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  1. AECT Convention, Orlando, Florida 2008 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Eddie

    2009-01-01

    This article presents several reports that highlight the events at the 2008 Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) International Convention in Orlando, Florida. At the annual convention this year, the Multimedia Production Division goal was to continue to share information about the latest tools in multimedia production,…

  2. AECT Convention, Orlando, Florida 2008 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, Eddie

    2009-01-01

    This article presents several reports that highlight the events at the 2008 Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) International Convention in Orlando, Florida. At the annual convention this year, the Multimedia Production Division goal was to continue to share information about the latest tools in multimedia production,…

  3. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (28th, Orlando, Florida, 2005). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    For the twenty-eighth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  4. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (28th, Orlando, Florida, 2005). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    For the twenty-eighth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  5. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (31st, Orlando, FL, 2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    For the thirty-first year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) sponsored the publication of these Proceedings. Papers were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. This year's Proceedings has two sections--Section 1 includes research and development papers and…

  6. Orlando, Florida, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Much of central Florida, including this detailed view of Orlando (28.5N, 81.0W) can be seen in this single photo. Disney World is at the top center of the scene and the crescent shaped Lake Tohopekaliga is near the bottom. The large round lakes are believed to be sinkholes formed during glacial times when ocean levels were several hundred feet lower than the present. Linear patterns east of Orlando are thought to be ancient shoreline ridges.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After their tour of KSC, members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly board their tour bus to return to Orlando. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - After their tour of KSC, members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly board their tour bus to return to Orlando. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  8. 737 Windshear Sensor Flight Tests, Orlando

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's Boeing 737 test aircraft on the ramp at Orlando International Airport following a day of flight tests evaluating the performance of radar, lidar, and infrared wind shear detection sensors

  9. Orlando, FL, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This color infrared photo of the Orlando, FL area (28.5N,81.5W) shows the extensive citrus tree orchards as neat bright red field patterns. The extensive road and highway network in the central Florida region is clearly visible. Also, the recent urban growth caused by the opening of the Disney World amusement complex just southwest of Orlando is clearly evident. This view spans the width of the state from Tampa Bay to the Atlantic coast.

  10. Orlando, FL, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This color infrared photo of the Orlando, FL area (28.5N,81.5W) shows the extensive citrus tree orchards as neat bright red field patterns. The extensive road and highway network in the central Florida region is clearly visible. Also, the recent urban growth caused by the opening of the Disney World amusement complex just southwest of Orlando is clearly evident. This view spans the width of the state from Tampa Bay to the Atlantic coast.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (center) is welcomed to the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the new NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (center) is welcomed to the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the new NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

  12. Stained glass solar windows for the swiss tech convention center.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    As a world first, 300 m² of dye-sensitized solar cells will be integrated into the facade of the EPFL's Convention Center. This prototype will constitute the first application of such technology to a public building. The translucent panels are constructed and assembled by local small and medium businesses and make use of an invention by EPFL researcher Michael Grätzel. This project is embedded within the framework of the partnership established in 2009 between EPFL and Romande Energie - whose aim is to create one of the largest solar energy parks in Switzerland.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During their tour of KSC, members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly get a close look at wheels used on an orbiter. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During their tour of KSC, members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly get a close look at wheels used on an orbiter. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly stop at the Space Station Processing Facility’s International Space Station observation room during their tour of KSC. The members are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly stop at the Space Station Processing Facility’s International Space Station observation room during their tour of KSC. The members are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director Jim Kennedy (center) makes a presentation to NASA and other officials about the benefits of locating NASA’s new Shared Services Center in the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director Jim Kennedy (center) makes a presentation to NASA and other officials about the benefits of locating NASA’s new Shared Services Center in the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

  17. Humor As a Weapon in Virginia Woolf's "Orlando."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackett, Robin

    Virginia Woolf's "Orlando" is an excellent example of mock biography to use in literature classes concerned with analyzing literary genres. Woolf used humor to undermine some conventions of the genre of biography and to reform biography into a shape adequate to express the life of Vita Sackville-West. An ordinary biography most likely…

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (center) listens to Congressman Tom Feeney (second from left) during a tour of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. At right is U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the new NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (center) listens to Congressman Tom Feeney (second from left) during a tour of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. At right is U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the new NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

  19. 77 FR 4394 - Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL AGENCY... provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties 12.4 acres at the Orlando Executive Airport... restrictions of a Quitclaim Deed agreement, dated August 9, 1961, between the subject airport and the...

  20. Proceedings of the Special Meeting on the Physics of Detectors Held at U.S. Naval Training Device Center, Orlando, Florida, on 15 March 1972

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-08-01

    manufacture. The bias is well within the power rating of the device. -le havo also seer. similar noise in lead- sulphide detectors. The noiie shown xeseibles...University Syracuse, New York ABSTRACT (Unclassified) The recombination cross section for mercury -doped germanium has been measured between 4-40 K, irt...in the mercury -doped samples was accounted for by quantitatively determining the density of these centers from carrier concentration and mobility

  1. An evaluation of rain chemistry data for the John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida and the University of Central Florida, Orlando

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Brooks C.; Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hinkle, C. Ross

    1986-01-01

    Concern over the effects of Space Shuttle launches prompted the initiation of a rather intense environmental monitoring program. The program included a precipitation monitoring network with 13 precipitation collection sites which were operated for various time periods to baseline precipitation chemistry at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). One additional site was also established as a remote background site on the Univ. of Central Florida (UCF) campus. One of the 13 sites was converted to a National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) station. Collections and analyses of samples were performed using a number of methodologies during the monitoring period. An evaluation of the data for comparability and utility for acid rain research was performed using the anion/cation, measured conductivity, calculated conductivity, Cl/Na, and Mg/Na ratios. Data collected at all KSC sites between 1977 and 1981, from 1983 to 1985 at the NADP site and at UCF to 1985 are comparable and appropriate for determining acid rain trends. Examination of those comparable data showed a fairly stable pH between 1977 and 1982 and an increase of 0.2 pH units which was observed as an incremental increase between 1982 and 1983 at KSC and UCF.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA and government officials are gathered to hear about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Seated at right are Lisa Malone, director of KSC External Affairs, and Joel Wells, with the Government Relations Office. Fourth from right is Jim Jennings, NASA deputy associate administrator for institutions and asset management. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for the center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA and government officials are gathered to hear about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Seated at right are Lisa Malone, director of KSC External Affairs, and Joel Wells, with the Government Relations Office. Fourth from right is Jim Jennings, NASA deputy associate administrator for institutions and asset management. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for the center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) greets Florida Congressman Tom Feeney during a tour of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the new NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) greets Florida Congressman Tom Feeney during a tour of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the new NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - U.S. Representative Ric Keller (left) listens intently to a presentation proposing the use of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. NASA and Florida officials toured the research park as well. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - U.S. Representative Ric Keller (left) listens intently to a presentation proposing the use of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. NASA and Florida officials toured the research park as well. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida, takes part in the proposal for locating NASA’s new Shared Services Center in the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. The presentation was given to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other officials. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida, takes part in the proposal for locating NASA’s new Shared Services Center in the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. The presentation was given to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other officials. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (left) greets U.S. Representative Ric Keller during a tour of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the new NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (left) greets U.S. Representative Ric Keller during a tour of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the new NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

  7. USGS Gulf Coast Science Conference and Florida Integrated Science Center Meeting: Proceedings with Abstracts, October 20-23, 2008, Orlando, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edited and compiled by Lavoie, Dawn; Rosen, Barry; Sumner, Dave; Haag, Kim; Tihansky, Ann; Boynton, Betsy; Koenig, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Welcome! The USGS is the Nation's premier source of information in support of science-based decision making for resource management. We are excited to have the opportunity to bring together a diverse array of USGS scientists, managers, specialists, and others from science centers around the Gulf working on biologic, geologic, and hydrologic issues related to the Gulf of Mexico and the State of Florida. We've organized the meeting around the major themes outlined in the USGS Circular 1309, Facing Tomorrow's Challenges - U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017. USGS senior leadership will provide a panel discussion about the Gulf of Mexico and Integrated Science. Capstone talks will summarize major topics and key issues. Interactive poster sessions each evening will provide the opportunity for you to present your results and talk with your peers. We hope that discussions and interactions at this meeting will help USGS scientists working in Florida and the Gulf Coast region find common interests, forge scientific collaborations and chart a direction for the future. We hope that the meeting environment will encourage interaction, innovation and stimulate ideas among the many scientists working throughout the region. We'd like to create a community of practice across disciplines and specialties that will help us address complex scientific and societal issues. Please take advantage of this opportunity to visit with colleagues, get to know new ones, share ideas and brainstorm about future possibilities. It is our pleasure to provide this opportunity. We are glad you're here.

  8. Seduction and revenge in Virginia Woolf's Orlando.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Susan

    2011-07-01

    Virginia Woolf's Orlando was characterized by Nigel Nicolson as a "charming love letter" to his mother, Vita Sackville-West. The fictional biography was actually an attempt by Woolf to organize herself after the unbearable humiliation of Vita's abandoning her for another woman. In imagining, writing, and publishing Orlando, Woolf turns her despair about Vita's betrayal into a monument of revenge, defending against disorganizing feelings of humiliation, powerlessness, rage, and loss by creating her own scathing portrait of Vita. In the novel, Woolf also intermittently merges herself with Orlando/Vita to create a permanent tie to the woman who--like her mother and sister--excited and rejected her.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. They are listening to comments from Italian astronaut Paolo Angelo Nespoli, who is with the European Space Agency. The members are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. They are listening to comments from Italian astronaut Paolo Angelo Nespoli, who is with the European Space Agency. The members are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  10. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly get a close look at some of the Shuttle’s hardware during their visit to the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. In the background is a segment of a solid rocket booster. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly get a close look at some of the Shuttle’s hardware during their visit to the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. In the background is a segment of a solid rocket booster. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  11. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly get a close look at a Space Shuttle main engine in the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly get a close look at a Space Shuttle main engine in the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  12. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. In the background is a segment of a solid rocket booster. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. In the background is a segment of a solid rocket booster. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  13. Prone to pregnancy: Orlando, Virginia Woolf and Sally Potter represent the gestating body.

    PubMed

    Maher, Jane Maree

    2007-03-01

    The visibility of pregnancy in contemporary societies through various forms of medical imaging has often been interpreted by feminist critics as negative for the autonomy and experience of pregnant women. Here, I consider the representation of pregnancy in Virginia Woolf's novel, Orlando, and Sally Potter's film of the same name arguing that, despite limited critical attention to Orlando's pregnancy, these texts offer a productive interpretation of gestation that counters conventionally reductive cultural images of that embodied state. In particular, I argue that Potter's translation of Woolf's novel to the screen gives us a useful model for thinking through the new visibility of pregnancy in contemporary Western culture.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During their tour of KSC, members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Convoy Command Center, the prime vehicle to control critical communications between the orbiter, the crew and the Launch Control Center after a Shuttle landing, to monitor the health of the Shuttle Orbiter systems and to direct convoy operations at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-10

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - During their tour of KSC, members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Convoy Command Center, the prime vehicle to control critical communications between the orbiter, the crew and the Launch Control Center after a Shuttle landing, to monitor the health of the Shuttle Orbiter systems and to direct convoy operations at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The Parliamentarians are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  15. Looking for a Person-Centered Medicine: Non Conventional Medicine in the Conventional European and Italian Setting

    PubMed Central

    Roberti di Sarsina, Paolo; Iseppato, Ilaria

    2011-01-01

    In Italy, the use of non conventional medicines (NCMs) is spreading among people as in the rest of Europe. Sales of alternative remedies are growing, and likewise the number of medical doctors (MDs) who practise NCM/complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, in Italy as in other countries of the European Union, at the present time the juridical/legal status of NCM/CAM is not well established, mainly due to the lack of any national law regulating NCM/CAM professional training, practice and public supply and the absence of government-promoted scientific research in this field. This is an obstacle to safeguarding the patient's interests and freedom of choice, especially now that dissatisfaction with biomedicine is inclining more and more people to look for a holistic and patient-centered form of medicine. PMID:19505973

  16. Variable Rate Irrigation Management for Humid Climates Using a Conventional Center Pivot System

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study investigates suitability of a standard commercial center pivot system for variable-rate water application under Mid-South conditions. The objective was to determine if field variability data can be applied to conventional moving sprinkler systems to optimize irrigation management on non-u...

  17. Metropolitan Orlando area computerized signal system

    SciTech Connect

    Aleman, F.R. ); Allen, T.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Florida's Orlando metropolitan area, which has a population measuring 1 million, is among the fastest growing areas in the nation. The city's weather and popular attractions draw 9 to 10 million tourists annually, half of them arriving in their own cars. Add to this the 1.1 million automobiles already on the streets, and the traffic problems become a nightmare. The Orlando metropolitan area has approximately 550 operational traffic signals, with an increasing number of new signals added each year to control the city's expanding growth. A central, computerized signal system has been conceived as one of the solutions necessary to cope with this tremendous traffic growth. The system is flexible, expandable, and capable of meeting future technical challenges. This article describes the steps that led to the feasibility study, design, and implementation of the Orlando area computerized signal system.

  18. Orlando, Florida: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of Orlando, FL, a 2008 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  19. Selective extra levator versus conventional abdomino perineal resection: experience from a tertiary-care center

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vishwas D.; Engineer, Reena; Patil, Prachi S.; Arya, Supreeta; Desouza, Ashwin L.

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare extra levator abdomino perineal resection (ELAPER) with conventional abdominoperineal resection (APER) in terms of short-term oncological and clinical outcomes. Methods This is a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database including all the patients of rectal cancer who underwent APER at Tata Memorial Center between July 1, 2013, and January 31, 2015. Short-term oncological parameters evaluated included circumferential resection margin involvement (CRM), tumor site perforation, and number of nodes harvested. Peri operative outcomes included blood loss, length of hospital stay, postoperative perineal wound complications, and 30-day mortality. The χ2-test was used to compare the results between the two groups. Results Forty-two cases of ELAPER and 78 cases of conventional APER were included in the study. Levator involvement was significantly higher in the ELAPER compared with the conventional group; otherwise, the two groups were comparable in all the aspects. CRM involvement was seen in seven patients (8.9%) in the conventional group compared with three patients (7.14%) in the ELAPER group. Median hospital stay was significantly longer with ELAPER. The univariate analysis of the factors influencing CRM positivity did not show any significance. Conclusions ELAPER should be the preferred approach for low rectal tumors with involvement of levators. For those cases in which levators are not involved, as shown in preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the current evidence is insufficient to recommend ELAPER over conventional APER. This stresses the importance of preoperative MRI in determining the best approach for an individual patient. PMID:27284466

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (center) makes a point while talking to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Congressman Tom Feeney, Congressman Dave Weldon, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (center) makes a point while talking to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Congressman Tom Feeney, Congressman Dave Weldon, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (center) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe are deep in conversation as they leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson at left is Congressman Tom Feeney. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (center) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe are deep in conversation as they leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson at left is Congressman Tom Feeney. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  2. The Teaching of Afro-Asian Literature: A Comparison between the Nonconventional Learner-Centered and the Conventional Teacher-Centered Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong Gonzales, Wilkinson Daniel O.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few decades, nonconventional learner-centered (NLC) trends in ELT have emerged amidst the current and probably dominant conventional teacher-centered (CTC) approaches used by majority of private and public schools in the Philippines. With the implementation of the K-12 curriculum, Afro-Asian literature remained the focus of the eighth…

  3. ORLANDO -- Oak Ridge Large Neutrino Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Efremenko, Yu.; Gabriel, T.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Plasil, F.; Fazely, A.; Svoboda, R.

    1997-12-01

    The authors discuss a proposal for construction of an Oak Ridge LArge Neutrino DetectOr (ORLANDO) to search for neutrino oscillations at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). A 4 MW SNS is proposed to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory with the first stage to be operative around 2006. It will have two target stations, which makes it possible with a single detector to perform a neutrino oscillation search at two different distances. Initial plans for the placement of the detector and the discovery potential of such a detector are discussed.

  4. 78 FR 78352 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 18, 2013, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.28(e): Order No. 1000 Further Regional Compliance Filing to...

  5. 76 FR 49469 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on July 29, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC), pursuant to section 205 of the Federal Power Act (FPA)...

  6. 75 FR 37789 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing June 23, 2010. Take notice that on June 11, 2010, the Orlando Utilities Commission filed, pro forma revised tariff sheets...

  7. 76 FR 35209 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 26, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.17(b): Amendment to...

  8. 76 FR 25685 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 15, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.25(e): Order 890 compliance to...

  9. 77 FR 34210 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends Class E Airspace at... E airspace at Orlando, FL (77 FR 16783). Interested parties were invited to participate in...

  10. Division Reports from the 2005 AECT Convention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TechTrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Association for Educational Communication & Technology held its International Convention in Orlando, Florida, October 18-22, 2005. The convention theme was "Exploring the Vision". Division report highlights include: (1) Reflections on a Convention: A Vision Explored (Wes Miller); (2) Definition and Terminology Committee (Al…

  11. Division Reports from the 2005 AECT Convention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TechTrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Association for Educational Communication & Technology held its International Convention in Orlando, Florida, October 18-22, 2005. The convention theme was "Exploring the Vision". Division report highlights include: (1) Reflections on a Convention: A Vision Explored (Wes Miller); (2) Definition and Terminology Committee (Al…

  12. Rejecting conventional wisdom: how academic medical centers can regain their leadership positions.

    PubMed

    Krauss, K; Smith, J

    1997-07-01

    Academic medical centers (i.e., medical schools and their principal hospitals) are following very similar strategies in attempts to secure their futures. It is likely that these undifferentiated strategies will fail, since most of them have been copied from the lower-cost, geographically better-positioned hospitals and health systems. Despite a wealth of innovative, entrepreneurial talent and the potential to reshape the world that AMCs live in, most AMCs are in reactive modes. Future directions and strategies are almost always shaped, forced, and justified by external pressures. The major problem with the strategic plans of most AMCs is that they are based on conventional industry wisdom. Strategic plans tend not to be analytically driven. The insight and understanding of those factors that drive the demand for AMCs' services and determine the performances of AMCs are lacking. The authors note some questions that are critical to the formulation of strategies for AMCs. For example, how can the research mission be changed from a cost-based to a value-based endeavor? Most AMCs cannot answer these questions, and if they do address them in the planning process, they do so superficially. Several examples of the factors that need to be understood are also given, such as patients' purposes and needs in seeking specialty care. Alternative strategies are listed, such as maintaining and exploiting the economic irrationality of the market rather than acting as if it were economically rational or forcing it to become so. Last, the authors outline the scope of the changes that are required and urge AMCs to reject conventional wisdom, determine their own unique situations, and work from there.

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Nelson are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Congressman Dave Weldon and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Nelson are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Congressman Dave Weldon and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Florida Congressman Tom Feeney talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Feeney are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Congressman Dave Weldon; and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Florida Congressman Tom Feeney talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Feeney are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Congressman Dave Weldon; and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (left front) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right front) leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson (at left) is Congressman Tom Feeney. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (left front) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right front) leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson (at left) is Congressman Tom Feeney. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (left foreground) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) look deep in conversation as they leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson is Congressman Tom Feeney and Center Director Jim Kennedy. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - U.S. Senator Bill Nelson (left foreground) and NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (right) look deep in conversation as they leave the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. Behind Nelson is Congressman Tom Feeney and Center Director Jim Kennedy. The research park is being proposed as the location for NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. On the left is Center Director Jim Kennedy. On the right are U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and U.S. Representative Ric Keller . Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Florida Congressman Tom Feeney and Congressman Dave Weldon.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. On the left is Center Director Jim Kennedy. On the right are U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and U.S. Representative Ric Keller . Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Florida Congressman Tom Feeney and Congressman Dave Weldon.

  18. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  19. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  20. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA and government officials are gathered to hear about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration. At the far end is NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe. He is flanked, on the left, by Florida Congressman Tom Feeney and U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; and on the right by U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon and U.S. Representative Ric Keller. In the foreground, at left, is Center Director Jim Kennedy. At right is Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA and government officials are gathered to hear about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration. At the far end is NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe. He is flanked, on the left, by Florida Congressman Tom Feeney and U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; and on the right by U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon and U.S. Representative Ric Keller. In the foreground, at left, is Center Director Jim Kennedy. At right is Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus.

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida, talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. She gave a presentation to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (far right) about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Dana are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida, talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. She gave a presentation to NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe (far right) about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Dana are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; and Congressman Dave Weldon. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - U.S. Representative Ric Keller talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Keller are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; Congressman Dave Weldon; and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - - U.S. Representative Ric Keller talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Keller are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; Congressman Dave Weldon; and O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  4. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; U.S. Representative Ric Keller; Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; and Congressman Dave Weldon. At right is Mike Rein, division chief of KSC External Affairs. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. Senator Bill Nelson and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

  5. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and Florida Congressman Tom Feeney. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He and government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind O’Keefe are (left to right) Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and Florida Congressman Tom Feeney. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included U.S. U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, Congressman Dave Weldon and Center Director Jim Kennedy.

  6. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Dave Weldon talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Weldon are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; at right is O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Dave Weldon talks to the media at the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. He, NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe and other government officials were at the park for a presentation about the assets of the research park as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Behind Weldon are (left to right) U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida; and Florida Congressman Tom Feeney; at right is O’Keefe. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Center Director Jim Kennedy also attended the presentation.

  7. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director Jim Kennedy makes a presentation to NASA and other officials about the benefits of locating NASA’s new Shared Services Center in the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. At the far left is Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC Director Jim Kennedy makes a presentation to NASA and other officials about the benefits of locating NASA’s new Shared Services Center in the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. At the far left is Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe discusses the presentation about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Florida Congressman Tom Feeney, Congressman Dave Weldon, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe discusses the presentation about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Florida Congressman Tom Feeney, Congressman Dave Weldon, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Dave Weldon listens to a presentation about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Congressman Tom Feeney, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Congressman Dave Weldon listens to a presentation about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando, as the site of NASA’s new Shared Services Center. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration for location of the Center, which would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Others attending the presentation included Congressman Tom Feeney, U.S. Representative Ric Keller, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, Center Director Jim Kennedy and Pamella J. Dana, Ph.D., director, Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development in Florida.

  10. Individualized reduction in dialysate sodium in conventional in-center hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    ARRAMREDDY, Rohini; SUN, Sumi J.; MENDOZA, Jair MUNOZ; CHERTOW, Glenn M.; SCHILLER, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have focused on the association between dialysate sodium (Na+) prescriptions and interdialytic weight gain (IDWG). We report on a case series of 13 patients undergoing conventional, thrice-weekly in-center hemodialysis with an individualized dialysate Na+ prescription. Individualized dialysate Na+ was achieved in all patients through a stepwise weekly reduction of the standard dialysate Na+ prescription (140 mEq/L) by 2–3 mEq/L until reaching a Na+ gradient of −2 mEq/L (dialysate Na+ minus average plasma Na+ over the preceding 3 months). Interdialytic weight gain, with and without indexing to dry weight (IDWG%), blood pressure, and the proportion of treatments with cramps, intradialytic hypotension (drop in systolic blood pressure >30 mmHg) and intradialytic hypotension requiring an intervention were reviewed. At the beginning of the observation period, the pre-hemodialysis (HD) plasma Na+ concentration ranged from 130 to 141 mEq/L. When switched from the standard to the individualized dialysate Na+ concentration, IDWG% decreased from 3.4% ± 1.6% to 2.5% ± 1.0% (P = 0.003) with no change in pre- or post-HD systolic or diastolic blood pressures (all P > 0.05). We found no significant change in the proportion of treatments with cramps (6% vs. 1.3%), intradialytic hypotension (62% vs. 65%), or intradialytic hypotension requiring an intervention (29% vs. 33%). Individualized reduction of dialysate Na+ reduces IDWG% without significantly increasing the frequency of cramps or hypotension. PMID:22554224

  11. Air Corrosivity in U.S. Outdoor-Air-Cooled Data Centers is Similar to That in Conventional Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Coles, Henry C.; Han, Taewon; Price, Phillip N.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Tschudi, William F.

    2011-07-17

    There is a concern that environmental-contamination caused corrosion may negatively affect Information Technology (IT) equipment reliability. Nineteen data centers in the United States and two in India were evaluated using Corrosion Classification Coupons (CCC) to assess environmental air quality as it may relate IT equipment reliability. The data centers were of two basic types: closed and outside-air cooled. A closed data center provides cool air to the IT equipment using air conditioning in which only a small percent age of the recirculation air is make-up air continuously supplied from outside to meet human health requirements. An outside-air cooled data center uses outside air directly as the primary source for IT equipment cooling. Corrosion measuring coupons containing copper and silver metal strips were placed in both closed and outside-air cooled data centers. The coupons were placed at each data center (closed and outside-air cooled types) with the location categorized into three groups: (1) Outside - coupons sheltered, located near or at the supply air inlet, but located before any filtering, (2) Supply - starting just after initial air filtering continuing inside the plenums and ducts feeding the data center rooms, and (3) Inside located inside the data center rooms near the IT equipment. Each coupon was exposed for thirty days and then sent to a laboratory for a corrosion rate measurement analysis. The goal of this research was to investigate whether gaseous contamination is a concern for U.S. data center operators as it relates to the reliability of IT equipment. More specifically, should there be an increased concern if outside air for IT equipment cooling is used To begin to answer this question limited exploratory measurements of corrosion rates in operating data centers in various locations were undertaken. This study sought to answer the following questions: (1) What is the precision of the measurements (2) What are the approximate statistical

  12. RadNet Air Data From Orlando, FL

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Orlando, FL from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  13. Exposure Calls to U. S. Poison Centers Involving Electronic Cigarettes and Conventional Cigarettes-September 2010-December 2014.

    PubMed

    Chatham-Stephens, Kevin; Law, Royal; Taylor, Ethel; Kieszak, Stephanie; Melstrom, Paul; Bunnell, Rebecca; Wang, Baoguang; Day, Hannah; Apelberg, Benjamin; Cantrell, Lee; Foster, Howell; Schier, Joshua G

    2016-12-01

    E-cigarette use is increasing, and the long-term impact on public health is unclear. We described the acute adverse health effects from e-cigarette exposures reported to U.S. poison centers. We compared monthly counts and demographic, exposure, and health effects data of calls about e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes made to poison centers from September 2010 through December 2014. Monthly e-cigarette calls increased from 1 in September 2010, peaked at 401 in April 2014, and declined to 295 in December 2014. Monthly conventional cigarette calls during the same period ranged from 302 to 514. E-cigarette calls were more likely than conventional cigarette calls to report adverse health effects, including vomiting, eye irritation, and nausea. Five e-cigarette calls reported major health effects, such as respiratory failure, and there were two deaths associated with e-cigarette calls. E-cigarette calls to U.S. poison centers increased over the study period, and were more likely than conventional cigarettes to report adverse health effects. It is important for health care providers and the public to be aware of potential acute health effects from e-cigarettes. Developing strategies to monitor and prevent poisonings from these novel devices is critical.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials and government representatives are gathered to learn about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. At the far end of the table is NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe. He is flanked, on the left, by Florida Congressman Tom Feeney and U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; and on the right by U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-19

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - NASA officials and government representatives are gathered to learn about the assets of the Central Florida Research Park, near Orlando. At the far end of the table is NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe. He is flanked, on the left, by Florida Congressman Tom Feeney and U.S. Senator Bill Nelson; and on the right by U.S. Congressman Dave Weldon. Central Florida leaders are proposing the research park as the site for the NASA Shared Services Center. The center would centralize NASA’s payroll, accounting, human resources, facilities and procurement offices that are now handled at each field center. The consolidation is part of the One NASA focus. Six sites around the U.S. are under consideration by NASA.

  15. Report of the Aesthetic Education Center (American Educational Theatre Association Convention, Chicago, Illinois, August, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Bernard S., Ed.; Ingham, Susan D., Ed.

    This report is a transcription of the proceedings of the Aesthetic Education Center meeting of 1971, sponsored by AETA and CEMREL, Inc. Following an opening statement, the report summarizes a panel discussion on "What Is Aesthetic Education?" which centered on finding approaches to relating the arts programs in schools more closely and in new ways…

  16. 78 FR 729 - Ellman Battery Superfund Site; Orlando, Orange County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Ellman Battery Superfund Site; Orlando, Orange County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... concerning a previous Removal Action at the Ellman Battery Superfund Site located in Orlando, Orange...

  17. Cooperative Mmonitoring Center Occasional Paper/5: Propspects of Conventional Arms Control in South Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Amit; Kamal, Nazir

    1998-11-01

    The intensely adversarial relationship between India and Pakistan is marked by military rivalry, mutual distrust, and suspicion. The most dividing disagreement has been over the Kashmir region. An inability to discuss the Kashmir issue has prevented discussion on other important issues. Since there is little prospect of detente, at least in the near-term, the question is whether this rivalry can be contained by other means, such as arms control approaches. Conventional arms control has been applied flexibly and successfully in some regions to reduce threat-perceptions and achieve reassuring military stability. Some lessons from other international models might be applied to the India/Pakistan context. This paper discusses the status of conventional arms control in South Asia, the dominant Indian and Pakistani perceptions about arms control, the benefits that could be derived from arms control, as well as the problems and prospects of arms control. It also discusses existing conventional arms control agreements at the regional and global levels as well as the potential role of cooperative monitoring technology.

  18. 77 FR 16783 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Orlando, FL...: This action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Orlando, FL, as new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures have been developed at Orlando Executive Airport. This action would enhance the safety...

  19. A comparison of the works of Peplau and Orlando.

    PubMed

    Forchuk, C

    1991-02-01

    Peplau and Orlando have had a great impact on the past and current practice of mental health nursing. Their works represent some of the first attempts at theory development in nursing. This article compares and critiques the works of these two theorists. The emphasis on the interpersonal relationship is a major focus of both theorists. Peplau has a greater emphasis on the development of the individual, while Orlando focuses on the immediate needs of the client. They both contribute greatly to the development of nursing science. Appreciating their work only for its historical significance would be a major oversight.

  20. Rethinking the Air Operations Center, Air Force Command and Control in Conventional War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    ADm-A285 444 DTIC ELECT ,IAll Rethinking the Air Operations Center Air Force C)mmand and Control in Conv6ntal War. J. TAYOR SIMK, Lt Col, USAF School...at the theater level as the best way to achieve these dual aims.3 Indeed, this advocacy is tightly intertwined with the history of the USAF in its...Conversely, fully effective strikes on poorly selected targets will, at best , merely waste effort, and are quite likely to be counterproductive. Thus

  1. Some propulsion system noise data handling conventions and computer programs used at the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montegani, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Methods of handling one-third-octave band noise data originating from the outdoor full-scale fan noise facility and the engine acoustic facility at the Lewis Research Center are presented. Procedures for standardizing, retrieving, extrapolating, and reporting these data are explained. Computer programs are given which are used to accomplish these and other noise data analysis tasks. This information is useful as background for interpretation of data from these facilities appearing in NASA reports and can aid data exchange by promoting standardization.

  2. The Population Genetic Composition of Conventional and SPF Colonies of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the Caribbean Primate Research Center.

    PubMed

    Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Ng, Jillian; Hernández-Pacheco, Raisa; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina; Maldonado, Elizabeth; Martínez, Melween I; Sariol, Carlos A

    2016-03-01

    The SPF breeding program at the Caribbean Primate Research Center supplies Indian-origin rhesus macaques of known genetic and virologic background for biomedical research. In this study, population genetic analyses using 14 short tandem-repeat sequences showed that the SPF colony has remained genetically homogenous over time, with sufficient amounts of heterozygosity and minimal stratification from its founders. Intergenerational studies indicated that an average of 7 alleles have been retained, inbreeding levels have remained low, and the degree of Indian ancestry is one of the highest among several national primate research centers. The relative low genetic diversity in the free-ranging population as well as in the captive SPF and conventional colonies when compared with that of other primate centers indicates that the free-ranging population, from which the captive-colony animals were derived, has experienced significant founder effects and genetic drift during the years after its establishment. This study supports the historical origin of the free-ranging population and confirms the high value of this resource for biomedical research. Current genetic diversity levels within the SPF colony can be ensured with the practice of colony management approaches such as equalizing male:female ratios in each SPF breeding group and increasing breeding group sizes. Introducing new Indian-origin macaques from other captive colonies might help to maximize the genetic diversity of the breeding stock. Furthermore, genetic estimates must be used to rank breeders according to their genetic value or their genome uniqueness to increase founder-genome representation and curb future genetic bottlenecks and allele loss.

  3. The Population Genetic Composition of Conventional and SPF Colonies of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the Caribbean Primate Research Center

    PubMed Central

    Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Ng, Jillian; Hernández-Pacheco, Raisa; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina; Maldonado, Elizabeth; Martínez, Melween I; Sariol, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    The SPF breeding program at the Caribbean Primate Research Center supplies Indian-origin rhesus macaques of known genetic and virologic background for biomedical research. In this study, population genetic analyses using 14 short tandem-repeat sequences showed that the SPF colony has remained genetically homogenous over time, with sufficient amounts of heterozygosity and minimal stratification from its founders. Intergenerational studies indicated that an average of 7 alleles have been retained, inbreeding levels have remained low, and the degree of Indian ancestry is one of the highest among several national primate research centers. The relative low genetic diversity in the free-ranging population as well as in the captive SPF and conventional colonies when compared with that of other primate centers indicates that the free-ranging population, from which the captive-colony animals were derived, has experienced significant founder effects and genetic drift during the years after its establishment. This study supports the historical origin of the free-ranging population and confirms the high value of this resource for biomedical research. Current genetic diversity levels within the SPF colony can be ensured with the practice of colony management approaches such as equalizing male:female ratios in each SPF breeding group and increasing breeding group sizes. Introducing new Indian-origin macaques from other captive colonies might help to maximize the genetic diversity of the breeding stock. Furthermore, genetic estimates must be used to rank breeders according to their genetic value or their genome uniqueness to increase founder-genome representation and curb future genetic bottlenecks and allele loss. PMID:27025804

  4. Orlando 737 Windshear Sensor Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's 737 'flying laboratory' flight tested three advance warning windshear sensors. The laser beams seen in the photograph were used to align the optical hardware of the infrared (located in front of the windows) and LIDAR (Light Detecting And Ranging) systems. In addition, a microwave doppler radar system is installed in the aircraft nose.

  5. Terminal Doppler weather radar operational test and evaluation, Orlando 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernella, David M.

    1991-04-01

    Lincoln Laboratory conducted an evaluation of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) system in Orlando, Florida during the summer of 1990. In previous years, evaluations have been conducted at airports in Kansas City, MO (1989) and Denver, CO (1988). Since the testing at the Kansas City International Airport, the radar was modified to operate in C-band, which is the intended frequency band for the production TDWR systems. The objectives of the 1990 evaluation period were to evaluate TDWR system performance in detecting low-altitude wind shear, specifically microbursts and gust fronts, at the Orlando International Airport and in the surrounding area; to refine the system's wind shear detection capabilities; and to evaluate elements of the system developed by the contractor, which were new for the C-band system and therefore not available for evaluation in previous years. Some performance comparisons are made among results from the vastly different weather environments of Denver, Kansas City, and Orlando. Statistics are presented and discussed for the performance of the system in detecting and predicting microbursts and gust fronts. A significant use of the prediction capability is its potential use for air traffic control (ATC) personnel to plan airport operations when hazardous weather is predicted. Issues such as low velocity ground clutter (from tree leaves, road traffic, and dense urban areas) that affect prediction performance are discussed along with possible software modification to account for them.

