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Sample records for conventional high-field magnetic

  1. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  2. Space applications of superconductivity - High field magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fickett, F. R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses developments in superconducting magnets and their applications in space technology. Superconducting magnets are characterized by high fields (to 15T and higher) and high current densities combined with low mass and small size. The superconducting materials and coil design are being improved and new high-strength composites are being used for magnet structural components. Such problems as maintaining low cooling temperatures (near 4 K) for long periods of time and degradation of existing high-field superconductors at low strain levels can be remedied by research and engineering. Some of the proposed space applications of superconducting magnets include: cosmic ray analysis with magnetic spectrometers, energy storage and conversion, energy generation by magnetohydrodynamic and thermonuclear fusion techniques, and propulsion. Several operational superconducting magnet systems are detailed.

  3. Single-layer high field dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim V. Kashikhin and Alexander V. Zlobin

    2001-07-30

    Fermilab is developing high field dipole magnets for post-LHC hadron colliders. Several designs with a nominal field of 10-12 T, coil bore size of 40-50 mm based on both shell-type and block-type coil geometry are currently under consideration. This paper presents a new approach to magnet design, based on simple and robust single-layer coils optimized for the maximum field, good field quality and minimum number of turns.

  4. Strain sensors for high field pulse magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Christian; Zheng, Yan; Easton, Daniel; Farinholt, Kevin M; Park, Gyuhae

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present an investigation into several strain sensing technologies that are being considered to monitor mechanical deformation within the steel reinforcement shells used in high field pulsed magnets. Such systems generally operate at cryogenic temperatures to mitigate heating issues that are inherent in the coils of nondestructive, high field pulsed magnets. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize the performance of various strain sensing technologies at liquid nitrogen temperatures (-196 C). Four sensor types are considered in this investigation: fiber Bragg gratings (FBG), resistive foil strain gauges (RFSG), piezoelectric polymers (PVDF), and piezoceramics (PZT). Three operational conditions are considered for each sensor: bond integrity, sensitivity as a function of temperature, and thermal cycling effects. Several experiments were conducted as part of this study, investigating adhesion with various substrate materials (stainless steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber), sensitivity to static (FBG and RFSG) and dynamic (RFSG, PVDF and PZT) load conditions, and sensor diagnostics using PZT sensors. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), and the results of this study will be used to identify the set of sensing technologies that would be best suited for integration within high field pulsed magnets at the NHMFL facility.

  5. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4/sup 0/K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs.

  6. A high-field superferric NMR magnet.

    PubMed

    Huson, F R; Bryan, R N; MacKay, W W; Herrick, R C; Colvin, J; Ford, J J; Pissanetzky, S; Plishker, G A; Rocha, R; Schmidt, W

    1993-01-01

    Strong, extensive magnetic fringe fields are a significant problem with magnetic resonance imaging magnets. This is particularly acute with 4-T, whole-body research magnets. To date this problem has been addressed by restricting an extensive zone around the unshielded magnet or by placing external unsaturated iron shielding around the magnet. This paper describes a solution to this problem which uses superconducting coils closely integrated with fully saturated iron elements. A 4-T, 30-cm-bore prototype, based on this design principle, was built and tested. The 5 G fringe field is contained within 1 meter of the magnet bore along the z axis. Homogeneity of the raw magnetic field is 10 ppm over 30% of the magnet's diameter after passive shimming. Compared with an unshielded magnet, 20% less superconductor is required to generate the magnetic field. Images and spectra are presented to demonstrate the magnet's viability for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

  7. High Field Pulse Magnets with New Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Lesch, B.; Cochran, V. G.; Eyssa, Y.; Tozer, S.; Mielke, C. H.; Rickel, D.; van Sciver, S. W.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    2004-11-01

    High performance pulse magnets using the combination of CuNb conductor and Zylon fiber composite reinforcement with bore sizes of 24, 15 and 10 mm have been designed, manufactured and tested to destruction. The magnets successfully reached the peak fields of 64, 70 and 77.8 T respectively with no destruction. Failures occurred near the end flanges at the layer. The magnet design, manufacturing and testing, and the mode of the failure are described and analyzed.

  8. High-field superconducting nested coil magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laverick, C.; Lobell, G. M.

