that directly regulates p21/CIP1 expression under non-stressed conditions. This study conclusively proves that PDEF is a breast tumor suppressor for

  9. Transcriptional control of fungal cell cycle and cellular events by Fkh2, a forkhead transcription factor in an insect pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan-Juan; Qiu, Lei; Cai, Qing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the cell cycle by forkhead (Fkh) transcription factors is likely associated with fungal adaptation to host and environment. Here we show that Fkh2, an ortholog of yeast Fkh1/2, orchestrates cell cycle and many cellular events of Beauveria bassiana, a filamentous fungal insect pathogen. Deletion of Fkh2 in B. bassiana resulted in dramatic down-regulation of the cyclin-B gene cluster and hence altered cell cycle (longer G2/M and S, but shorter G0/G1, phases) in unicellular blastospores. Consequently, ΔFkh2 produced twice as many, but smaller, blastospores than wild-type under submerged conditions, and formed denser septa and shorter/broader cells in aberrantly branched hyphae. In these hyphae, clustered genes required for septation and conidiation were remarkedly up-regulated, followed by higher yield and slower germination of aerial conidia. Moreover, ΔFkh2 displayed attenuated virulence and decreased tolerance to chemical and environmental stresses, accompanied with altered transcripts and activities of phenotype-influencing proteins or enzymes. All the changes in ΔFkh2 were restored by Fkh2 complementation. All together, Fkh2-dependent transcriptional control is vital for the adaptation of B. bassiana to diverse habitats of host insects and hence contributes to its biological control potential against arthropod pests. PMID:25955538

  10. In vitro control of fasciation in proliferating nucellar embryos of Mangifera indica L. var totapari red small for cloning.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, H C; Agnihotri, S; Sharma, M; Sharma, A K; Jain, M; Chourasia, A

    2003-11-01

    Nucellar tissue contained in ovular halves of young fruits of Mangifera indica L. totapari red small, a dwarfing rootstock, differentiated fasciated embryonal structures in presence of 6-benzylaminopurine [BAP(0.15 mg l(-1))], 6-(gamma-gamma-dimethylallylamino) purine [2iP(0.15 mg l(-1))] and indole-3-acetic acid [(IAA(0.5 mg l(-1))] incorporated in the semisolid medium during 50-60 days. Due to embryonal fasciation, hardly 2-3 well-formed embryos could be obtained per culture of proliferating embryos. Of the 3 ethylene inhibitors [L-alpha-(2-aminoethoxyvinyl)-glycine-HCl (AVG), AgNO3 and salicylic acid (SA)] used, embryonal fasciation and necrosis of intervening tissue was completely controlled by 3-4 subcultures of fasciated mass of embryos under the influence of AVG (0.05 mg l(-1)) in presence of adenine sulphate [AdS (50 mg l(-1))] incorporated in the same medium. Almost synchronized development of isolated embryos, measuring ca 2 cm in length, was observed in a different medium used in liquid stationary state and supplemented, particularly with stress-producing substances [abscisic acid (ABA, 0.01 mg l(-1)); and polyethylene glycol (PEG, 100 mg l(-1))] besides certain other modifications. About 34% convertibility of processed embryos was obtained during a period of 90 days. The plantlets had well-developed roots along with laterals which were longer than leafy shoots. In vitro raised plants survived ex vitro for about 2 months.

  11. The Culture of Pediococcus pentosaceus T1 Inhibits 
Listeria Proliferation in Salmon Fillets and Controls Maturation of Kimchi.

    PubMed

    Jang, Seongho; Lee, Dongyun; Jang, Il Sang; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the antilisterial effect of Pediococcus pentosaceus T1, which was isolated from kimchi, and to assess its potential for extending the shelf life of salmon and kimchi. Pediococcus pentosaceus T1 culture effectively inhibited proliferation of Listeria monocytogenes in a dose-dependent manner in a salmon-based medium. Antilisterial effect of the culture was stronger than that of nisin, an antibacterial peptide, as evidenced by lower minimum inhibitory concentration value (20 mg/mL) compared to nisin (over 20 mg/mL). P. pentosaceus T1 culture also effectively inhibited the growth of Listeria in salmon fillet. In particular, the culture (6 g per 100 mL) showed a stronger inhibitory effect than sodium hypochlorite (0.2 mg/mL), a disinfectant used in food processing. In kimchi fermentation, the treatment with P. pentosaceus T1 culture suppressed changes of acidity and pH during maturation. The inhibitory effect of the culture on kimchi lactic acid bacteria, which include Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus sakei, led to a drastic decrease in maturation rates of kimchi. Moreover, sensory test on kimchi treated with P. pentosaceus T1 showed that the culture improved overall acceptability of kimchi, which can be observed in higher scores of sourness, texture, off-flavour and mouthfeel compared with untreated kimchi. The results of this study suggest that kimchi-derived P. pentosaceus T1 could be a potential antilisterial agent in fish products as well as a starter to control overmaturation of kimchi.

  12. The Culture of Pediococcus pentosaceus T1 Inhibits 
Listeria Proliferation in Salmon Fillets and Controls Maturation of Kimchi

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Seongho; Lee, Dongyun; Jang, Il Sang; Choi, Hyeon-Son

    2015-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study is to evaluate the antilisterial effect of Pediococcus pentosaceus T1, which was isolated from kimchi, and to assess its potential for extending the shelf life of salmon and kimchi. Pediococcus pentosaceus T1 culture effectively inhibited proliferation of Listeria monocytogenes in a dose-dependent manner in a salmon-based medium. Antilisterial effect of the culture was stronger than that of nisin, an antibacterial peptide, as evidenced by lower minimum inhibitory concentration value (20 mg/mL) compared to nisin (over 20 mg/mL). P. pentosaceus T1 culture also effectively inhibited the growth of Listeria in salmon fillet. In particular, the culture (6 g per 100 mL) showed a stronger inhibitory effect than sodium hypochlorite (0.2 mg/mL), a disinfectant used in food processing. In kimchi fermentation, the treatment with P. pentosaceus T1 culture suppressed changes of acidity and pH during maturation. The inhibitory effect of the culture on kimchi lactic acid bacteria, which include Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Lactobacillus sakei, led to a drastic decrease in maturation rates of kimchi. Moreover, sensory test on kimchi treated with P. pentosaceus T1 showed that the culture improved overall acceptability of kimchi, which can be observed in higher scores of sourness, texture, off-flavour and mouthfeel compared with untreated kimchi. The results of this study suggest that kimchi-derived P. pentosaceus T1 could be a potential antilisterial agent in fish products as well as a starter to control overmaturation of kimchi. PMID:27904329

  13. Cellular control over spicule formation in sea urchin embryos: A structural approach.

    PubMed

    Beniash, E; Addadi, L; Weiner, S

    1999-03-01

    The spicules of the sea urchin embryo form in intracellular membrane-delineated compartments. Each spicule is composed of a single crystal of calcite and amorphous calcium carbonate. The latter transforms with time into calcite by overgrowth of the preexisting crystal. Relationships between the membrane surrounding the spiculogenic compartment and the spicule mineral phase were studied in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) using freeze-fracture. In all the replicas observed the spicules were tightly surrounded by the membrane. Furthermore, a variety of structures that are related to the material exchange process across the membrane were observed. The spiculogenic cells were separated from other cell types of the embryo, frozen, and freeze-dried on the TEM grids. The contents of electron-dense granules in the spiculogenic cells were shown by electron diffraction to be composed of amorphous calcium carbonate. These observations are consistent with the notion that the amorphous calcium carbonate-containing granules contain the precursor mineral phase for spicule formation and that the membrane surrounding the forming spicule is involved both in transport of material and in controlling spicule mineralization.

  14. Trans-Membrane Area Asymmetry Controls the Shape of Cellular Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Beznoussenko, Galina V.; Pilyugin, Sergei S.; Geerts, Willie J. C.; Kozlov, Michael M.; Burger, Koert N. J.; Luini, Alberto; Derganc, Jure; Mironov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane organelles often have complicated shapes and differ in their volume, surface area and membrane curvature. The ratio between the surface area of the cytosolic and luminal leaflets (trans-membrane area asymmetry (TAA)) determines the membrane curvature within different sites of the organelle. Thus, the shape of the organelle could be critically dependent on TAA. Here, using mathematical modeling and stereological measurements of TAA during fast transformation of organelle shapes, we present evidence that suggests that when organelle volume and surface area are constant, TAA can regulate transformation of the shape of the Golgi apparatus, endosomal multivesicular bodies, and microvilli of brush borders of kidney epithelial cells. Extraction of membrane curvature by small spheres, such as COPI-dependent vesicles within the Golgi (extraction of positive curvature), or by intraluminal vesicles within endosomes (extraction of negative curvature) controls the shape of these organelles. For instance, Golgi tubulation is critically dependent on the fusion of COPI vesicles with Golgi cisternae, and vice versa, for the extraction of membrane curvature into 50–60 nm vesicles, to induce transformation of Golgi tubules into cisternae. Also, formation of intraluminal ultra-small vesicles after fusion of endosomes allows equilibration of their TAA, volume and surface area. Finally, when microvilli of the brush border are broken into vesicles and microvilli fragments, TAA of these membranes remains the same as TAA of the microvilli. Thus, TAA has a significant role in transformation of organelle shape when other factors remain constant. PMID:25761238

  15. Inferring Growth Control Mechanisms in Growing Multi-cellular Spheroids of NSCLC Cells from Spatial-Temporal Image Data

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Margareta; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.; Drasdo, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantitative single cell-based mathematical model for multi-cellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) of SK-MES-1 cells, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, growing under various nutrient conditions: we confront the simulations performed with this model with data on the growth kinetics and spatial labeling patterns for cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM), cell distribution and cell death. We start with a simple model capturing part of the experimental observations. We then show, by performing a sensitivity analysis at each development stage of the model that its complexity needs to be stepwise increased to account for further experimental growth conditions. We thus ultimately arrive at a model that mimics the MCTS growth under multiple conditions to a great extent. Interestingly, the final model, is a minimal model capable of explaining all data simultaneously in the sense, that the number of mechanisms it contains is sufficient to explain the data and missing out any of its mechanisms did not permit fit between all data and the model within physiological parameter ranges. Nevertheless, compared to earlier models it is quite complex i.e., it includes a wide range of mechanisms discussed in biological literature. In this model, the cells lacking oxygen switch from aerobe to anaerobe glycolysis and produce lactate. Too high concentrations of lactate or too low concentrations of ATP promote cell death. Only if the extracellular matrix density overcomes a certain threshold, cells are able to enter the cell cycle. Dying cells produce a diffusive growth inhibitor. Missing out the spatial information would not permit to infer the mechanisms at work. Our findings suggest that this iterative data integration together with intermediate model sensitivity analysis at each model development stage, provide a promising strategy to infer predictive yet minimal (in the above sense) quantitative models of tumor growth, as prospectively of other tissue

  16. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator*

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Róisín M.; Finlay, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  17. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses.

  18. Cellularized Bilayer Pullulan-Gelatin Hydrogel for Skin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-05-01

    Skin substitutes significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of patients with burn injuries and chronic wounds. However, current skin substitutes have disadvantages related to high costs and inadequate skin regeneration due to highly inflammatory wounds. Thus, new skin substitutes are needed. By combining two polymers, pullulan, an inexpensive polysaccharide with antioxidant properties, and gelatin, a derivative of collagen with high water absorbency, we created a novel inexpensive hydrogel-named PG-1 for "pullulan-gelatin first generation hydrogel"-suitable for skin substitutes. After incorporating human fibroblasts and keratinocytes onto PG-1 using centrifugation over 5 days, we created a cellularized bilayer skin substitute. Cellularized PG-1 was compared to acellular PG-1 and no hydrogel (control) in vivo in a mouse excisional skin biopsy model using newly developed dome inserts to house the skin substitutes and prevent mouse skin contraction during wound healing. PG-1 had an average pore size of 61.69 μm with an ideal elastic modulus, swelling behavior, and biodegradability for use as a hydrogel for skin substitutes. Excellent skin cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and morphology were visualized through live/dead assays, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation assays, and confocal microscopy. Trichrome and immunohistochemical staining of excisional wounds treated with the cellularized skin substitute revealed thicker newly formed skin with a higher proportion of actively proliferating cells and incorporation of human cells compared to acellular PG-1 or control. Excisional wounds treated with acellular or cellularized hydrogels showed significantly less macrophage infiltration and increased angiogenesis 14 days post skin biopsy compared to control. These results show that PG-1 has ideal mechanical characteristics and allows ideal cellular characteristics. In vivo evidence suggests that cellularized PG-1 promotes skin regeneration and may

  19. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  20. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  1. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies. PMID:26587712

  2. K48-linked KLF4 ubiquitination by E3 ligase Mule controls T-cell proliferation and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Zhenyue; Sheng, Yi; Duncan, Gordon S.; Li, Wanda Y.; Dominguez, Carmen; Sylvester, Jennifer; Su, Yu-Wen; Lin, Gloria H.Y.; Snow, Bryan E.; Brenner, Dirk; You-Ten, Annick; Haight, Jillian; Inoue, Satoshi; Wakeham, Andrew; Elford, Alisha; Hamilton, Sara; Liang, Yi; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan C.; He, Housheng Hansen; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Mak, Tak W.

    2017-01-01

    T-cell proliferation is regulated by ubiquitination but the underlying molecular mechanism remains obscure. Here we report that Lys-48-linked ubiquitination of the transcription factor KLF4 mediated by the E3 ligase Mule promotes T-cell entry into S phase. Mule is elevated in T cells upon TCR engagement, and Mule deficiency in T cells blocks proliferation because KLF4 accumulates and drives upregulation of its transcriptional targets E2F2 and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27. T-cell-specific Mule knockout (TMKO) mice develop exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), show impaired generation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells with reduced cytokine production, and fail to clear LCMV infections. Thus, Mule-mediated ubiquitination of the novel substrate KLF4 regulates T-cell proliferation, autoimmunity and antiviral immune responses in vivo. PMID:28084302

  3. Antagonistic interplay between necdin and Bmi1 controls proliferation of neural precursor cells in the embryonic mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Minamide, Ryohei; Fujiwara, Kazushiro; Hasegawa, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the neocortex exhibit a high proliferation capacity during early embryonic development and give rise to cortical projection neurons after maturation. Necdin, a mammal-specific MAGE (melanoma antigen) family protein that possesses anti-mitotic and pro-survival activities, is expressed abundantly in postmitotic neurons and moderately in tissue-specific stem cells or progenitors. Necdin interacts with E2F transcription factors and suppresses E2F1-dependent transcriptional activation of the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1 gene. Here we show that necdin serves as a suppressor of NPC proliferation in the embryonic neocortex. Necdin is moderately expressed in the ventricular zone of mouse embryonic neocortex, in which proliferative cell populations are significantly increased in necdin-null mice. In the neocortex of necdin-null embryos, expression of Cdk1 and Sox2, a stem cell marker, is significantly increased, whereas expression of p16, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, is markedly diminished. Cdk1 and p16 expression levels are also significantly increased and decreased, respectively, in primary NPCs prepared from necdin-null embryos. Intriguingly, necdin interacts directly with Bmi1, a Polycomb group protein that suppresses p16 expression and promotes NPC proliferation. In HEK293A cells transfected with luciferase reporter constructs, necdin relieves Bmi1-dependent repression of p16 promoter activity, whereas Bmi1 counteracts necdin-mediated repression of E2F1-dependent Cdk1 promoter activity. In lentivirus-infected primary NPCs, necdin overexpression increases p16 expression, suppresses Cdk1 expression, and inhibits NPC proliferation, whereas Bmi1 overexpression suppresses p16 expression, increases Cdk1 expression, and promotes NPC proliferation. Our data suggest that embryonic NPC proliferation in the neocortex is regulated by the antagonistic interplay between necdin and Bmi1.