  6. Computer Center/DP Management. Papers Presented at the Association for Educational Data Systems Annual Convention (Phoenix, Arizona, May 3-7, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Educational Data Systems, Washington, DC.

    Fifteen papers on computer centers and data processing management presented at the Association for Educational Data Systems (AEDS) 1976 convention are included in this document. The first two papers review the recent controversy for proposed licensing of data processors, and they are followed by a description of the Institute for Certification of…

  7. Get Active Orlando: changing the built environment to increase physical activity.

    PubMed

    McCreedy, Malisa; Leslie, Jill G

    2009-12-01

    Active Living by Design's Get Active Orlando partnership (GAO) focused on downtown Orlando's Community Redevelopment Area, including the Parramore Heritage District, home to many low-income and ethnically diverse residents, including many seniors. The area had undergone substantial development, and GAO aimed to incorporate active living considerations into the city's changing landscape. Get Active Orlando conducted a baseline survey of all streets, sidewalks, and bicycle lanes in the project area and identified a sequence of plans and policies in which to incorporate changes identified in the assessment. To create more immediate opportunities for active living, the partnership initiated a senior walking program, a bicycle refurbishment and giveaway program, and community bicycle-riding events, and led a social-marketing campaign that emphasized simple lifestyle changes. Get Active Orlando influenced adoption of public policies supporting active living in Orlando, including the Downtown Transportation Plan, Streetscape Guidelines, Design Standards Review Checklist, and growth management policies. Establishment of the Mayor's Advisory Council on Active Living is testament to the heightened significance of active living in Orlando. Initial assessment data served as a strong platform for policy change. Creating connections across disciplines including land-use planning, transportation, public health, and economic development allowed GAO to secure substantial policy change to influence design of the built environment. Engaging community members, including youth, as leaders was an important factor in program success. The physical environment in Orlando's Community Redevelopment Area is beginning to change as a reflection of a new policy framework designed to support active living.

  8. The Orlando TDWR testbed and airborne wind shear date comparison results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Steven; Berke, Anthony; Matthews, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The focus of this talk is on comparing terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) and airborne wind shear data in computing a microburst hazard index called the F factor. The TDWR is a ground-based system for detecting wind shear hazards to aviation in the terminal area. The Federal Aviation Administration will begin deploying TDWR units near 45 airports in late 1992. As part of this development effort, M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory operates under F.A.A. support a TDWR testbed radar in Orlando, FL. During the past two years, a series of flight tests has been conducted with instrumented aircraft penetrating microburst events while under testbed radar surveillance. These tests were carried out with a Cessna Citation 2 aircraft operated by the University of North Dakota (UND) Center for Aerospace Sciences in 1990, and a Boeing 737 operated by NASA Langley Research Center in 1991. A large data base of approximately 60 instrumented microburst penetrations has been obtained from these flights.

  9. The Reading Writing Center: What We Can Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spillane, Lee Ann

    2006-01-01

    Writing centers offer students the means to success. The Reading Writing Center (RWC) at University High School in Orlando, Florida, serves a diverse population of more than 3,700 students. The center serves dual purposes. A classroom side operates as a demonstration space where the author, who is the center's director, leads and sometimes…

  10. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    On August 8, 2001, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory celebrated the centennial of the birth of its founder (and namesake), Ernest Orlando Lawrence. For the occasion, many speeches were given and old speeches were remembered. We recall the words of the late Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Laureate and one of the Lawrence's closest colleagues: ''Lawrence will always be remembered as the inventor of the cyclotron, but more importantly, he should be remembered as the inventor of the modern way of doing science''. J. L. Heilbron and R. W. Seidel, in the introduction of their book, ''Lawrence and His Laboratory'' stated, ''The motives and mechanisms that shaped the growth of the Laboratory helped to force deep changes in the scientific estate and in the wider society. In the entrepreneurship of its founder, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, these motives, mechanisms, and changes came together in a tight focus. He mobilized great and small philanthropists, state and local governments, corporations, and plutocrats, volunteers and virtuosos. The work they supported, from astrophysics and atomic bombs, from radiochemistry to nuclear medicine, shaped the way we observe, control, and manipulate our environment.'' Indeed, all over the civilized world, the ways we do science changed forever after Lawrence built his famed Radiation Laboratory. In this editorial, we epitomize his legacy of changing the way we do medicine, thereby affecting the health and well being of all humanity. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley. Lawrence conceived the idea of the cyclotron early in 1929 after reading an article by Rolf Wideroe on high-energy accelerators. In the spring of 1930 one of his students, Nels Edlefsen, constructed two crude models of a cyclotron. Later in the fall of the same year, another student, M. Stanley Livingston, constructed a 13-cm diameter model that had all the features of early

  11. Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory - Fundamental and applied research on lean premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Robert K.

    1999-07-07

    Ernest Orland Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is the oldest of America's national laboratories and has been a leader in science and engineering technology for more than 65 years, serving as a powerful resource to meet Us national needs. As a multi-program Department of Energy laboratory, Berkeley Lab is dedicated to performing leading edge research in the biological, physical, materials, chemical, energy, environmental and computing sciences. Ernest Orlando Lawrence, the Lab's founder and the first of its nine Nobel prize winners, invented the cyclotron, which led to a Golden Age of particle physics and revolutionary discoveries about the nature of the universe. To this day, the Lab remains a world center for accelerator and detector innovation and design. The Lab is the birthplace of nuclear medicine and the cradle of invention for medical imaging. In the field of heart disease, Lab researchers were the first to isolate lipoproteins and the first to determine that the ratio of high density to low density lipoproteins is a strong indicator of heart disease risk. The demise of the dinosaurs--the revelation that they had been killed off by a massive comet or asteroid that had slammed into the Earth--was a theory developed here. The invention of the chemical laser, the unlocking of the secrets of photosynthesis--this is a short preview of the legacy of this Laboratory.

  12. Leading Antibacterial Laboratory Research by Integrating Conventional and Innovative Approaches: The Laboratory Center of the Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group.

    PubMed

    Manca, Claudia; Hill, Carol; Hujer, Andrea M; Patel, Robin; Evans, Scott R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2017-03-15

    The Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) Laboratory Center (LC) leads the evaluation, development, and implementation of laboratory-based research by providing scientific leadership and supporting standard/specialized laboratory services. The LC has developed a physical biorepository and a virtual biorepository. The physical biorepository contains bacterial isolates from ARLG-funded studies located in a centralized laboratory and they are available to ARLG investigators. The Web-based virtual biorepository strain catalogue includes well-characterized gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains published by ARLG investigators. The LC, in collaboration with the ARLG Leadership and Operations Center, developed procedures for review and approval of strain requests, guidance during the selection process, and for shipping strains from the distributing laboratories to the requesting investigators. ARLG strains and scientific and/or technical guidance have been provided to basic research laboratories and diagnostic companies for research and development, facilitating collaboration between diagnostic companies and the ARLG Master Protocol for Evaluating Multiple Infection Diagnostics (MASTERMIND) initiative for evaluation of multiple diagnostic devices from a single patient sampling event. In addition, the LC has completed several laboratory-based studies designed to help evaluate new rapid molecular diagnostics by developing, testing, and applying a MASTERMIND approach using purified bacterial strains. In collaboration with the ARLG's Statistical and Data Management Center (SDMC), the LC has developed novel analytical strategies that integrate microbiologic and genetic data for improved and accurate identification of antimicrobial resistance. These novel approaches will aid in the design of future ARLG studies and help correlate pathogenic markers with clinical outcomes. The LC's accomplishments are the result of a successful collaboration with the ARLG

  13. Conventional Practitioners’ Communication of Integrative Alternatives for Chronic Back Pain: An Evidence-based, Patient-centered Model

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Ruthann

    2014-01-01

    Chronic back pain is one of the most common conditions treated in the United States. Informed consent is the communication of treatment alternatives, benefits, and risks and must be provided to patients in most instances. The alternatives provided during this discussion should include all options supported by research evidence and the patient’s preferences. This article proposes a model for chronic back pain that includes the communication of complementary therapies as part of a patient-centered, integrative approach to informed consent. The content of informed consent is determined by common law (court cases), legislation, regulations, and evidence-based research. The practitioner’s and patient’s knowledge and the patient’s values should be used to filter this information. Finally, shared decision making should be used to arrive at the patient’s final decision regarding informed consent for treatment. PMID:26770090

  14. Constrained snake vs. conventional snake for carotid ultrasound automated IMT measurements on multi-center data sets.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Filippo; Meiburger, Kristen M; Saba, Luca; Acharya, U Rajendra; Ledda, Mario; Nicolaides, Andrew; Suri, Jasjit S

    2012-09-01

    Accurate intima-media thickness (IMT) measurement of the carotid artery from minimal plaque ultrasound images is a relevant clinical need, since IMT increase is related to the progression of atherosclerosis. In this paper, we describe a novel dual snake-based model for the high-performance carotid IMT measurement, called Carotid Measurement Using Dual Snakes (CMUDS). Snakes (which are deformable contours) adapt to the lumen-intima (LI) and media-adventitia (MA) interfaces, thus enabling the IMT computation as distance between the LI and MA snakes. However, traditional snakes might be unable to maintain a correct distance and in some spatial location along the artery, it might even collapse between them or diverge. The technical improvement of this work is the definition of a dual snake-based constrained system, which prevents the LI and MA snakes from collapsing or bleeding, thus optimizing the IMT estimation. The CMUDS system consists of two parametric models automatically initialized using the far adventitia border which we automatically traced by using a previously developed multi-resolution approach. The dual snakes evolve simultaneously and are constrained by the distances between them, ensuring the regularization of LI/MA topology. We benchmarked our automated CMUDS with the previous conventional semi-automated snake system called Carotid Measurement Using Single Snake (CMUSS). Two independent readers manually traced the LIMA boundaries of a multi-institutional, multi-ethnic, and multi-scanner database of 665 CCA longitudinal 2D images. We evaluated our system performance by comparing it with the gold standard as traced by clinical readers. CMUDS and CMUSS correctly processed 100% of the 665 images. Comparing the performance with respect to the two readers, our automatically measured IMT was on average very close to that of the two readers (IMT measurement biases for CMUSS was equal to -0.011±0.329mm and -0.045±0.317mm, respectively, while for CMUDS, it was

  15. Calculation of operating expenses for conventional transarterial chemoembolization in an academic medical center: a step toward defining the value of transarterial chemoembolization.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Michael V; Meek, James

    2014-04-01

    To determine the "real cost" of conventional transarterial chemoembolization in the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Comprehensive cost data for performance of conventional transarterial chemoembolization were calculated from a retrospective review of records of 50 consecutive outpatient transarterial chemoembolization procedures in 36 patients with HCC. Costs included labor, equipment, facility acquisition and maintenance, overhead, and administrative costs in a single academic medical center. Hourly rate operational costs for the angiography suite and recovery area were calculated, to which the consumable supply costs were added. Conventional transarterial chemoembolization was defined as selective intrahepatic administration of chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin and mitomycin C) emulsified in ethiodized oil (Lipiodol). The hourly rate to operate an angiography suite at the institution was calculated to be $539/h. Recovery time was calculated at $108/h. Median overall cost of conventional transarterial chemoembolization was $3,269 (range, $2,223-$5,654). This overall cost comprised median room and personnel costs of $763 (range, $404-$1,797), consumable costs of $1,886 (range, $1,134-$4,126), and recovery costs of $378 (range, $162-$864). The largest contribution (62%) to the real cost of outpatient transarterial chemoembolization comes from the expendable equipment used in the procedure. The angiography suite and personnel costs constitute 25% of the total, and recovery costs constitute 13%. This finding is a change from previous reports in which angiography suite operation was the greatest contributor to cost. Understanding real cost is an essential step in determining the value of the procedure. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Building America Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Fibrous Insulation and Tiles, Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    2015-11-01

    This research is a test implementation of an unvented tile roof assembly in a hot-humid climate (Orlando, FL; Zone 2A), insulated with air permeable insulation (netted and blown fiberglass). Given the localized moisture accumulation and failures seen in previous unvented roof field work, it was theorized that a 'diffusion vent' (water vapor open, but air barrier 'closed') at the highest points in the roof assembly might allow for the wintertime release of moisture, to safe levels. The 'diffusion vent' is an open slot at the ridge and hips, covered with a water-resistant but vapor open (500+ perm) air barrier membrane. As a control comparison, one portion of the roof was constructed as a typical unvented roof (self-adhered membrane at ridge). The data collected to date indicate that the diffusion vent roof shows greater moisture safety than the conventional, unvented roof design. The unvented roof had extended winter periods of 95-100% RH, and wafer (wood surrogate RH sensor) measurements indicating possible condensation; high moisture levels were concentrated at the roof ridge. In contrast, the diffusion vent roofs had drier conditions, with most peak MCs (sheathing) below 20%. In the spring, as outdoor temperatures warmed, all roofs dried well into the safe range (10% MC or less). Some roof-wall interfaces showed moderately high MCs; this might be due to moisture accumulation at the highest point in the lower attic, and/or shading of the roof by the adjacent second story. Monitoring will be continued at least through spring 2016 (another winter and spring).

  17. NASA airborne radar wind shear detection algorithm and the detection of wet microbursts in the vicinity of Orlando, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.; Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The algorithms used in the NASA experimental wind shear radar system for detection, characterization, and determination of windshear hazard are discussed. The performance of the algorithms in the detection of wet microbursts near Orlando is presented. Various suggested algorithms that are currently being evaluated using the flight test results from Denver and Orlando are reviewed.

  18. Comparison of the efficacy of biologics versus conventional systemic therapies in the treatment of psoriasis at a comprehensive psoriasis care center.

    PubMed

    Au, Shiu-Chung; Madani, Abdulaziz; Alhaddad, Marwan; Alkofide, Maha; Gottlieb, Alice B

    2013-08-01

    The efficacy of biologic treatment for psoriasis has not been compared to that of conventional systemic therapies and phototherapy outside of clinical trial settings. Retrospective, cross-sectional. All patient visits with a code for psoriasis (ICD-9 696.1) in the clinical practice of two dermatologists with a high percentage (over 70% of chief complaints) of psoriasis patients from Jan 1, 2008 to Jan 4, 2012 inclusive were included in this retrospective data analysis. Patients were excluded if the baseline Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) at start of treatment was unknown, or less than 3 (moderate). The practice is a comprehensive psoriasis care center in the Northeastern United States serving a metropolitan population of over 4 million people. Patients were divided by treatment type (biologic, conventional systemic or both) and history of previous treatments. Patients were evaluated by Body Surface Area (BSA), PGA, Simple-Measure for Assessing Psoriasis Activity (S-MAPA, calculated by BSA multiplied by PGA). Patients were evaluated at baseline, 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks after start of treatment. Patients must have completed at least 8 weeks on a single treatment in order to be included. 46 courses of biologics, 12 courses of conventional systemic therapies, and 18 courses of both together were identified with PGA 3 or greater at baseline. Baseline S-MAPA for biologics was 74, for non-biologic systemics was 62.25. At week 24, S-MAPA improved 70.2% over baseline in patients treated with biologics, patients treated with non-biologic systemics improved by only 40.4% (P<0.05). The average number of prior treatments for patients on biologics was 1.87 versus 1.25 for patients on conventional systemic therapies (P=0.169). Biologics show superior results to conventional systemic therapies (70% improvement versus 40% improvement) for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis, as measured by decrease in S-MAPA (PGA multiplied by BSA) at week 24. These

  19. Goodbye, Orlando? Heat and Hot Issues, Theme Parks, and a Busy Show Floor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John; Blumenstein, Lynn; DiMattia, Susan; Kenney, Brian; Oder, Norman; Rogers, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The American Library Association's (ALA) Annual Conference, June 24?30, in steamy Orlando, drew 19,575 people, including 5,739 exhibitors, the lowest total since Miami in 1994, not counting the SARS-shadowed conference in Toronto last year (see statistics, p. 15). Although this years conference was filled with exciting events, this abstract is…

  20. 78 FR 43197 - Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Florida Power & Light Company; Tampa Electric Company; Orlando...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Florida Power & Light Company; Tampa Electric Company; Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Compliance Filings Take notice that on July 10, 2013, Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Florida Power...

  1. Goodbye, Orlando? Heat and Hot Issues, Theme Parks, and a Busy Show Floor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John; Blumenstein, Lynn; DiMattia, Susan; Kenney, Brian; Oder, Norman; Rogers, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The American Library Association's (ALA) Annual Conference, June 24?30, in steamy Orlando, drew 19,575 people, including 5,739 exhibitors, the lowest total since Miami in 1994, not counting the SARS-shadowed conference in Toronto last year (see statistics, p. 15). Although this years conference was filled with exciting events, this abstract is…

  2. SGML and the Orlando Project: Descriptive Markup for an Electronic History of Women's Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susan; Fisher, Sue; Clements, Patricia; Binhammer, Katherine; Butler, Terry; Carter, Kathryn; Grundy, Isobel; Hockey, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Describes novel ways in which the Orlando Project, based at the Universities of Alberta and Guelph, is using Standardized General Markup Language (SGML) to create an integrated electronic history of British women's writing in English. Discusses the types of documents being created and the related SGML requirements. (DSK)

  3. A Study of Selected Developing Colleges and Universities. Case Study V: Valencia Community College, Orlando, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Edward P.

    As part of a study of selected developing colleges and universities funded under the Advanced Institutional Development Program, this report reviews Valencia Community College (VCC) in Orlando, Florida, according to its state-of-development, structural history, administrative structure, and management system and effectiveness. Within this…

  4. 75 FR 52860 - Final Airworthiness Design Standards for Acceptance Under the Primary Category Rule; Orlando...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... Under the Primary Category Rule; Orlando Helicopter Airways (OHA), Inc., Models Cessna 172I, 172K, 172L... Airways (OHA), Inc., Models Cessna 172I, 172K, 172L, and 172M airplanes was published in the Federal... to apply these airworthiness design standards to other airplane models, OHA, Inc. must submit a...

  5. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (29th, Dallas, Texas, 2006). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    For the twenty-ninth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  6. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (29th, Dallas, Texas, 2006). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    For the twenty-ninth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  7. [Analysis of the applicability of Orlando's theory in Brazilian nursing journals].

    PubMed

    Toniolli, Ana Cláudia; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of a nurse theory allows us to explicit the purposes, contexts, variables, theoretical explanations, empirical evidences and the use of new approaches in the nursing practice that are determinant for the nature of the descriptive elements in this field. Thus, after identifying the articles published in different Brazilian Nursing magazines containing Orlando's Theory, the applicability of this theory was verified through the Model of Chinn & Krammer. The study is descriptive and exploratory. It was conducted through the analysis of Brazilian online databases containing national publications rated A and B. An article was located and analyzed under a qualitative method. Five categories were applied in order to extract the basic elements indicated by the chosen model. Considerations concerned the content of the article, allowing the collection of a rich material related to the applicability of Orlando's Theory together with the nursing assistance practiced in a specific situation where customers face surgery cancellation.

  8. Bovine Jugular Veins versus Homografts in the Pulmonary Position: An Analysis across Two Centers and 711 Patients-Conventional Comparisons and Time Status Graphs as a New Approach.

    PubMed

    Sandica, Eugen; Boethig, Dietmar; Blanz, Ute; Goerg, Rainer; Haas, Nikolaus Andreas; Laser, Kai Thorsten; Kececioglu, Deniz; Bertram, Harald; Sarikouch, Samir; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Beerbaum, Philipp; Horke, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Various diseases and diversity in implantation ages, together with evolving diagnostic and therapeutic options, hinder comparative evaluations of long-term outcomes for valved conduits used for reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT). We combined two common evaluation methods to optimally use information obtained by pooling the raw data from two high volume centers, each with very regular follow-up procedures, with the aim of analyzing durability differences between conventional homografts and bovine jugular veins. In the period 1985 to 2012, a total of 444 bovine jugular veins and 267 homografts were implanted, and 6,738 postoperative examinations took place. Evaluations included age-stratified Kaplan-Meier analyses, Cox regression models, and time status graphs, the third showing age-group stratified, time-related frequencies of intact, insufficient, stenotic, both insufficient and stenotic, and postinterventional conduits below the freedom from explantation curve. They take into account interventions, explantations, and the nonterminal character of echocardiographic findings. The durability of intact bovine jugular veins in children and young adults is not inferior to that of homografts. Averaged over the first 12 years after implantation, the age groups < 25 years in fact showed advantages for bovine jugular vein recipients. The average fraction of patients younger than 25 years whose conduits were not explanted, postinterventional, stenotic, insufficient, or stenotic and insufficient was at least 10% higher in recipients of bovine jugular veins than in homograft recipients. According to the time status graphs, the use of bovine jugular veins for RVOT in patients younger than 25 years appears to lead to superior results when compared with cryopreserved homografts. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. The classification of LANDSAT data for the Orlando, Florida, urban fringe area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, C. L.; Knapp, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Procedures used to map residential land cover on the Orlando, Florida, Urban fringe zone are detailed. The NASA Bureau of the Census Applications Systems Verification and Transfer project and the test site are described as well as the LANDSAT data used as the land cover information sources. Both single-date LANDSAT data processing and multitemporal principal components LANDSAT data processing are described. A summary of significant findings is included.

  10. Proceedings: 20th Steam Generator NDE Workshop: Orlando, Florida, July 9-11, 2001

    SciTech Connect

    2003-02-01

    The 2001 workshop took place in Orlando, Florida, from July 9 to 11, 2001. It covered one full day and two half-days of presentations. Attendees included representatives from domestic and overseas nuclear utilities, NSSS vendors, NDE service and equipment organizations, research laboratories, and regulatory bodies. This annual workshop serves as a forum for NDE specialists to gather and discuss current steam generator NDE issues and means for their resolution.

  11. Instantaneous Conventions

    PubMed Central

    Misyak, Jennifer; Noguchi, Takao; Chater, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Humans can communicate even with few existing conventions in common (e.g., when they lack a shared language). We explored what makes this phenomenon possible with a nonlinguistic experimental task requiring participants to coordinate toward a common goal. We observed participants creating new communicative conventions using the most minimal possible signals. These conventions, furthermore, changed on a trial-by-trial basis in response to shared environmental and task constraints. Strikingly, as a result, signals of the same form successfully conveyed contradictory messages from trial to trial. Such behavior is evidence for the involvement of what we term joint inference, in which social interactants spontaneously infer the most sensible communicative convention in light of the common ground between them. Joint inference may help to elucidate how communicative conventions emerge instantaneously and how they are modified and reshaped into the elaborate systems of conventions involved in human communication, including natural languages. PMID:27793986

  12. Orlando Magic: report from the 57th meeting of the American Society of Haematology, 5-7 December 2015, Orlando, USA.

    PubMed

    Mazzarella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The 57th American Society of Haematology (ASH) meeting held in Orlando, FL was certainly the year when myeloma management changed for good, with a plethora of newly Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs showing impressive outcome improvements and the introduction of new techniques for disease monitoring. Also, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells continued their triumphal march, consolidating their success in lymphoma and chronic lymhocytic leukaemia (CLL) and venturing into new fields such as again multiple myeloma. Some experimental drugs showed long-awaited results (midostaurin in FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)) and some brand new drugs showed promising results in the clinic after extensive preclinical studies, such as those targeting new epigenetic factors (histone methyltransferases) and apoptosis.

  13. Orlando Magic: report from the 57th meeting of the American Society of Haematology, 5–7 December 2015, Orlando, USA

    PubMed Central

    Mazzarella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The 57th American Society of Haematology (ASH) meeting held in Orlando, FL was certainly the year when myeloma management changed for good, with a plethora of newly Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs showing impressive outcome improvements and the introduction of new techniques for disease monitoring. Also, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells continued their triumphal march, consolidating their success in lymphoma and chronic lymhocytic leukaemia (CLL) and venturing into new fields such as again multiple myeloma. Some experimental drugs showed long-awaited results (midostaurin in FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)) and some brand new drugs showed promising results in the clinic after extensive preclinical studies, such as those targeting new epigenetic factors (histone methyltransferases) and apoptosis. PMID:26823681

  14. Acquisition and use of Orlando, Florida and Continental Airbus radar flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eide, Michael C.; Mathews, Bruce

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse is developing a lookdown pulse Doppler radar for production as the sensor and processor of a forward looking hazardous windshear detection and avoidance system. A data collection prototype of that product was ready for flight testing in Orlando to encounter low level windshear in corroboration with the FAA-Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR). Airborne real-time processing and display of the hazard factor were demonstrated with TDWR facilitated intercepts and penetrations of over 80 microbursts in a three day period, including microbursts with hazard factors in excess of .16 (with 500 ft. PIREP altitude loss) and the hazard factor display at 6 n.mi. of a visually transparent ('dry') microburst with TDWR corroborated outflow reflectivities of +5 dBz. Range gated Doppler spectrum data was recorded for subsequent development and refinement of hazard factor detection and urban clutter rejection algorithms. Following Orlando, the data collection radar was supplemental type certified for in revenue service on a Continental Airlines Airbus in an automatic and non-interferring basis with its ARINC 708 radar to allow Westinghouse to confirm its understanding of commercial aircraft installation, interface realities, and urban airport clutter. A number of software upgrades, all of which were verified at the Receiver-Transmitter-Processor (RTP) hardware bench with Orlando microburst data to produce desired advanced warning hazard factor detection, included some preliminary loads with automatic (sliding window average hazard factor) detection and annunciation recording. The current (14-APR-92) configured software is free from false and/or nuisance alerts (CAUTIONS, WARNINGS, etc.) for all take-off and landing approaches, under 2500 ft. altitude to weight-on-wheels, into all encountered airports, including Newark (NJ), LAX, Denver, Houston, Cleveland, etc. Using the Orlando data collected on hazardous microbursts, Westinghouse has developed a lookdown pulse Doppler

  15. Updating census urban area maps with LANDSAT data. [Orlando, Florida case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, S. Z.

    1981-01-01

    The use of LANDSAT data for updating census maps of urbanized areas by identification of a fringe of suburban territory to be considered for inclusion within a revised urban area map is described. Methodologies of the application system verification and transfer project are evaluated. These include manual analysis of color photographs, line printer maps, and land cover classifications; change detection using an image differencing routine to depict changes in reflectance values between the two anniversary LANDSAT images; and use of the IBIS/VICAR digital image processing system. Application of IBIS/VICAR to mapping the Orlando, Florida area is described in detail.

  16. Terminal Doppler Weather Radar Test Bed Operation, Orlando: January-June 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-04

    reserved for production-quality output. 38 Table 5- 2 . Sun Network Servers. Machine Hamlet Juliet Lear Oberon Viola j Cores j Guardian Machine Type 3/280S 3...P N -j-A242 8 90 .04 A- 2 :OProject Report !I ill i, i I , ’ATC-180 Terminal Doppler Weather Radar Test Bed Operation - Orlando January - June 1990...TECHNICAL REPORT STANDARD TITLE PAGE 1. Report No. 2 . Government Accession No. 3. Recipients Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle 5 Report Date Termna lII

  17. Satellite information on Orlando, Florida. [coordination of LANDSAT and Skylab data and EREP photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannah, J. W.; Thomas, G. L.; Esparza, F.

    1975-01-01

    A land use map of Orange County, Florida was prepared from EREP photography while LANDSAT and EREP multispectral scanner data were used to provide more detailed information on Orlando and its suburbs. The generalized maps were prepared by tracing the patterns on an overlay, using an enlarging viewer. Digital analysis of the multispectral scanner data was basically the maximum likelihood classification method with training sample input and computer printer mapping of the results. Urban features delineated by the maps are discussed. It is concluded that computer classification, accompanied by human interpretation and manual simplification can produce land use maps which are useful on a regional, county, and city basis.

  18. Directed and Direct: Changing Conventions in the American Documentary; University Film Study Center Research Program: A Symposium on The American Documentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Randall

    This article discusses the history of American documentary films and examines several specific films. Any documentary has the primary job of reacting a virtual reality and maintaining an impression of immediate experience. While this has remained a constant requirement, the formal conventions which filmmakers use to create the virtual reality have…

  19. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Awards Ceremony for 2011 Award Winners (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2012-05-21

    The winners for 2011 of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award were recognized in a ceremony held May 21, 2012. Dr. Steven Chu and others spoke of the importance of the accomplishments and the prestigious history of the award. The recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for 2011 are: Riccardo Betti (University of Rochester); Paul C. Canfield (Ames Laboratory); Mark B. Chadwick (Los Alamos National Laboratory); David E. Chavez (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Amit Goyal (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Thomas P. Guilderson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Lois Curfman McInnes (Argonne National Laboratory); Bernard Matthew Poelker (Thomas Jeffereson National Accelerator Facility); and Barry F. Smith (Argonne National Laboratory).

  20. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Awards Ceremony for 2011 Award Winners (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2016-07-12

    The winners for 2011 of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award were recognized in a ceremony held May 21, 2012. Dr. Steven Chu and others spoke of the importance of the accomplishments and the prestigious history of the award. The recipients of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for 2011 are: Riccardo Betti (University of Rochester); Paul C. Canfield (Ames Laboratory); Mark B. Chadwick (Los Alamos National Laboratory); David E. Chavez (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Amit Goyal (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Thomas P. Guilderson (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); Lois Curfman McInnes (Argonne National Laboratory); Bernard Matthew Poelker (Thomas Jeffereson National Accelerator Facility); and Barry F. Smith (Argonne National Laboratory).

  1. "Invisible During My Own Crisis": Responses of LGBT People of Color to the Orlando Shooting.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Johanna L; Gonzalez, Kirsten A; Galupo, M Paz

    2017-05-24

    On June 12, 2016, the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida was the target of one of the country's deadliest mass shootings. Pulse, a gay nightclub, was hosting a Latin Pride Night the evening of the tragedy, which resulted in the death of 49 victims and 53 casualties, over 90% of whom were lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) Latinx people, specifically. The present research investigates the narrative responses from LGBT people of color (LGBT-POC) following the tragedy. Results included an analysis of 94 participant narrative responses. Results were collected online from a sample of LGBT-POC with varying sexual, gender, and racial identities. Thematic analysis revealed four major themes: (1) Violence is Not New for LGBT-POC; (2) Personal Identification with Victims; (3) Lack of Intersectionality in Others' Responses to Orlando; and (4) Acknowledgment of Intersectionality across LGBT-POC. Discussion focuses on describing the ways in which LGBT-POC responded to the shooting regarding their multiple minority identities. Implications of this research reinforce the need for continued intersectional research with LGBT-POC.

  2. Comparison of conventional straight and swan-neck straight catheters inserted by percutaneous method for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shivendra; Prakash, Jai; Singh, R G; Dole, P K; Pant, Pragya

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the incidence of mechanical and infectious complications of conventional straight catheter (SC) versus swan-neck straight catheter (SNSC) implanted by percutaneous method. We retrospectively analyzed 45 catheter insertions being done by percutaneous method from January 1, 2011, to May 31, 2014. SC was inserted in 24 patients, and SNSC was inserted in 21 patients. Baseline characteristics for the two groups were similar with respect to age, sex and diabetic nephropathy as the cause for end-stage renal disease. Incidence of mechanical and infectious complications in SNSC group was found to be low as compared to the SC group and was statistically significant (1 in 11.6 patient months vs. 1 in 14.4 patient months, p = 0.02). Catheter migration was found to be the most common mechanical complication (20 %), and peritonitis was found to be the most common infectious complication in conventional SC group (27 episodes in 420 patient months vs. 11 episodes in 333 patient months, p = 0.03). The incidence of exit site and tunnel infection rates revealed no difference between the groups. SNSC insertion by percutaneous method is associated with low mechanical and infectious complications.

  3. 78 FR 22363 - Environmental Impact Statement for the All Aboard Florida Miami-Orlando Passenger Rail Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Environmental Impact Statement for the All Aboard Florida Miami-- Orlando... service proposed by the private company, All Aboard Florida--Operations LLC (AAF), between Miami and... and its representatives will be considered in the preparation of the EIS. To ensure all significant...

  4. Cryoplasty Versus Conventional Balloon Angioplasty of the Femoropopliteal Artery in Diabetic Patients: Long-Term Results from a Prospective Randomized Single-Center Controlled Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Spiliopoulos, Stavros Katsanos, Konstantinos; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Kagadis, George C.; Christeas, Nikolaos; Siablis, Dimitris

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate and long-term results of cryoplasty versus conventional balloon angioplasty in the femoropopliteal artery of diabetic patients. Fifty diabetic patients (41 men, mean age 68 years) were randomized to cryoplasty (group CRYO; 24 patients with 31 lesions) or conventional balloon angioplasty (group COBA; 26 patients with 34 lesions) of the femoropopliteal artery. Technical success was defined as <30% residual stenosis without any adjunctive stenting. Primary end points included technical success, primary patency, binary in-lesion restenosis (>50%), and freedom from target lesion recanalization. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to adjust for confounding factors of heterogeneity. In total, 61.3% (19 of 31) in group CRYO and 52.9% (18 of 34) in group COBA were de novo lesions. More than 70% of the lesions were Transatlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) B and C in both groups, and 41.4% of the patients in group CRYO and 38.7% in group COBA suffered from critical limb ischemia. Immediate technical success rate was 58.0% in group CRYO versus 64.0% in group COBA (p = 0.29). According to 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates, there were no significant differences with regard to patient survival (86.8% in group CRYO vs. 87.0% in group COBA, p = 0.54) and limb salvage (95.8 vs. 92.1% in groups CRYO and COBA, respectively, p = 0.60). There was a nonsignificant trend of increased binary restenosis in group CRYO (hazard ratio [HR] 1.3; 95% CI 0.6-2.6, p = 0.45). Primary patency was significantly lower in group CRYO compared with group COBA (HR 2.2; 95% CI 1.1-4.3, p = 0.02). Significantly more repeat intervention events because of recurrent symptoms were required in group CRYO (HR 2.5; 95% CI 1.2-5.3, p = 0.01). Cryoplasty was associated with lower primary patency and more clinically driven repeat procedures after long-term follow-up compared with conventional balloon angioplasty.

  5. From the application of antibiotics to antibiotic residues in liquid manures and digestates: A screening study in one European center of conventional pig husbandry.