    1970-01-01

    Superconducting magnet, employed in conjunction with five types of superconducting cables in a nested solenoid configuration, produces total, central magnetic field strengths approaching 70 kG. The multiple coils permit maximum information on cable characteristics to be gathered from one test.

  9. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  10. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led tomore » the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.« less

  11. Conventional magnetic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Wolowiec, C. T.; White, B. D.; Maple, M. B.

    2015-07-01

    We discuss several classes of conventional magnetic superconductors including the ternary rhodium borides and molybdenum chalcogenides (or Chevrel phases), and the quaternary nickel-borocarbides. These materials exhibit some exotic phenomena related to the interplay between superconductivity and long-range magnetic order including: the coexistence of superconductivity and antiferromagnetic order; reentrant and double reentrant superconductivity, magnetic field induced superconductivity, and the formation of a sinusoidally-modulated magnetic state that coexists with superconductivity. We introduce the article with a discussion of the binary and pseudobinary superconducting materials containing magnetic impurities which at best exhibit short-range “glassy” magnetic order. Early experiments on these materials led to the idea of a magnetic exchange interaction between the localized spins of magnetic impurity ions and the spins of the conduction electrons which plays an important role in understanding conventional magnetic superconductors. Furthermore, these advances provide a natural foundation for investigating unconventional superconductivity in heavy-fermion compounds, cuprates, and other classes of materials in which superconductivity coexists with, or is in proximity to, a magnetically-ordered phase.

  12. A compact high field magnetic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibiao; Wang, Ze; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2014-12-01

    We present the design and performance of a simple and compact magnetic force microscope (MFM), whose tip-sample coarse approach is implemented by the piezoelectric tube scanner (PTS) itself. In brief, a square rod shaft is axially spring-clamped on the inner wall of a metal tube which is glued inside the free end of the PTS. The shaft can thus be driven by the PTS to realize image scan and inertial stepping coarse approach. To enhance the inertial force, each of the four outer electrodes of the PTS is driven by an independent port of the controller. The MFM scan head is so compact that it can easily fit into the 52mm low temperature bore of a 20T superconducting magnet. The performance of the MFM is demonstrated by imaging a manganite thin film at low temperature and in magnetic fields up to 15T. PMID:25189114

  13. High-field magnetization of Dy2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetization of powdered samples of Dy2O3 has been measured at temperatures between 1.45 deg and 4.2 K, in applied magnetic fields ranging to 7 Teslas. A linear dependence of magnetization on applied field is observable in high field region, the slope of which is independent of temperature over the range investigated. The extrapolated saturation magnetic moment is 2.77 + or - 0.08 Bohr magnetons per ion.

  14. High-field magnetization of Dy2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetization of powdered samples of Dy2O3 has been measured at temperatures between 1.45 and 4.2 K, in applied magnetic fields ranging to 70 kilogauss. A linear dependence of magnetization on applied field is observable in the high-field region, the slope of which is independent of temperature over the range investigated. The extrapolated saturation magnetic moment is about 2.77 Bohr magnetons per ion.

  15. The high field superconducting magnet program at LLNL: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Chaplin, M.R.; Kerns, J.A.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.; Slack, D.S.; Summers, L.T.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1986-12-01

    In FY 86 the program continued along several interrelated thrust areas. These thrust areas have been broadly labeled as follows: (1) Superconductor Research and Technology; (2) Magnet Systems Materials Technology; (3) Magnet Systems Design Technology; (4) High Field Test Facility; and (5) Technology Transfer.

  16. Developments in materials for high-field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.R.; Hill, M.A.; Walsh, R.P.

    1993-10-01

    Results of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory`s program of characterization of materials and fabrication techniques used in the construction of high-field pulsed magnets are reported. High-field pulsed magnets require conductors with high mechanical strength (750 MPa or greater YS at 77K) and high electrical conductivity (70% IACS or greater at RT). Electrical insulation and resin systems for vacuum impregnation with high compressive strength (500 MPa at 77K) and moderate thermal conductivity (1kW/mK at 77K) are also required. Developments and future plans for the characterization of new magnet material systems are discussed. Testing result are reported: Mechanical and fatigue testing, electrical conductivity testing and thermal expansion measurements of high strength, high conductivity conductors at cryogenic and room temperature, mechanical testing of a coil support material at cryogenic and room temperature, thermal expansion and thermal conductivity tests of an electrical insulating system at cryogenic temperatures.