  4. Axl as a mediator of cellular growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Haley; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    The control of cellular growth and proliferation is key to the maintenance of homeostasis. Survival, proliferation, and arrest are regulated, in part, by Growth Arrest Specific 6 (Gas6) through binding to members of the TAM receptor tyrosine kinase family. Activation of the TAM receptors leads to downstream signaling through common kinases, but the exact mechanism within each cellular context varies and remains to be completely elucidated. Deregulation of the TAM family, due to its central role in mediating cellular proliferation, has been implicated in multiple diseases. Axl was cloned as the first TAM receptor in a search for genes involved in the progression of chronic to acute-phase leukemia, and has since been established as playing a critical role in the progression of cancer. The oncogenic nature of Axl is demonstrated through its activation of signaling pathways involved in proliferation, migration, inhibition of apoptosis, and therapeutic resistance. Despite its recent discovery, significant progress has been made in the development of effective clinical therapeutics targeting Axl. In order to accurately define the role of Axl in normal and diseased processes, it must be analyzed in a cell type-specific context. PMID:25344858

  5. Preparation of a target specific fraction controlling the proliferation of granulocytes. The abolishment of the specificity by glutathion.

    PubMed

    Klupp, T; Balázs, A; Sajgó, M

    1980-01-01

    A low molecular weight fraction (GI-3) was prepared from peripheral horse blood leukocytes. This fraction inhibits the proliferation of bone marrow cells, the effect is dose dependent. The proliferation of thymocytes and HeLa cells is not affected by GI-3. This specificity was abolished when glutathion was applied together with GI-3; the 3H-TdR uptake of thymocytes in vitro was completely inhibited, however, slight or no effect was observed on bone marrow and HeLa cells, respectively.

  6. Control of Formation and Cellular Detachment from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms by Cyclic di-GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Thormann, Kai M.; Duttler, Stefanie; Saville, Renee; Hyodo, Mamoru; Shukla, Soni; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2006-04-01

    Stability and resilience against environmental perturbations are critical properties of medical and environmental biofilms and pose important targets for their control. Biofilm stability is determined by two mutually exclusive processes: attachment of cells to and detachment from the biofilm matrix. Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an environmentally versatile, Fe(III) and Mn(IV) mineral -reducing microorganism, we identified mxdABCD as a new set of genes essential for formation of a three-dimensional biofilm. Molecular analysis revealed that mxdA encodes a cyclic bis(3',5')guanylic acid (cyclic di-GMP)-forming enzyme with an unusual GGDEF motif, i.e., NVDEF, which is essential for its function. mxdB encodes a putative membrane-associated glycosyl transferase. Both genes are essential for matrix attachment. The attachment-deficient phenotype of a Delta mxdA mutant was rescued by ectopic expression of VCA0956, encoding another diguanylate cyclase. Interestingly, a rapid cellular detachment from the biofilm occurred upon induction of yhjH, a gene encoding an enzyme that has been shown to have phosphodiesterase activity. In this way, it was possible to bypass the previously identified sudden depletion of molecular oxygen as an environmental trigger to induce biofilm dissolution. We propose a model for c-di-GMP as a key intracellular regulator for controlling biofilm stability by shifting the state of a biofilm cell between attachment and detachment in a concentration-dependent manner.

  7. Cellular metabolic rates in cultured primary dermal fibroblasts and myoblast cells from fast-growing and control Coturnix quail.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Ana Gabriela; Cooper-Mullin, Clara; Anthony, Nicholas B; Williams, Joseph B

    2014-05-01

    Fibroblast cells have been extensively used in research, including in medicine, physiology, physiological-ecology, and conservation biology. However, whether the physiology of fibroblasts reflects the physiology of other cell types in the same animal is unknown. Dermal fibroblasts are responsible for generating connective tissue and involved in wound healing, but generally, this cell type is thought to be metabolically inactive until it is required at the site of tissue damage. Thus, one might question whether fibroblasts are a representative model system to portray the metabolic profile of the whole organism, as compared with cells isolated from other tissues, like muscle, brain or kidneys. To explore whether fibroblasts have the same metabolic profile as do myoblast cells, we cultured cells from day-old chicks of quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) selected for fast-growth or normal growth (our control group). Our results suggest that isolated primary fibroblasts and myoblast cells had higher rates of glycolysis, oxygen consumption and more mitochondria in the fast-growing line than in the control line. Our findings lend support for the idea that fibroblasts are a representative cell system to characterize the whole organism metabolic signature at the cellular-level. These data are striking, however, because fibroblasts had higher rates of metabolism for every parameter measured than myoblast cells isolated from the same individuals.

  8. CK2 abrogates the inhibitory effects of PRH/HHEX on prostate cancer cell migration and invasion and acts through PRH to control cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Y H; Kershaw, R M; Humphreys, E H; Assis Junior, E M; Chaudhri, S; Jayaraman, P-S; Gaston, K

    2017-01-01

    PRH/HHEX (proline-rich homeodomain protein/haematopoietically expressed homeobox protein) is a transcription factor that controls cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell migration. Our previous work has shown that in haematopoietic cells, Protein Kinase CK2-dependent phosphorylation of PRH results in the inhibition of PRH DNA-binding activity, increased cleavage of PRH by the proteasome and the misregulation of PRH target genes. Here we show that PRH and hyper-phosphorylated PRH are present in normal prostate epithelial cells, and that hyper-phosphorylated PRH levels are elevated in benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatic adenocarcinoma, and prostate cancer cell lines. A reduction in PRH protein levels increases the motility of normal prostate epithelial cells and conversely, PRH over-expression inhibits prostate cancer cell migration and blocks the ability of these cells to invade an extracellular matrix. We show that CK2 over-expression blocks the repression of prostate cancer cell migration and invasion by PRH. In addition, we show that PRH knockdown in normal immortalised prostate cells results in an increase in the population of cells capable of colony formation in Matrigel, as well as increased cell invasion and decreased E-cadherin expression. Inhibition of CK2 reduces PRH phosphorylation and reduces prostate cell proliferation but the effects of CK2 inhibition on cell proliferation are abrogated in PRH knockdown cells. These data suggest that the increased phosphorylation of PRH in prostate cancer cells increases both cell proliferation and tumour cell migration/invasion. PMID:28134934

  9. A novel IL-17 signaling pathway controlling keratinocyte proliferation and tumorigenesis via the TRAF4-ERK5 axis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling; Chen, Xing; Zhao, Junjie; Martin, Bradley; Zepp, Jarod A; Ko, Jennifer S; Gu, Chunfang; Cai, Gang; Ouyang, Wenjun; Sen, Ganes; Stark, George R; Su, Bing; Vines, Charlotte M; Tournier, Cathy; Hamilton, Thomas A; Vidimos, Allison; Gastman, Brian; Liu, Caini; Li, Xiaoxia

    2015-09-21

    Although IL-17 is emerging as an important cytokine in cancer promotion and progression, the underlining molecular mechanism remains unclear. Previous studies suggest that IL-17 (IL-17A) sustains a chronic inflammatory microenvironment that favors tumor formation. Here we report a novel IL-17-mediated cascade via the IL-17R-Act1-TRAF4-MEKK3-ERK5 positive circuit that directly stimulates keratinocyte proliferation and tumor formation. Although this axis dictates the expression of target genes Steap4 (a metalloreductase for cell metabolism and proliferation) and p63 (a transcription factor for epidermal stem cell proliferation), Steap4 is required for the IL-17-induced sustained expansion of p63(+) basal cells in the epidermis. P63 (a positive transcription factor for the Traf4 promoter) induces TRAF4 expression in keratinocytes. Thus, IL-17-induced Steap4-p63 expression forms a positive feedback loop through p63-mediated TRAF4 expression, driving IL-17-dependent sustained activation of the TRAF4-ERK5 axis for keratinocyte proliferation and tumor formation.

  10. NTPDase2 and purinergic signaling control progenitor cell proliferation in neurogenic niches of the adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Gampe, Kristine; Stefani, Jennifer; Hammer, Klaus; Brendel, Peter; Pötzsch, Alexandra; Enikolopov, Grigori; Enjyoji, Keiichi; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Robson, Simon C; Zimmermann, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Nerve cells are continuously generated from stem cells in the adult mammalian subventricular zone (SVZ) and hippocampal dentate gyrus. We have previously noted that stem/progenitor cells in the SVZ and the subgranular layer (SGL) of the dentate gyrus express high levels of plasma membrane-bound nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 2 (NTPDase2), an ectoenzyme that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleoside diphosphates and triphosphates. We inferred that deletion of NTPDase2 would increase local extracellular nucleoside triphosphate concentrations perturbing purinergic signaling and boosting progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Using newly generated mice globally null for Entpd2, we demonstrate that NTPDase2 is the major ectonucleotidase in these progenitor cell-rich areas. Using BrdU-labeling protocols, we have measured stem cell proliferation and determined long-term survival of cell progeny under basal conditions. Brains of Entpd2 null mice revealed increased progenitor cell proliferation in both the SVZ and the SGL. However, this occurred without noteworthy alterations in long-term progeny survival. The hippocampal stem cell pool and the pool of the intermediate progenitor type-2 cells clearly expanded. However, substantive proportions of these proliferating cells were lost during expansion at around type-3 stage. Cell loss was paralleled by decreases in cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation in the doublecortin-positive progenitor cell population and by an increase in labeling for activated caspase-3 levels. We propose that NTPDase2 has functionality in scavenging mitogenic extracellular nucleoside triphosphates in neurogenic niches of the adult brain, thereby acting as a homeostatic regulator of nucleotide-mediated neural progenitor cell proliferation and expansion.

  11. Genetic interaction between pku300 and fbn2b controls endocardial cell proliferation and valve development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Yu, Qingming; Wu, Qing; Bu, Ye; Chang, Nan-Nan; Yan, Shouyu; Zhou, Xiao-Hai; Zhu, Xiaojun; Xiong, Jing-Wei

    2013-03-15

    Abnormal cardiac valve morphogenesis is a common cause of human congenital heart disease. The molecular mechanisms regulating endocardial cell proliferation and differentiation into cardiac valves remain largely unknown, although great progress has been made on the endocardial contribution to the atrioventricular cushion and valve formation. We found that scotch tape(te382) (sco(te382)) encodes a novel transmembrane protein that is crucial for endocardial cell proliferation and heart valve development. The zebrafish sco(te382) mutant showed diminished endocardial cell proliferation, lack of heart valve leaflets and abnormal common cardinal and caudal veins. Positional cloning revealed a C946T nonsense mutation of a novel gene pku300 in the sco(te382) locus, which encoded a 540-amino-acid protein on cell membranes with one putative transmembrane domain and three IgG domains. A known G3935T missense mutation of fbn2b was also found ∼570 kb away from pku300 in sco(te382) mutants. The genetic mutant sco(pku300), derived from sco(te382), only had the C946T mutation of pku300 and showed reduced numbers of atrial endocardial cells and an abnormal common cardinal vein. Morpholino knockdown of fbn2b led to fewer atrial endocardial cells and an abnormal caudal vein. Knockdown of both pku300 and fbn2b phenocopied these phenotypes in sco(te382) genetic mutants. pku300 transgenic expression in endocardial and endothelial cells, but not myocardial cells, partially rescued the atrial endocardial defects in sco(te382) mutants. Mechanistically, pku300 and fbn2b were required for endocardial cell proliferation, endocardial Notch signaling and the proper formation of endocardial cell adhesion and tight junctions, all of which are crucial for cardiac valve development. We conclude that pku300 and fbn2b represent the few genes capable of regulating endocardial cell proliferation and signaling in zebrafish cardiac valve development.

  12. Oma1 Links Mitochondrial Protein Quality Control and TOR Signaling To Modulate Physiological Plasticity and Cellular Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Bohovych, Iryna; Kastora, Stavroula; Christianson, Sara; Topil, Danelle; Kim, Heejeong; Fangman, Teresa; Zhou, You J; Barrientos, Antoni; Lee, Jaekwon; Brown, Alistair J P; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2016-09-01

    A network of conserved proteases known as the intramitochondrial quality control (IMQC) system is central to mitochondrial protein homeostasis and cellular health. IMQC proteases also appear to participate in establishment of signaling cues for mitochondrion-to-nucleus communication. However, little is known about this process. Here, we show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inactivation of the membrane-bound IMQC protease Oma1 interferes with oxidative-stress responses through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during logarithmic growth and reduced stress signaling via the TORC1-Rim15-Msn2/Msn4 axis. Pharmacological or genetic prevention of ROS accumulation in Oma1-deficient cells restores this defective TOR signaling. Additionally, inactivation of the Oma1 ortholog in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans also alters TOR signaling and, unexpectedly, leads to increased resistance to neutrophil killing and virulence in the invertebrate animal model Galleria mellonella Our findings reveal a novel and evolutionarily conserved link between IMQC and TOR-mediated signaling that regulates physiological plasticity and pancellular oxidative-stress responses.

  13. Functional interplay between p63 and p53 controls RUNX1 function in the transition from proliferation to differentiation in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Masse, I; Barbollat-Boutrand, L; Molina, M; Berthier-Vergnes, O; Joly-Tonetti, N; Martin, M T; Caron de Fromentel, C; Kanitakis, J; Lamartine, J

    2012-06-07

    The interfollicular epidermis is continuously renewed, thanks to a regulated balance between proliferation and differentiation. The ΔNp63 transcription factor has a key role in the control of this process. It has been shown that ΔNp63 directly regulates Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) transcription factor expression in mouse keratinocytes. The present study showed for the first time that RUNX1 is expressed in normal human interfollicular epidermis and that its expression is tightly regulated during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. It demonstrated that ΔNp63 directly binds two different RUNX1 regulatory DNA sequences and modulates RUNX1 expression differentially in proliferative or differentiated human keratinocytes. It also showed that the regulation of RUNX1 expression by ΔNp63 is dependent on p53 and that this coregulation relies on differential binding and activation of RUNX1 regulatory sequences by ΔNp63 and p53. We also found that RUNX1 inhibits keratinocyte proliferation and activates directly the expression of KRT1, a critical actor in early keratinocyte differentiation. Finally, we described that RUNX1 expression, similar to ΔNp63 and p53, was strongly expressed and downregulated in basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas respectively. Taken together, these data shed light on the importance of tight control of the functional interplay between ΔNp63 and p53 in regulating RUNX1 transcription factor expression for proper regulation of interfollicular epidermal homeostasis.