    PubMed

    Widyasari-Mehta, Arum; Hartung, Susen; Kreuzig, Robert

    2016-07-15

    In conventional pig husbandry, antibiotics are frequently applied. Together with excreta, antibiotic residues enter liquid manures finally used as organic soil fertilizers or input materials for biogas plants. Therefore, this first screening study was performed to survey the application patterns of antibiotics from fall 2011 until spring 2013. Manures and digestates were then analyzed for selected antibiotic residues from spring 2012 to 2013. The data analysis of veterinary drug application documents revealed the use of 34 different antibiotics belonging to 11 substance classes at 21 farms under study. Antibiotics, particularly tetracyclines, frequently administered to larger pig groups were detected in manure samples up to higher mg kg(-1) dry weight (DW) concentrations. Antibiotic residues in digestates, furthermore, show that a full removal capacity cannot be guaranteed through the anaerobic digestion process in biogas plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical, patient-related, and economic outcomes of home-based high-dose hemodialysis versus conventional in-center hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsides, Nicos; Mitra, Sandip; Cornelis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Despite technological advances in renal replacement therapy, the preservation of health and quality of life for individuals on dialysis still remains a challenge. The high morbidity and mortality in dialysis warrant further research and insight into the clinical domains of the technique and practice of this therapy. In the last 20 years, the focus of development in the field of hemodialysis (HD) has centered around adequate removal of urea and other associated toxins. High-dose HD offers an opportunity to improve mortality, morbidity, and quality of life of patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, the uptake of this modality is low, and the risk associated with the therapy is not fully understood. Recent studies have highlighted the evidence base and improved our understanding of this technique of dialysis. This article provides a review of high-dose and home HD, its clinical impact on patient outcome, and the controversies that exist. PMID:27462173

  7. Program review of the USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) has a history that starts in 1932 in Orlando to develop methods to control mosquitoes, including malaria vectors under conditions simulating those of the south Pacific jungles, and other insects affecting man and animals...

  8. Moon Convention

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-23

    People with similar jobs or interests hold conventions and meetings, so why shouldn't moons? Pandora, Prometheus, and Pan -- seen here, from right to left -- also appear to be holding some sort of convention in this image. Some moons control the structure of nearby rings via gravitational "tugs." The cumulative effect of the moon's tugs on the ring particles can keep the rings' edges from spreading out as they are naturally inclined to do, much like shepherds control their flock. Pan is a prototypical shepherding moon, shaping and controlling the locations of the inner and outer edges of the Encke gap through a mechanism suggested in 1978 to explain the narrow Uranian rings. However, though Prometheus and Pandora have historically been called "the F ring shepherd moons" due to their close proximity to the ring, it has long been known that the standard shepherding mechanism that works so well for Pan does not apply to these two moons. The mechanism for keeping the F ring narrow, and the roles played -- if at all -- by Prometheus and Pandora in the F ring's configuration are not well understood. This is an ongoing topic for study by Cassini scientists. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 29 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Jan. 2, 2015. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.6 million miles (2.6 million kilometers) from the rings and at a Sun-ring-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 86 degrees. Image scale is 10 miles (15 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/pia18306

  9. Microcomputer Productivity Study for the Naval Training Systems Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    rctt sd a uiu, art" 88 1 Technical Report 86-028 percent said it benefited them personally . The personal computer was rated by 97 percent of the finance ...IU.0 I~ 1.5U-. 1111 .0 X/? ZK . . % %. NAVAL TRAINING SYSTEMS CENTER ORLANDO. FLORIDA 00T UI FI LE COW" TECHNICAL REPORT 86-028 MICROCOMPUTER...ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Appreciation is expressed to the following persons for their contributions to this study: Thomas 0. Peeples for his assistance in

  10. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    SciTech Connect

    Chartock, Mike; Hansen, Todd

    1999-08-01

    The FY 2000-2004 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  11. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--2001

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The FY 1996--2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  12. Report of the American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Sessions 2015, Orlando.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Kimura, Mai; Kohno, Takashi; Fujita, Jun; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    The American Heart Association Scientific Sessions were held in Orlando on November 7-15, 2015. The meeting attracted more than 18,000 participants, including physicians, research scientists, students, and paramedical personnel, from more than 100 countries. Sessions over the 5 days included a comprehensive and unparalleled education delivered via more than 5,000 presentations, with 1,000 invited faculty members and 4,000 abstract presentations from the world leaders in cardiovascular disease. It also displayed the newest cardiovascular technology and resources by more than 200 exhibitors. There were 19 trials scheduled in 6 late-breaking clinical trial sessions. The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) aimed to determine the most appropriate targets for the systolic blood pressure among persons without diabetes. A total of 9,361 persons with systolic blood pressure of ≥130 mmHg and an increased cardiovascular risk, but without diabetes, were randomly assigned to a target systolic blood pressure of <120 mmHg (intensive treatment) or a target of <140 mmHg (standard treatment). A significantly lower rate of the primary composite outcome and all-cause mortality in the intensive-treatment group than in the standard-treatment group was observed. Summaries and overviews of the late-breaking trials, clinical science special report sessions, and sessions to which members of the Japanese Circulation Society contributed are presented.

  13. Preliminary appraisal of the geohydrologic aspects of drainage wells, Orlando area, central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimrey, Joel O.

    1978-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer contains two highly transmissive cavernous zones in the Orlando area: an upper producing zone about 150-600 feet below land surface and a lower producing zone about 1,100-1 ,500 feet below land surface. Natural head differences are downward and there is hydraulic connection between the two producing zones. Drainage wells are finished open-end into the upper producing zone and emplace surface waters directly into that zone by gravity. Quantitatively, their use constitutes an effective method of artificial recharge. Their negative aspects relate to the probably poor, but unknown, quality of the recharge water. Caution is suggested in drawing definite and final conclusions on the overall geohydrologic and environmental effects of drainage wells prior to the collection and interpretation of a considerable quantity of new data. Though few ground-water pollution problems have been documented, the potential for pollution should be seriously considered in light of the probable continuing need to use drainage wells; the probable volumes and quality of water involved; and the hydraulic relations between the two producing zones. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Conventional and stuffed Bergman-type phases in the Na-Au-T (T = Ga, Ge, Sn) systems: syntheses, structures, coloring of cluster centers, and Fermi sphere-brillouin zone interactions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qisheng; Smetana, Volodymyr; Miller, Gordon J; Corbett, John D

    2012-08-20

    Bergman-type phases in the Na-Au-T (T = Ga, Ge, and Sn) systems were synthesized by solid-state means and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Two structurally related (1/1) Bergman phases were found in the Na-Au-Ga system: (a) a conventional Bergman-type (CB) structure, Na(26)Au(x)Ga(54-x), which features empty innermost icosahedra, as refined with x = 18.1 (3), Im3, a = 14.512(2) Å, and Z = 2; (b) a stuffed Bergman-type (SB) structure, Na(26)Au(y)Ga(55-y), which contains Ga-centered innermost icosahedra, as refined with y = 36.0 (1), Im3, a = 14.597(2) Å, and Z = 2. Although these two subtypes have considerable phase widths along with respective tie lines at Na ≈ 32.5 and 32.1 atom %, they do not merge into a continuous solid solution. Rather, a quasicrystalline phase close to the Au-poor CB phase and an orthorhombic derivative near the Au-rich SB phase lie between them. In contrast, only Au-rich SB phases exist in the Ge and Sn systems, in which the innermost icosahedra are centered by Au rather than Ge or Sn. These were refined for Na(26)Au(40.93(5))Ge(14.07(5)) (Im3, a = 14.581(2) Å, and Z = 2) and Na(26)Au(39.83(6))Sn(15.17(6)) (Im3, a = 15.009(2) Å, and Z = 2), respectively. Occupations of the centers of Bergman clusters are rare. Such centering and coloring correlate with the sizes of the neighboring icosahedra, the size ratios between electropositive and electronegative components, and the values of the average valence electron count per atom (e/a). Theoretical calculations revealed that all of these phases are Hume-Rothery phases, with evident pseudogaps in the density of states curves that arise from the interactions between Fermi surface and Brillouin zone boundaries corresponding to a strong diffraction intensity.

  15. Initial real world experience with a novel insertable (Reveal LinQ(@Medtronic)) compared to the conventional (Reveal XT(@Medtronic)) implantable loop recorder at a tertiary care center - Points to ponder!

    PubMed

    Gunda, Sampath; Reddy, Yeruva Madhu; Pillarisetti, Jayasree; Koripalli, Sandeep; Jeffery, Courtney; Swope, Jeanine; Atkins, Donita; Bommana, Sudharani; Emert, Martin P; Pimentel, Rhea; Dendi, Raghuveer; Berenbom, Loren D; DiBiase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2015-07-15

    Limited data is available regarding the novel Reveal LinQ (LinQ) which is a new generation implantable loop recorders (ILRs). We performed a prospective, observational study of all consecutive patients undergoing conventional (Reveal XT; XT) and LinQ devices at our institution between January 2012 and December 2014. A total of 217 patients underwent ILR implantation. XT was implanted in 105 and LinQ in 112 patients. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. LinQ implantation using the manufacturer's technique termed, "manufacturer's method" group had significantly higher incidence of pocket infection compared to XT (6/50, 12% vs 3/105, 3%, p=0.032). With modifications to the LinQ implantation technique (using a conventional scalpel and placing a suture when needed to the incision) termed "modified method" group, the rate of infection has decreased significantly compared to "manufacturer's method group" (0/62, 0% vs 6/50, 12%, p=0.004) (Table 3). In multivariate regression analysis, the only independent predictors of infection were younger age (OR 0.95; p=0.04), insertion of LinQ device (OR 30.02; p=0.006) and procedure time (OR 1.07; p=0.03). In our single-center, prospective, observational study we found that with the current implantable techniques, the novel insertable LinQ device is associated with increased risk of complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MEETING REPORT: OMG Technical Committee Meeting in Orlando, FL, sees significant enhancement to CORBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-06-01

    The Object Management Group (OMG) Platform Technology Committee (PTC) ratified its support for a new asynchronous messaging service for CORBA at OMG's recent Technical Committee Meeting in Orlando, FL. The meeting, held from 8 - 12 June, saw the PTC send the Messaging Service out for a final vote among the OMG membership. The Messaging Service, which will integrate Message Oriented Middleware (MOM) with CORBA, will give CORBA a true asynchronous messaging capability - something of great interest to users and developers. Formal adoption of the specification will most likely occur by the end of the year. The Messaging Service The Messaging Service, when adopted, will be the world's first standard for Message Oriented Middleware and will give CORBA a true asynchronous messaging capability. Asynchronous messaging allows developers to build simpler, richer client environments. With asynchronous messaging there is less need for multi-threaded clients because the Asynchronous Method Invocation is non-blocking, meaning the client thread can continue work while the application waits for a reply. David Curtis, Director of Platform Technology for OMG, said: `This messaging service is one of the more valuable additions to CORBA. It enhances CORBA's existing asynchronous messaging capabilities which is a feature of many popular message oriented middleware products. This service will allow better integration between ORBs and MOM products. This enhanced messaging capability will only make CORBA more valuable for builders of distributed object systems.' The Messaging Service is one of sixteen technologies currently being worked on by the PTC. Additionally, seventeen Revision Task Forces (RTFs) are working on keeping OMG specifications up to date. The purpose of these Revision Task Forces is to take input from the implementors of OMG specifications and clarify or make necessary changes based on the implementor's input. The RTFs also ensure that the specifications remain up to date

  17. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of the 20 June 1991, Orlando microburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.

    1992-01-01

    On 20 June 1991, NASA's Boeing 737, equipped with in-situ and look-ahead wind-shear detection systems, made direct low-level penetrations (300-350 m AGL) through a microburst during several stages of its evolution. This microburst was located roughly 20 km northeast of Orlando International Airport and was monitored by a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) located about 10 km south of the airport. The first NASA encounter with this microburst (Event 142), at approximately 2041 UTC, was during its intensification phase. At flight level, in-situ measurements indicated a peak 1-km (averaged) F-factor of approximately 0.1. The second NASA encounter (Event 143) occurred at approximately 2046 UTC, about the time of microburst peak intensity. It was during this penetration that a peak 1-km F-factor of approximately 17 was encountered, which was the largest in-situ measurement of the 1991 summer deployment. By the third encounter (Event 144), at approximately 2051 UTC, the microburst had expanded into a macroburst. During this phase of evolution, an in-situ 1-km F-factor of 0.08 was measured. The focus of this paper is to examine this microburst via numerical simulation from an unsteady, three-dimensional meteorological cloud model. The simulated high-resolution data fields of wind, temperature, radar reflectivity factor, and precipitation are closely examined so as to derive information not readily available from 'observations' and to enhance our understanding of the actual event. Characteristics of the simulated microburst evolution are compared with TDWR and in-situ measurements.

  18. An In-Barracks Medical Screening Program at the Recruit Training Command, Naval Training Center, Orlando, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-25

    120ml 1 12. Burow’s Tablets, 12’s 40 13. Calamine Lotion, 53ml 12 14. Cepacol Lozenges, 16’s 50 15. Cepacol Troches, 12’s 50 16. Chlor-trimeton Tablets...Suspanston Analgesic Balm Afrin Nasal Spray Anusol Suppositories Ascorbic Acid Tablets Aspirin Tablets Benzyl Peroxide Gel Burow’s Tablets Calamine ...Tigan, 12’s 6 .96 5.76 NSND 14 .15 2.10 Amplci11n 28 1.60 44.80 DImetapp, 20’s 31 .80 24.80 Calamine 1 .50 .50 Hemm.Suppositories 2 .59 1.18 Azelid 2

  19. The City of Orlandos Garden House at Harry P. Leu Gardens Named a Top Finisher in EPA's Energy Star Battle of the Buildings Competition/The competition saves $50 million, prevents 250,000 metric tons of GHG emissions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - The City of Orlando's Garden House at Harry P. Leu Gardens in Orlando, Fla. was recognized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a top overall finisher in the agency's fifth-annual Energy Star Battle of the Buildings Competi

  20. Proceedings of the RESNA 2000 Annual Conference: Technology for the New Millennium (Orlando, Florida, June 28-July 2, 2000). Volume 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Jack, Ed.

    This text contains papers presented at the annual conference of the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) held on June 28-July 2, 2000, in Orlando, Florida. Papers are divided into the following sections: (1) technology for special populations, which includes papers that discuss using…

  1. Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61c Airplanes within Thunderstorms August 7, 1946 to August 13, 1946 at Orlando, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolefson, Harold B.

    1946-01-01

    This report presents the results obtained from gust and draft velocity measurements within thunderstorms for the period August 7, 1946 to August, 13, 1946 at Orlando Florida. In several of the surveys, indications of ambient air temperature were obtained from photo-observer records. These data are summarized in the report.

  2. Current Explorations of Adult Learner: Implications for Mentoring and More. Adult Higher Education Alliance Annual Conference Proceedings (36th, Orlando, Florida, March 10-11, 2016)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elufiede, Kemi, Ed.; Flynn, Bonnie, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The 36th Annual Adult Higher Education Alliance (AHEA) Conference was held on March 10-11, 2016 in Orlando, Florida, on the campus of the University of Central Florida. There were 48 presentations from scholars and practitioners from 20 states who participated in the conference. The contributions to these proceedings represent the best of the…

  3. Facing the Future: The Two-Year College, the Technician & the Entrepreneur. An International Symposium. Report from the Conference (Orlando, Florida, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Technology Strategies, Inc., Carrboro, NC.

    This document reports on the proceedings of an international 2-day conference in Orlando, Florida that was supported by the National Science Foundation. At the conference, practitioners, employers, policymakers, and researchers raised and debated issues surrounding two-year colleges. The themes of the conference reflected increasing demands by…

  4. Floridas Miami Tequesta Indian Site, Its Calusa Indian Locations, the Matacumbe Keys, and Orlandos Wikiwa Springs Generate Environmentally Significant EMFs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Dougall, Jean S.; Mc Leod, Roger D.; Mc Leod, David M.

    2003-10-01

    Florida purchased the Tequesta ([Langue] doc Christ Spirit-signal) Indian site along the Miami River site that vigorously pulsates with even minor rainstorms entering or leaving the area. Although there is a laughable chimera of a fountain of youth associated with Ponce de Leons discovery of the Florida peninsula in about AD 1513, the Calusa (Royal Christ Jesus Spirit-signal) Indian Nation has an associated significance with EMF signals they possibly monitored throughout their area of activity. Our efforts have also led to the investigation of cultural and other influences implied by the Matacumbe Keys that indicate a shared commonality of awareness with Native Americans of the northeast such as Metacomet, or regions like Maines Grand Lake Matagamon and its associated electromagnetic Spirit Signal. Wikiwa Springs near Orlando shares much with Massachusetts (adherent of serpent Jesus Christ Spirit-signal) Natick, and New Hampshires Naticook Island. These are the locales of environmentally sensitive instrumentation.

  5. A report from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology 2012 annual meeting (March 2-6, 2012 - Orlando, Florida, U.S.A.).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2012-04-01

    Seeing children (and not so young people) crying is not an expected sight in Orlando, but during the pollen season this may not be so uncommon. Unfortunately, allergies are very frequent in the population, and although effective therapies are available, many have disadvantages, and research continues to develop novel medicines and immunotherapies that will more rapidly, effectively and safely help people with allergies to enjoy their lives without teary eyes, runny nose and, most particularly, dramatic fights for inhaling air. Orlando was the site of this year's American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology meeting, many of the findings reported during which in relation with treatments for allergic and immunological diseases are presented in the following report. Copyright 2012 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61C Airplanes within Thunderstorms July 22, 1946 to July 23, 1946 at Orlando, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolefson, H. B.

    1947-01-01

    The results obtained from measurements of gust and draft velocities within thunderstorms for the period July 22, 1946 to July 23, 1946 at Orlando, Florida, are presented herein. These data are summarized in tables I and II, respectively, and are of the type presented in reference 1 for previous flights. Inspection of photo-observer records for the flights indicated that no data on ambient air temperature variations within thunderstorms were obtained.

  7. Evaluation of Gust and Draft Velocities from Flights of P-61C Airplanes within Thunderstorms July 24, 1946 to August 6, 1946 at Orlando, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolefson, Harold B.

    1947-01-01

    The results obtained from gust and draft velocity measurements within thunderstorms for the period July 24, 1946 to August 6, 1946 at Orlando, Florida are presented herein. These data are summarized in tables I and II and are of the type presented in reference 1 for previous flights. In two thunderstorm traverses, indications of ambient-air temperature were obtained from photo-observer records. These data are summarized in table III.

  8. Inventory of drainage wells and potential sources of contaminants to drainage-well inflow in Southwest Orlando, Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, George Fred

    1993-01-01

    Potential sources of contaminants that could pose a threat to drainage-well inflow and to water in the Floridan aquifer system in southwest Orlando, Florida, were studied between October and December 1990. Drainage wells and public-supply wells were inventoried in a 14-square-mile area, and available data on land use and activities within each drainage well basin were tabulated. Three public-supply wells (tapping the Lower Floridan aquifer) and 38 drainage wells (open to the Upper Floridan aquifer) were located in 17 drainage basins within the study area. The primary sources of drainage-well inflow are lake overflow, street runoff, seepage from the surficial aquifer system, and process-wastewater disposal. Drainage-well inflow from a variety of ares, including resi- dential, commercial, undeveloped, paved, and industrial areas, are potential sources of con- taminants. The four general types of possible contaminants to drainage-well inflow are inorganic chemicals, organic compounds, turbidity, and microbiological contaminants. Potential contami- nant sources include plant nurseries, citrus groves, parking lots, plating companies, auto- motive repair shops, and most commonly, lake- overflow water. Drainage wells provide a pathway for contaminants to enter the Upper Floridan aquifer and there is a potential for contaminants to move downward from the Upper Floridan to the Lower Floridan aquifer.

  9. Estimating Carbon Stocks Along Depressional Wetlands Using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) in the Disney Wilderness Preserve (Orlando, Florida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, M. D.; Comas, X.; Wright, W. J.; Mount, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Peat soils store a large fraction of the global carbon (C) in soil. It is estimated that 95% of carbon in peatlands is stored in the peat soil, while less than 5% occurs in the vegetation. The majority of studies related to C stocks in peatlands have taken place in northern latitudes leaving the tropical and subtropical latitudes clearly understudied. In this study we use a combination of indirect non-invasive geophysical methods (mainly ground penetrating radar, GPR) as well as direct measurements (direct coring) to calculate total C stocks within subtropical depressional wetlands in the Disney Wilderness Preserve (DWP, Orlando, FL). A set of three-dimensional (3D) GPR surveys were used to detect variability of the peat layer thickness and the underlying peat-sand mix layer across several depressional wetlands. Direct samples collected at selected locations were used to confirm depth of each interface and to estimate C content in the laboratory. Layer thickness estimated from GPR and direct C content were used to estimate total peat volume and C content for the entire depressional wetland. Through the use of aerial photos a relationship between surface area along the depressional wetlands and total peat thickness (and thus C content) was established for the depressions surveyed and applied throughout the entire preserve. This work shows the importance of depressional wetlands as critical contributors of the C budget at the DWP.

  10. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center`s program include addressing R&D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R&D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R&D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997.

  11. Center on Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah System Approach to Individualized Learning Project.

    Classroom areas organized into centers for specific study purposes are discussed. These centers are used for individual or small group work. The physical arrangement of the area used for a study center is described, including the organization of furniture, materials, and preferred locations. Suggestions are made for the management and stocking of…

  12. Diagnostic Performance of Shear Wave Elastography Parameters Alone and in Combination with Conventional B-Mode Ultrasound Parameters for the Characterization of Thyroid Nodules: A Prospective, Dual-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Zalewska, Elwira Bakuła; Gumińska, Anna; Słapa, Rafał Zenon; Mlosek, Krzysztof; Wareluk, Paweł; Jakubowski, Wiesław; Dedecjus, Marek

    2016-12-01

    The aims of our study were to determine whether shear wave elastography (SWE) can improve the conventional B-mode differentiation of thyroid lesions, determine the most accurate SWE parameter for differentiation and assess the influence of microcalcifications and chronic autoimmune thyroiditis on SWE values. We examined 119 patients with 169 thyroid nodules who prospectively underwent B-mode ultrasound and SWE using the same ultrasound machine. The parameters assessed using SWE were: mean elasticity within the entire lesion (SWE-whole) and mean (SWE-mean) and maximum (SWE-max) elasticity for a 2-mm-diameter region of interest in the stiffest portion of the lesion, excluding microcalcifications. The discriminant powers of a generalized estimating equation model including B-mode parameters only and a generalized estimation equation model including both B-mode and SWE parameters were assessed and compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, in association with pathologic verification. In total, 50 and 119 malignant and benign lesions were detected. In generalized estimated equation regression, the B-mode parameters associated with higher odds ratios (ORs) for malignant lesions were microcalcifications (OR = 4.3), hypo-echogenicity (OR = 3.13) and irregular margins (OR = 10.82). SWE-max was the only SWE independent parameter in differentiating between malignant and benign tumors (OR = 2.95). The area under the curve for the B-mode model was 0.85, whereas that for the model combining B-mode and SWE parameters was 0.87. There was no significant difference in mean SWE values between patients with and without chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. The results of the present study suggest that SWE is a valuable tool for the characterization of thyroid nodules, with SWE-max being a significant parameter in differentiating benign and malignant lesions, independent of conventional B-mode parameters. The combination of SWE parameters and

  13. Cincinnati; Our Convention City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borchin, Anna

    1970-01-01

    During Easter week, 1971, Cincinnati will be the hostess of the 50th anniversary convention of the Catholic Library Association. Items of historical interest concerning the city are briefly described. (NH)

  14. Minamata Convention on Mercury

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On November 6, 2013 the United States signed the Minamata Convention on Mercury, a new multilateral environmental agreement that addresses specific human activities which are contributing to widespread mercury pollution

  15. A Quiet Convention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Welch

    2003-01-01

    Describes how discussion of governance and academic standards dominated the proceedings at the first NCAA convention of Myles Brand's presidency. The new president also offered a qualified endorsement of Title IX. (EV)

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning of rooms 62-248 and 62-250 at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garabedian, G.

    1996-05-01

    This document details the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) process of Rooms 248 and 250 of Building 62 at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The document describes the D&D efforts for the rooms, their contents, and adjacent areas containing ancillary equipment. The rooms and equipment, before being released, were required to meet the unrestricted release criteria and requirements set forth in DOE orders 5400.5 and 5480.11, LBNL`s internal release-criteria procedure (EH&S Procedure 708), and the LBNL Radiological Control Manual. The radioactive material and items not meeting the release criteria were either sent to the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) for disposal or transferred to other locations approved for radioactive material. The D&D was undertaken by the Radiation Protection Group of LBNL`s Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) Division at the request of the Materials Sciences Division. Current and past use of radioactive material in both Rooms 248 and 250 necessitated the D&D in order to release both rooms for nonradioactive work. (1) Room 248 was designated a {open_quotes}controlled area.{close_quotes} There was contained radioactive material in some of the equipment. The previous occupants of Room 248 had worked with radioactive materials. (2) Room 250 was designated a {open_quotes}Radioactive Materials Management Area{close_quotes} (RMMA) because the current occupants used potentially dispersible radioisotopes. Both laboratories, during the occupancy of U.C. Berkeley Professor Leo Brewer and Ms. Karen Krushwitz, were kept in excellent condition. There was a detailed inventory of all radioactive materials and chemicals. All work and self surveys were documented. The labs were kept extremely orderly, clean, and in compliance. In October 1993 Ms. Krushwitz received an award in recognition of her efforts in Environmental Protection, Health, and Safety at LBNL.

  17. Display system optics II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 30, 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Assenheim, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Papers on display system optics are presented covering topics such as human factors and night vision systems flight, a peripheral vision display, cockpit vertical situation displays, a prototype near-IR projection system, the effect of a helmet-mounted display on the operator, radial parallax binocular three-dimensional imaging, telepresence systems, and the cockpit man-machine interface. Additional topics include eye-centered interferometric laser projection, laser filters, thin film technologies in active matrix addressing systems of LCDs, supertwisted nematic LCD geometry with improved response times and characteristics, a full color active-matrix LCD in the cockpit environment, polysilicon active-matrix LCDs for cockpit applications, and a dynamic color model for a liquid crystal shutter display. Other topics include a flat fluorescent lamp for LCD back-lighting, holographic combiner design to obtain uniform symbol brightness at a head-up display video camera, vision restriction devices, passive binarization methods for image display and computer-generated holograms, a prismatic combiner for head-up displays, holographic optical elements, multifunction displays optimized for viewability, and technologies for brighter color CRT displays.

  18. Conventional and Non-Conventional Drosophila Toll Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Scott A.; Wasserman, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Toll in Drosophila and of the remarkable conservation in pathway composition and organization catalyzed a transformation in our understanding of innate immune recognition and response. At the center of that picture is a cascade of interactions in which specific microbial cues activate Toll receptors, which then transmit signals driving transcription factor nuclear localization and activity. Experiments gave substance to the vision of pattern recognition receptors, linked phenomena in development, gene regulation, and immunity into a coherent whole, and revealed a rich set of variations for identifying non-self and responding effectively. More recently, research in Drosophila has illuminated the positive and negative regulation of Toll activation, the organization of signaling events at and beneath membranes, the sorting of information flow, and the existence of non-conventional signaling via Toll-related receptors. Here, we provide an overview of the Toll pathway of flies and highlight these ongoing realms of research. PMID:23632253

  19. Literary Competence beyond Conventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torell, Orjan

    2001-01-01

    Revises the concept of "literary competence" based on the texts produced by two Russian high school students. Shows that literacy competence cannot be reduced to internalized literary conventions, although these are a fundamental component of literary competence, and proposes a model of literary competence. Also explores merits and…

  20. Convention Problems - 1787.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Deroy L.

    Designed to motivate eighth-grade civics students in the study of the United States Constitution, this game is intended to simulate the basic problems faced by the delegates to the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. The four parts of the game introduce the governmental concepts of the bicameral legislature, the executive branch, the judicial branch,…

  1. Convention Problems - 1787.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Deroy L.

    Designed to motivate eighth-grade civics students in the study of the United States Constitution, this game is intended to simulate the basic problems faced by the delegates to the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. The four parts of the game introduce the governmental concepts of the bicameral legislature, the executive branch, the judicial branch,…

  2. A Conventional Mean Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatakos, N. G.; McCarthy, D. D.

    2016-12-01

    A CONVENTIONAL MEAN POLE PATH The gradual drift of the pole associated with the rotational axis of the Earth in a terrestrial reference frame is characterized by the motion of a "mean pole." The IERS Conventions (2010) does not provide a formal definition of such a "mean pole." In its glossary it defines the terminology "mean pole" in the celestial frame by using the definition "the position on the celestial sphere towards which the Earth's axis points at a particular epoch, with the oscillations due to precession-nutation removed." The need for a terrestrial mean pole is mentioned in Section 7.1.4 of the IERS Conventions, which outlines the procedure to account for the variation in terrestrial site coordinates caused by the pole tide. It states, that an estimate of the wander of the mean pole to within about 10 milliarc-seconds is needed to ensure that the geopotential field is aligned to the long term mean pole. Historically the angular coordinates of this "mean pole" were calculated by averaging the observed angular coordinates of the rotational pole over six years, the beat period of the annual and approximately 14-month Chandler motions of the rotational pole. The IERS Conventions (2010) realization of the mean pole is composed of a cubic fit of the polar coordinates valid over 1976-2010 and a linear model for extrapolation after 2010.0. Further it notes that in the future, the IERS conventional mean pole will be revised as needed with sufficient advance notice. However, this document leaves open the formal definition of a conventional terrestrial mean pole, the spectral frequency content to be expected in such a definition and a procedure to be used to realize the coordinates of the path for users. Background is provided regarding past realizations of a "mean pole," and the requirements for a realization of a mean pole path are reviewed. Possible definitions and potential mathematical models to provide mean pole coordinates in the future are outlined. In

  3. Conventional Reduced Risk Pesticide Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Find out about the Conventional Reduced Risk Pesticide Program, which expedites the review and regulatory decision-making process of conventional pesticides that pose less risk to human health and the environment than existing conventional alternatives.

  4. Conventional Strategic Deterrence

    SciTech Connect

    Latter, A.L.; Martinelli, E.A.; Speed, R.D.

    1992-08-01

    The Bush Administration argues that the US, as the world's only remaining superpower, must be prepared to intervene militarily in regional conflicts. However, the traditional American way of fighting-relying on ground forces with heavy equipment, supported by naval and air forces--could prove too expensive, both monetarily and in terms of expected American casualties, to garner the support of the American public or Congress. This paper argues that the revolution in conventional weaponry demonstrated in the Persian Gulf War opens up the possibility of a new strategy--called Conventional Strategic Deterrence--that could reduce both financial costs and casualties (if it were necessary to implement the strategy) while still being a strong and credible deterrent to regional conflict.

  5. IERS Conventions (2003)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    3), are the respective resonance frequencies associated with the Chandler wobble (CW), the retrograde free core nutation (FCN), and the pro- grade...Soc., 64, pp. 747–765. Zschau, J., 1983, “Rheology of the Earth’s mantle at tidal and Chandler Wobble periods,” Proc. Ninth Int. Symp. Earth Tides, New...Reference Frame CTRS Conventional Terrestrial Reference System CW Chandler Wobble DOMES Directory Of MERIT Sites DORIS Doppler Orbit determination

  6. Laparoscopic versus conventional appendectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Vallina, V L; Velasco, J M; McCulloch, C S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to prospectively define the impact of laparoscopy on the management of patients with a presumed diagnosis of appendicitis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: While the role of laparoscopy in the management of cholelithiasis is well established, its impact on the management of acute appendicitis needs to be objectively defined and compared to that of conventional management. Several authors have predicted that laparoscopic appendectomy will become the preferred treatment for appendicitis. METHODS: Two groups of consecutive patients with similar clinical characteristics of acute appendicitis were compared. Data on the laparoscopic group were compiled prospectively on standardized forms; data on the conventional group were collected retrospectively. Operative time, hospital stay, analgesia, cost, and return to normal activities were noted. RESULTS: Seventeen consecutive patients who underwent appendectomy were compared to 18 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopy (16 of these 18 had laparoscopic appendectomy). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of clinical characteristics and appendiceal histopathology. The mean operative times were 61 +/- 4.1 minutes and 46 +/- 2.9 minutes for the laparoscopy and conventional groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the laparoscopic appendectomy group, with 81% of patients being discharged on their first postoperative day (p < 0.001). The laparoscopic appendectomy patients required significantly less narcotic analgesia (p < 0.02). Return to normal activity was not significantly different between the two groups. The average total cost of laparoscopic appendectomy was 30% greater than that of conventional appendectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy is a useful adjunct to the management of patients with a presumed clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis. PMID:8239785

  7. Convention, Confirmation, and Credibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    4 It was Pierre Duhem , a physicist, who made the strongest claim regarding the conventionality of what most people think of as empirical theory near...Mach, op. cit. p. 306. 5. Pierre Duhem , The Aim and Structure of Physical Theory Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1954. In French, it appeared as...examine in detail the ideas of Mach, Poincare, and Duhem . That they had the idea that it could be philosophically respectable to regard scientific

  8. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  9. 737 Windshear Tests, Orlando

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA researchers evaluating wind shear sensor displays in the experimental flight deck at NASA's Boeing 737 research aircraft. During this flight test program, over 75 microbursts were penetrated at altitudes from 800-1100 ft to test the performance of radar, lidar and infrared wind shear sensors. Pictured from left to right are Wind Shear Program Manager Roland Bowles, NASA research pilot Lee Person, Wind Shear Program Deputy Manager Michael Lewis, NASA research engineer David Hinton, NASA research engineer Emedio Bracalante.

  10. Closing the Achievement Gap by Improving Reading Instruction. Hearing before the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventh Congress, First Session (Orlando, Florida, November 13, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    A field hearing of the United States House of Representatives' Committee on Education and the Workforce, entitled "Closing the Achievement Gap by Improving Reading Instruction," was held at Lancaster Elementary School in Orlando, Florida, on November 13, 2001. The hearing begins with welcoming statements by the committee chairman and one…

  11. Transcriptional analysis of four family 4 P450s in a Puerto Rico strain of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) compared with an Orlando strain and their possible functional roles in permethrin resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A field strain of Aedes aegypti was collected from Puerto Rico (PR) in October 2008. Based on LD50 values by topical application, the PR strain was 73-fold resistant to permethrin compared to a susceptible Orlando strain. In the presence of piperonyl butoxide (PBO), the resistance of Puerto Rico str...

  12. Optimizing Dam Operations for Power and for Fish: an Overview of the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers ADvanced Turbine Development R&D. A Pre-Conference Workshop at HydroVision 2006, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon July 31, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Dauble, Dennis D.

    2006-08-01

    This booklet contains abstracts of presentations made at a preconference workshop on the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers hydroturbine programs. The workshop was held in conjunction with Hydrovision 2006 July 31, 2006 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland Oregon. The workshop was organized by the Corps of Engineers, PNNL, and the DOE Wind and Hydropower Program. Presenters gave overviews of the Corps' Turbine Survival Program and the history of the DOE Advanced Turbine Development Program. They also spoke on physical hydraulic models, biocriteria for safe fish passage, pressure investigations using the Sensor Fish Device, blade strike models, optimization of power plant operations, bioindex testing of turbine performance, approaches to measuring fish survival, a systems view of turbine performance, and the Turbine Survival Program design approach.

  13. Conventional and unconventional superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, R. M.

    2012-02-01

    Superconductivity has been one of the most fruitful areas of research in condensed matter physics, bringing together researchers with distinct interests in a collaborative effort to understand from its microscopic basis to its potential for unprecedented technological applications. The concepts, techniques, and methods developed along its centennial history have gone beyond the realm of condensed matter physics and influenced the development of other fascinating areas, such as particle physics and atomic physics. These notes, based on a set of lectures given at the 2011 Advanced Summer School of Cinvestav, aim to motivate the young undergraduate student in getting involved in the exciting world of conventional and unconventional superconductors.