  17. Applications of high dielectric materials in high field magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, Kristina Noel

    At high magnetic fields, radiation losses, wavelength effects, self-resonance, and the high resistance of components all contribute to losses in conventional RF MRI coil designs. The hypothesis tested here is that these problems can be combated by the use of high permittivity ceramic materials at high fields. High permittivity ceramic dielectric resonators create strong uniform magnetic fields in compact structures at high frequencies and can potentially solve some of the challenges of high field coil design. In this study NMR probes were constructed for operation at 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) and 900 MHz (21.1 Tesla) using inductively fed CaTiO3 (relative permittivity of 156-166) cylindrical hollow bore dielectric resonators. The designs showed the electric field is largely confined to the dielectric itself, with near zero values in the hollow bore, which accommodates the sample. The 600 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value greater than 2000. Experimental and simulation mapping of the RF field show good agreement, with the ceramic resonator giving a pulse width approximately 25% less than a loop gap resonator of similar inner dimensions. High resolution images, with voxel dimensions less than 50 microm3, have been acquired from fixed zebrafish samples, showing excellent delineation of several fine structures. The 900 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value of 940 and shows Q performance five times better than Alderman-Grant and loop-gap resonators of similar dimensions. High resolution images were acquired of an excised mouse spinal cord (25 microm 3) and an excised rat soleus muscle (20 microm3). The spatial distribution of electromagnetic fields within the human body can be tailored using external dielectric materials. Here, a new material is introduced with high dielectric constant and low background MRI signal. The material is based upon metal titanates, which can be made into geometrically formable suspensions in de-ionized water. The suspension's material properties are

  18. Superconducting Nb3Ge for high-field magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginski, A. I.; Daniel, M. R.; Roland, C. W.; Woollam, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Superconducting Nb3Ge tape conductors 5 to 10 m long were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition. Such tapes could be used in high-field magnet applications. Average tape properties set the upper performance limit of a magnet at 17 teslas (4.2 K). Highest critical-current densities obtained in thin and layered films set the upper performance limit at 20 teslas (4.2 K).

  19. High-field Magnet Development toward the High Luminosity LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio

    2014-07-01

    The upcoming Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on the use of Accelerator Quality Nb3Sn Magnets which have been the focus of an intense R&D effort in the last decade. This contribution will describe the R&D and results of Nb3Sn Accelerator Quality High Field Magnets development efforts, with emphasis on the activities considered for the HL-LHC upgrades.

  20. Survey of high field superconducting material for accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Scahlan, R.; Greene, A.F.; Suenaga, M.

    1986-05-01

    The high field superconductors which could be used in accelerator dipole magnets are surveyed, ranking these candidates with respect to ease of fabrication and cost as well as superconducting properties. Emphasis is on Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi. 27 refs., 2 figs. (LEW)

  1. High Field Magnet R&D in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, Stephen A.

    2003-06-24

    Accelerator magnet technology is currently dominated by the use of NbTi superconductor. New and more demanding applications for superconducting accelerator magnets require the use of alternative materials. Several programs in the US are taking advantage of recent improvements in Nb{sub 3}Sn to develop high field magnets for new applications. Highlights and challenges of the US R&D program are presented along with the status of conductor development. In addition, a new R&D focus, the US LHC Accelerator Research Program, will be discussed.

  2. Homogenous BSCCO-2212 Round Wires for Very High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Scott Campbell Dr. Terry Holesinger Dr. Ybing Huang

    2012-06-30

    The performance demands on modern particle accelerators generate a relentless push towards higher field magnets. In turn, advanced high field magnet development places increased demands on superconducting materials. Nb3Sn conductors have been used to achieve 16 T in a prototype dipole magnet and are thought to have the capability for {approx}18 T for accelerator magnets (primarily dipoles but also higher order multipole magnets). However there have been suggestions and proposals for such magnets higher than 20 T. The High Energy Physics Community (HEP) has identified important new physics opportunities that are enabled by extremely high field magnets: 20 to 50 T solenoids for muon cooling in a muon collider (impact: understanding of neutrinos and dark matter); and 20+ T dipoles and quadrupoles for high energy hadron colliders (impact: discovery reach far beyond present). This proposal addresses the latest SBIR solicitation that calls for grant applications that seek to develop new or improved superconducting wire technologies for magnets that operate at a minimum of 12 Tesla (T) field, with increases up to 15 to 20 T sought in the near future (three to five years). The long-term development of accelerator magnets with fields greater than 20 T will require superconducting wires having significantly better high-field properties than those possessed by current Nb{sub 3}Sn or other A15 based wires. Given the existing materials science base for Bi-2212 wire processing, we believe that Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) round wires can be produced in km-long piece lengths with properties suitable to meet both the near term and long term needs of the HEP community. The key advance will be the translation of this materials science base into a robust, high-yield wire technology. While the processing and application of A15 materials have advanced to a much higher level than those of the copper oxide-based, high T{sub c} (HTS) counterparts, the HTS materials have

