Science.gov

Sample records for convection heat exchangers

  1. Clothing convective heat exchange--proposal for improved prediction in standards and models.

    PubMed

    Holmér, I; Nilsson, H; Havenith, G; Parsons, K

    1999-07-01

    Convection is an important determinant for both sensible and evaporative heat exchange. Heat transfer by convection for normal boundary conditions is readily described by simple power functions. Clothing affects convection in various ways and existing characterisation of clothing by its static insulation values produces inaccurate prediction of sensible heat exchange, eventually leading to erroneous risk assessment. The present paper reviews various methods for evaluation of clothing convective (sensible) heat exchange. Based on available data, two equations are proposed for determination of the reduction of the total insulation values obtained under static, still wind conditions as a consequence of wind and walking effects. The equations apply from 0 to 1.84 clo, from 0.2 to 3 m/s and for walking speeds up to 1.2 m/s. The equations are incorporated in ISO 7933 to provide a more realistic and accurate prediction of sensible heat transfer through clothing.

  2. Convective heat transfer from molten salt droplets in a direct contact heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber, O.; Naterer, G. F.; Dincer, I.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a new predictive model of droplet flow and heat transfer from molten salt droplets in a direct contact heat exchanger. The process is designed to recover heat from molten CuCl in a thermochemical copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) cycle of hydrogen production. This heat recovery occurs through the physical interaction between high temperature CuCl droplets and air. Convective heat transfer between droplets and air is analyzed in a counter-current spray flow heat exchanger. Numerical results for the variations of temperature, velocity and heat transfer rate are presented for two cases of CuCl flow. The optimal dimensions of the heat exchanger are found to be a diameter of 0.13 m, with a height of 0.6 and 0.8 m, for 1 and 0.5 mm droplet diameters, respectively. Additional results are presented and discussed for the heat transfer effectiveness and droplet solidification during heat recovery from the molten CuCl droplets.

  3. Experimental study of mixed convection heat transfer in vertical helically coiled tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbani, N.; Taherian, H.; Gorji, M.; Mirgolbabaei, H.

    2010-10-15

    In this study the mixed convection heat transfer in a coil-in-shell heat exchanger for various Reynolds numbers, various tube-to-coil diameter ratios and different dimensionless coil pitch was experimentally investigated. The experiments were conducted for both laminar and turbulent flow inside coil. Effects of coil pitch and tube diameters on shell-side heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchanger were studied. Different characteristic lengths were used in various Nusselt number calculations to determine which length best fits the data and several equations were proposed. The particular difference in this study in comparison with the other similar studies was the boundary conditions for the helical coils. The results indicate that the equivalent diameter of shell is the best characteristic length. (author)

  4. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, July 15, 1996--September 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    This report very briefly summarizes project objectives, results, and current activities. The goals of the project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosypohon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. Results include the experimental study of thermosyphon heat exchangers, which led to modeling equations that correlate the overall heat transfer coefficient-area product (UA) to mixed convection regime parameters. Current activities include the development and evaluation of a side-arm heat exchanger computer model and modification of the experimental facility for fundamental heat exchanger studies.

  5. Comparison of natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.; Liu, W.

    1998-09-15

    Thermosyphon heat exchangers are used in indirect solar water heating systems to avoid using a pump to circulate water from the storage tank to the heat exchanger. In this study, the authors consider the effect of heat exchanger design on system performance. They also compare performance of a system with thermosyphon flow to the same system with a 40W pump in the water loop. In the first part of the study, the authors consider the impact of heat exchanger design on the thermal performance of both one- and two-collector solar water heaters. The comparison is based on Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) OG300 simulations. The thermosyphon heat exchangers considered are (1) a one-pass, double wall, 0.22 m{sup 2}, four tube-in-shell heat exchanger manufactured by AAA Service and Supply, Inc., (the Quad-Rod); (2) a two-pass, double wall, 0.2 m{sup 2}, tube-in-shell made by Heliodyne, Inc., but not intended for commercial development; (3) a one-pass, single wall, 0.28 m{sup 2}, 31 tube-in-shell heat exchanger from Young Radiator Company, and (4) a one-pass single-wall, 0.61 m{sup 2}, four coil-in-shell heat exchanger made by ThermoDynamics Ltd. The authors compare performance of the systems with thermosyphon heat exchangers to a system with a 40 W pump used with the Quad-Rod heat exchanger. In the second part of the study, the effects of reducing frictional losses through the heat exchanger and/or the pipes connecting the heat exchanger to the storage tank, and increasing heat transfer area are evaluated in terms of OG300 ratings.

  6. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, February 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    This progress report describes the thermodynamic testing and modeling of a thermosyphon heat exchanger used in solar water heating systems. Testing of a four tube-in-shell thermosyphon heat exchanger was performed in two parts. The first portion of the test increased the collector fluid while the storage tank remained isothermal. After the collector fluid temperature was raised to 95 C, the second part of the test allowed the storage tank to gain heat. The test was performed for two collector flow rates. Measured values included collector side forced flow rate, temperature differences across the heat exchanger, vertical temperature distribution in the storage tank, vertical water temperature profile in the heat exchanger, and pressure drop on the thermosyphon side of the heat exchanger. The overall heat transfer coefficient-area product (UA) values obtained confirmed that models which assume UA depends solely on thermosyphon flow rate do not adequately characterize thermosyphon heat exchangers. This is because heat transfer in thermosyphon exchangers occurs in the mixed convection, rather than forced flow, regime. A linear regression equation was developed to better predict UA using the Prandtl, Reynolds, and Grashof numbers and dimensionless parameters based on fluid properties calculated for the average hot and cold leg temperatures. 9 figs.

  7. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Techniacl progress report, June 1, 1995--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  8. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, September 15, 1996--November 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  9. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, August 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  10. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, December 31, 1995--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger. The tasks for the project are as follows: (1) Develop a model of the thermal performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating applications. A test protocol will be developed which minimizes the number of tests required to adequately account for mixed convection effects. The TRNSYS component model will be fully integrated in a system component model and will use data acquired with the specified test protocol. (2) Conduct a fundamental study to establish friction and heat transfer correlations for conditions and geometries typical of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar systems. Data will be obtained as a function of a buoyancy parameter based on Grashof and Reynolds numbers. The experimental domain will encompass the ranges expected in solar water heating systems.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Conjugate Thermogravitational Convection in a Closed System with a Radiant Energy Source in Conditions of Convective-Radiative Heat Exchange at the External Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nee, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Mathematical modeling of conjugate natural convection in a closed rectangular cavity with a radiant energy source in conditions of convective-radiative heat exchange at the external boundary was conducted. The radiant energy distribution was set by the Lambert's law. Conduction and convection processes analysis showed that the air masses flow pattern is modified slightly over the time. The temperature increases in the gas cavity, despite the heat removal from the one of the external boundary. According to the results of the integral heat transfer analysis were established that the average Nusselt number (Nuav) increasing occurs up to τ = 200 (dimensionless time). Further Nuav has changed insignificantly due to the temperature field equalization near the interfaces "gas - wall".

  12. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, April 1, 1995--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosypohon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger.

  13. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, November 15, 1996--January 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    The goals of this project are: (1) to develop guidelines for the design and use of thermosypohon side-arm heat exchangers in solar domestic water heating systems, and (2) to establish appropriate modeling and testing criteria for evaluating the performance of systems using this type of heat exchanger.

  14. Nature's Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the heat-transfer systems of different animals. Systems include heat conduction into the ground, heat transferred by convection, heat exchange in lizards, fish and polar animals, the carotid rete system, electromagnetic radiation from animals and people, and plant and animal fiber optics. (MDH)

  15. Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, May 15, 1996--July 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    This progress report very briefly summarizes study results and includes an experimental plan developed for the fundamental study of heat transfer in thermosyphon side-arm heat exchangers. The study will investigate the influence of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers on the thermosyphon flow side of the heat exchanger, and the influence of the flow rate on the forced flow side of the heat exchanger. Detailed temperature, flow rate, and pressure data will be obtained for four, seven, and nine tube-in-shell heat exchanger designs. Correlations will be developed for the heat transfer and friction coefficients, and a semi-empirical model will be developed to predict the performance of thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heaters.

  16. Numerical investigation of forced convection of nano fluid flow in horizontal U-longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, S. M.; Sahar, A. F. A.; Firas, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    A numerical study has been carried out to investigate the heat transfer by laminar forced convection of nanofluid taking Titania (TiO2) and Alumina (Al2O3) as nanoparticles and the water as based fluid in a three dimensional plain and U-longitudinal finned tube heat exchanger. A Solid WORKS PREMIUM 2012 is used to draw the geometries of plain tube heat exchanger or U-longitudinal copper finned tube heat exchanger. Four U-longitudinal copper fins have 100 cm long, 3.8cm height and 1mm thickness are attached to a straight copper tube of 100 cm length, 2.2 cm inner diameter and 2.39 cm outer diameter. The governing equations which used as continuity, momentum and energy equations under assumptions are utilized to predict the flow field, temperature distribution, and heat transfer of the heat exchanger. The finite volume approach is used to obtain all the computational results using commercial ANSYS Fluent copy package 14.0 with assist of solid works and Gambit software program. The effect of various parameters on the performance of heat exchanger are investigated numerically such as Reynolds' number (ranging from 270 to 1900), volume consternation of nanoparticles (0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 0.8%), type of nanoparticles, and mass flow rate of nanofluid in the hot region of heat exchanger. For 0.8% consternation of nanoparticles, heat transfer has significant enhancement in both nanofluids. It can be found about 7.3% for TiO2 and about 7.5% for Al2O3 compared with the water only as a working fluid.

  17. Convective boiling of ammonia and Freon 22 in plate heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, C. B.; Hillis, D. L.; Thomas, A.

    An Alfa-Laval plate heat exchanger, previously used as a small ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) evaporator, was refurbished and tested. Several series of tests were carried out with ammonia as the working fluid, followed by one with Freon 22. Configurations utilizing all high angle plates and all low angle plates, and alternate high and low angle plates, were tested to determine the optimum combination for OTEC applications. The effects of ammonia contaminated by water on the thermal performance of the heat exchanger were evaluated. The use of the Linde High-Flux Surface on the working-fluid side of a Transfer plate heat exchanger was investigated to determine its effect on performance.

  18. A two Layer Convecting Mantle With Exchange : A Unified Model Based on Geochemical, Seismic and Heat Flow Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, C. J.; Jaupart, C.; Nolet, G.

    2007-12-01

    -penetrating slabs as emphasized by Fukao and al.(2001) and the recent observation of the large energy spectrum differences at 670 km depth (Gu and al., 2006). We discuss the problem of return flow, which is crucial for both energy budget and convection regime. The recent work on plume by Montelli and al. (2004, 2006) shows the existence of broad plumes in the lower mantle and thin plumes in the upper mantle. d) The estimate of heat flow coming from the lower mantle of 35-32 TW. The work of Davies(1990) and Sleep(1992) shows clearly that this transfer is not the result of plumes reaching the surface, because they correspond at most to 3TW. At the reverse the estimated heat flow carried by the lower mantle plumes is much higher (Nolet and al., 2006). We also discuss the heat flow paradox to explain a Urey ratio of 0.4 with whole mantle convection. In conclusion, we propose mantle with two layers convecting separately but with some exchange of matter, this global exchange corresponding to 1.1024kg since 4.4 Gy. Plume genesis is a two-stage process. Lower mantle plumes heat the Mesosphere boundary layer generating second generation plumes which reach the surface (Allègre and Turcotte; 1983; Allègre, 1987). In the upper mantle itself, we have to distinguish between a vigorously convecting asthenosphere and a sluggish convecting transition zone, both convecting in same cells.

  19. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  20. Experimental and numerical study of mixed convection with flow reversal in coaxial double-duct heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Mare, Thierry; Voicu, Ionut; Miriel, Jacques; Galanis, Nicolas; Sow, Ousmane

    2008-04-15

    Velocity vectors in a vertical coaxial double-duct heat exchanger for parallel ascending flow of water under conditions of laminar mixed convection have been determined experimentally using the particle image velocimetry technique. The measured velocity distributions for large annular flow rates, resulting in an essentially isothermal environment for the stream in the inner tube, are in very good agreement with corresponding numerical predictions. For flow rates of the same order of magnitude in the inner tube and the annulus, and corresponding temperature differences of about 20 C, experimental observations show that flow reversal occurs simultaneously in both streams over large axial distances for both heating and cooling of the flow in the inner tube. (author)

  1. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  2. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  3. Heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, C.R.

    1988-02-02

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections.

  4. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, Walter

    1976-01-06

    A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

  5. Two phase heat exchanger symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J.T.; Kitto, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    This book compiles the papers presented at the conference on the subject of heat transfer mechanics and instrumentation. Theoretical and experimental data are provided in each paper. The topics covered are: temperature effects of steel; optimization of design of two-phase heat exchanges; thermosyphon system and low grade waste heat recovery; condensation heat transfer in plate heat exchangers; forced convective boiling; and performance analysis of full bundle submerged boilers.

  6. Corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, Scott L.

    1989-01-01

    A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

  7. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  8. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  9. Segmented heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, Darryl Dean; Willi, Martin Leo; Fiveland, Scott Byron; Timmons, Kristine Ann

    2010-12-14

    A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

  10. Downhole heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1999-09-01

    The downhole heat exchanger (DHE) eliminates the problem of disposal of geothermal fluid, since only heat is taken from the well. The exchanger consists of a system of pipes or tubes suspended in the well through which clean secondary water is pumped or allowed to circulate by natural convection. These systems offer substantial economic savings over surface heat exchangers where a single-well system is adequate (typically less than 0.8 MWt, with well depths up to about 500 ft) and may be economical under certain conditions at well depths to 1500 ft. Several designs have proven successful; but, the most popular are a simple hairpin loop or multiple loops of iron pipe (similar to the tubes in a U-tube and shell exchanger) extending to near the well bottom. An experimental design consisting of multiple small tubes with headers at each end suspended just below the water surface appears to offer economic and heating capacity advantages. The paper describes design and construction details and New Zealand`s experience with downhole heat exchangers.

  11. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  12. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situtations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others or to reduce the number of heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures is predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few design guidelines are presented.

  13. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, R.R.

    1984-07-16

    This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  14. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-01-01

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  15. Woven heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Piscitella, Roger R.

    1987-05-05

    In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

  16. Heat exchangers: Selection, rating, and thermal design

    SciTech Connect

    Kakac, S.; Liu, H.

    1998-01-01

    This book takes a systematic approach to the subject, focusing on the selection, design, rating, and operational challenges of various types of heat exchangers. Written by well-known authors in the field of heat transfer, this book covers all the most commonly used types of heat exchangers, including condensers and evaporators. The text begins with the classification of the different types of heat exchangers and discusses methods for their sizing and rating. Single phase forced convection correlations in ducts and pressure drop and pumping power analysis are also covered. A chapter is devoted to the special problem of fouling. Thermal design methods and processes, including designs for condensers and evaporators, complete this thorough introduction to the subject. The appendix provides information on the thermophysical properties of fluids, including the new refrigerants. Every topic features worked examples to illustrate the methods and procedures presented, and additional problems are included at the end of each chapter, with examples to be used as a student design project. An instructor's manual is available, including complete solutions to selected problems in the text. The contents include: classification of heat exchangers; basic design methods of heat exchangers; forced convection correlations for single-phase side of heat exchangers; heat exchanger pressure drop and pumping power; fouling of heat exchangers; double-pipe heat exchangers; design correlations for condensers and evaporators; shell-and-tube heat exchangers; compact heat exchangers; gasketed-plate heat exchangers; and condensers and evaporators.

  17. A heat exchanger between forced flow helium gas at 14 to 18 K andliquid hydrogen at 20 K circulated by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.

    2003-09-15

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has three 350-mm long liquid hydrogen absorbers to reduce the momentum of 200 MeV muons in all directions. The muons are then re-accelerated in the longitudinal direction by 200 MHz RF cavities. The result is cooled muons with a reduced emittance. The energy from the muons is taken up by the liquid hydrogen in the absorber. The hydrogen in the MICE absorbers is cooled by natural convection to the walls of the absorber that are in turn cooled by helium gas that enters at 14 K. This report describes the MICE liquid hydrogen absorber and the heat exchanger between the liquid hydrogen and the helium gas that flows through passages in the absorber wall.

  18. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  19. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P

    2015-03-24

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  20. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2015-12-08

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  1. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P

    2013-12-10

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  2. Heat exchanger device and method for heat removal or transfer

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2012-07-24

    Systems and methods for a forced-convection heat exchanger are provided. In one embodiment, heat is transferred to or from a thermal load in thermal contact with a heat conducting structure, across a narrow air gap, to a rotating heat transfer structure immersed in a surrounding medium such as air.

  3. Transition in Internally Heated Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Yuji; Yanagisawa, Takatoshi

    2005-11-01

    Natural convection induced by internal heat generation in a shallow fluid layer was investigated experimentally. Internal heat generation was realized by passing electric current through ionic liquid. Kalliroscope flakes and thermo-chromic liquid crystal were utilized to clarify a transition of the convection with respect to the Rayleigh number, RI. Visualized flow pattern at higher Rayleigh number show two types of deformed cell shape, double cell structure, which has a small cell in a large cell, and spoke like cell structure, where descending flow neat the center of a cell spread like a spoke. Visualized temperature field was converted to temperature field in order to investigate the transition quantitatively. Variation of horizontal temperature fluctuation with respect to RI may show critical Rayleigh number for the transition.

  4. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  5. Heat exchange device

    SciTech Connect

    Callison, G.

    1984-01-17

    A heat exchange device is adapted to recover heat from the fire box of a wood burning stove or the like for heating ambient air in a room or other enclosed space. The heat exchange device is adapted to mount in a recess in a stove top in place of a lid which is normally supplied with the stove. The device according to the invention includes heat exchange means which extend into the fire box of the stove below the top surface thereof. The heat from the heat exchange device is transmitted into a main cavity of the device where the heat is transferred to air forced through the main cavity by a blower mounted to an outside surface of the device. Air exit means are provided on a surface opposite to the surface on which the blower is mounted to provide a passage for heated air into the room or other enclosed space to be heated. The device may also include a top mounted isolated handle for ease in handling the device such as for moving from one area to another. In a second embodiment of the device, a high temperature heat exchange glass plate is mounted on the surface of the device which is in contact with the fire box. Heat is transmitted by heat exchange plate to the main cavity of the device where the air is heated and blown into the room as above.

  6. Optimization of Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Catton

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this research is to develop tools to design and optimize heat exchangers (HE) and compact heat exchangers (CHE) for intermediate loop heat transport systems found in the very high temperature reator (VHTR) and other Generation IV designs by addressing heat transfer surface augmentation and conjugate modeling. To optimize heat exchanger, a fast running model must be created that will allow for multiple designs to be compared quickly. To model a heat exchanger, volume averaging theory, VAT, is used. VAT allows for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy to be solved for point by point in a 3 dimensional computer model of a heat exchanger. The end product of this project is a computer code that can predict an optimal configuration for a heat exchanger given only a few constraints (input fluids, size, cost, etc.). As VAT computer code can be used to model characteristics )pumping power, temperatures, and cost) of heat exchangers more quickly than traditional CFD or experiment, optimization of every geometric parameter simultaneously can be made. Using design of experiment, DOE and genetric algorithms, GE, to optimize the results of the computer code will improve heat exchanger disign.

  7. Microscale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The device described herein is designed primarily for use as a regenerative heat exchanger in a miniature Stirling engine or Stirling-cycle heat pump. A regenerative heat exchanger (sometimes called, simply, a "regenerator" in the Stirling-engine art) is basically a thermal capacitor: Its role in the Stirling cycle is to alternately accept heat from, then deliver heat to, an oscillating flow of a working fluid between compression and expansion volumes, without introducing an excessive pressure drop. These volumes are at different temperatures, and conduction of heat between these volumes is undesirable because it reduces the energy-conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle.

  8. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc J.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Tonon, Thomas

    2007-09-18

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  9. Thermoelectric heat exchange element

    DOEpatents

    Callas, James J.; Taher, Mahmoud A.

    2007-08-14

    A thermoelectric heat exchange module includes a first substrate including a heat receptive side and a heat donative side and a series of undulatory pleats. The module may also include a thermoelectric material layer having a ZT value of 1.0 or more disposed on at least one of the heat receptive side and the heat donative side, and an electrical contact may be in electrical communication with the thermoelectric material layer.

  10. Vacuum powered heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffolo, R.F.

    1986-06-24

    In an internal combustion engine including an oil lubrication system, a liquid cooling system, and an improved air intake system is described. The improved air intake system comprises: a housing including a first opening in one end, which opening is open to the atmosphere and a second opening comprising an air outlet opening in the other end open to the air intake manifold of the engine, a heat exchanger positioned in the first opening. The heat exchanger consists of a series of coils positioned in the flow path of the atmospheric air as it enters the housing, the heat exchanger being fluidly connected to either the engine lubrication system or the cooling system to provide a warm heat source for the incoming air to the housing, acceleration means positioned in the housing downstream of the heat exchanger, the acceleration means comprising a honeycomb structure positioned across the air intake flow path. The honey-comb structure includes a multitude of honey combed mini-venturi cells through which the heated air flows in an accelerated mode, a removable air filter positioned between the heat exchanger and the acceleration means and a single opening provided in the housing through which the air filter can be passed and removed, and additional openings in the housing positioned downstream of the heat exchanger and upstream of the air filter, the additional openings including removable flaps for opening and closing the openings to control the temperature of the air flowing through the housing.

  11. Convection and interfacial mass exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, P.; Legros, J. C.; Dauby, P. C.; Lebon, G.; Bestehorn, M.; Stephan, P.; Tadrist, L.; Cerisier, P.; Poncelet, D.; Barremaecker, L.

    2005-10-01

    Mass-exchange through fluid interfaces is ubiquitous in many natural and industrial processes. Yet even basic phase-change processes such as evaporation of a pure liquid are not fully understood, in particular when coupled with fluid motions in the vicinity of the phase-change interface, or with microscopic physical phenomena in the vicinity of a triple line (where the interface meets a solid). Nowadays, many industries recognise that this lack of fundamental knowledge is hindering the optimisation of existing processes. Their modelling tools are too dependent on empirical correlations with a limited - and often unknown - range of applicability. In addition to the intrinsic multiscale nature of the phenomena involved in typical industrial processes linked to interfacial mass exchange, their study is highly multi-disciplinary, involving tools and techniques belonging to physical chemistry, chemical engineering, fluid dynamics, non-linear physics, non-equilibrium thermodynamics, chemistry and statistical physics. From the experimental point of view, microgravity offers a unique environment to obtain valuable data on phase-change processes, greatly reducing the influence of body forces and allowing the detailed and accurate study of interfacial dynamics. In turn, such improved understanding leads to optimisation of industrial processes and devices involving phase-change, both for space and ground applications.

  12. A corrosive resistant heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Richlen, S.L.

    1987-08-10

    A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Aqueous Al2O3 nanofluids: the important factors impacting convective heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianguo; Ding, Yulong; Ma, Caiyun

    2014-12-01

    A high accuracy, counter flow double pipe heat exchanger system is designed for the measurement of convective heat transfer coefficients with different nanofluids. Both positive and negative enhancement of convective heat transfer of alumina nanofluids are found in the experiments. A modified equation was proposed to explain above phenomena through the physic properties of nanofluids such as thermal conductivity, special heat capacity and viscosity.

  14. Greywater heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, D.

    1983-11-21

    A kilowatt meter and water meter were installed to monitor pregreywater usage. The design considerations, the heat exchanger construction and installation, and the monitoring of usage levels are described.

  15. Microtube Strip Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1990-12-27

    Doty Scientific (DSI) believes their Microtube-Strip Heat Exchanger will contribute significantly to (a) the closed Brayton cycles being pursued at MIT, NASA, and elsewhere; (b) reverse Brayton cycle cryocoolers, currently being investigated by NASA for space missions, being applied to MRI superconducting magnets; and (c) high-efficiency cryogenic gas separation schemes for CO{sub 2} removal from exhaust stacks. The goal of this current study is to show the potential for substantial progress in high-effectiveness, low-cost, gas-to-gas heat exchangers for diverse applications at temperatures from below 100 K to above 1000 K. To date, the highest effectiveness measured is about 98%, and relative pressure drops below 0.1% with a specific conductance of about 45 W/kgK are reported. During the pre-award period DSI built and tested a 3-module heat exchanger bank using 103-tube microtube strip (MTS) modules. To add to their analytical capabilities, DSI has acquired computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This report describes the pre-award work and the status of the ten tasks of the current project, which are: analyze flow distribution and thermal stresses within individual modules; design a heat exchanger bank of ten modules with 400 microtube per module; obtain production quality tubestrip die and AISI 304 tubestrips; obtain production quality microtubing; construct revised MTS heat exchanger; construct dies and fixtures for prototype heat exchanger; construct 100 MTS modules; assemble 8-10 prototype MTS heat exchangers; test prototype MTS heat exchanger; and verify test through independent means. 7 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab. (CK)

  16. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  17. Counterflow Regolith Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Jonscher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A problem exists in reducing the total heating power required to extract oxygen from lunar regolith. All such processes require heating a great deal of soil, and the heat energy is wasted if it cannot be recycled from processed material back into new material. The counterflow regolith heat exchanger (CoRHE) is a device that transfers heat from hot regolith to cold regolith. The CoRHE is essentially a tube-in-tube heat exchanger with internal and external augers attached to the inner rotating tube to move the regolith. Hot regolith in the outer tube is moved in one direction by a right-hand - ed auger, and the cool regolith in the inner tube is moved in the opposite direction by a left-handed auger attached to the inside of the rotating tube. In this counterflow arrangement, a large fraction of the heat from the expended regolith is transferred to the new regolith. The spent regolith leaves the heat exchanger close to the temperature of the cold new regolith, and the new regolith is pre-heated close to the initial temperature of the spent regolith. Using the CoRHE can reduce the heating requirement of a lunar ISRU system by 80%, reducing the total power consumption by a factor of two. The unique feature of this system is that it allows for counterflow heat exchange to occur between solids, instead of liquids or gases, as is commonly done. In addition, in variants of this concept, the hydrogen reduction can be made to occur within the counterflow heat exchanger itself, enabling a simplified lunar ISRU (in situ resource utilization) system with excellent energy economy and continuous nonbatch mode operation.

  18. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change

  19. Monogroove liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F. (Inventor); Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A liquid supply control is disclosed for a heat transfer system which transports heat by liquid-vapor phase change of a working fluid. An assembly (10) of monogroove heat pipe legs (15) can be operated automatically as either heat acquisition devices or heat discharge sources. The liquid channels (27) of the heat pipe legs (15) are connected to a reservoir (35) which is filled and drained by respective filling and draining valves (30, 32). Information from liquid level sensors (50, 51) on the reservoir (35) is combined (60) with temperature information (55) from the liquid heat exchanger (12) and temperature information (56) from the assembly vapor conduit (42) to regulate filling and draining of the reservoir (35), so that the reservoir (35) in turn serves the liquid supply/drain needs of the heat pipe legs (15), on demand, by passive capillary action (20, 28).

  20. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized.

  1. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-02-28

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4kA was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summarized herein.

  2. Heat exchanger restart evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summary herein.

  3. Chimney heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteley, I.C.

    1981-09-01

    A heat exchanger for installation on the top of a chimney of a building includes a housing having a lower end receiving the top of the chimney and an upper end with openings permitting the escape of effluent from the chimney and a heat exchanger assembly disposed in the housing including a central chamber and a spirally arranged duct network defining an effluent spiral path between the top of the chimney and the central chamber and a fresh air spiral path between an inlet disposed at the lower end of the housing and the central chamber, the effluent and fresh air spiral paths being in heat exchange relationship such that air passing through the fresh air spiral path is heated by hot effluent gases passing upward through the chimney and the effluent spiral path for use in heating the building. A pollution trap can be disposed in the central chamber of the heat exchanger assembly for removing pollutants from the effluent, the pollution trap including a rotating cage carrying pumice stones for absorbing pollutants from the effluent with the surface of the pumice gradually ground off to reveal fresh stone as the cage rotates.

  4. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  5. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Culver, Donald W.

    1978-01-01

    A heat exchanger for use in nuclear reactors includes a heat exchange tube bundle formed from similar modules each having a hexagonal shroud containing a large number of thermally conductive tubes which are connected with inlet and outlet headers at opposite ends of each module, the respective headers being adapted for interconnection with suitable inlet and outlet manifold means. In order to adapt the heat exchanger for operation in a high temperature and high pressure environment and to provide access to all tube ports at opposite ends of the tube bundle, a spherical tube sheet is arranged in sealed relation across the chamber with an elongated duct extending outwardly therefrom to provide manifold means for interconnection with the opposite end of the tube bundle.

  6. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  7. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1991-10-16

    This progress report is for the September--October 1991 quarter. We have demonstrated feasibility of higher specific conductance by a factor of five than any other work in high-temperature gas-to-gas exchangers. These laminar-flow, microtube exchangers exhibit extremely low pressure drop compared to alternative compact designs under similar conditions because of their much shorter flow length and larger total flow area for lower flow velocities. The design appears to be amenable to mass production techniques, but considerable process development remains. The reduction in materials usage and the improved heat exchanger performance promise to be of enormous significance in advanced engine designs and in cryogenics.

  8. Convection in stars and heating of coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of convection in the sun and other cool stars are summarized. Recent studies of convection which have involved the use of supercomputers to model the flow of compressible gas in three dimensions are discussed. It is shown how the results of these computations may eventualy provide an understanding of how nonthermal processes heat coronal gas to temperatures of millions of degrees.

  9. Heat exchange apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2003-08-12

    A heat exchange apparatus comprising a coolant conduit or heat sink having attached to its surface a first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles and a second radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles thermally coupled to a body to be cooled and meshed with, but not contacting the first radial array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins or needles.

  10. DHE (downhole heat exchangers). [Downhole Heat Exchangers (DHE)

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.

    1990-11-01

    The use of downhole heat exchangers (DHE) for residential or commercial space and domestic water heating and other applications has several desirable features. Systems are nearly or completely passive -- that is, no or very little geothermal water or steam is produced from the well either reducing or completely eliminating surface environmental concerns and the need for disposal systems or injection wells. Initial cost of pumps and installation are eliminated or reduced along with pumping power costs and maintenance costs associated with pumping often corrosive geothermal fluids. Many residential and small commercial systems do not require circulating pumps because the density difference in the incoming and outgoing sides of the loop are sufficient to overcome circulating friction losses in the entire system. The major disadvantage of DHEs is their dependence on natural heat flow. In areas where geological conditions provide high permeability and a natural hydraulic gradient, DHEs can provide a substantial quantity of heat. A single 500-ft (152 m) well in Klamath Falls, Oregon, supplies over one megawatt thermal and output is apparently limited by the surface area of pipe that can be installed in the well bore. In contrast, DHEs used in conjunction with heat pumps may supply less than 8 KW from a well of similar depth. Here output is limited by conductive heat flow with perhaps a small contribution from convection near the well bore. The highest capacity DHE reported to date, in Turkey, supplies 6 MW thermal from an 820-ft (250 m) well. There were two main goals for this project. The first was to gather, disseminate and exchange internationally information on DHES. The second was to perform experiments that would provide insight into well bore/aquifer interaction and thereby provide more information on which to base DHE designs. 27 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Latent Heating Processes within Tropical Deep Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heever, S. C.; Mcgee, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    It has been suggested that latent heating above the freezing level plays an important role in reconciling Riehl and Malkus' Hot Tower Hypothesis (HTH) with observational evidence of diluted tropical deep convective cores. In this study, recent modifications to the HTH have been evaluated through the use of Lagrangian trajectory analysis of deep convective cores simulated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with sophisticated microphysical, surface and radiation parameterization schemes. Idealized, high-resolution simulations of a line of tropical convective cells have been conducted. A two-moment microphysical scheme was utilized, and the initial and lateral boundary grid conditions were obtained from a large-domain CRM simulation approaching radiative convective equilibrium. As the tropics are never too far from radiative convective equilibrium, such a framework is useful for investigating the relationships between radiation, thermodynamics and microphysics in tropical convection. Microphysical impacts on latent heating and equivalent potential temperature (θe) have been analyzed along trajectories ascending within convective regions. Changes in θe along backward trajectories are partitioned into contributions from latent heating due to ice processes and a residual term that is shown to be an approximate representation of mixing. It is apparent from the CRM simulations that mixing with dry environmental air decreases θe along ascending trajectories below the freezing level, while latent heating due to freezing and vapor deposition increase θe above the freezing level. The along-trajectory contributions to latent heating from cloud nucleation, condensation, evaporation, freezing, deposition, and sublimation have also been quantified. Finally, the source regions of trajectories reaching the upper troposphere have been identified. The analysis indicates that while much of the air ascending within convective

  12. Electrohydrodynamic convective heat transfer in a square duct.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Walter; Testi, Daniele

    2009-04-01

    Laminar to weakly turbulent forced convection in a square duct heated from the bottom is strengthened by ion injection from an array of high-voltage points opposite the heated strip. Both positive and negative ion injection are activated within the working liquid HFE-7100 (C(4)F(9)OCH(3)), with transiting electrical currents on the order of 0.1 mA. Local temperatures on the heated wall are measured by liquid crystal thermography. The tests are conducted in a Reynolds number range from 510 to 12,100. In any case, heat transfer is dramatically augmented, almost independently from the flow rate. The pressure drop increase caused by the electrohydrodynamically induced flow is also measured. A profitable implementation of the technique in the design of heat sinks and heat exchangers is foreseen; possible benefits are pumping power reduction, size reduction, and heat exchange capability augmentation. PMID:19426338

  13. Conjugate conductive, convective, and radiative heat transfer in rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Naraghi, M.H.N.; DeLise, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    A comprehensive conductive, convective and radiative model for thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers and nozzles is presented. In this model, the rocket thrust chamber and nozzle are subdivided into a number of stations along the longitudinal direction. At each station a finite element scheme is used to evaluate wall temperature distribution. The hot-gas-side convective heat transport is evaluated by numerically solving the compressible boundary layer equations and the radiative fluxes are evaluated by implementing an exchange factor scheme. The convective heat flux in the cooling channel is modeled based on the existing closed form correlations for rocket cooling channels. The conductive, convective and radiative processes are conjugated through an iterative procedure. The hot-gas-side heat transfer coefficients evaluated based on this model are compared to the experimental results reported in the literature. The computed convective heat transfer coefficients agree very well with experimental data for most of the engine except the throat where a discrepancy of approximately 20% exists. The model is applied to a typical regeneratively cooled rocket engine and the resulting wall temperature and heat flux distribution are presented.

  14. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  15. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  16. High flux heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Edward M.; Mackowski, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    This interim report documents the results of the first two phases of a four-phase program to develop a high flux heat exchanger for cooling future high performance aircraft electronics. Phase 1 defines future needs for high flux heat removal in advanced military electronics systems. The results are sorted by broad application categories: (1) commercial digital systems, (2) military data processors, (3) power processors, and (4) radar and optical systems. For applications expected to be fielded in five to ten years, the outlook is for steady state flux levels of 30-50 W/sq cm for digital processors and several hundred W/sq cm for power control applications. In Phase 1, a trade study was conducted on emerging cooling technologies which could remove a steady state chip heat flux of 100 W/sq cm while holding chip junction temperature to 90 C. Constraints imposed on heat exchanger design, in order to reflect operation in a fighter aircraft environment, included a practical lower limit on coolant supply temperature, the preference for a nontoxic, nonflammable, and nonfreezing coolant, the need to minimize weight and volume, and operation in an accelerating environment. The trade study recommended the Compact High Intensity Cooler (CHIC) for design, fabrication, and test in the final two phases of this program.

  17. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

  18. Liquid/liquid heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1980-01-01

    Conceptual design for heat exchanger, utilizing two immiscible liquids with dissimilar specific gravities in direct contact, is more efficient mechanism of heat transfer than conventional heat exchangers with walls or membranes. Concept could be adapted for collection of heat from solar or geothermal sources.

  19. Heterogeneous nanofluids: natural convection heat transfer enhancement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Convective heat transfer using different nanofluid types is investigated. The domain is differentially heated and nanofluids are treated as heterogeneous mixtures with weak solutal diffusivity and possible Soret separation. Owing to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, the resulting solutal buoyancy forces could be significant and interact with the initial thermal convection. A modified formulation taking into account the thermal conductivity, viscosity versus nanofluids type and concentration and the spatial heterogeneous concentration induced by the Soret effect is presented. The obtained results, by solving numerically the full governing equations, are found to be in good agreement with the developed solution based on the scale analysis approach. The resulting convective flows are found to be dependent on the local particle concentration φ and the corresponding solutal to thermal buoyancy ratio N. The induced nanofluid heterogeneity showed a significant heat transfer modification. The heat transfer in natural convection increases with nanoparticle concentration but remains less than the enhancement previously underlined in forced convection case. PMID:21711755

  20. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  1. Aerodynamics of heat exchangers for high-altitude aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drela, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Reduction of convective beat transfer with altitude dictates unusually large beat exchangers for piston- engined high-altitude aircraft The relatively large aircraft drag fraction associated with cooling at high altitudes makes the efficient design of the entire heat exchanger installation an essential part of the aircraft's aerodynamic design. The parameters that directly influence cooling drag are developed in the context of high-altitude flight Candidate wing airfoils that incorporate heat exchangers are examined. Such integrated wing-airfoil/heat-exchanger installations appear to be attractive alternatives to isolated heat.exchanger installations. Examples are drawn from integrated installations on existing or planned high-altitude aircraft.

  2. Hybrid Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Jianping Gene; Shih, Wei

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid light-weight heat exchanger concept has been developed that uses high-conductivity carbon-carbon (C-C) composites as the heat-transfer fins and uses conventional high-temperature metals, such as Inconel, nickel, and titanium as the parting sheets to meet leakage and structural requirements. In order to maximize thermal conductivity, the majority of carbon fiber is aligned in the fin direction resulting in 300 W/m.K or higher conductivity in the fin directions. As a result of this fiber orientation, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the C-C composite in both non-fiber directions matches well with the CTE of various high-temperature metal alloys. This allows the joining of fins and parting sheets by using high-temperature braze alloys.

  3. Anomalous heat transport and condensation in convection of cryogenic helium

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Pavel; Schmoranzer, David; Hanzelka, Pavel; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Skrbek, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    When a hot body A is thermally connected to a cold body B, the textbook knowledge is that heat flows from A to B. Here, we describe the opposite case in which heat flows from a colder but constantly heated body B to a hotter but constantly cooled body A through a two-phase liquid–vapor system. Specifically, we provide experimental evidence that heat flows through liquid and vapor phases of cryogenic helium from the constantly heated, but cooler, bottom plate of a Rayleigh–Bénard convection cell to its hotter, but constantly cooled, top plate. The bottom plate is heated uniformly, and the top plate is cooled by heat exchange with liquid helium maintained at 4.2 K. Additionally, for certain experimental conditions, a rain of helium droplets is detected by small sensors placed in the cell at about one-half of its height. PMID:23576759

  4. The heat pipe exchanger with controllable heat exchanging area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshiro, M.; Takasu, S.; Kurihara, M.; Taneda, K.; Nakamoto, T.; Nakayama, H.

    1984-03-01

    The heat transfer rate through the heat exchanger in an industrial boiler that burns heavy oils must be controlled so as not to decrease the exhaust gas temperature below the dew point of sulfuric acid. Two systems of heat pipe exchangers are examined: one controls the heat exchange area of the condenser section of the heat pipes and the other uses the variable conductance heat pipes. The characteristics of these two systems are described. The temperatures at various points and the gas quantity are plotted against the boiler loads. The maintainability and operational reliability of both systems are demonstrated.

  5. Experimental study of natural convective heat transfer in a vertical hexagonal sub channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandian, Nathanael P.; Umar, Efrizon; Hardianto, Toto; Febriyanto, Catur

    2012-06-01

    The development of new practices in nuclear reactor safety aspects and optimization of recent nuclear reactors, including the APWR and the PHWR reactors, needs a knowledge on natural convective heat transfer within sub-channels formed among several nuclear fuel rods or heat exchanger tubes. Unfortunately, the currently available empirical correlation equations for such heat transfer modes are limited and researches on convective heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders (especially within the natural convection modes) are scarcely done. Although boundary layers around the heat exchanger cylinders or fuel rods may be dominated by their entry regions, most of available convection correlation equations are for fully developed boundary layers. Recently, an experimental study on natural convective heat transfer in a subchannel formed by several heated parallel cylinders that arranged in a hexagonal configuration has been being done. The study seeks for a new convection correlation for the natural convective heat transfer in the sub-channel formed among the hexagonal vertical cylinders. A new convective heat transfer correlation equation has been obtained from the study and compared to several similar equations in literatures.

  6. Heat exchange assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc; Miller, Jeffrey; Tonon, Thomas S.

    2004-06-08

    A heat exchange assembly comprises a plurality of plates disposed in a spaced-apart arrangement, each of the plurality of plates includes a plurality of passages extending internally from a first end to a second end for directing flow of a heat transfer fluid in a first plane, a plurality of first end-piece members equaling the number of plates and a plurality of second end-piece members also equaling the number of plates, each of the first and second end-piece members including a recessed region adapted to fluidly connect and couple with the first and second ends of the plate, respectively, and further adapted to be affixed to respective adjacent first and second end-piece members in a stacked formation, and each of the first and second end-piece members further including at least one cavity for enabling entry of the heat transfer fluid into the plate, exit of the heat transfer fluid from the plate, or 180.degree. turning of the fluid within the plate to create a serpentine-like fluid flow path between points of entry and exit of the fluid, and at least two fluid conduits extending through the stacked plurality of first and second end-piece members for providing first fluid connections between the parallel fluid entry points of adjacent plates and a fluid supply inlet, and second fluid connections between the parallel fluid exit points of adjacent plates and a fluid discharge outlet so that the heat transfer fluid travels in parallel paths through each respective plate.

  7. Acoustical Convective Cooling Or Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Eugene H.; Robey, Judith L.

    1988-01-01

    Small, efficient ultrasonic device circulates fluid. Vibrating at ultrasonic frequency, piezoelectric driver sets up vortexes transfering heat to or from object in space. Used on Earth to apply localized or concentrated cooling to individual electronic components or other small parts.

  8. Solar Hot Water Heating by Natural Convection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate laboratory experiment in which a solar collector is used to heat water for domestic use. The working fluid is moved by natural convection so no pumps are required. Experimental apparatus is simple in design and operation so that data can be collected quickly and easily. (Author/JN)

  9. Forced Convection Heat Transfer in Circular Pipes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosun, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    One of the pitfalls of engineering education is to lose the physical insight of the problem while tackling the mathematical part. Forced convection heat transfer (the Graetz-Nusselt problem) certainly falls into this category. The equation of energy together with the equation of motion leads to a partial differential equation subject to various…

  10. Natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novomestský, Marcel; Smatanová, Helena; Kapjor, Andrej

    2016-06-01

    This article is concerned with natural convective heat transfer from square cylinder mounted on a plane adiabatic base, the cylinders having an exposed cylinder surface according to different horizontal angle. The cylinder receives heat from a radiating heater which results in a buoyant flow. There are many industrial applications, including refrigeration, ventilation and the cooling of electrical components, for which the present study may be applicable

  11. Heat exchanger bypass test report

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, M.L.

    1995-01-26

    This test report documents the results that were obtained while conducting the test procedure which bypassed the heat exchangers in the HC-21C sludge stabilization process. The test was performed on November 15, 1994 using WHC-SD-CP-TC-031, ``Heat Exchanger Bypass Test Procedure.`` The primary objective of the test procedure was to determine if the heat exchangers were contributing to condensation of moisture in the off-gas line. This condensation was observed in the rotameters. Also, a secondary objective was to determine if temperatures at the rotameters would be too high and damage them or make them inaccurate without the heat exchangers in place.

  12. Heat flux sensors for infrared thermography in convective heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-11-07

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described.

  13. Heat Flux Sensors for Infrared Thermography in Convective Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  14. Natural convection in a uniformly heated pool

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1996-05-01

    In the event of a core meltdown accident, to prevent reactor vessel failure from molten corium relocation to the reactor vessel lower head, the establishment of a coolable configuration has been proposed by flooding with water the reactor cavity. In Reference 3, it was shown that for the heavy-water new production reactor (NPW-HWR) design, this strategy, e.g., the rejection of decay heat to a containment decay heat removal system by boiling of water in the reactor cavity, could keep the reactor vessel temperature below failure limits. The analysis of Ref. 3 was performed with the computer code COMMIX-1AR/P, and showed that natural convection in the molten-corium pool was the dominant mechanism of heat transfer from the pool to the wall of the reactor vessel lower head. To determine whether COMMIX adequately predicts natural convection in a pool heated by a uniform heat source, in Ref. 4, the experiments of free convection in a semicircular cavity of Jahn and Reineke were analyzed with COMMIX. It was found that the Nusselt (Nu) number predicted by COMMIX was within the spread of the experimental measurements. In the COMMIX analysis of Ref. 4, the semicircular cavity was treated as symmetric. The objective of the work presented in this paper was to extend the COMMIX validation analysis of Ref. 4 by removing the assumption of symmetry and expanding the analysis up to the highest Rayleigh (Ra) number that leads to a steady state. In conclusion, this work shows that the numerical predictions of natural convection in an internally heated pool bounded by a curved bottom are in reasonably good agreement with experimental measurements.