  14. The DEAD-box RNA helicase 51 controls non-small cell lung cancer proliferation by regulating cell cycle progression via multiple pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojing; Liu, Hongli; Zhao, Chengling; Li, Wei; Xu, Huanbai; Chen, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    The genetic regulation of cell cycle progression and cell proliferation plays a role in the growth of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), one of the most common causes of cancer-related mortality. Although DEAD-box RNA helicases are known to play a role in cancer development, including lung cancer, the potential involvement of the novel family member DDX51 has not yet been investigated. In the current study we assessed the role of DDX51 in NSCLC using a siRNA-based approach. DDX51 siRNA-expressing cells exhibited a slower cell proliferation rate and underwent arrest in S-phase of the cell cycle compared with control cells. Microarray analyses revealed that DDX51siRNA expression resulted in the dysregulation of a number of cell signalling pathways. Moreover, injection of DDX51 siRNA into an animal model resulted in the formation of smaller tumours compared with the control group. We also assessed the expression of DDX51 in patients with NSCLC, and the data revealed that the expression was correlated with patient age but no other risk factors. Overall, our data suggest for the first time that DDX51 aids cell cancer proliferation by regulating multiple signalling pathways, and that this protein might be a therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:27198888

  15. Metabolic and protein interaction sub-networks controlling the proliferation rate of cancer cells and their impact on patient survival.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Amir; Bordel, Sergio

    2013-10-24

    Cancer cells can have a broad scope of proliferation rates. Here we aim to identify the molecular mechanisms that allow some cancer cell lines to grow up to 4 times faster than other cell lines. The correlation of gene expression profiles with the growth rate in 60 different cell lines has been analyzed using several genome-scale biological networks and new algorithms. New possible regulatory feedback loops have been suggested and the known roles of several cell cycle related transcription factors have been confirmed. Over 100 growth-correlated metabolic sub-networks have been identified, suggesting a key role of simultaneous lipid synthesis and degradation in the energy supply of the cancer cells growth. Many metabolic sub-networks involved in cell line proliferation appeared also to correlate negatively with the survival expectancy of colon cancer patients.

  16. Regulation of Srpr Expression by miR-330-5p Controls Proliferation of Mouse Epidermal Keratinocyte

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong-Kyu; Yoo, Hye-In; Choi, Keonwoo; Lee, Ah-Reum; Yoon, Sungjoo Kim

    2016-01-01

    Srpr is a gene encoding α subunit of the signal recognition particle receptor which is involved in the targeting and translocation of nascent secretory and membrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum. Previous studies showed aberrant expression of Srpr in several cell types with abnormal growth rate. Although Srpr is expressed in various tissues including skin, the role of Srpr in keratinocytes and regulation of its expression by miRNAs have not been studied. In this study, we investigated the role of SRPR and regulation of its expression by miRNA in skin keratinocytes. We found that SRPR was highly expressed in epidermal keratinocytes and regulated keratinocyte proliferation by affecting cell cycle progression. We also demonstrated that miR-330-5p directly inhibits Srpr expression. These data suggest that miR-330-5p-mediated regulation of the SRPR level is needed for the regulation of proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes. PMID:27768721

  17. JPRS Report Proliferation Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    Britain are also involved in the project to improve the [Transmitted via KYODO] safety and design of the reactor used at the plant. Finnish specialists...information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical , and biological weapons, including delivery systems and...Ministry Official Missile Control, Korea [ZHONGGUO XINWEN SHE] .................................. 3 Spokesman Denies Export of Reactor to Syria [RENMIN

  18. JPRS Report Proliferation Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical , and...HUNGARY Government Tightens Chemical Arms Trade Controls [MTI] 10 YUGOSLAVIA Consortium Agrees To Build USSR Chemical Plant [TANJUG] 10...May Sell Nuclear Research Reactor to Iran [AFP] 14 Plans To Sell Iran Nuclear Reactor Denied [Beijing XINHUA] 14 Official Defends Right To

  19. CDK2 differentially controls normal cell senescence and cancer cell proliferation upon exposure to reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Chae Young; Lee, Seung-Min; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} differently adjusted senescence and proliferation in normal and cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently decreased PCNA levels in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exposure transiently increased CDK2 activity in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p21{sup Cip1} is likely dispensable when H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces senescence in normal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggestively, CDK2 and PCNA play critical roles in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell fate decision. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species modulate cell fate in a context-dependent manner. Sublethal doses of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreased the level of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in normal cells (including primary human dermal fibroblasts and IMR-90 cells) without affecting cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, leading to cell cycle arrest and subsequent senescence. In contrast, exposure of cancer cells (such as HeLa and MCF7 cells) to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased CDK2 activity with no accompanying change in the PCNA level, leading to cell proliferation. A CDK2 inhibitor, CVT-313, prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cancer cell proliferation. These results support the notion that the cyclin/CDK2/p21{sup Cip1}/PCNA complex plays an important role as a regulator of cell fate decisions.

  20. Lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 inhibitors control breast cancer proliferation in ERα-dependent and independent manners

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Julie A.; Larrea, Michelle D.; Jasper, Jeff S.; McDonnell, Donald P.; McCafferty, Dewey G.

    2012-01-01

    Lysine specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, also known as KDM1) is a histone modifying enzyme that regulates the expression of many genes important in cancer progression and proliferation. It is present in various transcriptional complexes including those containing the estrogen receptor (ER). Indeed, inhibition of LSD1 activity and or expression has been shown to attenuate estrogen signaling in breast cancer cells in vitro implicating this protein in the pathogenesis of cancer. Herein we describe experiments that utilize small molecule inhibitors, phenylcyclopropylamines, along with small interfering RNA to probe the role of LSD1 in breast cancer proliferation and in estrogen-dependent gene transcription. Surprisingly, whereas we have confirmed that inhibition of LSD1 strongly inhibits proliferation of breast cancer cells, we have determined that the cytostatic actions of LSD1 inhibition are not impacted by ER-status. These data suggest that LSD1 may be a useful therapeutic target in several types of breast cancer; most notably inhibitors of LSD1 may have utility in the treatment of ER-negative cancers for which there are minimal therapeutic options. PMID:22533360

  1. The MAGUK-family protein CASK is targeted to nuclei of the basal epidermis and controls keratinocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ojeh, Nkemcho; Pekovic, Vanja; Jahoda, Colin; Määttä, Arto

    2008-08-15

    The Ca2+/calmodulin-associated Ser/Thr kinase (CASK) binds syndecans and other cell-surface proteins through its PDZ domain and has been implicated in synaptic assembly, epithelial polarity and neuronal gene transcription. We show here that CASK regulates proliferation and adhesion of epidermal keratinocytes. CASK is localised in nuclei of basal keratinocytes in newborn rodent skin and developing hair follicles. Induction of differentiation shifts CASK to the cell membrane, whereas in keratinocytes that have been re-stimulated after serum starvation CASK localisation shifts away from membranes upon entry to S phase. Biochemical fractionation demonstrates that CASK has several subnuclear targets and is found in both nucleoplasmic and nucleoskeletal pools. Knockdown of CASK by RNA interference leads to increased proliferation in cultured keratinocytes and in organotypic skin raft cultures. Accelerated cell cycling in CASK knockdown cells is associated with upregulation of Myc and hyperphosphorylation of Rb. Moreover, CASK-knockdown cells show increased hyperproliferative response to KGF and TGFalpha, and accelerated attachment and spreading to the collagenous matrix. These functions are reflected in wound healing, where CASK is downregulated in migrating and proliferating wound-edge keratinocytes.

  2. Engineering invitro cellular microenvironment using polyelectrolyte multilayer films to control cell adhesion and for drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidambi, Srivatsan

    Over the past decades, the development of new methods for fabricating thin films that provide precise control of the three-dimensional topography and cell adhesion has generated lots of interest. These films could lead to significant advances in the fields of tissue engineering, drug delivery and biosensors which have become increasingly germane areas of research in the field of chemical engineering. The ionic layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique called "Polyelectrolyte Multilayers (PEMs)", introduced by Decher in 1991, has emerged as a versatile and inexpensive method of constructing polymeric thin films, with nanometer-scale control of ionized species. PEMs have long been utilized in such applications as sensors, eletrochromics, and nanomechanical thin films but recently they have also been shown to be excellent candidates for biomaterial applications. In this thesis, we engineered these highly customizable PEM thin films to engineer in vitro cellular microenvironments to control cell adhesion and for drug delivery applications. PEM films were engineered to control the adhesion of primary hepatocytes and primary neurons without the aid of adhesive proteins/ligands. We capitalized upon the differential cell attachment and spreading of primary hepatocytes and neurons on poly(diallyldimethylammoniumchloride) (PDAC) and sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) surfaces to make patterned co-cultures of primary hepatocytes/fibroblasts and primary neurons/astrocytes on the PEM surfaces. In addition, we developed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) patterns of m-d-poly(ethylene glycol) (m-dPEG) acid molecules onto PEMs. The created m-dPEG acid monolayer patterns on PEMs acted as resistive templates, and thus prevented further deposits of consecutive poly(anion)/poly(cation) pairs of charged particles and resulted in the formation of three-dimensional (3-D) patterned PEM films or selective particle depositions atop the original multilayer thin films. These new patterned and structured

  3. SnoN/SKIL modulates proliferation through control of hsa-miR-720 transcription in esophageal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozuka, Eriko; Miyashita, Masao; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Akagi, Ichiro; Kikuchi, Kunio; Makino, Hiroshi; Matsutani, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Nomura, Tsutomu; Uchida, Eiji; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SnoN modulated miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B expression levels in TE-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-720 and miR-1274A suppressed the expression of target proteins p63 and ADAM9. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Esophageal cancer tissues have lower SnoN expression levels than normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Esophageal cancer tissues have higher miR-720 expression levels than normal tissues. -- Abstract: It is now evident that changes in microRNA are involved in cancer progression, but the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of miRNAs remain unknown. Ski-related novel gene (SnoN/SKIL), a transcription co-factor, acts as a potential key regulator within a complex network of p53 transcriptional repressors. SnoN has pro- and anti-oncogenic functions in the regulation of cell proliferation, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation. We characterized the roles of SnoN in miRNA transcriptional regulation and its effects on cell proliferation using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells. Silencing of SnoN altered a set of miRNA expression profiles in TE-1cells, and the expression levels of miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B were modulated by SnoN. The expression of these miRNAs resulted in changes to the target protein p63 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 9 (ADAM9). Furthermore, silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells, indicating a potential anti-oncogenic function. These results support our observation that cancer tissues have lower expression levels of SnoN, miR-720, and miR-1274A compared to adjacent normal tissues from ESCC patients. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of miRNA regulation, leading to changes in cell proliferation.

  4. Four faces of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an important mechanism for preventing the proliferation of potential cancer cells. Recently, however, it has become apparent that this process entails more than a simple cessation of cell growth. In addition to suppressing tumorigenesis, cellular senescence might also promote tissue repair and fuel inflammation associated with aging and cancer progression. Thus, cellular senescence might participate in four complex biological processes (tumor suppression, tumor promotion, aging, and tissue repair), some of which have apparently opposing effects. The challenge now is to understand the senescence response well enough to harness its benefits while suppressing its drawbacks. PMID:21321098

  5. Modeling and boundary force control of microcantilevers utilized in atomic force microscopy for cellular imaging and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Sohrab

    the proposed Euler-Bernoulli model, a more comprehensive model is developed by modeling the probe dynamics and including the effects of the rotary inertia and shear deformation under the same proposed tip-sample interaction force. An extensive comparative study between the Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam assumptions is conducted for different conditions including different base-excitation amplitudes and higher modes. The results underline that the comprehensive Timoshenko model unveils the effects of the nonlinear interaction force better than the Euler-Bernoulli beam model. In addition to extensive modeling efforts on the microcantilever and its interaction with sample, an adaptive control framework is developed in order to make the microcantilever's tip follow a desired trajectory. This trajectory can further be considered as an important path acquired by the path planning techniques to manipulate the nanoparticles. There is a base excitation considered for this model and can be considered as an input force control to excite the probe by taking advantage of flexibility of the cantilever despite its complexity and under existence of the external nonlinear interaction forces between the tip and sample's surface. When building such complicated controller on top of the proposed comprehensive model, the results could be extended to study a macro-micro hybrid rigid-flexible model of a microrobot to mimic the realistic behavior of the MM3ARTM microrobot. The MM3ARTM microrobot is equipped with a piezoresistive layer which functions as a force sensor and is capable of measuring very slight forces as small as micro to nano-Newton. Two types of controllers are investigated for the case of the tip force control. Lyapunov-based PD and robust adaptive controllers are developed for this purpose and their performances and stabilities are compared. In the experimental part, a platform for performing the automated nanomanipulation and real-time cellular imaging is developed by

  6. Protocol for the validation of microbiological control of cellular products according to German regulators recommendations--Boon and Bane for the manufacturer.

    PubMed

    Störmer, M; Radojska, S; Hos, N J; Gathof, B S

    2015-04-01

    In order to generate standardized conditions for the microbiological control of HPCs, the PEI recommended defined steps for validation that will lead to extensive validation as shown in this study, where a possible validation principle for the microbiological control of allogeneic SCPs is presented. Although it could be demonstrated that automated culture improves microbial safety of cellular products, the requirement for extensive validation studies needs to be considered.

  7. Highly expressed ribosomal protein L34 indicates poor prognosis in osteosarcoma and its knockdown suppresses osteosarcoma proliferation probably through translational control

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shuju; Zhao, Jinmin; Fowdur, Mitra; Wang, Kun; Jiang, Tenglong; He, Maolin

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma has devastating health implications on children and adolescents. However, due to its low incidence and high tumor heterogeneity, it is hard to achieve any further improvements in therapy and overall survival. Ribosomal protein L34 (RPL34) has been increasingly recognized to promote the proliferation of malignant cells, but its role in osteosarcoma has not been investigated. In this study, real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) and immunohistochemistry revealed that RPL34 was highly expressed in osteosarcoma tissues when compared to adjacent tissues and normal bone tissues. Survival analysis showed that high expression of RPL34 predicted a poor prognosis for osteosarcoma patients. Knockdown of RPL34 in Saos-2 cells via lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest. Moreover, screening of transcription factors using University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis, Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis revealed that MYC participates in the transcriptional regulation of RPL34, which interacts with the subunits of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3) and probably involves the translational control of growth-promoting proteins. Our findings suggest that RPL34 plays an important role in the proliferation of osteosarcoma cells. PMID:27883047

  8. Unaltered development of the archi- and neocortex in prematurely born infants: genetic control dominates in proliferation, differentiation and maturation of cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Abrahám, Hajnalka; Veszprémi, Béla; Gömöri, Eva; Kovács, Krisztina; Kravják, András; Seress, László

    2007-01-01

    The development of cerebral cortex includes highly organized, elaborate and long-lasting series of events, which do not come to an end by the time of birth. Indeed, many developmental events continue after the 40th postconceptual week resulting in a long morphological, behavioral and cognitive development of children. Premature birth causes an untimely dramatic change in the environment of the human fetus and often results in serious threats for life. Cognitive abilities of prematurely born children vary, but a correlation between cognitive impairment and the time of birth is evident. In this study we review the morphological evidence of cortical maturation in preterm and full-term infants. Various aspects of postnatal cortical development including cell proliferation and maturation of neurons in the temporal archi- and neocortex are discussed and compared in preterm infants and age-matched full-term controls. Our results suggest that cell proliferation and maturation are not influenced by the preterm delivery. In contrast, the perinatal decrease of the number of Cajal-Retzius cells might be regulated by a mechanism that is affected by preterm birth. We demonstrate that cognitive deficiencies of the prematurely born infants cannot be explained with light microscopically observed alteration of proliferation and maturation of neurons.