  14. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led to the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.

  15. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led tomore » the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.« less

  16. Hydrogeologic conditions and simulation of ground-water flow in the Greater Orlando Metropolitan Area, East-Central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, L.C.; Halford, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    A finite-difference ground-water flow model was used to simulate the effects of both modern-day (1988) and projected 2010 ground-water withdrawals on the Floridan aquifer system in the greater Orlando metropolitan area. This area covers about 2,500 square miles and includes all of Orange and Seminole Counties and parts of Lake, Volusia, Brevard, Osceola, and Polk Counties. The hydrogeology of the area is characterized by a thin surficial aquifer underlain by the thick, highly productive rocks of the Floridan aquifer system. Water in the Upper Floridan aquifer is brackish (chloride concentrations greater than 1,000 milligrams per liter) in discharge areas beneath and near the St. Johns and Wekiva Rivers and is freshest (chloride concentrations less than 100 milligrams per liter) inrecharge areas. A slight trend toward increasing concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate has been observed at Upper Floridan aquifer springs. Chloride concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer measured between 1966 and 1993 at the Cocoa well field have increased from 50 milligrams per liter to 120 milligrams per liter; concentrations measured in the Lower Floridan aquifer between 1966 and 1993 have increasedfrom 600 milligrams per liter to 3,000 milligrams per liter. The flow model was calibrated by comparing (a) simulated and estimated Upper Floridan aquifer predevelopment (unstressed) potentiometric surfaces, (b) simulated and measured heads at 142 Upper Floridan aquifer monitoring wells in 1988 (averageabsolute error of 1.8 feet), (c) simulated and measured discharge rates at 15 Upper Floridan aquifer springs in 1988 (306 cubic feet per second), and (d) simulated and measured drawdowns at 134 Upper Floridan aquifer monitoring wells between 1988 and May 1990 (58 and 95 percent of simulated drawdowns were within plus or minus 25and 50 percent of measured drawdowns, respectively). Relative to predevelopment conditions, model simulations indicate that about half of the

  17. Convention Center Management: A Systems Analysis & Design Course Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidry, Brandi N.; Totaro, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge faced by many instructors of systems analysis and design courses is the selection or development of projects that provide challenging, yet suitable, learning experiences for the students. Employing a system development project case in undergraduate MIS courses offers students a multitude of opportunities to experientially examine…

  18. Convention Center Management: A Systems Analysis & Design Course Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidry, Brandi N.; Totaro, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge faced by many instructors of systems analysis and design courses is the selection or development of projects that provide challenging, yet suitable, learning experiences for the students. Employing a system development project case in undergraduate MIS courses offers students a multitude of opportunities to experientially examine…

  19. Biodiesel from conventional feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Liu, De-Hua

    2012-01-01

    At present, traditional fossil fuels are used predominantly in China, presenting the country with challenges that include sustainable energy supply, energy efficiency improvement, and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. In 2007, China issued The Strategic Plan of the Mid-and-Long Term Development of Renewable Energy, which aims to increase the share of clean energy in the country's energy consumption to 15% by 2020 from only 7.5% in 2005. Biodiesel, an important renewable fuel with significant advantages over fossil diesel, has attracted great attention in the USA and European countries. However, biodiesel is still in its infancy in China, although its future is promising. This chapter reviews biodiesel production from conventional feedstocks in the country, including feedstock supply and state of the art technologies for the transesterification reaction through which biodiesel is made, particularly the enzymatic catalytic process developed by Chinese scientists. Finally, the constraints and perspectives for China's biodiesel development are highlighted.

  20. The impact of the Orlando mass shooting on fear of victimization and gun-purchasing intentions: Not what one might expect.

    PubMed

    Stroebe, Wolfgang; Leander, N Pontus; Kruglanski, Arie W

    2017-01-01

    Mass public shootings are typically followed by a spike in gun sales as well as calls for stricter gun control laws. What remains unclear is whether the spike in gun sales is motivated by increased threat perceptions or by concerns about gun control, or whether the sales are mainly driven by non-owners purchasing guns or gun owners adding to their collection. Two surveys of gun owners and non-owners, conducted immediately before and after the Orlando shooting, allowed us to assess its impact on threat perceptions and on gun-purchasing intentions. Although there was a minor impact on threat perceptions of non-owners, neither group reported any increased gun-purchasing intentions or an increased need of a gun for protection and self-defense. We suggest that these responses are representative for the majority of Americans and, therefore, people who are influenced by mass shootings to buy guns are probably an atypical minority.

  1. The impact of the Orlando mass shooting on fear of victimization and gun-purchasing intentions: Not what one might expect

    PubMed Central

    Stroebe, Wolfgang; Leander, N. Pontus; Kruglanski, Arie W.

    2017-01-01

    Mass public shootings are typically followed by a spike in gun sales as well as calls for stricter gun control laws. What remains unclear is whether the spike in gun sales is motivated by increased threat perceptions or by concerns about gun control, or whether the sales are mainly driven by non-owners purchasing guns or gun owners adding to their collection. Two surveys of gun owners and non-owners, conducted immediately before and after the Orlando shooting, allowed us to assess its impact on threat perceptions and on gun-purchasing intentions. Although there was a minor impact on threat perceptions of non-owners, neither group reported any increased gun-purchasing intentions or an increased need of a gun for protection and self-defense. We suggest that these responses are representative for the majority of Americans and, therefore, people who are influenced by mass shootings to buy guns are probably an atypical minority. PMID:28800365

  2. Conventional mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    The provision of mechanical ventilation for the support of infants and children with respiratory failure or insufficiency is one of the most common techniques that are performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Despite its widespread application in the PICUs of the 21st century, before the 1930s, respiratory failure was uniformly fatal due to the lack of equipment and techniques for airway management and ventilatory support. The operating rooms of the 1950s and 1960s provided the arena for the development of the manual skills and the refinement of the equipment needed for airway management, which subsequently led to the more widespread use of endotracheal intubation thereby ushering in the era of positive pressure ventilation. Although there seems to be an ever increasing complexity in the techniques of mechanical ventilation, its successful use in the PICU should be guided by the basic principles of gas exchange and the physiology of respiratory function. With an understanding of these key concepts and the use of basic concepts of mechanical ventilation, this technique can be successfully applied in both the PICU and the operating room. This article reviews the basic physiology of gas exchange, principles of pulmonary physiology, and the concepts of mechanical ventilation to provide an overview of the knowledge required for the provision of conventional mechanical ventilation in various clinical arenas. PMID:20927268

  3. Center Size and Center Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne; Morris, John

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of child care center size on cost, quality, and profits per child. Examined centers ranging from 40 to 80 children and found total cost and revenue per child were similar for small, medium, and large centers. Found profits per child were highest in large centers and that there was no relationship between center quality and…

  4. ESD and the Rio Conventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarabhai, Kartikeya V.; Ravindranath, Shailaja; Schwarz, Rixa; Vyas, Purvi

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 36 of Agenda 21, a key document of the 1992 Earth Summit, emphasised reorienting education towards sustainable development. While two of the Rio conventions, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), developed communication, education and public awareness (CEPA)…

  5. ESD and the Rio Conventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarabhai, Kartikeya V.; Ravindranath, Shailaja; Schwarz, Rixa; Vyas, Purvi

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 36 of Agenda 21, a key document of the 1992 Earth Summit, emphasised reorienting education towards sustainable development. While two of the Rio conventions, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), developed communication, education and public awareness (CEPA)…

  6. Defying cosmic convention

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-20

    Some galaxies are harder to classify than others. Here, Hubble’s trusty Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) has captured a striking view of two interacting galaxies located some 60 million light-years away in the constellation of Leo (The Lion). The more diffuse and patchy blue glow covering the right side of the frame is known as NGC 3447 — sometimes NGC 3447B for clarity, as the name NGC 3447 can apply to the overall duo. The smaller clump to the upper left is known as NGC 3447A. The trouble with space is that it is, to state the obvious, really, really big. Astronomers have for hundreds of years been discovering and naming galaxies, stars, cosmic clouds and more. Unifying and regulating the conventions and classifications for everything ever observed is very difficult, especially when you get an ambiguous object like NGC 3447, which stubbornly defies easy categorisation. Overall, we know NGC 3447 comprises a couple of interacting galaxies, but we’re unsure what each looked like before they began to tear one another apart. The two sit so close that they are strongly influenced and distorted by the gravitational forces between them, causing the galaxies to twist themselves into the unusual and unique shapes seen here. NGC 3447A appears to display the remnants of a central bar structure and some disrupted spiral arms, both properties characteristic of certain spiral galaxies. Some identify NGC 3447B as a former spiral galaxy, while others categorise it as being an irregular galaxy.  

  7. KSC-2012-1551

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Visitors enter the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., for the NBA All-Star Jam Session. Representatives from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida were available to highlight some of the contributions the space agency has made to sports, transportation and everyday life. One of the events leading up to the NBA All-Star game being held in Orlando on Feb. 26, the NBA All-Star Jam Session is a basketball experience intended for all ages, allowing fans to compete against their friends in skills challenges and collect autographs from players and legends. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

  8. KSC-2012-1554

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Inside the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., representatives from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida speak to attendees visiting the NBA All-Star Jam Session. The NASA exhibit offers hands-on educational activities highlighting some of the contributions the space agency has made to sports, transportation and everyday life. One of the events leading up to the NBA All-Star game being held in Orlando on Feb. 26, the NBA All-Star Jam Session is a basketball experience intended for all ages, allowing fans to compete against their friends in skills challenges and collect autographs from players and legends. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

  9. KSC-2012-1556

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Representatives from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida talk to visitors attending the NBA All-Star Jam Session at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. The NASA exhibit offers hands-on educational activities highlighting some of the contributions the space agency has made to sports, transportation and everyday life. One of the events leading up to the NBA All-Star game being held in Orlando on Feb. 26, the NBA All-Star Jam Session is a basketball experience intended for all ages, allowing fans to compete against their friends in skills challenges and collect autographs from players and legends. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

  10. KSC-2012-1553

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Inside the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., representatives from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida speak to attendees visiting the NBA All-Star Jam Session. The NASA exhibit offers hands-on educational activities highlighting some of the contributions the space agency has made to sports, transportation and everyday life. One of the events leading up to the NBA All-Star game being held in Orlando on Feb. 26, the NBA All-Star Jam Session is a basketball experience intended for all ages, allowing fans to compete against their friends in skills challenges and collect autographs from players and legends. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

  11. The Emergence of Conventional Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Maria

    Children in the emergent writing stage write in pre-conventional or emergent forms (scribbling, drawing, non-phonetic letterings, and phonetic spelling) before they write conventionally. A special education teacher in a kindergarten inclusion setting in the Bronx, New York, noticing that her students did not particularly like to write, decided and…

  12. Interservice/Industry Training Systems Conference (13th) Held in Orlando, Florida on 2-5 December 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    MICHAEL ZAJKOWSKI, PH.D., United States Navy, Advanced Projects Group, Naval Training Systems Center HUBERT W. MERRY, Chief, Engineering Simulation...SAC/XRH Cecil Ramsey, HQS Ft. McPherson Capt. Sue Schuler, USMC, PM Training Systems Jerry Shimp, Hughes Training, Inc. Phillip Sprinkle, PM TRADE...REFERENCES (I) G. Booth , Software Engineering with Ada, Lynn D. Stuckey, Jr. is a software systems (1) . BochSofwareEizinecingengineer with Boeing

  13. Simulated effects of projected ground-water withdrawals in the Floridan aquifer system, greater Orlando metropolitan area, east-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, Louis C.; Halford, Keith J.

    1999-01-01

    Ground-water levels in the Floridan aquifer system within the greater Orlando metropolitan area are expected to decline because of a projected increase in the average pumpage rate from 410 million gallons per day in 1995 to 576 million gallons per day in 2020. The potential decline in ground-water levels and spring discharge within the area was investigated with a calibrated, steady-state, ground-water flow model. A wetter-than-average condition scenario and a drought-condition scenario were simulated to bracket the range of water-levels and springflow that may occur in 2020 under average rainfall conditions. Pumpage used to represent the drought-condition scenario totaled 865 million gallons per day, about 50 percent greater than the projected average pumpage rate in 2020. Relative to average 1995 steady-state conditions, drawdowns simulated in the Upper Floridan aquifer exceeded 10 and 25 feet for wet and dry conditions, respectively, in parts of central and southwest Orange County and in north Osceola County. In Seminole County, drawdowns of up to 20 feet were simulated for dry conditions, compared with 5 to 10 feet simulated for wet conditions. Computed springflow was reduced by 10 percent for wet conditions and by 38 percent for dry conditions, with the largest reductions (28 and 76 percent) occurring at the Sanlando Springs group. In the Lower Floridan aquifer, drawdowns simulated in southwest Orange County exceeded 20 and 40 feet for wet and dry conditions, respectively.

  14. Current Scientific and Regulatory Approaches for Development of Orally Inhaled and Nasal Drug Products: Overview of the IPAC-RS/University of Florida Orlando Inhalation Conference.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, Guenther; Davis-Cutting, Craig; Oliver, Martin; Lee, Sau L; Lyapustina, Svetlana

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes discussions at the March 2014 conference organized by the University of Florida (UF) and International Pharmaceutical Aerosol Consortium on Regulation and Science (IPAC-RS), entitled "Orlando Inhalation Conference: Approaches in International Regulation." The special focus of the conference was on global scientific and regulatory issues associated with the testing and demonstration of equivalence for the registration of orally inhaled drug products (OIDPs) in the United States, Europe, Brazil, China, and India. The scope included all types of OIDPs throughout their lifecycle, e.g., innovator/brand-name products, generics, modifications due to lifecycle management, device changes, etc. Details were presented for the U.S. "weight of evidence approach" for registration of generic products (which includes demonstration of in vitro and in vivo equivalence, as well as quantitative and qualitative sameness, and device similarity). The European "stepwise" approach was elucidated, and the thinking of regulatory agencies in the major emerging markets was clarified. The conference also highlighted a number of areas that would benefit from further research and discussion, especially around patient/device interface and human factor studies, statistical methods and criteria for demonstrating equivalence, the relative roles of in vivo and in vitro tests, and appropriate designs and metrics for in vivo studies of inhaled drugs.

  15. Agricultural origins: centers and noncenters.

    PubMed

    Harlan, J R

    1971-10-29

    I propose the theory that agriculture originated independently in three different areas and that, in each case, there was a system composed of a center of origin and a noncenter, in which activities of domestication were dispersed over a span of 5,000 to 10,000 kilometers. One system includes a definable Near East center and a noncenter in Africa; another system includes a North Chinese center and a noncenter in Southeast Asia and the South Pacific; the third system includes a Mesoamerican center and a South American noncenter. There are suggestions that, in each case, the center and noncenter interact with each other. Crops did not necessarily originate in centers (in any conventional concept of the term), nor did agriculture necessarily develop in a geographical "center."

  16. Quantum Photonics Beyond Conventional Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-10

    computational task making it a key application of quantum technology for chemistry , biology and material science. In contrast to a digital simulation on a...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0045 Quantum Photonics Beyond Conventional Computing Jeremy OBrien THE UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL 07/10/2015 Final Report...2015 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 15 Mar 2012 – 15 Mar 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum Photonics Beyond Conventional

  17. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  18. KSC-2012-1552

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- At NASA's exhibit inside the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., visitors to the NBA All-Star Jam Session participate in hands-on educational activities to learn more about how science plays into sports. One of the events leading up to the NBA All-Star game being held in Orlando on Feb. 26, the NBA All-Star Jam Session is a basketball experience intended for all ages, allowing fans to compete against their friends in skills challenges and collect autographs from players and legends. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

  19. Constraining fault activity by investigating tectonically-deformed Quaternary palaeoshorelines using a synchronous correlation method: the Capo D'Orlando Fault as a case study (NE Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschis, Marco; Roberts, Gerald P.; Robertson, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Long-term curstal extension rates, accommodated by active normal faults, can be constrained by investigating Late Quaternary vertical movements. Sequences of marine terraces tectonically deformed by active faults mark the interaction between tectonic activity, sea-level changes and active faulting throughout the Quaternary (e.g. Armijo et al., 1996, Giunta et al, 2011, Roberts et al., 2013). Crustal deformation can be calculated over multiple seismic cycles by mapping Quaternary tectonically-deformed palaeoshorelines, both in the hangingwall and footwall of active normal faults (Roberts et al., 2013). Here we use a synchronous correlation method between palaeoshorelines elevations and the ages of sea-level highstands (see Roberts et al., 2013 for further details) which takes advantage of the facts that (i) sea-level highstands are not evenly-spaced in time, yet must correlate with palaeoshorelines that are commonly not evenly-spaced in elevation, and (ii) that older terraces may be destroyed and/or overprinted by younger highstands, so that the next higher or lower paleoshoreline does not necessarily correlate with the next older or younger sea-level highstand. We investigated a flight of Late Quaternary marine terraces deformed by normal faulting as a result of the Capo D'Orlando Fault in NE Sicily (e.g. Giunta et al., 2011). This fault lies within the Calabrian Arc which has experienced damaging seismic events such as the 1908 Messina Straits earthquake ~ Mw 7. Our mapping and previous mapping (Giunta et al. (2011) demonstrate that the elevations of marine terraces inner edges change along the strike the NE - SW oriented normal fault. This confirms active deformation on the Capo D'Orlando Fault, strongly suggesting that it should be added into the Database of Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS, Basili et al., 2008). Giunta et al. (2011) suggested that uplift rates and hence faults lip-rates vary through time for this examples. We update the ages assigned to

  20. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Annual Research Meeting in Conjunction with the Annual Convention of the Association for Career and Technical Education. Proceedings (Orlando, Florida, December 11-13, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G., Ed.

    This document contains 14 research papers presented at the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The following papers are included: "Factors that Influence Students to Attend 4-Year Automotive Programs" (Gregory G. Belcher, Robert L. Frisbee); "The Training Needs of Vocational Teachers for…

  1. Toddlers' Social Interactions Regarding Moral and Conventional Trangressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1984-01-01

    Social interactions regarding moral and conventional transgressions were observed among two toddler groups. Each of 16 day care center classrooms, eight serving 13- to 27-month-olds and eight serving 18- to 40-month-olds, was observed for three 45-minute sessions. Implications of results concerned the developmental origins of distinctions between…

  2. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-05-22

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  3. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Goyal, Amit (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2016-07-12

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  4. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  5. NULL convention floating point multiplier.

    PubMed

    Albert, Anitha Juliette; Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation.

  6. Coastal Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Geological Survey dedicated its new Center for Coastal Geology June 12 at the University of South Florida in St. Petersburg. Robert Halley leads the staff of nine USGS scientists studying coastal erosion and pollution and underwater mineral resources in cooperation with the university's Marine Science Department. Current research is on erosion along Lake Michigan and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The number of USGS scientists at the center should increase to 30 over five years.

  7. Hydrogen storage: beyond conventional methods.

    PubMed

    Dalebrook, Andrew F; Gan, Weijia; Grasemann, Martin; Moret, Séverine; Laurenczy, Gábor

    2013-10-09

    The efficient storage of hydrogen is one of three major hurdles towards a potential hydrogen economy. This report begins with conventional storage methods for hydrogen and broadly covers new technology, ranging from physical media involving solid adsorbents, to chemical materials including metal hydrides, ammonia borane and liquid precursors such as alcohols and formic acid.

  8. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    SciTech Connect

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  9. Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Hurkmans, Coen; Mutic, Sasa; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Brame, Scott; Straube, William; Galvin, James; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Michalski, Jeff; Bosch, Walter

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were

  10. The effects of flow-path modification on water-quality constituent retention in an urban stormwater detention pond and wetland system, Orlando, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gain, W.S.

    1996-01-01

    Changes in constituent retention in a wet stormwater-detention pond and wetland system in Orlando, Florida, were evaluated following the 1988 installation of a flow barrier which approximately doubled the flow path and increased detention time in the pond. The pond and wetland were arranged in series so that stormwater first enters the pond and overflows into the wetland before spilling over to the regional stream system. Several principal factors that contribute to constituent retention were examined, including changes in pond-water quality between storms, stormwater quality, and pond-water flushing during storms. A simple, analytical pond-water mixing model was used as the basis for interpreting changes in retention efficiencies caused by pond modification. Retention efficiencies were calculated by a modified event-mean concentration efficiency method using a minimum variance unbiased estimator approach. The results of this study generally support the hypothesis that changes in the geometry of stormwater treatment systems can significantly affect the constituent retention efficiency of the pond and wetland system. However, the results also indicate that these changes in efficiency are caused not only by changes in residence time, but also by changes in stormwater mixing and pond water flushing during storms. Additionally, the use of average efficiencies as indications of treatment effectiveness may fail to account for biases associated with sample distribution and independent physical properties of the system, such as the range and concentrations of constituents in stormwater inflows and stormwater volume. Changes in retention efficiencies varied among chemical constituents and were significantly different in the pond and wetland. Retention efficiency was related to inflow concentration for most constituents. Increased flushing of the pond after modification caused decreases in retention efficiencies for constituents that concentrate in the pond between storms

  11. Is there a standard of care for the management of advanced pancreatic cancer?. Highlights from the Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. Orlando, FL, USA. January 25-27, 2008.

    PubMed

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2008-03-08

    Despite advances in our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of pancreatic cancer, the outcome for this disease remains dismal. Gemcitabine, the standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer, offers modest improvement of tumor-related symptoms and marginal advantage of survival. Many chemotherapeutic and targeted agents have been pitted against or combined with gemcitabine in randomized phase III trials and no drug was shown to be superior to single-agent gemcitabine except two gemcitabine-containing combinations: capecitabine plus gemcitabine vs. gemcitabine and erlotinib. In this article, the author debates: "Is there a standard of care for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer?". In addition, he summarizes the key studies presented at the "Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium" held in Orlando, FL, USA on January 25-27, 2008. The studies discussed here include the following: i) a phase I study of a chemotherapy doublet gemcitabine plus capecitabine, combined with a biologic doublet (bevacizumab plus erlotinib) in patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (abstract #141); ii) a phase II study of gemcitabine, bevacizumab, and erlotinib in locally advanced and metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (abstract #151); iii) final results of the multicenter phase II study on gemcitabine, capecitabine, and bevacizumab in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (abstract #198); iv) interim results from a phase II study of volociximab in combination with gemcitabine in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer (abstract #142); v) a pilot study of combination chemotherapy with S-1 and irinotecan for advanced pancreatic cancer (abstract #155); vi) a multicenter phase II study of gemcitabine and S-1 combination chemotherapy in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer (abstract #212); vii) a phase I/II study of PHY906 plus capecitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma (abstract #260); and viii) the final results of a phase II trial of

  12. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens...

  13. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for testing. (1) The requirements of § 429.11 are applicable to conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens...

  14. Conventional Radiology in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Llopis, Eva; Kroon, Herman M; Acosta, Jose; Bloem, Johan L

    2017-09-01

    In clinical practice, the conventional radiography is still the radiologic method for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Moreover, it provides a quick overview of the symptomatic joints to narrow the differential diagnosis and to evaluate progression. RA is a polyarticular disease with bilateral and symmetric involvement of the peripheral joints, especially small joints, and less frequently, the cervical spine. The radiologic features are soft tissue swelling, periarticular osteoporosis, erosions, loss of joint space, and in advanced disease, osteolysis and typical subluxations or deformities, such as ulnar deviation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect…

  16. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect…

  17. Implementing the chemical weapons convention

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, B.; Tanzman, E. A.

    1999-12-07

    In 1993, as the CWC ratification process was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the CWC with national law could cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States as to how the CWC would be carried out. As a result, the author's colleagues and the author prepared the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Committee of CWC Legal Experts, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Central Europe, reviewed the Manual. In February 1998, they finished the second edition of the Manual in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The Manual tries to increase understanding of the Convention by identifying its obligations and suggesting methods of meeting them. Education about CWC obligations and available alternatives to comply with these requirements can facilitate national response that are consistent among States Parties. Thus, the Manual offers options that can strengthen international realization of the Convention's goals if States Parties act compatibly in implementing them. Equally important, it is intended to build confidence that the legal issues raised by the Convention are finite and addressable. They are now nearing competition of an internet version of this document so that interested persons can access it electronically and can view the full text of all of the national implementing legislation it cites. The internet address, or URL, for the internet version of the Manual is http: //www.cwc.ard.gov. This paper draws from the Manual. It comparatively addresses approximately thirty

  18. Satellite Information on Orlando, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannah, J. W. (Principal Investigator); Thomas, G. L.; Esparza, F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Computer classification, accompanied by human interpretation and manual simplification, can produce land use maps which are useful on a regional, county, and for special purpose, a city basis. Change monitoring is potentially an effective application of such data at all planning levels.

  19. Conventional power sources for colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.A.

    1987-07-01

    At SLAC we are developing high peak-power klystrons to explore the limits of use of conventional power sources in future linear colliders. In an experimental tube we have achieved 150 MW at 1 ..mu..sec pulse width at 2856 MHz. In production tubes for SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) we routinely achieve 67 MW at 3.5 ..mu..sec pulse width and 180 pps. Over 200 of the klystrons are in routine operation in SLC. An experimental klystron at 8.568 GHz is presently under construction with a design objective of 30 MW at 1 ..mu..sec. A program is starting on the relativistic klystron whose performance will be analyzed in the exploration of the limits of klystrons at very short pulse widths.

  20. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  1. High-temperature conventional superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M. I.; Drozdov, A. P.

    2017-02-01

    Conventional superconductors are described well by the Bardeen – Cooper – Schrieffer (BCS) theory (1957) and its related theories, all of which importantly put no explicit limit on transition temperature Tc. While this allows, in principle, room-temperature superconductivity, no such phenomenon has been observed. Since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, the measured critical temperature of BCS superconductors has not until recently exceeded 39 K. In 2014, hydrogen sulfide under high pressure was experimentally found to exhibit superconductivity at Tc = 200 K, a record high value which greatly exceeds that of the previous class of high-temperature superconductors, the cuprates. The superconductivity mechanism in cuprates has not yet been explained. Over a period of 25 years, the critical temperature of cuprates has not been increased above 164 K. The paper reviews research on record-high Tc superconductivity in hydrogen sulphide and other hydrides. Prospects for increasing Tc to room temperature are also discussed.

  2. High-temperature conventional superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M. I.; Drozdov, A. P.

    2016-11-01

    Conventional superconductors are described well by the Bardeen - Cooper - Schrieffer (BCS) theory (1957) and its related theories, all of which importantly put no explicit limit on transition temperature T_c. While this allows, in principle, room-temperature superconductivity, no such phenomenon has been observed. Since the discovery of superconductivity in 1911, the measured critical temperature of BCS superconductors has not until recently exceeded 39 K. In 2014, hydrogen sulfide under high pressure was experimentally found to exhibit superconductivity at T_c=200 K, a record high value which greatly exceeds that of the previous class of high-temperature superconductors, the cuprates. The superconductivity mechanism in cuprates has not yet been explained. Over a period of 25 years, the critical temperature of cuprates has not been increased above 164 K. The paper reviews research on record-high T_c superconductivity in hydrogen sulphide and other hydrides. Prospects for increasing T_c to room temperature are also discussed.

  3. Science and the climate convention

    SciTech Connect

    Goldemberg, J. )

    1994-08-01

    The scientific facts concerning the changes in the composition of the atmosphere that are leading to global warming are briefly presented. This greenhouse effect could be slowed or stopped if action is taken to curb emissions of greenhouse gases or enhance the [open quotes]sinks[close quotes] of these gases. The paper also addresses the response of the international community to this problem. Concern over global warming led to a landmark international agreement to work towards preventing global warming. This agreement is the Framework Convention on Climate Change; it was negotiated at the United Nations Conferences on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. Government policies that could prevent climate change are discussed.

  4. Non-conventional Fishbone Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; V.V. Lutsenko; V.S. Marchenko; R.B. White

    2004-11-10

    New instabilities of fishbone type are predicted. First, a trapped-particle-induced m = n = 1 instability with the mode structure having nothing to do with the conventional rigid kink displacement. This instability takes place when the magnetic field is weak, so that the precession frequency of the energetic ions is not small as compared to the frequency of the corresponding Alfven continuum at r = 0 and the magnetic shear is small inside the q = 1 radius [the case relevant to spherical tori]. Second, an Energetic Particle Mode fishbone instability driven by circulating particles. Third, a double-kink-mode instability driven by the circulating energetic ions. In particular, the latter can have two frequencies simultaneously: we refer to it as ''doublet'' fishbones. This instability can occur when the radial profile of the energetic ions has an off-axis maximum inside the region of the mode localization.

  5. Center for Autonomous Solar Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-26

    type material that is strongly absorbing. The Center’s research on thin film materials includes replacing the conventional indium tin oxide (ITO...used as a transparent conductor with aluminum doped zinc oxide. Indium is a rare and expensive material, and ITO is brittle, making it less suitable...industry standard of indium tin oxide (ITO). Extensive studies comparing ITO and AZO have been conducted on glass and plastic substrates. Likewise

  6. Engineering challenges of the acoustics of a political convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randorff, Jack E.

    2002-05-01

    The acoustical challenges encountered during the 2000 Republican Convention are discussed. The convention has held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania's First Union Center. This venue is a dual-purpose facility catering to professional basketball and professional ice hockey. The acoustical needs of the delegates and the broadcast audience are discussed. The technical performance requirements of convention sound reinforcement and media network broadcast feed are outlined. The necessary technical and performance trade-offs are enumerated with respect to the physical constraints, schedule requirements, budget limitations, and technical planning committee expectations. The conversion of a major sporting arena to a large-scale meeting room with reverberation times and general room conditions conducive to good listening was a significant undertaking. The site had been chosen for a preliminary screening visit approximately 2 years before. This presentation is a followup to ``Acoustics of Political Conventions-A Review,'' delivered at the Acoustical Society of America 139th Meeting in Atlanta in June 2000, 2 months before the convention in Philadelphia.

  7. Equal Remuneration Convention (ILO No. 100).

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The government of Uruguay ratified this UN International Labor Organization convention on equal remuneration on November 16, 1989, and the Government of Zimbabwe ratified this Convention on December 14, 1989.

  8. Conventional treatments for ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Dougados, M; Dijkmans, B; Khan, M; Maksymowych, W; van der Linden, S.; Brandt, J

    2002-01-01

    Management of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is challenged by the progressive nature of the disease. To date, no intervention is available that alters the underlying mechanism of inflammation in AS. Currently available conventional treatments are palliative at best, and often fail to control symptoms in the long term. Current drug treatment may perhaps induce a spurious state of "disease remission," which is merely a low level of disease activity. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are first line treatment, but over time, the disease often becomes refractory to these agents. Disease modifying antirheumatic drugs are second line treatment and may offer some clinical benefit. However, conclusive evidence of the efficacy of these drugs from large placebo controlled trials is lacking. Additionally, these drugs can cause treatment-limiting adverse effects. Intra-articular corticosteroid injection guided by arthrography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging is an effective means of reducing inflammatory back pain, but controlled studies are lacking. A controlled study has confirmed moderate but significant efficacy of intravenous bisphosphonate (pamidronate) treatment in patients with AS; further evaluation of bisphosphonate treatment is warranted. Physical therapy and exercise are necessary adjuncts to pharmacotherapy; however, the paucity of controlled data makes it difficult to identify the best way to administer these interventions. Surgical intervention may be required to support severe structural damage. Thus, for patients with AS, the future of successful treatment lies in the development of pharmacological agents capable of both altering the disease course through intervention at sites of disease pathogenesis, and controlling symptoms. PMID:12381510

  9. Synthesis and Charge Transport Properties of Polymers Derived from Oxidation of 1-H-1’(6-pyrrol-1-yl)-hexyl-4,4’-bipyridinium Bis-hexafluorophosphate and Demonstration of a pH Sensitive Microelectrochemical Transistor Derived from the Redox Properties of a Conventional Redox Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-15

    transport behavior of the viologen redox system. roly (P-V-Me2+) and poly (P-V-H2 + ) have been used to investigate the characteristics of...electrochemical properties of redox polymers, having a poly - pyrrole backbone and viologen subunits, derived from oxidative electropolymerization of l...The interesting properties from Poly (P-V-Me2 + ) and poly (P-V-Hn ) stem from the behavior of the pendant viologen redox centers. The device based on

  10. Cancer and Stroma-Targeted Immunotherapy with a Genetically Modified DC Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Department of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Era of Hope Meeting, August 2-5, 2011. Orlando Marriott World Center Hotel , Orlando, FL...DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Era of Hope Meeting, August 2-5, 2011. Orlando Marriott World Center Hotel , Orlando, FL

  11. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  12. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  13. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  14. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  15. 15 CFR 742.18 - Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or... REGULATIONS CONTROL POLICY-CCL BASED CONTROLS § 742.18 Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC or Convention). States... Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, also known as the Chemical Weapons Convention...

  16. A prompt start: Implementing the framework convention on climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Chayes, A.; Skolnikoff, E.B.; Victor, D.G.

    1992-12-01

    A Framework Convention on Climate Change is under active negotiation in the United Nations with the expectation it will be ready for Signature at the Rio Conference this June. Under the most optimistic projections, a Convention will not come into force and be an effective instrument for months, probably years. In recognition of the several institutional tasks that will be of crucial importance whatever the detailed content of the Convention a small group of high international organizations involved in the negotiations was convened at the Rockefeller Foundation`s Conference Center at Bellagio in January. The discussions at Bellagio on the need for a Prompt Start on these institutional tasks benefitted from earlier meetings at Harvard in March and at Bermuda in May, 1991, that the co-organizers convened to discuss these and related aspects of the negotiations on a Climate Convention. Those meetings were attended by members of the academic community, officials from the United Nations, and representatives of governments involved in the negotiations.

  17. A prompt start: Implementing the framework convention on climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Chayes, A. . Law School); Skolnikoff, E.B. . Center for International Studies); Victor, D.G. Dept. of Political Science)

    1992-01-01

    A Framework Convention on Climate Change is under active negotiation in the United Nations with the expectation it will be ready for Signature at the Rio Conference this June. Under the most optimistic projections, a Convention will not come into force and be an effective instrument for months, probably years. In recognition of the several institutional tasks that will be of crucial importance whatever the detailed content of the Convention a small group of high international organizations involved in the negotiations was convened at the Rockefeller Foundation's Conference Center at Bellagio in January. The discussions at Bellagio on the need for a Prompt Start on these institutional tasks benefitted from earlier meetings at Harvard in March and at Bermuda in May, 1991, that the co-organizers convened to discuss these and related aspects of the negotiations on a Climate Convention. Those meetings were attended by members of the academic community, officials from the United Nations, and representatives of governments involved in the negotiations.

  18. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  19. Center Director's Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-01

    In the Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit facility at the Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex, center director Bob Cabana, in the center background, speaks to guests as he updates community leaders on current and future activities at the space center.