  15. Heat exchanger leakage problem location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejčík, Jiří; Jícha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Recent compact heat exchangers are very often assembled from numerous parts joined together to separate heat transfer fluids and to form the required heat exchanger arrangement. Therefore, the leak tightness is very important property of the compact heat exchangers. Although, the compact heat exchangers have been produced for many years, there are still technological problems associated with manufacturing of the ideal connection between the individual parts, mainly encountered with special purpose heat exchangers, e.g. gas turbine recuperators. This paper describes a procedure used to identify the leakage location inside the prime surface gas turbine recuperator. For this purpose, an analytical model of the leaky gas turbine recuperator was created to assess its performance. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data which were acquired during the recuperator thermal performance analysis. The differences between these two data sets are used to indicate possible leakage areas.

  16. Air Circulation and Heat Exchange Under Reduced Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rygalov, V.; Wheeler, R.; Dixon, M.; Fowler, P.; Hillhouse, L.

    2010-01-01

    Heat exchange rates decrease non-linearly with reductions in atmospheric pressure. This decrease creates risk of thermal stress (elevated leaf temperatures) for plants under reduced pressures. Forced convection (fans) significantly increases heat exchange rate under almost all pressures except below 10 kPa. Plant cultivation techniques under reduced pressures will require forced convection. The cooling curve technique is a reliable means of assessing the influence of environmental variables like pressure and gravity on gas exchange of plant. These results represent the extremes of gas exchange conditions for simple systems under variable pressures. In reality, dense plant canopies will exhibit responses in between these extremes. More research is needed to understand the dependence of forced convection on atmospheric pressure. The overall thermal balance model should include latent and radiative exchange components.

  17. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

    2008-09-30

    The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

  18. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Giardina, Angelo R. [Marple Township, Delaware County, PA

    1981-03-03

    A shell and tube heat exchanger having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelpiped tube bundle moldules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending therethrough, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattice, each of which is situate d in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattice extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates.

  19. Modular heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Giardina, A.R.

    1981-03-03

    A shell and tube heat exchanger is described having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelepiped tube bundle modules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending there through, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattices, each of which is situated in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattices extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates. 12 figs.

  20. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  1. Heat transfer from oriented heat exchange areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantuch, Martin; Huzvar, Jozef; Kapjor, Andrej

    2014-03-01

    This paper deals with the transfer of heat-driven heat transfer surface area in relation to the construction of the criterion equation for "n" horizontal pipe one about another. On the bases of theoretical models have been developed for calculating the thermal performance of natural convection by Churilla and Morgan, for various pipe diameters and temperatures. These models were compared with models created in CFD-Fluent Ansys the same boundary conditions. The aim of the analyse of heat and fluxional pipe fields "n" pipes one about another at natural convection is the creation of criterion equation on the basis of which the heat output of heat transfer from pipe oriented areas one above another with given spacing could be quantified. At presence a sum of criterion equations exists for simple geometrical shapes of individual oriented geometrical areas but the criterion equation which would consider interaction of fluxional field generated by free convection from multiple oriented areas is not mentioned in standardly accessible technical literature and other magazine publications.

  2. Natural convection in a uniformly heated pool

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P.

    1996-12-31

    To prevent reactor vessel failure from molten corium relocation to the reactor vessel lower head in the event of a core meltdown accident, the establishment of a coolable configuration has been proposed by flooding the reactor cavity with water. In Ref. 3, it was shown that for the heavy-water new production reactor (NPW-HWR) design, this strategy (e.g., the rejection of decay heat to a containment decay heat removal system by boiling of water in the reactor cavity) could keep the reactor vessel temperature below failure limits. The analysis of Ref. 3 was performed with the COMMIX-IAR/P computer code and showed that natural convection in the molten-corium pool was the dominant mechanism of heat transfer from the pool to the wall of the reactor vessel lower head. COMMIX is a general-purpose thermal-hydraulics code based on finite differencing by the first-order upwind scheme. To determine whether COMMIX adequately predicts natural convection in a pool heated by a uniform heat source, in Ref. 4, the experiments of free convection in a semicircular cavity of Jahn and Reineke were analyzed with COMMIX in Ref. 5. It was found that the Nusselt number predicted by COMMIX was within the spread of the experimental measurements. In the COMMIX analysis of Ref. 5, the semicircular cavity was treated as symmetric. The objective of this paper was to extend the COMMIX validation analysis of Ref. 5 by removing the assumption of symmetry and expanding the analysis from the highest Rayleigh number of the experiments of Ref. 4 to the highest Rayleigh number that leads to a steady state.

  3. Direct-contact heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricard, A.

    The working principle of direct contact heat exchanger, where heat transfer takes place between two immiscible fluids coming into direct contact, is described. Typical direct contact devices are outlined. A better understanding of the principles involved and the development of computational models for multiphase subsytems are concluded as stimulus for direct contact heat and mass transfer applications.

  4. Liquid droplet heat exchanger studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Hedges, D. E.; Yungster, S.

    1987-01-01

    Recent analytical and experimental investigations of the liquid droplet heat exchanger (LDHX) concept for space power applications are described. The performance of the LDHX is compared to that of a conventional heat exchanger for heat rejection applications in a Brayton cycle, using the mass-specific heat exchanger effectiveness as a figure of merit. It is shown that the LDHX has an order of magnitude advantage over the conventional heat exchanger. Furthermore, significant improvement in cycle efficiency and power to mass ratio is possible. Two-phase flow experiments in a laboratory scale LDHX, using air and water as the two media, show very good agreement with the quasi-one-dimensional model used in the parametric studies.

  5. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Stevens, Richard J A M; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much-enhanced natural convection. In this article, we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection process in a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping this difference constant, we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between 2 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(9). We find a considerable enhancement of the heat transfer and study its dependence on the number of bubbles, the degree of superheat of the hot cell bottom, and the Rayleigh number. The increased buoyancy provided by the bubbles leads to more energetic hot plumes detaching from the cell bottom, and the strength of the circulation in the cell is significantly increased. Our results are in general agreement with recent experiments on boiling Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  6. Heat exchanger with ceramic elements

    DOEpatents

    Corey, John A.

    1986-01-01

    An annular heat exchanger assembly includes a plurality of low thermal growth ceramic heat exchange members with inlet and exit flow ports on distinct faces. A mounting member locates each ceramic member in a near-annular array and seals the flow ports on the distinct faces into the separate flow paths of the heat exchanger. The mounting member adjusts for the temperature gradient in the assembly and the different coefficients of thermal expansion of the members of the assembly during all operating temperatures.

  7. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    DOEpatents

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  8. Hydraulic characteristics of mixed convection in a heated vertical pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Jianchiu Han . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    By studying the integrated governing equations for mixed convection in a vertical pipe heated with constant wall heat flux, several concepts (or misconcepts) regarding convection mode and flow regimes are examined. A new alternative definition of convection mode reflecting the force balance in mixed convection is given. A new parameter, m (M), is introduced to quantitatively characterize various regimes for mixed convection. Two specific cases for laminar and turbulent air flow with Re = 500 and 5,000 respectively are studied numerically in detail. Typical behavior of m(M) for each case and other associated hydraulic characteristics of mixed convection are illustrated and discussed.

  9. Heat exchange apparatus utilizing thermal siphon pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Daman, E.L.; Kunsagi, L.

    1980-10-07

    A heat exchange apparatus is descirbed in which each of a plurality of thermal siphon pipes has an upper portion extending in an upper heat exchange section and a lower portion extending in a lower heat exchange section. Each pipe is closed at its ends and contains a heat transfer fluid so that when a hot fluid is passed through the lower heat exchange section, the heat is transferred from the hot fluid to the heat exchange fluid. A cool fluid is passed through the upper heat exchange section to remove the heat from the heat exchange fluid.

  10. Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Game Changing Development is taking on a technologydevelopment and demonstration effort to design, build, and test the next generation of Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers (PCM HXs) on ...

  11. Numerical simulation of heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate and detailed knowledge of the fluid flow field and thermal distribution inside a heat exchanger becomes invaluable as a large, efficient, and reliable unit is sought. This information is needed to provide proper evaluation of the thermal and structural performance characteristics of a heat exchanger. It is to be noted that an analytical prediction method, when properly validated, will greatly reduce the need for model testing, facilitate interpolating and extrapolating test data, aid in optimizing heat-exchanger design and performance, and provide scaling capability. Thus tremendous savings of cost and time are realized. With the advent of large digital computers and advances in the development of computational fluid mechanics, it has become possible to predict analytically, through numerical solution, the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy for both the shellside and tubeside fluids. The numerical modeling technique will be a valuable, cost-effective design tool for development of advanced heat exchangers.

  12. Analysis of thermosyphon heat exchangers for use in solar domestic hot water heating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Scott David

    1998-11-01

    A recent innovation in the solar industry is the use of thermosyphon heat exchangers. Determining the performance of these systems requires knowledge of how thermosyphon flow rate and heat exchanger performance vary with operating conditions. This study demonstrates that several thermosyphon heat exchanger designs operate in the laminar mixed convection regime. Empirical heat transfer and pressure drop correlations are obtained for three tube-in-shell heat exchangers (four, seven, and nine tube). Thermosyphon flow is on the shell side. Correlations are obtained with uniform heat flux on the tube walls and with a mixture of glycol and water circulating inside the tubes. Ranges of Reynolds, Prandtl, and Grashof numbers are 50 to 1800, 2.5 and 6.0, and 4×105 to 1×108, respectively. Nusselt number correlations are presented in a form that combines the contributions of forced and natural convection, Nu4Mixed=Nu4Forced+Nu4Natural. The Nusselt number is influenced by natural convection when the term Raq0.25/(Re0.5Pr0.33) is greater than unity. Pressure drop through these three designs is not significantly affected by mixed convection because most pressure drop losses are at the heat exchanger inlet and outlet. A comparison and discussion of the performance of several other heat exchanger designs (tube-in-shell and coil-in- shell designs) are presented. Generally, the coil-in- shell heat exchangers perform better than the tube-in- shell heat exchangers. Data from all heat exchanger designs is used to develop a new one-dimensional model for thermosyphon heat exchangers in solar water heating systems. The model requires two empirically determined relationships, pressure drop as a function of water mass flow rate and the overall heat transfer coefficient-area product (UA) as a function of Reynolds, Prandtl, and Grashof number. A testing protocol is presented that describes the procedure to obtain the data for the correlations. Two new TRNSYS component models are presented

  13. Plate heat exchanger design theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, R. K.; Wanniarachchi, A. S.

    Plate heat exchangers are commonly used in hygienic applications as well as in chemical processing and other industrial applications. Pertinent information on plate exchangers from a designer's point of view is summarized to provide a basic insight into performance behavior of chevron plates. Basic design methods are presented and a method of coupling between heat transfer and pressure drop is introduced. A step by step design procedure for rating and sizing problems is outlined.

  14. On free convection heat transfer with well defined boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, M.R.D.; Newport, D.T.; Dalton, T.M.

    1999-07-01

    The scaling of free convection heat transfer is investigated. The non-dimensional groups for Boussinesq and fully compressible variable property free convection, driven by isothermal surfaces, are derived using a previously published novel method of dimensional analysis. Both flows are described by a different set of groups. The applicability of each flow description is experimentally investigated for the case of the isothermal horizontal cylinder in an air-filled isothermal enclosure. The approach taken to the boundary conditions differs from that of previous investigations. Here, it is argued that the best definition of the boundary conditions is achieved for heat exchange between the cylinder and the enclosure rather than the cylinder and an arbitrarily chosen fluid region. The enclosure temperature is shown both analytically and experimentally to affect the Nusselt number. The previously published view that the Boussinesq approximation has only a limited range of application is confirmed, and the groups derived for variable property compressible free convection are demonstrated to be correct experimentally. A new correlation for horizontal cylinder Nusselt number prediction is presented.

  15. Heat exchanger and related methods

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Terry D.; McKellar, Michael G.

    2015-12-22

    Heat exchangers include a housing having an inlet and an outlet and forming a portion of a transition chamber. A heating member may form another portion of the transition chamber. The heating member includes a first end having a first opening and a second end having a second opening larger than the first opening. Methods of conveying a fluid include supplying a first fluid into a transition chamber of a heat exchanger, supplying a second fluid into the transition chamber, and altering a state of a portion of the first fluid with the second fluid. Methods of sublimating solid particles include conveying a first fluid comprising a material in a solid state into a transition chamber, heating the material to a gaseous state by directing a second fluid through a heating member and mixing the first fluid and the second fluid.

  16. Earth-air heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Kammel, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Optimizing the thermal environment of a livestock building is beneficial to the growth and production of the animal. Minimizing temperature extremes of inlet ventilation air to the livestock building by passing the air through underground ducts would accomplish this goal. Providing this optimum environment by reducing heating and cooling loads would reduce energy costs and increase profits for the producer. The heat transfer in an earth-air heat exchanger was studied in two phases to develop design criteria for these systems. The experimental phase consisted of an earth-air exchanger installation from which data were collected during hot weather (cooling effect), cold weather (heating effect), and mild weather performances. The analytical phase developed a finite element program for simulating the earth-air heat exchanger and studying the effects of important parameters on the heat transfer rate and the air temperature. Results of the first phase were used to verify the computer model. Design criteria for the earth-air heat exchanger were determined based on the information obtained in the two phases of this study.

  17. Natural convection in a fluid layer periodically heated from above.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Z; Floryan, J M

    2014-08-01

    Natural convection in a horizontal layer subject to periodic heating from above has been studied. It is shown that the primary convection leads to the cooling of the bulk of the fluid below the mean temperature of the upper wall. The secondary convection may lead either to longitudinal rolls, transverse rolls, or oblique rolls. The global flow properties (e.g., the average Nusselt number for the primary convection and the critical conditions for the secondary convection) are identical to those of the layer heated from below. However, the flow and temperature patterns exhibit phase shifts in the horizontal directions.

  18. Characterization of a tube-in-shell thermosyphon heat exchanger for solar water heating

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, S.D.; Davidson, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    Performance of a double-wall, natural convection, two-pass, tube-in-shell heat exchanger designed for use in a solar water heating system is measured. The heat exchanger is mounted along the length of a solar water storage tank. Flow of cold water on the shell side of the heat exchanger is driven solely by buoyancy forces. Hot side fluid is pumped. Flow rate, pressure drop and temperature data needed for a semi-empirical model of the heat exchanger are obtained. Performance is measured for forced convection, hot side volumetric flow rates of 0.016, 0.032 and 0.079 l/s. Temperature difference between hot and cold fluid at the inlets is varied from 0 to 75 degC. Measured values include thermosyphon and forced flow rates, temperature differences across the beat exchanger, vertical temperature distribution in the storage tank, and pressure drop due to shear on the thermosyphon side of the heat exchanger. Heat exchanger effectiveness and overall heat transfer area product (UA) are calculated. Thermosyphon mass flow rates are on the order of 0.01 kg/s. Although the low flow rates create thermal stratification of the water storage tank, they restrict energy transfer in the heat exchanger.

  19. Transient natural convection in heated inclined tubes

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M. . Oceanic Div.); Denbow, D.A. ); Murphy, H.D. )

    1990-05-01

    To simulate natural convection flow patterns in directionally drilled wellbores, experiments and analyses were conducted for a circular tube with length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio of 36 at angles of 0{degree}, 20{degree}, and 35{degree} from the vertical. The tube was heated at the bottom and cooled at the top, and the insulation was adjusted so that approximately one- to two-thirds of the power dissipated was transferred through the tube wall to the surroundings. An aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol was employed as the working fluid in order to obtain low Rayleigh numbers corresponding to conditions in geothermal wellbores. Results were primarily qualitative but were useful in providing insight into the phenomena occurring. Steady-state temperature distributions were measured for the three orientations and for several heating rates to demonstrate the effects of tube angle and Rayleigh number. transient measurements of the temperature distribution were obtained during cooling from a higher temperature without a heat source to calibrate the heat losses. With the electrical heat source, temporal data were taken during heating to examine the approach to steady state. Quasi-steady flow conditions were approached rapidly, but the overall time constant of the apparatus was of the order of one-third of a day. Predictions with the three-dimensional TEMPEST code were first tested by comparison with simple conduction analyses. Comparison with actual data showed good agreement of the predicted temperature levels for the maximum inclination, 35{degree}, and slightly poorer agreement for the other limit, a vertical tube. Trends of temperature level and Nusselt number with heating rate or Rayleigh number were reasonable, but the predicted variation of the end Nusselt number versus inclination was in the opposite direction from the experiment. 75 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Experimental tests for the occurence of convective heat transfer within the bed of rectangular steel profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyczółkowski, Rafał; Musiał, Dorota

    2012-09-01

    The paper describes tests intended to examine the occurrence of natural convection within the space occupied by 40×20 mm rectangular steel sections. Within these tests the bed of four layers of section was heated by the electric palate heater. Depending on the manner in which the heater was positioned, the tests were divided into two series. In the case of heating from above, the heat flowing through the bed is transferred only by conduction and radiation. When heating the bed from below, in addition to conduction and radiation, also a convective heat transfer will occur. Should this be the case, it will result in the intensification of the heat exchange. The results of measurements carried out have not demonstrated that the occurrence of any possible natural convection would influence the development of a temperature field in this type of charge.

  1. Convection zone origins of solar atmospheric heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.; Mayr, Hans G.

    1986-01-01

    Spicules are examined as a means for supplying the corona with mass, energy, and magnetic field. It is suggested that spicules form from the supersonic upward expansion of material on nearly evacuated network flux tubes embedded within the sun's convection zone. This allows supersonic but subescape velocities to be attained by the material as it flows outward through the photosphere. Although supersonic, the kinetic energy (subescape) of the spicule material, as observed, is insufficient for coronal heating. It is suggested that, through buoyancy changes on evacuated flux tubes, the magnetic field first 'wicks' material flow into the solar atmosphere. Subsequently, the magnetic field energizes the gaseous material to form the conventional hot, dynamically expanding, solar corona. This occurs through momentum and energy transport by Alfven waves and associated Maxwell stresses concurrently flowing upward on these 'geysers' (spicules). The vertical momentum equation governing fluid flow is examined, and a particular equipartition solution is presented for the flow velocity along a simple field geometry.

  2. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, P.G.; Rahman, F.H.; Lebeau, T.P.; Severin, B.K.

    1998-06-16

    A tube containment system is disclosed. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture. 6 figs.

  3. Ceramic heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  4. Numerical computation of sapphire crystal growth using heat exchanger method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chung-Wei; Chen, Jyh-Chen

    2001-05-01

    The finite element software FIDAP is employed to study the temperature and velocity distribution and the interface shape during a large sapphire crystal growth process using a heat exchanger method (HEM). In the present study, the energy input to the crucible by the radiation and convection inside the furnace and the energy output through the heat exchanger is modeled by the convection boundary conditions. The effects of the various growth parameters are studied. It is found that the contact angle is obtuse before the solid-melt interface touches the sidewall of the crucible. Therefore, hot spots always appear in this process. The maximum convexity decreases significantly when the cooling-zone radius (RC) increases. The maximum convexity also decreases significantly as the combined convection coefficient inside the furnace (hI) decreases.

  5. Lightweight long life heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, E. K.

    1975-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation of a full scale shuttle-type condensing heat exchanger constructed of aluminum and utilizing aluminum clad titanium parting sheets is described. A long term salt spray test of candidate parting sheet specimens is described. The results of an investigation into an alternate method of making composite sheet material are discussed.

  6. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  7. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators, or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  8. Microwave heating device for internal heating convection experiments, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, E.; Surducan, V.; Limare, A.; Neamtu, C.; Di Giuseppe, E.

    2014-12-01

    We report the design, construction, and performances of a microwave (MW) heating device for laboratory experiments with non-contact, homogeneous internal heating. The device generates MW radiation at 2.47 GHz from a commercial magnetron supplied by a pulsed current inverter using proprietary, feedback based command and control hardware and software. Specially designed MW launchers direct the MW radiation into the sample through a MW homogenizer, devised to even the MW power distribution into the sample's volume. An adjustable MW circuit adapts the MW generator to the load (i.e., the sample) placed in the experiment chamber. Dedicated heatsinks maintain the MW circuits at constant temperature throughout the experiment. Openings for laser scanning for image acquisition with a CCD camera and for the cooling circuits are protected by special MW filters. The performances of the device are analyzed in terms of heating uniformity, long term output power stability, and load matching. The device is used for small scale experiments simulating Earth's mantle convection. The 30 × 30 × 5 cm3 convection tank is filled with a water-based viscous fluid. A uniform and constant temperature is maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminum heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions apply at the tank base. We characterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution by measuring the velocity field by Particle Image Velocimetry and the temperature field by using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals.

  9. Microwave heating device for internal heating convection experiments, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Surducan, E; Surducan, V; Limare, A; Neamtu, C; Di Giuseppe, E

    2014-12-01

    We report the design, construction, and performances of a microwave (MW) heating device for laboratory experiments with non-contact, homogeneous internal heating. The device generates MW radiation at 2.47 GHz from a commercial magnetron supplied by a pulsed current inverter using proprietary, feedback based command and control hardware and software. Specially designed MW launchers direct the MW radiation into the sample through a MW homogenizer, devised to even the MW power distribution into the sample's volume. An adjustable MW circuit adapts the MW generator to the load (i.e., the sample) placed in the experiment chamber. Dedicated heatsinks maintain the MW circuits at constant temperature throughout the experiment. Openings for laser scanning for image acquisition with a CCD camera and for the cooling circuits are protected by special MW filters. The performances of the device are analyzed in terms of heating uniformity, long term output power stability, and load matching. The device is used for small scale experiments simulating Earth's mantle convection. The 30 × 30 × 5 cm(3) convection tank is filled with a water‑based viscous fluid. A uniform and constant temperature is maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminum heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions apply at the tank base. We characterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution by measuring the velocity field by Particle Image Velocimetry and the temperature field by using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals.

  10. Microwave heating device for internal heating convection experiments, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Surducan, E.; Surducan, V.; Neamtu, C.; Limare, A.; Di Giuseppe, E.

    2014-12-15

    We report the design, construction, and performances of a microwave (MW) heating device for laboratory experiments with non-contact, homogeneous internal heating. The device generates MW radiation at 2.47 GHz from a commercial magnetron supplied by a pulsed current inverter using proprietary, feedback based command and control hardware and software. Specially designed MW launchers direct the MW radiation into the sample through a MW homogenizer, devised to even the MW power distribution into the sample's volume. An adjustable MW circuit adapts the MW generator to the load (i.e., the sample) placed in the experiment chamber. Dedicated heatsinks maintain the MW circuits at constant temperature throughout the experiment. Openings for laser scanning for image acquisition with a CCD camera and for the cooling circuits are protected by special MW filters. The performances of the device are analyzed in terms of heating uniformity, long term output power stability, and load matching. The device is used for small scale experiments simulating Earth's mantle convection. The 30 × 30 × 5 cm{sup 3} convection tank is filled with a water‑based viscous fluid. A uniform and constant temperature is maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminum heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions apply at the tank base. We characterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution by measuring the velocity field by Particle Image Velocimetry and the temperature field by using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals.

  11. Microwave heating device for internal heating convection experiments, applied to Earth's mantle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Surducan, E; Surducan, V; Limare, A; Neamtu, C; Di Giuseppe, E

    2014-12-01

    We report the design, construction, and performances of a microwave (MW) heating device for laboratory experiments with non-contact, homogeneous internal heating. The device generates MW radiation at 2.47 GHz from a commercial magnetron supplied by a pulsed current inverter using proprietary, feedback based command and control hardware and software. Specially designed MW launchers direct the MW radiation into the sample through a MW homogenizer, devised to even the MW power distribution into the sample's volume. An adjustable MW circuit adapts the MW generator to the load (i.e., the sample) placed in the experiment chamber. Dedicated heatsinks maintain the MW circuits at constant temperature throughout the experiment. Openings for laser scanning for image acquisition with a CCD camera and for the cooling circuits are protected by special MW filters. The performances of the device are analyzed in terms of heating uniformity, long term output power stability, and load matching. The device is used for small scale experiments simulating Earth's mantle convection. The 30 × 30 × 5 cm(3) convection tank is filled with a water‑based viscous fluid. A uniform and constant temperature is maintained at the upper boundary by an aluminum heat exchanger and adiabatic conditions apply at the tank base. We characterize the geometry of the convective regime as well as its bulk thermal evolution by measuring the velocity field by Particle Image Velocimetry and the temperature field by using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals. PMID:25554309

  12. Fluidized bed heat exchanger with water cooled air distributor and dust hopper

    DOEpatents

    Jukkola, Walfred W.; Leon, Albert M.; Van Dyk, Jr., Garritt C.; McCoy, Daniel E.; Fisher, Barry L.; Saiers, Timothy L.; Karstetter, Marlin E.

    1981-11-24

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger is provided in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel. A steam-water natural circulation system is provided for heat exchange and the housing of the heat exchanger has a water-wall type construction. Vertical in-bed heat exchange tubes are provided and the air distributor is water-cooled. A water-cooled dust hopper is provided in the housing to collect particulates from the combustion gases and separate the combustion zone from a volume within said housing in which convection heat exchange tubes are provided to extract heat from the exiting combustion gases.

  13. Bounds for the heat transport in turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, Jesse

    In this thesis, we present a method of establishing upper bounds for the convective heat transport in a convecting fluid, based on the background method of Constantin-Doering. Specifically, we obtain upper estimates on the optimal bound by appropriately constraining the sets over which the optimization takes place. The method is used to investigate the Nu - Ra power scaling laws for several different convection flows, including porous medium, infinite Prandtl number and 2D free-stress convection. In addition, we study the effect of different temperature boundary conditions on the heat transport. After appropriately defining the heat transport and forcing scales for convection with a fixed heat flux through the layer, we formulate a variational upper bound for the Nusselt number and provide estimates for the optimal bound from above.

  14. An apparatus for the testing of small cryogenic heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatarathnam, G.; Sarangi, Sunil

    1996-02-01

    Most cryogenic processes demand high effectiveness heat exchangers. The performance of these exchangers is determined not only by convective heat transfer resistance, but also by other irreversibilities such as axial conduction, flow maldistribution, heat transfer with surroundings, and finite number of lateral heat transfer paths. While determination of heat transfer correlations for exchanger cores is sufficient in most conventional applications, high-Ntu cryogenic exchangers must be tested under true operating conditions. As a part of our matrix heat exchanger development program, an apparatus has been constructed for testing small, compact heat exchangers at low temperature. The apparatus, enclosed in a vacuum vessel, provides a variable cold end temperature and means for direct measurement of ineffectiveness. Temperature approaches at both ends and pressure drop in both channels are also measured. The construction of the apparatus as well as the instrumentation and data acquisition methods are discussed. The results of a test on a small matrix heat exchanger using the test apparatus are also presented.

  15. Radiant heat exchange calculations in radiantly heated and cooled enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K.S.; Zhang, P.

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents the development of a three-dimensional mathematical model to compute the radiant heat exchange between surfaces separated by a transparent and/or opaque medium. The model formulation accommodates arbitrary arrangements of the interior surfaces, as well as arbitrary placement of obstacles within the enclosure. The discrete ordinates radiation model is applied and has the capability to analyze the effect of irregular geometries and diverse surface temperatures and radiative properties. The model is verified by comparing calculated heat transfer rates to heat transfer rates determined from the exact radiosity method for four different enclosures. The four enclosures were selected to provide a wide range of verification. This three-dimensional model based on the discrete ordinates method can be applied to a building to assist the design engineer in sizing a radiant heating system. By coupling this model with a convective and conductive heat transfer model and a thermal comfort model, the comfort levels throughout the room can be easily and efficiently mapped for a given radiant heater location. In addition, objects such as airplanes, trucks, furniture, and partitions can be easily incorporated to determine their effect on the performance of the radiant heating system.

  16. Modelling crystal growth: Convection in an asymmetrically heated ampoule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rosenberger, Franz; Pulicani, J. P.; Krukowski, S.; Ouazzani, Jalil

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to develop and implement a numerical method capable of solving the nonlinear partial differential equations governing heat, mass, and momentum transfer in a 3-D cylindrical geometry in order to examine the character of convection in an asymmetrically heated cylindrical ampoule. The details of the numerical method, including verification tests involving comparison with results obtained from other methods, are presented. The results of the study of 3-D convection in an asymmetrically heated cylinder are described.

  17. SCALE ANALYSIS OF CONVECTIVE MELTING WITH INTERNAL HEAT GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau

    2011-03-01

    Using a scale analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate internal heat for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  18. Mantle Convection in a Microwave Oven: New Perspectives for the Internally Heated Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limare, A.; Fourel, L.; Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Surducan, V.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E. C.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal evolution of silicate planets is primarily controlled by the balance between internal heating - due to radioactive decay - and heat transport by mantle convection. In the Earth, the problem is particularly complex due to the heterogeneous distribution of heat sources in the mantle and the non-linear coupling between this distribution and convective mixing. To investigate the behaviour of such systems, we have developed a new technology based on microwave absorption to study internally-heated convection in the laboratory. This prototype offers the ability to reach the high Rayleigh-Roberts and Prandtl numbers that are relevant for planetary convection. Our experimental results obtained for a uniform distribution of heat sources were compared to numerical calculations reproducing exactly experimental conditions (3D Cartesian geometry and temperature-dependent physical properties), thereby providing the first cross validation of experimental and numerical studies of convection in internally-heated systems. We find that the thermal boundary layer thickness and interior temperature scale with RaH-1/4, where RaH is the Rayleigh-Roberts number, as theoretically predicted by scaling arguments on the dissipation of kinetic energy. Our microwave-based method offers new perspectives for the study of internally-heated convection in heterogeneous systems which have been out of experimental reach until now. We are able to selectively heat specific regions in the convecting layer, through the careful control of the absorption properties of different miscible fluids. This is analogous to convection in the presence of chemical reservoirs with different concentration of long-lived radioactive isotopes. We shall show results for two different cases: the stability of continental lithosphere over a convective fluid and the evolution of a hidden enriched reservoir in the lowermost mantle.

  19. Oxidizer heat exchanger component test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, is capable of multimode thrust operation. The engine operates at two low-thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust; and pumped idle, 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank prepressurization and maneuver thrust for low-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine during the low-thrust operating modes can be accomplished by using a heat exchanger to supply gaseous oxygen to the propellant injector. The oxidized heat exchanger (OHE) vaporizes the liquid oxygen using hydrogen as the energy source. This report summarizes the test activity and post-test data analysis for two possible heat exchangers, each of which employs a completely different design philosophy. One design makes use of a low-heat transfer (PHT) approach in combination with a volume to attenuate pressure and flow oscillations. The test data showed that the LHT unit satisfied the oxygen exit quality of 0.95 or greater in both the THI and PI modes while maintaining stability. The HHT unit fulfilled all PI requirements; data for THI satisfactory operation is implied from experimental data that straddle the exact THI operating point.

  20. Convective Heat Transfer in Acoustic Streaming Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Ashok

    1992-01-01

    Convective heat transfer due to acoustic streaming has been studied in the absence of an imposed mean flow. The work is motivated by the need to design and control the thermal features of a suitable experimental rig for the containerless processing of materials by heat treatment of acoustically levitated alloy samples at near zero-gravity. First the problem of heat transfer from an isolated sphere (in a standing sound field) is explored in detail. The streaming Reynolds number, Rs, which characterizes the resulting steady flows, is determined from the acoustic signal. A scale analysis is used to ascertain the importance of buoyancy and viscous dissipation. The steady velocity and temperature fields are determined using asymptotic techniques and numerical methods for the limiting cases of Rs<<1 and Rsgg1. Working correlations for the average Nusselt number are obtained for a wide range of Prandtl numbers. A simple experiment is conducted to verify the predictions for the more relevant case of Rsgg1. The acoustic levitation chamber itself is modelled as a Kundt tube (supporting a plane axial standing sound wave) with insulated side-wall and isothermal end-walls. Analytical solution techniques are used to determine the steady fields close to the tube walls. For the steady recirculatory transport in the core, the numerical solver PHOENICS is adopted for the solution of the complete elliptic form of the governing equations. A study of the effects of a range of acoustic and geometric parameters on the flow and heat transfer is performed and Nusselt number correlations are obtained for air. PHOENICS is also used to study the effects of variable fluid properties and axial side-wall conduction (coupled with radiation). The role of normal/reduced gravity is assessed and suggestions made for terrestrial testing of the levitation apparatus. Finally, with the sample located at a node in the levitation chamber, the effect of the interaction of the streaming flows (on the sphere

  1. Numerical investigation of transient heat transfer to hydromagnetic channel flow with radiative heat and convective cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makinde, O. D.; Chinyoka, T.

    2010-12-01

    This present study consists of a numerical investigation of transient heat transfer in channel flow of an electrically conducting variable viscosity Boussinesq fluid in the presence of a magnetic field and thermal radiation. The temperature dependent nature of viscosity is assumed to follow an exponentially model and the system exchanges heat with the ambient following Newton's law of cooling. The governing nonlinear equations of momentum and energy transport are solved numerically using a semi-implicit finite difference method. Solutions are presented in graphical form and given in terms of fluid velocity, fluid temperature, skin friction and heat transfer rate for various parametric values. Our results reveal that combined effect of thermal radiation, magnetic field, viscosity variation and convective cooling have significant impact in controlling the rate of heat transfer in the boundary layer region.

  2. Methods for characterizing convective cryoprobe heat transfer in ultrasound gel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Etheridge, Michael L; Choi, Jeunghwan; Ramadhyani, Satish; Bischof, John C

    2013-02-01

    While cryosurgery has proven capable in treating of a variety of conditions, it has met with some resistance among physicians, in part due to shortcomings in the ability to predict treatment outcomes. Here we attempt to address several key issues related to predictive modeling by demonstrating methods for accurately characterizing heat transfer from cryoprobes, report temperature dependent thermal properties for ultrasound gel (a convenient tissue phantom) down to cryogenic temperatures, and demonstrate the ability of convective exchange heat transfer boundary conditions to accurately describe freezing in the case of single and multiple interacting cryoprobe(s). Temperature dependent changes in the specific heat and thermal conductivity for ultrasound gel are reported down to -150 °C for the first time here and these data were used to accurately describe freezing in ultrasound gel in subsequent modeling. Freezing around a single and two interacting cryoprobe(s) was characterized in the ultrasound gel phantom by mapping the temperature in and around the "iceball" with carefully placed thermocouple arrays. These experimental data were fit with finite-element modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics, which was used to investigate the sensitivity and effectiveness of convective boundary conditions in describing heat transfer from the cryoprobes. Heat transfer at the probe tip was described in terms of a convective coefficient and the cryogen temperature. While model accuracy depended strongly on spatial (i.e., along the exchange surface) variation in the convective coefficient, it was much less sensitive to spatial and transient variations in the cryogen temperature parameter. The optimized fit, convective exchange conditions for the single-probe case also provided close agreement with the experimental data for the case of two interacting cryoprobes, suggesting that this basic characterization and modeling approach can be extended to accurately describe more complicated

  3. Condensation in horizontal heat exchanger tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Leyer, S.; Zacharias, T.; Maisberger, F.; Lamm, M.; Vallee, C.; Beyer, M.; Hampel, U.

    2012-07-01

    Many innovative reactor concepts for Generation III nuclear power plants use passive safety equipment for residual heat removal. These systems use two phase natural circulation. Heat transfer to the coolant results in a density difference providing the driving head for the required mass flow. By balancing the pressure drop the system finds its operational mode. Therefore the systems depend on a strong link between heat transfer and pressure drop determining the mass flow through the system. In order to be able to analyze these kind of systems with the help of state of the art computer codes the implemented numerical models for heat transfer, pressure drop or two phase flow structure must be able to predict the system performance in a wide parameter range. Goal of the program is to optimize the numerical models and therefore the performance of computer codes analyzing passive systems. Within the project the heat transfer capacity of a heat exchanger tube will be investigated. Therefore the tube will be equipped with detectors, both temperature and pressure, in several directions perpendicular to the tube axis to be able to resolve the angular heat transfer. In parallel the flow structure of a two phase flow inside and along the tube will be detected with the help of x-ray tomography. The water cooling outside of the tube will be realized by forced convection. It will be possible to combine the flow structure measurement with an angular resolved heat transfer for a wide parameter range. The test rig is set up at the TOPLFOW facility at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), so that it will be possible to vary the pressure between 5 and 70 bar. The steam mass content will be varied between 0 and 100 percent. The results will be compared to the large scaled Emergency Condenser Tests performed at the INKA test facility in Karlstein (Germany). The paper will explain the test setup and the status of the project will be presented. (authors)

  4. Pressurized bellows flat contact heat exchanger interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, Fred E. (Inventor); Howell, Harold R. (Inventor); Winkler, Roger V. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Disclosed is an interdigitated plate-type heat exchanger interface. The interface includes a modular interconnect to thermally connect a pair or pairs of plate-type heat exchangers to a second single or multiple plate-type heat exchanger. The modular interconnect comprises a series of parallel, plate-type heat exchangers arranged in pairs to form a slot therebetween. The plate-type heat exchangers of the second heat exchanger insert into the slots of the modular interconnect. Bellows are provided between the pairs of fins of the modular interconnect so that when the bellows are pressurized, they drive the plate-type heat exchangers of the modular interconnect toward one another, thus closing upon the second heat exchanger plates. Each end of the bellows has a part thereof a thin, membrane diaphragm which readily conforms to the contours of the heat exchanger plates of the modular interconnect when the bellows is pressurized. This ensures an even distribution of pressure on the heat exchangers of the modular interconnect thus creating substantially planar contact between the two heat exchangers. The effect of the interface of the present invention is to provide a dry connection between two heat exchangers whereby the rate of heat transfer can be varied by varying the pressure within the bellows.

  5. Heat exchanger expert system logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cormier, R.

    1988-01-01

    The reduction is described of the operation and fault diagnostics of a Deep Space Network heat exchanger to a rule base by the application of propositional calculus to a set of logic statements. The value of this approach lies in the ease of converting the logic and subsequently implementing it on a computer as an expert system. The rule base was written in Process Intelligent Control software.

  6. Heat exchanger analysis on a Microvax II/GPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haught, Alan F.

    1988-12-01

    The finite element code FIDAP was used to examine the fluid flow path within a flat plate tube/fin heat exchanger and the resulting heat transfer from the fins and tube walls. The mathematical formulation, mesh development and analysis procedure are presented, and the results obtained are compared with experimental observations of the fluid flow and measurements of the fluid heating. This problem illustrates the capabilities of finite element techniques for analyzing complex three-dimensional convection-dominated heat transfer, and demonstrates the scope of problems which can be addressed on a Micro VAX II/GPX workstation.

  7. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  8. Low Cost Polymer heat Exchangers for Condensing Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, Thomas; Trojanowski, Rebecca; Wei, George; Worek, Michael

    2015-09-30

    Work in this project sought to develop a suitable design for a low cost, corrosion resistant heat exchanger as part of a high efficiency condensing boiler. Based upon the design parameters and cost analysis several geometries and material options were explored. The project also quantified and demonstrated the durability of the selected polymer/filler composite under expected operating conditions. The core material idea included a polymer matrix with fillers for thermal conductivity improvement. While the work focused on conventional heating oil, this concept could also be applicable to natural gas, low sulfur heating oil, and biodiesel- although these are considered to be less challenging environments. An extruded polymer composite heat exchanger was designed, built, and tested during this project, demonstrating technical feasibility of this corrosion-resistant material approach. In such flue gas-to-air heat exchangers, the controlling resistance to heat transfer is in the gas-side convective layer and not in the tube material. For this reason, the lower thermal conductivity polymer composite heat exchanger can achieve overall heat transfer performance comparable to a metal heat exchanger. However, with the polymer composite, the surface temperature on the gas side will be higher, leading to a lower water vapor condensation rate.

  9. Enhancement of laminar convective heat transfer using microparticle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiu Yang; Tang, Shiyang; Yi, Pyshar; Baum, Thomas; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Ghorbani, Kamran

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the enhancement of convective heat transfer within a sub-millimetre diameter copper tube using Al2O3, Co3O4 and CuO microparticle suspensions. Experiments are conducted at different particle concentrations of 1.0, 2.0 and 5.0 wt% and at various flow rates ranging from 250 to 1000 µl/min. Both experimental measurements and numerical analyses are employed to obtain the convective heat transfer coefficient. The results indicate a significant enhancement in convective heat transfer coefficient due to the implementation of microparticle suspensions. For the case of Al2O3 microparticle suspension with 5.0 wt% concentration, a 20.3 % enhancement in convective heat transfer coefficient is obtained over deionised water. This is comparable to the case of Al2O3 nanofluid at the same concentration. Hence, there is a potential for the microparticle suspensions to be used for cooling of compact integrated systems.

  10. Fluidized bed heat exchanger utilizing angularly extending heat exchange tubes

    DOEpatents

    Talmud, Fred M.; Garcia-Mallol, Juan-Antonio

    1980-01-01

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the fluidized bed and a series of tubes connected at one end to the steam drum. A portion of the tubes are connected to a water drum and in the path of the air and the gaseous products of combustion exiting from the bed. Another portion of the tubes pass through the bed and extend at an angle to the upper surface of the bed.

  11. Heat exchanger identification by using iterative fuzzy observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalot, Sylvain; Guðmundsson, Oddgeir; Pálsson, Halldór; Pálsson, Ólafur Pétur

    2016-05-01

    The principle of fuzzy observers is first illustrated on a general example: the determination of the two parameters of second order systems using a step response. The set of equations describing the system are presented and it is shown that accurate results are obtained, even for a high level of noise. The heat exchanger model is then introduced. It is based on a spatial division of a counter flow heat exchanger into multiple sections. The governing equations are rewritten as a state space representation. The number of sections needed to get accurate results is determined by comparing estimated values to experimental data. Based on the mean value of the root mean squared errors, it is shown that 80 sections is an appropriate value for this heat exchanger. It is then shown that the iterative fuzzy observers can be used to determine the main parameters of the counter flow heat exchanger, i.e. the convection heat transfer coefficients, when in transient state. The final values of these parameters are <3.5 % apart from the values determined by a time consuming trial and error procedure. Finally a sensitivity study is carried out, showing that a ±1.5 % variation of the actual value of the overall heat transfer coefficient corresponds to a ±0.5 % variation of the estimated overall heat transfer coefficient. This study also shows that the fuzzy observers are equally efficient when the heat exchanger is in steady state.

  12. Fabrication of High-Temperature Heat Exchangers by Plasma Spraying Exterior Skins on Nickel Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafeez, P.; Yugeswaran, S.; Chandra, S.; Mostaghimi, J.; Coyle, T. W.

    2016-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed heat exchangers were tested at high temperatures (750 °C), and their performances were compared to the foam heat exchangers made by brazing Inconel sheets to their surface. Nickel foil was brazed to the exterior surface of 10-mm-thick layers of 10 and 40 PPI nickel foam. A plasma torch was used to spray an Inconel coating on the surface of the foil. A burner test rig was built to produce hot combustion gases that flowed over exposed face of the heat exchanger. Cooling air flowed through the foam heat exchanger at rates of up to 200 SLPM. Surface temperature and air inlet/exit temperature were measured. Heat transfer to air flowing through the foam was significantly higher for the thermally sprayed heat exchangers than for the brazed heat exchangers. On an average, thermally sprayed heat exchangers show 36% higher heat transfer than conventionally brazed foam heat exchangers. At low flow rates, the convective resistance is large (~4 × 10-2 m2 K/W), and the effect of thermal contact resistance is negligible. At higher flow rates, the convective resistance decreases (~2 × 10-3 m2 K/W), and the lower contact resistance of the thermally sprayed heat exchanger provides better performance than the brazed heat exchangers.

  13. Heat Exchange, Additive Manufacturing, and Neutron Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick

    2015-02-23

    Researchers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have captured undistorted snapshots of refrigerants flowing through small heat exchangers, helping them to better understand heat transfer in heating, cooling and ventilation systems.

  14. Heat exchanger for solar water heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, M.; Krupnick, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed efficient double-walled heat exchanger prevents contamination of domestic water supply lines and indicates leakage automatically in solar as well as nonsolar heat sources using water as heat transfer medium.

  15. Solution of heat removal from nuclear reactors by natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitek, Pavel; Valenta, Vaclav

    2014-03-01

    This paper summarizes the basis for the solution of heat removal by natural convection from both conventional nuclear reactors and reactors with fuel flowing coolant (such as reactors with molten fluoride salts MSR).The possibility of intensification of heat removal through gas lift is focused on. It might be used in an MSR (Molten Salt Reactor) for cleaning the salt mixture of degassed fission products and therefore eliminating problems with iodine pitting. Heat removal by natural convection and its intensification increases significantly the safety of nuclear reactors. Simultaneously the heat removal also solves problems with lifetime of pumps in the primary circuit of high-temperature reactors.

  16. Energy recovery heat exchanger installation

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, N.F.

    1983-08-16

    An installation is disclosed for energy recovery heat exchangers arranged to transfer heat into or out of air exhausted from an air handling system for paint spray booths. The system includes a collection chamber about which the intakes of a series of exhaust fans are arranged to draw exhaust air into an exhaust stack. Pairs of inclined wetted surface coil sets are mounted in the walls of the enclosures, each in communication with the intake of an exhaust fan so as to receive airflow of each exhaust fan. Each of the enclosures is provided with an access door to enable cleaning and other maintenance chores to be carried out on the coil sets and pivotally mounted blocking panels may be positioned to close off air flow across the coils and bypassing of the exhaust flow through the access doors in the event excessive overspray solids are present in the exhaust flow.