  3. High-field small animal magnetic resonance oncology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High-field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRS as well as diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level dependent contrast imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies.

  4. A Common Coil Design for High Field 2-in-1 Accelerator Magnets^*.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper presents a common coil design concept for 2-in-1 superconducting accelerator magnets. It practically eliminates the major problems in the ends of high field magnets built with either high temperature or conventional superconductors. Racetrack coils, consisting of rectangular blocks built with either superconducting cables or tapes, are common to both apertures with each aperture containing one half of each coil. The two apertures are in the same vertical plane in an over-under geometry. A set of common flat coils are placed vertically on left and right side of the two apertures producing field in the opposite directions. The ends are easy to wind with the conductors experiencing little strain. The ends can be fully supported by a simple 2-d geometry to contain the large Lorentz forces. The overall magnet design, construction and tooling are also expected to be simpler than in conventional cosine theta magnets. The block design for high field magnets uses more conductor than the cosine theta design but is preferred for dealing with the large Lorentz forces in the body of the magnet. The concept is also suitable for a variety of other high field superconducting, moderate field superferric, multi-aperture and combined function magnet designs. ^*Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Voltage spike detection in high field superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, D.F.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.M.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A measurement system for the detection of small magnetic flux changes in superconducting magnets, which are due to either mechanical motion of the conductor or flux jump, has been developed at Fermilab. These flux changes are detected as small amplitude, short duration voltage spikes, which are {approx}15mV in magnitude and lasts for {approx}30 {micro}sec. The detection system combines an analog circuit for the signal conditioning of two coil segments and a fast data acquisition system for digitizing the results, performing threshold detection, and storing the resultant data. The design of the spike detection system along with the modeling results and noise analysis will be presented. Data from tests of high field Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets at currents up to {approx}20KA will also be shown.

  6. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  7. Ultra-high field magnets for whole-body MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Rory

    2016-09-01

    For whole-body MRI, an ultra-high field (UHF) magnet is currently defined as a system operating at 7 T or above. Over 70 UHF magnets have been built, all with the same technical approach originally developed by Magnex Scientific Ltd. The preferred coil configuration is a compensated solenoid. In this case, the majority of the field is generated by a simple long solenoid that stretches the entire length of the magnet. Additional coils are wound on a separate former outside the main windings with the purpose of balancing the homogeneity. Most of the magnets currently in operation are passively shielded systems where the magnet is surrounded by a steel box of 200–870 tonnes of carbon steel. More recently actively shielded magnets have been built for operation at 7 T; in this case the stray field is controlled by with reverse turns wound on a separate former outside the primary coils. Protection against quench damage is much more complex with an actively shielded magnet design due to the requirement to prevent the stray field from increasing during a quench. In the case of the 7 T 900 magnet this controlled by combining some of the screening coils into each section of the protection circuit. Correction of the field variations caused by manufacturing tolerances and environmental effects are made with a combination of superconducting shims and passive shims. Modern UHF magnets operate in zero boil-off mode with the use of cryocoolers with cooling capacity at 4.2 K. Although there are no cryogen costs associated with normal operation UHF magnets require a significant volume (10 000–20 000 l) of liquid helium for the cool-down. Liquid helium is expensive therefore new methods of cool-down using high-power cryocoolers are being implemented to reduce the requirement.