  20. The arbitrariness and normativity of social conventions.

    PubMed

    Al-Amoudi, Ismael; Latsis, John

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates a puzzling feature of social conventions: the fact that they are both arbitrary and normative. We examine how this tension is addressed in sociological accounts of conventional phenomena. Traditional approaches tend to generate either synchronic accounts that fail to consider the arbitrariness of conventions, or diachronic accounts that miss central aspects of their normativity. As a remedy, we propose a processual conception that considers conventions as both the outcome and material cause of much human activity. This conceptualization, which borrows from the économie des conventions as well as critical realism, provides a novel perspective on how conventions are nested and defined, and on how they are established, maintained and challenged.

  1. Complexed metals in hazardous waste: Limitations of conventional chemical oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Diel, B.N.; Kuchynka, D.J.; Borchert, J.

    1994-12-31

    In the management of hazardous waste, more is known regarding the treatment of metals than about the fixation, destruction and/or immobilization of any other hazardous constituent group. Metals are the only hazardous constituents which cannot be destroyed, and so must be converted to their least soluble and/or reactive form to prevent reentry into the environment. The occurrence of complexed metals, e.g., metallocyanides, and/or chelated metals, e.g., M{center_dot}EDTA in hazardous waste streams presents formidable challenges to conventional waste treatment practices. This paper presents the results of extensive research into the destruction (chemical oxidation) of metallocyanides and metal-chelates, defines the utility and limitations of conventional chemical oxidation approaches, illustrates some of the waste management difficulties presented by such species, and presents preliminary data on the UV/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} photodecomposition of chelated metals.

  2. XTOD to Conventional Facilities Interface Control Document

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, D

    2005-09-29

    This document describes the interface between the LCLS X-ray Transport and Diagnostics (XTOD) (WBS 1.5) and the LCLS Conventional Facilities (CF) (WBS 1.1). The interface locations ranging from the beam dump to the far experimental hall are identified. Conventional Facilities provides x-ray, beamline and equipment enclosures, mounting surfaces, conventional utilities, compressed (clean, dry) air, process and purge gases, exhaust systems, power, and environmental conditions for the XTOD components and controls.

  3. Conventional housing conditions attenuate the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Andreas; Hoffacker, Peter; Zellmer, Konstantin; Goecer, Oktay; Recks, Mascha S; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) has remained unclear, but a causative contribution of factors outside the central nervous system (CNS) is conceivable. It was recently suggested that gut bacteria trigger the activation of CNS-reactive T cells and the development of demyelinative disease. C57BL/6 (B6) mice were kept either under specific pathogen free or conventional housing conditions, immunized with the myelin basic protein (MBP)-proteolipid protein (PLP) fusion protein MP4 and the development of EAE was clinically monitored. The germinal center size of the Peyer's patches was determined by immunohistochemistry in addition to the level of total IgG secretion which was assessed by ELISPOT. ELISPOT assays were also used to measure MP4-specific T cell and B cell responses in the Peyer's patches and the spleen. Ear swelling assays were performed to determine the extent of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions in specific pathogen free and conventionally housed mice. In B6 mice that were actively immunized with MP4 and kept under conventional housing conditions clinical disease was significantly attenuated compared to specific pathogen free mice. Conventionally housed mice displayed increased levels of IgG secretion in the Peyer's patches, while the germinal center formation in the gut and the MP4-specific TH17 response in the spleen were diminished after immunization. Accordingly, these mice displayed an attenuated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in ear swelling assays. The data corroborate the notion that housing conditions play a substantial role in the induction of murine EAE and suggest that the presence of gut bacteria might be associated with a decreased immune response to antigens of lower affinity. This concept could be of importance for MS and calls for caution when considering the therapeutic approach to treat patients with antibiotics.

  4. Conventional Housing Conditions Attenuate the Development of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Goecer, Oktay; Recks, Mascha S.; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Background The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) has remained unclear, but a causative contribution of factors outside the central nervous system (CNS) is conceivable. It was recently suggested that gut bacteria trigger the activation of CNS-reactive T cells and the development of demyelinative disease. Methods C57BL/6 (B6) mice were kept either under specific pathogen free or conventional housing conditions, immunized with the myelin basic protein (MBP)–proteolipid protein (PLP) fusion protein MP4 and the development of EAE was clinically monitored. The germinal center size of the Peyer’s patches was determined by immunohistochemistry in addition to the level of total IgG secretion which was assessed by ELISPOT. ELISPOT assays were also used to measure MP4-specific T cell and B cell responses in the Peyer’s patches and the spleen. Ear swelling assays were performed to determine the extent of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions in specific pathogen free and conventionally housed mice. Results In B6 mice that were actively immunized with MP4 and kept under conventional housing conditions clinical disease was significantly attenuated compared to specific pathogen free mice. Conventionally housed mice displayed increased levels of IgG secretion in the Peyer’s patches, while the germinal center formation in the gut and the MP4-specific TH17 response in the spleen were diminished after immunization. Accordingly, these mice displayed an attenuated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in ear swelling assays. Conclusions The data corroborate the notion that housing conditions play a substantial role in the induction of murine EAE and suggest that the presence of gut bacteria might be associated with a decreased immune response to antigens of lower affinity. This concept could be of importance for MS and calls for caution when considering the therapeutic approach to treat patients with antibiotics. PMID:24919069

  5. Criteria for the definition of Pituitary Tumor Centers of Excellence (PTCOE): A Pituitary Society Statement.

    PubMed

    Casanueva, Felipe F; Barkan, Ariel L; Buchfelder, Michael; Klibanski, Anne; Laws, Edward R; Loeffler, Jay S; Melmed, Shlomo; Mortini, Pietro; Wass, John; Giustina, Andrea

    2017-09-07

    With the goal of generate uniform criteria among centers dealing with pituitary tumors and to enhance patient care, the Pituitary Society decided to generate criteria for developing Pituitary Tumors Centers of Excellence (PTCOE). To develop that task, a group of ten experts served as a Task Force and through two years of iterative work an initial draft was elaborated. This draft was discussed, modified and finally approved by the Board of Directors of the Pituitary Society. Such document was presented and debated at a specific session of the Congress of the Pituitary Society, Orlando 2017, and suggestions were incorporated. Finally the document was distributed to a large group of global experts that introduced further modifications with final endorsement. After five years of iterative work a document with the ideal criteria for a PTCOE is presented. Acknowledging that very few centers in the world, if any, likely fulfill the requirements here presented, the document may be a tool to guide improvements of care delivery to patients with pituitary disorders. All these criteria must be accommodated to the regulations and organization of Health of a given country.

  6. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section 401.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list of...

  7. Convention on the Rights of the Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations, New York, NY.

    This publication aims to inform students and adults about the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child established in 1989. The Convention is the first international legal instrument to designate guarantees for children's human rights. It provides a single, up-to-date global perspective on the rights of the child which have been…

  8. The European Convention on Human Rights. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castberg, Frede

    This book outlines the contents of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and its Protocols 1 and 4. The major goal of the Convention, which constitutes an innovation in international law, is to guarantee the protection of "human rights" by allowing both member states and individuals to institute proceedings…

  9. 40 CFR 401.16 - Conventional pollutants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Conventional pollutants. 401.16 Section 401.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS § 401.16 Conventional pollutants. The following comprise the list...

  10. Conventional Expressions. Investigating Pragmatics and Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Conventional expressions, a subset of multiword units, are the target of the current study, which aims to address questions concerning native and nonnative speakers' knowledge and processing of a set of such strings. To this end, 13 expressions identified as conventional in the southwest of France were tested in an online contextualized…

  11. Using Conventional Sequences in L2 French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsberg, Fanny

    2010-01-01

    By means of a phraseological identification method, this study provides a general description of the use of conventional sequences (CSs) in interviews at four different levels of spoken L2 French as well as in interviews with native speakers. Use of conventional sequences is studied with regard to overall quantity, category distribution and type…

  12. 47 CFR 32.20 - Numbering convention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Numbering convention. 32.20 Section 32.20 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.20 Numbering convention. (a) The number...

  13. Conventional Expressions. Investigating Pragmatics and Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Conventional expressions, a subset of multiword units, are the target of the current study, which aims to address questions concerning native and nonnative speakers' knowledge and processing of a set of such strings. To this end, 13 expressions identified as conventional in the southwest of France were tested in an online contextualized…

  14. Intensive Hemodialysis Associates with Improved Survival Compared with Conventional Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Robert M.; Cuerden, Meaghan S.; Garg, Amit X.; Port, Friedrich; Austin, Peter C.; Moist, Louise M.; Pierratos, Andreas; Chan, Christopher T.; Zimmerman, Deborah; Lockridge, Robert S.; Couchoud, Cécile; Chazot, Charles; Ofsthun, Norma; Levin, Adeera; Copland, Michael; Courtney, Mark; Steele, Andrew; McFarlane, Philip A.; Geary, Denis F.; Pauly, Robert P.; Komenda, Paul; Suri, Rita S.

    2012-01-01

    Patients undergoing conventional maintenance hemodialysis typically receive three sessions per week, each lasting 2.5–5.5 hours. Recently, the use of more intensive hemodialysis (>5.5 hours, three to seven times per week) has increased, but the effects of these regimens on survival are uncertain. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to examine whether intensive hemodialysis associates with better survival than conventional hemodialysis. We identified 420 patients in the International Quotidian Dialysis Registry who received intensive home hemodialysis in France, the United States, and Canada between January 2000 and August 2010. We matched 338 of these patients to 1388 patients in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study who received in-center conventional hemodialysis during the same time period by country, ESRD duration, and propensity score. The intensive hemodialysis group received a mean (SD) 4.8 (1.1) sessions per week with a mean treatment time of 7.4 (0.87) hours per session; the conventional group received three sessions per week with a mean treatment time of 3.9 (0.32) hours per session. During 3008 patient-years of follow-up, 45 (13%) of 338 patients receiving intensive hemodialysis died compared with 293 (21%) of 1388 patients receiving conventional hemodialysis (6.1 versus 10.5 deaths per 100 person-years; hazard ratio, 0.55 [95% confidence interval, 0.34–0.87]). The strength and direction of the observed association between intensive hemodialysis and improved survival were consistent across all prespecified subgroups and sensitivity analyses. In conclusion, there is a strong association between intensive home hemodialysis and improved survival, but whether this relationship is causal remains unknown. PMID:22362910

  15. Prospects of Performance-Based Vocational Teacher Education. Proceedings of the National Invitational Conference on Performance-Based Teacher Education (Orlando, Florida, March 20-21, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fardig, Glen E., Ed.

    This compilation of presentations given at the National Conference on Performance Based Teacher Education (PBTE) centers around two main themes: the present state of the scene in performance-based vocational teacher education, and changes in the educational setting in both schools and colleges that will affect PBTE in the near future. Among the…

  16. Transcriptional analysis of four family 4 P450s in a Puerto Rico strain of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) compared with an Orlando strain and their possible functional roles in permethrin resistance.

    PubMed

    Reid, William R; Thornton, Anne; Pridgeon, Julia W; Becnel, James J; Tang, Fang; Estep, Alden; Clark, Gary G; Allan, Sandra; Liu, Nannan

    2014-05-01

    A field strain of Aedes aegypti (L.) was collected from Puerto Rico in October 2008. Based on LD50 values by topical application, the Puerto Rico strain was 73-fold resistant to permethrin compared with a susceptible Orlando strain. In the presence of piperonyl butoxide, the resistance of Puerto Rico strain of Ae. aegypti was reduced to 15-fold, suggesting that cytochrome P450-mediated detoxification is involved in the resistance of the Puerto Rico strain to permethrin. To determine the cytochrome P450s that might play a role in the resistance to permethrin, the transcriptional levels of 164 cytochrome P450 genes in the Puerto Rico strain were compared with that in the Orlando strain. Of the 164 cytochrome P450s, 33 were significantly (P < 0.05) up-regulated, including cytochrome P450s in families four, six, and nine. Multiple studies have investigated the functionality of family six and nine cytochrome P450s, therefore, we focused on the up-regulated family 4 cytochrome P450s. To determine whether up-regulation of the four cytochrome P450s had any functional role in permethrin resistance, transgenic Drosophila melanogaster Meigen lines overexpressing the four family 4 P450 genes were generated, and their ability to survive exposure to permethrin was evaluated. When exposed to 5 microg per vial permethrin, transgenic D. melanogaster expressing CYP4D24, CYP4H29, CYP4J15v1, and CYP4H33 had a survival rate of 60.0 +/- 6.7, 29.0 +/- 4.4, 64.4 +/- 9.7, and 11.0 +/- 4.4%, respectively. However, none of the control flies survived the permethrin exposure at the same concentration. Similarly, none of the transgenic D. melanogaster expressing CYP4J15v1 or CYP4H33 ?5 survived when they were exposed to permethrin at 10 microg per vial. However, transgenic D. melanogaster expressing CYP4D24 and CYP4H29 had a survival rate of 37.8 +/- 4.4 and 2.2 +/- 2.2%, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that CYP4D24 might play an important role in cytochrome P450-mediated

  17. The Learning Resources Center: Concepts and Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducote, Richard

    The need to change the conventional library into a learning resource center is stressed. With the learning resources concept, instructors will be more prone to look upon media not with the idea of why it should be used in teaching, but how it can be used in order to do a more effective job of teaching. The effective use of media will necessarily…

  18. The BigHorn Home Improvement Center

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    The BigHorn Home Improvement Center is one of the nation's first commercial buildings to integrate daylighting and natural ventilation cooling systems into a retail space. It is expected to reduce energy costs by 62% compared to conventionally designed retail buildings.

  19. Minimally Invasive Versus Conventional Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Rizwan Q.; Hickey, Graeme L.; Grant, Stuart W.; Bridgewater, Ben; Roxburgh, James C.; Kumar, Pankaj; Ridley, Paul; Bhabra, Moninder; Millner, Russell W. J.; Athanasiou, Thanos; Casula, Roberto; Chukwuemka, Andrew; Pillay, Thasee; Young, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has been demonstrated as a safe and effective option but remains underused. We aimed to evaluate outcomes of isolated MIAVR compared with conventional aortic valve replacement (CAVR). Methods Data from The National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) were analyzed at seven volunteer centers (2006–2012). Primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and midterm survival. Secondary outcomes were postoperative length of stay as well as cumulative bypass and cross-clamp times. Propensity modeling with matched cohort analysis was used. Results Of 307 consecutive MIAVR patients, 151 (49%) were performed during the last 2 years of study with a continued increase in numbers. The 307 MIAVR patients were matched on a 1:1 ratio. In the matched CAVR group, there was no statistically significant difference in in-hospital mortality [MIAVR, 4/307,(1.3%); 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4%–3.4% vs CAVR, 6/307 (2.0%); 95% CI, 0.8%–4.3%; P = 0.752]. One-year survival rates in the MIAVR and CAVR groups were 94.4% and 94.6%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in midterm survival (P = 0.677; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.56–1.46). Median postoperative length of stay was lower in the MIAVR patients by 1 day (P = 0.009). The mean cumulative bypass time (94.8 vs 91.3 minutes; P = 0.333) and cross-clamp time (74.6 vs 68.4 minutes; P = 0.006) were longer in the MIAVR group; however, this was significant only in the cross-clamp time comparison. Conclusions Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a safe alternative to CAVR with respect to operative and 1-year mortality and is associated with a shorter postoperative stay. Further studies are required in high-risk (logistic EuroSCORE > 10) patients to define the role of MIAVR. PMID:26926521

  20. Adapting conventional cancer treatment for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jian; Liu, Zhida; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy of directly killing tumors by conventional cancer therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, has been for several decades well established. But, a suppressed immune response might become a lethal side effect after repeated cycles of intensive treatment. Recently, achievements in immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive T cell-mediated immunotherapies have resulted in changes in frontline management of advanced cancer diseases. However, accumulated evidence indicates that immunotherapeutic and conventional strategies alone are often ineffective to eradicate big tumors or metastasis. To improve the outcomes of treatment for advanced cancer diseases, the combination of conventional cancer treatment with various immunotherapeutic approaches has been attempted and has shown potential synergistic effects. Recent studies have unexpectedly demonstrated that some strategies of conventional cancer treatment can regulate the immune response positively, thus the understanding of how to adapt conventional treatment for immunotherapy is crucial to the design of effective combination therapy of conventional treatment with immunotherapy. Here, we review both experimental and clinical studies on the therapeutic effect and its mechanisms of combining conventional therapy with immunotherapy in treatment of cancer.

  1. KSC-2012-1546

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Representatives from NASA’s Launch Services Program, located at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, provide information on the program to participants in NASA’s Project Management Challenge 2012. PM Challenge 2012 was held at the Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., on February 22-23, to provide a forum for all stakeholders in the project management community to meet and share stories, lessons learned and new uses of technology in the industry. The PM Challenge is sponsored by NASA's Office of the Chief Engineer. For additional information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/pmchallenge/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  2. KSC-2012-1547

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Representatives from NASA’s Glenn Research Center, located in Cleveland, provide information on their center’s programs and projects to participants in NASA’s Project Management Challenge 2012. PM Challenge 2012 was held at the Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., on February 22-23, to provide a forum for all stakeholders in the project management community to meet and share stories, lessons learned and new uses of technology in the industry. The PM Challenge is sponsored by NASA's Office of the Chief Engineer. For additional information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/pmchallenge/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  3. KSC-2012-1550

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Representatives from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida provide information on the Commercial Crew Program to participants in NASA’s Project Management Challenge 2012. PM Challenge 2012 was held at the Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., on February 22-23, to provide a forum for all stakeholders in the project management community to meet and share stories, lessons learned and new uses of technology in the industry. The PM Challenge is sponsored by NASA's Office of the Chief Engineer. For additional information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/pmchallenge/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  4. The Propulsion Center at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold; Schmidt, George R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center at MSFC serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. Our mission is to move the nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft like access to earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space. Current efforts cover a wide range of exciting areas, including high-energy plasma thrusters, advanced fission and fusion engines, antimatter propulsion systems, beamed energy rockets and sails, and fundamental motive physics. Activities involve concept investigation, proof-of-concept demonstration, and breadboard validation of new propulsion systems. The Propulsion Research Center at MSFC provides an environment where NASA, national laboratories, universities, and industry researchers can pool their skills together to perform landmark propulsion achievements. We offer excellent educational opportunities to students and young researchers-fostering a wellspring of innovation that will revolutionize space transportation.

  5. The Propulsion Center at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold; Schmidt, George R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center at MSFC serves as a national resource for research of advanced, revolutionary propulsion technologies. Our mission is to move the nation's capabilities beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of aircraft like access to earth-orbit, rapid travel throughout the solar system, and exploration of interstellar space. Current efforts cover a wide range of exciting areas, including high-energy plasma thrusters, advanced fission and fusion engines, antimatter propulsion systems, beamed energy rockets and sails, and fundamental motive physics. Activities involve concept investigation, proof-of-concept demonstration, and breadboard validation of new propulsion systems. The Propulsion Research Center at MSFC provides an environment where NASA, national laboratories, universities, and industry researchers can pool their skills together to perform landmark propulsion achievements. We offer excellent educational opportunities to students and young researchers-fostering a wellspring of innovation that will revolutionize space transportation.

  6. [New challenges in the biological weapons convention].

    PubMed

    Sissonen, Susanna; Raijas, Tiina; Haikala, Olli; Hietala, Heikki; Virri, Markku; Nikkari, Simo

    2012-01-01

    Microbes and their toxins are biological weapons that can cause disease in humans, animals or plants, and which can be used with hostile intent in warfare and terrorism. Biological agents can be used as weapons of mass destruction and therefore, immense human and social and major economical damage can be caused. Rapid development of life sciences and technologies during the recent decades has posed new challenges to the Biological Weapons Convention. The Convention states that the States Parties to the BWC strive to ensure that the Convention remains relevant and effective, despite changes in science, technology or politics.

  7. KSC-2012-1561

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. – Education specialists from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center set up a physics demonstration for the students from Meadow Woods Middle School in Orlando during NASA’s Project Management PM Challenge 2012. Here, Jim Gerard, in the red shirt at center, is assisted by Rachel Powers, in the blue shirt. The demonstrations are designed to increase student interest and pursuit of the science, technology, engineering and mathematics STEM fields integral to producing the next generation of scientists and engineers. PM Challenge 2012 was held at the Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., on Feb. 22-23, to provide a forum for all stakeholders in the project management community to meet and share stories, lessons learned and new uses of technology in the industry. The PM Challenge is sponsored by NASA's Office of the Chief Engineer. For additional information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/pmchallenge/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  8. KSC-2012-1562

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. – Laura Colville, in the gray shirt at right, from the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, interacts with students from Meadow Woods Middle School in Orlando during NASA’s Project Management PM Challenge 2012. The demonstrations are designed to increase student interest and pursuit of the science, technology, engineering and mathematics STEM fields integral to producing the next generation of scientists and engineers. PM Challenge 2012 was held at the Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., on Feb. 22-23, to provide a forum for all stakeholders in the project management community to meet and share stories, lessons learned and new uses of technology in the industry. The PM Challenge is sponsored by NASA's Office of the Chief Engineer. For additional information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/pmchallenge/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  9. The improvement and the effect of IERS conventions (2003)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Na; Shi, Chuang; Li, Min; Rong, Zou

    2008-12-01

    The new generation of space datum in China should comply with the latest IERS (International Earth Rotation and Reference System Service) convention as much as possible. This paper has deeply addressed and researched the main improvements of the current version IERS Conventions (2003), including the changes of the Terrestrial Reference System, the Celestial Reference System, and the transformation between them, the tide correction and so on, which would undoubtedly benefit the realization and maintenance of our space datum. Based on PANDA (Position And Navigation Data Analyst) software developed by GNSS Center of Wuhan University, we analyzed the effect of improvements of the IERS Conventions (2003) on precise orbit determination and precise positioning. The results show that the effect of improvements of models of the coordinate transformation between the celestial and the terrestrial reference system and tide correction (including solid earth tide, ocean tide and polar tide) on precise orbit determination are 4mm, 9mm and 5mm in terms of RMS in along, cross and radial direction of the track; and the effect of the improvement of the tide models on positioning is basically under 0.6mm, and the RMS of the differences are 0.3mm, 0.3mm and 0.2mm in X, Y and Z.

  10. The Watergate Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  11. The Watergate Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  12. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  13. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum

    DOE PAGES

    Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-07

    High-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate has been attributed to various exotic mechanisms, and new experiments indicate that it may be conventional, with broader implications.

  14. 7 CFR 58.316 - Conventional churns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....316 Conventional churns. Churns shall be constructed of aluminum, stainless steel or equally corrosion resistant metal, free from cracks, and in good repair. All gasket material shall be fat resistant,...

  15. Nanoporous films: From conventional to the conformal

    DOE PAGES

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie

    2015-12-14

    Here, thin and continuous films of porous metal-organic frameworks can now be conformally deposited on various substrates using a vapor-phase synthesis approach that departs from conventional solution-based routes.

  16. The conventions for the polarization angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serego Alighieri, Sperello di

    2017-02-01

    Since more than a century astronomers measure the position angle of the major axis of the polarization ellipse starting from the North direction and increasing counter-clockwise, when looking at the source. This convention has been enforced by the IAU with a Resolution in 1973. Much later the WMAP satellite, which has observed the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, has unfortunately adopted the opposite convention: the polarization position angle is measured starting from the South and increasing clockwise, when looking at the source. This opposite convention has been followed by most cosmic microwave background polarization experiments and is causing obvious problems and misunderstandings. The attempts and prospects to enforce the official IAU convention are described.

  17. The conventions for the polarization angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Serego Alighieri, Sperello

    2017-02-01

    Since more than a century astronomers measure the position angle of the major axis of the polarization ellipse starting from the North direction and increasing counter-clockwise, when looking at the source. This convention has been enforced by the IAU with a Resolution in 1973. Much later the WMAP satellite, which has observed the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, has unfortunately adopted the opposite convention: the polarization position angle is measured starting from the South and increasing clockwise, when looking at the source. This opposite convention has been followed by most cosmic microwave background polarization experiments and is causing obvious problems and misunderstandings. The attempts and prospects to enforce the official IAU convention are described.

  18. 7 CFR 58.316 - Conventional churns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....316 Conventional churns. Churns shall be constructed of aluminum, stainless steel or equally corrosion resistant metal, free from cracks, and in good repair. All gasket material shall be fat resistant, nontoxic...

  19. 7 CFR 58.316 - Conventional churns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....316 Conventional churns. Churns shall be constructed of aluminum, stainless steel or equally corrosion resistant metal, free from cracks, and in good repair. All gasket material shall be fat resistant, nontoxic...

  20. High-temperature superconductivity: A conventional conundrum

    SciTech Connect

    Božović, Ivan

    2016-01-07

    High-temperature superconductivity in ultrathin films of iron selenide deposited on strontium titanate has been attributed to various exotic mechanisms, and new experiments indicate that it may be conventional, with broader implications.

  1. Children's sensitivity to the conventionality of sources.

    PubMed

    Diesendruck, Gil; Carmel, Nurit; Markson, Lori

    2010-01-01

    Four studies examined preschoolers' sensitivity to agents' knowledge of conventional forms. Three- to 4-year-olds heard a speaker apply either conventional or wrong labels to familiar objects (Studies 1 and 2, N = 57) or peculiar but correct labels (Study 3, N = 19). When then asked by the speaker for the referent of a novel label, children exposed to an accurate labeler were more likely to choose an unfamiliar object than children exposed to an inaccurate labeler. Study 4 (N = 36) replicated these findings using object functions instead of labels. Children hold an assumption of conventionality with regard to both object labels and functions, but they are selective in their application of this assumption toward agents who are knowledgeable of conventions in these domains.

  2. The Symmetry and Packing Fraction of the Body Centered Tetragonal Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that for different ratios of lattice parameters, "c/a," the body centered tetragonal structure may be view as body centered tetragonal, body centered cubic, face centered cubic or hexagonal. This illustrates that the apparent symmetry of a lattice depends on the choice of the conventional unit cell.

  3. Reflexive convention: civil partnership, marriage and family.

    PubMed

    Heaphy, Brian

    2017-09-14

    Drawing on an analysis of qualitative interview data from a study of formalized same-sex relationships (civil partnerships) this paper examines the enduring significance of marriage and family as social institutions. In doing so, it intervenes in current debates in the sociology of family and personal life about how such institutions are undermined by reflexivity or bolstered by convention. Against the backdrop of dominating sociological frames for understanding the links between the changing nature of marriage and family and same-sex relationship recognition, the paper analyses the diverse and overlapping ways (including the simple, relational, strategic, ambivalent and critical ways) in which same-sex partners reflexively constructed and engaged with marriage and family conventions. My analysis suggests that instead of viewing reflexivity and convention as mutually undermining, as some sociologists of family and personal life do, it is insightful to explore how diverse forms of reflexivity and convention interact in everyday life to reconfigure the social institutions of marriage and family, but do not undermine them as such. I argue the case for recognizing the ways in which 'reflexive convention', or reflexive investment in convention, contributes to the continuing significance of marriage and family as social institutions. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  4. The evolution of NATO's conventional force posture

    SciTech Connect

    Duffield, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation has three objectives. The first is to describe the evolution of NATO's conventional force posture in greater detail than has previously been possible by drawing upon recently declassified government documents. The author's focus is on changes that have occurred in the role of conventional forces in NATO strategy as well as in the structure and actual capabilities of NATO's conventional forces. He examines five episodes in NATO history during which significant change in the alliance's conventional forces was seriously contemplated, attempted, or actually took place. The second objective is to explain this history. To this end, he examines several leading theories of international relations: balance of power and balance of threat, public goods, and regimes. By comparing the predictions of these theories with the historical record, he was able to identify the factors most important in shaping NATO's conventional force posture over the years. Since these factors are likely to continue to be important, this analysis allows assessing prospects for future change, the third objective. This study suggests that NATO's conventional force posture has become increasingly static over the years.

  5. Dryden Flight Research Center: Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a general overview of Dryden Flight Research Center. Strategic partnerships, Dryden's mission activity, exploration systems and aeronautics research programs are also described.

  6. Student Success Center Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  7. Conceptualizing the Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Gary T.

    The learning center is an integrated, fully-coordinated facility, combining a number of traditional library, media development, and personalized learning functions. Conceptualizing the learning center is facilitated through a description of the premises for such a center, the components, and guidelines for developing a learning center. De Anza…

  8. Conventions and workflows for using Situs

    SciTech Connect

    Wriggers, Willy

    2012-04-01

    Recent developments of the Situs software suite for multi-scale modeling are reviewed. Typical workflows and conventions encountered during processing of biophysical data from electron microscopy, tomography or small-angle X-ray scattering are described. Situs is a modular program package for the multi-scale modeling of atomic resolution structures and low-resolution biophysical data from electron microscopy, tomography or small-angle X-ray scattering. This article provides an overview of recent developments in the Situs package, with an emphasis on workflows and conventions that are important for practical applications. The modular design of the programs facilitates scripting in the bash shell that allows specific programs to be combined in creative ways that go beyond the original intent of the developers. Several scripting-enabled functionalities, such as flexible transformations of data type, the use of symmetry constraints or the creation of two-dimensional projection images, are described. The processing of low-resolution biophysical maps in such workflows follows not only first principles but often relies on implicit conventions. Situs conventions related to map formats, resolution, correlation functions and feature detection are reviewed and summarized. The compatibility of the Situs workflow with CCP4 conventions and programs is discussed.

  9. NASA and Industry Partners Co-sponsor 2015 Unmanned Aircraft Systems Traffic Management (UTM) Convention

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-07

    With issues about drones becoming front page news, NASA recently co-sponsored the 2015 Unmanned Aerial Systems Traffic Management Convention. Held at NASA’s Ames Research Center, the event brought together representatives from the public, from industry, academia, government and the international community to shape the future of low-altitude air traffic management.

  10. Teacher Education Centers: The CMTEC Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sentz, Erma I.; Perry, Floyd

    Central Minnesota Teacher Education Council (CMTEC) Centers are public school districts under contract with CMTEC who designate "cluster buildings" that serve a minimum of 10 student teachers per quarter each. In all CMTEC Centers, emphasis is placed on providing opportunities for student teachers to teach under guidance in both major and minor…

  11. From Teacher Centered to Student Centered Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockemy, M. J.; Summers, Sylvia

    In 1991, staff at the Business Resource Center (BRC) at Tacoma Community College, in Washington, began to reevaluate their approach to serving students. Up to that point, the BRC had been teacher centered, with staff operating under the assumptions that only the students who succeeded were actually "college material," that students would cheat if…

  12. Conventional machining of ESR 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niji, K. K.

    1980-07-01

    This program involved the study of conventional machining of heat treated ESR 4340 steel (Rc 54-57). Initial effort involved a survey of available data regarding the machining of high strength steels with hardnesses of Rc 50 and above. A machining program was conducted, determining optimum tools and conditions for turning, drilling, face milling, end milling, and grinding operations. Effects of various parameters includng cutting speeds, feeds, depths of cut, and cutting fluids on tool life was determined. All the operations were found to be extremely difficult and applicaton of conventional procedures is not feasible. Tool lives remained short despite reductions in speeds and feeds. Conventional grinding methods induced detrimental residual tensile stresses along the surface, resulting in cracking, lapping, and untempered martensitic structures. Low stress grinding techniques were found to be applicable to this material when proper dressing procedures and reduced rates were used.

  13. The collapse of the conventional career.

    PubMed

    Mangan, P

    The Collapse of the Conventional Career was commissioned by the ENB as 'the first in a number of discussion papers in which important issues were to be explored so that the professional could debate them fully' (Jean Hooper, chairwoman of the ENB, in her foreword). The author Celia Davis' premise was that, conventionally, a career was seen as comprising full-time work carried out without a break in service. Because many female nurses could not fulfil this expectation they were disadvantaged in a number of ways. In order to address the problems faced in practice by those who would not be able, for various reasons, to undertake a conventional career, Professor Davis looked at what changes in thinking and policy would be required.

  14. Knee bone tumors: findings on conventional radiology*

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Neto, Francisco; Teixeira, Manuel Joaquim Diógenes; Araújo, Leonardo Heráclio do Carmo; Ponte, Carlos Eduardo Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    The knee is a common site for bone tumors, whether clinically painful or not. Conventional radiology has been established as the first line of investigation in patients with knee pain and can reveal lesions that often generate questions not only for the generalist physician but also for the radiologist or general orthopedist. History, image examination, and histopathological analysis compose the essential tripod of the diagnosis of bone tumors, and conventional radiology is an essential diagnostic tool in patients with knee pain. This pictorial essay proposes to depict the main conventional radiography findings of the most common bone tumors around the knee, including benign and malignant tumors, as well as pseudo-tumors. PMID:27403019

  15. Immunocompetence of fattening pigs fed organic versus conventional diets in organic versus conventional housing.

    PubMed

    Millet, S; Cox, E; Buyse, J; Goddeeris, B M; Janssens, G P J

    2005-03-01

    The effect of organic or conventional feeding on the immune response of pigs was determined using organic or conventional housing in a pig fattening unit. The experimental design involved four pens of four animals per housing and diet combination (organic housing and organic nutrition; organic housing and conventional nutrition; conventional housing and organic nutrition and conventional housing and conventional nutrition). The IgM, IgA and IgG responses against intramuscularly injected bovine thyroglobulin were determined as indicators of the antigen-specific immune responsiveness. Some general health and welfare related parameters were evaluated by measuring haptoglobin concentrations at selected times; blood lactate concentration was measured at slaughter. Conventional housing led to a higher IgG response three weeks after the first immunisation. Organic housing led to lower haptoglobin and lactate concentrations at slaughter, indicating a higher stress resistance in these pigs. No major differences between the two feeding types were found. We conclude that the immune responses following either a conventional or an organic diet are comparable, whereas organic housing can increase stress resistance at slaughter compared to conventional housing.

  16. Advanced concepts in joining by conventional processes

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.R.; Fasching-James, A.A.; Onsoien, M.I.; Allen, J.W.

    1994-12-31

    Innovations which can be made to conventional arc welding processes so that advanced materials can be more efficiently joined are considered. Three examples are discussed: (1) GTA welding of iron aluminides, (2) GMA welding of advanced steels, and (3) SMA welding of structural steels. Advanced materials present new challenges for the materials joining specialist. The three examples discussed in this paper demonstrate, however, that modest but creative alterations of conventional GTAW, GMAW, or SMAW processes can provide new and better controls for solving advanced materials joining problems.

  17. 1985 CSEG/CGU National Convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirce, John W.; Millington, Graham

    The Canadian Society of Exploration Geophysicists (CSEG) and the Canadian Geophysical Union (CGU) held their first joint national meeting in Calgary, Canada, May 7-10, 1985. As the CSEG represents primarily the oil exploration side of geophysics and the CGU represents mainly the academic side, both groups felt that a joint convention would broaden their perspectives. Some 1750 delegates and over 100 students registered for the meeting. The Convention Committee was chaired by Ian Baker (Atlantis Resources Ltd.), and CGU was represented by Peter Savage (Pan Canadian Petroleum Ltd.). The Technical Committee was chaired by John Peirce (Petro-Canada Inc.) for CGU and Graham Millington (Canadian Superior Oil Ltd.) for CSEG

  18. Investigation of Surfaces after Non Conventional Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micietova, Anna; Neslusan, Miroslav; Cillikova, Maria

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with analysis of surface integrity of steel after electro discharge machining (EDM), water jet machining, (WJM) laser beam machining (LBM) and plasma beam machining (PBM). The paper discusses surface integrity expressed in surface roughness, sample precision expressed in perpendicularity deviation as well as stress state. This study also demonstrates influence of the various non-conventional methods on structure transformations and reports about sensitivity of the different non-conventional methods of machining with regard to variable thickness of machined samples.