  17. Light bulb heat exchanger for magnetohydrodynamic generator applications - Preliminary evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.; Hwang, C. C.; Seikel, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    The light-bulb heat-exchanger concept is investigated as a possible means of using a combustion heat source to supply energy to an inert gas MHD power generator system. In this concept, combustion gases flow through a central passage which consists of a duct with transparent walls through which heat is transferred by radiation to a radiation receiver which in turn heats the inert gas by convection. The effects of combustion-gas emissivity, transparent-wall-transmissivity, radiation-receiver emissivity, and the use of fins in the inert gas coolant passage are studied. The results indicate that inert gas outlet temperatures of 2500 K are possible for combustion temperatures of 3200 K and that sufficient energy can be transferred from the combustion gas to reduce its temperature to approximately 2000 K. At this temperature more conventional heat exchangers can be used.

  18. Evidence of convective heat transfer enhancement induced by spinodal decomposition.

    PubMed

    Poesio, P; Lezzi, A M; Beretta, G P

    2007-06-01

    Spinodal decomposition can be driven by either diffusion or self-induced convection; the importance of convection relative to diffusion depends on the Péclet number, defined as the ratio between convective and diffusive mass fluxes. Diffusion is the dominating mechanism of phase segregation when the Péclet number is small - i.e., when viscosity and diffusivity are large - or when the domain characteristic size is small. For low-viscosity mixtures, convection is the dominating process and the segregation is very rapid as it takes a few seconds compared to the hours needed in the case of pure diffusion. In such cases, strong convective motion of the phase segregating domains is generated even in small-size systems and is almost independent of the temperature difference as long as it is below the transition value. We study experimentally the enhancement of heat transfer in a 1-mm -thick cell. A water-acetonitrile-toulene mixture is quenched into a two-phase region so as to induce convection-driven spinodal decomposition. The heat transfer rate is measured and compared to that obtained in the absence of convective motion. A substantial reduction in the cooling time obtains in the case of spinodal decomposition. The heat transfer enhancement induced by this self-induced, disordered but effectively convective effect may be exploited in the cooling or heating of small-scale systems whereby forced convection cannot be achieved because of the small sizes involved. A scaling analysis of the data based on the diffuse interface H model for a symmetric mixture near the equilibrium point yields very encouraging agreement and insights. PMID:17677356

  19. Improved ceramic heat exchange material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccollister, H. L.

    1977-01-01

    Improved corrosion resistant ceramic materials that are suitable for use as regenerative heat exchangers for vehicular gas turbines is reported. Two glass-ceramic materials, C-144 and C-145, have superior durability towards sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate compared to lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) Corning heat exchange material 9455. Material C-144 is a leached LAS material whose major crystalline phase is silica keatite plus mullite, and C-145 is a LAS keatite solid solution (S.S.) material. In comparison to material 9455, material C-144 is two orders of magnitude better in dimensional stability to sulfuric acid at 300 C, and one order of magnitude better in stability to sodium sulfate at 1000 C. Material C-145 is initially two times better in stability to sulfuric acid, and about one order of magnitude better in stability to sodium sulfate. Both C-144 and C-145 have less than 300 ppm delta L/L thermal expansion from ambient to 1000 C, and good dimensional stability of less than approximately 100 ppm delta L/L after exposure to 1000 C for 100 hours. The glass-ceramic fabrication process produced a hexagonal honeycomb matrix having an 85% open frontal area, 50 micrometer wall thickness, and less than 5% porosity.

  20. Testing and analysis of immersed heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

    1986-08-01

    The objectives were to determine the performance of four immersed, ''supply-side'' heat exchangers used in solar domestic-hot-water systems; to examine the effects of flow rate, temperature difference, and coil configuration on performance; and to develop a simple model to predict the performance of immersed heat exchangers. We tested four immersed heat exchangers: a smooth coil, a finned spiral, a single-wall bayonet, and a double-wall bayonet. We developed two analyticl models and a simple finite difference model. We experimentally verified that the performance of these heat exchangers depends on the flow rate through them; we also showed that the temperature difference between the heat exchanger's inlet and the storage tank can strongly affect a heat exchanger's performance. We also compared the effects of the heat exchanger's configuration and correlated Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for each heat exchanger tested. The smooth coil had a higher effectiveness than the others, while the double-wall bayonet had a very low effectiveness. We still do not know the long-term effectiveness of heat exchangers regarding scale accumulation, nor do we know the effects of very low flow rates on a heat exchanger's performance.

  1. Effects of forced convection of heated air on insensible water loss and heat loss in preterm infants in incubators.

    PubMed

    Okken, A; Blijham, C; Franz, W; Bohn, E

    1982-07-01

    To assess the effect of forced convection of heated air exchange in preterm infants in conventional incubators, we measured insensible water loss and total heat loss in preterm infants in a conventional forced convection incubator (air velocity 15 to 25 cm/second) and in a specially constructed still-air incubator (air velocity 0 to 2 cm/second) at equal operative temperature and humidity. Under the forced conditions, insensible water loss in the preterm infants increased by a mean 52% from 1.04 +/- 0.24 (mean +/- SD) to 1.58 +/- 0.51 ml/kg/hour (P less than 0.001). The ensuing increase in evaporative heat loss was partly reflected in the small but significant increase in total heat loss from 1.65 +/- 0.47 to 1.80 +/- 0.44 kcal/kg/hour (P less than 0.02). In the forced convection incubator, the increased evaporative heat loss in preterm infants was apparently partly compensated by a decreased nonevaporative heat loss. If reduction of insensible water loss is required, preterm infants should not be subjected to forced convection in incubators.

  2. 10,000 - A reason to study granular heat convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einav, I.; Rognon, P.; Gan, Y.; Miller, T.; Griffani, D.

    2013-06-01

    In sheared granular media, particle motion is characterized by vortex-like structures; here this is demonstrated experimentally for disks system undergoing indefinite deformation during simple shear, as often imposed by the rock masses hosting earthquake fault gouges. In traditional fluids it has been known for years that vortices represent a major factor of heat transfer enhancement via convective internal mixing, but in analyses of heat transfer through earthquake faults and base planes of landslides this has been continuously neglected. Can research proceed by neglecting heat convection by internal mixing? Our answer is astonishingly far from being yes.

  3. 10,000 - A reason to study granular heat convection

    SciTech Connect

    Einav, I.; Rognon, P.; Gan, Y.; Miller, T.; Griffani, D.

    2013-06-18

    In sheared granular media, particle motion is characterized by vortex-like structures; here this is demonstrated experimentally for disks system undergoing indefinite deformation during simple shear, as often imposed by the rock masses hosting earthquake fault gouges. In traditional fluids it has been known for years that vortices represent a major factor of heat transfer enhancement via convective internal mixing, but in analyses of heat transfer through earthquake faults and base planes of landslides this has been continuously neglected. Can research proceed by neglecting heat convection by internal mixing? Our answer is astonishingly far from being yes.

  4. Convective heat transfer for fluids passing through aluminum foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyga, Roman; Troniewski, Leon

    2015-03-01

    This paper analyses the experimental findings within heat transfer when heating up air, water and oil streams which are passed through a duct with internal structural packing elements in the form of metal foams. Three types of aluminum foams with different cell sizes, porosity specifications and thermal conductivities were used in the study. The test data were collected and they made it possible to establish the effect of the foam geometry, properties of fluids and flow hydrodynamic conditions on the convective heat transfer process from the heating surface to the fluid flowing by (wetting) that surface. The foam was found to be involved in heat transfer to a limited extent only. Heat is predominantly transferred directly from the duct wall to a fluid, and intensity of convective heat transfer is controlled by the wall effects. The influence of foam structural parameters, like cell size and/or porosity, becomes more clearly apparent under laminar flow conditions.

  5. Direct contact heat exchangers for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taussig, R. T.; Thayer, W. J.; Lo, V. C. H.; Sakins, K. M.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1985-06-01

    Direct contact heat exchanger concepts have been investigated for use in space, including droplet vortex heat exchangers, coflowing droplet heat exchangers, electrostatically driven heat exchangers, and belt and disk heat exchangers. These concepts are characterized by a low heat exchanger mass per unit of heat transferred, low pressure losses, high reliability, and compactness in design. Operation in zero-G poses unique problems for those direct contact heat exchangers which require separation of two fluid media after heat transfer is completed. Other problems include maintenance of good heat transfer coefficients in the absence of buoyant forces, exposure of heat transfer media to vacuum conditions for certain applications, and materials compatibility. A preliminary systems analysis indicates the potential for substantial weight reductions in turbine Brayton cycle space power systems for output powers above several MW(e). Based on the status of current technology and the results of this analysis, recommendations are made for the most attractive applications and the R&D required to ready a direct contact heat exchanger for use in space.

  6. Design of single passage heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Fehr, R.L.; Walton, L.R.; Parker, B.F.

    1981-01-01

    The available literature has been reviewed, and information useful for heat exchanger design has been presented and compared. The available design information is presented in the form of simplified equations that are suitable for the design of heat exchangers for livestock buildings. The equations presented have been used to develop a computer program as an example of how they can be arranged to aid in designing heat exchangers. 14 refs.

  7. Scaling of the local convective heat flux in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiao-Dong; Tong, Penger; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2008-06-20

    Local convective heat flux J(r) in turbulent thermal convection is obtained from simultaneous velocity and temperature measurements in a cylindrical cell filled with water. The measured J(r) in the bulk region shows a different scaling behavior with varying Rayleigh numbers compared with that measured in the plume-dominated regions near the sidewall and near the lower conducting plate. The local transport measurements thus allow us to disentangle boundary and bulk contributions to the total heat flux and directly check their respective scaling behavior against the theoretical predictions.

  8. Comments on "Modified wind chill temperatures determined by a whole body thermoregulation model and human-based convective coefficients" by Ben Shabat, Shitzer and Fiala (2013) and "Facial convective heat exchange coefficients in cold and windy environments estimated from human experiments" by Ben Shabat and Shitzer (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osczevski, Randall J.

    2014-08-01

    Ben Shabat et al. (Int J Biometeorol 56(4):639-51, 2013) present revised charts for wind chill equivalent temperatures (WCET) and facial skin temperatures (FST) that differ significantly from currently accepted charts. They credit these differences to their more sophisticated calculation model and to the human-based equation that it used for finding the convective heat transfer coefficient (Ben Shabat and Shitzer, Int J Biometeorol 56:639-651, 2012). Because a version of the simple model that was used to create the current charts accurately reproduces their results when it uses the human-based equation, the differences that they found must be entirely due to this equation. In deriving it, Ben Shabat and Shitzer assumed that all of the heat transfer from the surface of their cylindrical model was due to forced convection alone. Because several modes of heat transfer were occurring in the human experiments they were attempting to simulate, notably radiation, their coefficients are actually total external heat transfer coefficients, not purely convective ones, as the calculation models assume. Data from the one human experiment that used heat flux sensors supports this conclusion and exposes the hazard of using a numerical model with several adjustable parameters that cannot be measured. Because the human-based equation is faulty, the values in the proposed charts are not correct. The equation that Ben Shabat et al. (Int J Biometeorol 56(4):639-51, 2013) propose to calculate WCET should not be used.

  9. Heat and momentum transport scalings in horizontal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkina, Olga; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-02-01

    In a horizontal convection (HC) system heat is supplied and removed exclusively through a single, top, or bottom, surface of a fluid layer. It is commonly agreed that in the studied Rayleigh number (Ra) range, the convective heat transport, measured by the Nusselt number, follows the Rossby (1965) scaling, which is based on the assumptions that the HC flows are laminar and determined by their boundary layers. However, the universality of this scaling is questionable, as these flows are observed to become more turbulent with increasing Ra. Here we propose a theoretical model for heat and momentum transport scalings with Ra, which is based on the Grossmann and Lohse (2000) ideas, applied to HC flows. The obtained multiple scaling regimes include in particular the Rossby scaling and the ultimate scaling by Siggers et al. (2004). Our results have bearing on the understanding of the convective processes in many geophysical systems and engineering applications.

  10. High temperature heat exchange: nuclear process heat applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vrable, D.L.

    1980-09-01

    The unique element of the HTGR system is the high-temperature operation and the need for heat exchanger equipment to transfer nuclear heat from the reactor to the process application. This paper discusses the potential applications of the HTGR in both synthetic fuel production and nuclear steel making and presents the design considerations for the high-temperature heat exchanger equipment.

  11. Experimental investigation of a manifold heat-pipe heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Konev, S.V.; Wang Tszin` Lyan`; D`yakov, I.I.

    1995-12-01

    Results of experimental investigations of a heat exchanger on a manifold water heat pipe are given. An analysis is made of the temperature distribution along the heat-transfer agent path as a function of the transferred heat power. The influence of the degree of filling with the heat transfer agent on the operating characteristics of the construction is considered.

  12. Probe Measures Fouling As In Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, Wilbur J.; Macdavid, Kenton S.

    1990-01-01

    Combustion deposits reduce transfer of heat. Instrument measures fouling like that on gas side of heat exchanger in direct-fired boiler or heat-recovery system. Heat-flux probe includes tube with embedded meter in outer shell. Combustion gases flow over probe, and fouling accumulates on it, just as fouling would on heat exchanger. Embedded heat-flow meter is sandwich structure in which thin Chromel layers and middle alloy form thermopile. Users determine when fouling approaches unacceptable levels so they schedule cleaning and avoid decreased transfer of heat and increased drop in pressure fouling causes. Avoids cost of premature, unnecessary maintenance.

  13. Prandtl Number Dependent Natural Convection with Internal Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Hee Lee; Seung Dong Lee; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-06-01

    Natural convection plays an important role in determining the thermal load from debris accumulated in the reactor vessel lower head during a severe accident. Recently, attention is being paid to the feasibility of external vessel flooding as a severe accident management strategy and to the phenomena affecting the success path for retaining the molten core material inside the vessel. The heat transfer inside the molten core material can be characterized by the strong buoyancy-induced flows resulting from internal heating due to decay of fission products. The thermo-fluid dynamic characteristics of such flow depend strongly on the thermal boundary conditions. The spatial and temporal variation of heat flux on the pool wall boundaries and the pool superheat are mainly characterized by the natural convection flow inside the molten pool. In general, the natural convection heat transfer phenomena involving the internal heat generation are represented by the modified Rayleigh number (Ra’), which quantifies the internal heat source and hence the strength of the buoyancy force. In this study, tests were conducted in a rectangular section 250 mm high, 500 mm long and 160 mm wide. Twenty-four T-type thermocouples were installed in the test section to measure temperatures. Four T-type thermocouples were used to measure the boundary temperatures. The thermocouples were placed in designated locations after calibration. A direct heating method was adopted in this test to simulate the uniform heat generation. The experiments covered a range of Ra' between 1.5x106 and 7.42x1015 and the Prandtl number (Pr) between 0.7 and 6.5. Tests were conducted with water and air as simulant. The upper and lower boundary conditions were maintained uniform. The results demonstrated feasibility of the direct heating method to simulate uniform volumetric heat generation. Particular attentions were paid to the effect of Pr on natural convection heat transfer within the rectangular pool.

  14. Toward evaluation of heat fluxes in the convective boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Sorbjan, Z.

    1995-05-01

    This article demonstrates that vertical profiles of the heat flux in the convective boundary layer can be diagnosed through an integration over height of the time change rates of observed potential temperature profiles. Moreover, the basic characteristics of the convective boundary layer, such as the mixed-layer height z{sub t}, the depth of the interfacial (entrainment) layer, and the heat flux zero-crossing height h{sub 0} can be uniquely evaluated based on a time evolution of potential temperature profiles in the lower atmosphere. 12 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Solar water heating system and heat exchanger therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Koskela, M.O.

    1982-04-27

    In a solar water system including a solar collector prevention of damage to the collector during freezing conditions is achieved by providing a relatively small independent heat exchanger between the solar collector and the water heater and a vacuum breaking system whereby the water in the solar collector is drained into the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger is connected to a thermal siphon arrangement with the water heater.

  16. Heat Exchanger With Reservoir And Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Richard F.; Edelstein, Fred

    1989-01-01

    Heat-pipe assembly operates as evaporator or as condenser. New heat exchanger incorporates important improvements over previous designs. By adding reservoir to primary loop, locating ultrasonic liquid-level sensors on reservoir rather than directly on one of heat pipes, and revising control logic, uneven distribution of flow among heat pipes and erroneous behavior of valves eliminated.

  17. Analysis of sensible heat exchanges from a thermal manikin.

    PubMed

    Quintela, Divo; Gaspar, Adélio; Borges, Carlos

    2004-09-01

    The present work is dedicated to the analysis of dry heat exchanges as measured by a thermal manikin placed in still air. We believe that the understanding of some fundamental aspects governing fluid flow and heat transfer around three-dimensional bodies such as human beings deserves appropriate attention. This should be of great significance for improving physiological models concerned with thermal exposures. The potential interest of such work can be directed towards quite distinct targets such as working conditions, sports, the military, or healthcare personnel and patients. In the present study, we made use of a climate chamber and an articulated thermal manikin of the Pernille type, with 16 body parts. The most common occidental postures (standing, sitting and lying) were studied. In order to separate heat losses due to radiation and convection, the radiative heat losses of the manikin were significantly reduced by means of a shiny aluminium coating, which was carefully applied to the artificial skin. The air temperature within the test chamber was varied between 13 degrees C and 29 degrees C. The corresponding mean differences between the skin and the operative temperatures changed from 3.8 degrees C up to 15.8 degrees C. The whole-body heat transfer coefficients by radiation and convection for both standing and sitting postures are in good agreement with those in the published literature. The lying posture appears to be more efficient for losing heat by convection. This is confirmed when the heat losses of each individual part are considered. The proposed correlations for the whole body suggest that natural convection is mainly laminar.

  18. Heat Exchanger Lab for Chemical Engineering Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajala, Jonathan W.; Evans, Edward A.; Chase, George G.

    2015-01-01

    Third year chemical engineering undergraduate students at The University of Akron designed and fabricated a heat exchanger for a stirred tank as part of a Chemical Engineering Laboratory course. The heat exchanger portion of this course was three weeks of the fifteen week long semester. Students applied concepts of scale-up and dimensional…

  19. Heat exchanger with a removable tube section

    DOEpatents

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.

    1975-07-29

    A heat exchanger is described in which the tube sheet is secured against primary liquid pressure, but which allows for easy removal of the tube section. The tube section is supported by a flange which is secured by a number of shear blocks, each of which extends into a slot which is immovable with respect to the outer shell of the heat exchanger. (auth)

  20. Influence of heating mode on three-dimensional mantle convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bercovici, D.; Schubert, G.; Glatzmaier, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical models of three-dimensional thermal convection in highly viscous spherical shells with different combinations of internal and basal heating consistently have upwelling concentrations in the form of cylindrical plumes and downwelling in planar sheets. As the proportion of internal heating increases, the number of upwelling plumes increases, and downwelling sheets become more vigorous and time-dependent. With any amount of basal heating, the entire convective pattern, during its evolution, is anchored to the upwelling plumes. As the proportion of internal heating increases, the heat flow carried by the upwelling plumes remains a large fraction of the basal heat flow. Downwelling sheets carry only a minor fraction (approximately 30 percent) of the basal heat flow (even when the shell is entirely heated from below), but they advect almost all of the internally generated heat. The relatively large number of plumes in the earth's mantle (inferred from hotspots), the possibility that downwelling slabs are vigorous enough to penetrate the lower mantle, and the small fraction of terrestrial surface heat flow carried by plumes all suggest that the mantle is predominantly heated from within.

  1. Condensing heat exchangers for maximum boiler efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; DiVitto, J.G.; Rakocy, M.E.

    1994-12-31

    Until now, boiler efficiency has been limited due to the minimum temperature allowed at the stack. Heat lost up the stack was in exchange for keeping the flue gas temperature above the water vapor dew point. If water vapor was allowed to condense out, rapid deterioration, due to acid corrosion, of the outlet duct and stack would result. With the development of the condensing heat exchanger, boiler efficiency can now exceed 90%. Approximately 1% gain in boiler efficiency can be expected for every 40 F (4.5 C) reduction in flue gas stack temperature. In the CHX{reg_sign} condensing heat exchanger, all gas wetted surfaces are covered with DuPont Teflon{reg_sign}. The Teflon covered heat exchanger surfaces are impervious to all acids normally resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels. This allows the flue gas to be cooled to below the water vapor dew point with no subsequent corrosion of the heat exchanger surfaces.

  2. Fuel delivery system including heat exchanger means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffinberry, G. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A fuel delivery system is presented wherein first and second heat exchanger means are each adapted to provide the transfer of heat between the fuel and a second fluid such as lubricating oil associated with the gas turbine engine. Valve means are included which are operative in a first mode to provide for flow of the second fluid through both first and second heat exchange means and further operative in a second mode for bypassing the second fluid around the second heat exchanger means.

  3. Testing and plugging power plant heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Sutor, F.

    1994-12-31

    Heat Exchanger tubes fail for any number of reasons including but certainly not limited to the cumulative effects of corrosion, erosion, thermal stress and fatigue. This presentation will attempt to identify the most common techniques for determining which tubes are leaking and then introduce the products in use to plug the leaking tubes. For the sake of time I will limit the scope of this presentation to include feedwater heaters and secondary system heat exchangers such as Hydrogen Coolers, Lube Oil Coolers, and nuclear Component Cooling Water, Emergency Cooling Water, Regenerative Heat Recovery heat exchangers.

  4. Improved ceramic heat exchanger materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, H. W.

    1980-01-01

    The development and evaluation of materials for potential application as heat exchanger structures in automotive gas turbine engines is discussed. Test specimens in the form of small monolithic bars were evaluated for thermal expansion and dimensional stability before and after exposure to sea salt and sulfuric acid, followed by short and long term cycling at temperatures up to 1200 C. The material finally selected, GE-7808, consists of the oxides, ZrO2-MgO-Al2O3-S1O2, and is described generically as ZrMAS. The original version was based on a commercially available cordierite (MAS) frit. However, a clay/talc mixture was demonstrated to be a satisfactory very low cost source of the cordierite (MAS) phase. Several full size honeycomb regenerator cores, about 10.2 cm thick and 55 cm diameter were fabricated from both the frit and mineral versions of GE-7808. The honeycomb cells in these cores had rectangular dimensions of about 0.5 mm x 2.5 mm and a wall thickness of approximately 0.2 mm. The test data show that GE-7808 is significantly more stable at 1100 C in the presence of sodium than the aluminosilicate reference materials. In addition, thermal exposure up to 1100 C, with and without sodium present, results in essentially no change in thermal expansion of GE-7808.

  5. Application of nanofluids in heat transfer enhancement of compact heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnasegaran, P.; Shuaib, N. H.; Jalal, M. F. Abdul; Sandhita, E.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, numerical investigation using ethylene glycol (EG) as a base fluid with diamond and SiO2 as the coolants with nanoparticle volume fractions (φ) ranged from 0.1 % to 2 % on automobile flat tube plain fin compact heat exchanger (CHE) is conducted. The convective heat transfer coefficient in the developing regions along the flat tubes with the nanofluid flow showed marked improvement over the base fluid (0 %). Quantitative results of the heat transfer enhancement of CHE with increasing volumetric concentrations of nanofluids at various Reynolds numbers are presented.

  6. Measurement of the Convective Heat-Transfer Coefficient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conti, Rosaria; Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Fiordilino, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    We propose an experiment for investigating how objects cool down toward the thermal equilibrium with their surroundings. We describe the time dependence of the temperature difference of the cooling objects and the environment with an exponential decay function. By measuring the thermal constant t, we determine the convective heat-transfer…

  7. Relating Convective and Stratiform Rain to Latent Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lang, Stephen; Zeng, Xiping; Shige, Shoichi; Takayabu, Yukari

    2010-01-01

    The relationship among surface rainfall, its intensity, and its associated stratiform amount is established by examining observed precipitation data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The results show that for moderate-high stratiform fractions, rain probabilities are strongly skewed toward light rain intensities. For convective-type rain, the peak probability of occurrence shifts to higher intensities but is still significantly skewed toward weaker rain rates. The main differences between the distributions for oceanic and continental rain are for heavily convective rain. The peak occurrence, as well as the tail of the distribution containing the extreme events, is shifted to higher intensities for continental rain. For rainy areas sampled at 0.58 horizontal resolution, the occurrence of conditional rain rates over 100 mm/day is significantly higher over land. Distributions of rain intensity versus stratiform fraction for simulated precipitation data obtained from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations are quite similar to those from the satellite, providing a basis for mapping simulated cloud quantities to the satellite observations. An improved convective-stratiform heating (CSH) algorithm is developed based on two sources of information: gridded rainfall quantities (i.e., the conditional intensity and the stratiform fraction) observed from the TRMM PR and synthetic cloud process data (i.e., latent heating, eddy heat flux convergence, and radiative heating/cooling) obtained from CRM simulations of convective cloud systems. The new CSH algorithm-derived heating has a noticeably different heating structure over both ocean and land regions compared to the previous CSH algorithm. Major differences between the new and old algorithms include a significant increase in the amount of low- and midlevel heating, a downward emphasis in the level of maximum cloud heating by about 1 km, and a larger variance between land and ocean in

  8. Mixed Convective Peristaltic Flow of Water Based Nanofluids with Joule Heating and Convective Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Nawaz, Sadaf; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Rafiq, Maimona

    2016-01-01

    Main objective of present study is to analyze the mixed convective peristaltic transport of water based nanofluids using five different nanoparticles i.e. (Al2O3, CuO, Cu, Ag and TiO2). Two thermal conductivity models namely the Maxwell's and Hamilton-Crosser's are used in this study. Hall and Joule heating effects are also given consideration. Convection boundary conditions are employed. Furthermore, viscous dissipation and heat generation/absorption are used to model the energy equation. Problem is simplified by employing lubrication approach. System of equations are solved numerically. Influence of pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature are discussed. Also the heat transfer rate at the wall is observed for considered five nanofluids using the two phase models via graphs. PMID:27104596

  9. Mixed Convective Peristaltic Flow of Water Based Nanofluids with Joule Heating and Convective Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Nawaz, Sadaf; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Rafiq, Maimona

    2016-01-01

    Main objective of present study is to analyze the mixed convective peristaltic transport of water based nanofluids using five different nanoparticles i.e. (Al2O3, CuO, Cu, Ag and TiO2). Two thermal conductivity models namely the Maxwell's and Hamilton-Crosser's are used in this study. Hall and Joule heating effects are also given consideration. Convection boundary conditions are employed. Furthermore, viscous dissipation and heat generation/absorption are used to model the energy equation. Problem is simplified by employing lubrication approach. System of equations are solved numerically. Influence of pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature are discussed. Also the heat transfer rate at the wall is observed for considered five nanofluids using the two phase models via graphs. PMID:27104596

  10. Liquid Argon Maximm Convective Heat Flux vs. Liquid Depth

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.; /Fermilab

    1990-01-12

    In order to help answer questions about the magnitude of heat flux to the liquid argon in a liquid argon calorimeter which could cause boiling (bubbles), calculations estimating the heat flux which can be removed by free convection were made in February, 1988. These calculations are intended to be an estimate of the heat flux above which boiling would occur. No formal writeup was made of these calculations, although the graph dated 3 Feb 88 and revised (adding low-velocity forced convection lines) 19 Feb 88 was presented in several meetings and widely distributed. With this description of the calculations, copies of the original graph and calculations are being added to the D0 Engineering Note files. The liquid argon surface is in equilibrium with argon vapor at a pressure of 1.3 bar, so the surface is at 89.70 K. The liquid is entirely at this surface temperature throughout the bulk of the volume, except locally where it is warmed by a solid surface at a higher temperature than the bulk liquid. This surface temperature is taken to be the boiling temperature of argon at the pressure corresponding to 1.3 bar plus the liquid head; hence it is a function of depth below the surface. The free and forced convection correlations used are 'from Kreith, 'Heat Transfer', for heated flat plates in a large (i.e., no other objects nearby enough to disturb the flow) uniform volume of fluid. Heat flux is a function of plate size, really length along the flow path (since a boundary layer increases in thickness starting from the leading edge of the plate), and orientation (i.e., vertical or horizontal). The maximum heat flux which can be carried away by free convection (i.e., the heat flux above which boiling occurs) is .001 W/sq.cm. at 4 inches below the surface and 0.1 to 0.2 W/sq.cm. 15 feet below the surface. Forced convection over a 1 cm plate with a fluid velocity of 1 cm/sec, or a 10 cm plate at 10 cm/sec, is about like free convection. The line for much higher heat flux is

  11. Convective heat transfer and fluid flow physics in some ribbed ducts using liquid crystal thermography and PIV measuring techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundén, Bengt

    2011-08-01

    Enhancement of forced convection is important in several engineering applications. Surface modifications like rib-roughening are commonly used in applications such as compact heat exchangers and internal cooling of gas turbine blades and vanes. This paper gives a brief summary of convective heat transfer and fluid flow in some ribbed ducts using liquid crystal thermography and PIV measuring techniques. Details of the flow pattern and the influence of rib configuration and arrangement on the heat transfer are presented. Nevertheless, the understanding of the flow and thermal physics in ribbed ducts is not yet complete and further studies are needed.

  12. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan; Lee, Steve; He, Hung

    2008-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The emitted infrared (IR) heat flux from the lunar surface varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. Due to the extremely high incident IR flux, especially at low beta angles, a radiator is oftentimes unable to reject the vehicle heat load throughout the entire lunar orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when the radiator is unable to reject the required heat load. The stored energy is then removed from the PCM heat exchanger when the environment is more benign. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration Low Lunar Orbit missions. The Advanced Thermal Control project at JSC is completing a PCM heat exchanger life test to determine whether further technology development is warranted. The life test is being conducted on four nPentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed and reported in the current document.

  13. Mixed convection heat transfer in concave and convex channels

    SciTech Connect

    Moukalled, F.; Doughan, A.; Acharya, S.

    1997-07-01

    Mixed convection heat transfer studies in the literature have been primarily confined to pipe and rectangular channel geometry's. In some applications, however, heat transfer in curved channels may be of interest (e.g., nozzle and diffuser shaped passages in HVAC systems, fume hoods, chimneys, bell-shaped or dome-shaped chemical reactors, etc.). A numerical investigation of laminar mixed convection heat transfer of air in concave and convex channels is presented. Six different channel aspects ratios (R/L = 1.04, 1.25, 2.5, 5, 10, and {infinity}) and five different values of Gr/Re{sup 2} (Gr/Re{sup 2} = 0, 0.1, 1, 3, 5) are considered. Results are displayed in terms of streamline and isotherm plots, velocity and temperature profiles, and local and average Nusselt number estimates. Numerical predictions reveal that compared to straight channels of equal height, concave channels of low aspect ratio have lower heat transfer at relatively low values of Gr/Re{sup 2} and higher heat transfer at high values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. When compared to straight channels of equal heated length, concave channels are always found to have lower heat transfer and for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}. On the other hand, predictions for convex channels revealed enhancement in heat transfer compared to straight channels of equal height and/or equal heated length for all values of Gr/Re{sup 2}.

  14. Heat exchanger, head and shell acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1992-09-01

    Instability of postulated flaws in the head component of the heat exchanger could not produce a large break, equivalent to a DEGB in the PWS piping, due to the configuration of the head and restraint provided by the staybolts. Rather, leakage from throughwall flaws in the head would increase with flaw length with finite leakage areas that are bounded by a post-instability flaw configuration. Postulated flaws at instability in the shell of the heat exchanger or in the cooling water nozzles could produce a large break in the Cooling Water System (CWS) pressure boundary. An initial analysis of flaw stability for postulated flaws in the heat exchanger head was performed in January 1992. This present report updates that analysis and, additionally, provides acceptable flaw configurations to maintain defined structural or safety margins against flaw instability of the external pressure boundary components of the heat exchanger, namely the head, shell, and cooling water nozzles. Structural and flaw stability analyses of the heat exchanger tubes, the internal pressure boundary of the heat exchangers or interface boundary between the PWS and CWS, were previously completed in February 1992 as part of the heat exchanger restart evaluation and are not covered in this report.

  15. Analysis of a Flooded Heat Exchanger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Aaron H.; Luyben, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Flooded heat exchangers are often used in industry to reduce the required heat-transfer area and the size of utility control valves. These units involve a condensing vapor on the hot side that accumulates as a liquid phase in the lower part of the vessel. The heat transfer occurs mostly in the vapor space, but the condensate becomes somewhat…

  16. A meshless method for modeling convective heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, David B

    2010-01-01

    A meshless method is used in a projection-based approach to solve the primitive equations for fluid flow with heat transfer. The method is easy to implement in a MATLAB format. Radial basis functions are used to solve two benchmark test cases: natural convection in a square enclosure and flow with forced convection over a backward facing step. The results are compared with two popular and widely used commercial codes: COMSOL, a finite element model, and FLUENT, a finite volume-based model.

  17. Use of the exergy concept for design improvement of heat exchangers and heat exchanger networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ranasinghe, J.

    1989-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics, through the exergy concept, allows us to quantify and rationally coat the consumption of exergy (irreversibility) used to drive the heat exchange process and the effluent losses of exergy in a heat exchanger. For systems with a network of heat exchangers, the exergy concept recognizes that properly integrated heat pumps reduce the heat transfer irreversibility; this results in reduced utility consumption. Heat engines properly integrated in heat exchanger networks also recover a fraction of the thermodynamic potential destroyed during the heat transfer process and generate power at very high efficiencies. Heat exchanger design conditions are characterized and potential trade-off options discussed. A modification to the irreversibility minimization method is proposed next, and the proposed method gives more realistic guide posts for heat exchangers, compared to the corresponding guide posts obtained from present methods. This thesis also proposes a method to obtain the irreversibility cost coefficients for heat exchangers residing in complex systems. The application of the modified irreversibility method proposed here, and the thermoeconomic method, are illustrated by optimizing an emerging technology ceramic heat exchanger residing in a complex power plant. A method based on the exergy concept is developed to recognize the potential for improvement of processes with process integrated heat pumps and heat engines. Once potential processes have been identified, economically optimum load and level of integration have to be determined. The method of formulating the economic optimization problem is presented, and bounds for some design variables are finally developed.

  18. Coupled Convective and Radiative Heat Transfer Simulation for Urban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracik, Stefan; Sadeghipour, Mostapha; Pitchurov, George; Liu, Jiying; Heidarinejad, Mohammad; Srebric, Jelena; Building Science Group, Penn State Team

    2013-11-01

    A building's surroundings affect its energy use. An analysis of building energy use needs to include the effects of its urban environment, as over half of the world's population now lives in cities. To correctly model the energy flow around buildings, an energy simulation needs to account for both convective and radiative heat transfer. This study develops a new model by coupling OpenFOAM and Radiance, open source packages for simulating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and solar radiation, respectively. The model currently provides themo-fluid parameters including convective heat transfer coefficients, pressure coefficients, and solar heat fluxes that will be used as inputs for building energy simulations in a follow up study. The model uses Penn State campus buildings immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer flow as a case study to determine the thermo-fluid parameters around buildings. The results of this case study show that shadows can reduce the solar heat flux of a building's surface by eighty percent during a sunny afternoon. Convective heat transfer coefficients can vary by around fifty percent during a windy day.

  19. Instabilities of Natural Convection in a Periodically Heated Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. Z.; Floryan, Jerzy M.

    2013-11-01

    Natural convection in a horizontal layer subject to a spatially periodic heating along the lower wall has been investigated. The heating produces sinusoidal temperature variations characterized by the wave number α and the Rayleigh number Rap. The primary response has the form of stationary rolls with axis orthogonal to the heating wave vector. For large α convection is limited to a thin layer adjacent to the lower wall with a uniform conduction above it. Linear stability was used to determine conditions leading to a secondary convection. Two mechanisms of instability have been identified. For α = 0(1), the parametric resonance dominates and leads to the pattern of instability that is locked-in with the pattern of the heating according to the relation δcr = α /2, where δcr denotes the component of the critical disturbance wave vector parallel to the heating wave vector. The second mechanism, Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) mechanism, dominates for large α. Competition between these mechanisms gives rise to non-commensurable states and appearance of soliton lattices, to the formation of distorted transverse rolls, and to the appearance of the wave vector component in the direction perpendicular to the forcing direction.

  20. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.

    1987-07-10

    A heat transfer drying apparatus includes an acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber for receiving material to be dried. The chamber includes a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, a material inlet, and a gas outlet which also serves as a dried material and gas outlet. A non-pulsing first heat transfer gas source provides a first drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A valveless, continuous second heat transfer gas source provides a second drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the second heat transfer gas inlet. The second drying gas also generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling with the gases in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber. The second drying gas itself oscillates at an acoustic frequency of approximately 180 Hz due to fluid mechanical motion in the gas. The oscillations of the second heat transfer gas coupled to the first heat transfer gas in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber enhance heat and mass transfer by convection within the chamber. 3 figs.

  1. Heat Exchanger Support Bracket Design Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1995-01-12

    This engineering note documents the design of the heat exchanger support brackets. The heat exchanger is roughly 40 feet long, 22 inches in diameter and weighs 6750 pounds. It will be mounted on two identical support brackets that are anchored to a concrete wall. The design calculations were done for one bracket supporting the full weight of the heat exchanger, rounded up to 6800 pounds. The design follows the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of steel construction, Eighth edition. All calculated stresses and loads on welds were below allowables.

  2. Heat exchanger with transpired, highly porous fins

    DOEpatents

    Kutscher, Charles F.; Gawlik, Keith

    2002-01-01

    The heat exchanger includes a fin and tube assembly with increased heat transfer surface area positioned within a hollow chamber of a housing to provide effective heat transfer between a gas flowing within the hollow chamber and a fluid flowing in the fin and tube assembly. A fan is included to force a gas, such as air, to flow through the hollow chamber and through the fin and tube assembly. The fin and tube assembly comprises fluid conduits to direct the fluid through the heat exchanger, to prevent mixing with the gas, and to provide a heat transfer surface or pathway between the fluid and the gas. A heat transfer element is provided in the fin and tube assembly to provide extended heat transfer surfaces for the fluid conduits. The heat transfer element is corrugated to form fins between alternating ridges and grooves that define flow channels for directing the gas flow. The fins are fabricated from a thin, heat conductive material containing numerous orifices or pores for transpiring the gas out of the flow channel. The grooves are closed or only partially open so that all or substantially all of the gas is transpired through the fins so that heat is exchanged on the front and back surfaces of the fins and also within the interior of the orifices, thereby significantly increasing the available the heat transfer surface of the heat exchanger. The transpired fins also increase heat transfer effectiveness of the heat exchanger by increasing the heat transfer coefficient by disrupting boundary layer development on the fins and by establishing other beneficial gas flow patterns, all at desirable pressure drops.

  3. Miniature convection cooled plug-type heat flux gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1994-02-01

    Tests and analysis of a new miniature plug-type heat flux gauge configuration are described. This gauge can simultaneously measure heat flux on two opposed active surfaces when heat flux levels are equal to or greater than about 0.2 MW/m(sup 2). The performance of this dual active surface gauge was investigated over a wide transient and steady heat flux and temperature range. The tests were performed by radiatively heating the front surface with an argon arc lamp while the back surface was convection cooled with air. Accuracy is about +20 percent. The gauge is responsive to fast heat flux transients and is designed to withstand the high temperature (1300 K), high pressure (15 MPa), erosive and corrosive environments in modern engines. This gauge can be used to measure heat flux on the surfaces of internally cooled apparatus such as turbine blades and combustors used in jet propulsion systems and on the surfaces of hypersonic vehicles. Heat flux measurement accuracy is not compromised when design considerations call for various size gauges to be fabricated into alloys of various shapes and properties. Significant gauge temperature reductions (120 K), which can lead to potential gauge durability improvement, were obtained when the gauges were air-cooled by forced convection.

  4. Miniature Convection Cooled Plug-type Heat Flux Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.

    1994-01-01

    Tests and analysis of a new miniature plug-type heat flux gauge configuration are described. This gauge can simultaneously measure heat flux on two opposed active surfaces when heat flux levels are equal to or greater than about 0.2 MW/m(sup 2). The performance of this dual active surface gauge was investigated over a wide transient and steady heat flux and temperature range. The tests were performed by radiatively heating the front surface with an argon arc lamp while the back surface was convection cooled with air. Accuracy is about +20 percent. The gauge is responsive to fast heat flux transients and is designed to withstand the high temperature (1300 K), high pressure (15 MPa), erosive and corrosive environments in modern engines. This gauge can be used to measure heat flux on the surfaces of internally cooled apparatus such as turbine blades and combustors used in jet propulsion systems and on the surfaces of hypersonic vehicles. Heat flux measurement accuracy is not compromised when design considerations call for various size gauges to be fabricated into alloys of various shapes and properties. Significant gauge temperature reductions (120 K), which can lead to potential gauge durability improvement, were obtained when the gauges were air-cooled by forced convection.

  5. Evaluation of atmospheric turbulence, energy exchanges and structure of convective cores during the occurrence of mesoscale convective systems using MST radar facility at Gadanki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Sultana, Sabiha; Narayana Rao, T.; Satheesh Kumar, S.

    2014-06-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) wreak lots of havoc and severe damage to life and property due to associated strong gusty winds, rainfall and hailstorms even though they last for an hour or so. Planetary boundary layer (PBL) plays an important role in the transportation of energy such as momentum, heat and moisture through turbulence into the upper layers of the atmosphere and acts as a feedback mechanism in the generation and sustenance of MCS. In the present study, three severe thunderstorms that occurred over mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar facility at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), Gadanki, India, have been considered to understand turbulence, energy exchanges and wind structure during the different epochs such as pre-, during and after the occurrence of these convective episodes. Significant changes in the turbulence structure are noticed in the upper layers of the atmosphere during the thunderstorm activity. Identified strong convective cores with varying magnitudes of intensity in terms of vertical velocity at different heights in the atmosphere discern the presence of shallow as well as deep convection during initial, mature and dissipative stages of the thunderstorm. Qualitative assessments of these convective cores are verified using available Doppler Weather Radar imageries in terms of reflectivity. The MST radar derived horizontal wind profiles are in good comparison with observed radiosonde winds. Significant variations in the surface meteorological parameters, sensible heat flux and turbulent kinetic energy as well as horizontal wind profiles are noticed during the different epochs of the convective activity. This work is useful in evaluating the performance of PBL schemes of mesoscale models in simulating MCS.

  6. Heat flux in a penetrative convection experiment in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corre, Yoann; Alboussière, Thierry; Labrosse, Stéphane; Odier, Philippe; Joubaud, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    In geophysical systems, stably stratified fluids adjacent to convective regions often experience thermal plume penetration from the latter. This penetrative convection occurs in stellar interiors between radiative and convective regions and possibly in liquid envelopes of planets, such as the Earth's core. We are interested in quantifying this process experimentally as it could play a crucial role in their dynamics. A volume of water initially at ambiant temperature is cooled from below at 0 degrees Celsius. Due to the maximum density of water near 4 degrees, a convective region develops and grows below a purely conductive region. A laser sheet crosses the experimental cell, lightening both neutrally buoyant particles and a thermosensitive fluorescent dye, which allows to monitor the velocity and temperature fields respectively (PIV-LIF technique), giving access to the local convective and conductive heat flux. The apparatus is placed on a rotating table to inspect the effect of the Coriolis force on the interfacial region. We find that increasing the rotation rate deepens the penetration of vortices into the conductive region, thus changing the structure of the interfacial layer and possibly eroding the stable region.

  7. Novel Power Electronics Three-Dimensional Heat Exchanger: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bennion, K.; Cousineau, J.; Lustbader, J.; Narumanchi, S.

    2014-08-01

    Electric drive systems for vehicle propulsion enable technologies critical to meeting challenges for energy, environmental, and economic security. Enabling cost-effective electric drive systems requires reductions in inverter power semiconductor area. As critical components of the electric drive system are made smaller, heat removal becomes an increasing challenge. In this paper, we demonstrate an integrated approach to the design of thermal management systems for power semiconductors that matches the passive thermal resistance of the packaging with the active convective cooling performance of the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger concept builds on existing semiconductor thermal management improvements described in literature and patents, which include improved bonded interface materials, direct cooling of the semiconductor packages, and double-sided cooling. The key difference in the described concept is the achievement of high heat transfer performance with less aggressive cooling techniques by optimizing the passive and active heat transfer paths. An extruded aluminum design was selected because of its lower tooling cost, higher performance, and scalability in comparison to cast aluminum. Results demonstrated a heat flux improvement of a factor of two, and a package heat density improvement over 30%, which achieved the thermal performance targets.

  8. Steady and unsteady state thermal behaviour of triple concentric-tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boultif, Nora; Bougriou, Cherif

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical analysis by using the finite difference method to describe the steady and unsteady state thermal behavior of triple concentric-tube heat exchanger with parallel flow and counter flow arrangements. One gives the temperature variations of the three fluids and three walls with time along the triple concentric-tube heat exchanger. The fluids have a time lag and the response of triple concentric-tube heat exchanger in parallel flow configuration is faster than those of a counterflow arrangement, its performances are always lower than those of a counterflow triple concentric-tube heat exchanger. The heat transfer coefficients by convection of the three fluids vary with time in addition to the temperature and the heat exchanger performances are lower in unsteady state than the steady state case.

  9. Flow patterns and heat convection in a rectangular water bolus for use in superficial hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigates both numerically and experimentally the spatio-temporal effects of water flow in a custom-made water bolus used for superficial hyperthermia generated by a 915-MHz, 4 × 3 microwave applicator array. Similar hyperthermia models referenced in the literature use a constant water temperature and uniform heat flux to describe conduction and convection energy exchange within the heating apparatus available to cool the tissue surface. The results presented in this paper show that the spatially varying flow pattern and rate are vital factors for the overall heat control applicability of the 5 mm thick bolus under study. Regions with low flow rates and low heat convection clearly put restrictions on the maximum microwave energy possible within the limits of skin temperature rise under the bolus. Our analysis is illustrated by experimental flow front studies using a contrast liquid set-up monitored by high definition video and complemented by numerical analysis of liquid flow and heat exchange within the rectangular water bolus loaded by malignant tissue. Important factors for the improvement of future bolus designs are also discussed in terms of diameter and configuration of the water input and output tubing network.