  8. Ultra-high field magnets for whole-body MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Rory

    2016-09-01

    For whole-body MRI, an ultra-high field (UHF) magnet is currently defined as a system operating at 7 T or above. Over 70 UHF magnets have been built, all with the same technical approach originally developed by Magnex Scientific Ltd. The preferred coil configuration is a compensated solenoid. In this case, the majority of the field is generated by a simple long solenoid that stretches the entire length of the magnet. Additional coils are wound on a separate former outside the main windings with the purpose of balancing the homogeneity. Most of the magnets currently in operation are passively shielded systems where the magnet is surrounded by a steel box of 200-870 tonnes of carbon steel. More recently actively shielded magnets have been built for operation at 7 T; in this case the stray field is controlled by with reverse turns wound on a separate former outside the primary coils. Protection against quench damage is much more complex with an actively shielded magnet design due to the requirement to prevent the stray field from increasing during a quench. In the case of the 7 T 900 magnet this controlled by combining some of the screening coils into each section of the protection circuit. Correction of the field variations caused by manufacturing tolerances and environmental effects are made with a combination of superconducting shims and passive shims. Modern UHF magnets operate in zero boil-off mode with the use of cryocoolers with cooling capacity at 4.2 K. Although there are no cryogen costs associated with normal operation UHF magnets require a significant volume (10 000-20 000 l) of liquid helium for the cool-down. Liquid helium is expensive therefore new methods of cool-down using high-power cryocoolers are being implemented to reduce the requirement.

  9. Developments at the High Field Magnet Laboratory in Nijmegen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perenboom, J. A. A. J.; Maan, J. C.; van Breukelen, M. R.; Wiegers, S. A. J.; den Ouden, A.; Wulffers, C. A.; van der Zande, W. J.; Jongma, R. T.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Redlich, B.

    2013-03-01

    The High Field Magnet Laboratory at the Radboud University Nijmegen is rapidly expanding its capabilities. The developments encompass both organizational changes and new possibilities for research. The organization of the HFML was strengthened as a consequence of stronger participation of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), and an increase of the core-funding. This change makes that HFML is now considered on a national level as large research facility that operates at an international scale. At the same time work is underway to build new and powerful magnets, and provide electromagnetic radiation for magneto-spectroscopic studies. Electromagnetic radiation in the infrared and far-infrared spectrum will soon be available in the HFML with wavelengths between 3 μm and 1.5 mm, produced by the `FELIX' facility, comprising the long-wavelength free electron laser `FLARE' that in September 2011 produced its first light and the free electron lasers that have been moved from Rijnhuizen to Nijmegen. In magnet technology great strides are made to make magnets available for the user community with unprecedented performance: late in 2012 we hope to commission a new all-resistive magnet system that will generate a steady magnetic field as high as 38 T, by fully exploiting the maximum power of the installation, i.e. 20 MW, and using all available improvements in the design and construction of `Florida-Bitter' resistive magnets. We are also well underway with the design of a 45 T hybrid magnet system, using Nb3Sn superconductors and wind-and-react Cable-in-Conduit technology.

  10. High Field Small Animal Magnetic Resonance Oncology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) imaging, and hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy as well as diffusion-weighted, Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) contrast imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies. PMID:24374985

  11. SKEW QUADRUPOLES IN RHIC DIPOLE MAGNETS AT HIGH FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; GUPTA, P.; THOMPSON, P.; WANDERER, P.

    1995-06-11

    In the RHIC arc dipoles, the center of the cold mass lies above the center of the cryostat. At the maximum design field, the magnetic flux lines leak through the yoke to the asymmetrically located cryostat, which provides an additional return path. This introduces a systematic top-bottom asymmetry leading to a skew quadrupole term at high fields. A similar asymmetry is also created by any difference in weights of the upper and the lower yoke halves. Data from measurements of several RHIC dipoles are presented to study this effect. In the current production series of the RDIC dipoles, an attempt is made to compensate the effect of the cryostat by an asymmetry in the iron yoke. Seven dipoles with this type of yoke have been cold tested, and show a reduced saturation in the skew quadrupole term, as expected.

  12. Improved capacitive stress transducers for high-field superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Christopher Pete; Holik, Eddie Frank, III; Jaisle, Andrew; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.

    2012-06-01

    High-field (12-18 Tesla) superconducting magnets are required to enable an increase in the energy of future colliders. Such field strength requires the use of Nb3Sn superconductor, which has limited tolerance for compressive and shear strain. A strategy for stress management has been developed at Texas A&M University and is being implemented in TAMU3, a short-model 14 Tesla stress-managed Nb3Sn block dipole. The strategy includes the use of laminar capacitive stress transducers to monitor the stresses within the coil package. We have developed fabrication techniques and fixtures, which improve the reproducibility of the transducer response both at room temperature and during cryogenic operation. This is a report of the status of transducer development.