  19. KSC-2012-1560

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. – Education project specialist Josh Santora, left, from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, engages a student from Meadow Woods Middle School in Orlando in a physics demonstration during NASA’s Project Management PM Challenge 2012. The demonstrations are designed to increase student interest and pursuit of the science, technology, engineering and mathematics STEM fields integral to producing the next generation of scientists and engineers. PM Challenge 2012 was held at the Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., on Feb. 22-23, to provide a forum for all stakeholders in the project management community to meet and share stories, lessons learned and new uses of technology in the industry. The PM Challenge is sponsored by NASA's Office of the Chief Engineer. For additional information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/pmchallenge/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  20. KSC-2012-1557

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- A representative from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida speaks with a young visitor attending the NBA All-Star Jam Session at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. The NASA exhibit offers hands-on educational activities highlighting some of the contributions the space agency has made to sports, transportation and everyday life. One of the events leading up to the NBA All-Star game being held in Orlando on Feb. 26, the NBA All-Star Jam Session is a basketball experience intended for all ages, allowing fans to compete against their friends in skills challenges and collect autographs from players and legends. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

  1. KSC-2012-1558

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- A representative from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida speaks with a young visitor attending the NBA All-Star Jam Session at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. The NASA exhibit offers hands-on educational activities highlighting some of the contributions the space agency has made to sports, transportation and everyday life. One of the events leading up to the NBA All-Star game being held in Orlando on Feb. 26, the NBA All-Star Jam Session is a basketball experience intended for all ages, allowing fans to compete against their friends in skills challenges and collect autographs from players and legends. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

  2. KSC-2012-1555

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Visitors to the NBA All-Star Jam Session at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., use a large touch-screen to learn more about NASA's activities and missions. Representatives from Kennedy Space Center in Florida helped attendees participate in hands-on educational activities to learn more about how science plays into sports. One of the events leading up to the NBA All-Star game being held in Orlando on Feb. 26, the NBA All-Star Jam Session is a basketball experience intended for all ages, allowing fans to compete against their friends in skills challenges and collect autographs from players and legends. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin

  3. KSC-2012-1564

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. – Students from Meadow Woods Middle School in Orlando take part in a hands-on activity during NASA’s Project Management PM Challenge 2012. Education specialists from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center supported the annual PM Challenge with demonstrations designed to illustrate various principles of physics. The demonstrations are designed to increase student interest and pursuit of the science, technology, engineering and mathematics STEM fields integral to producing the next generation of scientists and engineers. PM Challenge 2012 was held at the Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., on Feb. 22-23, to provide a forum for all stakeholders in the project management community to meet and share stories, lessons learned and new uses of technology in the industry. The PM Challenge is sponsored by NASA's Office of the Chief Engineer. For additional information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/pmchallenge/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  4. KSC-2012-1563

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. – Education specialist Jim Gerard, in the red shirt, from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, prepares a physics demonstration for students from Meadow Woods Middle School in Orlando during NASA’s Project Management PM Challenge 2012. The demonstrations are designed to increase student interest and pursuit of the science, technology, engineering and mathematics STEM fields integral to producing the next generation of scientists and engineers. PM Challenge 2012 was held at the Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., on Feb. 22-23, to provide a forum for all stakeholders in the project management community to meet and share stories, lessons learned and new uses of technology in the industry. The PM Challenge is sponsored by NASA's Office of the Chief Engineer. For additional information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/pmchallenge/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  5. Robotic versus conventional laparoscopic colorectal operations: a-single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Mehmet Abdussamet; Kocataş, Ali; Gemici, Eyüp; Kalaycı, Mustafa Uygar; Alış, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Robotic surgery was first introduced in 2000 especially to overcome the limitations of low rectum cancer surgery. There is still no consensus regarding the standard method for colorectal surgery. The aim of this study was to compare robotic surgery with laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Material and Methods: This is a retrospective study. Data of patients with a diagnosis of colon or rectal cancer were analyzed for robotic colorectal surgery and laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Results: The cost of robotic surgery group was statistically higher than the laparoscopic surgery group (p=0.032). The average operation duration was 178 minutes in the laparoscopic surgery group and 228 minutes in the robotic surgery group, and this difference was statistically significant (p=0.044). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups regarding other parameters. Discussion: Disadvantages of robotic surgery seem to be its higher cost and longer operation duration as compared to laparoscopic surgery. We claim that an increase in the number of cases and experience may shorten the operation time while the increase in commercial interest may decrease the cost disadvantage of robotic surgery. PMID:27436931

  6. Alternate biomass harvesting systems using conventional equipment

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; William F. Watson; I. Winston Savelle

    1985-01-01

    Three harvesting methods were field tested in two stand types. Costs and stand utilization rates were developed for a conventional harvesting system, without energy wood recovery; a two-pass roundwood and energy wood system; and a one-pass system that harvests roundwood and energy wood. The systems harvested 20-acre test blocks in two pine pulpwood plantations and in a...

  7. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-12-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F&ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F&ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I&C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Storying Selves in Conventional and Creative Resumes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harter, Lynn M.; Quinlan, Margaret M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an activity in which students use narrative theory as a conceptual canvas for understanding resumes as autobiographical performances shaped by social and material forces. By asking students to story their lives in both conventional and creative resumes, this assignment invites students to produce autobiographical discourse…

  10. ACTE Annual Convention Revs up Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers (J1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights the annual Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) Convention held at Charlotte, North Carolina. It was the first time that the premiere professional development event for career and technical educators had come to Charlotte and the city did not disappoint. In fact, Charlotte proved to be the perfect place for…

  11. Encouraging Students to Attend the National Convention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiorentino, Leah Holland; Manson, Mara; Whalen, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    Two years ago, the faculty from Adelphi University's Department of Health Studies, Physical Education, and Human Performance Science were discussing ways to increase graduate student involvement in AAHPERD. The first conference course was organized in conjunction with the AAHPERD National Convention & Exposition in New Orleans. To ensure…

  12. Young Adult Realism: Conventions, Narrators, and Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Catherine Sheldrick

    1985-01-01

    Examination of a subset of books popular with young adults--problem novels or young adult realism--is based on deductions concerning nature of reading response that text invites. Young adult realism as formula of popular culture, changes in conventions, narrators and narratees, and identification and distance are discussed. (34 references) (EJS)

  13. Teaching the Conventions of Academic Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thonney, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on disciplinary discourses, it's not surprising that so little recent attention has been devoted to identifying conventions that are universal in academic discourse. In this essay, the author argues that there are shared features that unite academic writing, and that by introducing these features to first-year students…

  14. Children's Impressions of Moral and Conventional Transgressors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Judith G.

    1985-01-01

    Two studies examined children's inferences of personality for actors engaging in different domains of behavior. In both studies, first, fourth, and seventh graders were given two descriptions of actors engaging in either moral or conventional transgressions. Findings indicated that children's concepts of persons were inferred from information…

  15. Distance Education at Conventional Universities in Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kappel, Hans-Henning; Lehmann, Burkhard; Loeper, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    Reviews developments in German distance education from the Fernuniversitat in the 1970s to the hybridized (face-to-face and distance education) programs at conventional universities. Discusses the work of the German Association for Distance Education and two dual-mode programs: the master of arts degree at the University of Koblenz-Landau and the…

  16. Conventions and workflows for using Situs

    PubMed Central

    Wriggers, Willy

    2012-01-01

    Situs is a modular program package for the multi-scale modeling of atomic resolution structures and low-resolution biophysical data from electron microscopy, tomography or small-angle X-ray scattering. This article provides an overview of recent developments in the Situs package, with an emphasis on workflows and conventions that are important for practical applications. The modular design of the programs facilitates scripting in the bash shell that allows specific programs to be combined in creative ways that go beyond the original intent of the developers. Several scripting-enabled functionalities, such as flexible transformations of data type, the use of symmetry constraints or the creation of two-dimensional projection images, are described. The processing of low-resolution biophysical maps in such workflows follows not only first principles but often relies on implicit conventions. Situs conventions related to map formats, resolution, correlation functions and feature detection are reviewed and summarized. The compatibility of the Situs workflow with CCP4 conventions and programs is discussed. PMID:22505255

  17. Teaching the Conventions of Academic Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thonney, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on disciplinary discourses, it's not surprising that so little recent attention has been devoted to identifying conventions that are universal in academic discourse. In this essay, the author argues that there are shared features that unite academic writing, and that by introducing these features to first-year students…

  18. Evolution, and the Conflict Between Conventional Wisdoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Discusses the conflict between evolution and the "conventional wisdom of Christianity and the problems faced by the biology teacher in teaching evolution in certain communities. The practical consequences of both evolution and Christianity are compared and contrasted. Science teachers are urged to present the concepts of evolution honestly and…

  19. Individual budgets for care versus conventional services.

    PubMed

    2012-08-31

    Cash-for-care schemes, in which older and disabled people are offered cash payments in place of conventional social services, are becoming increasingly common. This study explores the experiences of older people taking part in a pilot of such a scheme. Quantitative data from 263 structured interviews were gathered, as well as qualitative data from 40 semi-structured interviews.

  20. The Conventional and Unconventional about Disability Conventions: A Reflective Analysis of United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umeasiegbu, Veronica I.; Bishop, Malachy; Mpofu, Elias

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in relation to prior United Nations conventions on disability and U.S. disability policy law with a view to identifying the conventional and also the incremental advances of the CRPD. Previous United Nations conventions related to…

  1. The Conventional and Unconventional about Disability Conventions: A Reflective Analysis of United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umeasiegbu, Veronica I.; Bishop, Malachy; Mpofu, Elias

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in relation to prior United Nations conventions on disability and U.S. disability policy law with a view to identifying the conventional and also the incremental advances of the CRPD. Previous United Nations conventions related to…

  2. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. 429.23 Section 429.23 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION CERTIFICATION, COMPLIANCE... represented value of estimated annual operating cost, energy consumption or other measure of energy...

  3. Slogans and Standard Bearers--The National Party Conventions [And] The Democratic and Republican Conventions, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Jean; And Others

    This unit is designed to help secondary social studies students learn about national political party conventions. It is arranged into 15 class sessions and contains two case studies. Each class session explores a political subject related to national conventions, such as the American party system, the primary process, elections, selection of…

  4. Conventional Expressions as a Pragmalinguistic Resource: Recognition and Production of Conventional Expressions in L2 Pragmatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardovi-Harlig, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the source of second language (L2) learners' low use of conventional expressions--one part of pragmalinguistic competence--by investigating the relationship between recognition and production of conventional expressions in L2 pragmatics. Two tasks--an aural recognition task and an oral production task--were completed by 122…

  5. Implications of Minimizing Trauma During Conventional Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Matthew L.; Driscoll, Colin L. W.; Gifford, René H.; Service, Geoffrey J.; Tombers, Nicole M.; Hughes-Borst, Becky J.; Neff, Brian A.; Beatty, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the relationship between implantation-associated trauma and postoperative speech perception scores among adult and pediatric patients undergoing cochlear implantation using conventional length electrodes and minimally traumatic surgical techniques. Study Design Retrospective chart review (2002–2010). Setting Tertiary academic referral center. Patients All subjects with significant preoperative low-frequency hearing (≤70 dB HL at 250 Hz) who underwent cochlear implantation with a newer generation implant electrode (Nucleus Contour Advance, Advanced Bionics HR90K [1J and Helix], and Med El Sonata standard H array) were reviewed. Intervention(s) Preimplant and postimplant audiometric thresholds and speech recognition scores were recorded using the electronic medical record. Main Outcome Measure(s) Postimplantation pure tone threshold shifts were used as a surrogate measure for extent of intracochlear injury and correlated with postoperative speech perception scores. Results Between 2002 and 2010, 703 cochlear implant (CI) operations were performed. Data from 126 implants were included in the analysis. The mean preoperative low-frequency pure-tone average was 55.4 dB HL. Hearing preservation was observed in 55% of patients. Patients with hearing preservation were found to have significantly higher postoperative speech perception performance in the cochlear implantation-only condition than those who lost all residual hearing. Conclusion Conservation of acoustic hearing after conventional length cochlear implantation is unpredictable but remains a realistic goal. The combination of improved technology and refined surgical technique may allow for conservation of some residual hearing in more than 50% of patients. Germane to the conventional length CI recipient with substantial hearing loss, minimizing trauma allows for improved speech perception in the electric condition. These findings support the use of minimally traumatic techniques in all CI

  6. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  7. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  8. Evaluating Teacher Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman, Sharon

    1977-01-01

    Considers what teacher centers actually are, what they do, what they are supposed to do, and how they are formed. Discusses three types of centers, their organizational structure and function, and the theory underlying them. (Editor/RK)

  9. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  10. Nonschool Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Doris B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a privately financed science center, museum and planetarium - observatory in Twin Falls, Idaho. Centers three hour program includes a lecture on archaeology, time to look at displays, a lunch break, and a planetarium lecture. (RB)

  11. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  12. Nonschool Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Doris B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a privately financed science center, museum and planetarium - observatory in Twin Falls, Idaho. Centers three hour program includes a lecture on archaeology, time to look at displays, a lunch break, and a planetarium lecture. (RB)

  13. BKG Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  14. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  15. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  16. The Comprehensive Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Gary T.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study of community college learning resource centers as they exist today and examines some emerging functions which point toward the role of the center in the future. (DC)

  17. KSC-2012-1548

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Representatives from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, located in Virginia, provide information on their center’s programs and projects to participants in NASA’s Project Management Challenge 2012. PM Challenge 2012 was held at the Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., on February 22-23, to provide a forum for all stakeholders in the project management community to meet and share stories, lessons learned and new uses of technology in the industry. The PM Challenge is sponsored by NASA's Office of the Chief Engineer. For additional information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/pmchallenge/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  18. KSC-2012-1549

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-23

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- NASA representatives provide information on the agency’s Technical Standards Program to participants in NASA’s Project Management Challenge 2012. PM Challenge 2012 was held at the Caribe Royale Hotel and Convention Center in Orlando, Fla., on February 22-23, to provide a forum for all stakeholders in the project management community to meet and share stories, lessons learned and new uses of technology in the industry. The PM Challenge is sponsored by NASA's Office of the Chief Engineer. For additional information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/pmchallenge/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann

  19. KSC-2010-4569

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-05

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Attendees of the 2010 Tom Joyner Family Reunion use astronaut gloves to perform a task at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. To encourage student attendees to focus on pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), NASA featured some of its greatest legends and trailblazers during a panel discussion at the reunion event. NASA's Education Office sponsored the panel discussion and educational activities as part of the agency's "Summer of Innovation" initiative and the federal "Educate to Innovate" campaign. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller

  20. KSC-2010-4570

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-05

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Attendees of the 2010 Tom Joyner Family Reunion talk with NASA astronaut Mike Foreman at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. To encourage student attendees to focus on pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), NASA featured some of its greatest legends and trailblazers during a panel discussion at the reunion event. NASA's Education Office sponsored the panel discussion and educational activities as part of the agency's "Summer of Innovation" initiative and the federal "Educate to Innovate" campaign. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller

  1. KSC-2010-4578

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-05

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- During the 2010 Tom Joyner Family Reunion, space activist and actress Nichelle Nichols talks to attendees at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. To encourage student attendees to focus on pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), NASA featured some of its greatest legends and trailblazers during a panel discussion at the reunion event. Other panel members included NASA astronaut Leland Melvin, Christine Darden, Lew Braxton, Robyn Gordon and Jim Jennings. NASA's Education Office sponsored the panel discussion and educational activities as part of the agency's "Summer of Innovation" initiative and the federal "Educate to Innovate" campaign. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller

  2. KSC-2010-4573

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-05

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Attendees of the 2010 Tom Joyner Family Reunion stand in line to receive an autograph from NASA astronauts Mike Foreman, left, and Leland Melvin at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. To encourage student attendees to focus on pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), NASA featured some of its greatest legends and trailblazers during a panel discussion at the reunion event. Foreman and Melvin are both veterans of two space shuttle missions. NASA's Education Office sponsored the panel discussion and educational activities as part of the agency's "Summer of Innovation" initiative and the federal "Educate to Innovate" campaign. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller

  3. KSC-2010-4574

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-05

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Attendees of the 2010 Tom Joyner Family Reunion were photographed and then their faces were put into a NASA "Legends and Trailblazers" poster at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. To encourage student attendees to focus on pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), NASA featured some of its greatest legends and trailblazers during a panel discussion at the reunion event. NASA's Education Office sponsored the panel discussion and educational activities as part of the agency's "Summer of Innovation" initiative and the federal "Educate to Innovate" campaign. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller

  4. KSC-2010-4568

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-05

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Attendees of the 2010 Tom Joyner Family Reunion stand in line to receive an autograph from NASA astronaut Leland Melvin at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. To encourage student attendees to focus on pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), NASA featured some of its greatest legends and trailblazers during a panel discussion at the reunion event. NASA's Education Office sponsored the panel discussion and educational activities as part of the agency's "Summer of Innovation" initiative and the federal "Educate to Innovate" campaign. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller

  5. KSC-2010-4577

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-05

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- During the 2010 Tom Joyner Family Reunion, NASA astronaut Leland Melvin talks to attendees at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. To encourage student attendees to focus on pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), NASA featured some of its greatest legends and trailblazers during a panel discussion at the reunion event. Panel members, sitting from left, are Christine Darden, Lew Braxton, Robyn Gordon, Jim Jennings, and space activist and actress Nichelle Nichols. NASA's Education Office sponsored the panel discussion and educational activities as part of the agency's "Summer of Innovation" initiative and the federal "Educate to Innovate" campaign. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller

  6. KSC-2010-4571

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-05

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Attendees of the 2010 Tom Joyner Family Reunion learn about packing food for space from NASA education specialist Chris Hartenstine at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. To encourage student attendees to focus on pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), NASA featured some of its greatest legends and trailblazers during a panel discussion at the reunion event. NASA's Education Office sponsored the panel discussion and educational activities as part of the agency's "Summer of Innovation" initiative and the federal "Educate to Innovate" campaign. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller

  7. KSC-2010-4576

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-05

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- During the 2010 Tom Joyner Family Reunion, Jim Jennings talks to attendees at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Fla. To encourage student attendees to focus on pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), NASA featured some of its greatest legends and trailblazers during a panel discussion at the reunion event. Other panel members included NASA astronaut Leland Melvin, Christine Darden, Lew Braxton, Robyn Gordon, Jim Jennings, and space activist and actress Nichelle Nichols. NASA's Education Office sponsored the panel discussion and educational activities as part of the agency's "Summer of Innovation" initiative and the federal "Educate to Innovate" campaign. Photo credit: NASA/Amanda Diller

  8. Conventional forces and arms control: Technology and strategy in a changing world

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, J.F.; White, P.C.

    1990-06-01

    To address the implications of changes for future roles of conventional forces and to assess the technology implications of future strategies, force requirements, and conventional arms control agreements, the Center for National Security Studies in cooperation with the Defense Research and Applications Directorate of the Los Alamos National Laboratory held a conference on Conventional Forces and Arms Control: Technology and Strategy in a Changing World'' at Los Alamos from September 25--27, 1989. The distinguished participants from government, industry, and academia in the United States and Western Europe addressed such issues as: What are the implications of geopolitical and technological trends for international security and stability How will these global changes affect US and allied strategies and force structure, especially the requirements for conventional, nonnuclear forces What will be the role of and rationale for conventional forces in the context of current and prospective allied security requirements How can the West assure it will have the forces necessary for its security How will technological developments influence the structure of tomorrow's conventional forces What impacts will arms reductions have on future systems and force structures What are the prospects for the development and deployment in weapon systems of future conventional military technologies, in light of existing and potential political, economic, bureaucratic, and other impediments

  9. The Adult Literacy League and the Center for Adult Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooks, William Michael; Nelson, Floride

    Since its foundation in 1968, the Adult Literacy League of Orlando, Florida, has dedicated itself to eradicating the educational handicaps of more than 2,575 local residents. The League, which in 1975 became part of the Open Campus of Valencia Community College (VCC), offers two courses: (1) a Literacy Tutor Training Workshop, a 10-hour program to…

  10. Language Resource Centers Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Language Resource Centers (LRC) program provides grants to institutions of higher education to establish, strengthen, and operate resource centers that serve to improve the nation's capacity to teach and learn foreign languages. Eligible applicants are institutions of higher education. Duration of the grant is four years. Center activities…

  11. Equality of Fitness Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swoyer, Jesse O.

    2008-01-01

    The author, who has been a personal trainer for the past ten years, recently realized that all fitness centers are not equal. In February, he was able to participate in the grand opening of the Center for Independent Living of Central PA (CILCP), a fitness center that is designed to accommodate persons with disabilities living in the Central…

  12. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  13. Center Director's Update

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-01

    In the Space Shuttle Atlantis exhibit facility at the Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex, guests get a close-up look at a plant growth experiment similar to one aboard the International Space Station. This followed a presentation by center director Bob Cabana who updated community leaders on current and future activities at the space center.

  14. Probing the Effectiveness of the Conventional Introductory Science Lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, T. F.; Prather, E. E.

    2003-12-01

    For quite some time now, the repeated call for a more student-centered approach to teaching due to the ineffectiveness of lecture has been gaining prominence in the earth and space science teaching community. However, our extensive review of the literature suggests that this claim of ineffectiveness of lecture has not been validated in the context of the conventional introductory science course for non-science majors. At the beginning of a large-enrollment introductory astronomy survey course, we administered 68-multiple choice items as a pretest to 81 students. At the end of each lecture we administered the specific items related to that particular day's lecture a second time as a posttest. The average score on the 68 items administered as a pretest was 30 percent correct and the posttest average score was 52 percent correct. Although this does represent a statistically significant gain in scores, we judge this level of success to be insufficient for long term learning achievement. These results illustrate that instructor-centered strategies are largely ineffective at promoting meaningful conceptual gains on traditional earth and space topics presented to non-science majors. This work was supported by NSF CCLI #9952232 and NSF Geosciences Education #9907755.

  15. Compliance with the Climate Change Convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil Adger, W.

    Compliance with the Climate Change Convention is a necessary step to avoid the impacts of accelerated climate change through the enhanced greenhouse effect. The political and economic factors influencing compliance are numerous. Two are focused on here. Firstly, the process by which international agreements are translated to action through becoming national programmes is important. For the U.K. and other EU members, compliance is inextricably linked to its responsibilities within the European Union. Secondly, joint implementation of the Convention through bilateral offsets is discussed. Emissions related to biological sources such as from forestry, agriculture and land use, the scientific uncertainty in their measurement, and the skewed distribution of their sources to developing countries, ensure that joint implementation which entails offsets of these emissions through sink enhancement is unlikely to be a major part of global strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, due to transactions costs and to disputes over equity in resource use.

  16. "Conventional" CT images from spectral measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajbhandary, Paurakh L.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    Spectral imaging systems need to be able to produce "conventional" images, and it's been shown that systems with energy discriminating detectors can achieve higher CNR than conventional systems by optimal weighting. Combining measured data in energy bins (EBs) and also combining basis material images have previously been proposed, but there are no studies systematically comparing the two methods. In this paper, we analytically evaluate the two methods for systems with ideal photon counting detectors using CNR and beam hardening (BH) artifact as metrics. For a 120-kVp polychromatic simulations of a water phantom with low contrast inserts, the difference of the optimal CNR between the two methods for the studied phantom is within 2%. For a polychromatic spectrum, beam-hardening artifacts are noticeable in EB weighted images (BH artifact of 3.8% for 8 EB and 6.9% for 2 EB), while weighted basis material images are free of such artifacts.

  17. Non-conventional mesons at PANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacosa, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Non-conventional mesons, such as glueballs and tetraquarks, will be in the focus of the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. In this lecture we recall the basic properties of QCD and describe some features of unconventional states. We focus on the search of the not-yet discovered glueballs and the use of the extended Linear Sigma Model for this purpose, and on the already discovered but not-yet understood X, Y, Z states.

  18. The Outlook for Conventional Petroleum Resources,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    conventional petroleum accumulations of the world are geologically limited. Petroleum is a replenishable resource only in terms of the geologic time-scale...the thirty most signifi- cant provinces lies south of the equator. Central Sumatra straddles it. The Niger Delta, the Maracaibo Basin , and the Eastern...Venezuela Basin are between 00 and 100 N latitude. Twenty-three of the thirty are between 200 and 60 N latitude. The great variation in the

  19. A call center primer.

    PubMed

    Durr, W

    1998-01-01

    Call centers are strategically and tactically important to many industries, including the healthcare industry. Call centers play a key role in acquiring and retaining customers. The ability to deliver high-quality and timely customer service without much expense is the basis for the proliferation and expansion of call centers. Call centers are unique blends of people and technology, where performance indicates combining appropriate technology tools with sound management practices built on key operational data. While the technology is fascinating, the people working in call centers and the skill of the management team ultimately make a difference to their companies.

  20. Merging conventional and laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, Benno; Dornmair, Irene; Gehrke, Tim; Titberidze, Mikheil; Maier, Andreas R.; Hidding, Bernhard; Flöttmann, Klaus; Grüner, Florian

    2013-05-01

    Laser wake field accelerators deliver high quality electron beams in terms of emittance and bunch length. However, there are also parameters which cannot compete with conventional machines, namely the spectral width as well as the shot-to-shot stability in terms of energy and pointing. The bunch formation in this new type of accelerators happens in a highly non-linear plasma wave and is a statistical process based on Coulomb scattering. However, there is no direct access to the injection mechanism of electrons into that plasma wake field. Injecting a well-characterized electron beam produced by a conventional accelerator into a plasma wake field could help to solve this problem: Measuring the difference in the electron spectrum in such a pump-probe type experiment should yield the possibility to directly reconstruct the electric field distribution. From that point on, comparisons with theoretical models as well as results from particle-in-cell (PIC) codes could lead to a better understanding of the injection process. At DESY in Hamburg there is a conventional accelerator suited for such a type of experiment: the Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE). We report on the status of the beam line extension to REGAE and the plans of the external injection project, with the goal to directly measure the wake field and further improve the stability of laser wake field accelerators.

  1. Designing Interoperable Data Products with Community Conventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, T.; Jelenak, A.; Lee, H.

    2015-12-01

    The HDF Product Designer (HPD) is a cloud-based client-server collaboration tool that can bring existing netCDF-3/4/CF, HDF4/5, and HDF-EOS2/5 products together to create new interoperable data products that serve the needs of the Earth Science community. The tool is designed to reduce the burden of creating and storing data in standards-compliant, interoperable HDF5 files and lower the technical and programming skill threshold needed to design such products by providing a user interface that combines the netCDF-4/HDF5 interoperable feature set with applicable metadata conventions. Users can collaborate quickly to devise new HDF5 products while at the same time seamlessly incorporating the latest best practices and conventions in their community by importing existing data products. The tool also incorporates some expert system features through CLIPS, allowing custom approaches in the file design, as well as easy transfer of preferred conventions as they are being developed. The current state of the tool and the plans for future development will be presented. Constructive input from any interested parties is always welcome.

  2. Capsule endoscopy in patients refusing conventional endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Vázquez, Javier; Argüelles-Arias, Federico; García-Montes, Josefa Maria; Caunedo-Álvarez, Ángel; Pellicer-Bautista, Francisco Javier; Herrerías-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is nowadays the diagnostic technique of choice in the study of small bowel pathologies, allowing the non-invasive study of the entire mucosa. This has led, together with new technical advances, to the creation of two new models (PillCam ESO and PillCam Colon) for the study of esophageal and colonic diseases. These two new capsules offer an interesting alternative to conventional endoscopy in the study of the upper and lower digestive tracts, because traditional endoscopy is often unpleasant and uncomfortable for the patient, can be painful, often requires moderate or deep sedation and is not without complications (hemorrhage, perforation, etc.). PillCam Colon is particularly important for its usefulness in the diagnosis of colonic polyps, and is a potentially useful tool in cases of incomplete colonoscopy or in colorectal cancer screening, even more when most patients are reluctant to undergo screening programs due to the said disadvantages of conventional colonoscopy. This article discusses the advantages of capsule endoscopy over conventional endoscopy, its current application possibilities and indications in routine clinical practice. In the various sections of the work, we assess the application of endoscopic capsule in different sections of the digestive tract (esophagus, stomach, and colon) and finally the potential role of panendoscopy with PillCam Colon. PMID:24966612

  3. From conventional to advanced environmental sanitation.

    PubMed

    Schertenleib, R

    2005-01-01

    The basic concept of collecting domestic liquid waste in water-borne sewer systems goes back more than 100 years and became in the last century the conventional approach to sanitation in urban areas. Over the years, these sewage disposal systems had to be successively upgraded by additional sewage treatment plants increasing investment, operating and maintenance costs. Although these conventional sanitation systems could improve significantly the public health situation in those countries who could afford to install and operate them, it is highly questionable, if they are economically and ecologically sustainable. The large number of people in the developing world who still do not have access to adequate sanitation is a clear indication that the conventional approach to sanitation is not adapted to the socio-economic condition prevailing in most countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Advanced environmental sanitation is aiming not only to protect public health and the integrity of aquatic ecosystems but also to conserve precious freshwater and non-renewable resources. The Bellagio Principles and the Household Centred Environmental Sanitation Approach (HCES) are suggested as guiding principles and a new approach for planing and designing advanced (sustainable) environmental sanitation systems.

  4. The Truly Conventional Positron Source for Ilc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Tsunehiko; Urakawa, Junji; Takahashi, Tohru; Kawada, Shin-Ichi; Riemann, Sabine; Gai, Wei; Liu, Wanming; Gao, Jie; Pei, Guoxi; Okuda, Natsuki; Ushakov, Andriy

    2013-10-01

    We propose the conventional positron source driven by a several-GeV electron beam for ILC. Thermal load of the positron production target was a risk of the conventional positron source. To cure it, we employ a 300 Hz electron linac to create positrons with stretched pulse length. In ILC, the bunch timing structures and pulse timing structures can be diffecent in the positron source, in the DR, and in the main linac. We have some flexibility to choose timing structures in positron source and we use it for time stretching. ILC requires about 2600 bunches in a train in the main linac which pulse length is 1 ms. In the conventional source, about 130 positron bunches are created by each pulse of the 300Hz linac. Then 2600 bunches are created in 63 ms. We optimized parameters such as drive beam energy, beam size on the target, and target thickness to maximize the capture efficiency and to mitigate the target thermal load. A slow rotating tungsten disk is employed as positron production target.

  5. Measures to implement the Chemical Weapons Convention

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzman, E.; Kellman, B.

    1999-11-05

    This seminar is another excellent opportunity for those involved in preventing chemical weapons production and use to learn from each other about how the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) can become a foundation of arms control in Africa and around the world. The author is grateful to the staff of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) for inviting him to address this distinguished seminar. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors alone, and do not represent the position of the government of the US nor or of any other institution. In 1993, as the process of CWC ratification was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the treaty with national law would cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States Parties in how the Convention would be carried out. As a result the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention was prepared and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Manual was reviewed by the Committee of Legal Experts on National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Mica. In February 1998, the second edition of the Manual was published in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The second edition 1998 clarified the national implementation options to reflect post-entry-into-force thinking, added extensive references to national implementing measures that had been enacted by various States Parties, and included a prototype national implementing statute developed by the authors to provide a starting point for those whose national implementing

  6. Emergency Operations Center at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, Gary C.

    1997-01-01

    In June 1966, at the start of the Gulf Coast hurricane season, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) celebrated the opening of its new 4,000-square foot, state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The new EOC has been upgraded and enhanced to support a wide spectrum of emergencies affecting JSC and neighboring communities. One of the main features of the EOC is its premier computerized dispatch center. The new system unites many of JSC's critical emergency functions into one integrated network. It automatically monitors fire alarms, security entrances, and external cameras. It contains the JSC inventory of hazardous materials, by building and room, and can call up Material Safety Data Sheets for most of the generic hazardous materials used on-site. The EOC is available for community use during area emergencies such as hurricanes and is a welcome addition to the Clear Lake/Galveston Bay Area communities' emergency response resources.

  7. Emergency Operations Center at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, Gary C.

    1997-01-01

    In June 1966, at the start of the Gulf Coast hurricane season, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) celebrated the opening of its new 4,000-square foot, state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The new EOC has been upgraded and enhanced to support a wide spectrum of emergencies affecting JSC and neighboring communities. One of the main features of the EOC is its premier computerized dispatch center. The new system unites many of JSC's critical emergency functions into one integrated network. It automatically monitors fire alarms, security entrances, and external cameras. It contains the JSC inventory of hazardous materials, by building and room, and can call up Material Safety Data Sheets for most of the generic hazardous materials used on-site. The EOC is available for community use during area emergencies such as hurricanes and is a welcome addition to the Clear Lake/Galveston Bay Area communities' emergency response resources.

  8. Environmental Assessment for Conventional Strike Missile Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    information during the preparation of the EA: Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD Robert Dickey NOAA National...Islands Fish and Wildlife Office, Honolulu, HI Diane Noda, Ventura US Fish and Wildlife Office, Ventura, CA Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA James ...Plant Society, San Luis Obispo, CA Environmental Defense Center, Santa Barbara, CA La Purisima Audubon Society, Lompoc, CA Libraries Alele Museum

  9. When teacher-centered instructors are assigned to student-centered classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasry, Nathaniel; Charles, Elizabeth; Whittaker, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Technology-rich student-centered classrooms such as SCALE-UP and TEAL are designed to actively engage students. We examine what happens when the design of the classroom (conventional or teacher-centered versus student-centered classroom spaces) is consistent or inconsistent with the teacher's epistemic beliefs about learning and teaching (traditional or teacher-centered versus student-centered pedagogies). We compare two types of pedagogical approaches and two types of classroom settings through a quasiexperimental 2×2 factorial design. We collected data from 214 students registered in eight sections of an introductory calculus-based mechanics course given at a Canadian publicly funded two-year college. All students were given the Force Concept Inventory at the beginning and at the end of the 15-week-long course. We then focused on six teachers assigned to teach in the student-centered classroom spaces. We used qualitative observations and the Approaches to Teaching Inventory (ATI), a self-reported questionnaire, to determine the teachers' epistemic beliefs (teacher-centered or student-centered) and how these beliefs affected their use of the space and their students' conceptual learning. We report four main findings. First, the student-centered classroom spaces are most effective when used with student-centered pedagogies. Second, student-centered classrooms are ineffective when used with teacher-centered pedagogies and may have negative effects for students with low prior knowledge. Third, we find a strong correlation between six instructors' self-reported epistemic beliefs of student centeredness and their classes' average normalized gain (r =0.91; p =0.012). Last, we find that some instructors are more willing to adopt student-centered teaching practices after using student-centered classroom spaces. These data suggest that student-centered classrooms are effective only when instructors' epistemic framework of teaching and learning is consistent with a student-centered

  10. Microlaparoscopy versus conventional laparoscopy in transperitoneal pyeloplasty.

    PubMed

    Benson, Aaron D; Juliano, Trisha M; Viprakasit, Davis P; Herrell, S Duke

    2014-12-01

    Laparoscopic pyeloplasty has emerged as the gold standard for repair of ureteropelvic junction obstruction. Microlaparoscopic (MLP, <3 mm) instrumentation has improved markedly and can now be used for suturing and complex dissection needed during laparoscopic pyeloplasty. We present our experience with microlaparoscopy compared with conventional laparoscopy for transperitoneal pyeloplasty. We performed a retrospective analysis of hybrid MLP, using a 5-mm camera in a hidden umbilical incision, and 1.9 or 3 mm working instruments and compared with patients undergoing conventional laparoscopic pyeloplasty (CLP). The data for MLP and CLP were compared using the Student t test, Pearson chi-square test, and Fisher exact test, where appropriate. Between January 2009 and May 2013, there were 19 MLP and 27 CLP procedures performed. The MLP group mean age was younger than the CLP group (34 vs 50 years; P=0.0003). Body mass index, previous treatment rates, operative time, length of stay, ureteral stent duration, and complication rates were not statistically different between the MLP and CLP groups. Strict success rates (indicated by follow-up renal scan T½<20 min) were similar between MLP and CLP groups (89.5% vs 88.9%; P=0.95). No MLP procedures were converted to CLP or open approaches. From technical, perioperative, and outcome perspectives, transperitoneal pyeloplasty with microlaparoscopy is both safe and feasible in our hands compared with conventional laparoscopy, and results in subjectively superior cosmesis. This is the largest MLP series to date and contains, to our knowledge, the only cases described using prototype 1.9 mm instruments.