  10. Flow patterns and heat convection in a rectangular water bolus for use in superficial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigates both numerically and experimentally the spatio-temporal effects of water flow in a custom-made water bolus used for superficial hyperthermia generated by a 915-MHz, 4 x 3 microwave applicator array. Similar hyperthermia models referenced in the literature use a constant water temperature and uniform heat flux to describe conduction and convection energy exchange within the heating apparatus available to cool the tissue surface. The results presented in this paper show that the spatially varying flow pattern and rate are vital factors for the overall heat control applicability of the 5 mm thick bolus under study. Regions with low flow rates and low heat convection clearly put restrictions on the maximum microwave energy possible within the limits of skin temperature rise under the bolus. Our analysis is illustrated by experimental flow front studies using a contrast liquid set-up monitored by high definition video and complemented by numerical analysis of liquid flow and heat exchange within the rectangular water bolus loaded by malignant tissue. Important factors for the improvement of future bolus designs are also discussed in terms of diameter and configuration of the water input and output tubing network.

  11. Flow patterns and heat convection in a rectangular water bolus for use in superficial hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Birkelund, Yngve; Jacobsen, Svein; Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates both numerically and experimentally the spatio-temporal effects of water flow in a custom made water bolus used for superficial hyperthermia generated by a 915-MHz, 4 × 3 microwave applicator array. Similar hyperthermia models referenced in the literature use a constant water temperature and uniform heat flux to describe conduction and convection energy exchange within the heating apparatus available to cool the tissue surface. The results presented in this paper show that the spatially varying flow pattern and rate are vital factors for the overall heat control applicability of the 5 mm thick bolus under study. Regions with low flow rates and low heat convection clearly put restrictions on the maximum microwave energy possible within the limits of skin temperature rise under the bolus. Our analysis is illustrated by experimental flow front studies using a contrast liquid setup monitored by high definition video and complemented by numerical analysis of liquid flow and heat exchange within the rectangular water bolus loaded by malignant tissue. Important factors for improvement of future bolus designs are also discussed in terms of diameter and configuration of the water input and output tubing network. PMID:19494426

  12. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high speed flow fields.

  13. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  14. Joule-Thomson expander and heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    The Joule-Thomson Expander and Heat Exchanger Program was initiated to develop an assembly (JTX) which consists of an inlet filter, counterflow heat exchanger, Joule-Thomson expansion device, and a low pressure jacket. The program objective was to develop a JTX which, when coupled to an open cycle supercritical helium refrigerating system (storage vessel), would supply superfluid helium (He II) at 2 K or less for cooling infrared detectors.

  15. Measuring Heat-Exchanger Water Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zampiceni, J.

    1986-01-01

    Water leakage in heat exchanger measured directly with help of electroytic hygrometer. In new technique, flow of nitrogen gas set up in one loop of heat exchanger. Other loop filled with water under pressure. Water concentration produced by leakage of water into nitrogen flow measured by hygrometer. New measurement method determines water concentrations up to 2,000 parts per million with accuracy of +/- 5 percent.

  16. Ceramic heat exchangers: Manufacturing techniques and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrigan, M. A.; Sandstrom, D. J.

    1981-05-01

    The objective of the ceramic heat pipe program being conducted at Los Alamos is demonstration of the practical feasibility of this technology for the solution of severe high temperature recuperation functions. Ceramic heat pipe recuperators were theoretically shown to offer distinct advantages over conventional ceramic heat exchangers from the standpoint of efficiency of heat recuperation and economics. The main stumbling block to their widespread utilization is related to the problems of materials for construction and the details of fabrication and assembly. The performance objectives of ceramic heat pipes and some aspects of the materials technology program aimed at solving the problem of economic ceramic heat pipe fabrication are described.

  17. Proceedings of the DOE/Advanced Heat Exchangers Program Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-02-01

    Semiannual review meetings of the USDOE's Advanced Heat Exchanger Program with the objective of reviewing ongoing and recently completed project activities. Personnel from industrial contractors and National Laboratories present technical aspects of their projects. The projects deal with high temperature heat exchangers for waste heat recuperation and process heat exchange and other areas such as materials performance and heat transfer enhancement. Topics presented are high pressure heat exchangers, ceramic heat exchangers, enhanced tubes, and materials studies to include silicon carbide whiskers and alumina.

  18. A Study of Mixed Convection in a Heated Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. Z.; Floryan, Jerzy M.

    2014-11-01

    Mixed convection in a channel subject to a spatially periodic heating along one of the walls has been studied. The pattern of the heating is characterized by the wave number α and its intensity is expressed in terms of the Rayleigh number Rap. The primary convection occurring in response to the applied heating has the form of counter-rotating rolls with the wave vector parallel to the wave vector of the heating. The resulting net heat flow between the walls increases proportionally to Rap but the growth saturates when Rap = 0(103) . The most effective heating pattern corresponds to α ~ 1 as this leads to the most intense transverse motion. The primary convection is subject to transition to secondary states with the onset conditions depending on α. Conditions leading to transition between different forms of secondary motions have been determined using the linear stability theory. Three patterns of secondary motion may occur at small Reynolds numbers Re, i.e., the longitudinal rolls, the transverse rolls and the oblique rolls, with the critical conditions varying significantly as a function of α. Increase of α leads to the elimination of the longitudinal rolls and, eventually, elimination of the oblique rolls with the transverse rolls assuming the dominant role. For large α the transition is driven by the Rayleigh-Bénard mechanism while for α = 0(1) the spatial parametric resonance dominates. It is shown that the global flow characteristics are identical regardless of whether the heating is applied either at the lower or at the upper walls.

  19. Brayton-cycle heat exchanger technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killackey, J. J.; Coombs, M. G.; Graves, R. F.; Morse, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The following five tasks designed to advance this development of heat exchanger systems for close loop Brayton cycle power systems are presented: (1) heat transfer and pressure drop data for a finned tubular heat transfer matrix. The tubes are arranged in a triangular array with copper stainless steel laminate strips helically wound on the tubes to form a disk fin geometry; (2) the development of a modularized waste heat exchanger. Means to provide verified double containment are described; (3) the design, fabrication, and test of compact plate fin heat exchangers representative of full scale Brayton cycle recuperators; (4) the analysis and design of bellows suitable for operation at 1600 F and 200 psia for 1,000 cycles and 50,000 hours creep life; and (5) screening tests used to select a low cost braze alloy with the desirable attributes of a gold base alloy. A total of 22 different alloys were investigated; the final selection was Nicrobraz 30.

  20. Convection flows driven by laser heating of a liquid layer.

    PubMed

    Rivière, David; Selva, Bertrand; Chraibi, Hamza; Delabre, Ulysse; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    When a fluid is heated by the absorption of a continuous laser wave, the fluid density decreases in the heated area. This induces a pressure gradient that generates internal motion of the fluid. Due to mass conservation, convection eddies emerge in the sample. To investigate these laser-driven bulk flows at the microscopic scale, we built a setup to perform temperature measurements with a fluorescent-sensitive dye on the one hand, and measured the flow pattern at different beam powers, using a particle image velocimetry technique on the other hand. Temperature measurements were also used in numerical simulations in order to compare predictions to the experimental velocity profiles. The combination of our numerical and experimental approaches allows a detailed description of the convection flows induced by the absorption of light, which reveals a transition between a thin and a thick liquid layer regime. This supports the basis of optothermal approaches for microfluidic applications. PMID:26986418

  1. Free surface deformation and heat transfer by thermocapillary convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Eckart; Dreyer, Michael; Basting, Steffen; Bänsch, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    Knowing the location of the free liquid/gas surface and the heat transfer from the wall towards the fluid is of paramount importance in the design and the optimization of cryogenic upper stage tanks for launchers with ballistic phases, where residual accelerations are smaller by up to four orders of magnitude compared to the gravity acceleration on earth. This changes the driving forces drastically: free surfaces become capillary dominated and natural or free convection is replaced by thermocapillary convection if a non-condensable gas is present. In this paper we report on a sounding rocket experiment that provided data of a liquid free surface with a nonisothermal boundary condition, i.e. a preheated test cell was filled with a cold but storable liquid in low gravity. The corresponding thermocapillary convection (driven by the temperature dependence of the surface tension) created a velocity field directed away from the hot wall towards the colder liquid and then in turn back at the bottom towards the wall. A deformation of the free surface resulting in an apparent contact angle rather different from the microscopic one could be observed. The thermocapillary flow convected the heat from the wall to the liquid and increased the heat transfer compared to pure conduction significantly. The paper presents results of the apparent contact angle as a function of the dimensionless numbers (Weber-Marangoni and Reynolds-Marangoni number) as well as heat transfer data in the form of a Nusselt number. Experimental results are complemented by corresponding numerical simulations with the commercial software Flow3D and the inhouse code Navier.

  2. Mixed convection laminar flow and heat transfer of liquids in horizontal internally finned tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Shome, B.

    1998-01-01

    Energy and material savings, as well as economic incentives, have led to concentrated efforts over the past several decades in the field of heat transfer enhancement to produce more efficient and compact heat exchangers. Internally finned tubes are widely used for heat transfer enhancement, particularly in chemical process and petroleum industries. A finned tube heat exchanger with optimum geometry could offer 35--40% increase in heat duty for equal pumping power and size over a smooth tube heat exchanger or a comparable decrease in the heat exchanger size for a given heat duty. Developing mixed convection flow in internally finned tubes with variable viscosity was numerically investigated for a fin geometry range of 8 {le} N {le} 24, 0.1 {le} H {le} 0.3 and an operating condition range of 50 {le} Pr{sub in} {le} 1,250, 0 {le} Ra{sub in} {le} 10{sup 7}, and 0 {le} q{sub w}d/k{sub in} {le} 2,000. The numerical model was validated by comparison with existing numerical and experimental data. Internal finning was found to produce a complex two-cell, buoyancy-induced vortex structure. The results show that coring (retarded velocity in the interfin region) leads to poor heat transfer performance of tubes with large numbers of fins or with tall fins. The overall results indicated that large enhancement in the heat transfer can be obtained in the entrance region. Furthermore, variable viscosity effects are seen to have a pronounced effect on the friction factor and Nusselt number predictions.

  3. Large downhole heat exchanger in Turkey and Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1999-09-01

    The multi-tube DHE is more economical to install in shallow wells with high-static water levels; since it can be installed with lighter equipment and has a high output for its short length, it does not require drilling beyond the hot aquifer when the aquifer is near the surface. The vertical convection in the well must also be high to provide adequate heat transfer to the loops. For energy outputs for large demands, the DHE is normally not adequate and thus, some form of pumping with a surface heat exchanger is necessary. A Turkish installation is described that is part of the geothermal district heating system on the west coast of Turkey. A multiple loop installation in Klamath Falls, Oregon is also described.

  4. AERIAL MEASUREMENTS OF CONVECTION CELL ELEMENTS IN HEATED LAKES

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E; Saleem Salaymeh, S; Timothy Brown, T; Alfred Garrett, A; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Linda Nichols, L

    2007-12-19

    Power plant-heated lakes are characterized by a temperature gradient in the thermal plume originating at the discharge of the power plant and terminating at the water intake. The maximum water temperature discharged by the power plant into the lake depends on the power generated at the facility and environmental regulations on the temperature of the lake. Besides the observed thermal plume, cloud-like thermal cells (convection cell elements) are also observed on the water surface. The size, shape and temperature of the convection cell elements depends on several parameters such as the lake water temperature, wind speed, surfactants and the depth of the thermocline. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Clemson University are collaborating to determine the applicability of laboratory empirical correlations between surface heat flux and thermal convection intensity. Laboratory experiments at Clemson University have demonstrated a simple relationship between the surface heat flux and the standard deviation of temperature fluctuations. Similar results were observed in the aerial thermal imagery SRNL collected at different locations along the thermal plume and at different elevations. SRNL will present evidence that the results at Clemson University are applicable to cooling lakes.

  5. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  6. Flow and heat transfer enhancement in tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of heat exchangers can be improved to perform a certain heat-transfer duty by heat transfer enhancement techniques. Enhancement techniques can be divided into two categories: passive and active. Active methods require external power, such as electric or acoustic field, mechanical devices, or surface vibration, whereas passive methods do not require external power but make use of a special surface geometry or fluid additive which cause heat transfer enhancement. The majority of commercially interesting enhancement techniques are passive ones. This paper presents a review of published works on the characteristics of heat transfer and flow in finned tube heat exchangers of the existing patterns. The review considers plain, louvered, slit, wavy, annular, longitudinal, and serrated fins. This review can be indicated by the status of the research in this area which is important. The comparison of finned tubes heat exchangers shows that those with slit, plain, and wavy finned tubes have the highest values of area goodness factor while the heat exchanger with annular fin shows the lowest. A better heat transfer coefficient ha is found for a heat exchanger with louvered finned and thus should be regarded as the most efficient one, at fixed pumping power per heat transfer area. This study points out that although numerous studies have been conducted on the characteristics of flow and heat transfer in round, elliptical, and flat tubes, studies on some types of streamlined-tubes shapes are limited, especially on wing-shaped tubes (Sayed Ahmed et al. in Heat Mass Transf 50: 1091-1102, 2014; in Heat Mass Transf 51: 1001-1016, 2015). It is recommended that further detailed studies via numerical simulations and/or experimental investigations should be carried out, in the future, to put further insight to these fin designs.

  7. Gas exchange in wetlands with emergent vegetation: The effects of wind and thermal convection at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, Cristina M.; Variano, Evan A.

    2013-07-01

    Methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen are exchanged between wetlands and the atmosphere through multiple pathways. One of these pathways, the hydrodynamic transport of dissolved gas through the surface water, is often underestimated in importance. We constructed a model wetland in the laboratory with artificial emergent plants to investigate the mechanisms and magnitude of this transport. We measured gas transfer velocities, which characterize the near-surface stirring driving air-water gas transfer, while varying two stirring processes important to gas exchange in other aquatic environments: wind and thermal convection. To isolate the effects of thermal convection, we identified a semiempirical model for the gas transfer velocity as a function of surface heat loss. The laboratory results indicate that thermal convection will be the dominant mechanism of air-water gas exchange in marshes with emergent vegetation. Thermal convection yielded peak gas transfer velocities of 1 cm h-1. Because of the sheltering of the water surface by emergent vegetation, gas transfer velocities for wind-driven stirring alone are likely to exceed this value only in extreme cases.

  8. Sunspots and the physics of magnetic flux tubes. VI - Convective propulsion. VII - Heat flow in a convective downdraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of negative aerodynamic drag in an ideal fluid subject to convective instability is considered. It is shown that a cylinder moving in such a fluid is propelled forward in its motion by the convective forces and that the characteristic acceleration time is comparable to the onset time of convective motions in the fluid. It is suggested that convective propulsion plays an important role in the dynamics of flux tubes extending through the surface of the sun. The suppression of the upward heat flow in a Boussinesq convective cell with free upper and lower boundaries by a downdraft is then analyzed. Application to the solar convection zone indicates that downdrafts of 1 to 2 km/s at depths of 1000 to 4000 km beneath the visible surface of the sun are sufficient to reduce the upward heat flux to a small fraction of the ambient value.

  9. Convection Heat Transfer in Three-Dimensional Turbulent Separated/Reattached Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bassem F. Armaly

    2007-10-31

    The measurements and the simulation of convective heat transfer in separated flow have been a challenge to researchers for many years. Measurements have been limited to two-dimensional flow and simulations failed to predict accurately turbulent heat transfer in the separated and reattached flow region (prediction are higher than measurements by more than 50%). A coordinated experimental and numerical effort has been initiated under this grant for examining the momentum and thermal transport in three-dimensional separated and reattached flow in an effort to provide new measurements that can be used for benchmarking and for improving the simulation capabilities of 3-D convection in separated/reattached flow regime. High-resolution and non-invasive measurements techniques are developed and employed in this study to quantify the magnitude and the behavior of the three velocity components and the resulting convective heat transfer. In addition, simulation capabilities are developed and employed for improving the simulation of 3-D convective separated/reattached flow. Such basic measurements and simulation capabilities are needed for improving the design and performance evaluation of complex (3-D) heat exchanging equipment. Three-dimensional (3-D) convective air flow adjacent to backward-facing step in rectangular channel is selected for the experimental component of this study. This geometry is simple but it exhibits all the complexities that appear in any other separated/reattached flow, thus making the results generated in this study applicable to any other separated and reattached flow. Boundary conditions, inflow, outflow, and wall thermal treatment in this geometry can be well measured and controlled. The geometry can be constructed with optical access for non-intrusive measurements of the flow and thermal fields. A three-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) is employed to measure simultaneously the three-velocity components and their turbulent fluctuations

  10. Heat Exchanger With Internal Pin Elements

    DOEpatents

    Gerstmann, Joseph; Hannon, Charles L.

    2004-01-13

    A heat exchanger/heater comprising a tubular member having a fluid inlet end, a fluid outlet end and plurality of pins secured to the interior wall of the tube. Various embodiments additionally comprise a blocking member disposed concentrically inside the pins, such as a core plug or a baffle array. Also disclosed is a vapor generator employing an internally pinned tube, and a fluid-heater/heat-exchanger utilizing an outer jacket tube and fluid-side baffle elements, as well as methods for heating a fluid using an internally pinned tube.

  11. High effectiveness contour matching contact heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, Robert L. (Inventor); Roebelen, George J., Jr. (Inventor); Davenport, Arthur K. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    There is a need in the art for a heat exchanger design having a flexible core providing contour matching capabilities, which compensates for manufacturing tolerance and distortion buildups, and which accordingly furnishes a relatively uniform thermal contact conductance between the core and external heat sources under essentially all operating conditions. The core of the heat exchanger comprises a top plate and a bottom plate, each having alternate rows of pins attached. Each of the pins fits into corresponding tight-fitting recesses in the opposite plate.

  12. Observer-based monitoring of heat exchangers.

    PubMed

    Astorga-Zaragoza, Carlos-Manuel; Alvarado-Martínez, Víctor-Manuel; Zavala-Río, Arturo; Méndez-Ocaña, Rafael-Maxim; Guerrero-Ramírez, Gerardo-Vicente

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this work is to provide a method for monitoring performance degradation in counter-flow double-pipe heat exchangers. The overall heat transfer coefficient is estimated by an adaptive observer and monitored in order to infer when the heat exchanger needs preventive or corrective maintenance. A simplified mathematical model is used to synthesize the adaptive observer and a more complex model is used for simulation. The reliability of the proposed method was demonstrated via numerical simulations and laboratory experiments with a bench-scale pilot plant. PMID:17706652

  13. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  14. Heat transport measurements in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Robert E; Liu, Yuanming

    2008-01-01

    We present experimental heat transport measurements of turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection with rotation about a vertical axis. The fluid, water with Prandtl number ({sigma}) about 6, was confined in a cell which had a square cross section of 7.3 cm x 7.3 cm and a height of 9.4 cm. Heat transport was measured for Rayleigh numbers 2 x 10{sup 5} < Ra < 5 x 10{sup 8} and Taylor numbers 0 < Ta < 5 x 10{sup 9}. We show the variation of normalized heat transport, the Nusselt number, at fixed dimensional rotation rate {Omega}{sub D}, at fixed Ra varying Ta, at fixed Ta varying Ra, and at fixed Rossby number Ro. The scaling of heat transport in the range 10{sup 7} to about 10{sup 9} is roughly 0.29 with a Ro dependent coefficient or equivalently is also well fit by a combination of power laws of the form a Ra{sup 1/5} + b Ra{sup 1/3} . The range of Ra is not sufficient to differentiate single power law or combined power law scaling. The overall impact of rotation on heat transport in turbulent convection is assessed.

  15. Laboratory simulation of heat exchange for liquids with Pr > 1: Heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, I. A.; Zakharova, O. D.; Krasnoshchekova, T. E.; Sviridov, V. G.; Sukomel, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Liquid metals are promising heat transfer agents in new-generation nuclear power plants, such as fast-neutron reactors and hybrid tokamaks—fusion neutron sources (FNSs). We have been investigating hydrodynamics and heat exchange of liquid metals for many years, trying to reproduce the conditions close to those in fast reactors and fusion neutron sources. In the latter case, the liquid metal flow takes place in a strong magnetic field and strong thermal loads resulting in development of thermogravitational convection in the flow. In this case, quite dangerous regimes of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) heat exchange not known earlier may occur that, in combination with other long-known regimes, for example, the growth of hydraulic drag in a strong magnetic field, make the possibility of creating a reliable FNS cooling system with a liquid metal heat carrier problematic. There exists a reasonable alternative to liquid metals in FNS, molten salts, namely, the melt of lithium and beryllium fluorides (Flibe) and the melt of fluorides of alkali metals (Flinak). Molten salts, however, are poorly studied media, and their application requires detailed scientific substantiation. We analyze the modern state of the art of studies in this field. Our contribution is to answer the following question: whether above-mentioned extremely dangerous regimes of MHD heat exchange detected in liquid metals can exist in molten salts. Experiments and numerical simulation were performed in order to answer this question. The experimental test facility represents a water circuit, since water (or water with additions for increasing its electrical conduction) is a convenient medium for laboratory simulation of salt heat exchange in FNS conditions. Local heat transfer coefficients along the heated tube, three-dimensional (along the length and in the cross section, including the viscous sublayer) fields of averaged temperature and temperature pulsations are studied. The probe method for measurements in

  16. Heat exchanger with auxiliary cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Coleman, John H.

    1980-01-01

    A heat exchanger with an auxiliary cooling system capable of cooling a nuclear reactor should the normal cooling mechanism become inoperable. A cooling coil is disposed around vertical heat transfer tubes that carry secondary coolant therethrough and is located in a downward flow of primary coolant that passes in heat transfer relationship with both the cooling coil and the vertical heat transfer tubes. A third coolant is pumped through the cooling coil which absorbs heat from the primary coolant which increases the downward flow of the primary coolant thereby increasing the natural circulation of the primary coolant through the nuclear reactor.

  17. Pressurized-Flat-Interface Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, F. E.; Howell, H. R.; Winkler, R. V.

    1990-01-01

    High thermal conductance obtained without leakage between loops. Heat-exchanger interface enables efficient transfer of heat between two working fluids without allowing fluids to intermingle. Interface thin, flat, and easy to integrate into thermal system. Possible application in chemical or pharmaceutical manufacturing when even trace contamination of process stream with water or other coolant ruins product. Reduces costs when highly corrosive fluids must be cooled or heated.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Heat transfer rate of Nano fluids using a Shell and Tube Heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SIVA ESWARA RAO, M.; SREERAMULU, DOWLURU; ASIRI NAIDU, D.

    2016-09-01

    Nano fluids are used for increasing thermal properties in heat transfer equipment like heat exchangers, radiators etc. This paper investigates the heat transfer rate of Nano fluids using a shell and tube heat exchanger in single and multi tubes under turbulent flow condition by a forced convection mode. Alumina Nanoparticles are prepared by using Sol-Gel method. Heat transfer rate increases with decreasing particle size. In this experiment Alumina Nano particles of about 22 nm diameter used. Alumina Nano fluids are prepared with different concentrations of Alumina particles (0.13%, 0.27%, 0.4%, and 0.53%) with water as a base fluid using ultra-sonicator. Experiment have been conducted on shell and tube heat exchanger for the above concentrations on parallel and counter flow conditions by keeping constant inlet temperatures and mass flow rate. The result shows that the heat transfer rate is good compared to conventional fluids. The properties of Nano fluids and non-dimensional numbers have been calculated.

  19. Numerical predictions of natural convection in a uniformly heated pool

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P. Cho, D.H.

    1993-05-01

    In the event of a core meltdown accident, one of the accident progression paths is fuel relocation to the lower reactor plenum. In the heavy water new production reactor (NPR-HWR) design the reactor cavity is flooded with water. In such a design, decay heat removal to the water in the reactor cavity and thence to the containment may be adequate to keep the reactor vessel temperature below failure limits. If this is the case, the accident progression can be arrested by retaining a coolable corium configuration in the lower reactor plenum. The strategy of reactor cavity flooding to prevent reactor vessel failure from molten corium relocation to the reactor vessel lower head has also been considered for commercial pressurized water reactors. Previously, the computer code COMMIX-LAR/P was used to determine if the heat removal rate from the molten cerium in the lower plenum to the water in the cavity was adequate to keep the reactor vessel temperature in the NPR-HWR design below failure limits. It was found that natural convection in the molten pool resulted in heat removal rates that kept the peak reactor vessel temperature about 400{degrees}C below the steel melting point. The objective of the work presented in this paper was to determine whether COMMIX adequately predicts natural convection in a pool heated by a uniform heat source. For this purpose, the experiments of free convection in a semicircular cavity of Jahn and Reeneke were analyzed with COMMIX and code predictions were compared with experimental measurements. COMMIX is a general purpose thermalhydraulics code based on finite differencing by the first order upwind scheme.

  20. Numerical predictions of natural convection in a uniformly heated pool

    SciTech Connect

    Tzanos, C.P. Cho, D.H.

    1993-01-01

    In the event of a core meltdown accident, one of the accident progression paths is fuel relocation to the lower reactor plenum. In the heavy water new production reactor (NPR-HWR) design the reactor cavity is flooded with water. In such a design, decay heat removal to the water in the reactor cavity and thence to the containment may be adequate to keep the reactor vessel temperature below failure limits. If this is the case, the accident progression can be arrested by retaining a coolable corium configuration in the lower reactor plenum. The strategy of reactor cavity flooding to prevent reactor vessel failure from molten corium relocation to the reactor vessel lower head has also been considered for commercial pressurized water reactors. Previously, the computer code COMMIX-LAR/P was used to determine if the heat removal rate from the molten cerium in the lower plenum to the water in the cavity was adequate to keep the reactor vessel temperature in the NPR-HWR design below failure limits. It was found that natural convection in the molten pool resulted in heat removal rates that kept the peak reactor vessel temperature about 400[degrees]C below the steel melting point. The objective of the work presented in this paper was to determine whether COMMIX adequately predicts natural convection in a pool heated by a uniform heat source. For this purpose, the experiments of free convection in a semicircular cavity of Jahn and Reeneke were analyzed with COMMIX and code predictions were compared with experimental measurements. COMMIX is a general purpose thermalhydraulics code based on finite differencing by the first order upwind scheme.

  1. Why convective heat transport in the solar nebula was inefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P.

    1993-01-01

    The radial distributions of the effective temperatures of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence (T Tauri) stars are relatively well-constrained by ground-based and spacecraft infrared photometry and radio continuum observations. If the mechanisms by which energy is transported vertically in the disks are understood, these data can be used to constrain models of the thermal structure and evolution of solar nebula. Several studies of the evolution of the solar nebula have included the calculation of the vertical transport of heat by convection. Such calculations rely on a mixing length theory of transport and some assumption regarding the vertical distribution of internal dissipation. In all cases, the results of these calculations indicate that transport by radiation dominates that by convection, even when the nebula is convectively unstable. A simple argument that demonstrates the generality (and limits) of this result, regardless of the details of mixing length theory or the precise distribution of internal heating is presented. It is based on the idea that the radiative gradient in an optically thick nebula generally does not greatly exceed the adiabatic gradient.

  2. Convective heat transfer in foams under laminar flow in pipes and tube bundles

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Joseph A.; McKinley, Ian M.; Moreno-Magana, David; Pilon, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports experimental data and scaling analysis for forced convection of foams and microfoams in laminar flow in circular and rectangular tubes as well as in tube bundles. Foams and microfoams are pseudoplastic (shear thinning) two-phase fluids consisting of tightly packed bubbles with diameters ranging from tens of microns to a few millimeters. They have found applications in separation processes, soil remediation, oil recovery, water treatment, food processes, as well as in fire fighting and in heat exchangers. First, aqueous solutions of surfactant Tween 20 with different concentrations were used to generate microfoams with various porosity, bubble size distribution, and rheological behavior. These different microfoams were flowed in uniformly heated circular tubes of different diameter instrumented with thermocouples. A wide range of heat fluxes and flow rates were explored. Experimental data were compared with analytical and semi-empirical expressions derived and validated for single-phase power-law fluids. These correlations were extended to two-phase foams by defining the Reynolds number based on the effective viscosity and density of microfoams. However, the local Nusselt and Prandtl numbers were defined based on the specific heat and thermal conductivity of water. Indeed, the heated wall was continuously in contact with a film of water controlling convective heat transfer to the microfoams. Overall, good agreement between experimental results and model predictions was obtained for all experimental conditions considered. Finally, the same approach was shown to be also valid for experimental data reported in the literature for laminar forced convection of microfoams in rectangular minichannels and of macrofoams across aligned and staggered tube bundles with constant wall heat flux. PMID:25552745

  3. Heat exchanger restart evaluation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.M.; Hirst, C.W.; Lentz, T.F.

    1992-03-18

    On December 24, 1991, the K-Reactor was in the shutdown mode with full AC process water flow and full cooling water flow. Safety rod testing was being performed as part of the power ascension testing program. The results of cooling water samples indicated tritium concentrations higher than allowable. Further sampling and testing confirmed a Process Water System to Cooling Water System leak in heat exchanger 4A (HX 4A). The heat exchanger was isolated and the plant shutdown. Heat exchanger 4A was removed from the plant and moved to C-Area prior to performing examinations and diagnostic testing. This included locating and identifying the leaking tube or tubes, eddy current examination of the leaking tube and a number of adjacent tubes, visually inspecting the leaking tube from both the inside as well as the area surrounding the identified tube. The leaking tube was removed and examined metallurgically to determine the failure mechanism. In addition ten other tubes that either exhibited eddy current indications or would represent a baseline condition were removed from heat exchanger 4A for metallurgical examination. Additional analysis and review of heat exchanger leakage history was performed to determine if there are any patterns which can be used for predictive purposes. Compensatory actions have been taken to improve the sensitivity and response time to any future events of this type. The results of these actions are summary herein.

  4. Finite volume simulation for convective heat transfer in wavy channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslan, Erman; Taymaz, Imdat; Islamoglu, Yasar

    2016-03-01

    The convective heat transfer characteristics for a periodic wavy channel have been investigated experimentally and numerically. Finite volume method was used in numerical study. Experiment results are used for validation the numerical results. Studies were conducted for air flow conditions where contact angle is 30°, and uniform heat flux 616 W/m2 is applied as the thermal boundary conditions. Reynolds number ( Re) is varied from 2000 to 11,000 and Prandtl number ( Pr) is taken 0.7. Nusselt number ( Nu), Colburn factor ( j), friction factor ( f) and goodness factor ( j/ f) against Reynolds number have been studied. The effects of the wave geometry and minimum channel height have been discussed. Thus, the best performance of flow and heat transfer characterization was determined through wavy channels. Additionally, it was determined that the computed values of convective heat transfer coefficients are in good correlation with experimental results for the converging diverging channel. Therefore, numerical results can be used for these channel geometries instead of experimental results.

  5. ETR HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING, TRA644. WORKERS ARE INSTALLING HEAT EXCHANGER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ETR HEAT EXCHANGER BUILDING, TRA-644. WORKERS ARE INSTALLING HEAT EXCHANGER PIPING. INL NEGATIVE NO. 56-3122. Jack L. Anderson, Photographer, 9/21/1956 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. Performance of a convective, infrared and combined infrared- convective heated conveyor-belt dryer.

    PubMed

    El-Mesery, Hany S; Mwithiga, Gikuru

    2015-05-01

    A conveyor-belt dryer was developed using a combined infrared and hot air heating system that can be used in the drying of fruits and vegetables. The drying system having two chambers was fitted with infrared radiation heaters and through-flow hot air was provided from a convective heating system. The system was designed to operate under either infrared radiation and cold air (IR-CA) settings of 2000 W/m(2) with forced ambient air at 30 °C and air flow of 0.6 m/s or combined infrared and hot air convection (IR-HA) dryer setting with infrared intensity set at 2000 W/m(2) and hot at 60 °C being blown through the dryer at a velocity of 0.6 m/s or hot air convection (HA) at an air temperature of 60 °C and air flow velocity 0.6 m/s but without infrared heating. Apple slices dried under the different dryer settings were evaluated for quality and energy requirements. It was found that drying of apple (Golden Delicious) slices took place in the falling rate drying period and no constant rate period of drying was observed under any of the test conditions. The IR-HA setting was 57.5 and 39.1 % faster than IR-CA and HA setting, respectively. Specific energy consumption was lower and thermal efficiency was higher for the IR-HA setting when compared to both IR-CA and HA settings. The rehydration ratio, shrinkage and colour properties of apples dried under IR-HA conditions were better than for either IR-CA or HA. PMID:25892769

  7. Performance of a convective, infrared and combined infrared- convective heated conveyor-belt dryer.

    PubMed

    El-Mesery, Hany S; Mwithiga, Gikuru

    2015-05-01

    A conveyor-belt dryer was developed using a combined infrared and hot air heating system that can be used in the drying of fruits and vegetables. The drying system having two chambers was fitted with infrared radiation heaters and through-flow hot air was provided from a convective heating system. The system was designed to operate under either infrared radiation and cold air (IR-CA) settings of 2000 W/m(2) with forced ambient air at 30 °C and air flow of 0.6 m/s or combined infrared and hot air convection (IR-HA) dryer setting with infrared intensity set at 2000 W/m(2) and hot at 60 °C being blown through the dryer at a velocity of 0.6 m/s or hot air convection (HA) at an air temperature of 60 °C and air flow velocity 0.6 m/s but without infrared heating. Apple slices dried under the different dryer settings were evaluated for quality and energy requirements. It was found that drying of apple (Golden Delicious) slices took place in the falling rate drying period and no constant rate period of drying was observed under any of the test conditions. The IR-HA setting was 57.5 and 39.1 % faster than IR-CA and HA setting, respectively. Specific energy consumption was lower and thermal efficiency was higher for the IR-HA setting when compared to both IR-CA and HA settings. The rehydration ratio, shrinkage and colour properties of apples dried under IR-HA conditions were better than for either IR-CA or HA.

  8. Energy absorber for sodium-heated heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Essebaggers, J.

    1975-12-01

    A heat exchanger is described in which water-carrying tubes are heated by liquid sodium and in which the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes is minimized. An energy absorbing chamber contains a compressible gas and is connected to the body of flowing sodium by a channel so that, in the event of a sodium-water reaction, products of the reaction will partially fill the energy absorbing chamber to attenuate the rise in pressure within the heat exchanger.

  9. Heat exchanger for coal gasification process

    DOEpatents

    Blasiole, George A.

    1984-06-19

    This invention provides a heat exchanger, particularly useful for systems requiring cooling of hot particulate solids, such as the separated fines from the product gas of a carbonaceous material gasification system. The invention allows effective cooling of a hot particulate in a particle stream (made up of hot particulate and a gas), using gravity as the motive source of the hot particulate. In a preferred form, the invention substitutes a tube structure for the single wall tube of a heat exchanger. The tube structure comprises a tube with a core disposed within, forming a cavity between the tube and the core, and vanes in the cavity which form a flow path through which the hot particulate falls. The outside of the tube is in contact with the cooling fluid of the heat exchanger.

  10. Convective heat transfer in a closed two-phase thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ani, M. A.

    2014-08-01

    A numerical analysis of heat transfer processes and hydrodynamics in a two-phase closed thermosyphon in a fairly wide range of variation of governing parameters has been investigated. A mathematical model is formulated based on the laws of mass conservation, momentum and energy in dimensionless variables "stream function - vorticity vector velocity - temperature". The analysis of the modes of forced and mixed convection for different values of Reynolds number and heat flows in the evaporation zone, the possibility of using two-phase thermosyphon for cooling gas turbine blades, when the heat is coming from the turbine blades to the thermosyphon is recycled a secondary refrigerant has been studied with different values of the centrifugal velocity. Nusselet Number, streamlines, velocity, temperature fields and temperature profile has been calculated during the investigation.

  11. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  12. The study and development of the empirical correlations equation of natural convection heat transfer on vertical rectangular sub-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamajaya, Ketut; Umar, Efrizon; Sudjatmi, K. S.

    2012-06-01

    This study focused on natural convection heat transfer using a vertical rectangular sub-channel and water as the coolant fluid. To conduct this study has been made pipe heaters are equipped with thermocouples. Each heater is equipped with five thermocouples along the heating pipes. The diameter of each heater is 2.54 cm and 45 cm in length. The distance between the central heating and the pitch is 29.5 cm. Test equipment is equipped with a primary cooling system, a secondary cooling system and a heat exchanger. The purpose of this study is to obtain new empirical correlations equations of the vertical rectangular sub-channel, especially for the natural convection heat transfer within a bundle of vertical cylinders rectangular arrangement sub-channels. The empirical correlation equation can support the thermo-hydraulic analysis of research nuclear reactors that utilize cylindrical fuel rods, and also can be used in designing of baffle-free vertical shell and tube heat exchangers. The results of this study that the empirical correlation equations of natural convection heat transfer coefficients with rectangular arrangement is Nu = 6.3357 (Ra.Dh/x)0.0740.

  13. A Mass Computation Model for Lightweight Brayton Cycle Regenerator Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a theoretical analysis of convective heat transfer across large internal surface areas, this paper discusses the design implications for generating lightweight gas-gas heat exchanger designs by packaging such areas into compact three-dimensional shapes. Allowances are made for hot and cold inlet and outlet headers for assembly of completed regenerator (or recuperator) heat exchanger units into closed cycle gas turbine flow ducting. Surface area and resulting volume and mass requirements are computed for a range of heat exchanger effectiveness values and internal heat transfer coefficients. Benefit cost curves show the effect of increasing heat exchanger effectiveness on Brayton cycle thermodynamic efficiency on the plus side, while also illustrating the cost in heat exchanger required surface area, volume, and mass requirements as effectiveness is increased. The equations derived for counterflow and crossflow configurations show that as effectiveness values approach unity, or 100 percent, the required surface area, and hence heat exchanger volume and mass tend toward infinity, since the implication is that heat is transferred at a zero temperature difference. To verify the dimensional accuracy of the regenerator mass computational procedure, calculation of a regenerator specific mass, that is, heat exchanger weight per unit working fluid mass flow, is performed in both English and SI units. Identical numerical values for the specific mass parameter, whether expressed in lb/(lb/sec) or kg/ (kg/sec), show the dimensional consistency of overall results.

  14. A Mass Computation Model for Lightweight Brayton Cycle Regenerator Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a theoretical analysis of convective heat transfer across large internal surface areas, this paper discusses the design implications for generating lightweight gas-gas heat exchanger designs by packaging such areas into compact three-dimensional shapes. Allowances are made for hot and cold inlet and outlet headers for assembly of completed regenerator (or recuperator) heat exchanger units into closed cycle gas turbine flow ducting. Surface area and resulting volume and mass requirements are computed for a range of heat exchanger effectiveness values and internal heat transfer coefficients. Benefit cost curves show the effect of increasing heat exchanger effectiveness on Brayton cycle thermodynamic efficiency on the plus side, while also illustrating the cost in heat exchanger required surface area, volume, and mass requirements as effectiveness is increased. The equations derived for counterflow and crossflow configurations show that as effectiveness values approach unity, or 100 percent, the required surface area, and hence heat exchanger volume and mass tend toward infinity, since the implication is that heat is transferred at a zero temperature difference. To verify the dimensional accuracy of the regenerator mass computational procedure, calculation of a regenerator specific mass, that is, heat exchanger weight per unit working fluid mass flow, is performed in both English and SI units. Identical numerical values for the specific mass parameter, whether expressed in lb/(lb/sec) or kg/(kg/sec), show the dimensional consistency of overall results.

  15. Micro-Scale Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Stelter, Stephan; Stelter, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    A micro-scale regenerative heat exchanger has been designed, optimized and fabricated for use in a micro-Stirling device. Novel design and fabrication techniques enabled the minimization of axial heat conduction losses and pressure drop, while maximizing thermal regenerative performance. The fabricated prototype is comprised of ten separate assembled layers of alternating metal-dielectric composite. Each layer is offset to minimize conduction losses and maximize heat transfer by boundary layer disruption. A grating pattern of 100 micron square non-contiguous flow passages were formed with a nominal 20 micron wall thickness, and an overall assembled ten-layer thickness of 900 microns. Application of the micro heat exchanger is envisioned in the areas of micro-refrigerators/coolers, micropower devices, and micro-fluidic devices.

  16. Carbon nanotube heat-exchange systems

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Terry Joseph; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-11-11

    A carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) and method for producing the same. One embodiment of the carbon nanotube heat-exchange system (10) comprises a microchannel structure (24) having an inlet end (30) and an outlet end (32), the inlet end (30) providing a cooling fluid into the microchannel structure (24) and the outlet end (32) discharging the cooling fluid from the microchannel structure (24). At least one flow path (28) is defined in the microchannel structure (24), fluidically connecting the inlet end (30) to the outlet end (32) of the microchannel structure (24). A carbon nanotube structure (26) is provided in thermal contact with the microchannel structure (24), the carbon nanotube structure (26) receiving heat from the cooling fluid in the microchannel structure (24) and dissipating the heat into an external medium (19).

  17. Single phase channel flow forced convection heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, J.P.

    1999-04-01

    A review of the current knowledge of single phase forced convection channel flow of liquids (Pr > 5) is presented. Two basic channel geometries are considered, the circular tube and the rectangular duct. Both laminar flow and turbulent flow are covered. The review begins with a brief overview of the heat transfer behavior of Newtonian fluids followed by a more detailed presentation of the behavior of purely viscous and viscoelastic Non-Newtonian fluids. Recent developments dealing with aqueous solutions of high molecular weight polymers and aqueous solutions of surfactants are discussed. The review concludes by citing a number of challenging research opportunities.

  18. The Role of the Velocity Gradient in Laminar Convective Heat Transfer through a Tube with a Uniform Wall Heat Flux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Liang-Bi; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Xia

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of convective heat transfer. For this purpose, the reason why thermal diffusivity should be placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux, and the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer are analysed. The background to these analyses is that, when the energy…

  19. Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.G.

    1993-11-09

    Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices. 11 figures.

  20. Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G.

    1993-01-01

    Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices.

  1. Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David Gordon

    2001-04-17

    Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices.

  2. Heat exchanger containing a component capable of discontinuous movement

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David Gordon

    2002-01-01

    Regenerative heat exchangers are described for transferring heat between hot and cold fluids. The heat exchangers have seal-leakage rates significantly less than those of conventional regenerative heat exchangers because the matrix is discontinuously moved and is releasably sealed while in a stationary position. Both rotary and modular heat exchangers are described. Also described are methods for transferring heat between a hot and cold fluid using the discontinuous movement of matrices.

  3. Numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions and pulse heating effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.; Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes the numerical simulation of hyperbolic heat conduction with convection boundary conditions. The effects of a step heat loading, a sudden pulse heat loading, and an internal heat source are considered in conjunction with convection boundary conditions. Two methods of solution are presened for predicting the transient behavior of the propagating thermal disturbances. In the first method, MacCormack's predictor-corrector method is employed for integrating the hyperbolic system of equations. Next, the transfinite element method, which employs specially tailored elements, is used for accurately representing the transient response of the propagating thermal wave fronts. The agreement between the results of various numerical test cases validate the representative behavior of the thermal wave fronts. Both methods represent hyperbolic heat conduction behavior by effectively modeling the sharp discontinuities of the propagating thermal disturbances.

  4. Natural convection of ferrofluids in partially heated square enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selimefendigil, Fatih; Öztop, Hakan F.; Al-Salem, Khaled

    2014-12-01

    In this study, natural convection of ferrofluid in a partially heated square cavity is numerically investigated. The heater is located to the left vertical wall and the right vertical wall is kept at constant temperature lower than that of the heater. Other walls of the square enclosure are assumed to be adiabatic. Finite element method is utilized to solve the governing equations. The influence of the Rayleigh number (104≤Ra≤5×105), heater location (0.25H≤yh≤0.75H), strength of the magnetic dipole (0≤γ≤2), horizontal and vertical location of the magnetic dipole (-2H≤a≤-0.5H, 0.2H≤b≤0.8H) on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics are investigated. It is observed that different velocity components within the square cavity are sensitive to the magnetic dipole source strength and its position. The length and size of the recirculation zones adjacent to the heater can be controlled with magnetic dipole strength. Averaged heat transfer increases with decreasing values of horizontal position of the magnetic dipole source. Averaged heat transfer value increases from middle towards both ends of the vertical wall when the vertical location of the dipole source is varied. When the heater location is changed, a symmetrical behavior in the averaged heat transfer plot is observed and the minimum value of the averaged heat transfer is attained when the heater is located at the mid of vertical wall.

  5. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of laminar mixed convection of water with sub-millimeter bubbles in a vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, A.; Kimura, K.; Endo, H.; Hagiwara, Y.

    2009-02-01

    Laminar mixed-convection heat transfer is widely seen in compact heat exchangers. Injection of sub-millimeter bubbles is considered as one of the efficient techniques for enhancing laminar mixed-convection heat transfer for liquids. However, the effects of sub-millimeter-bubble injection on the laminar mixed-convection heat transfer are poorly understood. In this study, we experimentally investigate flow and heat transfer characteristics of the laminar mixed-convection of water with sub-millimeter bubbles in a vertical channel. The thermocouples and a PTV (Particle Tracking Velocimetry) technique are used for the temperature and velocity measurements, respectively. Tap water is used for working fluid and hydrogen bubbles generated by electrolysis of water are used as the sub-millimeter bubbles. The Reynolds number of the main flow ranges from 100 to 150. Our results show that the ratio of the heat transfer coefficient with sub-millimeter-bubble injection to that without injection decreases as the Reynolds number increases. It is found from the liquid velocity measurements that this decrease is mainly due to a decrease in the "bubble advection effect".