  9. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92) Oncogenes Contribute to a Single Oncogenic Network Controlling Cell Proliferation in Friend Erythroleukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, Samer; Giraud, Guillaume; Morlé, François; Guyot, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed. PMID:23056458

  10. Cadherins and Pak1 control contact inhibition of proliferation by Pak1-betaPIX-GIT complex-dependent regulation of cell-matrix signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fengming; Jia, Liwei; Thompson-Baine, Ann-Marie; Puglise, Jason M; Ter Beest, Martin B A; Zegers, Mirjam M P

    2010-04-01

    It is crucial for organ homeostasis that epithelia have effective mechanisms to restrict motility and cell proliferation in order to maintain tissue architecture. On the other hand, epithelial cells need to rapidly and transiently acquire a more mesenchymal phenotype, with high levels of cell motility and proliferation, in order to repair epithelia upon injury. Cross talk between cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling is crucial for regulating these transitions. The Pak1-betaPIX-GIT complex is an effector complex downstream of the small GTPase Rac1. We previously showed that translocation of this complex from cell-matrix to cell-cell adhesion sites was required for the establishment of contact inhibition of proliferation. In this study, we provide evidence that this translocation depends on cadherin function. Cadherins do not recruit the complex by direct interaction. Rather, we found that inhibition of the normal function of cadherin or Pak1 leads to defects in focal adhesion turnover and to increased signaling by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. We propose that cadherins are involved in regulation of contact inhibition by controlling the function of the Pak1-betaPIX-GIT complex at focal contacts.

  11. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92) oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Samer; Giraud, Guillaume; Morlé, François; Guyot, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  12. Control of Wnt5b secretion by Wntless modulates chondrogenic cell proliferation through fine-tuning fgf3 expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo-Tsung; Wen, Shih-Hsien; Hwang, Sheng-Ping L; Huang, Chang-Jen; Kuan, Yung-Shu

    2015-06-15

    Wnts and Fgfs regulate various tissues development in vertebrates. However, how regional Wnt or Fgf activities are established and how they interact in any given developmental event is elusive. Here, we investigated the Wnt-mediated craniofacial cartilage development in zebrafish and found that fgf3 expression in the pharyngeal pouches is differentially reduced along the anteroposterior axis in wnt5b mutants and wntless (wls) morphants, but its expression is normal in wnt9a and wnt11 morphants. Introducing fgf3 mRNAs rescued the cartilage defects in Wnt5b- and Wls-deficient larvae. In wls morphants, endogenous Wls expression is not detectable but maternally deposited Wls is present in eggs, which might account for the lack of axis defects in wls morphants. Secretion of endogenous Wnt5b but not Wnt11 was affected in the pharyngeal tissue of Wls morphants, indicating that Wls is not involved in every Wnt secretion event. Furthermore, cell proliferation but not apoptosis in the developing jaw was affected in Wnt5b- and Wls-deficient embryos. Therefore, Wnt5b requires Wls for its secretion and regulates the proliferation of chondrogenic cells through fine-tuning the expression of fgf3 during jaw cartilage development.

  13. 14-3-3{sigma} controls corneal epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation through the Notch signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Ying; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2010-02-19

    14-3-3{sigma} (also called stratifin) is specifically expressed in the stratified squamous epithelium and its function was recently shown to be linked to epidermal stratification and differentiation in the skin. In this study, we investigated its role in corneal epithelium cell proliferation and differentiation. We showed that the 14-3-3{sigma} mutation in repeated epilation (Er) mutant mice results in a dominant negative truncated protein. Primary corneal epithelial cells expressing the dominant negative protein failed to undergo high calcium-induced cell cycle arrest and differentiation. We further demonstrated that blocking endogenous 14-3-3{sigma} activity in corneal epithelial cells by overexpressing dominative negative 14-3-3{sigma} led to reduced Notch activity and Notch1/2 transcription. Significantly, expression of the active Notch intracellular domain overcame the block in epithelial cell differentiation in 14-3-3{sigma} mutant-expressing corneal epithelial cells. We conclude that 14-3-3{sigma} is critical for regulating corneal epithelial proliferation and differentiation by regulating Notch signaling activity.

  14. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  15. Clustering Nuclear Receptors in Liver Regeneration Identifies Candidate Modulators of Hepatocyte Proliferation and Hepatocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Giusi; D'Orazio, Andria; Cariello, Marica; Massafra, Vittoria; Salvatore, Lorena; Martelli, Nicola; Murzilli, Stefania; Sasso, Giuseppe Lo; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Moschetta, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver regeneration (LR) is a valuable model for studying mechanisms modulating hepatocyte proliferation. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are key players in the control of cellular functions, being ideal modulators of hepatic proliferation and carcinogenesis. Methods & Results We used a previously validated RT-qPCR platform to profile modifications in the expression of all 49 members of the NR superfamily in mouse liver during LR. Twenty-nine NR transcripts were significantly modified in their expression during LR, including fatty acid (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, PPARs) and oxysterol (liver X receptors, Lxrs) sensors, circadian masters RevErbα and RevErbβ, glucocorticoid receptor (Gr) and constitutive androxane receptor (Car). In order to detect the NRs that better characterize proliferative status vs. proliferating liver, we used the novel Random Forest (RF) analysis to selected a trio of down-regulated NRs (thyroid receptor alpha, Trα; farsenoid X receptor beta, Fxrβ; Pparδ) as best discriminators of the proliferating status. To validate our approach, we further studied PPARδ role in modulating hepatic proliferation. We first confirmed the suppression of PPARδ both in LR and human hepatocellular carcinoma at protein level, and then demonstrated that PPARδ agonist GW501516 reduces the proliferative potential of hepatoma cells. Conclusions Our data suggest that NR transcriptome is modulated in proliferating liver and is a source of biomarkers and bona fide pharmacological targets for the management of liver disease affecting hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:25116592

  16. Cyclin E controls Drosophila female germline stem cell maintenance independently of its role in proliferation by modulating responsiveness to niche signals.

    PubMed

    Ables, Elizabeth T; Drummond-Barbosa, Daniela

    2013-02-01

    Stem cells must proliferate while maintaining 'stemness'; however, much remains to be learned about how factors that control the division of stem cells influence their identity. Multiple stem cell types display cell cycles with short G1 phases, thought to minimize susceptibility to differentiation factors. Drosophila female germline stem cells (GSCs) have short G1 and long G2 phases, and diet-dependent systemic factors often modulate G2. We previously observed that Cyclin E (CycE), a known G1/S regulator, is atypically expressed in GSCs during G2/M; however, it remained unclear whether CycE has cell cycle-independent roles in GSCs or whether it acts exclusively by modulating the cell cycle. In this study, we detected CycE activity during G2/M, reflecting its altered expression pattern, and showed that CycE and its canonical partner, Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), are required not only for GSC proliferation, but also for GSC maintenance. In genetic mosaics, CycE- and Cdk2-deficient GSCs are rapidly lost from the niche, remain arrested in a G1-like state, and undergo excessive growth and incomplete differentiation. However, we found that CycE controls GSC maintenance independently of its role in the cell cycle; GSCs harboring specific hypomorphic CycE mutations are not efficiently maintained despite normal proliferation rates. Finally, CycE-deficient GSCs have an impaired response to niche bone morphogenetic protein signals that are required for GSC self-renewal, suggesting that CycE modulates niche-GSC communication. Taken together, these results show unequivocally that the roles of CycE/Cdk2 in GSC division cycle regulation and GSC maintenance are separable, and thus potentially involve distinct sets of phosphorylation targets.

  17. Galectin-1 Controls the Proliferation and Migration of Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells and Their Interaction With Hepatocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Malena; Bacigalupo, María L; Carabias, Pablo; Elola, María T; Wolfenstein-Todel, Carlota; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Espelt, María V; Troncoso, María F

    2016-07-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal1), a β-galactoside-binding protein elevated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and its expression correlates with HCC growth, invasiveness, and metastasis. During the early stages of HCC, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 ) acts as a tumor suppressor; however in advanced stages, HCC cells lose their cytostatic response to TGF-β1 and undergo EMT. Here, we investigated the role of Gal1 on liver endothelial cell biology, and the interplay between Gal1 and TGF-β1 in HCC progression. By Western blot and immunofluorescence, we analyzed Gal1 expression, secretion and localization in HepG2 and HuH-7 human HCC cells, and in SK-HEP-1 human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (SECs). We used loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments to down- or up-regulate Gal1 expression, respectively, in HepG2 cells. We cultured SK-HEP-1 cells with conditioned media from HCC cells secreting different levels of Gal1, and demonstrated that Gal1 derived from tumor hepatocytes induced its own expression in SECs. Colorimetric and scratch-wound assays revealed that secretion of Gal1 by HCC cells induced SEC proliferation and migration. Moreover, by fluorescence microscopy we demonstrated that Gal1 promoted glycan-dependent heterotypic adhesion of HepG2 cells to SK-HEP-1 SECs. Furthermore, TGF-β1 induced Gal1 expression and secretion by HCC cells, and promoted HepG2 cell adhesion to SK-HEP-1 SECs through a Gal1-dependent mechanism. Finally, Gal1 modulated HepG2 cell proliferation and sensitivity to TGF-β1 -induced growth inhibition. Our results suggest that Gal1 and TGF-β1 might function coordinately within the HCC microenvironment to regulate tumor growth, invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis.

  18. Epstein–Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B.; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G.; Sinclair, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  19. Long-term upregulation of inflammation and suppression of cell proliferation in the brain of adult rats exposed to traumatic brain injury using the controlled cortical impact model.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Sandra A; Tajiri, Naoki; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Grimmig, Bethany; Diamond, David M; Diamond, David; Sanberg, Paul R; Bickford, Paula C; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-01-01

    The long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI), specifically the detrimental effects of inflammation on the neurogenic niches, are not very well understood. In the present in vivo study, we examined the prolonged pathological outcomes of experimental TBI in different parts of the rat brain with special emphasis on inflammation and neurogenesis. Sixty days after moderate controlled cortical impact injury, adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were euthanized and brain tissues harvested. Antibodies against the activated microglial marker, OX6, the cell cycle-regulating protein marker, Ki67, and the immature neuronal marker, doublecortin, DCX, were used to estimate microglial activation, cell proliferation, and neuronal differentiation, respectively, in the subventricular zone (SVZ), subgranular zone (SGZ), striatum, thalamus, and cerebral peduncle. Stereology-based analyses revealed significant exacerbation of OX6-positive activated microglial cells in the striatum, thalamus, and cerebral peduncle. In parallel, significant decrements in Ki67-positive proliferating cells in SVZ and SGZ, but only trends of reduced DCX-positive immature neuronal cells in SVZ and SGZ were detected relative to sham control group. These results indicate a progressive deterioration of the TBI brain over time characterized by elevated inflammation and suppressed neurogenesis. Therapeutic intervention at the chronic stage of TBI may confer abrogation of these deleterious cell death processes.

  20. JPRS Report, Proliferation Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical , and biological weapons, including... Reactor Refurbished, Ready To Start Up [NEPSZABADSAG 25 Nov] 11 JPRS-TND-92-047 18 December 1992 2 NEAR EAST & SOUTH ASIA EGYPT U.S...supplies technology related to aerosol physics to sectors such as the chemical and petro- chemical industries and pollu- tion-control equipment

  1. Dynamic NF-κB and E2F interactions control the priority and timing of inflammatory signalling and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ankers, John M; Awais, Raheela; Jones, Nicholas A; Boyd, James; Ryan, Sheila; Adamson, Antony D; Harper, Claire V; Bridge, Lloyd; Spiller, David G; Jackson, Dean A; Paszek, Pawel; Sée, Violaine; White, Michael RH

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic cellular systems reprogram gene expression to ensure appropriate cellular fate responses to specific extracellular cues. Here we demonstrate that the dynamics of Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) signalling and the cell cycle are prioritised differently depending on the timing of an inflammatory signal. Using iterative experimental and computational analyses, we show physical and functional interactions between NF-κB and the E2 Factor 1 (E2F-1) and E2 Factor 4 (E2F-4) cell cycle regulators. These interactions modulate the NF-κB response. In S-phase, the NF-κB response was delayed or repressed, while cell cycle progression was unimpeded. By contrast, activation of NF-κB at the G1/S boundary resulted in a longer cell cycle and more synchronous initial NF-κB responses between cells. These data identify new mechanisms by which the cellular response to stress is differentially controlled at different stages of the cell cycle. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10473.001 PMID:27185527

  2. Effect of weightlessness on lymphocyte proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment to study the effect of weightlessness on lymphocyte proliferation to detect possible alteration of the cells responsible for the immune response during long-duration space flights is described. Human lymphocytes in culture medium will be delivered shortly before launch in an incubator which will be kept at 37C. Mitogen will be added to the culture. A control without mitogen will be run in parallel. After 70 hours of incubation, radioactive thymidine will be added. After two hours, cellular activity will be stopped by fixation and incubator power switched off. Later, the amount of incorporated thymidine will be determined and the cell morphology and the distribution of cell organelles will be investigated.

  3. Cell proliferation inhibition in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Extended durations of spaceflight have been shown to be deleterious on an organismic level; however, mechanisms underlying cellular sensitivity to the gravitational environment remain to be elucidated. The majority of the gravitational studies to date indicates that cell regulatory pathways may be influenced by their gravitational environment. Still, few cell biology experiments have been performed in space flight and even fewer experiments have been repeated on subsequent flights. With flight opportunities on STS-50, 54, and 57, Sf9 cells were flown in the BioServe Fluids Processing Apparatus and cell proliferation was measured with and without exposure to a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor. Results from these flights indicate that the Sf9 cells grew comparable to ground controls, that the CeReS inhibitor bound to its specific receptor, and that its signal transduction cascade was not gravity sensitive.

  4. Different N-terminal isoforms of Oct-1 control expression of distinct sets of genes and their high levels in Namalwa Burkitt's lymphoma cells affect a wide range of cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Pankratova, Elizaveta V.; Stepchenko, Alexander G.; Portseva, Tatiana; Mogila, Vladic A.; Georgieva, Sofia G.