  11. EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1980-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, located in Sioux Falls, SD, is a data management, systems development, and research field center of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Mapping Division. The Center was established in the early 1970's to receive, process, and distribute data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Landsat satellites. The Center holds the world's largest collection of space and aircraft acquired imagery of the Earth. These holdings include over 2 million images acquired from satellites and over 8 million aerial photographs. The Center is also a major focal point for information concerning the holdings of foreign Landsat ground reception stations and data acquired by other countries' Earth observing satellites. The central U.S. location provides the Center with a unique capability to receive real-time electronic signals from Earth orbiting satellites, used for developing data sets of most of the North American continent.

  12. Conventional fire protection considerations in LMFBRs

    SciTech Connect

    1985-01-01

    In Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) the presence of liquid alkali metals such as sodium or NaK precludes the utilization of conventional fire fighting agents in areas containing liquid metals. Also because of fundamental differences between an LMFBR plant layout and that of a Light Water Reactor (LWR) plant, special LMFBR fire protection guidelines were established. This report describes the design considerations for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) fire protection system. The report concludes with a description of the CRBRP fire protection design features major differences from LWRs.

  13. Simulating a Guitar with a Conventional Sonometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burstein, Zily; Gower, Christina M.; Varieschi, Gabriele U.

    Musical acoustics is an interesting sub-field of physics which is usually able to engage students in a dual perspective, by combining science and art together. The physics principles involved in most musical instruments can be easily demonstrated with standard laboratory equipment and can become part of lecture or lab activities. In particular, we will show in this paper how to simulate a guitar using a conventional sonometer, in relation to the problem of the instrument intonation, i.e., how to obtain correctly tuned notes on a guitar or similar string instruments.

  14. B-1B excels in conventional role

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, W.B.

    1992-07-01

    A report is presented of an observational flight performed in a USAF B-1B to better understand the operational aspects of the aircraft's new conventional bombing mission as an integral element of a multiaircraft tactical strike package. The basic flight plan consisted of a standard takeoff and climb, cruising to the training area at 22,000 ft, descending for a 400 ft low-level run, making two simulated bomb drops, and climbing back to 25,000 ft for the return to base. Attention is given the new/enhanced avionics, the ALQ-161 defensive electronic warfare system and ripple-release Mk. 82 bombing procedures.

  15. Trauma: Conventional radiologic study in spine injury

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book includes a discussion of the anatomy of the spinal cord and descriptions of methods for tailored radiologic investigation of spine trauma. Most of the text is devoted to the analysis and classification of spinal injury by radiologic signs and mode of injury. The author addresses injury to the entire spine but emphasizes the cervical spine. Plain radiography and conventional tomography are the only imaging methods discussed. The author stresses the active role of the attending radiologist in directing every phase of the x-ray study. Many subtle variations in patient positioning plus beam direction and angulation are described.

  16. Incidence of Tardive Dyskinesia with Atypical and Conventional Antipsychotic Medications: Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Scott W.; Morgenstern, Hal; Saksa, John R.; Walsh, Barbara C.; Sullivan, Michelle C.; Money, Roy; Hawkins, Keith A.; Gueorguieva, Ralitza V.; Glazer, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Most previous studies of the incidence of tardive dyskinesia with atypical compared to conventional antipsychotics have not had tardive dyskinesia as their primary focus. The current study aimed to compare the incidence of tardive dyskinesia with atypical vs. conventional antipsychotics using methods similar to those from a previous prospective cohort study at our site in the 1980s. Method 352 initially tardive dyskinesia-free psychiatric outpatients were examined for a new diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia every 6 months for up to 4 years at a community mental health center. At baseline, subjects were receiving conventional antipsychotics only (23%), atypicals only (64%), or both (14%). Only 26 subjects had never received conventional antipsychotics. Results Compared with subjects treated with conventional antipsychotics alone since the previous visit, the adjusted tardive dyskinesia incidence rate-ratio for subjects treated with atypical antipsychotics alone was 0.68 (95% confidence interval 0.29 to 1.64). The incidence and prevalence of tardive dyskinesia was similar to previous findings at this site in the 1980s. Conclusion The incidence of tardive dyskinesia with recent exposure to atypical antipsychotics alone was more similar to that for conventional antipsychotics than in most previous studies. Despite high penetration of atypical antipsychotics into clinical practice, the incidence and prevalence of tardive dyskinesia appeared relatively unchanged since the 1980s. Clinicians should continue to monitor for tardive dyskinesia, and researchers should continue to pursue efforts to treat or prevent it. PMID:20156410

  17. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  18. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  19. Forensic Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.; Grant, P.M.

    1994-03-01

    Since 1991, the Laboratory's Forensic Science Center has focused a comprehensive range of analytical expertise on issues related to non proliferation, counterterrorism, and domestic law enforcement. During this short period, LLNL's singular combination of human and technological resources has made the Center among the best of its kind in the world. The Forensic Science Center houses a variety of state-of-the-art analytical tools ranging from gas chromatograph/mass spectrometers to ultratrace DNA detection techniques. The Center's multidisciplinary staff provides expertise in organic and inorganic analytical chemistry, nuclear science, biochemistry, and genetics useful for supporting law enforcement and for verifying compliance with international treaties and agreements.

  20. Data Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular VLBI sessions of the Key Stone Project VLBI Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In addition to the Key Stone Project VLBI sessions, NICT has been conducting geodetic VLBI sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.

  1. 13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  2. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  3. Muzzle shunt augmentation of conventional railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    Augmentation is a well-known technique for reducing the armature current and hence the armature power dissipation in a plasma armature railgun. In spite of the advantages, no large augmented railguns have been built, primarily due to the mechanical and electrical complexity introduce by the extra conductors required. It is possible to achieve some of the benefits of augmentation in conventional railgun by diverting a fraction {phi} of the input current through a shunt path at the muzzle of the railgun. In particular, the relation between force and armature current is the same as that obtained in an n-turn, series connected augmented railgun with n = 1/(1-{phi}). The price of this simplification is a reduction in electrical efficiency and some additional complexity in the external electrical system. Additions to the electrical system are required to establish the shunt current and to control its magnitude during projectile acceleration. The relationship between muzzle shunt augmentation and conventional series augmentation is developed and various techniques is developed and various techniques for establishing and controlling the shunt current are illustrated with a practical example. 5 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Children's conceptions of conventional and nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    The general objective of this study was to investigate the development of the conceptions of conventional and nuclear war in the preadolescent and adolescent child. Subjects consisted of children in three age groups: 5-6, 9-10, and 13-14 year olds (N = 63) drawn from public and private schools in the metropolitan Los Angeles area. Children were administered an interview and supplementary measures. Parents were administered questionnaires examining related areas. The principal findings were as follows: (1) The development of the war concepts. Regarding the concept of conventional war, by the age of five or six, the child usually can recognize the word war and indicate that the word has to do with fighting between two or more parties. However, the notion of nationality is evidently not solidly grasped until around the ages of 8-11 years old. In this study, 45% of the 5 and 6 year olds were minimally aware of the concept of nuclear war. By the time the child reaches the age of 9 or 10, the proportion of those with minimal awareness rises to about 80%. By 13 and 14 years old, 100% are familiar with the concept. (2) Levels of Worry. Of the children aware of the subject of nuclear war, 76% indicated that they were very worried by its possibility.

  5. The Chemical Weapons Convention -- Legal issues

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) offers a unique challenge to the US system of constitutional law. Its promise of eliminating what is the most purely genocidal type of weapon from the world`s arsenals as well as of destroying the facilities for producing these weapons, brings with it a set of novel legal issues. The reservations about the CWC expressed by US business people are rooted in concern about safeguarding confidential business information and protecting the constitutional right to privacy. The chief worry is that international verification inspectors will misuse their power to enter commercial property and that trade secrets or other private information will be compromised as a result. It has been charged that the Convention is probably unconstitutional. The author categorically disagrees with that view and is aware of no scholarly writing that supports it. The purpose of this presentation is to show that CWC verification activities can be implemented in the US consistently with the traditional constitutional regard for commercial and individual privacy. First, he very briefly reviews the types of verification inspections that the CWC permits, as well as some of its specific privacy protections. Second, he explains how the Fourth Amendment right to privacy works in the context of CWC verification inspections. Finally, he reviews how verification inspections can be integrated into these constitutional requirements in the SU through a federal implementing statute.

  6. Beam broadening in transmission and conventional EBSD.

    PubMed

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Keller, Robert R; Stoykovich, Mark P

    2017-04-01

    Transmission electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) has become a routine technique for crystal orientation mapping when ultrahigh resolution is needed and has demonstrated advantages in the characterization of nanoscale and micron-sized samples (Babinsky et al., 2015). In this work, we use experimental measurements and simulations to compare the resolution of the transmission and conventional reflection EBSD techniques across a range of sample volumes and characterization conditions. Monte Carlo simulations of electron trajectories provide the opportunity to estimate beam size and effective resolution, as well as electron flux, as a function of sample thickness or incident beam energy in t-EBSD. Increasing incident beam energy is shown to negatively impact beam diameter in some cases, and the effect of thinning a sample for conventional EBSD is shown to improve characterization resolution but dramatically decrease the number of high-loss electrons backscattered to the detector. In addition to considering spatial resolution when implementing EBSD techniques, it is found that maintaining a high yield of diffracted electrons to the detector is also of critical importance, which is supported by experimental results. Consequently, this work provides key insights into the nature of electron scattering and probe volume for the practical implementation of both transmission and reflection EBSD techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Un-conventional wisdom: theory-specificity in Reichenbach's geometric conventionalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimbel, Steven

    2004-09-01

    The standard account portrays Hans Reichenbach's argument for geometric conventionalism as based upon general epistemological concerns of verifiability. As such, his version of conventionalism ought to be equally well applicable to all theories that posit a geometric structure to space-time. But when Reichenbach's writings from the period between the publication of Relativitätstheorie und Erkenntnis Apriori and Axiomatik der Raum-Zeit-Lehre, i.e., between 1920 and 1924, are examined, a very different picture emerges. The argument for the conventionality of geometry that appears in these writings is tied to discussions of the theory of general relativity and Reichenbach explicitly argues that geometry in Minkowski space-time is not conventional once the definition of simultaneity is put in place. In light of this, the received interpretation of Reichenbach's position needs to be replaced with a theory-specific picture of geometric conventionalism. This change has interesting consequences for both the standard arguments against Reichenbach's view and for questions in Reichenbach scholarship.

  8. The Ad Hoc process to strengthen the framework convention on climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishna, K.; Deutz, A.M.; Jacobsen, L.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Woods Hole Research Center convened an International Conference on The Ad Hoc Process to Strengthen the Framework Convention on Climate Change in Woods Hole, MA, on October 7-9, 1995. The conference was conducted to examine the prospects for successful adoption of a protocol to the Framework Convention on Climate Change by 1997. In preparation for the Second session of the Ad Hoc Group on the Berlin Mandate, several governmental and nongovernmental representatives met in Woods Hole to discuss the process and possible outcome of the Berlin Mandate negotiations for a protocol or other legal instrument to strengthen the Convention. The conference was by invitation and all participants attended in their personal capacities.

  9. Handbook for Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwalk Board of Education, CT.

    The handbook for learning centers contains guidelines, forms, and supplementary information to be used with all children identified as having a learning disability, mild retardation, or sensory deprivation in the Norwalk, Connecticut public schools. It is stressed that the learning center should provide supportive services for at least 35 minutes…

  10. Outfitting Campus Fitness Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Explains how universities and colleges, both private and public, are including fitness centers as ways of increasing their student enrollment levels. Comments are provided on school experiences in fitness-center design, equipment purchasing, and maintenance and operating-costs issues. (GR)

  11. Simple Machine Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  12. Science Center and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshamooz, Saeed; Alamolhodaei, Hassan; Darvishian, Saeed; Daneshamooz, Soniya

    2013-01-01

    The project team gathered data with the assistance of Recreational and Cultural Organization of Mashhad Municipality, Organization of Mashhad Municipality and Science and Astronomy Science Center of Mashhad Municipality, Khorasan Razavi, Islamic Republic of Iran. This paper discusses the effect of science center on attitude of students who visit…

  13. Accredited Birth Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bellingham, WA 98225 360-752-2229 Accredited since July 2015 Best Start Birth Center Accredited 3343 4th Avenue San Diego, CA 92103 619-299-0840 ... Corvallis, OR 97330 541-286-4030 Accredited since July 2017 Dar a Luz Birth and Health Center Accredited 7708 4th Street NW Los Ranchos, NM 87107 505-924- ...

  14. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  15. NASA News Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-31

    The NASA News Center, seen here, is the hub of news operations for the media, providing information and contacts about Space Shuttle processing and other activities around KSC. News Center staff also conduct media tours, escorting journalists and photo/videographers to key sites such as the launch pads and Vehicle Assembly Building as needed.

  16. Developing a Teacher Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Theodore W.

    This paper begins by outlining six functions of a teacher center that are seen as generally accepted and by remarking on certain realities, like the overworked teacher and dearth of funds, that are pertinent to establishing a teacher center. The majority of the text is devoted to an explanation of a large number of specific principles that should…

  17. The Alexandria Research Center

    Treesearch

    John T. Cassady; William F. Mann

    1954-01-01

    This booklet describes the work of the Alexandria Research Center. The Center is a field unit of the Southern Forest Experiment Station, Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture. Its special mission is to find practical solutions to the most urgent land-management problems of the cutover longleaf pine lands west of the Mississippi River. The...

  18. Student Media Center Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Dorothy Ann

    A simple guide to using the schools media center is provided. Students are told how to find and use the print and nonprint resources in the media center, including the card catalog, microfilm, video and audio equipment, and films and filmstrips. (SK)

  19. Simple Machine Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  20. GSFC VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Gipson, John; Bolotin, Sergei; Le Bail, Karine; Baver, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2012. The GSFC VLBI Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  1. World Saver Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Theresa; And Others

    Conservation is a concern for all cultures, and children are familiar with this concept because of recycling in their homes and home towns. The World Saver Center, an example of the thematic approach to learning, is designed to allow children to experiment with concepts of conservation in a familiar setting. The center, designed to resemble an…

  2. One Stop Career Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Patricia

    With the aid of a U.S. Department of Labor grant, a number of one-stop career centers are being developed or have been implemented in California. A one-stop career center is a physical and electronic site where comprehensive services to job seekers and employers are available. These services include the following: assessment and eligibility…

  3. Early Childhood Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan; Woolums, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood centers have become a common and necessary part of millions of Americans' lives. More women in the workforce, longer workweeks, and educational research supporting the importance of early education have all contributed to the rise of early childhood centers throughout the United States. Today, more than 30 percent of children under…

  4. GSFC VLBI Analysis center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Petrov, Leonid; Baver, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2004. The GSFC Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development activities aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  5. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  6. Science Center and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshamooz, Saeed; Alamolhodaei, Hassan; Darvishian, Saeed; Daneshamooz, Soniya

    2013-01-01

    The project team gathered data with the assistance of Recreational and Cultural Organization of Mashhad Municipality, Organization of Mashhad Municipality and Science and Astronomy Science Center of Mashhad Municipality, Khorasan Razavi, Islamic Republic of Iran. This paper discusses the effect of science center on attitude of students who visit…

  7. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  8. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  9. National Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Lee W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) are provided. The NTTC mission is to serve as a hub for the nationwide technology-transfer network to expedite the movement of federally developed technology into the stream of commerce. A description of the Center is provided.

  10. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  11. Tribal Business Assistance Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansdowne, Michele

    The Salish Kootenai College Tribal Business Assistance Center was established in 1994 to provide technical assistance to individuals who are pursuing a small business. The center assists the entrepreneur by way of individual consultation with business advisors, small business workshops, and business administration courses that have been created…

  12. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Cancer.gov

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  13. Differences between conventional and non-conventional MRI techniques in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Baglieri, Annalisa; Marino, Maria Adele; Morabito, Rosa; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an in vivo assessment of cortical and subcortical regions affected in Parkinson’s disease (PD). This review summarizes the most important conventional and non-conventional MRI techniques applied in this field. Standard neuroimaging techniques have played a marginal role in the diagnosis and follow-up of PD, essentially being used only to discriminate atypical syndromes from PD, to exclude secondary causes such as vascular lesions, and to confirm the absence of specific imaging features found in atypical parkinsonisms. However, non-conventional MRI techniques, i.e. new neuroimaging approaches such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, and functional MRI, may allow the detection of structural, functional and metabolic changes useful not only for differential diagnosis, but also for early diagnosis and outcome and treatment monitoring in PD. In addition, we illustrate the advantages of high-field MRI over lower magnetic fields, highlighting the great potential of advanced neuroimaging techniques. PMID:24125556

  14. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Installation Effects for Conventional and Unconventional Airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    As extensive experimental campaign was performed to study the aeroacoustic installation effects of an open rotor with respect to both a conventional tube and wing type airframe and an unconventional hybrid wing body airframe. The open rotor rig had two counter rotating rows of blades each with eight blades of a design originally flight tested in the 1980s. The aeroacoustic installation effects measured in an aeroacoustic wind tunnel included those from flow effects due to inflow distortion or wake interaction and acoustic propagation effects such as shielding and reflection. The objective of the test campaign was to quantify the installation effects for a wide range of parameters and configurations derived from the two airframe types. For the conventional airframe, the open rotor was positioned in increments in front of and then over the main wing and then in positions representative of tail mounted aircraft with a conventional tail, a T-tail and a U-tail. The interaction of the wake of the open rotor as well as acoustic scattering results in an increase of about 10 dB when the rotor is positioned in front of the main wing. When positioned over the main wing a substantial amount of noise reduction is obtained and this is also observed for tail-mounted installations with a large U-tail. For the hybrid wing body airframe, the open rotor was positioned over the airframe along the centerline as well as off-center representing a twin engine location. A primary result was the documentation of the noise reduction from shielding as a function of the location of the open rotor upstream of the trailing edge of the hybrid wing body. The effects from vertical surfaces and elevon deflection were also measured. Acoustic lining was specially designed and inserted flush with the elevon and airframe surface, the result was an additional reduction in open rotor noise propagating to the far field microphones. Even with the older blade design used, the experiment provided

  15. ARO Geoscience Center fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonderhaar, Thomas H.; Behunek, Jan L.; Bringi, Viswanathan N.; Brubaker, Thomas H.; Julien, Pierre Y.

    1992-01-01

    The fellowship grant was supported by the ARO Center for Geosciences located at the Foothills Campus at Colorado State University under the auspices of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA). The center for Geosciences at Colorado State University was established in collaboration with the Army Research Office on October 1, 1986. The center brought together a wide range of expertise into one focused multidisciplinary research framework. Under the administrative structure of CIRA, the center involved investigators from the University's Departments of Atmospheric Science, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Earth Resources, Forest and Wood Science, Physics, and Psychology. The technical components of the center are in atmospheric and surface remote and in-situ sensing; atmospheric modeling; hydrologic modeling; and geoscience information extraction.

  16. Suggested notation conventions for rotational seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    We note substantial inconsistency among authors discussing rotational motions observed with inertial seismic sensors (and much more so in the broader topic of rotational phenomena). Working from physics and other precedents, we propose standard terminology and a preferred reference frame for inertial sensors (Fig. 1) that may be consistently used in discussions of both finite and infinitesimal observed rotational and translational motions in seismology and earthquake engineering. The scope of this article is limited to observations because there are significant differences in the analysis of finite and infinitesimal rotations, though such discussions should remain compatible with those presented here where possible. We recommend the general use of the notation conventions presented in this tutorial, and we recommend that any deviations or alternatives be explicitly defined.

  17. Microtearing modes in spherical and conventional tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, S.; Pusztai, I.; Guttenfelder, W.; Fülöp, T.; Mollén, A.

    2013-06-01

    The onset and characteristics of microtearing modes (MTM) in the core of spherical (NSTX) and conventional tokamaks (ASDEX Upgrade and JET) are studied through local linear gyrokinetic simulations with GYRO (Candy and Belli 2011 General Atomics Report GA-A26818). For experimentally relevant core plasma parameters in the NSTX and ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks, in agreement with previous works, we find MTMs as the dominant linear instability. Also, for JET-like core parameters considered in our study an MTM is found as the most unstable mode. In all of these plasmas, finite collisionality is needed for MTMs to become unstable and the electron temperature gradient is found to be the fundamental drive. However, a significant difference is observed in the dependence of the linear growth rate of MTMs on electron temperature gradient. While it varies weakly and non-monotonically in JET and ASDEX Upgrade plasmas, in NSTX it increases with the electron temperature gradient.

  18. HMI conventions for process control graphics.

    PubMed

    Pikaar, Ruud N

    2012-01-01

    Process operators supervise and control complex processes. To enable the operator to do an adequate job, instrumentation and process control engineers need to address several related topics, such as console design, information design, navigation, and alarm management. In process control upgrade projects, usually a 1:1 conversion of existing graphics is proposed. This paper suggests another approach, efficiently leading to a reduced number of new powerful process graphics, supported by a permanent process overview displays. In addition a road map for structuring content (process information) and conventions for the presentation of objects, symbols, and so on, has been developed. The impact of the human factors engineering approach on process control upgrade projects is illustrated by several cases.

  19. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and conventional surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Golubovic, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to present the efficacy and indications for application of conventional surgical treatment of retinal detachment by using external implants, that is,application of encircling band and buckle. This study comprised patients from the University Eye Clinic in Skopje. A total of 33 patients were diagnosed and surgically treated in the period between May 2010 and August 2011. Conventional surgery was applied in smaller number of patients whose changes of the vitreous body were manifested by detachment of posterior hyaloid membrane, syneresis, with appearance of a small number of pigment cells in the vitreous body and synchysis, and the very retina was with fresh detachment without folds or epiretinal changes (that is, PVR A grade). There were a larger number of patients with more distinct proliferative changes of the vitreous body and of the retina, grades PVR B to C1-C2, and who also underwent the same surgical approach. Routine ophthalmologic examinations were performed, including: determination of visual acuity by Snellen's optotypes, determination of eye pressure with Schiotz's tonometer, examination of anterior segment on biomicroscopy, indirect biomicroscopy of posterior eye segment (vitreous body and retina) and examination on biomicroscopy with Goldmann prism, B scan echography of the eyes before and after surgical treatment. Conventional treatment was used by external application of buckle or application of buckle and encircling band. In case of one break, radial buckle was applied and in case of multiple breaks in one quadrant limbus parallel buckle was applied. Besides buckle, encircling band was applied in patients with total or subtotal retinal detachment with already present distinct changes in the vitreous body (PVR B or C1-C2) and degenerative changes in the vitreous body. Breaks were closed with cryopexy. The results obtained have shown that male gender was predominant and that the disease was manifested in younger male adults

  20. Combination of DC Vaccine and Conventional Chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wei; Wei, Ran; Shen, Hongchang; Ni, Yang; Meng, Long; Du, Jiajun

    2016-01-01

    Recently mutual interactions of chemotherapy and immunotherapy have been widely accepted, and several synergistic mechanisms have been elucidated as well. Although much attention has focused on the combination of DC vaccine and chemotherapy, there are still many problems remaining to be resolved, including the optimal treatment schedule of the novel strategy. In this article, we methodically examined literature about the combination strategy of DC vaccine and conventional chemotherapy. Based on the published preclinical and clinical trials, treatment schedules of the combinational strategy can be classified as three modalities: chemotherapy with subsequent DC vaccine (post-DC therapy); DC vaccine followed by chemotherapy (pre-DC therapy); concurrent DC vaccine with chemotherapy (con-DC therapy).The safety and efficacy of this combinatorial immunotherapy strategy and its potential mechanisms are discussed. Although we could not draw conclusions on optimal treatment schedule, we summarize some tips which may be beneficial to trial design in the future.

  1. Muzzle shunt augmentation of conventional railguns

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.V. . Physics Div.)

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on augmentation which is a technique for reducing the armature current and hence the armature power dissipation in a plasma armature railgun. In spite of the advantages, no large augmented railguns have been built, primarily due to the mechanical and electrical complexity introduced by the extra conductors required. it is possible to achieve some of the benefits of augmentation in a conventional railgun by diverting a fraction {phi} of the input current through a shunt path at the muzzle of the railgun. In particular, the relation between force and armature current is the same as that obtained in an n-turn, series-connected augmented railgun with n = 1/(1 {minus} {phi}). The price of this simplification is a reduction in electrical efficiency and some additional complexity in the external electrical system.

  2. Conventional radiological strategy of common gastrointestinal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-Zhuo; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the clinical characteristics and imaging features of common gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasms in terms of conventional radiological imaging methods. Barium studies are readily available for displaying primary malignancies and are minimally or not at all invasive. A neoplasm may be manifested as various imaging findings, including mucosal disruption, soft mass, ulcer, submucosal invasion and lumen stenosis on barium studies. Benign tumors typically appear as smoothly marginated intramural masses. Malignant neoplasms most often appear as irregular infiltrative lesions on barium examination. Tumor extension to adjacent GI segments may be indistinct on barium images. Cross-sectional images such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may provide more accurate details of the adjacent organ invasion, omental or peritoneal spread. PMID:25628800

  3. Are cobaltates conventional? An ARPES viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.Z. . E-mail: mzhasan@Princeton.edu; Qian, D.; Foo, M.L.; Cava, R.J.

    2006-07-15

    Recently discovered class of cobaltate superconductors (Na{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 2}.nH{sub 2}O) is a novel realization of interacting quantum electron system in a triangular network with low-energy degrees of freedom. We employ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study the quasiparticle parameters in the parent superconductors. Results reveal a large hole-like Fermi surface generated by the crossing of heavy quasiparticles. The measured quasiparticle parameters collectively suggest two orders of magnitude departure from the conventional weak coupling (such as Al) Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer electron dynamics paradigm and unveils cobaltates as a rather hidden class of relatively high temperature superconductors. These parameters also form the basis for a microscopic Hamiltonian of the system.

  4. Conventional and nanotechniques for DNA methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganathan, Rajasree; Basheer, Nazeema B; Amirthalingam, Laxmi; Muthukumar, Harshiny; Kaliaperumal, Rajendran; Shanmugam, Kumaran

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is critical for gene silencing and is associated with the incidence of many diseases, including cancer. Underlying molecular mechanisms of human diseases and tissue-specific gene expression have been elucidated based on DNA methylation studies. This review highlights the advantages and drawbacks of various methylation screening techniques: blotting, genomic sequencing, bisulfite sequencing, methylation-specific PCR, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation, microarray analysis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, nanowire transistor detection procedure, quantum dot-based nanoassay, single-molecule real-time detection, fluorimetric assay, electrochemical detection, and atomic force spectroscopy. The review provides insight for selecting a method or a combination of methods for DNA methylation analysis. Convergence of conventional and contemporary nanotechniques to enumerate methylation at specific CpG sites of oncogene would fill the gap in diagnosis of cancer.

  5. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone

    PubMed Central

    Groopman, Amber M.; Katz, Jonathan I.; Holland, Mark R.; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A.; Miller, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable. PMID:26328678

  6. Conventional, Bayesian, and Modified Prony's methods for characterizing fast and slow waves in equine cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Groopman, Amber M; Katz, Jonathan I; Holland, Mark R; Fujita, Fuminori; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wear, Keith A; Miller, James G

    2015-08-01

    Conventional, Bayesian, and the modified least-squares Prony's plus curve-fitting (MLSP + CF) methods were applied to data acquired using 1 MHz center frequency, broadband transducers on a single equine cancellous bone specimen that was systematically shortened from 11.8 mm down to 0.5 mm for a total of 24 sample thicknesses. Due to overlapping fast and slow waves, conventional analysis methods were restricted to data from sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm to 6.0 mm. In contrast, Bayesian and MLSP + CF methods successfully separated fast and slow waves and provided reliable estimates of the ultrasonic properties of fast and slow waves for sample thicknesses ranging from 11.8 mm down to 3.5 mm. Comparisons of the three methods were carried out for phase velocity at the center frequency and the slope of the attenuation coefficient for the fast and slow waves. Good agreement among the three methods was also observed for average signal loss at the center frequency. The Bayesian and MLSP + CF approaches were able to separate the fast and slow waves and provide good estimates of the fast and slow wave properties even when the two wave modes overlapped in both time and frequency domains making conventional analysis methods unreliable.

  7. Bimatoprost, Prostamide Activity and Conventional Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Z.; Woodward, D.F.; Cornell, C.; Fliri, H.; Martos, J.; Petit, S.; Wang, J.W.; Kharlamb, A.B.; Wheeler, L.A.; Garst, M.E.; Landsverk, K.; Struble, C.S.; Stamer, W.D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Despite structural similarity with prostaglandin F2α, the ocular hypotensive agent, bimatoprost (Lumigan), shows unique pharmacology in vitro and functional activity in vivo. Unfortunately, the precise mechanisms that underlie bimatoprost's distinctive impact on aqueous humor dynamics are unclear. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of bimatoprost and a novel prostamide-selective antagonist, AGN 211334, on human conventional drainage. Methods: Two model systems were employed to test the consequences of bimatoprost and/or AGN 211334 treatment on conventional drainage. Human anterior segments in organ culture were perfused at a constant flow rate of 2.5μl/min while pressure was recorded continuously. After stable baseline facilities were established, segments were treated with drug(s) and pressure was monitored for an additional three days. In parallel, drug(s) effects on hydraulic conductivity of human trabecular meshwork (TM) cell monolayers were evaluated. Pharmacological properties of AGN 211334 were characterized using isolated feline iris preparations in organ culture and heterologously expressed G-protein coupled receptors in vitro. Results: Bimatoprost increased outflow facility by an average of 40 ± 10 % within 48 hours of treatment (n=10, p<0.001). Preincubation or coincubation with AGN 211334 significantly blunted bimatoprost effects by 95% or 43%, respectively. Similar results were obtained in cell culture experiments where bimatoprost increased hydraulic conductivity of TM cell monolayers by 78 ± 25 %. Pretreatment with AGN 211334 completely blocked bimatoprost effects while coincubation decreased bimatoprost effects on average by 74%. Interestingly, in both models AGN 211334 alone significantly decreased fluid flux across trabecular tissues/cells. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that bimatoprost interacts with a prostamide receptor in the trabecular meshwork to increase outflow facility. PMID:17724194

  8. VapeCons: E-cigarette user conventions.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rebecca S

    2015-11-01

    E-cigarette 'vaping conventions' provide a venue for user social networking, parties, and 'try before you buy' access to a wide range of e-cigarette products. This study identifies and describes vaping conventions, raising awareness of this potentially problematic practice. Conventions were identified via Google searches in April and May 2014 and August 2015. Details captured included location, sponsors, admission cost, event features, and promotions. 41 distinct organizations have planned 90 vaping conventions in 37 different locations since 2010. Conventions promoted access to a wide range of product vendors, seminars, social interactions with other users, parties, gifts, vaping contests, and other events. E-cigarette use at conventions was encouraged. Vaping conventions promote e-cigarette use and social norms without public health having a voice to educate attendees about negative consequences of use. Future research should focus on the effects of attending these conventions on attendees and on indoor air quality in vapor-filled convention rooms.

  9. Energy efficient data centers

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed through extensive participation with data center professionals, examination of case

  10. The New American Home 2007 Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    2006-12-01

    The New American Home demonstrates use of innovative building materials, cutting-edge design, and the latest construction techniques, providing production homebuilders with a model for producing more energy efficient, durable homes.

  11. The New American Home 2007, Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-12-01

    Each year, The New American Home (R) demonstrates use of innovative building materials, cutting-edge design, and the latest construction techniques, providing production homebuilders with a model for producing more energy efficient, durable homes without sacrificing style. Cosponsored by The National Council of the Housing Industry and BUILDER Magazine, The New American Home (R) is not only the official showcase house of the annual International Builders' Show, but is also a for-sale product. The majority of features and innovations in the home are accessible to both builders and consumers for integration into their own homes.

  12. Orlando C. Kirton, MD, FACS, FCCM, FCCP.

    PubMed Central

    Pyrtek, Ludwig J.

    2007-01-01

    The chair is named for Ludwig J. Pyrtek, MD, an esteemed surgeon at Hartford Hospital, who was devoted to the care of his patients and was an outstanding educator within his chosen field. A unique aspect of the chair is that its income is not used to support the salary of the director but is used to enhance the education activities of the department, such as the purchasing of state-of-the-art teaching devices, support of surgical resident research activities, educational travel for residents and honoraria for nationally/internationally known clinicians/scientists to speak at grand rounds. Images p1420-a PMID:18229781

  13. Orlando C. Kirton, MD, FACS, FCCM, FCCP.

    PubMed

    Pyrtek, Ludwig J

    2007-12-01

    The chair is named for Ludwig J. Pyrtek, MD, an esteemed surgeon at Hartford Hospital, who was devoted to the care of his patients and was an outstanding educator within his chosen field. A unique aspect of the chair is that its income is not used to support the salary of the director but is used to enhance the education activities of the department, such as the purchasing of state-of-the-art teaching devices, support of surgical resident research activities, educational travel for residents and honoraria for nationally/internationally known clinicians/scientists to speak at grand rounds.

  14. New American Home 2008: Orlando, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-12-01

    Each year, The New American home demonstrates innovative building materials, cutting-edge design, and the latest construction techniques. It provides production homebuilders with an example for producing more energy-efficient, durable homes without sacrificing style. This year, The New American Home celebrates its 25th anniversary. The New American Home is the official showcase house of the annual International Builders' Show, and is a for-sale product. Most features and innovations in the home are accessible to builders and consumers for integration into their own home.