  6. Experimental measurements and modeling of convective heat transfer in the transitional rarefied regime

    SciTech Connect

    Strongrich, Andrew D.; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2014-12-09

    We present experimental measurements and numerical simulations of convective heat transfer performance in the transitional rarefied regime for an isolated rectangular beam geometry. Experiments were performed using single crystalline silicon beam elements having width-to-thickness aspect ratios of 8.5 and 17.4. Devices were enclosed in a vacuum chamber and heated resistively using a DC power supply. A range of pressures corresponding to Knudsen numbers between 0.096 and 43.2 in terms of device thickness were swept, adjusting applied power to maintain a constant temperature of 50 K above the ambient temperature. Both parasitic electrical resistance associated with the hardware and radiative exchange with the environment were removed from measured data, allowing purely convective heat flux to be extracted. Numerical simulations were carried out deterministically through solution of the Ellipsoidal Statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model of the Boltzmann equation. Results agree with experimental data, revealing a strong coupling between dissipated heat flux and thermal stresses within the flowfield as well as a nonlinear transition between the free-molecule and continuum regimes.

  7. 14 CFR 29.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... secondary heat exchanger between the primary exhaust gas heat exchanger and the ventilating air system; or... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Exhaust System § 29.1125 Exhaust heat... inspecting the critical parts of each exchanger; (3) Each exchanger must have cooling provisions wherever...

  8. 14 CFR 29.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... secondary heat exchanger between the primary exhaust gas heat exchanger and the ventilating air system; or... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Exhaust System § 29.1125 Exhaust heat... inspecting the critical parts of each exchanger; (3) Each exchanger must have cooling provisions wherever...

  9. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. -H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimum combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.

  10. Comparative analysis of compact heat exchangers for application as the intermediate heat exchanger for advanced nuclear reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Bartel, N.; Chen, M.; Utgikar, V. P.; Sun, X.; Kim, I. -H.; Christensen, R.; Sabharwall, P.

    2015-04-04

    A comparative evaluation of alternative compact heat exchanger designs for use as the intermediate heat exchanger in advanced nuclear reactor systems is presented in this article. Candidate heat exchangers investigated included the Printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) and offset strip-fin heat exchanger (OSFHE). Both these heat exchangers offer high surface area to volume ratio (a measure of compactness [m2/m3]), high thermal effectiveness, and overall low pressure drop. Helium–helium heat exchanger designs for different heat exchanger types were developed for a 600 MW thermal advanced nuclear reactor. The wavy channel PCHE with a 15° pitch angle was found to offer optimummore » combination of heat transfer coefficient, compactness and pressure drop as compared to other alternatives. The principles of the comparative analysis presented here will be useful for heat exchanger evaluations in other applications as well.« less

  11. Turbulence convective heat transfer for cooling the photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arianmehr, Iman

    Solar PV (photovoltaic) is a rapidly advancing renewable energy technology which converts sunlight directly into electricity. One of the outstanding challenges of the current PV technology is the reduction in its conversion efficiency with increasing PV panel temperature, which is closely associated with the increase in solar intensity and the ambient temperature surrounding the PV panels. To more effectively capture the available energy when the sun is most intense, significant efforts have been invested in active and passive cooling research over the last few years. While integrated cooling systems can lead to the highest total efficiencies, they are usually neither the most feasible nor the most cost effective solutions. This work examines some simple passive means of manipulating the prevailing wind turbulence to enhance convective heat transfer over a heated plate in a wind tunnel.

  12. Convective heat transfer enhancement inside tubes using inserted helical coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, R. K.; Sharafeldeen, M. A.; Berbish, N. S.; Moawed, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Convective heat transfer was experimentally investigated in tubes with helical coils inserts in turbulent flow regime within Reynolds number range of 14400 ≤ Re ≤ 42900. The present work aims to extend the experimental data available on wire coil inserts to cover wire diameter ratio from 0.044 to 0.133 and coil pitch ratio from 1 to 5. Uniform heat flux was applied to the external surface of the tube and air was selected as fluid. The effects of Reynolds number and wire diameter and coil pitch ratios on the Nusselt number and friction factor were studied. The enhancement efficiency and performance criteria ranges are of (46.9-82.6%) and (100.1-128%) within the investigated range of the different parameters, respectively. Correlations are obtained for the average Nusselt number and friction factor utilizing the present measurements within the investigated range of geometrical parameters and Re.

  13. Marangoni mixed convection flow with Joule heating and nonlinear radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shaheen, Uzma; Shafiq, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Asghar, Saleem

    2015-07-15

    Marangoni mixed convective flow of Casson fluid in a thermally stratified medium is addressed. Flow analysis has been carried out in presence of inclined magnetic field. Heat transfer analysis is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and nonlinear thermal radiation. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are first converted into ordinary differential systems and then developed the convergent series solutions. Flow pattern with the influence of pertinent parameters namely the magnetic parameter, Casson fluid parameter, temperature ratio parameter, stratification parameter, Prandtl number, Eckert number and radiation parameter is investigated. Expression of local Nusselt number is computed and analyzed. It is found that the Nusselt number decreases by increasing magnetic parameter, temperature ratio parameter, angle of inclination and stratification parameter. Moreover the effect of buoyancy parameter on the velocity distribution is opposite in both the opposing and assisting flow phenomena. Thermal field and associated layer thickness are enhanced for larger radiation parameter.

  14. Numerical study of forced convective heat transfer around airships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qiumin; Fang, Xiande

    2016-02-01

    Forced convective heat transfer is an important factor that affects the thermal characteristics of airships. In this paper, the steady state forced convective heat transfer around an ellipsoid is numerically investigated. The numerical simulation is carried out by commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software over the extended Re range from 20 to 108 and the aspect ratio from 2 to 4. Based on the regression and optimization with software, a new piecewise correlation of the Nusselt number at constant wall temperature for ellipsoid is proposed, which is suitable for applications to airships and other ellipse shaped bodies such as elliptical balloons. The thermal characteristics of a stratospheric airship in midsummer located in the north hemisphere are numerical studied. The helium temperature predicated using the new correlation is compared to those predicted by correlations applicable for spheres and flat plates. The results show that the helium temperature obtained using the new correlation at noon is about 5.4 K lower than that using the correlation of spheres and about 2.1 K higher than that of flat plates.

  15. Low heat transfer oxidizer heat exchanger design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanic, P. G.; Kmiec, T. D.; Peckham, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    The RL10-IIB engine, a derivative of the RLIO, is capable of multi-mode thrust operation. This engine operates at two low thrust levels: tank head idle (THI), which is approximately 1 to 2 percent of full thrust, and pumped idle (PI), which is 10 percent of full thrust. Operation at THI provides vehicle propellant settling thrust and efficient engine thermal conditioning; PI operation provides vehicle tank pre-pressurization and maneuver thrust for log-g deployment. Stable combustion of the RL10-IIB engine at THI and PI thrust levels can be accomplished by providing gaseous oxygen at the propellant injector. Using gaseous hydrogen from the thrust chamber jacket as an energy source, a heat exchanger can be used to vaporize liquid oxygen without creating flow instability. This report summarizes the design and analysis of a United Aircraft Products (UAP) low-rate heat transfer heat exchanger concept for the RL10-IIB rocket engine. The design represents a second iteration of the RL10-IIB heat exchanger investigation program. The design and analysis of the first heat exchanger effort is presented in more detail in NASA CR-174857. Testing of the previous design is detailed in NASA CR-179487.

  16. Optimization of Borehole Heat Exchanger Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Daniel; Rühaak, Wolfram; Welsch, Bastian; Oladyshkin, Sergey; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Arrays of borehole heat exchangers are an increasingly popular source for renewable energy. Furthermore, they can serve as borehole thermal energy storages for seasonally fluctuating heat sources like solar thermal energy or district heating grids. However, the uncertainty of geological parameters and the nonlinear behavior of the complex system make it difficult to simulate and predict the required design of borehole heat exchanger arrays. As a result, the arrays easily turn out to be over or undersized, which compromises the economic feasibility of these systems. Here, we present a novel optimization strategy for the design of borehole thermal energy storages. The arbitrary polynomial chaos expansion method is used to build a proxy model from a set of numerical training simulations, which allows for the consideration of parameter uncertainties. Thus, the resulting proxy model bypasses the problem of excessive computation time for the numerous function calls required for a mathematical optimization. Additionally, we iteratively refine the proxy model during the optimization procedure using additional numerical simulation runs. With the presented solution, many aspects of borehole heat exchanger arrays can be optimized under geological uncertainty.

  17. Heat transfer in counterflow heat exchangers with helical turbulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamankhan, Piroz

    2010-10-01

    A 3D mathematical model has been developed to investigate the heat transfer augmentation in a circular tube with a helical turbulator. Glycol-water blends of various concentrations were used in the inner tube, and pure water was used in the outer tube. Changes in fluid physical properties with temperature were taken into account, and k- ε, k - ω , and large eddy simulations were developed for turbulence modeling. The simulation results showed a nonlinear variation in Reynolds and Prandtl numbers for a long model of a heat exchanger even in the absence of a turbulator. The presence of the turbulator was found to increase the heat transfer, sometimes without inducing turbulence, but also increased the pressure drop. The results demonstrate that the model could be used as a useful tool for optimization of heat exchanger performance in the presence of a turbulator. Comparisons with experimental data showed reasonably agreement with large eddy simulation results.

  18. Brayton heat exchange unit development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, C. J.; Richard, C. E.; Duncan, J. D.

    1971-01-01

    A Brayton Heat Exchanger Unit (BHXU), consisting of a recuperator, a heat sink heat exchanger and a gas ducting system, was designed, fabricated, and tested. The design was formulated to provide a high performance unit suitable for use in a long-life Brayton-cycle powerplant. A parametric analysis and design study was performed to establish the optimum component configurations to achieve low weight and size and high reliability, while meeting the requirements of high effectiveness and low pressure drop. Layout studies and detailed mechanical and structural design were performed to obtain a flight-type packaging arrangement. Evaluation testing was conducted from which it is estimated that near-design performance can be expected with the use of He-Xe as the working fluid.

  19. High Performance Woven Mesh Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, Richard A.; Li, Chen; Park, Ji-Wook; Xu, Jun

    2002-07-01

    Simple-to-fabricate woven mesh structures, consisting of bonded laminates of two-dimensional plain-weave conductive screens, or three-dimensional orthogonal weaves are described. Geometric equations show that these porous matrices can be fabricated to have a wide range of porosity and a highly anisotropic thermal conductivity vector. A mathematical model of the thermal performance of such a mesh, deployed as a heat exchange surface, is developed. Measurements of pressure drop and overall heat transfer rate are reported and used with the performance model to develop correlation equations of mesh friction factor and Colburn j-factor as a function of coolant properties, mesh characteristics and flow rate through the mesh. A heat exchanger performance analysis delineates conditions where the two mesh technologies offer superior performance.

  20. Heat convection in a micro impinging jet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, John Dzung Hoang

    2000-10-01

    This thesis covers the development of an efficient micro impinging jet heat exchanger, using MEMS technology, to provide localized cooling for present and next generation microelectronic computer chips. Before designing an efficient localized heat exchanger, it is necessary to investigate fluid dynamics and heat transfer in the micro scale. MEMS technology has been used in this project because it is the only tool currently available that can provide a large array of batch-fabricated, micro-scale nozzles for localized cooling. Our investigation of potential MEMS heat exchanger designs begins with experiments that measure the pressure drops and temperature changes in a micro scale tubing system that will be necessary to carry fluid to the impingement point. Our basic MEMS model is a freestanding micro channel with integrated temperature microsensors. The temperature distribution along the channel in a vacuum is measured. The measured flow rates are compared with an analytical model developed for capillary flow that accounts for 2-D, slip and compressibility effects. The work is focused on obtaining correlations in the form of the Nussult number, the Reynolds number and a H/d geometric factor. A set of single MEMS nozzles have been designed to test heat transfer effectiveness as a function of nozzle diameter, ranging from 1.0 mm to 250 um. In addition, nozzle and slot array MEMS devices have been fabricated. In order to obtain quantitative measurements from these micron scale devices, a series of target temperature sensor chips were custom made and characterized for these experiments. The heat transfer characteristics of various MEMS nozzle configurations operating at various steady inlet pressures, at different heights above the heated substrate, have been characterized. These steady results showed that the average heat transfer coefficient, averaged over a 1 cm2 test area, was usually less than 0.035 W/cm 2K for any situation. However, the local heat transfer

  1. Experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in volumetrically heated spherical segments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Asfia, F.; Dhir, V.

    1998-03-01

    One strategy for preventing the failure of lower head of a nuclear reactor vessel is to flood the concrete cavity with subcooled water in accidents in which relocation of core material into the vessel lower head occurs. After the core material relocates into the vessel, a crust of solid material forms on the inner wall of the vessel, however, most of the pool remains molten and natural convection exists in the pool. At present, uncertainty exists with respect to natural convection heat transfer coefficients between the pool of molten core material and the reactor vessel wall. In the present work, experiments were conducted to examine natural convection heat transfer in internally heated partially filled spherical pools with external cooling. In the experiments, Freon-113 contained in a Pyrex bell jar was used as a test liquid. The pool was bounded with a spherical segment at the bottom, and was heated with magnetrons taken from a conventional microwave oven. The vessel was cooled from the outside with natural convection of water or with nucleate boiling of liquid nitrogen.

  2. A Reduced-Boundary-Function Method for Convective Heat Transfer With Axial Heat Conduction and Viscous Dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhijie Xu

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a new method of solution for the convective heat transfer under forced laminar flow that is confined by two parallel plates with a distance of 2a or by a circular tube with a radius of a. The advection-conduction equation is first mapped onto the boundary. The original problem of solving the unknown field T(x,r,t) is reduced to seek the solutions of T at the boundary (r = a or r = 0, r is the distance from the centerline shown in Fig. 1), i.e., the boundary functions T{sub a}(x,t) {triple_bond} T(x,r=a,t) and/or T{sub 0}(x,t) {triple_bond} T(x,r=0,t). In this manner, the original problem is significantly simplified by reducing the problem dimensionality from 3 to 2. The unknown field T(x,r,t) can be eventually solved in terms of these boundary functions. The method is applied to the convective heat transfer with uniform wall temperature boundary condition and with heat exchange between flowing fluids and its surroundings that is relevant to the geothermal applications. Analytical solutions are presented and validated for the steady-state problem using the proposed method.

  3. A Reduced-Boundary-Function Method for Convective Heat Transfer with Axial Heat Conduction and Viscous Dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a method of solution for the convective heat transfer under forced laminar flow that is confined by two parallel plates with a distance of 2a or by a circular tube with a radius of a. The advection-conduction equation is first mapped onto the boundary. The original problem of solving the unknown field is reduced to seek the solutions of T at the boundary (r=a or r=0, r is the distance from the centerline shown in Fig. 1), i.e. the boundary functions and/or . In this manner, the original problem is significantly simplified by reducing the problem dimensionality from 3 to 2. The unknown field can be eventually solved in terms of these boundary functions. The method is applied to the convective heat transfer with uniform wall temperature boundary condition and with heat exchange between flowing fluids and its surroundings that is relevant to the geothermal applications. Analytical solutions are presented and validated for the steady state problem using the proposed method.

  4. Preliminary SP-100/Stirling heat exchanger designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul; Tower, Leonard; Dawson, Ronald; Blue, Brian; Dunn, Pat

    1993-01-01

    Analytic modeling of several heat exchanger concepts to couple the SP-100 nuclear reactor primary lithium loop and the Space Stirling Power Convertor (SSPC) was performed. Four 25 kWe SSPC's are used to produce the required 100 kW of electrical power. This design work focused on the interface between a single SSPC and the primary lithium loop. Manifolding to separate and collect the four channel flow was not modeled. This work modeled two separate types of heat exchanger interfaces (conductive coupling and radiative coupling) to explore their relative advantages and disadvantages. The minimum mass design of the conductively coupled concepts was 18 kg or 0.73 kg/kWe for a single 25 kWe convertor. The minimum mass radiatively coupled concept was 41 kg or 1.64 kg/kWe. The direct conduction heat exchanger provides a lighter weight system because of its ability to operate the Stirling convertor evaporator at higher heat fluxes than those attainable by the radiatively coupled systems. Additionally the conductively coupled concepts had relatively small volumes and provide potentially simpler assembly. Their disadvantages were the tight tolerances and material joining problems associated with this refractory to superalloy interface. The advantages of the radiatively coupled designs were the minimal material interface problems.

  5. Convective Heating of the LIFE Engine Target During Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Holdener, D S; Tillack, M S; Wang, X R

    2011-10-24

    Target survival in the hostile, high temperature xenon environment of the proposed Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) engine is critical. This work focuses on the flow properties and convective heat load imposed upon the surface of the indirect drive target while traveling through the xenon gas. While this rarefied flow is traditionally characterized as being within the continuum regime, it is approaching transition where conventional CFD codes reach their bounds of operation. Thus ANSYS, specifically the Navier-Stokes module CFX, will be used in parallel with direct simulation Monte Carlo code DS2V and analytically and empirically derived expressions for heat transfer to the hohlraum for validation. Comparison of the viscous and thermal boundary layers of ANSYS and DS2V were shown to be nearly identical, with the surface heat flux varying less than 8% on average. From the results herein, external baffles have been shown to reduce this heat transfer to the sensitive laser entrance hole (LEH) windows and optimize target survival independent of other reactor parameters.

  6. Mixed turbulent convective heat transfer in vertical ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Larry William

    Time averaged and dynamic heat transfer phenomena associated with opposing mixed turbulent convection in vertical ducts were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Surface renewal theory and experimental data were used to obtain a time averaged heat transfer correlation containing the proper parameter functionality. The heat transfer dynamics of large scale flow phenomena observed were also investigated experimentally. Time series and Poincare maps were initially generated and compared with flow observations. The results indicated that although many different flow structures and flow sequences existed at the various parameter settings, the most predominant flow structure was a large single cell. All of the power spectral densities computed from the time series display broad band noise with the average power decreasing with increasing frequency. No bifurcation sequences characterizing a large scale transition mechanism could be established. Finally, the Grassberger-Proccacia dimension algorithm was implemented for data obtained at a wall heat flux of 0.4533 (Btu/sq ft/s) and a volumetric flow rate of 0.03384 (cu ft/s).

  7. Triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A triple loop heat exchanger for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The triple loop heat exchanger comprises portions of a strong solution line for conducting relatively hot, strong solution from a generator to a solution heat exchanger of the absorption refrigeration system, conduit means for conducting relatively cool, weak solution from the solution heat exchanger to the generator, and a bypass system for conducting strong solution from the generator around the strong solution line and around the solution heat exchanger to an absorber of the refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator to an undesirable level. The strong solution line and the conduit means are in heat exchange relationship with each other in the triple loop heat exchanger so that, during normal operation of the refrigeration system, heat is exchanged between the relatively hot, strong solution flowing through the strong solution line and the relatively cool, weak solution flowing through the conduit means. Also, the strong solution line and the bypass system are in heat exchange relationship in the triple loop heat exchanger so that if the normal flow path of relatively hot, strong solution flowing from the generator to an absorber is blocked, then this relatively, hot strong solution which will then be flowing through the bypass system in the triple loop heat exchanger, is brought into heat exchange relationship with any strong solution which may have solidified in the strong solution line in the triple loop heat exchanger to thereby aid in desolidifying any such solidified strong solution.

  8. Transient Heat Transfer in a Semitransparent Radiating Layer with Boundary Convection and Surface Reflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Surface convection and refractive index are examined during transient radiative heating or cooling of a grey semitransparent layer with internal absorption, emission and conduction. Each side of the layer is exposed to hot or cold radiative surroundings, while each boundary is heated or cooled by convection. Emission within the layer and internal reflections depend on the layer refractive index. The reflected energy and heat conduction distribute energy across the layer and partially equalize the transient temperature distributions. Solutions are given to demonstrate the effect of radiative heating for layers with various optical thicknesses, the behavior of the layer heated by radiation on one side and convectively cooled on the other, and a layer heated by convection while being cooled by radiation. The numerical method is an implicit finite difference procedure with non-uniform space and time increments. The basic method developed in earlier work is expanded to include external convection and incident radiation.

  9. Heat Transfer of Nanofluid in a Double Pipe Heat Exchanger.

    PubMed

    Aghayari, Reza; Maddah, Heydar; Zarei, Malihe; Dehghani, Mehdi; Kaskari Mahalle, Sahar Ghanbari

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the enhancement of heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number of a nanofluid containing nanoparticles (γ-AL2O3) with a particle size of 20 nm and volume fraction of 0.1%-0.3% (V/V). Effects of temperature and concentration of nanoparticles on Nusselt number changes and heat transfer coefficient in a double pipe heat exchanger with counter turbulent flow are investigated. Comparison of experimental results with valid theoretical data based on semiempirical equations shows an acceptable agreement. Experimental results show a considerable increase in heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number up to 19%-24%, respectively. Also, it has been observed that the heat transfer coefficient increases with the operating temperature and concentration of nanoparticles.

  10. Natural convection heat transfer for a staggered array of heated, horizontal cylinders within a rectangular enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, C.E.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis presents the results of an experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in a staggered array of heated cylinders, oriented horizontally within a rectangular enclosure. The main purpose of this research was to extend the knowledge of heat transfer within enclosed bundles of spent nuclear fuel rods sealed within a shipping or storage container. This research extends Canaan`s investigation of an aligned array of heated cylinders that thermally simulated a boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel assembly sealed within a shipping or storage cask. The results are presented in terms of piecewise Nusselt-Rayleigh number correlations of the form Nu = C(Ra){sup n}, where C and n are constants. Correlations are presented both for individual rods within the array and for the array as a whole. The correlations are based only on the convective component of the heat transfer. The radiative component was calculated with a finite-element code that used measured surface temperatures, rod array geometry, and measured surface emissivities as inputs. The correlation results are compared to Canaan`s aligned array results and to other studies of natural convection in horizontal tube arrays.

  11. 1-MWe heat exchangers for OTEC. Final acceptance document

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, J.E.

    1980-06-19

    Acceptance documents for major units of 1 MWe OTEC heat exchangers, including condensers and evaporators, are provided. Included are a transportation plan for the heat exchangers and design specifications for the phase separator. (LEW)

  12. Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM) Cargo Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zampiceni, John J.; Harper, Lon T.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the New Shuttle Orbiter's Multi- Purpose Logistics Modulo (MPLM) Cargo Heat Exchanger (HX) and associated MPLM cooling system. This paper presents Heat Exchanger (HX) design and performance characteristics of the system.

  13. Thermal induced flow oscillations in heat exchangers for supercritical fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedly, J. C.; Manganaro, J. L.; Krueger, P. G.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical model has been developed to predict possible unstable behavior in supercritical heat exchangers. From complete model, greatly simplified stability criterion is derived. As result of this criterion, stability of heat exchanger system can be predicted in advance.

  14. Optimizing PT Arun LNG main heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Irawan, B.

    1995-12-01

    The capacity of a LNG liquefaction unit has been increased by upgrading the refrigeration system, without making changes to the main heat exchanger (MHE). It is interesting, that after all modifications were completed, a higher refrigerant circulation alone could not increase LNG production. However, by optimizing the refrigerant component ratio, the UA of the MHE increased and LNG production improved. This technical evaluation will provide recommendations and show how the evaluation of the internal temperature profile helped optimize the MHE operating conditions.

  15. Simulation model air-to-air plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A simple simulation model of an air-to-air plate heat exchanger is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows the eflcient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is to shorten computation time and to use only input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part-load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important in energy eficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculations or load calculations with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short- time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control theory, are neglected. The part-load behavior is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part-load condition. If the heat transfer coefficients on the two exchanger sides are not equal (i. e. due to partial bypassing of air), their ratio can be easily calculated and set as a parameter. The model is static and uses explicit equations only. The explicit model formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability, which allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods like automatic system optimization. This paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for any particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

  16. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu∼Pr^{1/4}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1/2}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≪1 and Nu∼Pr^{0}Ra^{1/4}, Re∼Pr^{-1}Ra^{1/2} for Pr≫1. These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 10^{5} to 10^{10} and Pr from 10^{-2} to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10^{-1}. PMID:27300823

  17. Momentum and heat transport scalings in laminar vertical convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We derive the dependence of the Reynolds number Re and the Nusselt number Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr in laminar vertical convection (VC), where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls. The boundary layer equations in laminar VC yield two limiting scaling regimes: Nu˜Pr1/4Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1/2Ra1/2 for Pr≪1 and Nu˜Pr0Ra1/4 , Re˜Pr-1Ra1/2 for Pr≫1 . These theoretical results are in excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for Ra from 105 to 1010 and Pr from 10-2 to 30. The transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 10-1.

  18. System for efficiently exchanging heat with ground water in an aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W.

    1984-05-15

    A method and means for using ground water in an aquifer as a heat source and heat sink are disclosed wherein heat is exchanged between the uniform temperature ground water and heat-exchanging apparatus at the earth's surface through a single well bore. The ground water is exchanged between an upper and lower portion of the aquifer, alternatively depending on the operating mode, in such a manner that a stratified lateral flow of the water after heat exchange is produced following natural convective paths in the top or bottom of the aquifer and resulting in wide laminar dissipation of the altered temperature water while avoiding thermal mixing between that water and the remaining uniform temperature water in the aquifer. This manner of exchange provides a continuous flow of heating or cooling water at or near the ambient aquifer temperature without any depletion of the aquifer. Embodiments are described wherein the aquifer water is brought to the earth's surface and wherein a separate heat-exchanging fluid is circulated between the aquifer and the earth's surface, and modifications are also disclosed involving a valved plenum device for use with the former embodiments and whereby the aquifer may be used to store solar heat.

  19. Characterizations and Convective Heat Transfer Performance of Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yijun

    fluid results. However, pressure drop measurements showed that pumping power was increased by more than five times for the 2.6% concentration. An examination of the ratio of heat transfer enhancement to the pumping power increase (termed as merit parameter) as a function of Reynolds numbers indicates that the increase in pumping power is much greater than the corresponding heat transfer enhancement. This study additionally showed that concentrations of ND50-Syltherm800, TiO2-water and Al2O3-water nanofluids did not enhance convection heat transfer. Hence, the effect of nanoparticles on the heat transfer properties of a nanofluid appears dependent on the particular type of nanoparticle employed.

  20. Optimal heat transport solutions for Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondak, David; Smith, Leslie M.; Waleffe, Fabian

    2015-12-01

    Steady flows that optimize heat transport are obtained for two-dimensional Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection with no-slip horizontal walls for a variety of Prandtl numbers $Pr$ and Rayleigh number up to $Ra\\sim 10^9$. Power law scalings of $Nu\\sim Ra^{\\gamma}$ are observed with $\\gamma\\approx 0.31$, where the Nusselt number $Nu$ is a non-dimensional measure of the vertical heat transport. Any dependence of the scaling exponent on $Pr$ is found to be extremely weak. On the other hand, the presence of two local maxima of $Nu$ with different horizontal wavenumbers at the same $Ra$ leads to the emergence of two different flow structures as candidates for optimizing the heat transport. For $Pr \\lesssim 7$, optimal transport is achieved at the smaller maximal wavenumber. In these fluids, the optimal structure is a plume of warm rising fluid which spawns left/right horizontal arms near the top of the channel, leading to downdrafts adjacent to the central updraft. For $Pr > 7$ at high-enough Ra, the optimal structure is a single updraft absent significant horizontal structure, and characterized by the larger maximal wavenumber.

  1. Natural convection in asymmetric triangular enclosures heated from below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyo, O. M.; Angeli, D.; Barozzi, G. S.; Collins, M. W.

    2014-11-01

    Triangular enclosures are typical configurations of attic spaces found in residential as well as industrial pitched-roof buildings. Natural convection in triangular rooftops has received considerable attention over the years, mainly on right-angled and isosceles enclosures. In this paper, a finite volume CFD package is employed to study the laminar air flow and temperature distribution in asymmetric rooftop-shaped triangular enclosures when heated isothermally from the base wall, for aspect ratios (AR) 0.2 <= AR <= 1.0, and Rayleigh number (Ra) values 8 × 105 <= Ra <= 5 × 107. The effects of Rayleigh number and pitch angle on the flow structure and temperature distributions within the enclosure are analysed. Results indicate that, at low pitch angle, the heat transfer between the cold inclined and the hot base walls is very high, resulting in a multi-cellular flow structure. As the pitch angle increases, however, the number of cells reduces, and the total heat transfer rate progressively reduces, even if the Rayleigh number, being based on the enclosure height, rapidly increases. Physical reasons for the above effect are inspected.

  2. Effect of heat flux on differential rotation in turbulent convection.

    PubMed

    Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2006-04-01

    We studied the effect of the turbulent heat flux on the Reynolds stresses in a rotating turbulent convection. To this end we solved a coupled system of dynamical equations which includes the equations for the Reynolds stresses, the entropy fluctuations, and the turbulent heat flux. We used a spectral tau approximation in order to close the system of dynamical equations. We found that the ratio of the contributions to the Reynolds stresses caused by the turbulent heat flux and the anisotropic eddy viscosity is of the order of approximately 10(L rho/l0)2, where l0 is the maximum scale of turbulent motions and L rho is the fluid density variation scale. This effect is crucial for the formation of the differential rotation and should be taken into account in the theories of the differential rotation of the Sun, stars, and planets. In particular, we demonstrated that this effect may cause the differential rotation which is comparable with the typical solar differential rotation.

  3. Enhancement of natural-convection heat transfer from a horizontal heated plate using grid fins

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Kenzo; Nagae, Naoyuki; Kimura, Fumiyoshi

    1996-01-01

    An enhancement technique was developed for natural-convection heat transfer from a horizontal heated plate. In order to enhance the heat transfer, grid fins made of copper plates were soldered to the copper base plate. These grid fins function not only as an extended surface but also as a heat-transfer promoter. The apparent heat-transfer coefficient of the above enhanced plate were measured and compared with those of a nontreated, smooth plate and a conventional plate with vertical straight fins. It was found that the highest performance is achieved by the present plate. By adopting grid fins with appropriate size and height, the heat-transfer coefficient at the central portion of the present plate is increased by 35% compared to that of the conventional finned plate with the same fin area of fin height.

  4. 14 CFR 23.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 23.1125 Section 23... § 23.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine powered airplanes the following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat exchanger must be constructed and installed to withstand the vibration, inertia,...

  5. 40 CFR 63.1409 - Heat exchange system provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Heat exchange system provisions. 63... § 63.1409 Heat exchange system provisions. (a) Unless one or more of the conditions specified in... subpart shall monitor each heat exchange system used to cool process equipment in an affected...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1328 - Heat exchange systems provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Heat exchange systems provisions. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1328 Heat exchange... of this subpart. (h) The compliance date for heat exchange systems subject to the provisions of...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 23.1125 Section 23... § 23.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine powered airplanes the following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat exchanger must be constructed and installed to withstand the vibration, inertia,...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1328 - Heat exchange systems provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Heat exchange systems provisions. 63... Heat exchange systems provisions. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, each owner... § 63.1335(e)(6), for the purposes of this subpart. (h) The compliance date for heat exchange...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1328 - Heat exchange systems provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Heat exchange systems provisions. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1328 Heat exchange... of this subpart. (h) The compliance date for heat exchange systems subject to the provisions of...

  10. 14 CFR 23.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 23.1125 Section 23... § 23.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine powered airplanes the following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat exchanger must be constructed and installed to withstand the vibration, inertia,...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 23.1125 Section 23... § 23.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine powered airplanes the following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat exchanger must be constructed and installed to withstand the vibration, inertia,...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 23.1125 Section 23... § 23.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine powered airplanes the following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat exchanger must be constructed and installed to withstand the vibration, inertia,...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1328 - Heat exchange systems provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Heat exchange systems provisions. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group IV Polymers and Resins § 63.1328 Heat exchange... of this subpart. (h) The compliance date for heat exchange systems subject to the provisions of...

  14. Heat exchanger support apparatus in a fluidized bed

    DOEpatents

    Lawton, Carl W.

    1982-01-01

    A heat exchanger is mounted in the upper portion of a fluidized combusting bed for the control of the temperature of the bed. A support, made up of tubes, is extended from the perforated plate of the fluidized bed up to the heat exchanger. The tubular support framework for the heat exchanger has liquid circulated therethrough to prevent deterioration of the support.

  15. 40 CFR 63.1409 - Heat exchange system provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... normal range. (5) The recirculating heat exchange system is used to cool process fluids that contain less...-through heat exchange system is used to cool process fluids that contain less than 5 percent by weight of... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Heat exchange system provisions....

  16. OXIDE DISPERSION-STRENGTHENED HEAT EXCHANGER TUBING

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Mark A.

    2001-11-06

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys (e.g. the INCOLOY{reg_sign} MA956 alloy) are known for their excellent high temperature properties and are prime candidate materials for the construction of very high temperature heat exchangers that will be used in Vision 21 power plants. The main limitation of these materials is their poor weldability. Commercially available ODS tubing also tends to exhibit relatively poor circumferential creep strength due to current processing practices resulting in a fine grain size in the transverse direction. Thus far, these two characteristics of the ODS tubing have restricted its use to mostly non-pressure containing applications. The objectives of this program are to develop: (a) an MA956 tube with sufficient circumferential creep strength for long term use as heat exchanger tubing for very high temperatures; (b) a welding technique(s) for producing adequate joints between an MA956 tube and an MA956 tube, and an MA956 tube and an INCONEL 601 tube; (c) the bending strain limits, below which recrystallization will not occur in a MA956 tube during normal operation; and (d) the high temperature corrosion limits for the MA956 alloy with respect to working-fluid side and fireside environments. Also, this program seeks to generate data for use by heat exchanger designers and the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, and perform an analysis of the mechanical property, tube bending, and corrosion data in order to determine the implications on the design of a very high temperature heat exchanger (T>1093 C/2000 F). After one year, work is currently being conducted on increasing the circumferential strength of a MA956 tube, developing joining techniques for this material, determining the tube bending strain limits, and establishing the high temperature corrosion parameters for the MA956 alloy in environments expected to be present in Vision 21 power plants. Work in these areas will is continuing into the next fiscal year, with success

  17. Graphite Foam Heat Exchangers for Thermal Management

    SciTech Connect

    Klett, J.W.

    2004-06-07

    Improved thermal management is needed to increase the power density of electronic and more effectively cool electronic enclosures that are envisioned in future aircraft, spacecraft and surface ships. Typically, heat exchanger cores must increase in size to more effectively dissipate increased heat loads, this would be impossible in many cases, thus improved heat exchanger cores will be required. In this Phase I investigation, MRi aimed to demonstrate improved thermal management using graphite foam (Gr-foam) core heat exchangers. The proposed design was to combine Gr-foams from POCO with MRi's innovative low temperature, active metal joining process (S-Bond{trademark}) to bond Gr-foam to aluminum, copper and aluminum/SiC composite faceplates. The results were very favorable, so a Phase II SBIR with the MDA was initiated. This had primarily 5 tasks: (1) bonding, (2) thermal modeling, (3) cooling chip scale packages, (4) evaporative cooling techniques and (5) IGBT cold plate development. The bonding tests showed that the ''reflow'' technique with S-Bond{reg_sign}-220 resulted in the best and most consistent bond. Then, thermal modeling was used to design different chip scale packages and IGBT cold plates. These designs were used to fabricate many finned graphite foam heat sinks specifically for two standard type IC packages, the 423 and 478 pin chips. These results demonstrated several advantages with the foam. First, the heat sinks with the foam were lighter than the copper/aluminum sinks used as standards. The sinks for the 423 design made from foam were not as good as the standard sinks. However, the sinks made from foam for the 478 pin chips were better than the standard heat sinks used today. However, this improvement was marginal (in the 10-20% better regime). However, another important note was that the epoxy bonding technique resulted in heat sinks with similar results as that with the S-bond{reg_sign}, slightly worse than the S-bond{reg_sign}, but still

  18. Analysis of the heat transfer in double and triple concentric tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rădulescu, S.; Negoiţă, L. I.; Onuţu, I.

    2016-08-01

    The tubular heat exchangers (shell and tube heat exchangers and concentric tube heat exchangers) represent an important category of equipment in the petroleum refineries and are used for heating, pre-heating, cooling, condensation and evaporation purposes. The paper presents results of analysis of the heat transfer to cool a petroleum product in two types of concentric tube heat exchangers: double and triple concentric tube heat exchangers. The cooling agent is water. The triple concentric tube heat exchanger is a modified constructive version of double concentric tube heat exchanger by adding an intermediate tube. This intermediate tube improves the heat transfer by increasing the heat area per unit length. The analysis of the heat transfer is made using experimental data obtained during the tests in a double and triple concentric tube heat exchanger. The flow rates of fluids, inlet and outlet temperatures of water and petroleum product are used in determining the performance of both heat exchangers. Principally, for both apparatus are calculated the overall heat transfer coefficients and the heat exchange surfaces. The presented results shows that triple concentric tube heat exchangers provide better heat transfer efficiencies compared to the double concentric tube heat exchangers.

  19. A heat transfer model of a horizontal ground heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, R. E.; Shtern, Yu. I.; Shtern, M. Yu.; Rogachev, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Ground-source heat pumps are gaining popularity in Eastern Europe, especially those which are using the horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX). Due to the difficulty of accessing GHX after the installation, materials and the quality of the installation must satisfy the very high requirements. An inaccurate calculation of GHX can be the reason of a scarcity of heat power in a crucial moment. So far, there isn't any appropriate mathematical description of the horizontal GHX which takes into account the mutual influence of GHX pipes on each other. To solve this problem we used the temperature wave approach. As a result, a mathematical model which describes the dependence of the heat transfer rate per unit length of the horizontal GHX pipe on the thermal properties of soil, operating time of GHX and the distance between pipes was obtained. Using this model, heat transfer rates per unit length of a horizontal GHX were plotted as functions of the distance between pipes and operating time. The modeling shows that heat transfer rates decreases rapidly with the distance between pipes lower then 2 meters. After the launch of heat pump, heat power of GHX is reduced during the first 20 - 30 days and get steady after that. The obtained results correlate with experimental data. Therefore the proposed mathematical model can be used to design a horizontal GHX with the optimal characteristics, and predict its capability during operation.

  20. The Conduction of Heat through Cryogenic Regenerative Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Superczynski, W. F.; Green, G. F.

    2006-04-01

    The need for improved regenerative cryocooler efficiency may require the replacement of conventional matrices with ducts. The ducts can not be continuous in the direction of temperature gradient when using conventional materials to prevent unacceptable conduction losses. However, this discontinuity creates a complex geometry to model and determine conduction losses. Chesapeake Cryogenics, Inc. has designed, fabricated and tested an apparatus for measuring the heat conduction through regenerative heat exchangers implementing different matrices. Data is presented for stainless steel photo etched disk, phophorus-bronze embossed ribbon coils and screens made of both stainless steel and phosphorus-bronze. The heat conduction was measured with the regenerators evacuated and pressurized with helium gas. In this test apparatus, helium gas presence increased the heat leak significantly. A description of the test apparatus, instrumentation, experimental methods and data analysis are presented.

  1. Preliminary design package for maxi-therm heat exchanger module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Heat exchangers were developed for use in a solar heating and cooling system installed in a single family dwelling. Each of the three exchangers consisted of a heating and cooling module and a submersed electric water heating element. Information necessary to evaluate the preliminary design of the heat exchanger is presented in terms of the development and verification plans, performance specifications, installation and maintenance, and hazard analysis.

  2. Borehole Heat Exchangers: heat transfer simulation in the presence of a groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelotti, A.; Alberti, L.; La Licata, I.; Antelmi, M.

    2014-04-01

    The correct design of the Borehole Heat Exchanger is crucial for the operation and the energy performance of a Ground Source Heat Pump. Most design methods and tools are based on the assumption that the ground is a solid medium where conduction is the only heat transfer mechanism. In turn in regions rich in groundwater the groundwater flow influence has to be assessed, by including the convection effects. In this paper a numerical model of a 100 m U-pipe in a saturated porous medium is presented. The model is created adopting MT3DMS coupled to MODFLOW. A Darcy flow is imposed across the medium. The typical operation of a Borehole Heat Exchanger operating both in winter and in summer is simulated for two years, under different groundwater velocities. The energy injected to and extracted from the ground is derived as a function of the Darcy velocity and compared with the purely conductive case. Temperature fields in the ground at key moments are shown and discussed. From both the energy and the aquifer temperature field points of view, the velocity ranges for respectively negligible and relevant influence of the groundwater flow are identified.

  3. Microchannel Heat Exchangers with Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Ohadi, M.M.; Radermacher, R.

    2001-09-15

    The objective of the present study was to determine the performance of CO{sub 2} microchannel evaporators and gas coolers in operational conditions representing those of residential heat pumps. A set of breadboard prototype microchannel evaporators and gas coolers was developed and tested. The refrigerant in the heat exchangers followed a counter cross-flow path with respect to the airflow direction. The test conditions corresponded to the typical operating conditions of residential heat pumps. In addition, a second set of commercial microchannel evaporators and gas coolers was tested for a less comprehensive range of operating conditions. The test results were reduced and a comprehensive data analysis, including comparison with the previous studies in this field, was performed. Capacity and pressure drop of the evaporator and gas cooler for the range of parameters studied were analyzed and are documented in this report. A gas cooler performance prediction model based on non-dimensional parameters was also developed and results are discussed as well. In addition, in the present study, experiments were conducted to evaluate capacities and pressure drops for sub-critical CO{sub 2} flow boiling and transcritical CO{sub 2} gas cooling in microchannel heat exchangers. An extensive review of the literature failed to indicate any previous systematic study in this area, suggesting a lack of fundamental understanding of the phenomena and a lack of comprehensive data that would quantify the performance potential of CO{sub 2} microchannel heat exchangers for the application at hand. All experimental tests were successfully conducted with an energy balance within {+-}3%. The only exceptions to this were experiments at very low saturation temperatures (-23 C), where energy balances were as high as 10%. In the case of evaporators, it was found that a lower saturation temperature (especially when moisture condensation occurs) improves the overall heat transfer coefficient

  4. Heat exchanger life extension via in-situ reconditioning

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan

    2016-06-28

    A method of in-situ reconditioning a heat exchanger includes the steps of: providing an in-service heat exchanger comprising a precipitate-strengthened alloy wherein at least one mechanical property of the heat exchanger is degraded by coarsening of the precipitate, the in-service heat exchanger containing a molten salt working heat exchange fluid; deactivating the heat exchanger from service in-situ; in a solution-annealing step, in-situ heating the heat exchanger and molten salt working heat exchange fluid contained therein to a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the coarsened precipitate; in a quenching step, flowing the molten salt working heat-exchange fluid through the heat exchanger in-situ to cool the alloy and retain a supersaturated solid solution while preventing formation of large precipitates; and in an aging step, further varying the temperature of the flowing molten salt working heat-exchange fluid to re-precipitate the dissolved precipitate.

  5. Stochasticity and organization of tropical convection: Role of stratiform heating in the simulation of MJO in an aquaplanet coarse resolution GCM using a stochastic multicloud parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouider, B.; Majda, A.; Deng, Q.; Ravindran, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) are large computer codes based on the discretization of the equations of atmospheric and oceanic motions coupled to various processes of transfer of heat, moisture and other constituents between land, atmosphere, and oceans. Because of computing power limitations, typical GCM grid resolution is on the order of 100 km and the effects of many physical processes, occurring on smaller scales, on the climate system are represented through various closure recipes known as parameterizations. The parameterization of convective motions and many processes associated with cumulus clouds such as the exchange of latent heat and cloud radiative forcing are believed to be behind much of uncertainty in GCMs. Based on a lattice particle interacting system, the stochastic multicloud model (SMCM) provide a novel and efficient representation of the unresolved variability in GCMs due to organized tropical convection and the cloud cover. It is widely recognized that stratiform heating contributes significantly to tropical rainfall and to the dynamics of tropical convective systems by inducing a front-to-rear tilt in the heating profile. Stratiform anvils forming in the wake of deep convection play a central role in the dynamics of tropical mesoscale convective systems. Here, aquaplanet simulations with a warm pool like surface forcing, based on a coarse-resolution GCM , of ˜170 km grid mesh, coupled with SMCM, are used to demonstrate the importance of stratiform heating for the organization of convection on planetary and intraseasonal scales. When some key model parameters are set to produce higher stratiform heating fractions, the model produces low-frequency and planetary-scale Madden Julian oscillation (MJO)-like wave disturbances while lower to moderate stratiform heating fractions yield mainly synoptic-scale convectively coupled Kelvin-like waves. Rooted from the stratiform instability, it is conjectured here that the strength and extent of stratiform

  6. Mixed Convection Heat Transfer Experiments in Smooth and Rough Verticla Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    P Symolon; W Neuhaus; R Odell

    2004-12-22

    The mixed convection regime is a transitional heat transfer regime between forced convection and natural convection, where both the forced component of flow, and the buoyancy induced component are important. Aiding flow is when buoyancy forces act in the same direction as the forced flow (heated upflow or cooled downflow), while opposing flow is when the buoyancy force is in the opposite direction of the forced flow (cooled upflow or heated downflow). For opposing flow the buoyancy always increases the rate of heat transfer over the forced convection value. For aiding flow, as the heat flux increased, a reduction in heat transfer is encountered until a condition known as laminarization occurs, where the heat transfer is at a minimum value. Further increases in the wall heat flux causes re-transition to turbulence, and increased heat transfer. In this paper, for the first time, experiments were performed to characterize the effect of surface roughness on heat transfer in mixed convection, for the case of aiding flow. A correlation was developed to allow calculation of mixed convection heat transfer coefficients for rough or smooth tubes.