    2016-01-01

    Oct-1 transcription factor has various functions in gene regulation. Its expression level is increased in several types of cancer and is associated with poor survival prognosis. Here we identified distinct Oct-1 protein isoforms in human cells and compared gene expression patterns and functions for Oct-1A, Oct-1L, and Oct-1X isoforms that differ by their N-terminal sequences. The longest isoform, Oct-1A, is abundantly expressed and is the main Oct-1 isoform in most of human tissues. The Oct-1L and the weakly expressed Oct-1X regulate the majority of Oct-1A targets as well as additional sets of genes. Oct-1X controls genes involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, RNA processing, and cellular response to stress. The high level of Oct-1 isoforms upregulates genes related to cell cycle progression and activates proliferation both in Namalwa Burkitt's lymphoma cells and primary human fibroblasts. It downregulates expression of genes related to antigen processing and presentation, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, oxidative metabolism, and cell adhesion, thus facilitating pro-oncogenic processes. PMID:27407111

  5. FAM13A is associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) progression and controls tumor cell proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Felix; Heim, Lisanne; Trump, Sonja; Mittler, Susanne; Sopel, Nina; Andreev, Katerina; Ferrazzi, Fulvia; Ekici, Arif B; Rieker, Ralf; Springel, Rebekka; Assmann, Vera L; Lechmann, Matthias; Koch, Sonja; Engelhardt, Marina; Warnecke, Christina; Trufa, Denis I; Sirbu, Horia; Hartmann, Arndt; Finotto, Susetta

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) associated Family with sequence similarity 13, member A (FAM13A) with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) occurrence. Here, we found increased numbers of FAM13A protein expressing cells in the tumoral region of lung tissues from a cohort of patients with NSCLC. Moreover, FAM13A inversely correlated with CTLA4 but directly correlated with HIF1α levels in the control region of these patients. Consistently, FAM13A RhoGAP was found to be associated with T cell effector molecules like HIF1α and Tbet and was downregulated in immunosuppressive CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)CTLA4(+) T cells. TGFβ, a tumor suppressor factor, as well as siRNA to FAM13A, suppressed both isoforms of FAM13A and inhibited tumor cell proliferation. RNA-Seq analysis confirmed this finding. Moreover, siRNA to FAM13A induced TGFβ levels. Finally, in experimental tumor cell migration, FAM13A was induced and TGFβ accelerated this process by inducing cell migration, HIF1α, and the FAM13A RhoGAP isoform. Furthermore, siRNA to FAM13A inhibited tumor cell proliferation and induced cell migration without affecting HIF1α. In conclusion, FAM13A is involved in tumor cell proliferation and downstream of TGFβ and HIF1α, FAM13A RhoGAP is associated with Th1 gene expression and lung tumor cell migration. These findings identify FAM13A as key regulator of NSCLC growth and progression.

  6. Cryptococcal phospholipase B1 is required for intracellular proliferation and control of titan cell morphology during macrophage infection.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert J; Li, Zhongming; Hughes, William S; Djordjevic, Julianne T; Nielsen, Kirsten; May, Robin C

    2015-04-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and a leading cause of fungal-infection-related fatalities, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Several virulence factors are known to play a major role in the pathogenesis of cryptococcal infections, including the enzyme phospholipase B1 (Plb1). Compared to other well-studied Cryptococcus neoformans virulence factors such as the polysaccharide capsule and melanin production, very little is known about the contribution of Plb1 to cryptococcal virulence. Phospholipase B1 is a phospholipid-modifying enzyme that has been implicated in multiple stages of cryptococcal pathogenesis, including initiation and persistence of pulmonary infection and dissemination to the central nervous system, but the underlying reason for these phenotypes remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that a Δplb1 knockout strain of C. neoformans has a profound defect in intracellular growth within host macrophages. This defect is due to a combination of a 50% decrease in proliferation and a 2-fold increase in cryptococcal killing within the phagosome. In addition, we show for the first time that the Δplb1 strain undergoes a morphological change during in vitro and in vivo intracellular infection, resulting in a subpopulation of very large titan cells, which may arise as a result of the attenuated mutant's inability to cope within the macrophage.

  7. Challenge inspections in Arms Control treaties: Any lessons for strengthening NPT verification. [Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Allentuck, J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent revelations of an ongoing and sophisticated nuclear weapons development program in Iraq have lead to suggestions for strengthening International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. Especially troubling was the realization that safeguards, as presently applied, could not possibly have detected such a program. It is clear that the inspections which have taken place in Iraq since the Gulf War could only have been imposed on a nation which had suffered a severe military defeat. It has, however, been argued that challenge or challenge like'' inspections already incorporated in or proposed for the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (the CFE Treaty) the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) and the Treaty Between the United States and the USSR on the Reduction and Limitation of Strategic offensive Arms (START) might serve as models for enhanced special inspections in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (the NPT). The expectation that none of the challenge or challenge like inspections in the above treaties would provide a model for the NPT was confirmed although certain characteristics of these inspections do provide useful points of departure. Although the context of challenge inspections in CWC bears substantial similarity to the NPT, it is from the provisions for suspect-site'' and formerly declared site'', challenge like inspections in START that innovative ideas for strengthening special inspections in NPT may be derived.

  8. Fatty acids and retinoids control lipid metabolism through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-retinoid X receptor heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, H; Dreyer, C; Medin, J; Mahfoudi, A; Ozato, K; Wahli, W

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptors called PPARs (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha, beta, and gamma) regulate the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids by induction of the acyl-CoA oxidase gene that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme of the pathway. Gel retardation and cotransfection assays revealed that PPAR alpha heterodimerizes with retinoid X receptor beta (RXR beta; RXR is the receptor for 9-cis-retinoic acid) and that the two receptors cooperate for the activation of the acyl-CoA oxidase gene promoter. The strongest stimulation of this promoter was obtained when both receptors were exposed simultaneously to their cognate activators. Furthermore, we show that natural fatty acids, and especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, activate PPARs as potently as does the hypolipidemic drug Wy 14,643, the most effective activator known so far. Moreover, we discovered that the synthetic arachidonic acid analogue 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid is 100 times more effective than Wy 14,643 in the activation of PPAR alpha. In conclusion, our data demonstrate a convergence of the PPAR and RXR signaling pathways in the regulation of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids by fatty acids and retinoids. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8384714

  9. ATR controls cellular adaptation to hypoxia through positive regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) expression.

    PubMed

    Fallone, F; Britton, S; Nieto, L; Salles, B; Muller, C

    2013-09-12

    Tumor cells adaptation to severe oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) plays a major role in tumor progression. The transcription factor HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor 1), whose α-subunit is stabilized under hypoxic conditions is a key component of this process. Recent studies showed that two members of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs) family, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase), regulate the hypoxic-dependent accumulation of HIF-1. These proteins initiate cellular stress responses when DNA damage occurs. In addition, it has been demonstrated that extreme hypoxia induces a replicative stress resulting in regions of single-stranded DNA at stalled replication forks and the activation of ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related protein), another member of the PIKKs family. Here, we show that even less severe hypoxia (0.1% O2) also induces activation of ATR through replicative stress. Importantly, in using either transiently silenced ATR cells, cells expressing an inactive form of ATR or cells exposed to an ATR inhibitor (CGK733), we demonstrate that hypoxic ATR activation positively regulates the key transcription factor HIF-1 independently of the checkpoint kinase Chk1. We show that ATR kinase activity regulates HIF-1α at the translational level and we find that the elements necessary for the regulation of HIF-1α translation are located within the coding region of HIF-1α mRNA. Finally, by using three independent cellular models, we clearly show that the loss of ATR expression and/or kinase activity results in the decrease of HIF-1 DNA binding under hypoxia and consequently affects protein expression levels of two HIF-1 target genes, GLUT-1 and CAIX. Taken together, our data show a new function for ATR in cellular adaptation to hypoxia through regulation of HIF-1α translation. Our work offers new prospect for cancer therapy using ATR inhibitors with the potential to decrease cellular adaptation in hypoxic

  10. Cellular mechanism through which parathyroid hormone-related protein induces proliferation in arterial smooth muscle cells: definition of an arterial smooth muscle PTHrP/p27kip1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi-Taesch, Nathalie; Sicari, Brian M; Ubriani, Kiran; Bigatel, Todd; Takane, Karen K; Cozar-Castellano, Irene; Bisello, Alessandro; Law, Brian; Stewart, Andrew F

    2006-10-27

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is present in vascular smooth muscle (VSM), is markedly upregulated in response to arterial injury, is essential for normal VSM proliferation, and also markedly accentuates neointima formation following rat carotid angioplasty. PTHrP contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS) through which it enters the nucleus and leads to marked increases in retinoblastoma protein (pRb) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Our goal was to define key cell cycle molecules upstream of pRb that mediate cell cycle acceleration induced by PTHrP. The cyclin D/cdk-4,-6 system and its upstream regulators, the inhibitory kinases (INKs), are not appreciably influenced by PTHrP. In striking contrast, cyclin E/cdk-2 kinase activity is markedly increased by PTHrP, and this is a result of a specific, marked, PTHrP-induced proteasomal degradation of p27(kip1). Adenoviral restoration of p27(kip1) fully reverses PTHrP-induced cell cycle progression, indicating that PTHrP mediates its cell cycle acceleration in VSM via p27(kip1). In confirmation, adenoviral delivery of PTHrP to murine primary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) significantly decreases p27(kip1) expression and accelerates cell cycle progression. p27(kip1) is well known to be a central cell cycle regulatory molecule involved in both normal and pathological VSM proliferation and is a target of widely used drug-eluting stents. The current observations define a novel "PTHrP/p27(kip1) pathway" in the arterial wall and suggest that this pathway is important in normal arterial biology and a potential target for therapeutic manipulation of the arterial response to injury.

  11. A Decade of Boon or Burden: What Has the CHIP Ever Done for Cellular Protein Quality Control Mechanism Implicated in Neurodegeneration and Aging?

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vibhuti; Amanullah, Ayeman; Upadhyay, Arun; Mishra, Ribhav; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Cells regularly synthesize new proteins to replace old and abnormal proteins for normal cellular functions. Two significant protein quality control pathways inside the cellular milieu are ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Autophagy is known for bulk clearance of cytoplasmic aggregated proteins, whereas the specificity of protein degradation by UPS comes from E3 ubiquitin ligases. Few E3 ubiquitin ligases, like C-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) not only take part in protein quality control pathways, but also plays a key regulatory role in other cellular processes like signaling, development, DNA damage repair, immunity and aging. CHIP targets misfolded proteins for their degradation through proteasome, as well as autophagy; simultaneously, with the help of chaperones, it also regulates folding attempts for misfolded proteins. The broad range of CHIP substrates and their associations with multiple pathologies make it a key molecule to work upon and focus for future therapeutic interventions. E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP interacts and degrades many protein inclusions formed in neurodegenerative diseases. The presence of CHIP at various nodes of cellular protein-protein interaction network presents this molecule as a potential candidate for further research. In this review, we have explored a wide range of functionality of CHIP inside cells by a detailed presentation of its co-chaperone, E3 and E4 enzyme like functions, with central focus on its protein quality control roles in neurodegenerative diseases. We have also raised many unexplored but expected fundamental questions regarding CHIP functions, which generate hopes for its future applications in research, as well as drug discovery. PMID:27757073

  12. S6K1 and E2FB are in mutually antagonistic regulatory links controlling cell growth and proliferation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Rossana; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László

    2013-06-01

    Plant development is dependent on the coordination between growth and cell proliferation. The nutrient sensing TOR kinase and its downstream target, the 40S ribosomal S6 Kinase, are central controllers of cell growth that were also shown to determine cell size by inhibiting the onset of mitosis in yeast and animal cells. We have shown that the Arabidopsis S6 Kinase1 inhibits cell proliferation through the RBR-E2FB complex. S6K1 interacts with RBR via its N-terminal RBR binding motif, promotes its nuclear localization and consequent RBR-dependent repression of cell cycle genes through E2FB. Here we show that S6K1 and E2FB are in a mutually antagonistic relationship both in their protein abundance and in their activity. We propose that this double inhibitory regulatory connection between S6K1 and E2FB forms a regulatory switch that might be important to determine whether cells divide or grow.

  13. Tobacco Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Interacts with Ethylene Receptor Tobacco Histidine Kinase1 and Enhances Plant Growth through Promotion of Cell Proliferation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is an important phytohormone in the regulation of plant growth, development, and stress response throughout the lifecycle. Previously, we discovered that a subfamily II ethylene receptor tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Histidine Kinase1 (NTHK1) promotes seedling growth. Here, we identified an NTHK1-interacting protein translationally controlled tumor protein (NtTCTP) by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assay and further characterized its roles in plant growth. The interaction was further confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and the kinase domain of NTHK1 mediates the interaction with NtTCTP. The NtTCTP protein is induced by ethylene treatment and colocalizes with NTHK1 at the endoplasmic reticulum. Overexpression of NtTCTP or NTHK1 reduces plant response to ethylene and promotes seedling growth, mainly through acceleration of cell proliferation. Genetic analysis suggests that NtTCTP is required for the function of NTHK1. Furthermore, association of NtTCTP prevents NTHK1 from proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Our data suggest that plant growth inhibition triggered by ethylene is regulated by a unique feedback mechanism, in which ethylene-induced NtTCTP associates with and stabilizes ethylene receptor NTHK1 to reduce plant response to ethylene and promote plant growth through acceleration of cell proliferation. PMID:25941315

  14. Tobacco Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Interacts with Ethylene Receptor Tobacco Histidine Kinase1 and Enhances Plant Growth through Promotion of Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jian-Jun; Cao, Yang-Rong; Chen, Hao-Wei; Wei, Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is an important phytohormone in the regulation of plant growth, development, and stress response throughout the lifecycle. Previously, we discovered that a subfamily II ethylene receptor tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Histidine Kinase1 (NTHK1) promotes seedling growth. Here, we identified an NTHK1-interacting protein translationally controlled tumor protein (NtTCTP) by the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid assay and further characterized its roles in plant growth. The interaction was further confirmed by in vitro glutathione S-transferase pull down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays, and the kinase domain of NTHK1 mediates the interaction with NtTCTP. The NtTCTP protein is induced by ethylene treatment and colocalizes with NTHK1 at the endoplasmic reticulum. Overexpression of NtTCTP or NTHK1 reduces plant response to ethylene and promotes seedling growth, mainly through acceleration of cell proliferation. Genetic analysis suggests that NtTCTP is required for the function of NTHK1. Furthermore, association of NtTCTP prevents NTHK1 from proteasome-mediated protein degradation. Our data suggest that plant growth inhibition triggered by ethylene is regulated by a unique feedback mechanism, in which ethylene-induced NtTCTP associates with and stabilizes ethylene receptor NTHK1 to reduce plant response to ethylene and promote plant growth through acceleration of cell proliferation.