  15. Comparison of conventional and non conventional methods of extraction of heartwood of Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb.

    PubMed

    Devgun, Manish; Nanda, Arun; Ansari, Shahid H

    2012-01-01

    The renewed interest in plant-derived drugs has led to an increased need for efficient extraction methods. The present investigation was an attempt to evaluate and compare the conventional methods of extraction with non conventional methods of extraction, such as ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) methods. Pterocarpus marsupium Roxb. has been reported to contain bioactive phytochemicals, e.g., pterostilbene (3',5'-dimethoxy-4-stilbenol). The results showed that among the conventional extraction methods, percolation gave the highest yield. The non conventional methods were optimized. The extraction yield was the highest in case of MAE. The phytochemical screening of the extracts indicated similar groups of compounds in all the extracts. The thin layer chromatography showed the presence of pterostilbene in the extracts obtained by using percolation, MAE and UAE. In these extracts the quantification of pterostilbene was conducted by high performance liquid chromatography and the method was validated. The MAE method extracted significantly higher amount of pterostilbene.

  16. CECSelected Convention Papers; Annual International Convention (46th, New York City, April 14-20, 1968.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, VA.

    A collection of selected convention papers is presented on the following topics: the gifted child, children with behavioral disorders, the visually handicapped, programs in special education, the homebound and hospitalized, children with learning disabilities, international aspects of special education, general articles, administration programs,…

  17. Visualization Center Dedicated

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-17

    The dedication ceremony of the University of Southern Mississippi Center of Higher Learning (CHL) High-Performance Visualization Center at SSC was held Oct. 17. The center's RAVE II 3-D visualization system, available to both on- and off-site scientists, turns data into a fully immersive environment for the user. Cutting the ribbon are, from left, Rear Adm. Thomas Donaldson, commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command; Jim Meredith, former director of the CHL; USM President Dr. Shelby Thames; Lt. Gov. Amy Tuck; Dr. Peter Ranelli, director of the CHL; Dewey Herring, chairman of the policy board for the CHL; and former Sen. Cecil Burge.

  18. Visualization Center Dedicated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The dedication ceremony of the University of Southern Mississippi Center of Higher Learning (CHL) High-Performance Visualization Center at SSC was held Oct. 17. The center's RAVE II 3-D visualization system, available to both on- and off-site scientists, turns data into a fully immersive environment for the user. Cutting the ribbon are, from left, Rear Adm. Thomas Donaldson, commander of the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command; Jim Meredith, former director of the CHL; USM President Dr. Shelby Thames; Lt. Gov. Amy Tuck; Dr. Peter Ranelli, director of the CHL; Dewey Herring, chairman of the policy board for the CHL; and former Sen. Cecil Burge.

  19. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut Katherine Hire and LEGO-Master Model Builders assisted children from Mississippi, Louisiana and Mississippi in the building of a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled ' Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  20. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    More than 2,000 children and adults from Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama recently build a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled 'Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  1. Movement quality of conventional prostheses and the DEKA Arm during everyday tasks.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Jeffrey; Resnik, Linda; Wilken, Jason; Smurr Walters, Lisa; Gates, Deanna

    2017-02-01

    Conventional prosthetic devices fail to restore the function and characteristic movement quality of the upper limb. The DEKA Arm is a new, advanced prosthesis featuring a compound, powered wrist and multiple grip configurations. The purpose of this study was to determine if the DEKA Arm improved the movement quality of upper limb prosthesis users compared to conventional prostheses. Case series. Three people with transradial amputation completed tasks of daily life with their conventional prosthesis and with the DEKA Arm. A total of 10 healthy controls completed the same tasks. The trajectory of the wrist joint center was analyzed to determine how different prostheses affected movement duration, speed, smoothness, and curvature compared to patients' own intact limbs and controls. Movement quality decreased with the DEKA Arm for two participants, and increased for the third. Prosthesis users made slower, less smooth, more curved movements with the prosthetic limb compared to the intact limb and controls, particularly when grasping and manipulating objects. The effects of one month of training with the DEKA Arm on movement quality varied with participants' skill and experience with conventional prostheses. Future studies should examine changes in movement quality after long-term use of advanced prostheses. Clinical relevance Movement quality with the DEKA Arm may depend on the user's previous experience with conventional prostheses. Quantitative analyses are needed to assess the efficacy of novel prosthetic devices and to better understand how to train people to use them effectively.

  2. Patient outcomes and procedure working time for digital versus conventional impressions: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Yolanda R; Bohner, Lauren; Tortamano, Pedro; Pigozzo, Monica N; Laganá, Dalva C; Sesma, Newton

    2017-09-27

    Limited evidence is available comparing digital versus conventional impressions from the point of view of patient preference. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify and summarize the available literature related to patient-centered outcomes for digital versus conventional impression techniques. The databases Medline, Cochrane, Science Direct, Scopus, and Embase were electronically searched and complemented by hand searches. All published papers available on the databases from 1955 to July 2016 were considered for title and abstract analysis. A total of 2943 articles were initially identified through database searches, of which only 5 met the inclusion criteria for qualitative analysis. Four studies comparing patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) between conventional and digital impressions revealed that the digital technique was more comfortable and caused less anxiety and sensation of nausea. Only 1 study reported no difference between the techniques regardless of patient comfort. Two studies reported a shorter procedure for the conventional technique, whereas 3 studies reported a shorter procedure for the digital technique. A lack of clinical studies addressing patient outcomes regarding digital prosthodontic treatments was observed among the included articles. However, current evidence suggests that patients are more likely to prefer the digital workflow than the conventional techniques. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Static rear stability of conventional and lightweight variable-axle-position wheelchairs.

    PubMed

    Loane, T D; Kirby, R L

    1985-03-01

    Wheelchair users with high or posteriorly placed centers of mass often complain of rear tipping on inclines or when accelerating. In this study we compared the rear stability of occupied conventional and lightweight wheelchairs and determined the effect of various rear axle positions. Ten normal subjects were studied in both a conventional (22.6 kg) and a lightweight (12.3 kg) wheelchair. Twenty-one experienced wheelchair users were also studied in their own wheelchairs. Stability points were determined with brakes unlocked on a tilt platform. Inter- and intraobserver test-retest reliabilities were 0.97 and 0.974, respectively. For the normal subjects the mean (+/- 1SD) stability point in the conventional chair was 28.6 (+/- 2.7) degrees. In the lightweight chair their mean stability points ranged from 21.7 (+/- 2.6) degrees to 9.4 (+/- 2.9) degrees, depending upon axle position. The mean difference between the conventional chair and the lightweight chair in its most stable position was 6.9 (+/- 1.7) degrees (t = 13.04, p less than 0.0001) and in its least stable position 19.3 (+/- 2.4) degrees (t = 24.97, p less than 0.0001). Experienced wheelchair users in their own lightweight wheelchairs were less stable than users of conventional chairs (t = 2.16, p less than 0.05) or chairs with posteriorly offset axles (t = 3.64, p less than 0.01).

  4. NESTA Revolutionizing Teacher's Experiences at NSTA Conventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireton, F.

    2002-05-01

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) conventions are traditionally composed of short workshops, half or full day workshops, and lectures on science teaching or education research. Occasional science lectures such as the AGU lecture offer science content information. The National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA) will join the National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT), American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the American Geological Institute (AGI) to bring teachers a suite of exciting and informative events at the (NSTA) 2002 convention. Events begin with a guided learning field trip to Mission Trails Regional Park and Torrey Pines State Reserve where Earth and space science teachers experience a model of constructivist leaning techniques. Most field trips are a "show and tell" experience, designed to transmit knowledge from the field trip leader to the field trip participants. In the "guided learning" environment, the leader serves as a facilitator, asking questions, guiding participants to discover concepts for themselves. Participants examine selected processes and features that constitute a constructivist experience in which knowledge acquired at any given location builds on knowledge brought to the site. Employing this strategy involves covering less breadth but greater depth, modeling the concept of "less is more." On Thursday NESTA will host two Share-a-thons. These are not what a person would think of as a traditional workshop where presenter makes a presentation then the participants work on an activity. They could be called the flea market of teaching ideas. Tables are set around the perimeter of a room where the presenters are stationed. Teachers move from table to table picking up information and watching short demonstrations. The Earth and Space Science Resource Day on Friday will focus on teachers needs. Starting with breakfast, teachers will hear from Soames Summerhays, Naturalist and President of Summerhays Films, about how he

  5. The High-Energy Astrophysics Learning Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, L. A.; Lochner, J. C.; Allen, J. S.

    1996-12-01

    As part of the education outreach efforts of the HEASARC (High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center), we have developed a cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy World Wide Web site which contains information and activities for all ages and education levels. Additional associated sites are now being added, such as StarChild, which broaden the range of topics to cover other astronomy issues. Also included is a "Teacher's Corner", which contains educator-prepared Study Guides for the site and multi-level, multi-disciplinary Lesson Plans based on actual satellite data and analyses. We intend to provide high visibility and easy access to the site for teachers and students by exhibiting it at NSTA (and other) conventions, giving mini-workshops at such conventions, and distributing a CD-ROM version of the site. The development, growth, and use of the site are presented.

  6. Facility Focus: Athletic Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the designs of the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Ohio State University and the fitness center of Scottsdale Community College in Arizona. Discusses design goals and unique features and includes photographs. (EV)

  7. NMA Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierulf, Halfdan Pascal; Andersen, Per Helge

    2013-01-01

    The Norwegian Mapping Authority (NMA) has during the last few years had a close cooperation with Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI) in the analysis of space geodetic data using the GEOSAT software. In 2012 NMA has taken over the full responsibility for the GEOSAT software. This implies that FFI stopped being an IVS Associate Analysis Center in 2012. NMA has been an IVS Associate Analysis Center since 28 October 2010. NMA's contributions to the IVS as an Analysis Centers focus primarily on routine production of session-by-session unconstrained and consistent normal equations by GEOSAT as input to the IVS combined solution. After the recent improvements, we expect that VLBI results produced with GEOSAT will be consistent with results from the other VLBI Analysis Centers to a satisfactory level.

  8. Precision Joining Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a Precision Joining Center (PJC) is proposed. The PJC will be a cooperatively operated center with participation from U.S. private industry, the Colorado School of Mines, and various government agencies, including the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The PJC's primary mission will be as a training center for advanced joining technologies. This will accomplish the following objectives: (1) it will provide an effective mechanism to transfer joining technology from the NWC to private industry; (2) it will provide a center for testing new joining processes for the NWC and private industry; and (3) it will provide highly trained personnel to support advance joining processes for the NWC and private industry.

  9. Principal Center Updates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, William

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Occupational Health Program Manager briefed attendees on current Agency initiatives and projects affecting Center Occupational Health personnel. Plans, insight, and expectations for the coming year will be discussed.

  10. Tsukuba VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurihara, Shinobu; Nozawa, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    The Tsukuba Analysis Center is funded by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan (GSI). The c5++ analysis software is regularly used for the IVS-INT2 analysis and the ultra-rapid EOP experiments.

  11. America's Blood Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spokesperson Biographies Statements Logo & Style Guidelines Every two seconds someone needs blood. It's About Life. Please Donate ... from the Foundation for America’s Blood Centers. 2 SECONDS Every 2 seconds, someone in the United States ...

  12. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Vasculitis Clinical Research Network - Dr. Peter A. Merkel -- Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH - Rare Lung Diseases Clinical...cytopenias, including granular lymphocyte leukemia, pure red cell aplasia, and myelodysplastic syndromes; vasculitis disorders; inborn defects in steroid

  13. Proteome Characterization Centers - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The centers, a component of NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium, will analyze a subset of TCGA samples to define proteins translated from cancer genomes and their related biological processes.

  14. Mental Health Screening Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... to help us make DBSAlliance.org better! Go! Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression This screening form was developed from ...

  15. The EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The EROS Data Center, 16 miles (25 km) northeast of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is operated by the EROS Program to provide access to NASA's LANDSAT [formerly Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS)] imagery, aerial photography acquired by the U.S. Department of the Interior, and photography and imagery acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from research aircraft and from Skylab, Apollo, and Gemini spacecraft. The primary functions of the Center are data storage and reproduction, and user assistance and training. This publication describes the Data Center operations, data products, services, and procedures for ordering remotely sensed data. The EROS Data Center and its principal facility, the 120,000-square-foot (11,200 m2) Karl E. Mundt Federal Building, were dedicated August 7, 1973.

  16. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  17. Chapels/Worship Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of notable school chapels and worship centers, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  18. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  19. Test Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the test observation periscope in the Test Control Center exhibit in StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., visitors can observe a test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine exactly as test engineers might see it during a real engine test. The Test Control Center exhibit exactly simulates not only the test control environment, but also the procedure of testing a rocket engine. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative dispays and exhibits from NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion and remote sensing applications. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  20. Science Center Goes Underground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A unique underground science center at Bluffton College, designed to save energy and preserve trees, rolling landscape, and other environmental features of the campus, is under construction in Bluffton, Ohio. (Author)

  1. Facility Focus: Athletic Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the designs of the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Ohio State University and the fitness center of Scottsdale Community College in Arizona. Discusses design goals and unique features and includes photographs. (EV)

  2. Test Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the test observation periscope in the Test Control Center exhibit in StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., visitors can observe a test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine exactly as test engineers might see it during a real engine test. The Test Control Center exhibit exactly simulates not only the test control environment, but also the procedure of testing a rocket engine. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative dispays and exhibits from NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion and remote sensing applications. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  3. A Center for All.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leisner, Hava

    2002-01-01

    Describes the building of Princeton University's $42 million Frist Student Center, which incorporates the original physics building, Palmer Hall, and a new addition. Provides information on the architect, construction manager, and product suppliers. Includes photographs. (EV)

  4. Test Control Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-25

    At the test observation periscope in the Test Control Center exhibit in StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., visitors can observe a test of a Space Shuttle Main Engine exactly as test engineers might see it during a real engine test. The Test Control Center exhibit exactly simulates not only the test control environment, but also the procedure of testing a rocket engine. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative dispays and exhibits from NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion and remote sensing applications. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  5. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  6. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpkins, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the importance of the Kennedy Space Center both in terms to the economy of Florida and to spaceflight. It reviews the general NASA direction,the challenges of the coming year and the accomplishments.

  7. Soviet Mission Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This photo is an overall view of the Mission Control Center in Korolev, Russia during the Expedition Seven mission. The Expedition Seven crew launched aboard a Soyez spacecraft on April 26, 2003. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  8. Assessing urbanized area expansion through the integration of Landsat and conventional data /79052/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. B.; Friedman, S. Z.

    1979-01-01

    An image base information system (IBIS) is utilized to integrate Landsat and census data for the purpose of mapping urban land and updating urbanized-area outer lines. IBIS is a subset of the video image communication and retrieval digital image processing system developed at JPL. IBIS is used to analyze three urban areas: Orlando, Florida; Seattle, Washington; and Boston, Massachusetts. In all three applications the primary objective is to map the expansion of urban land cover in the urban fringe. Pertinent tabular reports are produced.

  9. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    flSttfiferrces ReferentHistory Alternative Medicine Alternative and Complementary/Integrative Nutritional Therapies in Cancer Prevention and Treatment ...to meet a clear and compelling need to respond to Florida’s "cancer epidemic." Building a major cancer research and treatment center at the... Medicine . This Department includes all the basic science faculty recruited by the Cancer Center and will be the academic home for a new interdisciplinary

  10. Transportation Systems Center

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, G.S.

    1992-07-01

    The Transportation Systems Center at Sandia Laboratory performs research, development, and implementation of technologies that enhance the safe movement of people, goods, and information. Our focus is on systems engineering. However, we realize that to understand the puzzle, you must also understand the pieces. This brochure describes some of the activities currently underway at the Center and presents the breadth and depth of our capabilities. Please contact the noted, individuals for more, information.

  11. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  12. Patient-centered Communication

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Sara L; Buell, Stephanie; Zettler, Patti; White, Martha; Ruston, Delaney C; Lo, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate patient preferences for a patient-centered or a biomedical communication style. DESIGN Randomized study. SETTING Urgent care and ambulatory medicine clinics in an academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS We recruited 250 English-speaking adult patients, excluding patients whose medical illnesses prevented evaluation of the study intervention. INTERVENTION Participants watched one of three videotaped scenarios of simulated patient-physician discussions of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Each participant watched two versions of the scenario (biomedical vs. patient-centered communication style) and completed written and oral questionnaires to assess outcome measurements. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Main outcome measures were 1) preferences for a patient-centered versus a biomedical communication style; and 2) predictors of communication style preference. Participants who preferred the patient-centered style (69%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 63 to 75) tended to be younger (82%[51/62] for age < 30; 68%[100/148] for ages 30–59; 55%[21/38] for age > 59; P < .03), more educated (76%[54/71] for postcollege education; 73%[94/128] for some college; 49%[23/47] for high school only; P = .003), use CAM (75%[140/188] vs. 55%[33/60] for nonusers; P = .006), and have a patient-centered physician (88%[74/84] vs. 30%[16/54] for those with a biomedical physician; P < .0001). On multivariate analysis, factors independently associated with preferring the patient-centered style included younger age, use of herbal CAM, having a patient-centered physician, and rating a “doctor's interest in you as a person” as “very important.” CONCLUSIONS Given that a significant proportion of patients prefer a biomedical communication style, practicing physicians and medical educators should strive for flexible approaches to physician-patient communication. PMID:15566435

  13. Patient Safety Center Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Enterectomy Bariatric 7/20/05 4 hours/course (28 hours/year) Surgery R 7 Dr. Karen Horvath R5 Lap Enterectomy & Colectomy 11/30/05 4...areas in the UW Schools of Nursing and Dentistry, at the Harborview Research Center Microvascular Surgery lab, with the Seattle Children’s Hospital and...1 laboratory complex (2500 sq ft) has been designed within the University of Washington Medical Center, in the Surgery Pavilion complex

  14. Cartagena Convention and Land-Based Sources Protocol

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA participated in meetings on the Action Plan for the Caribbean Environment Programme and the Convention for the Protection and Development of the Marine Environment of the Wider Caribbean Region (the Cartagena Convention).

  15. The Development of Toddlers' Moral and Conventional Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Judith G.; Braeges, Judith L.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the development of toddlers' moral and conventional judgments and effects of language development on such judgments. Rudimentary distinctions between familiar moral, social and conventional transgressions are made during the child's third year. (Author/BB)

  16. Academic Writing in Intercultural Contexts: Integrating Conventions and Personal Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlewood, William

    1996-01-01

    Examines the teaching of writing from an intercultural standpoint to see how far the imposed conventions of academic writing conflict with the conventions of native language and culture and self expression. (Author/VWL)

  17. Center for Space Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Renjeng

    1998-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction (CSC) at University of Colorado at Boulder is one of eight University Space Engineering Research Centers established by NASA in 1988. The mission of the Center is to conduct research into space technology and to directly contribute to space engineering education. The Center reports to the Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences and resides in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The College has a long and successful track record of cultivating multi-disciplinary research and education programs. The Center for Space Construction represents prominent evidence of this record. The basic concept on which the Center was founded is the in-space construction of large space systems, such as space stations, interplanetary space vehicles, and extraterrestrial space structures. Since 1993, the scope of CSC research has evolved to include the design and construction of all spacecraft, large and small. With the broadened scope our research projects seek to impact the technological basis for spacecraft such as remote sensing satellites, communication satellites and other special-purpose spacecraft, as well as large space platforms. A summary of accomplishments, including student participation and degrees awarded, during the contract period is presented.

  18. The medical effects of conventional weapons.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, R F

    1992-01-01

    The medical effects of weapons used in modern conventional warfare are, overwhelmingly, penetrating. Fragments from explosive munitions such as shells, rockets, and grenades are the predominate source of missiles, especially in high-intensity war. Bullets from assault rifles and machine guns cause fewer casualties, except in counterinsurgency operations. The threat from penetrating missiles depends upon the part of the body that is struck and, to a lesser extent, upon the physical characteristics of the missile. The missile's mass and velocity determine its potential to do physical damage, but the extent to which this potential is realized depends upon diverse factors such as shape, construction, and stability. The American experience in the wars of this century indicate that approximately 20%-25% of all casualties died on the battlefield and are therefore classified as killed in action. Approximately 3%-5% die while receiving care, and thus are classified as died of wounds. Wounds of the brain or heart and great vessels are the most common causes of death. Prevention of sepsis in soft-tissue and orthopedic wounds is the major medical treatment problem in survivors. Since it determines the quality and quantity of combat casualty care, the single most important factor determining mortality or morbidity for combat casualties is the tactical situation.

  19. Conventional therapy for Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Büning, Carsten; Lochs, Herbert

    2006-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is a multifactorial disorder of unknown cause. Outstanding progress regarding the pathophysiology of CD has led to the development of innovative therapeutic concepts. Numerous controlled trials have been performed in CD over the last years. However, many drugs have not been approved by regulatory authorities due to lack of efficacy or severe side effects. Therefore, well-known drugs, including 5-ASA, systemic or topical corticosteroids, and immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, are still the mainstay of CD therapy. Importantly, biologicals such as infliximab have shown to be efficacious in problematic settings such as fistulizing or steroid-dependent CD. This review is intended to give practical guidelines to clinicians for the conventional treatment of CD. We concentrated on the results of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and meta-analyses, when available, that provide the highest degree of evidence. We provide evidence-based treatment algorithms whenever possible. However, many clinical situations have not been answered by controlled clinical trials and it is important to fill these gaps through expert opinions. We hope that this review offers a useful tool for clinicians in the challenging treatment of CD. PMID:16937460

  20. Conventional and advanced imaging in neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Y; Sutton, I J; Ghadiri, M; Masters, L; Zivadinov, R; Barnett, M H

    2014-08-01

    Myelitis and optic neuritis are prototypic clinical presentations of both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Once considered a subtype of multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, is now known to have a discrete pathogenesis in which antibodies to the water channel, aquaporin 4, play a critical role. Timely differentiation of neuromyelitis optica from MS is imperative, determining both prognosis and treatment strategy. Early, aggressive immunosuppression is required to prevent the accrual of severe disability in neuromyelitis optica; conversely, MS-specific therapies may exacerbate the disease. The diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica requires the integration of clinical, MR imaging, and laboratory data, but current criteria are insensitive and exclude patients with limited clinical syndromes. Failure to recognize the expanding spectrum of cerebral MR imaging patterns associated with aquaporin 4 antibody seropositivity adds to diagnostic uncertainty in some patients. We present the state of the art in conventional and nonconventional MR imaging in neuromyelitis optica and review the place of neuroimaging in the diagnosis, management, and research of the condition. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  1. Conventional transbronchial needle aspiration in community practice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conventional transbronchial needle aspiration (C-TBNA) provides an opportunity to diagnose mediastinal lesions and stage bronchogenic carcinoma in a minimally invasive fashion. The procedure is easy to learn and requires zero upfront cost. Any community pulmonologist can acquire and maintain the skills of C-TBNA without undergoing formal interventional pulmonary fellowship training. Besides being used for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer, C-TBNA can be used in patients suspected to have benign conditions such as sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. It also contributes in improving the diagnostic yield of flexible bronchoscopy while dealing with endobronchial, submucosal, peribronchial, or peripheral lesions. C-TBNA may be the only diagnostic modality that can be performed in patients in whom mediastinoscopy is contraindicated due to a bleeding diathesis. The procedure is safe and has great potential to augment the welfare of patients with pulmonary ailments. The learning curve of the procedure is short and steep. Every community pulmonologist should be able to perform C-TBNA. PMID:26807272

  2. Non-conventional therapeutics for oral infections.

    PubMed

    Allaker, Robert P; Ian Douglas, C W

    2015-01-01

    As our knowledge of host-microbial interactions within the oral cavity increases, future treatments are likely to be more targeted. For example, efforts to target a single species or key virulence factors that they produce, while maintaining the natural balance of the resident oral microbiota that acts to modulate the host immune response would be an advantage. Targeted approaches may be directed at the black-pigmented anaerobes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, associated with periodontitis. Such pigments provide an opportunity for targeted phototherapy with high-intensity monochromatic light. Functional inhibition approaches, including the use of enzyme inhibitors, are also being explored to control periodontitis. More general disruption of dental plaque through the use of enzymes and detergents, alone and in combination, shows much promise. The use of probiotics and prebiotics to improve gastrointestinal health has now led to an interest in using these approaches to control oral disease. More recently the potential of antimicrobial peptides and nanotechnology, through the application of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive and delivery capabilities, has been explored. The aim of this review is to consider the current status as regards non-conventional treatment approaches for oral infections with particular emphasis on the plaque-related diseases.

  3. Rheological events following laparoscopic and conventional laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Beilin, Benzion; Mayburd, Eduard; Yardeni, Israel-Zeev; Bessler, Hanna

    2005-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery has become a widely used procedure with many advantages compared to conventional laparotomy. Although rare, this technique is not entirely absent from clinical hazards and particularly thromboembolic events. This complication is due to activation of the coagulation cascade, as well as factors that may cause alterations in blood rheology. Apart from high hematocrit, presence of abnormal proteins and elevated fibrinogen level, the type of anesthesia, temperature, and increased intra-abdominal pressure following CO(2) insufflation may affect blood viscosity. Therefore, the objective of the study was to compare rheological events in 17 patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery to those in 15 patients who underwent laparotomy. Both groups of patients did not show any complications during the early and late post-operative period. The values of whole blood viscosity in patients undergoing laparoscopy did not differ from those in patients treated by laparotomy. A slight, although significant decrease in plasma viscosity and red blood cell aggregation was observed in patients who underwent laparotomy. The results suggest that the benefits of laparoscopic surgery in the present series were not affected by alterations in blood and plasma viscosity, as well as in red blood cell aggregation.

  4. Nursing research conventions: objectivity or obfuscation?

    PubMed

    Porter, S

    1993-01-01

    This paper is a critique of naïve realism, the philosophy which animates much nursing research, and which leads researchers to assume that the attainment of objective knowledge is possible. The nature of naïve realism, and its relationship to objectivity, is discussed. Central to this outlook is the belief that the values and interests of the researcher can and should be divorced from the prosecution of research. This is reflected in the literary convention of referring to the researcher in the third person. Contrary to this position, I argue that the interpretations, values and interests of the researcher are central to the research process. Moreover, nursing research may be affected by the interests of managers, educationalists, and those who wish to see nursing attain professional status. Nursing researchers should accept that they are part of the social situations which they study. They should therefore become reflexive in their outlook. This entails recognizing and attempting to understand the effects of the researcher, rather than trying to eliminate or ignore them.

  5. Non-conventional therapeutics for oral infections

    PubMed Central

    Allaker, Robert P; Ian Douglas, CW

    2015-01-01

    As our knowledge of host-microbial interactions within the oral cavity increases, future treatments are likely to be more targeted. For example, efforts to target a single species or key virulence factors that they produce, while maintaining the natural balance of the resident oral microbiota that acts to modulate the host immune response would be an advantage. Targeted approaches may be directed at the black-pigmented anaerobes, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella intermedia, associated with periodontitis. Such pigments provide an opportunity for targeted phototherapy with high-intensity monochromatic light. Functional inhibition approaches, including the use of enzyme inhibitors, are also being explored to control periodontitis. More general disruption of dental plaque through the use of enzymes and detergents, alone and in combination, shows much promise. The use of probiotics and prebiotics to improve gastrointestinal health has now led to an interest in using these approaches to control oral disease. More recently the potential of antimicrobial peptides and nanotechnology, through the application of nanoparticles with biocidal, anti-adhesive and delivery capabilities, has been explored. The aim of this review is to consider the current status as regards non-conventional treatment approaches for oral infections with particular emphasis on the plaque-related diseases. PMID:25668296

  6. Black silicon morphologies using conventional RIE processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R.; Loh, Joel Y. Y.; Pishon, Md. Nishanto Nahid; Kherani, Nazir P.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the use of conventional non-Bosch, non-cryogenic Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) processing to produce a range of low optical reflection morphologies on <100> silicon wafer. Tapered structures and nano dendritic-pillars are patterned into silicon over a pressure range of 550 - 700 mTorr at various run times. Low pressure RIE conditions yield tapered profiles while at higher pressures nano-pillars are produced. The optimized condition of 650 mTorr for 20-30 minutes yields uniform distribution of nano dendritic pillars resulting in a low average reflectance of 4.2% - without an additional antireflective coating. A simple kinetic Monte-Carlo model shows that nano-dendritic structures can be formed due to low etching rate of side walls and evolve into tapered structures over a longer run time. Refractive index profiles built from our simulated patterns and surface morphology of the samples yield calculated reflectance curves that correlate well with experimental results.

  7. NASA InterCenter Collaboration Increases ROI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, Kimberly; Best, Susan; Felton, Larry; Newhouse, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Funding for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space mission operations is tighter than ever in the current environment of federal government deficit reductions. Conventional wisdom would expect this environment to drive increasing competition between NASA centers for the limited available funds. However, recent inter-center activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center emphasize collaboration rather than competition and demonstrate the value of partnerships to increase the return on shrinking investments. These efforts cover a variety of activities and potential returns. To facilitate sharing data from test and verification through operations without levying requirements on data format or software tools, the HOSC is working with multiple centers on an evolutionary path toward a distributed data architecture and archive. The approach reduces the required investment by allowing the partners to reuse their existing formats and tools, while facilitating gone ]stop h user visibility into and controlled access to the full complement of data regardless of user or data location. The HOSC is also working on two activities to promote sharing operations implementations and leveraging the experts and expertise across multiple NASA sites. In one, the use of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standards for the message abstraction layer provides an interoperability layer on top of existing ground data system communication architectures. This allows missions to select the most appropriate solutions for their requirements with a minimal investment in rehosting the components in a coherent operational environment. The other emphasizes shared tools and increased remote access to minimize travel for tests and critical activities and reduce the floor space required for a dedicated operations center. This paper summarizes these and other inter-center collaboration activities at the HOSC and the

  8. Stafford Technical Center: Designing a Future for Architects and Builders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucci, William, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The Engineering Technology Academy (ETA) program at Stafford Technical Center in Rutland, Vermont, offers benefits beyond the conventional high school learning experience. In September, at the beginning of the program, students learn the traditional skills of using tools, line weights and lettering. Once they develop these basic skills, students…

  9. Stafford Technical Center: Designing a Future for Architects and Builders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucci, William, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The Engineering Technology Academy (ETA) program at Stafford Technical Center in Rutland, Vermont, offers benefits beyond the conventional high school learning experience. In September, at the beginning of the program, students learn the traditional skills of using tools, line weights and lettering. Once they develop these basic skills, students…

  10. Criteria for Planning the University Learning Resources Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Irving R.; Drob, Harold A.

    Initiated in 1969 at the request of the University of California President's Advisory Committee on Learning Resources, this study identifies the essential criteria for planning university learning resources centers in the 1970's. General definitions of learning resources for conventional and innovative instruction are given together with a brief…

  11. Evidence-Centered Design: Recommendations for Implementation and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Amy; Ewing, Maureen; Kaliski, Pamela; Huff, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-centered design (ECD) is an orientation towards assessment development. It differs from conventional practice in several ways and consists of multiple activities. Each of these activities results in a set of useful documentation: domain analysis, domain modeling, construction of the assessment framework, and assessment…

  12. 19 CFR 114.2 - Customs Conventions and Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: (a) Customs Convention on the A.T.A. Carnet for the Temporary Admission of Goods (hereinafter referred to as A.T.A. Convention). (b) (c) Customs Convention on the International Transport of Goods Under.... (d) Agreement Between the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the United States and...

  13. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources of Thailand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean volumes of 1.6 billion barrels of undiscovered conventional oil and 17 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered conventional natural gas in three geologic provinces of Thailand using a geology-based methodology. Most of the undiscovered conventional oil and gas resource is estimated to be in the area known as offshore Thai Basin province.

  14. Indentability of conventional and negative Poisson's ratio foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakes, R. S.; Elms, K.

    1992-01-01

    The indentation resistance of foams, both of conventional structure and of reentrant structure giving rise to negative Poisson's ratio, is studied using holographic interferometry. In holographic indentation tests, reentrant foams had higher yield strength and lower stiffness than conventional foams of the same original relative density. Calculated energy absorption for dynamic impact is considerably higher for reentrant foam than conventional foam.

  15. 30 CFR 75.206 - Conventional roof support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conventional roof support. 75.206 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.206 Conventional roof support. (a) Except in anthracite mines using non-mechanized mining systems, when conventional roof...

  16. 30 CFR 75.206 - Conventional roof support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conventional roof support. 75.206 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Roof Support § 75.206 Conventional roof support. (a) Except in anthracite mines using non-mechanized mining systems, when conventional roof...

  17. Trends, Fashions, Patterns, Norms, Conventions...and Hypertext Too.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amitay, Einat

    2001-01-01

    Outlines the theory behind the formation of language conventions, then reveals conventions evolving in the community of people writing hypertext on the Web. Demonstrates how these conventions can be used to augment and shift the meaning of already published hypertexts. Describes the system called InCommonSense, which reuses particular hypertext…

  18. 29 CFR 452.63 - Nominations at conventions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nominations at conventions. 452.63 Section 452.63 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Nominations for Office § 452.63 Nominations at conventions. In elections at conventions at which nominations are also made, delegates who have been elected by secret ballot must be given...

  19. Nanoscale Sensing with Nitrogen Vacancy Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Elana; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alex; Park, Hongkun; Lukin, Mikhail

    2015-05-01

    In the last several decades Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful tool in science and technology. Conventional MRI technology, however, relies on measuring magnetic fields from a large (macroscopic) number of molecules, for example tissues in specific areas of the brain. Extending these techniques to the nanoscale could enable revolutionary advances in the physical, biological and medical sciences. Here we report on recent progress in using Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to detect small numbers of nuclear spins in biological molecules. In particular, we have demonstrated detection of single proteins attached to the diamond surface.

  20. Lens auto-centering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Doucet, Michel; Côté, Patrice; Gauvin, Jonny; Anctil, Geneviève; Tremblay, Mathieu

    2015-09-01

    In a typical optical system, optical elements usually need to be precisely positioned and aligned to perform the correct optical function. This positioning and alignment involves securing the optical element in a holder or mount. Proper centering of an optical element with respect to the holder is a delicate operation that generally requires tight manufacturing tolerances or active alignment, resulting in costly optical assemblies. To optimize optical performance and minimize manufacturing cost, there is a need for a lens mounting method that could relax manufacturing tolerance, reduce assembly time and provide high centering accuracy. This paper presents a patent pending lens mounting method developed at INO that can be compared to the drop-in technique for its simplicity while providing the level of accuracy close to that achievable with techniques using a centering machine (usually < 5 μm). This innovative auto-centering method is based on the use of geometrical relationship between the lens diameter, the lens radius of curvature and the thread angle of the retaining ring. The autocentering principle and centering test results performed on real optical assemblies are presented. In addition to the low assembly time, high centering accuracy, and environmental robustness, the INO auto-centering method has the advantage of relaxing lens and barrel bore diameter tolerances as well as lens wedge tolerances. The use of this novel lens mounting method significantly reduces manufacturing and assembly costs for high performance optical systems. Large volume productions would especially benefit from this advancement in precision lens mounting, potentially providing a drastic cost reduction.