  7. Analysis of the heat transfer from horizontal pipes at natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapjor, Andrej; Huzvar, Jozef; Ftorek, Branislav; Smatanova, Helena

    2014-08-01

    These article deals with heat transfer from "n" horizontal pipes one above another at natural convection. On the bases of theoretical models have been developed for calculating the thermal performance of natural convection by Churilla and Morgan, for various pipe diameters and temperatures. These models were compared with models created in CFD-Fluent Ansys the same boundary conditions. The aim of the analyze of heat and fluxional pipe fields "n" pipes one about another at natural convection is the creation of criterion equation on the basis of which the heat output of heat transfer from pipe oriented areas one above another with given spacing could be quantified.

  8. Convective Heating Predictions of Apollo IV Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Molly E.

    2012-01-01

    It has been more than 50 years since NASA engineers have attempted to design a manned space vehicle with the capability to return from beyond low Earth orbit. In this interval, our methodologies for designing the thermal protection system (TPS) to protect humans from the extremely high temperatures of re-entry have changed significantly. With these considerations in mind, we return to the Apollo IV (AS-501) flight data. This incredible data set allows us to assess the current tools and methodologies being used to design Orion MPCV. In particular, our ability to predict the aftbody separated region convective heating environments for MPCV is critical. The design uses reusable TPS in this area, whereas Apollo designers used ablative TPS which can withstand much more severe environments. This presentation will revisit the flight data, summarize the assumptions going into the analysis, present the results and draw conclusions regarding how accurately we can currently predict the heating in the aftbody separated region of a re-entry capsule.

  9. Natural convection heat transfer analysis of ATR fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Langerman, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    Natural convection air cooling of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel assemblies is analyzed to determine the level of decay heat that can be removed without exceeding the melting temperature of the fuel. The study was conducted to assist in the level 2 PRA analysis of a hypothetical ATR water canal draining accident. The heat transfer process is characterized by a very low Rayleigh number (Ra {approx} 10{sup {minus}5}) and a high temperature ratio. Since neither data nor analytical models were available for Ra < 0.1, an analytical approach is presented based upon the integral boundary layer equations. All assumptions and simplifications are presented and assessed and two models are developed from similar foundations. In one model, the well-known Boussinesq approximations are employed, the results from which are used to assess the modeling philosophy through comparison to existing data and published analytical results. In the other model, the Boussinesq approximations are not used, thus making the model more general and applicable to the ATR analysis.

  10. Natural convection flow in porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiki, Md. Noor-A.-Alam; Molla, Md. Mamun; Saha, Suvash C.

    2016-07-01

    Unsteady natural convection flow in a two dimensional fluid saturated porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux, symmetrical cooling from the sides and the insulated top wall has been investigated numerically. The governing equations are the Darcy's law for the porous media and the energy equation for the temperature field has been considered. The non-dimensional Darcy's law in terms of the stream function is solved by finite difference method using the successive over-relaxation (SOR) scheme and the energy equation is solved by Alternative Direction Alternative (ADI) scheme. The uniform heat flux source is located centrally at the bottom wall. The numerical results are presented in terms of the streamlines and isotherms, as well as the local and average rate of heat transfer for the wide range of the Darcy's Rayleigh number and the length of the heat flux source at the bottom wall.

  11. Technology Solutions Case Study: Foundation Heat Exchanger, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-01

    The foundation heat exchanger, developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is a new concept for a cost-effective horizontal ground heat exchanger that can be connected to water-to-water or water-to-air heat pump systems for space conditioning as well as domestic water heating.

  12. Heat Transfer Convection in The Cooking of Apple Using a Solar Cooker Box-Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terres, H.; Chávez, S.; Lizardi, A.; López, R.; Vaca, M.; Flores, J.; Salazar, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, experimental results to determine the convection heat transfer coefficient in the cooking process of apple using a solar cooker box-type are presented. Experimental data of temperatures for water, surface and central point of the apple were used. To determine the convection coefficient, the apple was modelled as a sphere. The temperatures evolution was defined using thermocouples located at water, surface and central point in the vegetables. Using heat transfer convection equations in transitory state and the temperatures measured, the Biot number and the convection coefficient were determined.

  13. Adjoint optimization of natural convection problems: differentially heated cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saglietti, Clio; Schlatter, Philipp; Monokrousos, Antonios; Henningson, Dan S.

    2016-06-01

    Optimization of natural convection-driven flows may provide significant improvements to the performance of cooling devices, but a theoretical investigation of such flows has been rarely done. The present paper illustrates an efficient gradient-based optimization method for analyzing such systems. We consider numerically the natural convection-driven flow in a differentially heated cavity with three Prandtl numbers (Pr=0.15{-}7 ) at super-critical conditions. All results and implementations were done with the spectral element code Nek5000. The flow is analyzed using linear direct and adjoint computations about a nonlinear base flow, extracting in particular optimal initial conditions using power iteration and the solution of the full adjoint direct eigenproblem. The cost function for both temperature and velocity is based on the kinetic energy and the concept of entransy, which yields a quadratic functional. Results are presented as a function of Prandtl number, time horizons and weights between kinetic energy and entransy. In particular, it is shown that the maximum transient growth is achieved at time horizons on the order of 5 time units for all cases, whereas for larger time horizons the adjoint mode is recovered as optimal initial condition. For smaller time horizons, the influence of the weights leads either to a concentric temperature distribution or to an initial condition pattern that opposes the mean shear and grows according to the Orr mechanism. For specific cases, it could also been shown that the computation of optimal initial conditions leads to a degenerate problem, with a potential loss of symmetry. In these situations, it turns out that any initial condition lying in a specific span of the eigenfunctions will yield exactly the same transient amplification. As a consequence, the power iteration converges very slowly and fails to extract all possible optimal initial conditions. According to the authors' knowledge, this behavior is illustrated here

  14. Wind effects on convective heat loss from a cavity receiver for a parabolic concentrating solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.Y.

    1993-09-01

    Tests were performed to determine the convective heat loss characteristics of a cavity receiver for a parabolid dish concentrating solar collector for various tilt angles and wind speeds of 0-24 mph. Natural (no wind) convective heat loss from the receiver is the highest for a horizontal receiver orientation and negligible with the reveler facing straight down. Convection from the receiver is substantially increased by the presence of side-on wind for all receiver tilt angles. For head-on wind, convective heat loss with the receiver facing straight down is approximately the same as that for side-on wind. Overall it was found that for wind speeds of 20--24 mph, convective heat loss from the receiver can be as much as three times that occurring without wind.

  15. Modeling Urban Surface-Atmosphere Sensible Heat Exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, S. M.; Oke, T.; Lemonsu, A.; Grimmond, C.; Jackson, P.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding the nature of energy partitioning at the surface of cities is prerequisite to gaining proper insight and ability to model their climatic environment and impacts. Of particular relevance in the urban setting is the surface-atmosphere exchange of sensible heat. The combined conductive-convective exchange of turbulent sensible heat flux (QH) and net storage heat flux (Δ QS) has been shown to account for over 90% of the daytime net radiation at highly urbanized sites. This relation depends on surface structure, materials and the degree of surface-atmosphere coupling and its understanding is required in many applications; for example, to assess building climates, and to model evapo-transpiration, the urban heat island, and boundary layer growth. Observational studies, while allowing for general awareness of urban surface-atmosphere energetic interactions, are often limited in their applicability to other urban sites and/or processes. To overcome this, numerical models which aim to simulate urban climates have been developed. The Town Energy Balance (TEB) model of Masson (2000) couples the micro- and meso- scales and accurately represents the urban energy budget in meso-scale atmospheric models. TEB uses local canyon geometry together with surface and substrate radiative, thermal, moisture and roughness properties to simulate the effects produced by the presence of buildings. The urban system is simulated by calculating individual energy balances for walls, roads, and roofs, which are then integrated to resolve the local-scale surface energy balance. The model has been independently evaluated using measured fluxes from three dry sites - central Mexico City, a light industrial site in Vancouver (Masson et al., 2002) and the city center of Marseille, France (Lemonsu et al., 2003). At these sites, TEB simulated net radiation to within less than 10 W m-2 and its partitioning into turbulent and storage heat fluxes to within a few tens of W -2. TEB's good

  16. Reliability analysis on a shell and tube heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingeswara, S.; Omar, R.; Mohd Ghazi, T. I.

    2016-06-01

    A shell and tube heat exchanger reliability was done in this study using past history data from a carbon black manufacturing plant. The heat exchanger reliability study is vital in all related industries as inappropriate maintenance and operation of the heat exchanger will lead to major Process Safety Events (PSE) and loss of production. The overall heat exchanger coefficient/effectiveness (Uo) and Mean Time between Failures (MTBF) were analyzed and calculated. The Aspen and down time data was taken from a typical carbon black shell and tube heat exchanger manufacturing plant. As a result of the Uo calculated and analyzed, it was observed that the Uo declined over a period caused by severe fouling and heat exchanger limitation. This limitation also requires further burn out period which leads to loss of production. The MTBF calculated is 649.35 hours which is very low compared to the standard 6000 hours for the good operation of shell and tube heat exchanger. The guidelines on heat exchanger repair, preventive and predictive maintenance was identified and highlighted for better heat exchanger inspection and repair in the future. The fouling of heat exchanger and the production loss will be continuous if proper heat exchanger operation and repair using standard operating procedure is not followed.

  17. Flow rate distribution and effect of convection and radiation heat transfer on the temperature profile during a coil annealing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haouam, A.; Bigerelle, M.

    2015-02-01

    Determining the temperature of several steel coils, heated in a furnace with a controlled hydrogen environment is important in an annealing process. Temperatures must be defined during heat treatment in order to guarantee metallurgical properties and acceptable reduced residual stresses. In this paper we approach hydrogen flow characteristics in the furnace and through a set of coils using an annealing non-differential model. Fluid flow is schematized as a pipe network solved by the Hardy Cross method to obtain pressure drops across the various gas flow segments. A comparison is made between measured and simulated results, confirming the adequacy of adopted assumptions and the validity of proposed model. Convective and radiative exchanges between the furnace and the coils are calculated by a discretization using the finite differences method. The convection coefficients are estimated and introduced into the boundary conditions around the coil to obtain the temperature distribution in the coils and in the covering bell. Finally, heat exchanges by convection and radiation are estimated by this model and the modeling errors are <8 °C.

  18. High-temperature self-circulating thermoacoustic heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, S.; Swift, G. W.; Reid, R. S.

    2005-07-01

    Thermoacoustic and Stirling engines and refrigerators use heat exchangers to transfer heat between the oscillating flow of their thermodynamic working fluids and external heat sources and sinks. An acoustically driven heat-exchange loop uses an engine's own pressure oscillations to steadily circulate its own thermodynamic working fluid through a physically remote high-temperature heat source without using moving parts, allowing for a significant reduction in the cost and complexity of thermoacoustic and Stirling heat exchangers. The simplicity and flexibility of such heat-exchanger loops will allow thermoacoustic and Stirling machines to access diverse heat sources and sinks. Measurements of the temperatures at the interface between such a heat-exchange loop and the hot end of a thermoacoustic-Stirling engine are presented. When the steady flow is too small to flush out the mixing chamber in one acoustic cycle, the heat transfer to the regenerator is excellent, with important implications for practical use.

  19. Turbulent heat exchanger {Delta}T and {Delta}P

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, D.

    1996-12-31

    Optimum pressure drop ({Delta}P) and temperature difference ({Delta}T) in turbulent flow heat exchangers are presented in three frameworks: as quantitatively defined by fluid properties, the value of energy and the cost of heat exchange surface (with a little help from a relationship between [power/mass] and heat transfer); as the energy cost for heat recovery (with the {Delta}T cost being about equal to the heat exchanger cost and the {Delta}P cost being about 1/3 as great); and as the second law lost work inherent in heat exchange (with the {Delta}T loss being {approximately}3 times the {Delta}T loss).

  20. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-tube Heat Exchangers with Winglets

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

    2000-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with a circular tube and/or a delta-winglet pair. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.51 x 10-3 to 14.0 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 670 – 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of a circular tube, a delta-winglet pair, and a combination of a circular tube and a delta-winglet pair. Comparisons of local and average heat transfer distributions for the circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Overall mean finsurface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement associated with the deployment of the winglets with the circular cylinder. At the lowest Reynolds numbers (which correspond to the laminar operating conditions of existing geothermal air-cooled condensers), the enhancement level is nearly a factor of two. At higher Reynolds numbers, the enhancement level is close to 50%.

  1. Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, R.D. )

    1994-02-01

    A series of experiments has been made on aeroacoustic tones produced by flow over tubes in a duct. The sound is characterized by the onset of a loud and persistent acoustic resonance. The acoustic resonance occurs at the frequency of the acoustic modes. The magnitude and extent of the resonance are functions of tube pattern and tube pitch. The sound levels increase in proportion with Mach number, dynamic head and pressure drop. A design procedure for predicting the magnitude of the sound within the tube array is presented. Methods of resonance avoidance are illustrated. An example is made for a large petrochemical heat exchanger.

  2. Heat exchanger for a Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, M.; Nomaguchi, T.; Kazumoto, Y.; Tsuchino, K.; Kawajiri, K.; Hisamori, Y.

    1987-05-05

    A heat exchanger is described for a Stirling engine comprising: a domed cylinder having a domed portion and a cylindrical portion. The domed cylinder serves as a high-temperature cylinder and a regenerator housing of the Stirling engine; a cylindrical inner liner which is coaxially disposed inside the domed cylinder and which divides the inside of the domed cylinder into an expansion space inside of the inner liner and a regenerator space between the outer surface of the inner liner and the inner surface of the cylindrical portion of the domed cylinder.

  3. DESIGN OF A COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGER FOR HEAT RECUPERATION FROM A HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    G. K. Housley; J.E. O'Brien; G.L. Hawkes

    2008-11-01

    Design details of a compact heat exchanger and supporting hardware for heat recuperation in a high-temperature electrolysis application are presented. The recuperative heat exchanger uses a vacuum-brazed plate-fin design and operates between 300 and 800°C. It includes corrugated inserts for enhancement of heat transfer coefficients and extended heat transfer surface area. Two recuperative heat exchangers are required per each four-stack electrolysis module. The heat exchangers are mated to a base manifold unit that distributes the inlet and outlet flows to and from the four electrolysis stacks. Results of heat exchanger design calculations and assembly details are also presented.

  4. Forced-convection Heat-transfer Characteristics of Molten Sodium Hydroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grele, Milton D; Gedeon, Louis

    1953-01-01

    The forced-convection heat-transfer characteristics of sodium hydroxide were experimentally investigated. The heat-transfer data for heating fall slightly above the McAdams correlation line, and the heat-transfer data for cooling are fairly well represented by the McAdams correlation line.

  5. Convection patterns in end-heated inclined enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.

    2001-07-01

    The natural convection in inclined side-heated rectangular boxes with adiabatic walls is theoretically and numerically investigated. The study is focused on the characterization of the convection patterns arising at the core of the basic steady unicellular flow and covers the whole range of Prandtl numbers (0<=Pr<=∞) and inclinations (from α=0°, heated-from-below vertical cavities, to α=180°). The onset of the flow instabilities depends on the core Rayleigh number R≡K Ra, defined in terms of the local streamwise temperature gradient, KΔT/L. The critical value of R for transversal and longitudinal modes is determined by the linear stability analysis of the basic plane-parallel flow, which also provides the stability diagram in the (Pr-α) chart. Anyhow, the effect of confinement can decisively change the stability properties of the core: if the steady unicell reaches the boundary layer regime (BLR) the local temperature gradient vanishes at the core leaving a completely stable core region. A theoretical determination of the frontier of the BLR in the space of parameters (α, R, and cavity size) yields an extra criterion of stability that has been displayed in the stability diagram. As confirmed by numerical calculations, the core-flow instabilities can only develop for Pr

  6. Experimental investigation of forced convective heat transfer performance in nanofluids of Al2O3/water and CuO/water in a serpentine shaped micro channel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, A.; Alagumurthi, N.; Senthilvelan, T.

    2016-07-01

    The microchannels are device used to remove high heat fluxes from smaller area. In this experimental research work the heat transfer performance of nanofluids of Al2O3/water and CuO/water were compared. The important character of such fluids is the enhanced thermal conductivity, in comparison with base fluid without considerable alteration in physical and chemical properties. The effect of forced convective heat transfer coefficient was calculated using serpentine shaped microchannel heat exchanger. Furthermore we calculated the forced convective heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluids using theoretical correlations in order to compare the results with the experimental data. The heat transfer coefficient for different particle concentration and temperature were analysed using forced convection heat transfer using nanofluids. The findings indicate considerable enhancement in convective heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluids as compared to the basefluid. The results also shows that CuO/water nanofluid has increased heat transfer coefficient compared with Al2O3/water and base fluids. Moreover the experimental results indicate there is increased forced convective heat transfer coefficient with the increase in nano particle concentration.

  7. Characterization of various losses in a cryogenic counterflow heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminuddin, Mohammad; Zubair, Syed M.

    2014-11-01

    A detailed assessment of irreversibility, predominantly heat in-leak and axial wall conduction, is essential in accurately predicting the performance of high effectiveness heat exchangers employed in cryogenic applications. Integration into a refrigeration system as well requires consideration of parasitic heat loss by conduction from exchanger cold end to the adjacent components. Governing equations incorporating these effects in a counterflow exchanger are solved numerically and the model predictions evaluated for heat exchanger ineffectiveness and heat loss by conduction. The optimum performance mandates minimization of both. Although ineffectiveness decreases at higher longitudinal conduction, cold end loss increases with deterioration of the overall performance. Utilizing lower heat capacity rate hot fluid, nevertheless, reduces the cold end loss. Heat in-leak is relatively high with concurrent consideration of axial wall conduction and has adverse consequence on heat exchanger effectiveness. Analysis of the net heat transferred to lower stages of refrigeration reveals a critical NTU.

  8. Active latent heat storage with a screw heat exchanger - experimental results for heat transfer and concept for high pressure steam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipf, Verena; Willert, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Anton

    2016-05-01

    An innovative active latent heat storage concept was invented and developed at Fraunhofer ISE. It uses a screw heat exchanger (SHE) for the phase change during the transport of a phase change material (PCM) from a cold to a hot tank or vice versa. This separates heat transfer and storage tank in comparison to existing concepts. A test rig has been built in order to investigate the heat transfer coefficients of the SHE during melting and crystallization of the PCM. The knowledge of these characteristics is crucial in order to assess the performance of the latent heat storage in a thermal system. The test rig contains a double shafted SHE, which is heated or cooled with thermal oil. The overall heat transfer coefficient U and the convective heat transfer coefficient on the PCM side hPCM both for charging and discharging have been calculated based on the measured data. For charging, the overall heat transfer coefficient in the tested SHE was Uch = 308 W/m2K and for discharging Udis = 210 W/m2K. Based on the values for hPCM the overall heat transfer coefficients for a larger SHE with steam as heat transfer fluid and an optimized geometry were calculated with Uch = 320 W/m2K for charging and Udis = 243 W/m2K for discharging. For pressures as high as p = 100 bar, an SHE concept has been developed, which uses an organic fluid inside the flight of the SHE as working media. With this concept, the SHE can also be deployed for very high pressure, e.g. as storage in solar thermal power plants.

  9. Condensate removal device for heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trusch, R. B.; Oconnor, E. W. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A set of perforated tubes disposed at the gas output side of a heat exchanger, in a position not to affect the rate of flow of the air or other gas is described. The tubes are connected to a common manifold which is connected to a sucking device. Where it is necessary to conserve and recirculate the air sucked through the tubes, the output of the manifold is run through a separator to remove the condensate from the gas. The perforations in the slurper tubes are small, lying in the range of 0.010 inch to 0.100 inch. The tubes are disposed in contact with the surfaces of the heat exchanger on which the condensate is precipitated, whether fins or plates, so that the water may be directed to the tube openings by means of surface effects, together with the assistance of the air flow. Only about 5 percent of the air output need be thus diverted, and it effectively removes virtually all of the condensate.

  10. Mixed double-diffusive convection in gas-loaded heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, P.F. ); Tien, C.L. )

    1990-02-01

    This study examines mixed double-diffusive convection in gas-loaded heat pipes and two-phase thermosyphons. The numerical simulation and experiments show that steady, laminar natural convection due to the combined effects of temperature and concentration gradients can greatly redistribute the noncondensable gas within the condenser. This change of the gas distribution, however, does not significantly alter the overall condensation heat transfer. This interesting result implies that even with natural convection present, much simpler integral models can still be applied with confidence for the design of variable-conductance heat pipes and thermosyphons.

  11. BASIMO - Borehole Heat Exchanger Array Simulation and Optimization Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Daniel; Rühaak, Wolfram; Welsch, Bastian; Bär, Kristian; Sass, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Borehole heat exchangers represent a well-established technology, which pushes for new fields of applications and novel modifications. Current simulation tools cannot - or only to some extent - describe features like inclined or partly insulated boreholes unless they run fully discretized models of the borehole heat exchangers. However, fully discretized models often come at a high computational cost, especially for large arrays of borehole heat exchangers. We present a tool, which uses one dimensional thermal resistance and capacity models for the borehole heat exchangers coupled with a numerical finite element model for the subsurface heat transport. An unstructured tetrahedral mesh bypasses the limitations of structured grids for borehole path geometries, while the thermal resistance and capacity model is improved to account for borehole heat exchanger properties changing with depth. The presented tool benefits from the fast analytical solution of the thermal interactions within the boreholes while still allowing for a detailed consideration of the borehole heat exchanger properties.

  12. Roles of convective heating and boundary-layer moisture asymmetry in slowing down the convectively coupled Kelvin waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Li, Tim

    2016-06-01

    Mechanisms for an in-phase relationship between convection and low-level zonal wind and the slow propagation of the convectively coupled Kelvin wave (CCKW) are investigated by analyzing satellite-based brightness temperature and reanalysis data and by constructing a simple theoretical model. Observational data analysis reveals an eastward shift of the low-level convergence and moisture relative to the CCKW convective center. The composite vertical structures show that the low-level convergence lies in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) (below 800 hPa), and is induced by the pressure trough above the top of PBL through an Ekman-pumping process. A traditional view of a slower eastward propagation speed compared to the dry Kelvin waves is attributed to the reduction of atmospheric static stability in mid-troposphere due to the convective heating effect. The authors' quantitative assessment of the heating effect shows that this effect alone cannot explain the observed CCKW phase speed. We hypothesize that additional slowing process arises from the effect of zonally asymmetric PBL moisture. A simple theoretical model is constructed to understand the relative role of the heating induced effective static stability effect and the PBL moisture effect. The result demonstrates the important role of the both effects. Thus, PBL-free atmosphere interaction is important in explaining the observed structure and propagation of CCKW.

  13. Heat Transfer of Thermocapillary Convection in a Two-Layered Fluid System Under the Influence of Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Ludovisis, D.; Cha, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    Heat transfer of a two-layer fluid system has been of great importance in a variety of industrial applications. For example, the phenomena of immiscible fluids can be found in materials processing and heat exchangers. Typically in solidification from a melt, the convective motion is the dominant factor that affects the uniformity of material properties. In the layered flow, thermocapillary forces can come into an important play, which was first emphasized by a previous investigator in 1958. Under extraterrestrial environments without gravity, thermocapillary effects can be a more dominant factor, which alters material properties in processing. Control and optimization of heat transfer in an immiscible fluid system need complete understanding of the flow phenomena that can be induced by surface tension at a fluid interface. The present work is focused on understanding of the magnetic field effects on thermocapillary convection, in order to optimize material processing. That is, it involves the study of the complicated phenomena to alter the flow motion in crystal growth. In this effort, the Marangoni convection in a cavity with differentially heated sidewalls is investigated with and without the influence of a magnetic field. As a first step, numerical analyses are performed, by thoroughly investigating influences of all pertinent physical parameters. Experiments are then conducted, with preliminary results, for comparison with the numerical analyses.

  14. A Coupled Model for Natural Convection and Condensation in HeatedSubsurface Enclosures Embedded in Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Halecky, N.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Webb, S.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-04-14

    In heated tunnels such as those designated for emplacementof radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, axial temperature gradients maycause natural convection processes that can significantly influence themoisture conditions in the tunnels and in the surrounding fractured rock.Large-scale convection cells would provide an effective mechanism foraxial vapor transport, driving moisture out of the formation away fromthe heated tunnel section into cool end sections (where no waste isemplaced). To study such processes, we have developed and applied anenhanced version of TOUGH2 (Pruess et al., 1999) adding a new module thatsolves for natural convection in open cavities. The new TOUGH2 simulatorsimultaneously handles (1) the flow and energy transport processes in thefractured rock; (2) the flow and energy transport processes in thecavity; and (3) the heat and mass exchange at the rock-cavity interface.The new module is applied to simulate the future thermal-hydrological(TH) conditions within and near a representative waste emplacement tunnelat Yucca Mountain. Particular focus is on the potential for condensationalong the emplacement section, a possible result of heat outputdifferences between individual waste packages.

  15. Condensate removal mechanisms in a constrained vapor bubble heat exchanger.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ling; Wang, Yingxin; Wayner, Peter C; Plawsky, Joel L

    2002-10-01

    Microgravity experiments on the constrained vapor bubble heat exchanger (CVB) are being developed for the space station. Herein, ground-based experimental studies on condensate removal in the condenser region of the vertical CVB were conducted and the mechanism of condensate removal in microgravity was found to be the capillary force. The effects of curvature and contact angle on the driving forces for condensate removal is studied. The Nusselt correlations are derived for the film condensation and the flow from the drop to the meniscus at the moment of merging. These new correlations scale as forced convection with h proportional to L(1/2) or h proportional to L(1/2)(cd). For the partially wetting ethanol system studied, the heat transfer coefficient for film condensation was found to be 4.25 x 10(4) W/m(2)K; for dropwise condensation at moment of merging it was found to be 9.64 x 10(4) W/m(2)K; and for single drops it was found to be 1.33 x 10(5) W/m(2)K.

  16. 14 CFR 25.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 25.1125 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Exhaust System § 25.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine powered airplanes, the following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat...

  17. 40 CFR 63.654 - Heat exchange systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Heat exchange systems. 63.654 Section... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.654 Heat exchange systems. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, the owner or operator of a heat...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 25.1125 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Exhaust System § 25.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine powered airplanes, the following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 29.1125 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Exhaust System § 29.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine powered rotorcraft the following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat...

  20. 14 CFR 29.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 29.1125 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Exhaust System § 29.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine powered rotorcraft the following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat...

  1. 14 CFR 29.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 29.1125 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Exhaust System § 29.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine powered rotorcraft the following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat...

  2. 40 CFR 63.654 - Heat exchange systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Heat exchange systems. 63.654 Section... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.654 Heat exchange systems. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, the owner or operator of a heat...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1125 - Exhaust heat exchangers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exhaust heat exchangers. 25.1125 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Exhaust System § 25.1125 Exhaust heat exchangers. For reciprocating engine powered airplanes, the following apply: (a) Each exhaust heat...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1409 - Heat exchange system provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Heat exchange system provisions. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Manufacture of Amino/Phenolic Resins § 63.1409 Heat... each heat exchange system used to cool process equipment in an affected source, according to...

  5. A Project to Design and Build Compact Heat Exchangers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    Students designed and manufactured compact, shell-and-tube heat exchangers in a project-based learning exercise integrated with our heat transfer course. The heat exchangers were constructed from common building materials available at home improvement centers. The cost of materials for a device was less than $20. The project gave students…

  6. 40 CFR 63.654 - Heat exchange systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Heat exchange systems. 63.654 Section... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.654 Heat exchange systems. (a) Except as specified in paragraph (b) of this section, the owner or operator of a heat...

  7. Local Heat Transfer for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers using Oval Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

    2000-08-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with either a circular tube or an elliptical tube in crossflow. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.56 x 10-3 to 15.6 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 630 – 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. The elliptical tube had an aspect ratio of 3:1 and a/H equal to 4.33. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of circular and oval tubes and their relationship to the complex horseshoe vortex system that forms in the flow stagnation region. Fin surface stagnation-region Nusselt numbers are shown to be proportional to the square-root of Reynolds number.

  8. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and effectiveness in corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıç, Bayram; İpek, Osman

    2016-06-01

    In this study, heat transfer rate and effectiveness of corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles were investigated experimentally. Chevron angles of plate heat exchangers are β = 30° and β = 60°. For this purpose, experimentally heating system used plate heat exchanger was designed and constructed. Thermodynamic analysis of corrugated plate heat exchangers having different chevron angles were carried out. The heat transfer rate and effectiveness values are calculated. The experimental results are shown that heat transfer rate and effectiveness values for β = 60° is higher than that of the other. Obtained experimental results were graphically presented.

  9. Heat exchanger for fuel cell power plant reformer

    DOEpatents

    Misage, Robert; Scheffler, Glenn W.; Setzer, Herbert J.; Margiott, Paul R.; Parenti, Jr., Edmund K.

    1988-01-01

    A heat exchanger uses the heat from processed fuel gas from a reformer for a fuel cell to superheat steam, to preheat raw fuel prior to entering the reformer and to heat a water-steam coolant mixture from the fuel cells. The processed fuel gas temperature is thus lowered to a level useful in the fuel cell reaction. The four temperature adjustments are accomplished in a single heat exchanger with only three heat transfer cores. The heat exchanger is preheated by circulating coolant and purge steam from the power section during startup of the latter.

  10. Local convective heat transfer coefficient and friction factor of CuO/water nanofluid in a microchannel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabi, A. R.; Zarrinabadi, S.; Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Hashemabadi, S. H.; Salimi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Forced convective heat transfer in a microchannel heat sink (MCHS) using CuO/water nanofluids with 0.1 and 0.2 vol% as coolant was investigated. The experiments were focused on the heat transfer enhancement in the channel entrance region at Re < 1800. Hydraulic performance of the MCHS was also estimated by measuring friction factor and pressure drop. Results showed that higher convective heat transfer coefficient was obtained at the microchannel entrance. Maximum enhancement of the average heat transfer coefficient compared with deionized water was about 40 % for 0.2 vol% nanofluid at Re = 1150. Enhancement of the convective heat transfer coefficient of nanofluid decreased with further increasing of Reynolds number.

  11. Circulatory heat sources for canine respiratory heat exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Solway, J; Leff, A R; Dreshaj, I; Munoz, N M; Ingenito, E P; Michaels, D; Ingram, R H; Drazen, J M

    1986-01-01

    We assessed the roles of the pulmonary and bronchial circulations as potential heat sources to the pulmonary airways during respiratory heat loss, by observing the changes in airstream temperature that accompanied temporary occlusion of the pulmonary or bronchial circulations. Baseline end-expiratory and end-inspiratory airstream temperatures were 35.4 +/- 0.2 degrees C (SEM) and 30.9 +/- 0.3 degrees C, respectively, among all trials. With occlusion of the lower lobe pulmonary arteries for 3 min ipsilateral end-expiratory and end-inspiratory airstream temperatures fell by 2.8 +/- 0.2 and 1.1 +/- 0.2 degrees C, respectively, during hyperpnea with room temperature air, and by 3.5 +/- 0.5 and 1.8 +/- 0.2 degrees C, respectively, during hyperpnea with frigid air. In marked contrast, interruption of the bronchial circulation for 3 min had no effect on airstream temperatures. These data indicate that under these conditions, the pulmonary circulation, but not the bronchial circulation, serves as an important local heat source for respiratory heat exchange within the pulmonary airways. Images PMID:3760181

  12. Two Experiments for Estimating Free Convection and Radiation Heat Transfer Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Economides, Michael J.; Maloney, J. O.

    1978-01-01

    This article describes two simple undergraduate heat transfer experiments which may reinforce a student's understanding of free convection and radiation. Apparatus, experimental procedure, typical results, and discussion are included. (Author/BB)

  13. Heat transfer augmentation in double pipe heat exchanger using mechanical turbulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamboj, Kushal; Singh, Gurjeet; Sharma, Rohit; Panchal, Dilbagh; Hira, Jaspreet

    2016-05-01

    The work presented here focuses on heat transfer augmentation by means of divergent-convergent spring turbulator (the enhancement device). Aim of the present work is to find such an optimum pitch at which the augmentation in heat transfer is maximum and the amount of power consumption is minimum, so that an economic design can be created with maximum thermal efficiency. So, the concept of pitch variation is introduced, which is defined as the horizontal distance between two consecutive turbulators. It describes that, the lesser is the pitch the more number of turbulators that can be inserted in inner pipe of double pipe heat exchanger, hence more will be the friction factor. This physics increases convective ability of the heat transfer process from the surface of inner pipe. There is a certain limit to which a pitch can be decreased, lesser the pitch the more the pressure drop and friction factor and hence the more will be the pumping power requirement to maintain a desired mass flow rate of hot water. Analysis of thermal factors such as Nusselts number, friction factor, with different pitches of divergent convergent spring turbulators of circular cross-section 15, 10, and 5 cm at Reynolds's number ranging between 9000 < Re < 40,000 is done graphically.

  14. MHD forced convective laminar boundary layer flow from a convectively heated moving vertical plate with radiation and transpiration effect.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to x(m) whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to x((m-1)/2) where x is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  15. MHD forced convective laminar boundary layer flow from a convectively heated moving vertical plate with radiation and transpiration effect.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to x(m) whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to x((m-1)/2) where x is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory.

  16. High temperature heat exchanger studies for applications to gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, June Kee; Jeong, Ji Hwan; Ha, Man Yeong; Kim, Kui Soon

    2009-12-01

    Growing demand for environmentally friendly aero gas-turbine engines with lower emissions and improved specific fuel consumption can be met by incorporating heat exchangers into gas turbines. Relevant researches in such areas as the design of a heat exchanger matrix, materials selection, manufacturing technology, and optimization by a variety of researchers have been reviewed in this paper. Based on results reported in previous studies, potential heat exchanger designs for an aero gas turbine recuperator, intercooler, and cooling-air cooler are suggested.

  17. Heat exchanger and water tank arrangement for passive cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Gillett, James E.; Johnson, F. Thomas; Orr, Richard S.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    A water storage tank in the coolant water loop of a nuclear reactor contains a tubular heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has tubesheets mounted to the tank connections so that the tubesheets and tubes may be readily inspected and repaired. Preferably, the tubes extend from the tubesheets on a square pitch and then on a rectangular pitch therebetween. Also, the heat exchanger is supported by a frame so that the tank wall is not required to support all of its weight.

  18. Performance of multiple mini-tube heat exchangers as an internal heat exchanger of a vapor-injection cycle heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jin Yong; Jeong, Ji Hwan

    2016-04-01

    A multiple mini-tube (MMT) heat exchanger was considered as an internal heat exchanger of vapor-injection cycle heat pump. Heat transfer and pressure drop in multiple mini-tube heat exchangers were numerically and experimentally investigated. Results show that the best performance of the MMT heat exchanger can be obtained when the intermediate-pressure two-phase refrigerant is supplied to the shell-side and this refrigerant reaches a saturated vapor state at the exit of the heat exchanger.

  19. Global optimization algorithm for heat exchanger networks

    SciTech Connect

    Quesada, I.; Grossmann, I.E. )

    1993-03-01

    This paper deals with the global optimization of heat exchanger networks with fixed topology. It is shown that if linear area cost functions are assumed, as well as arithmetic mean driving force temperature differences in networks with isothermal mixing, the corresponding nonlinear programming (NLP) optimization problem involves linear constraints and a sum of linear fractional functions in the objective which are nonconvex. A rigorous algorithm is proposed that is based on a convex NLP underestimator that involves linear and nonlinear estimators for fractional and bilinear terms which provide a tight lower bound to the global optimum. This NLP problem is used within a spatial branch and bound method for which branching rules are given. Basic properties of the proposed method are presented, and its application is illustrated with several example problems. The results show that the proposed method only requires few nodes in the branch and bound search.

  20. Condensing Heat Exchanger with Hydrophilic Antimicrobial Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A multi-layer antimicrobial hydrophilic coating is applied to a substrate of anodized aluminum, although other materials may form the substrate. A silver layer is sputtered onto a thoroughly clean anodized surface of the aluminum to about 400 nm thickness. A layer of crosslinked, silicon-based macromolecular structure about 10 nm thickness overlies the silver layer, and the outermost surface of the layer of crosslinked, silicon-based macromolecular structure is hydroxide terminated to produce a hydrophilic surface with a water drop contact angle of less than 10.degree.. The coated substrate may be one of multiple fins in a condensing heat exchanger for use in the microgravity of space, which has narrow channels defined between angled fins such that the surface tension of condensed water moves water by capillary flow to a central location where it is pumped to storage. The antimicrobial coating prevents obstruction of the capillary passages.

  1. Joule-Thomson effect and internal convection heat transfer in turbulent He II flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walstrom, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    The temperature rise in highly turbulent He II flowing in tubing was measured in the temperature range 1.6-2.1 K. The effect of internal convection heat transport on the predicted temperature profiles is calculated from the two-fluid model with mutual friction. The model predictions are in good agreement with the measurements, provided that the pressure gradient term is retained in the expression for internal convection heat flow.

  2. Direct contact droplet heat exchangers for thermal management in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Hertzberg, A.

    1982-01-01

    A liquid droplet heat exchanger for space applications is described which transfers heat between a gas and a liquid metal dispersed into droplets. The ability of the droplet heat exchanger to transfer heat between two media in direct contact over a wide temperature range circumvents many of the material limitations of conventional tube-type heat exchangers and does away with complicated plumbing systems and their tendency toward single point failure. Droplet heat exchangers offer large surface to volume ratios in a compact geometry, very low gas pressure drop, and high effectiveness. The application of the droplet heat exchanger in a high temperature Brayton cycle is discussed to illustrate its performance and operational characteristics.

  3. Thermal energy storage heat exchanger: Molten salt heat exchanger design for utility power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferarra, A.; Yenetchi, G.; Haslett, R.; Kosson, R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of thermal energy storage (TES) in the latent heat of molten salts as a means of conserving fossil fuels and lowering the cost of electric power was evaluated. Public utility systems provided electric power on demand. This demand is generally maximum during late weekday afternoons, with considerably lower overnight and weekend loads. Typically, the average demand is only 60% to 80% of peak load. As peak load increases, the present practice is to purchase power from other grid facilities or to bring older less efficient fossil-fuel plants on line which increase the cost of electric power. The widespread use of oil-fired boilers, gas turbine and diesel equipment to meet peaking loads depletes our oil-based energy resources. Heat exchangers utilizing molten salts can be used to level the energy consumption curve. The study begins with a demand analysis and the consideration of several existing modern fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants for use as models. Salts are evaluated for thermodynamic, economic, corrosive, and safety characteristics. Heat exchanger concepts are explored and heat exchanger designs are conceived. Finally, the economics of TES conversions in existing plants and new construction is analyzed. The study concluded that TES is feasible in electric power generation. Substantial data are presented for TES design, and reference material for further investigation of techniques is included.

  4. Advanced heat exchanger development for molten salts

    DOE PAGES

    Sabharwall, Piyush; Clark, Denis; Glazoff, Michael; Zheng, Guiqiu; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700°C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet materialmore » in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850°C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.« less

  5. Advanced heat exchanger development for molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabharwall, Piyush; Clark, Denis; Glazoff, Michael; Zheng, Guiqiu; Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark

    2014-12-01

    This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700°C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850°C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.

  6. Thermal Propulsion Capture System Heat Exchanger Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Evan M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges of manned spaceflight beyond low earth orbit and the moon is harmful radiation that astronauts would be exposed to on their long journey to Mars and further destinations. Using nuclear energy has the potential to be a more effective means of propulsion compared to traditional chemical engines (higher specific impulse). An upper stage nuclear engine would allow astronauts to reach their destination faster and more fuel efficiently. Testing these engines poses engineering challenges due to the need to totally capture the engine exhaust. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System is a concept for cost effectively and safely testing Nuclear Thermal Engines. Nominally, hydrogen exhausted from the engine is not radioactive, but is treated as such in case of fuel element failure. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System involves injecting liquid oxygen to convert the hydrogen exhaust into steam. The steam is then cooled and condensed into liquid water to allow for storage. The Thermal Propulsion Capture System concept for ground testing of a nuclear powered engine involves capturing the engine exhaust to be cooled and condensed before being stored. The hydrogen exhaust is injected with liquid oxygen and burned to form steam. That steam must be cooled to saturation temperatures before being condensed into liquid water. A crossflow heat exchanger using water as a working fluid will be designed to accomplish this goal. Design a cross flow heat exchanger for the Thermal Propulsion Capture System testing which: Eliminates the need for water injection cooling, Cools steam from 5800 F to saturation temperature, and Is efficient and minimizes water requirement.

  7. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  8. Analysis of Radiation-natural Convection Interactions in 1-g and low-g Environments using the Discrete Exchange Factor Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1993-01-01

    A new numerical method is presented for the analysis of combined natural convection and radiation heat transfer with applications in many engineering situations such as materials processing, combustion and fire research. Because of the recent interest in the low gravity environment of space, attention is devoted to both 1-g and low-g applications. The two-dimensional mathematical model is represented by a set of coupled nonlinear integro-partial differential equations. Radiative exchange is formulated using the Discrete Exchange Factor method (DEF). This method considers point to point exchange and provides accurate results over a wide range of radiation parameters. Numerical results show that radiation significantly influences the flow and heat transfer in both low-g and 1-g applications. In the low-g environment, convection is weak, and radiation can easily become the dominant heat transfer mode. It is also shown that volumetric heating by radiation gives rise to an intricate cell pattern in the top heated enclosure.

  9. The empirical correlations for natural convection heat transfer Al2O3 and ZrO2 nanofluid in vertical sub-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamajaya, K.; Umar, E.; Sudjatmi

    2015-09-01

    Study on convection heat transfer using water-Al2O3 nanofluid as the working fluid in the vertical sub-channel has been conducted. The results of the study have been compared with the water-ZrO2 nanofluid and pure-water as the working fluid. The equipment used in this experiment is a vertical triangular sub-channel, equipped by primary cooling system, heat exchanger and a secondary cooling system. As a heating source used three vertical cylinders that have a uniform heat flux with a pitch to diameter ratio (P/D) 01:16. Cooling is used is water-Al2O3 colloid at 0.05 wt. %. Heat transfer from heating to cooling would occur in natural or forced convection. However, in this study will be discussed only natural convection heat transfer. The results showed that the natural convection heat transfer of water-Al2O3 nanofluid in a triangular sub-channels depending on the position. The results of the correlation as follows,

  10. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Reynolds number to the 0.6 power with peak Nusselt numbers near 75 at a Reynolds number of 10,000. Open-celled metallic foams offer three important characteristics which enable them to perform well in heat exchange applications. They contain a very large surface area to volume ratio, a highly complex flow passage through the foam, and in many cases, significant thermal conductivity in the solid phase. Unfortunately, difficulty arises when metal foams are implemented in heat exchanger designs. The performance of the foam has not been characterized in a way which is conducive to analytical design of high performance heat exchangers. The second part of this work provides both flow and heat transfer measurements for metal foam geometries. Full-field velocity measurements through a foam sample were acquired using MRV. The measurements show transverse velocities on the order of 25-30% of the Darcy velocity, UD, which produce enhanced thermal dispersion within the foam matrix. A mechanical dispersion coefficient, DM, was formed which demonstrates the transverse dispersion to be 13 times the kinematic viscosity and 9 times the thermal diffusivity of air at 20°C and 1 atm. To describe the heat transfer performance of the foam as a fin, we have developed a new method that utilizes a well documented, periodic heat exchanger core test and a new one heated wall (OHW) test which when used in conjunction are shown to determine the convective performance (hmAc), the conductive performance (ksAc), and the effective bond resistance associated to attaching metal foams to primary heat transfer surfaces (RBond). Small pore diameter foams, d ≤ 1 mm, where found to perform approximately a factor of 2 greater per unit volume than a comparable fine-fin heat exchanger surface at the same pumping power which points to the fact the foam as a system is conduction limited not convection limited.

  11. Thermal and economic analysis of plastic heat exchangers for solar water heating

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Davidson, J.; Raman, R.; Mantell, S.

    1999-07-01

    The feasibility of polymer heat exchangers for solar water heaters is examined in terms of thermal performance and cost of tube-in-shell and immersed designs. High temperature nylon and cross-linked polyethylene were identified as suitable polymers for this application. These materials can meet the high temperature and pressure requirements of a domestic potable hot water system. The heat exchanger designs are compared for heat transfer area required to provide 3,000 and 6,000 W. A nylon tube-in-shell heat exchanger, sized for a 3,000 W load, is approximately 80% of the cost of a copper tube-in-shell heat exchanger. For an immersed heat exchanger, a high temperature nylon tube bank design has the lowest cost. The nylon tube bank heat exchanger, sized for a 3,000 W load, is approximately 80% the cost of an immersed coiled copper tube heat exchanger.

  12. Scale/Analytical Analyses of Freezing and Convective Melting with Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali S. Siahpush; John Crepeau; Piyush Sabharwall

    2013-07-01

    Using a scale/analytical analysis approach, we model phase change (melting) for pure materials which generate constant internal heat generation for small Stefan numbers (approximately one). The analysis considers conduction in the solid phase and natural convection, driven by internal heat generation, in the liquid regime. The model is applied for a constant surface temperature boundary condition where the melting temperature is greater than the surface temperature in a cylindrical geometry. The analysis also consider constant heat flux (in a cylindrical geometry).We show the time scales in which conduction and convection heat transfer dominate.