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) contributes to control of melanogenesis in B16 F10 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Grabacka, Maja; Wieczorek, Justyna; Michalczyk-Wetula, Dominika; Malinowski, Michel; Wolan, Norbert; Wojcik, Katarzyna; Plonka, Przemyslaw M

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies revealed the cooperation between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and α-MSH signaling, which results in enhanced melanogenesis in melanocytes and melanoma cells. However, the agonists of PPARα, such as fenofibrate, exert depigmenting effect. Therefore, we aimed to check how the PPARα expression level affects the antimelanogenic activity of fenofibrate and whether PPARα modulates melanogenesis independently of its agonist. To answer these questions, we used three B16 F10-derived cell lines, which varied in the PPARα expression level and were developed by stable transfection with plasmids driving shRNA-based PPARα silencing or overexpression of PPARα-emerald GFP fusion protein. Melanin contents were assessed with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy along with color component image analysis-a novel approach to pigment content characteristics in melanoma cells. B16 F10 wt and Ctrl shRNA lines showed intermediate pigmentation, whereas the pigmentation of the B16 F10-derived cell lines was inversely correlated with the PPARα expression level. We observed that cells overexpressing PPARα were almost amelanotic and cells with reduced PPARα protein level were heavily melanized. Furthermore, fenofibrate down-regulated the melanogenic apparatus (MITF, tyrosinase, and tyrosinase-related proteins) in the cells with the regular PPARα expression level resulting in their visibly lower total melanin content in all the cell lines. From these observations, we conclude that fenofibrate works as a strong depigmenting agent, which acts independently of PPARα, but in an additive fashion. Our results also indicate that alterations in PGC-1a acetylation and expression level might contribute to the regulation of melanogenesis by PPARα and fenofibrate.

  16. Proliferation of canine bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells on different nanomaterial based thin film scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Das, Kinsuk; Mili, Bhabesh; A P, Madhusoodan; Saxena, Abhishek Chandra; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Praveen; Verma, Med Ram; Sarkar, Mihir; Bag, Sadhan

    2017-04-01

    Stem cell niche research uses nanotechnologies to mimic the extra-cellular microenvironment to promote proliferation and differentiation. The aim of designing different scaffolds is to simulate the best structural and environmental pattern for extracellular matrix. This experiment was designed to study the proliferative behaviour of canine bone marrow deriver mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on different nanomaterial based thin film scaffolds of carbon nanotubes (CNT), chitosan and poly ε-caprolactone. Similar number of cells was seeded on the scaffolds and standard cell culture flask, taken as control. Cells were maintained on DMEM media and relative number of metabolically active cells was determined by MTT assay up to day six of culture. Cells proliferated on control and all the scaffolds as the days progressed. Although proliferation rate was slow but no decline of cell number was noticed on the scaffolds during the study period. Initially, the cell proliferation was lower on CNT but as time progressed no significant difference was observed compared to control. The result indicated that nanomaterial based scaffolds reduce the proliferation rate of canine MSCs. However, canine MSCs adapted and proliferated better on CNT substrate in vitro and may be used as a scaffold component in canine tissue engineering in future.

  17. The Fto Gene Regulates the Proliferation and Differentiation of Pre-Adipocytes in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Jingying; Lu, Lunjie; Xu, Jiaying; Qin, Liqiang

    2016-02-19

    The highly regulated differentiation and proliferation of pre-adipocytes play a key role in the initiation of obesity. Fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) is a novel gene strongly associated with the risk of obesity. A deficiency of FTO may cause growth retardation in addition to fat mass and adipocyte size reduction in vivo. To investigate the potential role of Fto gene on the proliferation and differentiation of pre-adipocytes, we generated Fto-knockdown and overexpressed 3T3-L1 cells. Using numerous proliferation assays our results suggest that Fto knockdown leads to suppression of proliferation, lower mitochondrial membrane potential, less cellular ATP, and decreased and smaller intracellular lipid droplets compared with controls (p < 0.05). Western blot analysis demonstrated that Fto knockdown can significantly suppress peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) expression and inhibit Akt phosphorylation. By contrast, overexpression of Fto had the opposing effect on proliferation, mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP generation, in vitro differentiation, Akt phosphorylation, and PPARγ and GLUT4 expression. Moreover, we demonstrated that Wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, could inhibit phospho-Akt in Fto overexpressed 3T3-L1 cells. Taken together, the results suggest that Fto regulates the proliferation and differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells via multiple mechanisms, including PPARγ and PI3K/Akt signaling.

  18. Vanin-1 licenses inflammatory mediator production by gut epithelial cells and controls colitis by antagonizing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activity

    PubMed Central

    Berruyer, Carole; Pouyet, Laurent; Millet, Virginie; Martin, Florent M.; LeGoffic, Aude; Canonici, Alexandra; Garcia, Stéphane; Bagnis, Claude; Naquet, Philippe; Galland, Franck

    2006-01-01

    Colitis involves immune cell–mediated tissue injuries, but the contribution of epithelial cells remains largely unclear. Vanin-1 is an epithelial ectoenzyme with a pantetheinase activity that provides cysteamine/cystamine to tissue. Using the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-colitis model we show here that Vanin-1 deficiency protects from colitis. This protection is reversible by administration of cystamine or bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ antagonist. We further demonstrate that Vanin-1, by antagonizing PPARγ, licenses the production of inflammatory mediators by intestinal epithelial cells. We propose that Vanin-1 is an epithelial sensor of stress that exerts a dominant control over innate immune responses in tissue. Thus, the Vanin-1/pantetheinase activity might be a new target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:17145956

  19. Vanin-1 licenses inflammatory mediator production by gut epithelial cells and controls colitis by antagonizing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activity.

    PubMed

    Berruyer, Carole; Pouyet, Laurent; Millet, Virginie; Martin, Florent M; LeGoffic, Aude; Canonici, Alexandra; Garcia, Stéphane; Bagnis, Claude; Naquet, Philippe; Galland, Franck

    2006-12-25

    Colitis involves immune cell-mediated tissue injuries, but the contribution of epithelial cells remains largely unclear. Vanin-1 is an epithelial ectoenzyme with a pantetheinase activity that provides cysteamine/cystamine to tissue. Using the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-colitis model we show here that Vanin-1 deficiency protects from colitis. This protection is reversible by administration of cystamine or bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)gamma antagonist. We further demonstrate that Vanin-1, by antagonizing PPARgamma, licenses the production of inflammatory mediators by intestinal epithelial cells. We propose that Vanin-1 is an epithelial sensor of stress that exerts a dominant control over innate immune responses in tissue. Thus, the Vanin-1/pantetheinase activity might be a new target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory bowel disease.

  20. SERCA2a controls the mode of agonist-induced intracellular Ca2+ signal, transcription factor NFAT and proliferation in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Bobe, Regis; Hadri, Lahouaria; Lopez, Jose J.; Sassi, Yassine; Atassi, Fabrice; Karakikes, Ioannis; Liang, Lifan; Limon, Isabelle; Lompré, Anne-Marie; Hatem, Stephane N.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Lipskaia, Larissa

    2011-01-01

    In blood vessels, tone is maintained by agonist-induced cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations of quiescent/contractile vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, in synthetic/proliferative VSMCs, Gq/phosphoinositide receptor-coupled agonists trigger a steady-state increase in cytosolic Ca2+ followed by a Store Operated Calcium Entry (SOCE) which translates into activation of the proliferation-associated transcription factor NFAT. Here, we report that in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs), the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase type 2a (SERCA2a) expressed in the contractile form of the hCASMCs, controls the nature of the agonist-induced Ca2+ transient and the resulting down-stream signaling pathway. Indeed, restoring SERCA2a expression by gene transfer in synthetic hCASMCs 1) increased Ca2+ storage capacity; 2) modified agonist-induced IP3R Ca2+ release from steady-state to oscillatory mode (the frequency of agonist-induced IP3R Ca2+ signal was 11.66 ± 1.40/100 sec in SERCA2a-expressing cells (n=39) vs 1.37 ± 0.20/100 sec in control cell (n=45), p<0.01); 3) suppressed SOCE by preventing interactions between SR calcium sensor STIM1 and pore forming unit ORAI1; 4) inhibited calcium regulated transcription factor NFAT and its down-stream physiological function such as proliferation and migration. This study provides evidence for the first time that oscillatory and steady-state patterns of Ca2+ transients have different effects on calcium-dependent physiological functions in smooth muscle cells. PMID:21195084

  1. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  2. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data.

  3. Cellular proliferation rate and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 and IGFBP-3 and estradiol receptor alpha expression in the mammary gland of dairy heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes during development.

    PubMed

    Perri, A F; Dallard, B E; Baravalle, C; Licoff, N; Formía, N; Ortega, H H; Becú-Villalobos, D; Mejia, M E; Lacau-Mengido, I M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary ductal morphogenesis during prepuberty occurs mainly in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and estradiol stimulation. Dairy heifers infected with gastrointestinal nematodes have reduced IGF-1 levels, accompanied by reduced growth rate, delayed puberty onset, and lower parenchyma-stroma relationship in their mammary glands. Immunohistochemical studies were undertaken to determine variations in cell division rate, IGF-1 system components, and estradiol receptors (ESR) during peripubertal development in the mammary glands of antiparasitic-treated and untreated Holstein heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Mammary biopsies were taken at 20, 30, 40, and 70 wk of age. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunolabeling, evident in nuclei, tended to be higher in the parenchyma of the glands from treated heifers than in those from untreated. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) type 2 and type 3 immunolabeling was cytoplasmic and was evident in stroma and parenchyma. The IGFBP2-labeled area was lower in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, a maximal expression of this protein was seen at 40 wk of age, whereas in the untreated group the labeling remained constant. No differences were observed for IGFBP3 between treatment groups or during development. Immunolabeling for α ESR (ESR1) was evident in parenchymal nuclei and was higher in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, ESR1 peaked at 30 wk of age and then decreased. These results demonstrate that the parasite burden in young heifers negatively influence mammary gland development, affecting cell division rate and parameters related to estradiol and IGF-1 signaling in the gland.

  4. Inside-out Signaling Promotes Dynamic Changes in the Carcinoembryonic Antigen-related Cellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (CEACAM1) Oligomeric State to Control Its Cell Adhesion Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prerna C.; Lee, Hannah S. W.; Ming, Aaron Y. K.; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M.; Yip, Christopher M.; Rocheleau, Jonathan V.; Gray-Owen, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts are fundamental to multicellular organisms and are subject to exquisite levels of control. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) can engage in both cis-homophilic (parallel) oligomerization and trans-homophilic (anti-parallel) binding. In this study, we establish that the CEACAM1 transmembrane domain has a propensity to form cis-dimers via the transmembrane-embedded 432GXXXG436 motif and that this basal state is overcome when activated calmodulin binds to the CEACAM1 cytoplasmic domain. Although mutation of the 432GXXXG436 motif reduced CEACAM1 oligomerization, it did not affect surface localization of the receptor or influence CEACAM1-dependent cellular invasion by the pathogenic Neisseria. The mutation did, however, have a striking effect on CEACAM1-dependent cellular aggregation, increasing both the kinetics of cell-cell association and the size of cellular aggregates formed. CEACAM1 association with tyrosine kinase c-Src and tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 was not affected by the 432GXXXG436 mutation, consistent with their association with the monomeric form of wild type CEACAM1. Collectively, our results establish that a dynamic oligomer-to-monomer shift in surface-expressed CEACAM1 facilitates trans-homophilic binding and downstream effector signaling. PMID:24005674

  5. Identification of specific adenovirus E1A N-terminal residues critical to the binding of cellular proteins and to the control of cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H G; Rikitake, Y; Carter, M C; Yaciuk, P; Abraham, S E; Zerler, B; Moran, E

    1993-01-01

    Adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) oncogene-encoded sequences essential for transformation- and cell growth-regulating activities are localized at the N terminus and in regions of highly conserved amino acid sequence designated conserved regions 1 and 2. These regions interact to form the binding sites for two classes of cellular proteins: those, such as the retinoblastoma gene product, whose association with the E1A products is specifically dependent on region 2, and another class which so far is known to include only a large cellular DNA-binding protein, p300, whose association with the E1A products is specifically dependent on the N-terminal region. Association between the E1A products and either class of cellular proteins can be disrupted by mutations in conserved region 1. While region 2 has been studied intensively, very little is known so far concerning the nature of the essential residues in the N-terminal region, or about the manner in which conserved region 1 participates in the binding of two distinct sets of cellular proteins. A combination of site-directed point mutagenesis and monoclonal antibody competition experiments reported here suggests that p300 binding is dependent on specific, conserved residues in the N terminus, including positively charged residues at positions 2 and 3 of the E1A proteins, and that p300 and pRB bind to distinct, nonoverlapping subregions within conserved region 1. The availability of precise point mutations disrupting p300 binding supports previous data linking p300 with cell cycle control and enhancer function. Images PMID:8416379

  6. Design and synthesis of temperature-responsive polymer/silica hybrid nanoparticles and application to thermally controlled cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Hiruta, Yuki; Nemoto, Ryo; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2017-02-04

    This study reports the development of temperature-responsive polymer/silica hybrid nanoparticles and their application to temperature-dependent intracellular uptake of hydrophobic encapsulated fluorescence molecules. Amphiphilic diblock copolymer comprising a temperature-responsive segment, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N,N-dimethylacrylamide) [P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm)] and a trimethyoxysilyl-containing hydrophobic segment was synthesized (PBM-b-ND); this amphiphilic diblock copolymer self-assembled in an aqueous solution, and temperature-responsive polymer/silica hybrid fluorescence nanoparticles were fabricated via a base-catalyzed sol-gel process. The fluorescence probe rhodamine DHPE or boron dipyrromethene derivative was encapsulated into the polymer core with a silica network in a stable manner. Other types of polymer/silica hybrid fluorescence nanoparticles were also developed using either homo-PNIPAAm (PBM-b-N) or homo-PDMAAm (PBM-b-D) segments, instead of P(NIPAAm-co-DMAAm). While PBM-b-D did not exhibit a temperature-dependent phase transition (hydrophilic characteristic), PBM-b-N and PBM-b-ND exhibited temperature-dependent phase transition (hydrophilic/hydrophobic) at 32°C and 38°C, respectively. The cellular uptake of PBM-b-N was clearly observed at both 37°C and 42°C, while the cellular uptake of PBM-b-D was minimal at these temperatures. On the other hand, significant enhancement in the intracellular uptake of PBM-b-ND was observed at 42°C, compared to its uptake at a lower temperature of 37°C. These results indicated that temperature-responsive polymer/silica hybrid nanoparticle, PBM-b-ND demonstrate potential for applications in theranostics with cancer therapy via the combination of local drug delivery and local hyperthermia, as well as for monitoring treatment effectiveness with fluorescence imaging.