  13. Calculation of convective and radiative heating on the forebody heatshield of the aeroassist flight experiment vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. Harris, II; Greendyke, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    The total (convective and radiative) heating is calculated over the entire forebody heatshield of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle. The convective heating is calculated using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code (LAURA) which includes both chemical and thermal nonequilibrium effects. The flowfield solution is then used to provide inputs to a nonequilibrium air radiation code (NEQAIR) to calculate the nonequilibrium radiative heating. Results are presented at two points on the current Baseline 5A trajectory corresponding to the start of the primary data taking period and peak heating.

  14. Impact of tidal heating on the onset of convection in Enceladus’s ice shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Běhounková, Marie; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gaël; Čadek, Ondřej

    2013-09-01

    By performing 3D simulations of thermal convection and tidal dissipation, we investigated the effect of tidal heating on the onset of convection in Enceladus’s ice shell. We considered a composite non-Newtonian rheology including diffusion, grain-size-sensitive and dislocation creeps, and we defined an effective tidal viscosity reproducing the dissipation function as predicted by the Andrade rheology. For simulations with no or moderate tidal heating, the onset of convection requires ice grain sizes smaller than or equal to 0.5-0.6 mm. For simulations including significant tidal heating (>10-6 W m-3), the critical grain size for the onset of convection is shifted up to values of 1-1.5 mm. Whatever the width of the internal ocean, convection is initiated in the polar region due to enhanced tidal dissipation at high latitudes. For a given eccentricity value, the onset of convection depends on the ocean width, as tidal flexing and hence tidal heat production is controlled by the ocean width. For heating rates larger than 5-9 × 10-7 W m-3, we systematically observe the occurrence of melting in our simulations, whatever the grain size and for both convecting and non-convecting cases. Grain sizes smaller than 1.5 mm, required to initiate convection, may be obtained either by the presence of a few percent of impurities limiting the grain growth by pinning effects or by the increase of stress and hence dynamic recrystallization associated with tidally-induced melting events.

  15. Matrix heat exchanger including a liquid, thermal couplant

    DOEpatents

    Fewell, Thomas E.; Ward, Charles T.

    1976-01-01

    A tube-to-tube heat exchanger is disclosed with a thermally conductive matrix between and around the tubes to define annuli between the tubes and matrix. The annuli are filled to a level with a molten metal or alloy to provide a conductive heat transfer path from one tube through the matrix to the second tube. A matrix heat exchanger of this type is particularly useful for heat transfer between fluids which would react should one leak into the second.

  16. Modeling heat exchange characteristics of long term space operations: Role of skin wettedness and exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Richard R.

    1994-01-01

    The problems of heat exchange during rest and exercise during long term space operations are covered in this report. Particular attention is given to the modeling and description of the consequences of requirement to exercise in a zero-g atmosphere during Space Shuttle flights, especially long term ones. In space environments, there exists no free convection therefore only forced convection occurring by movement, such as pedalling on a cycle ergometer, augments required heat dissipation necessary to regulate body temperature. The requirement to exercise at discrete periods of the day is good practice in order to resist the deleterious consequences of zero-gravity problems and improve distribution of body fluids. However, during exercise (ca. 180 to 250W), in zero-g environments, the mass of eccrine sweating rests as sheets on the skin surface and the sweat cannot evaporate readily. The use of exercise suits with fabrics that have hydrophobic or outwicking properties somewhat distributes the mass of sweat to a larger surface from which to evaporate. However, with no free convection, increased skin wettedness throughout the body surface induces increasing thermal discomfort, particularly during continuous exercise. This report presents several alternatives to aid in this problem: use of intermittent exercise, methods to quantify local skin wettedness, and introduction of a new effective temperature that integrates thermal stress and heat exchange avenues in a zero-g atmosphere.

  17. Characteristics of convective heat transfer in the MHD peristalsis of Carreau fluid with Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Farooq, S.; Ahmad, B.; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-04-01

    This article addresses the characteristics of convective heat transfer and radially imposed magnetic field on peristaltic flow of an incompressible Carreau fluid in a curved channel. Joule heating is also present. Mathematical analysis has been carried out under long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations. Solutions of the resulting non-linear system for small values of Weissenberg number are constructed. The salient features of flow quantities are pointed out with particular focus to pumping, velocity, temperature and trapping. It is observed pressure gradient enhances for larger values of power law index parameter. The velocity and temperature are decreasing functions of radial magnetic field parameter. Further the impact of Weissenberg and Biot numbers on the temperature are opposite.

  18. Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer through Open-Cell Metal Foam Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Mehrdad

    In this thesis analytical and numerical investigations of fluid flow and heat transfer through open cell metal foam heat exchangers are presented. Primarily, different representative unit cell approximations, i.e, tetrakaidecahedron, dodecahedron and cubic are discussed. By applying the thermal resistance analogy, a novel formulation for evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of metal foams is proposed. The model improves previous models based on cubic or hexagonal cells. By using computer tomography images of a nickel foam sample a realistic 3D geometry is created and the foam's geometrical properties (i.e., porosity and surface area to volume ratio) and effective thermal conductivity are obtained. By using the experimentally found values of permeability, Forchheimer coefficient and solid-fluid interfacial convection coefficient, mathematical models for fluid flow and heat transfer in metal foams are developed. Two different assumptions: local thermal equilibrium (LTE) and local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE), are used. LTNE yields more accurate results. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of metal foam is made and validated against the experimental data for a square cross sectional nickel foam heat exchanger channel heated from the side walls while cooling air passes through the foam. The simulations are carried out for constant temperature or heat flux and different foam materials with pore densities of 10 and 40 pores per inch. The results show that the bonding of the foam to the walls has a considerable impact on the heat transfer rate. Convective heat transfer coefficients in terms of Nusselt number as functions of Reynolds number are also obtained. The design and CFD modeling of metal foam cross flow heat exchangers are also discussed. The results indicate both effectiveness and number of transfer units (NTU) for the metal foam heat exchangers are higher than those of a hollow channel; however, the effectiveness-NTU curves

  19. Natural convection in enclosures. Proceedings of the nineteenth national heat transfer conference, Orlando, FL, July 27-30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Torrance, K.E.; Catton, I.

    1980-01-01

    Natural convection in low aspect ratio rectangular enclosures is considered along with three-dimensional convection within rectangular boxes, natural convection flow visualization in irradiated water cooled by air flow over the surface, free convection in vertical slots, the stratification in natural convection in vertical enclosures, the flow structure with natural convection in inclined air-filled enclosures, and natural convection across tilted, rectangular enclosures of small aspect ratio. Attention is given to the effect of wall conduction and radiation on natural convection in a vertical slot with uniform heat generation of the heated wall, a numerical study of thermal insulation enclosure, free convection in a piston-cylinder enclosure with sinusoidal piston motion, natural convection heat transfer between bodies and their spherical enclosure, an experimental study of the steady natural convection in a horizontal annulus with irregular boundaries, three-dimensional natural convection in a porous medium between concentric inclined cylinders, a numerical solution for natural convection in concentric spherical annuli, and heat transfer by natural convection in porous media between two concentric spheres.

  20. Numerical investigation of thermal regimes in twin-tube-channel heat pipelines using conductive-convective model of heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetzov, G. V.; Polovnikov, V. Yu.

    2012-04-01

    The results of numerical investigation are reported on thermal regimes in the systems of heat transport based on the solution of the conjugative problem of conductive-convective heat transfer in the system •twin-tube-channel underground heat pipeline„ environmental medium. It is shown that the use of the proposed approach allows one to perform the comprehensive analysis of the heating regimes in such systems.

  1. Nanofluid flow and forced convection heat transfer over a stretching surface considering heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, M.; Valipour, P.; Shambooli, M.; Ayani, M.; Mirparizi, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, magnetic field effects on the forced convection flow of a nanofluid over a stretching surface in the presence of heat generation/absorption are studied. The equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme featuring the shooting technique. Different types of nanoparticles as copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) with water as their base fluid has been considered. The influence of significant parameters, such as magnetic parameter, volume fraction of the nanoparticles, heat generation/absorption parameter, velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The results show that the values of temperature profiles increase with increasing heat generation/absorption and volume fraction of the nanoparticles but they decrease with increasing velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter. Also, it can be found that selecting silver as nanoparticle leads to the highest heat transfer enhancement.

  2. Natural convection heat transfer in vertical triangular subchannel in Zirconia-water nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandian, N. P.; Alkharboushi, A. A. K.; Kamajaya, K.

    2015-09-01

    Natural convection heat transfer in vertical triangular sub-channel has important role in cooling mechanism of the APWR and the PHWR nuclear reactors. Unfortunately, natural convection correlation equations for such geometry are scarcely available. Recent studies showed that ZrO2-water nanofluid has a good prospect to be used in the nuclear reactor technology due to its low neutron absorption cross section. Although several papers have reported transport properties of ZrO2-water nanofluids, practically there is no correlation equation for predicting natural convection heat transfer in a vertical triangular sub-channel in ZrO2-water nanofluid. Therefore, a study for finding such heat transfer correlation equation has been done by utilizing Computational Fluid Dynamics software and reported in this paper. In the study, natural convection heat transfer in a vertical triangular sub-channel has been simulated at several values of heat transfer flux within 9.1 to 30.9 kW/m2 range and ZrO2 concentrations of 0 (pure water), 0.27, and 3 volume-% of ZrO2. The study shows that the ZrO2 concentration has no significant influence to the natural convection heat transfer at those concentration levels. The obtained theoretical heat transfer correlation equations were verified through experiment, and they showed very similar results. The correlation equations are reported in this paper.

  3. Modified Laser Flash Method for Thermal Properties Measurements and the Influence of Heat Convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Bochuan; Zhu, Shen; Ban, Heng; Li, Chao; Scripa, Rosalia N.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    2003-01-01

    The study examined the effect of natural convection in applying the modified laser flash method to measure thermal properties of semiconductor melts. Common laser flash method uses a laser pulse to heat one side of a thin circular sample and measures the temperature response of the other side. Thermal diffusivity can be calculations based on a heat conduction analysis. For semiconductor melt, the sample is contained in a specially designed quartz cell with optical windows on both sides. When laser heats the vertical melt surface, the resulting natural convection can introduce errors in calculation based on heat conduction model alone. The effect of natural convection was studied by CFD simulations with experimental verification by temperature measurement. The CFD results indicated that natural convection would decrease the time needed for the rear side to reach its peak temperature, and also decrease the peak temperature slightly in our experimental configuration. Using the experimental data, the calculation using only heat conduction model resulted in a thermal diffusivity value is about 7.7% lower than that from the model with natural convection. Specific heat capacity was about the same, and the difference is within 1.6%, regardless of heat transfer models.

  4. Combined Steady-State and Dynamic Heat Exchanger Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal; Bader, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a heat-transfer experiment that combines steady-state analysis and dynamic control. A process-water stream is circulated through two tube-in-shell heat exchangers in series. In the first, the process water is heated by steam. In the second, it is cooled by cooling water. The equipment is pilot-plant size: heat-transfer areas…

  5. A Liquid-Liquid Thermoelectric Heat Exchanger as a Heat Pump for Testing Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik B.; Makinen, Janice; Le, Hung V.

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of the Phase Change HX payload on the International Space Station (ISS) is to test and demonstrate the viability and performance of Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers (PCM HX). The system was required to pump a working fluid through a PCM HX to promote the phase change material to freeze and thaw as expected on Orion's Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. Due to limitations on ISS's Internal Thermal Control System, a heat pump was needed on the Phase Change HX payload to help with reducing the working fluid's temperature to below 0degC (32degF). This paper will review the design and development of a TEC based liquid-liquid heat exchanger as a way to vary to fluid temperature for the freeze and thaw phase of the PCM HX. Specifically, the paper will review the design of custom coldplates and sizing for the required heat removal of the HX.

  6. Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

    2010-09-01

    This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will

  7. Universal Monitor (UM) for OTEC compact heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1981-09-01

    Universal Monitor (UM), is a device-independent concept to measure, with precision, the initiation and progression of fouling in any given OTEC Compact Heat Exchanger model with or without the application of countermeasures. Design description and supporting analyses for the Universal Monitor for OTEC Compact Heat Exchangers are presented.

  8. Cyclic high temperature heat storage using borehole heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boockmeyer, Anke; Delfs, Jens-Olaf; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The transition of the German energy supply towards mainly renewable energy sources like wind or solar power, termed "Energiewende", makes energy storage a requirement in order to compensate their fluctuating production and to ensure a reliable energy and power supply. One option is to store heat in the subsurface using borehole heat exchangers (BHEs). Efficiency of thermal storage is increasing with increasing temperatures, as heat at high temperatures is more easily injected and extracted than at temperatures at ambient levels. This work aims at quantifying achievable storage capacities, storage cycle times, injection and extraction rates as well as thermal and hydraulic effects induced in the subsurface for a BHE storage site in the shallow subsurface. To achieve these aims, simulation of these highly dynamic storage sites is performed. A detailed, high-resolution numerical simulation model was developed, that accounts for all BHE components in geometrical detail and incorporates the governing processes. This model was verified using high quality experimental data and is shown to achieve accurate simulation results with excellent fit to the available experimental data, but also leads to large computational times due to the large numerical meshes required for discretizing the highly transient effects. An approximate numerical model for each type of BHE (single U, double U and coaxial) that reduces the number of elements and the simulation time significantly was therefore developed for use in larger scale simulations. The approximate numerical model still includes all BHE components and represents the temporal and spatial temperature distribution with a deviation of less than 2% from the fully discretized model. Simulation times are reduced by a factor of ~10 for single U-tube BHEs, ~20 for double U-tube BHEs and ~150 for coaxial BHEs. This model is then used to investigate achievable storage capacity, injection and extraction rates as well as induced effects for

  9. Impact of tidal heating on the onset of convection in Enceladus' ice shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behounkova, Marie; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gael; Cadek, Ondrej

    2013-04-01

    Observations of Enceladus by the Cassini spacecraft indicated that its south pole is very active, with jets of water vapor and ice emanating from warm tectonic ridges. Convective processes in the ice shell are commonly advocated to explain the enhanced activity at the south pole. The conditions under which convection may occur on Enceladus are, however, still puzzling. According to the estimation of Barr and McKinnon (2007) based on scaling laws, convection may initiate in Enceladus' ice shell only for grain size smaller than 0.3 mm, which is very small compared to the grain size observed on Earth in polar ice sheets for similar temperature and stress conditions (2-4mm). Moreover, Bahounková et al. (2012) showed that such enhanced activity periods associated with thermal convection and internal melting should be brief (~ 1 - 10Myrs) and should be followed by relatively long periods of inactivity (~ 100Myrs), with a probable cessation of thermal convection. In order to constrain the likelihood and periodicity of enhanced activity periods, the conditions under which thermal convection may restart are needed to be investigated. In particular, the goal is to understand how tidal heating, especially during periods of elevated eccentricity, may influence the onset of convection. To answer this question, 3D simulations of thermal convection including a self-consistent computation of tidal dissipation using the code Antigone (Bahounková et al., 2010, 2012) were performed, a composite non-Newtonian rheology (Goldsby and Kohlstedt, 2001) and Maxwell-like rheology mimicking Andrade model were considered. Our simulations show that the onset of convection may occur in Enceladus' ice shell only for ice grain size smaller or equal than 0.5 mm in absence of tidal heating. Tidal dissipation shifts the critical grain size for convection up to values of 1-1.5 mm. The convection is initiated in the polar region due to enhanced tidal dissipation in this area and remains in the

  10. Mixed convection heat transfer inside a differentially heated square enclosure in presence of a rotating heat conducting cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Muntasir; Kamruzzaman, Ahsan, Faraz; Hasan, Mohammad Nasim

    2016-07-01

    A numerical study of mixed convection heat transfer phenomena in a square cavity containing a heat conducting rotating cylinder has been investigated. A discrete isoflux heater is placed at the bottom wall of the enclosure while the top wall is kept adiabatic. Left and right sidewalls of the enclosure are assumed to be maintained at constant low temperature. A two-dimensional solution for steady laminar mixed convection flow is obtained by using the finite element scheme based on the Galerkin method of weighted residuals for different rotating speeds of the cylinder varying over the range of 0-1000 keeping the Rayleigh number fixed at 5×104 and the Prandtl number at 0.7. The effects of rotating speeds of the cylinder, its radius and conductivity ratio of the rotating cylinder and working fluid on the streamlines, isotherms, local Nusselt number, average Nusselt number and other heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena are investigated. The results indicate that the flow field, temperature distribution and heat transfer rate are dependent on rotating speeds and cylinder size. However, it has been observed that the effect of conductivity ratio is not so prominent.

  11. Modes of mantle convection and the removal of heat from the earth's interior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spohn, T.; Schubert, G.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal histories for two-layer and whole-mantle convection models are calculated and presented, based on a parameterization of convective heat transport. The model is composed of two concentric spherical shells surrounding a spherical core. The models were constrained to yield the observed present-day surface heat flow and mantle viscosity, in order to determine parameters. These parameters were varied to determine their effects on the results. Studies show that whole-mantle convection removes three times more primordial heat from the earth interior and six times more from the core than does two-layer convection (in 4.5 billion years). Mantle volumetric heat generation rates for both models are comparable to that of a potassium-depleted chondrite, and thus surface heat-flux balance does not require potassium in the core. Whole and two-layer mantle convection differences are primarily due to lower mantle thermal insulation and the lower heat removal efficiency of the upper mantle as compared with that of the whole mantle.

  12. Scalings of field correlations and heat transport in turbulent convection.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mahendra K; Mishra, Pankaj K; Pandey, Ambrish; Paul, Supriyo

    2012-01-01

    Using direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection under free-slip boundary condition, we show that the normalized correlation function between the vertical velocity field and the temperature field, as well as the normalized viscous dissipation rate, scales as Ra-0.22 for moderately large Rayleigh number Ra. This scaling accounts for the Nusselt number Nu exponent of approximately 0.3, as observed in experiments. Numerical simulations also reveal that the aforementioned normalized correlation functions are constants for the convection simulation under periodic boundary conditions.

  13. Circulating heat exchangers for oscillating wave engines and refrigerators

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Backhaus, Scott N.

    2003-10-28

    An oscillating-wave engine or refrigerator having a regenerator or a stack in which oscillating flow of a working gas occurs in a direction defined by an axis of a trunk of the engine or refrigerator, incorporates an improved heat exchanger. First and second connections branch from the trunk at locations along the axis in selected proximity to one end of the regenerator or stack, where the trunk extends in two directions from the locations of the connections. A circulating heat exchanger loop is connected to the first and second connections. At least one fluidic diode within the circulating heat exchanger loop produces a superimposed steady flow component and oscillating flow component of the working gas within the circulating heat exchanger loop. A local process fluid is in thermal contact with an outside portion of the circulating heat exchanger loop.

  14. Reactor safety research section probability of heat exchanger leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, D.S.; Shine, E.P.; Copeland, W.J.

    1992-02-01

    Three heat exchangers (HXs) were changed out after the December 1991 leak of Process Water to the Savannah River. This leaves 6 of the original 304 stainless steel heat exchangers which will remain in K-Reactor for restart. This report discusses SRS site specific data which were used to estimate the probability of a leak within a one-year period as a function of leak rate and root cause in these six heat exchangers in conjunction with six new heat exchangers presently in service in K-Reactor. Based on several assumptions and statistical models, SRS data indicate that the total probability of a leak occurring during a one-year period in K-Reactor with 6 original (304 stainless steel) and 6 new (316-L or SEA-CURE) heat exchangers, with a leak rate greater than 20, 40 or 90 pounds/hr, is 0.013, 0.004 or 0.0005, respectively.

  15. Self-defrosting recuperative air-to-air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Drake, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A heat exchanger includes a stationary spirally or concentrically wound heat exchanger core with rotating baffles on upper and lower ends thereof. The rotating baffles include rotating inlets and outlets which are in communication with respective fixed inlets and outlets via annuli. The rotation of the baffles causes a concurrent rotation of the temperature distribution within the stationary exchanger core, thereby preventing frost build-up in some applications and preventing the formation of hot spots in other applications.

  16. Numerical Calculation and Exergy Equations of Spray Heat Exchanger Attached to a Main Fan Diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, H.; Wang, H.; Chen, S.

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the energy depreciation rule of spray heat exchanger, which is attached to a main fan diffuser, is analyzed based on the second law of thermodynamics. Firstly, the exergy equations of the exchanger are deduced. The equations are numerically calculated by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, and the exergy destruction is quantitatively effected by the exchanger structure parameters, working fluid (polluted air, i.e., PA; sprayed water, i.e., SW) initial state parameters and the ambient reference parameters. The results are showed: (1) heat transfer is given priority to latent transfer at the bottom of the exchanger, and heat transfer of convection and is equivalent to that of condensation in the upper. (2) With the decrease of initial temperature of SW droplet, the decrease of PA velocity or the ambient reference temperature, and with the increase of a SW droplet size or initial PA temperature, exergy destruction both increase. (3) The exergy efficiency of the exchanger is 72.1 %. An approach to analyze the energy potential of the exchanger may be provided for engineering designs.

  17. On effectiveness and entropy generation in heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Daxi; Li, Zhixin; Guo, Zengyuan

    1996-12-01

    Some conceptual problems were discussed in the present paper. Firstly, according to the physical meaning of effectiveness, a new expression of effectiveness was developed by using an ideal heat exchanger model and temperature histogram method, in which the non-uniform inlet temperature profile was considered. Secondly, the relation of entropy generation number to effectiveness was studied, it was pointed out that both of them could express the perfect degree of a heat exchanger to the second thermodynamic law. Finally, to describe both quantity and quality of heat transferred in a heat exchanger, a criterion named as comprehensive thermal performance coefficient (CTPE) was presented.

  18. Ceramic heat-exchanger applications study

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlin, D.J.; Sgamboti, C.T.; Lessard, R.D.

    1982-10-01

    To put the potential benefits of ceramic heat exchangers (CHX) applications into quantitative perspective, several industrial cogeneration and electric utiity power generation systems were surveyed and evaluated. This study was focused on coal-based fuel fired applications, for which system performance and economic assessments were made. Seven CHX applications in the industrial cogeneration sector were selected for evaluation. These include (1) Gasified Coal-Fired Gas Turbine, (2) Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor (PFBC)-Gas Turbine, (3) Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (AFBC)-Gas Turbine, (4 and 5) AFBC Combined Cycle with and without reheat and (6 and 7) Indirect Coal-Fired Gas Turbine and Combined Cycle. The performance and economics of these cogeneration systems were evaluated and compared with other competing systems (both advanced and State-of-the-Art). For the electric utility power generation sector five applications utilizing a CHX were selected and evaluated; their performance and cost factors were compared to those of a reference pulverized coal-fired steam plant with flue gas desulfurization. These five applications included (1) PFBC-Combined Cycle, (2) AFBC-Combined Cycle, (3) Industrial Coal Gasifier-Combined Cycle, (4) Indirect Coal-Fired Combined Cycle, and (5) Indirect Coal-Fired Simple Cycle. Of the five CHX applications evaluated in the power generation sector, only the AFBC system showed a clear gain over the reference pulverized coal system.

  19. Method for making heat exchange tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.L.; Campbell, B.J.

    1987-09-15

    This patent describes a method of making a heat exchange tube from difficult to work materials such as titanium and stainless steel in a single finning pass. It consists of inserting a mandrel having at least a first larger diameter portion and a second smaller diameter portion inside a plain tube. Then move the axes of a rotating disc carrying finning arbors toward the tube so that first and second sets of discs on the arbors, which are separated from each other by a spacer member, will sequentially force portions of the tube toward the first and second portions of the mandrel. The first set of discs serve to initially form the fins on the tube to at least approximately their final outside diameter and the second set of discs, whose discs are axially spaced so as to have a greater pitch than the discs of the first set, serve to reduce the root diameter of the fins previously formed by the first set of discs without substantially changing the outer diameter of the fins formed by the first set of discs. The greater pitch of the second set of discs causes an elongation of the tube and reduces its tendency to twist during finning.

  20. Heat transfer in vertical Bridgman growth of oxides - Effects of conduction, convection, and internal radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, S.; Derby, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the present investigation of crystalline phase internal radiation and heat conduction during the vertical Bridgman growth of a YAG-like oxide crystal, where transport through the melt is dominated by convection and conduction, heat is also noted to be conducted through ampoule walls via natural convection and enclosure radiation. The results of a quasi-steady-state axisymmetric Galerkin FEM indicate that heat transfer through the system is powerfully affected by the optical absorption coefficient of the crystal. The coupling of internal radiation through the crystal with conduction through the ampoule walls promotes melt/crystal interface shapes that are highly reflected near the ampoule wall.

  1. Heat flow control in thermo-magnetic convective systems using engineered magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaewook; Nomura, Tsuyoshi; Dede, Ercan M.

    2012-09-01

    We present the design of a magnetically controlled convective heat transfer system. The underlying thermo-magnetic instability phenomenon is described, and enhanced convective fluid flow patterns are determined using non-linear programming techniques plus a design sensitivity analysis. Specifically, the magnetic fluid body force is computed by finding the optimal distribution and magnetization direction of a magnetic field source, where the objective is to minimize the maximum temperature of a closed loop heat transfer system. Sizeable fluid recirculation zones are induced by arranging magnetic field generation elements in configurations similar to Halbach arrays. Applications include improved heat flow control for electromechanical systems.

  2. Studies of Forced-Convection Heat Transfer Augmentation in Large Containment Enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, S.Z.; Peterson, P.F.

    2001-06-17

    Heat transfer enhancement due to jet mixing inside a cylindrical enclosure is discussed. This work addresses conservative heat transfer assumptions regarding mixing and condensation that have typically been incorporated into passive containment design analyses. This research presents the possibility for increasing decay heat removal of passive containment systems under combined natural and forced convection. Eliminating these conservative assumptions could result in a changed containment design and reduce the construction cost. It is found that the ratio of forced- and free-convection Nusselt numbers can be predicted as a function of the Archimedes number and a correlated factor accounting for jet orientation and enclosure geometry.

  3. Measurement of convective heat transfer coefficient for a horizontal cylinder rotating in quiescent air

    SciTech Connect

    Oezerdem, B.

    2000-04-01

    Heat transfer from a rotating cylinder is one of the problems, which is drawing attention due to its wide range of engineering applications. The present paper deals with convective heat transfer from a horizontal cylinder rotating in quiescent air, experimentally. The average convective heat transfer coefficients have been measured by using radiation pyrometer, which offers a new method. According to the experimental results, a correlation in terms of the average Nusselt number and rotating Reynolds number has been established. The average Nusselt number increased with an increase in the rotating speed. Comparison of the results, with previous studies, have been showed a good agreement with each other.

  4. Two-phase numerical model for thermal conductivity and convective heat transfer in nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Kondaraju, Sasidhar; Lee, Joon Sang

    2011-03-21

    Due to the numerous applications of nanofluids, investigating and understanding of thermophysical properties of nanofluids has currently become one of the core issues. Although numerous theoretical and numerical models have been developed by previous researchers to understand the mechanism of enhanced heat transfer in nanofluids; to the best of our knowledge these models were limited to the study of either thermal conductivity or convective heat transfer of nanofluids. We have developed a numerical model which can estimate the enhancement in both the thermal conductivity and convective heat transfer in nanofluids. It also aids in understanding the mechanism of heat transfer enhancement. The study reveals that the nanoparticle dispersion in fluid medium and nanoparticle heat transport phenomenon are equally important in enhancement of thermal conductivity. However, the enhancement in convective heat transfer was caused mainly due to the nanoparticle heat transport mechanism. Ability of this model to be able to understand the mechanism of convective heat transfer enhancement distinguishes the model from rest of the available numerical models.

  5. Model of Heat Exchangers for Waste Heat Recovery from Diesel Engine Exhaust for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Chad; Vuppuluri, Prem; Shi, Li; Hall, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    The performance and operating characteristics of a hypothetical thermoelectric generator system designed to extract waste heat from the exhaust of a medium-duty turbocharged diesel engine were modeled. The finite-difference model consisted of two integrated submodels: a heat exchanger model and a thermoelectric device model. The heat exchanger model specified a rectangular cross-sectional geometry with liquid coolant on the cold side, and accounted for the difference between the heat transfer rate from the exhaust and that to the coolant. With the spatial variation of the thermoelectric properties accounted for, the thermoelectric device model calculated the hot-side and cold-side heat flux for the temperature boundary conditions given for the thermoelectric elements, iterating until temperature and heat flux boundary conditions satisfied the convection conditions for both exhaust and coolant, and heat transfer in the thermoelectric device. A downhill simplex method was used to optimize the parameters that affected the electrical power output, including the thermoelectric leg height, thermoelectric n-type to p-type leg area ratio, thermoelectric leg area to void area ratio, load electrical resistance, exhaust duct height, coolant duct height, fin spacing in the exhaust duct, location in the engine exhaust system, and number of flow paths within the constrained package volume. The calculation results showed that the configuration with 32 straight fins was optimal across the 30-cm-wide duct for the case of a single duct with total height of 5.5 cm. In addition, three counterflow parallel ducts or flow paths were found to be an optimum number for the given size constraint of 5.5 cm total height, and parallel ducts with counterflow were a better configuration than serpentine flow. Based on the reported thermoelectric properties of MnSi1.75 and Mg2Si0.5Sn0.5, the maximum net electrical power achieved for the three parallel flow paths in a counterflow arrangement was 1

  6. Test results of a Stirling engine utilizing heat exchanger modules with an integral heat pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Skupinski, R.C.; Tower, L.K.; Madi, F.J.; Brusk, K.D.

    1993-04-01

    The Heat Pipe Stirling Engine (HP-1000), a free-piston Stirling engine incorporating three heat exchanger modules, each having a sodium filled heat pipe, has been tested at the NASA-Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The heat exchanger modules were designed to reduce the number of potential flow leak paths in the heat exchanger assembly and incorporate a heat pipe as the link between the heat source and the engine. An existing RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine was modified to operate using the heat exchanger modules. This paper describes heat exchanger module and engine performance during baseline testing. Condenser temperature profiles, brake power, and efficiency are presented and discussed.

  7. Test results of a Stirling engine utilizing heat exchanger modules with an integral heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skupinski, Robert C.; Tower, Leonard K.; Madi, Frank J.; Brusk, Kevin D.

    1993-01-01

    The Heat Pipe Stirling Engine (HP-1000), a free-piston Stirling engine incorporating three heat exchanger modules, each having a sodium filled heat pipe, has been tested at the NASA-Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The heat exchanger modules were designed to reduce the number of potential flow leak paths in the heat exchanger assembly and incorporate a heat pipe as the link between the heat source and the engine. An existing RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine was modified to operate using the heat exchanger modules. This paper describes heat exchanger module and engine performance during baseline testing. Condenser temperature profiles, brake power, and efficiency are presented and discussed.

  8. Forced convective heat transfer from anisotropic aluminum foam in a channel flow

    SciTech Connect

    Paek, J.W.; Kim, S.Y.; Kang, B.H.; Hyun, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    Porous media is employed widely in industrial applications which demand compact and highly efficient thermal systems, such as a substrate for catalyst and regenerative heat exchangers. The main advantage of porous media is high surface area-to-volume ratio, which leads to enhanced heat transport a condition necessary for the miniaturization of thermal systems. A recently introduced foam material is a highly permeable porous medium with porosity, typically {epsilon} {ge} 0.9, which can provide a considerably reduced pressure drop for the throughflow, compared with packed beds. Also, inherently inter-connected solid ligaments in the foam material increase the effective thermal conductivity of the entire system. By these favorable features for the heat transport, the foam material made of aluminum has emerged to be a promising candidate for enhanced heat transport. Convective heat transfer and pressure drop in anisotropic aluminum foam metal are investigated by experimental measurements. Anisotropic aluminum foam metal could be obtained by drilling holes in an isotropic foam metal. The porosity of aluminum foam metals used in the present study is fixed at around 0.92, and the Reynolds number varies from 250 to 2,100. The axial holes fabricated in the foam metal aim to reduce pressure loss through the foam metal while maintaining similar heat transfer rates to the isotropic foam. The experiments are implemented for wide ranges of governing parameters: the hole arrangement such as straight and interrupted holes, the staggered position of holes, the hole spacing 2.8 mm {lt} S {le} 35 mm, and the diameter of holes 1.0 mm {le} d {le} 6.0 mm. The results obtained in the present experiment indicate that the straight holes fabricated along the center line of the foam yield higher heat transfer rates against the pressure loss, compared with the other hole arrangement. It is also observed that there exists an optimal hole spacing and hole diameter, which can provide similar

  9. Investigating Convective Heat Transfer with an Iron and a Hairdryer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Manuel I.; Lucio, Jesus H.

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental set-up to study free and forced convection in undergraduate physics laboratories is presented. The flat plate of a domestic iron has been chosen as the hot surface, and a hairdryer is used to generate an air stream around the plate. Several experiments are proposed and typical numerical results are reported. An analysis and…

  10. Optimized heat exchanger unit in a thermoacoustic refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fawal, Mawahib Hassan; Mohd-Ghazali, Normah

    2012-06-01

    Due to concern over the environmental impact caused by hazardous refrigerants, the last ten years or so has seen increasing research into thermoacoustic refrigeration. A thermoacoustic refrigerator is a device which uses acoustic power to pump heat. It holds the merits of simple mechanical design, absence of harmful refrigerants and having no or few moving parts. However, the performance of the thermoacoustic refrigerator, particularly the standing wave types, is currently not competitive compared to its counterpart conventional vapor-compression refrigerator. Thermoacoustic refrigeration prototypes, built up-to-date, achieved 0.1-0.2 relative coefficient of performance (COPR) compared with that of 0.33-0.5 for the conventional vapor-compression refrigerators. The poor heat exchanger design is one of the reasons for this poor efficiency. This paper discussed the influence of the thermoacoustic refrigerator heat exchanger's parameters on its design and the optimization of the performance of the system using the Lagrange multiplier method. The results showed that, the dissipated power is less than the published value by about 49% in the cold heat exchanger and about 38.5% in the hot heat exchanger. Furthermore, the increase of the cold heat exchanger effectiveness is found to be 3%. Thus, the decrease in the dissipated power in both heat exchangers with effective cold heat exchanger increases the performance of the thermoacoustic refrigerator.

  11. Heat exchanger and method of making. [rocket lining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, A.; Kazaroff, J. M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A heat exchange of increased effectiveness is disclosed. A porous metal matrix is disposed in a metal chamber or between walls through which a heat-transfer fluid is directed. The porous metal matrix has internal bonds and is bonded to the chamber in order to remove all thermal contact resistance within the composite structure. Utilization of the invention in a rocket chamber is disclosed as a specific use. Also disclosed is a method of constructing the heat exchanger.

  12. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  13. Wind-chill-equivalent temperatures: regarding the impact due to the variability of the environmental convective heat transfer coefficient.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    The wind-chill index (WCI), developed in Antarctica in the 1940s and recently updated by the weather services in the USA and Canada, expresses the enhancement of heat loss in cold climates from exposed body parts, e.g., face, due to wind. The index provides a simple and practical means for assessing the thermal effects of wind on humans outdoors. It is also used for indicating weather conditions that may pose adverse risks of freezing at subfreezing environmental temperatures. Values of the WCI depend on a number of parameters, i.e, temperatures, physical properties of the air, wind speed, etc., and on insolation and evaporation. This paper focuses on the effects of various empirical correlations used in the literature for calculating the convective heat transfer coefficients between humans and their environment. Insolation and evaporation are not included in the presentation. Large differences in calculated values among these correlations are demonstrated and quantified. Steady-state wind-chill-equivalent temperatures (WCETs) are estimated by a simple, one-dimensional heat-conducting hollow-cylindrical model using these empirical correlations. Partial comparison of these values with the published "new" WCETs is presented. The variability of the estimated WCETs, due to different correlations employed to calculate them, is clearly demonstrated. The results of this study clearly suggest the need for establishing a "gold standard" for estimating convective heat exchange between exposed body elements and the cold and windy environment. This should be done prior to the introduction and adoption of further modifications to WCETs and indices. Correlations to estimate the convective heat transfer coefficients between exposed body parts of humans in windy and cold environments influence the WCETs and need to be standardized. PMID:16397760

  14. Wind-chill-equivalent temperatures: regarding the impact due to the variability of the environmental convective heat transfer coefficient.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    The wind-chill index (WCI), developed in Antarctica in the 1940s and recently updated by the weather services in the USA and Canada, expresses the enhancement of heat loss in cold climates from exposed body parts, e.g., face, due to wind. The index provides a simple and practical means for assessing the thermal effects of wind on humans outdoors. It is also used for indicating weather conditions that may pose adverse risks of freezing at subfreezing environmental temperatures. Values of the WCI depend on a number of parameters, i.e, temperatures, physical properties of the air, wind speed, etc., and on insolation and evaporation. This paper focuses on the effects of various empirical correlations used in the literature for calculating the convective heat transfer coefficients between humans and their environment. Insolation and evaporation are not included in the presentation. Large differences in calculated values among these correlations are demonstrated and quantified. Steady-state wind-chill-equivalent temperatures (WCETs) are estimated by a simple, one-dimensional heat-conducting hollow-cylindrical model using these empirical correlations. Partial comparison of these values with the published "new" WCETs is presented. The variability of the estimated WCETs, due to different correlations employed to calculate them, is clearly demonstrated. The results of this study clearly suggest the need for establishing a "gold standard" for estimating convective heat exchange between exposed body elements and the cold and windy environment. This should be done prior to the introduction and adoption of further modifications to WCETs and indices. Correlations to estimate the convective heat transfer coefficients between exposed body parts of humans in windy and cold environments influence the WCETs and need to be standardized.

  15. Wind-chill-equivalent temperatures: regarding the impact due to the variability of the environmental convective heat transfer coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2006-03-01

    The wind-chill index (WCI), developed in Antarctica in the 1940s and recently updated by the weather services in the USA and Canada, expresses the enhancement of heat loss in cold climates from exposed body parts, e.g., face, due to wind. The index provides a simple and practical means for assessing the thermal effects of wind on humans outdoors. It is also used for indicating weather conditions that may pose adverse risks of freezing at subfreezing environmental temperatures. Values of the WCI depend on a number of parameters, i.e, temperatures, physical properties of the air, wind speed, etc., and on insolation and evaporation. This paper focuses on the effects of various empirical correlations used in the literature for calculating the convective heat transfer coefficients between humans and their environment. Insolation and evaporation are not included in the presentation. Large differences in calculated values among these correlations are demonstrated and quantified. Steady-state wind-chill-equivalent temperatures (WCETs) are estimated by a simple, one-dimensional heat-conducting hollow-cylindrical model using these empirical correlations. Partial comparison of these values with the published “new” WCETs is presented. The variability of the estimated WCETs, due to different correlations employed to calculate them, is clearly demonstrated. The results of this study clearly suggest the need for establishing a “gold standard” for estimating convective heat exchange between exposed body elements and the cold and windy environment. This should be done prior to the introduction and adoption of further modifications to WCETs and indices. Correlations to estimate the convective heat transfer coefficients between exposed body parts of humans in windy and cold environments influence the WCETs and need to be standardized.

  16. Direct-contact closed-loop heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Gregory F.; Minkov, Vladimir; Petrick, Michael

    1984-01-01

    A high temperature heat exchanger with a closed loop and a heat transfer liquid within the loop, the closed loop having a first horizontal channel with inlet and outlet means for providing direct contact of a first fluid at a first temperature with the heat transfer liquid, a second horizontal channel with inlet and outlet means for providing direct contact of a second fluid at a second temperature with the heat transfer liquid, and means for circulating the heat transfer liquid.

  17. Temperature distribution in internally heated walls of heat exchangers composed of nonnuclear flow passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Low, George M

    1951-01-01

    In the walls of heat exchangers composed of noncircular passages, the temperature varies in the circumferential direction because of local variations of the heat-transfer coefficients. A prediction of the magnitude of this variation is necessary in order to determine the region of highest temperature and in order to determine the admissible operating temperatures. A method for the determination of these temperature distributions and of the heat-transfer characteristics of a special type of heat exchanger is developed. The heat exchanger is composed of polygonal flow passages and the passage walls are uniformly heated by internal heat sources. The coolant flow within the passages is assumed to be turbulent. The circumferential variation of the local heat-transfer coefficients is estimated from flow measurements made by Nikuradse, postulating similarity between velocity and temperature fields. Calculations of temperature distributions based on these heat-transfer coefficients are carried out and results for heat exchangers with triangular and rectangular passages are presented.

  18. Conjugate conduction-convection heat transfer model for four-stroke heat-barrier-piston engines

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, D.A.; Shih, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical model for conjugate conduction-convection heat transfer in a four-stroke heat-barrier-piston engine has been developed. The system boundaries were extended beyond the flow to fixed distances within the piston and cylinder linings. The model was used to simulate the compression stroke and fuel injection portion of the power stroke of a four-stroke engine cycle. Final runs involved a 20 X 26 mesh to solve the conjugate heat transfer problem in the large region made up of the flow field and a thin portion of the adjacent cylinder linings. A smaller mesh was used for other flow field calculations inside the interior boundary of the cylinder linings and piston. The engine was modeled with the fuel injector co-located with a single valve, making possible an axisymmetric solution. The effects of swirl were not considered. It was found to be convenient to divide the flow field into three regions: one fixed in space with time, one utilizing a stretching and compressing computational mesh, and one moving with time without stretching and compressing.

  19. Exergy Transfer Characteristics on Low Temperature Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. Y.; Yuan, X. F.; Li, Y. R.; Peng, L.

    By analyzing exergy transfer process of the low temperature heat exchangers operating below the surrounding temperature, the concept of exergy transfer coefficient is put forward and the expressions which involving relevant variables for the exergy transfer coefficient, the heat transfer units number and the ratio of cold to hot fluids heat capacity rate, etc. are derived. Taking the parallel flow, counter flow and cross flow low temperature heat exchangers as examples, the numerical results of exergy transfer coefficient are given and the comparison of exergy transfer coefficient with heat transfer coefficient is analyzed.

  20. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.; Marsala, Joseph

    1994-11-29

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium.

  1. Stability analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with internal heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo-Fu; Zhou, Lin; Wan, Zhen-Hua; Ma, Dong-Jun; Sun, De-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The flow instabilities of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with effect of uniform internal heat source are investigated numerically. The instabilities of the static state and of axisymmetric flows are investigated by linear stability analysis. The convection threshold depends on the strength of internal heat source q and the aspect ratio of the cylinder Γ . The stability of axisymmetric flows is strongly affected by these two parameters, as well as the Prandtl number Pr. Depending on the value of q , three regimes are identified: weak internal heating, moderate internal heating, and strong internal heating regime. In a weak internal heating regime, the instability characteristics are similar to Rayleigh-Bénard convection. In a moderate internal heating regime, intense interaction of buoyancy instability and hydrodynamic instability result in complex instability curves. When q is large enough, the internal heating effect overwhelms the boundary heating effect. Specifically, the influence of Pr on instability is studied at a moderate internal heat strength q =6.4 . An extremely multivalued stability curve is observed. At most five critical Rayleigh numbers can be determined for the axisymmetry-breaking instability at a certain Prandtl number. An axisymmetric unsteady instability mode is observed as well. By nonlinear simulation, the oscillatory flow patterns are obtained, and the axisymmetry-breaking bifurcation of the unsteady toroidal flow is studied.

  2. Stability analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with internal heat generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo-Fu; Zhou, Lin; Wan, Zhen-Hua; Ma, Dong-Jun; Sun, De-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The flow instabilities of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with effect of uniform internal heat source are investigated numerically. The instabilities of the static state and of axisymmetric flows are investigated by linear stability analysis. The convection threshold depends on the strength of internal heat source q and the aspect ratio of the cylinder Γ. The stability of axisymmetric flows is strongly affected by these two parameters, as well as the Prandtl number Pr. Depending on the value of q, three regimes are identified: weak internal heating, moderate internal heating, and strong internal heating regime. In a weak internal heating regime, the instability characteristics are similar to Rayleigh-Bénard convection. In a moderate internal heating regime, intense interaction of buoyancy instability and hydrodynamic instability result in complex instability curves. When q is large enough, the internal heating effect overwhelms the boundary heating effect. Specifically, the influence of Pr on instability is studied at a moderate internal heat strength q=6.4. An extremely multivalued stability curve is observed. At most five critical Rayleigh numbers can be determined for the axisymmetry-breaking instability at a certain Prandtl number. An axisymmetric unsteady instability mode is observed as well. By nonlinear simulation, the oscillatory flow patterns are obtained, and the axisymmetry-breaking bifurcation of the unsteady toroidal flow is studied.

  3. Stability analysis of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with internal heat generation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo-Fu; Zhou, Lin; Wan, Zhen-Hua; Ma, Dong-Jun; Sun, De-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The flow instabilities of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a cylinder with effect of uniform internal heat source are investigated numerically. The instabilities of the static state and of axisymmetric flows are investigated by linear stability analysis. The convection threshold depends on the strength of internal heat source q and the aspect ratio of the cylinder Γ. The stability of axisymmetric flows is strongly affected by these two parameters, as well as the Prandtl number Pr. Depending on the value of q, three regimes are identified: weak internal heating, moderate internal heating, and strong internal heating regime. In a weak internal heating regime, the instability characteristics are similar to Rayleigh-Bénard convection. In a moderate internal heating regime, intense interaction of buoyancy instability and hydrodynamic instability result in complex instability curves. When q is large enough, the internal heating effect overwhelms the boundary heating effect. Specifically, the influence of Pr on instability is studied at a moderate internal heat strength q=6.4. An extremely multivalued stability curve is observed. At most five critical Rayleigh numbers can be determined for the axisymmetry-breaking instability at a certain Prandtl number. An axisymmetric unsteady instability mode is observed as well. By nonlinear simulation, the oscillatory flow patterns are obtained, and the axisymmetry-breaking bifurcation of the unsteady toroidal flow is studied. PMID:27575218

  4. Physical explosion analysis in heat exchanger network design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasha, M.; Zaini, D.; Shariff, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The failure of shell and tube heat exchangers is being extensively experienced by the chemical process industries. This failure can create a loss of production for long time duration. Moreover, loss of containment through heat exchanger could potentially lead to a credible event such as fire, explosion and toxic release. There is a need to analyse the possible worst case effect originated from the loss of containment of the heat exchanger at the early design stage. Physical explosion analysis during the heat exchanger network design is presented in this work. Baker and Prugh explosion models are deployed for assessing the explosion effect. Microsoft Excel integrated with process design simulator through object linking and embedded (OLE) automation for this analysis. Aspen HYSYS V (8.0) used as a simulation platform in this work. A typical heat exchanger network of steam reforming and shift conversion process was presented as a case study. It is investigated from this analysis that overpressure generated from the physical explosion of each heat exchanger can be estimated in a more precise manner by using Prugh model. The present work could potentially assist the design engineer to identify the critical heat exchanger in the network at the preliminary design stage.