  7. Tai Chi, Cellular Inflammation, and Transcriptome Dynamics in Breast Cancer Survivors With Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Witarama, Tuff; Carrillo, Carmen; Sadeghi, Nina; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Ma, Jeffrey; Nicassio, Perry; Ganz, Patricia A.; Bower, Julienne E.; Cole, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Background Mind–body therapies such as Tai Chi are widely used by breast cancer survivors, yet effects on inflammation are not known. This study hypothesized that Tai Chi Chih (TCC) would reduce systemic, cellular, and genomic markers of inflammation as compared with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Methods In this randomized trial for the treatment of insomnia, 90 breast cancer survivors with insomnia were assigned to TCC or CBT-I for 2-hour sessions weekly for 3 months. At baseline and postintervention, blood samples were obtained for measurement of C-reactive protein and toll-like receptor-4–activated monocyte production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), with a random subsample (n = 48) analyzed by genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Results Levels of C-reactive protein did not change in the TCC and CBT-I groups. Levels of toll-like receptor-4–activated monocyte production of IL-6 and TNF combined showed an overall reduction in TCC versus CBT-I (P < .02), with similar effects for IL-6 (P = .07) and TNF (P < .05) alone. For genome-wide transcriptional profiling of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells, expression of genes encoding proinflammatory mediators showed an overall reduction in TCC versus CBT-I (P = .001). TELiS promoter-based bioinformatics analyses implicated a reduction of activity of the proinflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB, in structuring these differences. Conclusions Among breast cancer survivors with insomnia, 3 months of TCC reduced cellular inflammatory responses, and reduced expression of genes encoding proinflammatory mediators. Given the link between inflammation and cancer, these findings provide an evidence-based molecular framework to understand the potential salutary effects of TCC on cancer survivorship. PMID:25749595

  8. Modulation of the Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome Using Computer-Controlled Bioreactors: Impact on Neuronal Cell Proliferation, Survival and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Fábio G.; Panchalingam, Krishna M.; Assunção-Silva, Rita; Serra, Sofia C.; Mendes-Pinheiro, Bárbara; Patrício, Patrícia; Jung, Sunghoon; Anjo, Sandra I.; Manadas, Bruno; Pinto, Luísa; Sousa, Nuno; Behie, Leo A.; Salgado, António J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has been shown that the therapeutic benefits of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) in the Central Nervous System (CNS) are mainly attributed to their secretome. The implementation of computer-controlled suspension bioreactors has shown to be a viable route for the expansion of these cells to large numbers. As hMSCs actively respond to their culture environment, there is the hypothesis that one can modulate its secretome through their use. Herein, we present data indicating that the use of computer-controlled suspension bioreactors enhanced the neuroregulatory profile of hMSCs secretome. Indeed, higher levels of in vitro neuronal differentiation and NOTCH1 expression in human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) were observed when these cells were incubated with the secretome of dynamically cultured hMSCs. A similar trend was also observed in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of rat brains where, upon injection, an enhanced neuronal and astrocytic survival and differentiation, was observed. Proteomic analysis also revealed that the dynamic culturing of hMSCs increased the secretion of several neuroregulatory molecules and miRNAs present in hMSCs secretome. In summary, the appropriate use of dynamic culture conditions can represent an important asset for the development of future neuro-regenerative strategies involving the use of hMSCs secretome. PMID:27301770

  9. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    PubMed

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found.

  10. ERα-XPO1 Cross Talk Controls Tamoxifen Sensitivity in Tumors by Altering ERK5 Cellular Localization.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Kinga; Zhao, Yiru Chen; Kulkoyluoglu, Eylem; Chen, Karen Lee Ann; Hieronymi, Kadriye; Holloway, Jamie; Li, Sarah; Ray, Tania; Ray, Partha Sarathi; Landesman, Yosef; Lipka, Alexander Edward; Smith, Rebecca Lee; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep

    2016-10-01

    Most breast cancer deaths occur in women with recurrent, estrogen receptor (ER)-α(+), metastatic tumors. There is a critical need for therapeutic approaches that include novel, targetable mechanism-based strategies by which ERα (+) tumors can be resensitized to endocrine therapies. The objective of this study was to validate a group of nuclear transport genes as potential biomarkers to predict the risk of endocrine therapy failure and to evaluate the inhibition of XPO1, one of these genes as a novel means to enhance the effectiveness of endocrine therapies. Using advanced statistical methods, we found that expression levels of several of nuclear transport genes including XPO1 were associated with poor survival and predicted recurrence of tamoxifen-treated breast tumors in human breast cancer gene expression data sets. In mechanistic studies we showed that the expression of XPO1 determined the cellular localization of the key signaling proteins and the response to tamoxifen. We demonstrated that combined targeting of XPO1 and ERα in several tamoxifen-resistant cell lines and tumor xenografts with the XPO1 inhibitor, Selinexor, and tamoxifen restored tamoxifen sensitivity and prevented recurrence in vivo. The nuclear transport pathways have not previously been implicated in the development of endocrine resistance, and given the need for better strategies for selecting patients to receive endocrine modulatory reagents and improving therapy response of relapsed ERα(+) tumors, our findings show great promise for uncovering the role these pathways play in reducing cancer recurrences.

  11. ERα-XPO1 Cross Talk Controls Tamoxifen Sensitivity in Tumors by Altering ERK5 Cellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Kinga; Zhao, Yiru Chen; Kulkoyluoglu, Eylem; Chen, Karen Lee Ann; Hieronymi, Kadriye; Holloway, Jamie; Li, Sarah; Ray, Tania; Ray, Partha Sarathi; Landesman, Yosef; Lipka, Alexander Edward; Smith, Rebecca Lee

    2016-01-01

    Most breast cancer deaths occur in women with recurrent, estrogen receptor (ER)-α(+), metastatic tumors. There is a critical need for therapeutic approaches that include novel, targetable mechanism-based strategies by which ERα (+) tumors can be resensitized to endocrine therapies. The objective of this study was to validate a group of nuclear transport genes as potential biomarkers to predict the risk of endocrine therapy failure and to evaluate the inhibition of XPO1, one of these genes as a novel means to enhance the effectiveness of endocrine therapies. Using advanced statistical methods, we found that expression levels of several of nuclear transport genes including XPO1 were associated with poor survival and predicted recurrence of tamoxifen-treated breast tumors in human breast cancer gene expression data sets. In mechanistic studies we showed that the expression of XPO1 determined the cellular localization of the key signaling proteins and the response to tamoxifen. We demonstrated that combined targeting of XPO1 and ERα in several tamoxifen-resistant cell lines and tumor xenografts with the XPO1 inhibitor, Selinexor, and tamoxifen restored tamoxifen sensitivity and prevented recurrence in vivo. The nuclear transport pathways have not previously been implicated in the development of endocrine resistance, and given the need for better strategies for selecting patients to receive endocrine modulatory reagents and improving therapy response of relapsed ERα(+) tumors, our findings show great promise for uncovering the role these pathways play in reducing cancer recurrences. PMID:27533791

  12. Preliminary study on forming microbubble-surrounded cells as carriers for cellular therapy and evaluation of ultrasound controllability by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demachi, Fumi; Murayama, Yuta; Hosaka, Naoto; Mochizuki, Takashi; Masuda, Kohji; Enosawa, Shin; Chiba, Toshio; Oda, Yusuke; Suzuki, Ryo; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    Although various cellular immune therapies have been proposed and developed, because the therapeutic cells disperse upon injection into blood flow, there is a limitation on the accumulation of the cells to the target area. We previously reported our attempts to actively control microbubbles in artificial blood vessels, and here we propose a new method of carrying therapeutic cells for cellular therapy using microbubbles and ultrasound. When microbubbles and their aggregations attach to the surface of therapeutic cells, the acoustic force needed to propel the cells is increased because of the size expansion and the boundary in acoustic impedance on the cell surface. We fabricated a cylindrical chamber including two ultrasound transducers to emit a suspension of microbubbles (TF-BLs, transferrin-bubble liposomes) on the cells (Colon-26) to enhance the adhesion of microbubbles on the cells. We found that the optimum conditions for producing BL-surrounded cells were a sound pressure of 100 kPa-pp, an exposure time of 30 s, and a TF-BL concentration of 0.33 mg lipid/mL, when the cell concentration was constant at 0.77 × 105/mL in phosphate-buffered saline. Using these BL-surrounded cells, we confirmed the controllability of the cells under ultrasound exposure, where the displacement increased in proportion to the sound pressure and was not confirmed with the original cells.

  13. Stochastic asymptotical synchronization of chaotic Markovian jumping fuzzy cellular neural networks with mixed delays and the Wiener process based on sampled-data control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalpana, M.; Balasubramaniam, P.

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the stochastic asymptotical synchronization of chaotic Markovian jumping fuzzy cellular neural networks (MJFCNNs) with discrete, unbounded distributed delays, and the Wiener process based on sampled-data control using the linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach. The Lyapunov—Krasovskii functional combined with the input delay approach as well as the free-weighting matrix approach is employed to derive several sufficient criteria in terms of LMIs to ensure that the delayed MJFCNNs with the Wiener process is stochastic asymptotical synchronous. Restrictions (e.g., time derivative is smaller than one) are removed to obtain a proposed sampled-data controller. Finally, a numerical example is provided to demonstrate the reliability of the derived results.

  14. A retroviral promoter and a cellular enhancer define a bipartite element which controls env ERVWE1 placental expression.

    PubMed

    Prudhomme, Sarah; Oriol, Guy; Mallet, François

    2004-11-01

    The HERV-W family contains hundreds of loci diversely expressed in several physiological and pathological contexts. A unique locus termed ERVWE1 encodes an envelope glycoprotein (syncytin) involved in hominoid placental physiology. Here we show that syncytin expression is regulated by a bipartite element consisting of a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-inducible long terminal repeat (LTR) retroviral promoter adjacent to a cellular enhancer conferring a high level of expression and placental tropism. Deletion mutant analysis showed that the ERVWE1 5' LTR contains binding sites essential for basal placental activity in the region from positions +1 to +125. The region from positions +125 to +310 represents a cAMP-responsive core HERV-W promoter active in all cell types. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis highlighted the complexity of U3 regulation. ERVWE1 placenta-specific positive (e.g., T240) and negative (e.g., G71) regulatory sites were identified, as were essential sites required for basic activity (e.g., A247). The flanking sequences of the ERVWE1 provirus contain several putative regulatory elements. The upstream HERV-H and HERV-P LTRs were found to be inactive. Conversely, the 436-bp region located between the HERV-P LTR and ERVWE1 was shown to be an upstream regulatory element (URE) which is significantly active in placenta cells. This URE acts as a tissue-specific enhancer. Genetic and functional analyses of hominoid UREs revealed large differences between UREs of members of the Hominidae and the Hylobatidae. These data allowed the identification of a positive regulatory region from positions -436 to -128, a mammalian apparent LTR retrotransposon negative regulatory region from positions -128 to -67, and a trophoblast-specific enhancer (TSE) from positions -67 to -35. Putative AP-2, Sp-1, and GCMa binding sites are essential constituents of the 33-bp TSE.

  15. Endothelial Cellular Responses to Biodegradable Metal Zinc.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    Biodegradable zinc (Zn) metals, a new generation of biomaterials, have attracted much attention due to their excellent biodegradability, bioabsorbability, and adaptability to tissue regeneration. Compared with magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe), Zn exhibits better corrosion and mechanical behaviors in orthopedic and stent applications. After implantation, Zn containing material will slowly degrade, and Zn ions (Zn(2+)) will be released to the surrounding tissue. For stent applications, the local Zn(2+)concentration near endothelial tissue/cells could be high. However, it is unclear how endothelia will respond to such high concentrations of Zn(2+), which is pivotal to vascular remodeling and regeneration. Here, we evaluated the short-term cellular behaviors of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCECs) exposed to a concentration gradient (0-140 μM) of extracellular Zn(2+). Zn(2+) had an interesting biphasic effect on cell viability, proliferation, spreading, and migration. Generally, low concentrations of Zn(2+) promoted viability, proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while high concentrations of Zn(2+) had opposite effects. For gene expression profiles, the most affected functional genes were related to cell adhesion, cell injury, cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, vessel tone, and coagulation. These results provide helpful information and guidance for Zn-based alloy design as well as the controlled release of Zn(2+)in stent and other related medical applications.

  16. SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is involved in a wide array of cellular processes, including glucose homeostasis, energy metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis, and immune response. However, it is un...

  17. An essential developmental function for murine phosphoglycolate phosphatase in safeguarding cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Segerer, Gabriela; Hadamek, Kerstin; Zundler, Matthias; Fekete, Agnes; Seifried, Annegrit; Mueller, Martin J.; Koentgen, Frank; Gessler, Manfred; Jeanclos, Elisabeth; Gohla, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PGP) is thought to target phosphoglycolate, a 2-deoxyribose fragment derived from the repair of oxidative DNA lesions. However, the physiological role of this activity and the biological function of the DNA damage product phosphoglycolate is unknown. We now show that knockin replacement of murine Pgp with its phosphatase-inactive PgpD34N mutant is embryonically lethal due to intrauterine growth arrest and developmental delay in midgestation. PGP inactivation attenuated triosephosphate isomerase activity, increased triglyceride levels at the expense of the cellular phosphatidylcholine content, and inhibited cell proliferation. These effects were prevented under hypoxic conditions or by blocking phosphoglycolate release from damaged DNA. Thus, PGP is essential to sustain cell proliferation in the presence of oxygen. Collectively, our findings reveal a previously unknown mechanism coupling a DNA damage repair product to the control of intermediary metabolism and cell proliferation. PMID:27731369

  18. Treatment Analysis in a Cancer Stem Cell Context Using a Tumor Growth Model Based on Cellular Automata.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, Ángel; Santos, José

    2015-01-01

    Cancer can be viewed as an emergent behavior in terms of complex system theory and artificial life, Cellular Automata (CA) being the tool most used for studying and characterizing the emergent behavior. Different approaches with CA models were used to model cancer growth. The use of the abstract model of acquired cancer hallmarks permits the direct modeling at cellular level, where a cellular automaton defines the mitotic and apoptotic behavior of cells, and allows for an analysis of different dynamics of the cellular system depending on the presence of the different hallmarks. A CA model based on the presence of hallmarks in the cells, which includes a simulation of the behavior of Cancer Stem Cells (CSC) and their implications for the resultant growth behavior of the multicellular system, was employed. This modeling of cancer growth, in the avascular phase, was employed to analyze the effect of cancer treatments in a cancer stem cell context. The model clearly explains why, after treatment against non-stem cancer cells, the regrowth capability of CSCs generates a faster regrowth of tumor behavior, and also shows that a continuous low-intensity treatment does not favor CSC proliferation and differentiation, thereby allowing an unproblematic control of future tumor regrowth. The analysis performed indicates that, contrary to the current attempts at CSC control, trying to make CSC proliferation more difficult is an important point to consider, especially in the immediate period after a standard treatment for controlling non-stem cancer cell proliferation.

  19. Retinol-binding protein 4 and its membrane receptor STRA6 control adipogenesis by regulating cellular retinoid homeostasis and retinoic acid receptor α activity.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Matthias; Tuvia, Neta; Deutschmann, Claudia; Witte, Nicole; Tolkachov, Alexander; Valai, Atijeh; Henze, Andrea; Sander, Leif E; Raila, Jens; Schupp, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Retinoids are vitamin A (retinol) derivatives and complex regulators of adipogenesis by activating specific nuclear receptors, including the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR). Circulating retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and its membrane receptor STRA6 coordinate cellular retinol uptake. It is unknown whether retinol levels and the activity of RAR and RXR in adipocyte precursors are linked via RBP4/STRA6. Here, we show that STRA6 is expressed in precursor cells and, dictated by the apo- and holo-RBP4 isoforms, mediates bidirectional retinol transport that controls RARα activity and subsequent adipocyte differentiation. Mobilization of retinoid stores in mice by inducing RBP4 secretion from the liver activated RARα signaling in the precursor cell containing the stromal-vascular fraction of adipose tissue. Retinol-loaded holo-RBP4 blocked adipocyte differentiation of cultured precursors by activating RARα. Remarkably, retinol-free apo-RBP4 triggered retinol efflux that reduced cellular retinoids, RARα activity, and target gene expression and enhanced adipogenesis synergistically with ectopic STRA6. Thus, STRA6 in adipocyte precursor cells links nuclear RARα activity to the circulating RBP4 isoforms, whose ratio in obese mice was shifted toward limiting the adipogenic potential of their precursors. This novel cross talk identifies a retinol-dependent metabolic function of RBP4 that may have important implications for the treatment of obesity.