  5. Numerical studies of convective heat transfer in an inclined semiannular enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Lin-Wen; Yung, Chain-Nan; Chai, An-Ti; Rashidnia, Nasser

    1989-01-01

    Natural convection heat transfer in a two-dimensional differentially heated semiannular enclosure is studied. The enclosure is isothermally heated and cooled at the inner and outer walls, respectively. A commercial software based on the SIMPLER algorithm was used to simulate the velocity and temperature profiles. Various parameters that affect the momentum and heat transfer processes were examined. These parameters include the Rayleigh number, Prandtl number, radius ratio, and the angle of inclination. A flow regime extending from conduction-dominated to convection-dominated flow was examined. The computed results of heat transfer are presented as a function of flow parameter and geometric factors. It is found that the heat transfer rate attains a minimum when the enclosure is tilted about +50 deg with respect to the gravitational direction.

  6. Heat Recovery Ventilation for Housing: Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Robert J.; Miller, Barbara

    The air-to-air heat exchanger (a fan powered ventilation device that recovers heat from stale outgoing air) is explained in this six-part publication. Topic areas addressed are: (1) the nature of air-to-air heat exchangers and how they work; (2) choosing and sizing the system; (3) installation, control, and maintenance of the system; (4) heat…

  7. On boundary condition in heat-exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarov, E. P.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the numerical study of heat-exchange of solid body with high-temperature external flow. As follows from the Newton's boundary condition, connecting a heat-flux density with temperature difference between the flow and a body, the heat-exchange coefficient is physically equivalent to the body-surface-normal component of the entropy flux from external flow at equilibrium flow regime. The method of determination of the heat-exchange characteristics using the time-history temperature measurements by a thin-film thermocouple sensor is described. As it is shown from the numerical analysis, the asymptotic value of the heat-exchange coefficient that corresponded to equilibrium regime of external flow exists. Implementation time of this value, i.e. relaxation time, may be of some characteristic time scales of the sensor measuring layer.

  8. The predictive protective control of the heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevriva, Pavel; Filipova, Blanka; Vilimec, Ladislav

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with the predictive control applied to flexible cogeneration energy system FES. FES was designed and developed by the VITKOVICE POWER ENGINEERING joint-stock company and represents a new solution of decentralized cogeneration energy sources. In FES, the heating medium is flue gas generated by combustion of a solid fuel. The heated medium is power gas, which is a gas mixture of air and water steam. Power gas is superheated in the main heat exchanger and led to gas turbines. To protect the main heat exchanger against damage by overheating, the novel predictive protective control based on the mathematical model of exchanger was developed. The paper describes the principle, the design and the simulation of the predictive protective method applied to main heat exchanger of FES.

  9. Microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and method for its fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1982-08-31

    A microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and a method for its fabrication are disclosed. The heat exchanger is formed from a stack of thin metal sheets which are bonded together. The stack consists of alternating slotted and unslotted sheets. Each of the slotted sheets includes multiple parallel slots which form fluid flow channels when sandwiched between the unslotted sheets. Successive slotted sheets in the stack are rotated ninety degrees with respect to one another so as to form two sets of orthogonally extending fluid flow channels which are arranged in a crossflow configuration. The heat exchanger has a high surface to volume ratio, a small dead volume, a high heat transfer coefficient, and is suitable for use with fluids under high pressures. The heat exchanger has particular application in a Stirling engine that utilizes a liquid as the working substance.

  10. Microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and method for its fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert; Wheatley, John C.

    1985-01-01

    A microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and a method for its fabrication are disclosed. The heat exchanger is formed from a stack of thin metal sheets which are bonded together. The stack consists of alternating slotted and unslotted sheets. Each of the slotted sheets includes multiple parallel slots which form fluid flow channels when sandwiched between the unslotted sheets. Successive slotted sheets in the stack are rotated ninety degrees with respect to one another so as to form two sets of orthogonally extending fluid flow channels which are arranged in a crossflow configuration. The heat exchanger has a high surface to volume ratio, a small dead volume, a high heat transfer coefficient, and is suitable for use with fluids under high pressures. The heat exchanger has particular application in a Stirling engine that utilizes a liquid as the working substance.

  11. Microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and method for its fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Wheatley, J.C.

    1985-05-14

    A microchannel crossflow fluid heat exchanger and a method for its fabrication are disclosed. The heat exchanger is formed from a stack of thin metal sheets which are bonded together. The stack consists of alternating slotted and unslotted sheets. Each of the slotted sheets includes multiple parallel slots which form fluid flow channels when sandwiched between the unslotted sheets. Successive slotted sheets in the stack are rotated ninety degrees with respect to one another so as to form two sets of orthogonally extending fluid flow channels which are arranged in a crossflow configuration. The heat exchanger has a high surface to volume ratio, a small dead volume, a high heat transfer coefficient, and is suitable for use with fluids under high pressures. The heat exchanger has particular application in a Stirling engine that utilizes a liquid as the working substance. 9 figs.

  12. Chromate/silicate aluminum surface treatment for heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, B.B.; Ramo, S.J. Jr.

    1993-08-10

    A process is described for surface treating an aluminum heat exchanger by successively immersing the heat exchanger within a series of chemical solutions to provided the heat exchanger with a corrosive-resistent hydrophilic coating; the process comprising the steps of: providing a cleaning mixture including 40 to 60 weight percent of nitric acid and 1 to 5 weight percent of sodium fluoride, adding water to the cleaning mixture to form an aqueous cleaning solution having a total concentration of cleaning mixture between 2.0 to 5.0 weight percent; providing a chromate mixture including 10 weight percent of chromium trioxide, 25 weight percent of nitric acid and between 10 to 11 weight percent of hydrofluoric acid, providing a chromate activator comprising less than 25 weight percent of molybdic acid and disodium salt, adding water and the chromate activator to the chromate mixture to form an aqueous chromate solution; providing a silicate mixture comprising 90 to 100 weight percent of silicate of soda and 0 to 10 weight percent of potassium hydroxide, adding water to the silicate mixture to form an aqueous silicate solution; immersing the heat exchanger within an aqueous cleaning solution, and removing the heat exchanger from the cleaning solution; immersing the cleansed heat exchanger in the aqueous chromate solution, and removing the heat exchanger from the chromate solution; immersing the chromed heat exchanger in the aqueous silicate solution, and subsequently removing the heat exchanger from the silicate solution; and characterized by maintaining the total concentration of chromate mixture within the aqueous chromate solution at 0.9 to 1.5 weight percent ([plus minus] 0.1%) and the total concentration of chromate activator within the aqueous chromate solution at 1.1 weight percent ([plus minus] 0.1 %) thereby providing the necessary chemical concentration for producing a corrosion-resistent hydrophilic coating which is substantially free from musty odor emission.

  13. Performance evaluation of a shell and tube heat exchanger operated with oxide based nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrul, I. M.; Mahbubul, I. M.; Saidur, R.; Khaleduzzaman, S. S.; Sabri, M. F. M.

    2016-08-01

    This study is about the performance evaluation of a shell and tube heat exchanger operated with nanofluid. Thermal conductivity, viscosity, and density of the nanofluids were increased, but the specific heat of the nanofluids was decreased with increasing the concentrations of the particles. The convective heat transfer coefficient was found to be 2-15 % higher than that of water at 50 kg/min of both side fluid. Nevertheless, energy effectiveness has improved about 23-52 % for the above-mentioned nanofluids. As, energy effectiveness (ɛ) is strongly depends on the density and specific heat of the operating fluids therefore, maximum ɛ has obtained for ZnO-W nanofluid and lowest found for SiO2-W nanofluid.

  14. The effect of external heat transfer on thermal explosion in a spherical vessel with natural convection.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A N

    2015-07-14

    When any exothermic reaction proceeds in an unstirred vessel, natural convection may develop. This flow can significantly alter the heat transfer from the reacting fluid to the environment and hence alter the balance between heat generation and heat loss, which determines whether or not the system will explode. Previous studies of the effects of natural convection on thermal explosion have considered reactors where the temperature of the wall of the reactor is held constant. This implies that there is infinitely fast heat transfer between the wall of the vessel and the surrounding environment. In reality, there will be heat transfer resistances associated with conduction through the wall of the reactor and from the wall to the environment. The existence of these additional heat transfer resistances may alter the rate of heat transfer from the hot region of the reactor to the environment and hence the stability of the reaction. This work presents an initial numerical study of thermal explosion in a spherical reactor under the influence of natural convection and external heat transfer, which neglects the effects of consumption of reactant. Simulations were performed to examine the changing behaviour of the system as the intensity of convection and the importance of external heat transfer were varied. It was shown that the temporal development of the maximum temperature in the reactor was qualitatively similar as the Rayleigh and Biot numbers were varied. Importantly, the maximum temperature in a stable system was shown to vary with Biot number. This has important consequences for the definitions used for thermal explosion in systems with significant reactant consumption. Additionally, regions of parameter space where explosions occurred were identified. It was shown that reducing the Biot number increases the likelihood of explosion and reduces the stabilising effect of natural convection. Finally, the results of the simulations were shown to compare favourably with

  15. A Modeling Study of Heating and Drying Effects of Convective Clouds in an Extratropical Mesoscale Convective System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Yoshi; Jiang, Jih-Yih

    1985-12-01

    The two-dimensional version of the cumulus ensemble model developed by Soong and Ogura is applied both to a prestorm situation and to the mature stage of the extratropical mesoscale convective system (MCS) that developed on 10-11 April 1979 (AVE-SESAME-79 I) over the central United States. The objective is to investigate the statistical properties of convection, developing in response to an imposed large-scale forcing, and the thermodynamic feedback effect of clouds on the large-scale environment in midlatitudes. The result is compared to that recently obtained by Tao for a tropical rainband.The outstanding result of the model integration for 17 h of physical time is that statistical properties of clouds averaged horizontally over 128 km of the model domain undergo temporal variations for a given time-independent large-scale forcing, rather than settling down into a steady state. When applied to a prestorm situation, the model predicts heavy precipitation that continues to fall for the first 5 h, followed by a 4 h period without precipitation. A second burst of deep convection then occurs. An analysis of the result reveals that the pause of precipitation occurs when the subcloud layer is dried up primarily due to the net vertical transport of moisture associated with clouds. Convection again starts developing when the moisture in the subcloud layer is replenished by the imposed large-scale forcing. The precipitation rate averaged over the precipitation period is found to exceed the supply of moisture by the large-scale forcing. The result implies that the fraction of moisture convergence in a vertical air column that contributes to moisten the environmental atmosphere in Kuo's cumulus parameterization scheme can be negative.Further, the result indicates the following: 1) The updraft mass flux increases with height until it reaches the local maximum at 350 mb, indicating that the cloud population is dominated by deep clouds, in contrast to the bimodal or broad

  16. Transient Convection Due to Imposed Heat Flux: Application to Liquid-Acquisition Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Chato, David J.; Doherty, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    A model problem is considered that addresses the effect of heat load from an ambient laboratory environment on the temperature rise of liquid nitrogen inside an enclosure. This model has applications to liquid acquisition devices inside the cryogenic storage tanks used to transport vapor-free propellant to the main engine. We show that heat loads from Q = 0.001 to 10 W, with corresponding Rayleigh numbers from Ra = 109 to 1013, yield a range of unsteady convective states and temperature rise in the liquid. The results show that Q = 1 to 10 W (Ra = 1012 to 1013) yield temperature distributions along the enclosure height that are similar in trend to experimental measurements. Unsteady convection, which shows selfsimilarity in its planforms, is predicted for the range of heat-load conditions. The onset of convection occurs from a free-convection-dominated base flow that becomes unstable against convective instability generated at the bottom of the enclosure while the top of the enclosure is convectively stable. A number of modes are generated with small-scale thermals at the bottom of the enclosure in which the flow selforganizes into two symmetric modes prior to the onset of the propagation of the instability. These symmetric vertical modes transition to asymmetric modes that propagate as a traveling-wave-type motion of convective modes and are representative of the asymptotic convective state of the flow field. Intense vorticity production is created in the core of the flow field due to the fact that there is shear instability between the vertical and horizontal modes. For the higher Rayleigh numbers, 1012 to 1013, there is a transition from a stationary to a nonstationary response time signal of the flow and temperature fields with a mean value that increases with time over various time bands and regions of the enclosure.

  17. Combined thermocapillary and buoyancy-driven convection within short-duration pulse-heated liquid droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, F.; Khodadadi, J.M.

    1999-12-01

    Containerless processing of advanced materials and thermophysical property determination techniques for high-temperature materials almost exclusively manipulate spherical droplets. Spherical droplets are also observed in other industrial applications and naturally occurring phenomena, such as spray forming, fuel droplet vaporization, thermal storage technology, powder metallurgy, and environmental transport. In addition to the heat diffusion mode of thermal transport, the possible mechanisms of convection that may be encountered within droplets are surface-tension-driven and buoyancy-driven convection. Here, buoyancy-driven convection and its interaction with thermocapillary flow within short-duration-heated liquid droplets was studied computationally. A parametric study was conducted to investigate the effect of the Grashof number Gr and the surface-tension Reynolds number Re for fluids with different Prandtl numbers Pr having both negative and positive surface-tension temperature coefficients ({partial{underscore}derivative}{sigma}/{partial{underscore}derivative}T). Both the additive and impeding effects of buoyancy-driven convection on the thermocapillary flow was observed. The numerical analysis indicated that the buoyancy-driven convection has a weak effect on low-Pr fluids during the short-pulse-heating condition. For mid-Pr fluids the buoyancy effect is more prominent. In monitoring the history of the surface temperature rise, it was found that the buoyancy-driven convection has a weak effect for low-Pr fluids at the side and bottom observation points, whereas buoyancy-driven convection has substantial influence at the bottom observation point for mid-Pr fluids with a positive surface-tension temperature coefficient. It was concluded that the presence of additive or impeding modes depends not only on the sign of the surface-tension temperature coefficient of fluids as proposed by other researchers, but also on Pr, geometry, and boundary conditions. The

  18. Study on the Heat-Flow Controllable Heat Exchanger-3rd report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Osamu; Hamano, Masayoshi; Yanadori, Michio

    The heat-flow controllable heat exchanger for the purpose of heat recovery through the waste hot water at the bathroom and the washing room has been developed. The system is especially available at the house of cold area and the recovery heat is used to warm the suction air conducted from ventilation device. As the result of field test, it is clarified that the heat recovery rate by the system is very large. Also, the exchanger is possible to control the amount of recorery heat. Therefore, it is considered that the exchanger is applicable in the ventilation systems used the waste hot water.

  19. Study of transient behavior of finned coil heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooke, S. P.; Elissa, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    The status of research on the transient behavior of finned coil cross-flow heat exchangers using single phase fluids is reviewed. Applications with available analytical or numerical solutions are discussed. Investigation of water-to-air type cross-flow finned tube heat exchangers is examined through the use of simplified governing equations and an up-wind finite difference scheme. The degenerate case of zero air-side capacitance rate is compared with available exact solution. Generalization of the numerical model is discussed for application to multi-row multi-circuit heat exchangers.

  20. Wire-packed heat exchangers for dilution refrigerators.

    PubMed

    Polturak, E; Rappaport, M; Rosenbaum, R

    1978-03-01

    Very simple wire-packed step heat exchangers for dilution refrigerators are described. No sintering is used in fabrication. Flow impedances and thermal resistance between the liquid and the copper wires are low. A refrigerator with five wire-packed heat exchangers in addition to a countercurrent heat exchanger attains a temperature of 11.4 mK with a single mixing chamber and 6.1 mK with two mixing chambers. High cooling power is achieved at modest (3)He circulation rates. PMID:18699084

  1. Control strategies in a thermal oil - Molten salt heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, Lidia; Bonilla, Javier; Rodríguez-García, Margarita M.; Palenzuela, Patricia; de la Calle, Alberto; Valenzuela, Loreto

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a preliminary control scheme for a molten salt - thermal oil heat exchanger. This controller regulates the molten salt mass flow rate to reach and maintain the desired thermal oil temperature at the outlet of the heat exchanger. The controller architecture has been tested using an object-oriented heat exchanger model that has been validated with data from a molten salt testing facility located at CIEMAT-PSA. Different simulations are presented with three different goals: i) to analyze the controller response in the presence of disturbances, ii) to demonstrate the benefits of designing a setpoint generator and iii) to show the controller potential against electricity price variations.

  2. Heat exchanger and water tank arrangement for passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, J.E.; Johnson, F.T.; Orr, R.S.; Schulz, T.L.

    1993-11-30

    A water storage tank in the coolant water loop of a nuclear reactor contains a tubular heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has tube sheets mounted to the tank connections so that the tube sheets and tubes may be readily inspected and repaired. Preferably, the tubes extend from the tube sheets on a square pitch and then on a rectangular pitch there between. Also, the heat exchanger is supported by a frame so that the tank wall is not required to support all of its weight. 6 figures.

  3. Convective Heat Transfer in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor of the Space Transportation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This simulation involved a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a full motor initial grain of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System (STS). It was conducted with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) commercial code FLUENT. This analysis was performed to: a) maintain continuity with most related previous analyses, b) serve as a non-vectored baseline for any three-dimensional vectored nozzles, c) provide a relatively simple application and checkout for various CFD solution schemes, grid sensitivity studies, turbulence modeling and heat transfer, and d) calculate nozzle convective heat transfer coefficients. The accuracy of the present results and the selection of the numerical schemes and turbulence models were based on matching the rocket ballistic predictions of mass flow rate, head end pressure, vacuum thrust and specific impulse, and measured chamber pressure drop. Matching these ballistic predictions was found to be good. This study was limited to convective heat transfer and the results compared favorably with existing theory. On the other hand, qualitative comparison with backed-out data of the ratio of the convective heat transfer coefficient to the specific heat at constant pressure was made in a relative manner. This backed-out data was devised to match nozzle erosion that was a result of heat transfer (convective, radiative and conductive), chemical (transpirating), and mechanical (shear and particle impingement forces) effects combined.

  4. A general stagnation-point convective heating equation for arbitrary gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, K.; Graves, R. A., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    The stagnation-point convective heat transfer to an axisymmetric blunt body for arbitrary gases in chemical equilibrium was investigated. The gases considered were base gases of nitrogen, oxygen, hydrogen, helium, neon, argon, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and methane and 22 gas mixtures composed of the base gases. Enthalpies ranged from 2.3 to 116.2 MJ/kg, pressures ranged from 0.001 to 100 atmospheres, and the wall temperatures were 300 and 1111 K. A general equation for the stagnation-point convective heat transfer in base gases and gas mixtures was derived and is a function of the mass fraction, the molecular weight, and a transport parameter of the base gases. The relation compares well with present boundary-layer computer results and with other analytical and experimental results. In addition, the analysis verified that the convective heat transfer in gas mixtures can be determined from a summation relation involving the heat transfer coefficients of the base gases. The basic technique developed for the prediction of stagnation-point convective heating to an axisymmetric blunt body could be applied to other heat transfer problems.

  5. Effects of Nonequilibrium at Edge of Boundary Layer on Convective Heat Transfer to a Blunt Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goekcen, Tahir; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of a previous study on nonequilibrium convective heat transfer to a blunt body. In the previous study, for relatively high Reynolds number flows, it was found that: nonequilibrium convective heat transfer to a blunt body is not strongly dependent on freestream parameters, provided that the thermochemical equilibrium is reached at the edge of boundary layer; and successful testing of convective heat transfer in an arc-jet environment is possible by duplicating the surface pressure and total enthalpy. The nonequilibrium convective heat transfer computations are validated against the results of Fay and Riddell/Goulard theory. Present work investigates low Reynolds number conditions which are typical in an actual arc-jet flow environment. One expects that there will be departures from the Fay and Riddell/Goulard result since certain assumptions of the classical theory are not satisfied. These departures are of interest because the Fay and Riddell/Goulard formulas are extensively used in arc-jet testing (e.g., to determine the enthalpy of the flow and the catalytic efficiency of heat shield materials). For practical sizes of test materials, density of the test flow (and Reynolds number) in an arc-jet is such that thermochemical equilibrium may not be reached at the edge of boundary layer. For blunt body flows of nitrogen and air, computations will be presented to show the effects of thermochemical nonequilibrium at the boundary layer edge on nonequilibrium heat transfer.

  6. Supercritical convection, critical heat flux, and coking characteristics of propane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Gross, R. S.; Boyd, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of propane at subcritical and supercritical pressure were experimentally evaluated using electrically heated Monel K-500 tubes. A design correlation for supercritical heat transfer coefficient was established using the approach previously applied to supercritical oxygen. Flow oscillations were observed and the onset of these oscillations at supercritical pressures was correlated with wall-to-bulk temperature ratio and velocity. The critical heat flux measured at subcritical pressure was correlated with the product of velocity and subcooling. Long duration tests at fixed heat flux conditions were conducted to evaluate coking on the coolant side tube wall and coking rates comparable to RP-1 were observed.

  7. Slotting Fins of Heat Exchangers to Provide Thermal Breaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scull, Timothy D.

    2003-01-01

    Heat exchangers that include slotted fins (in contradistinction to continuous fins) have been invented. The slotting of the fins provides thermal breaks that reduce thermal conduction along flow paths (longitudinal thermal conduction), which reduces heat-transfer efficiency. By increasing the ratio between transverse thermal conduction (the desired heat-transfer conduction) and longitudinal thermal conduction, slotting of the fins can be exploited to (1) increase heat-transfer efficiency (thereby reducing operating cost) for a given heat-exchanger length or to (2) reduce the length (thereby reducing the weight and/or cost) of the heat exchanger needed to obtain a given heat transfer efficiency. By reducing the length of a heat exchanger, one can reduce the pressure drop associated with the flow through it. In a case in which slotting enables the use of fins with thermal conductivity greater than could otherwise be tolerated on the basis of longitudinal thermal conduction, one can exploit the conductivity to make the fins longer (in the transverse direction) than they otherwise could be, thereby making it possible to make a heat exchanger that contains fewer channels and therefore, that weighs less, contains fewer potential leak paths, and can be constructed from fewer parts and, hence, reduced cost.

  8. The effect of near-surface heating on the underlying convection pattern with application to Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J. H.; Nimmo, F.

    2007-12-01

    Rapid strike-slip motion is predicted to be a consequence of diurnal tidal stresses in most satellites of the outer solar system with short orbital timescales [1]. Such motion can lead to near-surface heating through friction or viscous dissipation [2]. Here we discuss the effect of near-surface shear heating on convection in the underlying ice shells of icy satellites [3], with a focus on Enceladus and a possible origin of the south polar thermal anomaly [4]. We present models of convection in spherical ice shells including both spatially variable volumetric tidal heating [5] and regional shear heating localized in the top 5 km at either the pole or the equator. We observe that the presence of the near-surface heating strongly controls the convective pattern, increasing the wavelength, and promoting the formation of a hot upwelling beneath the shear zone. Our results suggest that localized near- surface heating may result in a degree-1 convective planform in an ice shell of a thickness that may be appropriate for a differentiated Enceladus (d < 0.36 Rsat). The near-surface heating and convection pattern will produce a localized heat flow anomaly. The upwelling beneath the shear zone also produces a few hundred meters of long-wavelength dynamic topography. The ℓ=2 component of the topography may cause reorientation of the satellite [6]. [1] Hoppa, G., B. R. Tufts, R. Greenberg, and P. Geissler, Icarus, 141, 287-298, 1999. [2] Nimmo, F., E. Gaidos, JGR, 107, 5021, 2002. [3] Han, L., A. P. Showman, LPSC XXXVIII, #2277, 2007. [4] Spencer, J. R., et al., Science, 311, 1401-1405. [5] Tobie, G., A. Mocquet, C. Sotin, Icarus, 177 534-549. [6] Nimmo, F., R. T. Pappalardo, Nature, 441, 614-616.

  9. The effect of internal heating on plate dynamics in planetary mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Hansen, U.; Lowman, J. P.

    2009-12-01

    Plate dynamics on terrestrial planets such as Mars, Venus and Earth strongly differs in temporal variability and thermal evolution. Stagnant-lid convection is characterized by a hot convecting interior and subduction events leading to a cooling of the interior. Moreover it has been shown that the heating mode of mantle convection affects the time-dependence of plate-like surface behavior. Flow reversals have been observed as a result of a heat build-up close to a subduction zone. We investigate the effect of strong internal heating on plate dynamics which is of particular importance for the Super-Earth, a recently discovered class of exosolar planets. In particular, in numerical mantle convection models we consider different modes of internal heating such as purely internal heating and mixed-mode heating. In our study we apply different model approaches in which the viscosity depends on temperature and pressure to allow for high viscosity plates. Plate mobilisation is obtained by additionally employing either a stress dependence of the viscosity or utilizing the force-balance method. The latter approach requires that the stress at the base of each high viscosity plate sums to zero so that the plates neither drive nor resist mantle flow. We find differences between the two modes of heating which has implications for the thermal history. Systems with an insulating bottom are characterized by a cooler interior than systems which are additionally heated from below. This leads to great differences in the plate dynamics, as it is more difficult to sustain stagnant-lid convection in cooler systems.

  10. Heat exchanger for reactor core and the like

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, Jay S.; Kissinger, John A.

    1986-01-01

    A compact bayonet tube type heat exchanger which finds particular application as an auxiliary heat exchanger for transfer of heat from a reactor gas coolant to a secondary fluid medium. The heat exchanger is supported within a vertical cavity in a reactor vessel intersected by a reactor coolant passage at its upper end and having a reactor coolant return duct spaced below the inlet passage. The heat exchanger includes a plurality of relatively short length bayonet type heat exchange tube assemblies adapted to pass a secondary fluid medium therethrough and supported by primary and secondary tube sheets which are releasibly supported in a manner to facilitate removal and inspection of the bayonet tube assemblies from an access area below the heat exchanger. Inner and outer shrouds extend circumferentially of the tube assemblies and cause the reactor coolant to flow downwardly internally of the shrouds over the tube bundle and exit through the lower end of the inner shroud for passage to the return duct in the reactor vessel.

  11. Evaluation of fluid bed heat exchanger optimization parameters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Uncertainty in the relationship of specific bed material properties to gas-side heat transfer in fluidized beds has inhibited the search for optimum bed materials and has led to over-conservative assumptions in the design of fluid bed heat exchangers. An experimental program was carried out to isolate the effects of particle density, thermal conductivity, and heat capacitance upon fluid bed heat transfer. A total of 31 tests were run with 18 different bed material loads on 12 material types; particle size variations were tested on several material types. The conceptual design of a fluidized bed evaporator unit was completed for a diesel exhaust heat recovery system. The evaporator heat transfer surface area was substantially reduced while the physical dimensions of the unit increased. Despite the overall increase in unit size, the overall cost was reduced. A study of relative economics associated with bed material selection was conducted. For the fluidized bed evaporator, it was found that zircon sand was the best choice among materials tested in this program, and that the selection of bed material substantially influences the overall system costs. The optimized fluid bed heat exchanger has an estimated cost 19% below a fin augmented tubular heat exchanger; 31% below a commercial design fluid bed heat exchanger; and 50% below a conventional plain tube heat exchanger. The comparisons being made for a 9.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h waste heat boiler. The fluidized bed approach potentially has other advantages such as resistance to fouling. It is recommended that a study be conducted to develop a systematic selection of bed materials for fluidized bed heat exchanger applications, based upon findings of the study reported herein.

  12. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer Model for Convective Drying of Building Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Ashwani; Chandramohan, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model of simultaneous heat and moisture transfer is developed for convective drying of building material. A rectangular brick is considered for sample object. Finite-difference method with semi-implicit scheme is used for solving the transient governing heat and mass transfer equation. Convective boundary condition is used, as the product is exposed in hot air. The heat and mass transfer equations are coupled through diffusion coefficient which is assumed as the function of temperature of the product. Set of algebraic equations are generated through space and time discretization. The discretized algebraic equations are solved by Gauss-Siedel method via iteration. Grid and time independent studies are performed for finding the optimum number of nodal points and time steps respectively. A MATLAB computer code is developed to solve the heat and mass transfer equations simultaneously. Transient heat and mass transfer simulations are performed to find the temperature and moisture distribution inside the brick.

  13. Process Heat Exchanger Options for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-06-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  14. Process Heat Exchanger Options for Fluoride Salt High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-04-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  15. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bramlette, T. Tazwell; Keller, Jay O.

    1989-01-01

    A heat transfer apparatus includes a first chamber having a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, and an outlet. A first heat transfer gas source provides a first gas flow to the first chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A second gas flow through a second chamber connected to the side of the first chamber, generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling of the first and second gases in the acoustically augmented first chamber. The first chamber may also include a material inlet for receiving material to be dried, in which case the gas outlet serves as a dried material and gas outlet.

  16. Natural convection heat transfer simulation using energy conservative dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Abu-Nada, Eiyad

    2010-05-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics with energy conservation (eDPD) was used to study natural convection via Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) problem and a differentially heated enclosure problem (DHE). The current eDPD model implemented the Boussinesq approximation to model the buoyancy forces. The eDPD results were compared to the finite volume solutions and it was found that the eDPD method predict the temperature and flow fields throughout the natural convection domains properly. The eDPD model recovered the basic features of natural convection, such as development of plumes, development of thermal boundary layers, and development of natural convection circulation cells (rolls). The eDPD results were presented via temperature isotherms, streamlines, velocity contours, velocity vector plots, and temperature and velocity profiles. Further useful quantities, such as Nusselt number was calculated from the eDPD results and found to be in good agreement with the finite volume calculations.

  17. Oscillating side-branch enhancements of thermoacoustic heat exchangers

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.

    2003-05-13

    A regenerator-based engine or refrigerator has a regenerator with two ends at two different temperatures, through which a gas oscillates at a first oscillating volumetric flow rate in the direction between the two ends and in which the pressure of the gas oscillates, and first and second heat exchangers, each of which is at one of the two different temperatures. A dead-end side branch into which the gas oscillates has compliance and is connected adjacent to one of the ends of the regenerator to form a second oscillating gas flow rate additive with the first oscillating volumetric flow rate, the compliance having a volume effective to provide a selected total oscillating gas volumetric flow rate through the first heat exchanger. This configuration enables the first heat exchanger to be configured and located to better enhance the performance of the heat exchanger rather than being confined to the location and configuration of the regenerator.

  18. 1-MWE heat exchangers for OTEC. Final design report

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, A.M.

    1980-06-19

    The design of a 1 MWe OTEC heat exchanger is documented, including the designs of the evaporator and associated systems, condenser, instrumentation, and materials for corrosion/erosion control and fabrication processes. (LEW)

  19. Various methods to improve heat transfer in exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Zitek; Vaclav, Valenta

    2015-05-01

    The University of West Bohemia in Pilsen (Department of Power System Engineering) is working on the selection of effective heat exchangers. Conventional shell and tube heat exchangers use simple segmental baffles. It can be replaced by helical baffles, which increase the heat transfer efficiency and reduce pressure losses. Their usage is demonstrated in the primary circuit of IV. generation MSR (Molten Salt Reactors). For high-temperature reactors we consider the use of compact desk heat exchangers, which are small, which allows the integral configuration of reactor. We design them from graphite composites, which allow up to 1000°C and are usable as exchangers: salt-salt or salt-acid (e.g. for the hydrogen production). In the paper there are shown thermo-physical properties of salts, material properties and principles of calculations.

  20. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary..., consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  1. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary..., consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  2. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary..., consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  3. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary..., consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  4. 21 CFR 870.4240 - Cardiopulmonary bypass heat exchanger.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4240 Cardiopulmonary..., consisting of a heat exchange system used in extracorporeal circulation to warm or cool the blood...

  5. 40 CFR 63.654 - Heat exchange systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 63.654 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries § 63.654 Heat exchange...

  6. Determination of drying kinetics and convective heat transfer coefficients of ginger slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpinar, Ebru Kavak; Toraman, Seda

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, the effects of some parametric values on convective heat transfer coefficients and the thin layer drying process of ginger slices were investigated. Drying was done in the laboratory by using cyclone type convective dryer. The drying air temperature was varied as 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C and the air velocity is 0.8, 1.5 and 3 m/s. All drying experiments had only falling rate period. The drying data were fitted to the twelve mathematical models and performance of these models was investigated by comparing the determination of coefficient ( R 2), reduced Chi-square ( χ 2) and root mean square error between the observed and predicted moisture ratios. The effective moisture diffusivity and activation energy were calculated using an infinite series solution of Fick's diffusion equation. The average effective moisture diffusivity values and activation energy values varied from 2.807 × 10-10 to 6.977 × 10-10 m2/s and 19.313-22.722 kJ/mol over the drying air temperature and velocity range, respectively. Experimental data was used to evaluate the values of constants in Nusselt number expression by using linear regression analysis and consequently, convective heat transfer coefficients were determined in forced convection mode. Convective heat transfer coefficient of ginger slices showed changes in ranges 0.33-2.11 W/m2 °C.

  7. Determination of drying kinetics and convective heat transfer coefficients of ginger slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpinar, Ebru Kavak; Toraman, Seda

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the effects of some parametric values on convective heat transfer coefficients and the thin layer drying process of ginger slices were investigated. Drying was done in the laboratory by using cyclone type convective dryer. The drying air temperature was varied as 40, 50, 60 and 70 °C and the air velocity is 0.8, 1.5 and 3 m/s. All drying experiments had only falling rate period. The drying data were fitted to the twelve mathematical models and performance of these models was investigated by comparing the determination of coefficient (R 2), reduced Chi-square (χ 2) and root mean square error between the observed and predicted moisture ratios. The effective moisture diffusivity and activation energy were calculated using an infinite series solution of Fick's diffusion equation. The average effective moisture diffusivity values and activation energy values varied from 2.807 × 10-10 to 6.977 × 10-10 m2/s and 19.313-22.722 kJ/mol over the drying air temperature and velocity range, respectively. Experimental data was used to evaluate the values of constants in Nusselt number expression by using linear regression analysis and consequently, convective heat transfer coefficients were determined in forced convection mode. Convective heat transfer coefficient of ginger slices showed changes in ranges 0.33-2.11 W/m2 °C.

  8. Fouling of carbon steel heat exchanger caused by iron bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Starosvetsky, J.; Armon, R.; Starosvetsky, D. ); Groysman, A.

    1999-01-01

    A carbon steel heat exchanger installed in a reverse osmosis unit failed after 1 1/2 years from start-up as a result of tubes, lids, tube sheets, and connection pipes clogging from rust deposits. Chemical analysis of cooling water and scraped precipitates, as well laboratory screening of the deposits for bacteria, revealed that activity of iron-oxidizing bacteria present in cooling water could lead to heat exchanger blockage.

  9. A simplified model of heat transfer in heat exchangers and stack plates of thermoacoustic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Cila; Chen, Yuwen

    2006-08-01

    A simplified model of heat transfer was developed to investigate the thermal behavior of heat exchangers and stack plates of thermoacoustic devices. The model took advantage of previous results describing the thermal behavior of the thermoacoustic core and heat transfer in oscillating flow to study the performance of heat exchangers attached to the core. The configuration considered is a flat tube (with a working fluid flowing in the tube) of the thickness of the stack plate attached to both ends of the stack plate. Geometrical and operational parameters as well as thermophysical properties of the heat exchangers, transport fluids in the heat exchangers, stack plate and the thermoacoustic working fluid were organized into dimensionless groups that allowed accounting for their impact on the performance of the heat exchangers. Two types of thermal boundary conditions were considered: constant temperature and constant heat flux along the heat exchanger tubes. Numerical simulations were carried out with the model introduced in the paper. The temperature distributions and heat fluxes near the edge of the stack plate were found to be nonlinear. The influence of system parameters on the thermal performance of the heat exchangers was analyzed.

  10. Multi-scale convection in a geodynamo simulation with uniform heat flux along the outer boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, E. M.; Matsui, H.; Buffett, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Conducting fluids stirring within the Earth and other planets generate magnetic fields through a process known as dynamo action. Numerical simulations of dynamo action provide insight into this process, yet cannot replicate the extreme conditions of planetary turbulence, and so important physics may not be adequately captured. For example, it is generally expected that Earth's magnetic field, which is generated by convecting liquid metal within its core, will produce strong Lorentz forces that substantially alter that convection. In most dynamo models, however, Lorentz forces do very little to change convective flow, which is predominantly fine-scaled (Soderlund et al., 2012; King & Buffett, 2013). An important exception to this observation is in dynamo models that employ uniform heat flux boundary conditions, rather than the usual uniform temperature conditions, in which convection occurs on both small and large scales (Sakuraba & Roberts, 2009; Takahashi & Shimizu, 2012). How, exactly, thermal boundary conditions and magnetic field generation conspire to affect convection is not understood. We investigate the combined influence of thermal boundary conditions and magnetic fields using four simulations: two dynamos and two non-magnetic models, with either uniform temperature or heat flux fixed at the outer boundary. Of the four, only the fixed-heat-flux dynamo simulation produces multi-scale convective flow patterns. Comparison between the models suggests that the fixed-flux dynamo generates large patches of strong toroidal field that suppress convective motions near the outer boundary, giving rise to this observed change in convection scales. Strong toroidal field generation by this particular model is made possible by its relatively strong zonal flow, and its strong zonal flow is owed to a baroclinic response to meridional temperature gradients that persist in models with fixed heat flux boundary conditions. Thus, by allowing temperature to vary along the outer

  11. A fundamentally new approach to air-cooled heat exchangers.

    SciTech Connect

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2010-01-01

    We describe breakthrough results obtained in a feasibility study of a fundamentally new architecture for air-cooled heat exchangers. A longstanding but largely unrealized opportunity in energy efficiency concerns the performance of air-cooled heat exchangers used in air conditioners, heat pumps, and refrigeration equipment. In the case of residential air conditioners, for example, the typical performance of the air cooled heat exchangers used for condensers and evaporators is at best marginal from the standpoint the of achieving maximum the possible coefficient of performance (COP). If by some means it were possible to reduce the thermal resistance of these heat exchangers to a negligible level, a typical energy savings of order 30% could be immediately realized. It has long been known that a several-fold increase in heat exchanger size, in conjunction with the use of much higher volumetric flow rates, provides a straight-forward path to this goal but is not practical from the standpoint of real world applications. The tension in the market place between the need for energy efficiency and logistical considerations such as equipment size, cost and operating noise has resulted in a compromise that is far from ideal. This is the reason that a typical residential air conditioner exhibits significant sensitivity to reductions in fan speed and/or fouling of the heat exchanger surface. The prevailing wisdom is that little can be done to improve this situation; the 'fan-plus-finned-heat-sink' heat exchanger architecture used throughout the energy sector represents an extremely mature technology for which there is little opportunity for further optimization. But the fact remains that conventional fan-plus-finned-heat-sink technology simply doesn't work that well. Their primary physical limitation to performance (i.e. low thermal resistance) is the boundary layer of motionless air that adheres to and envelops all surfaces of the heat exchanger. Within this boundary layer

  12. Brazed aluminum, Plate-fin heat exchangers for OTEC

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, H.D.

    1980-12-01

    Brazed aluminum plate-fin heat exchangers have been available for special applications for over thirty years. The performance, compactness, versatility, and low cost of these heat exchangers has been unequaled by other heat exchanger configuration. The application of brazed aluminum has been highly limited because of necessary restrictions for clean non-corrosive atmospheres. Air and gas separation have provided ideal conditions for accepting brazed aluminum and in turn have benefited by the salient features of these plate-fin heat exchangers. In fact, brazed aluminum and cryogenic gas and air separation have become nearly synonymous. Brazed aluminum in its historic form could not be considered for a seawater atmosphere. However, technology presents a new look of significant importance to OTEC in terms of compactness and cost. The significant technological variation made was to include one-piece hollow extensions for the seawater passages. Crevice corrosion sites are thereby entirely eliminated and pitting corrosion attack will be controlled by an integral and sacrificial layer of a zinc-aluminum alloy. This paper on brazed aluminum plate-fin heat exchangers for OTEC will aquaint the reader with the state-of-art and variations suggested to qualify this form of aluminum for seawater use. In order to verify the desirable cost potential for OTEC, Trane teamed with Westinghouse to perform an OTEC system analysis with this heat exchanger. These results are very promising and reported in detail elsewhere.

  13. The fouling in the tubular heat exchanger of Algiers refinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harche, Rima; Mouheb, Abdelkader; Absi, Rafik

    2016-05-01

    Crude oil fouling in refinery preheat exchangers is a chronic operational problem that compromises energy recovery in these systems. Progress is hindered by the lack of quantitative knowledge of the dynamic effects of fouling on heat exchanger transfer and pressure drops. In subject of this work is an experimental determination of the thermal fouling resistance in the tubular heat exchanger of the crude oil preheats trains installed in an Algiers refinery. By measuring the inlet and outlet temperatures and mass flows of the two fluids, the overall heat transfer coefficient has been determined. Determining the overall heat transfer coefficient for the heat exchanger with clean and fouled surfaces, the fouling resistance was calculated. The results obtained from the two cells of exchangers studies, showed that the fouling resistance increased with time presented an exponential evolution in agreement with the model suggested by Kern and Seaton, with the existence of fluctuation caused by the instability of the flow rate and the impact between the particles. The bad cleaning of the heat exchangers involved the absence of the induction period and caused consequently, high values of the fouling resistance in a relatively short period of time.

  14. Dynamos driven by weak thermal convection and heterogeneous outer boundary heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Swarandeep; Sreenivasan, Binod; Amit, Hagay

    2016-01-01

    We use numerical dynamo models with heterogeneous core-mantle boundary (CMB) heat flux to show that lower mantle lateral thermal variability may help support a dynamo under weak thermal convection. In our reference models with homogeneous CMB heat flux, convection is either marginally supercritical or absent, always below the threshold for dynamo onset. We find that lateral CMB heat flux variations organize the flow in the core into patterns that favour the growth of an early magnetic field. Heat flux patterns symmetric about the equator produce non-reversing magnetic fields, whereas anti-symmetric patterns produce polarity reversals. Our results may explain the existence of the geodynamo prior to inner core nucleation under a tight energy budget. Furthermore, in order to sustain a strong geomagnetic field, the lower mantle thermal distribution was likely dominantly symmetric about the equator.

  15. Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Huebotter, P.R.; McLennan, G.A.

    1984-08-30

    The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

  16. Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Huebotter, Paul R.; McLennan, George A.

    1985-01-01

    The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

  17. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  18. Self-defrosting recuperative air-to-air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Drake, R.L.

    1993-12-28

    A heat exchanger is described which includes a stationary spirally or concentrically wound heat exchanger core with rotating baffles on upper and lower ends thereof. The rotating baffles include rotating inlets and outlets which are in communication with respective fixed inlets and outlets via annuli. The rotation of the baffles causes a concurrent rotation of the temperature distribution within the stationary exchanger core, thereby preventing frost build-up in some applications and preventing the formation of hot spots in other applications. 3 figures.

  19. PS1 satellite refrigerator heat exchanger: Failure of the LN2 heat exchanger to low pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, B.

    1992-11-01

    The PS1 heat exchanger is one of three prototype heat exchangers built by Atomic Welders before Meyer was given the contract to build the Satellite Refrigerator Heat Exchanger components. This heat exchanger was first put into operation in July 1983. In November 1991, this heat exchanger experienced a failure in the shell of heat exchanger 1 causing nitrogen to contaminate the helium in the refrigerator. The resulting contamination plugged heat exchanger 3. The break occurred at a weld that connects a 0.25 inch thick ring to heat exchanger 1. The failure appears to be a fatigue of the shell due to temperature oscillations. The flow rate through the break was measured to be 1.0 scfm for a pressure drop over the crack of 50 psi. An ANSYS analysis of the failure area indicates that the stress would be 83,000 psi if the metal did not yield. This is based on cooling down the shell to 80K from 300K with the shell side helium on the outside of the shell at 300K. This is the largest change in temperature that occurs during operation. During normal operations, the temperature swings are not nearly this large, however temperatures down to 80K are not unusual (LN2 overflowing pot). The highest temperatures are typically 260K. The analysis makes no attempt to estimate the stress concentration factor at this weld but there is no doubt that it is greater than 1. No estimate as to the number of cycles to cause failure was calculated nor any estimate as to the actual number of cycles was made.

  20. The Reynolds analogy for the mixed convection over a vertical surface with prescribed heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyari, E.; Pop, I.

    2009-03-01

    The steady mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical surface with prescribed heat flux is revisited in this Note. The subset of solutions which can be obtained with the aid of the Reynolds analogy is discussed in a close relationship with the dual solutions reported by Merkin and Mahmood [1] for impermeable, and more recently by Ishak et al. [2], for permeable surfaces.