  20. Synthesis and study of benzothiazole conjugates in the control of cell proliferation by modulating Ras/MEK/ERK-dependent pathway in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ahmed; Faazil, Shaikh; Ramaiah, M Janaki; Ashraf, Md; Balakrishna, M; Pushpavalli, S N C V L; Patel, Nibedita; Pal-Bhadra, Manika

    2013-10-15

    By applying a methodology, a series of benzothiazole-pyrrole based conjugates (4a-r) were synthesized and evaluated for their antiproliferative activity. Compounds such as 4a, 4c, 4e, 4g-j, 4m, 4n, 4o and 4r exhibited significant cytotoxic effect in the MCF-7 cell line. Cell cycle effects were examined for these conjugates at 2 μM as well as 4 μM concentrations and FACS analysis show an increase of G2/M phase cells with concomitant decrease of G1 phase cells thereby indicating G2/M cell cycle arrest by them. Interestingly 4o and 4r are effective in causing apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. Moreover, 4o showed down regulation of oncogenic expression of Ras and its downstream effector molecules such as MEK1, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and VEGF. The apoptotic aspect of this conjugate is further evidenced by increased expression of caspase-9 in MCF-7 cells. Hence these small molecules have the potential to control both the cell proliferation as well as the invasion process in the highly malignant breast cancers.

  1. Molecular and cellular processes underlying the hallmarks of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jonathan M; Bernstein, Clare R; West, Catharine M L; Homer, Jarrod J

    2013-09-01

    The hallmarks of cancer were updated by Hanahan and Weinberg in 2011. Here we discuss the updated hallmarks in relation to what is known of the molecular and cellular processes underlying the development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Several mechanisms are described, and recent surveys of HNSCC suggest a limited number of mutations, from which more mechanisms may emerge. There are also epigenetic changes to the control of normal processes. More than one mechanism underlies each hallmark. Processes essential to the development of HNSCC need not be essential to the proliferation of the fully developed tumour. Attention is paid to the emerging hallmarks, deregulation of cellular energy metabolism and evasion of immune destruction, and enabling characteristics, genome instability and mutation and tumour-promoting inflammation. HNSCC may adapt to hypoxia, suppress HLA expression, and express Toll-like receptors to facilitate inflammation, which support the proliferation of the tumour.

  2. Light-controlled cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of nucleic acid-binding agents. Studies in vitro and in zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Penas, Cristina; Sánchez, Mateo I.; Guerra-Varela, Jorge; Sanchez-Piñón, Laura; Vázquez, M. Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    We have synthesized oligoarginine conjugates of selected DNA-binding agents (a bisbenzamidine, acridine and thiazole orange) and demonstrated that the DNA binding and cell internalization properties of such conjugates can be inhibited by appending a negatively charged oligoglutamic tail through a photolabile linker. Irradiation with UV light releases the parent octaarginine conjugates, thus restoring their cell internalization and biological activity. Preliminary assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrates the potential of this prodrug strategy for controlling in vivo cytotoxicity. PMID:26534774

  3. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conference’s failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  4. Discussing epigenetics in Southern California: a report from the International Symposium on Epigenetic Control and Cellular Plasticity, UCI, December 15-16, 2011.

    PubMed

    Rattner, Barbara P

    2012-04-01

    With the goal of discussing how epigenetic control and chromatin remodeling contribute to the various processes that lead to cellular plasticity and disease, this symposium marks the collaboration between the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) in France and the University of California, Irvine (UCI). Organized by Paolo Sassone-Corsi (UCI) and held at the Beckman Center of the National Academy of Sciences at the UCI campus December 15-16, 2011, this was the first of a series of international conferences on epigenetics dedicated to the scientific community in Southern California. The meeting also served as the official kick off for the newly formed Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism at the School of Medicine, UCI (http://cem.igb.uci.edu).

  5. Enhanced delivery of daidzein into fibroblasts and neuronal cells with cationic derivatives of gamma-cyclodextrin for the control of cellular glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, Kamil; Kujdowicz, Monika; Kajta, Małgorzata; Nowakowska, Maria; Szczubiałka, Krzysztof

    2015-04-01

    Two cationic derivatives of γ-cyclodextrin (GCD) were synthesized by functionalization with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride (GTMAC) and ethylenediamine (EDA). Both these derivatives (GCD-GTMAC and GCD-EDA) have been shown to interact strongly with anionic biopolymers, unfractionated heparin (UFH) and mucin, the latter showing their mucoadhesive properties. They form inclusion complexes with daidzein (DAI), an isoflavone displaying a multitude of physiological effects, much more efficiently than the unmodified GCD. It was also shown that the complexes of these GCD derivatives with DAI and Nile Red penetrate human fibroblasts and murine hippocampal neuronal cells indicating that cationic GCD derivatives can be considered as potential delivery systems for isoflavones and other poorly water soluble compounds. Moreover, it was found that DAI delivered in cationic GCD complexes decreased the level of the cellular glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in normal fibroblasts suggesting their possible application in the control of GAGs in mucopolysaccharidoses, lysosomal storage diseases caused by pathological accumulation of GAGs in the cells.

  6. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Tai Chi Reverse Cellular and Genomic Markers of Inflammation in Late Life Insomnia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Witarama, Tuff; Carrillo, Carmen; Sadeghi, Nina; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Ma, Jeffrey; Nicassio, Perry; Bootzin, Richard; Cole, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep disturbance is associated with activation of systemic and cellular inflammation, as well as pro-inflammatory transcriptional profiles in circulating leukocytes. Whether treatments that target insomnia-related complaints might reverse these markers of inflammation in older adults with insomnia is not known. Methods In this randomized trial, 123 older adults with insomnia were randomly assigned to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), tai chi chih (TCC), or sleep seminar education active control condition (SS) for two hour sessions weekly over 4 months with follow-up at 7- and 16-months. We measured C-reactive protein (CRP) at baseline, month 4 and 16, Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4)-activated monocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines at baseline, month 2, 4, 7, and 16, and genome-wide transcriptional profiling at baseline and month 4. Results As compared to SS active control, CBT-I reduced levels of CRP (month 4, 16, P’s<0.05), monocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines (month 2 only, P<0.05), and pro-inflammatory gene expression (month 4, P<0.01). TCC marginally reduced CRP (month 4, P=0.06), and significantly reduced monocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines (month 2, 4, 7, 16, all P’s<0.05) and proinflammatory gene expression (month 4, P<0.001). In CBT and TCC, TELIS promoter-based bioinformatics analyses indicated reduced activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and AP1. Conclusions Among older adults with insomnia, CBT-I reduced systemic inflammation, TCC reduced cellular inflammatory responses, and both treatments reduced expression of genes encoding proinflammatory mediators. The findings provide an evidence-based molecular framework to understand the potential salutary effects of insomnia treatment on inflammation, with implications for inflammatory disease risk. PMID:25748580

  7. Cellular responses to a prolonged delay in mitosis are determined by a DNA damage response controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Colin, Didier J; Hain, Karolina O; Allan, Lindsey A; Clarke, Paul R

    2015-03-01

    Anti-cancer drugs that disrupt mitosis inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis, although the mechanisms of these responses are poorly understood. Here, we characterize a mitotic stress response that determines cell fate in response to microtubule poisons. We show that mitotic arrest induced by these drugs produces a temporally controlled DNA damage response (DDR) characterized by the caspase-dependent formation of γH2AX foci in non-apoptotic cells. Following exit from a delayed mitosis, this initial response results in activation of DDR protein kinases, phosphorylation of the tumour suppressor p53 and a delay in subsequent cell cycle progression. We show that this response is controlled by Mcl-1, a regulator of caspase activation that becomes degraded during mitotic arrest. Chemical inhibition of Mcl-1 and the related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL by a BH3 mimetic enhances the mitotic DDR, promotes p53 activation and inhibits subsequent cell cycle progression. We also show that inhibitors of DDR protein kinases as well as BH3 mimetics promote apoptosis synergistically with taxol (paclitaxel) in a variety of cancer cell lines. Our work demonstrates the role of mitotic DNA damage responses in determining cell fate in response to microtubule poisons and BH3 mimetics, providing a rationale for anti-cancer combination chemotherapies.

  8. The control of cellular shape and motility. Mg2+ and tropomyosin regulate the formation and the dissociation of microfilament bundles.

    PubMed Central

    Grazi, E; Cuneo, P; Cataldi, A

    1992-01-01

    At pH 7.14 and 37 degrees C, in 7.2% (w/v) poly(ethylene glycol) 6000, tropomyosin-regulated actin filaments are converted into filament bundles by increasing the free Mg2+ concentration to 1.7-2.0 mM. When free Mg2+ concentration is decreased below 1.7 mM, bundles dissociate back into tropomyosin-regulated actin filaments. Pure actin filaments are insensitive to this mechanism of control and are found as filament bundles in all the range of free Mg2+ concentrations tested (1.37-2.2 mM). The mechanism of regulation described above is likely to operate in the cell, where the concentration of free Mg2+ is linked to the energy charge of the adenine nucleotide system. Images Fig. 3. PMID:1471985

  9. Director`s series on proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.C.; Price, M.E.

    1995-11-17

    This is an occasional publication of essays on the topics of nuclear, chemical, biological, and missile proliferation. The views represented are those of the author`s. Essay topics include: Nuclear Proliferation: Myth and Reality; Problems of Enforcing Compliance with Arms Control Agreements; The Unreliability of the Russian Officer Corps: Reluctant Domestic Warriors; and Russia`s Nuclear Legacy.

  10. Harnessing cellular-derived forces in self-assembled microtissues to control the synthesis and alignment of ECM.

    PubMed

    Schell, Jacquelyn Y; Wilks, Benjamin T; Patel, Mohak; Franck, Christian; Chalivendra, Vijaya; Cao, Xuan; Shenoy, Vivek B; Morgan, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    The alignment and blend of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins give a tissue its specific mechanical properties as well as its physiological function. Various tissue engineering methods have taken purified ECM proteins and aligned them into gels, sponges and threads. Although, each of these methods has created aligned ECM, they have had many limitations including loss of hierarchal collagen structure and poor mechanical performance. Here, we have developed a new method to control ECM synthesis using self-assembled cells. Cells were seeded into custom designed, scaffold-free, micro-molds with fixed obstacles that harnessed and directed cell-mediated stresses. Cells within the microtissue reacted to self-generated tension by aligning, elongating, and synthesizing an ECM whose organization was dictated by the strain field that was set by our micro-mold design. We have shown that through cell selection, we can create tissues with aligned collagen II or aligned elastin. We have also demonstrated that these self-assembled microtissues have mechanical properties in the range of natural tissues and that mold design can be used to further tailor these mechanical properties.

  11. Nuclear LSm8 affects number of cytoplasmic processing bodies via controlling cellular distribution of Like-Sm proteins

    PubMed Central

    Novotný, Ivan; Podolská, Kateřina; Blažíková, Michaela; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya; Svoboda, Petr; Staněk, David

    2012-01-01

    Processing bodies (P-bodies) are dynamic cytoplasmic structures involved in mRNA degradation, but the mechanism that governs their formation is poorly understood. In this paper, we address a role of Like-Sm (LSm) proteins in formation of P-bodies and provide evidence that depletion of nuclear LSm8 increases the number of P-bodies, while LSm8 overexpression leads to P-body loss. We show that LSm8 knockdown causes relocalization of LSm4 and LSm6 proteins to the cytoplasm and suggest that LSm8 controls nuclear accumulation of all LSm2–7 proteins. We propose a model in which redistribution of LSm2–7 to the cytoplasm creates new binding sites for other P-body components and nucleates new, microscopically visible structures. The model is supported by prolonged residence of two P-body proteins, DDX6 and Ago2, in P-bodies after LSm8 depletion, which indicates stronger interactions between these proteins and P-bodies. Finally, an increased number of P-bodies has negligible effects on microRNA-mediated translation repression and nonsense mediated decay, further supporting the view that the function of proteins localized in P-bodies is independent of visible P-bodies. PMID:22875987

  12. Controllable inhibition of cellular uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein: structure-function relationships for nanoscale amphiphilic polymers.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Nicole M; Sparks, Sarah M; Demirdirek, Bahar; Uhrich, Kathryn E; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2010-08-01

    A family of anionic nanoscale polymers based on amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs) was developed for controlled inhibition of highly oxidized low-density lipoprotein (hoxLDL) uptake by inflammatory macrophage cells, a process that triggers the escalation of a chronic arterial disease called atherosclerosis. The basic AM structure is composed of a hydrophobic portion formed from a mucic acid sugar backbone modified at the four hydroxyls with lauroyl groups conjugated to hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The AM structure-activity relationships were probed by synthesizing AMs with six key variables: length of the PEG chain, carboxylic acid location, type of anionic charge, number of anionic charges, rotational motion of the anionic group, and PEG architecture. All AM structures were confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and their ability to inhibit hoxLDL uptake in THP-1 human macrophage cells was compared in the absence and presence of serum. We report that AMs with one, rotationally restricted carboxylic acid within the hydrophobic portion of the polymer was sufficient to yield the most effective AM for inhibiting hoxLDL internalization by THP-1 human macrophage cells under serum-containing conditions. Further, increasing the number of charges and altering the PEG architecture in an effort to increase serum stabilization did not significantly impair the ability of AMs to inhibit hoxLDL internalization, suggesting that selected modifications to the AMs could potentially promote multifunctional characteristics of these nanoscale macromolecules.

  13. (In)activity-related neuroplasticity in brainstem control of sympathetic outflow: unraveling underlying molecular, cellular, and anatomical mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mischel, Nicholas A; Subramanian, Madhan; Dombrowski, Maryetta D; Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J; Mueller, Patrick J

    2015-07-15

    More people die as a result of physical inactivity than any other preventable risk factor including smoking, high cholesterol, and obesity. Cardiovascular disease, the number one cause of death in the United States, tops the list of inactivity-related diseases. Nevertheless, the vast majority of Americans continue to make lifestyle choices that are creating a rapidly growing burden of epidemic size and impact on the United States healthcare system. It is imperative that we improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which physical inactivity increases the incidence of cardiovascular disease and how exercise can prevent or rescue the inactivity phenotype. The current review summarizes research on changes in the brain that contribute to inactivity-related cardiovascular disease. Specifically, we focus on changes in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), a critical brain region for basal and reflex control of sy