  13. Graded High Field Nb3Sn Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.

    2007-06-01

    Dipole magnets with fields beyond 16T will require superconducting coils that are at least 40 mm thick, an applied pres-stress around 150 MPa and a protection scheme for stored energy in the range of 1-2 MJ/m. The coil size will have a direct impact on the overall magnet cost and the stored energy will raise new questions on protection. To reduce coil size and minimize risk, the coil may have to be graded. Grading is achieved by splitting the coil into several layers with current densities that match the short sample field in each layer. Grading, especially at high fields, can be effective; however it will also significantly raise the stress. In this paper we report on the results of a study on the coil size and field relation to that of the stress and stored energy. We then extend the results to graded coils and attempt to address high stress issues and ways to reduce it.

  14. Open half-volume quadrature transverse electromagnetic coil for high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Peshkovsky, A S; Kennan, R P; Fabry, M E; Avdievich, N I

    2005-04-01

    A half-volume quadrature head transverse electromagnetic (TEM) coil has been constructed for 4 T imaging applications. This coil produces a sufficiently large homogeneous B(1) field region for the use as a volume coil. It provides superior transmission efficiency, resulting in significantly lower power deposition, as well as greater sensitivity and improved patient comfort and accessibility compared with conventional full-volume coils. Additionally, this coil suppresses the RF penetration artifact that distorts the RF magnetic field profile and alters the intensity in high-field images recorded with linear surface and volume coils. These advantages make it possible to apply this device as an efficient transmit/receive coil for high-field imaging with a restricted field of view.

  15. Exploration of Traveling Waves in High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Zachary

    2010-10-01

    MRI has been a remarkable means of medical imaging for the last three decades without exposure to ionizing radiation. The increase in MRI signal with the increase of magnetic field strength is the main motive in a move towards imaging at higher field strengths. However, the advent of higher field strength MRI has come with the challenge of maintaining homogeneous excitation fields (B1). One promising solution to this has been to transmit radio-frequency (RF) signals using a patch antenna instead of the usual RF coil. This technique exploits the theory of waveguides and traveling waves typically used in high frequency applications. In this particular study we have investigated this unique application by measuring B1 maps, geometric distortions, and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in order to better quantify its potential in MRI. Using phantoms to match the similar physical features of the human head/torso region, we ran comparative scans using the traveling wave setup versus the conventional head volume coil setup on a Philips 7 Tesla MRI scanner. The goal of this experiment was to systematically measure B1 maps for flip angle efficiency and multi-planar rendering images for geometric distortion. Although the application of traveling wave in MRI does suffer from low excitation (small flip angles), there seems to be little to no correlation between traveling wave phase variability and frequency/phase encoding. Therefore, further experiments, if carried out, may enhance image quality such as RF shielding, the use of local receive coils, and/or the addition of a second patch antenna.

  16. A low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator.

    PubMed

    Secoli, Riccardo; Robinson, Matthew; Brugnoli, Michele; Rodriguez y Baena, Ferdinando

    2015-03-01

    To perform minimally invasive surgical interventions with the aid of robotic systems within a magnetic resonance imaging scanner offers significant advantages compared to conventional surgery. However, despite the numerous exciting potential applications of this technology, the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging-compatible robotics has been hampered by safety, reliability and cost concerns: the robots should not be attracted by the strong magnetic field of the scanner and should operate reliably in the field without causing distortion to the scan data. Development of non-conventional sensors and/or actuators is thus required to meet these strict operational and safety requirements. These demands commonly result in expensive actuators, which mean that cost effectiveness remains a major challenge for such robotic systems. This work presents a low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator: a pneumatic stepper motor which is controllable in open loop or closed loop, along with a rotary encoder, both fully manufactured in plastic, which are shown to perform reliably via a set of in vitro trials while generating negligible artifacts when imaged within a standard clinical scanner. PMID:25833997

  17. High Field Magnetization measurements of uranium dioxide single crystals (P08358- E003-PF)

    SciTech Connect

    Gofryk, K.; Harrison, N.; Jaime, M.

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary high field magnetic measurements of UO2 are consistent with a complex nature of the magnetic ordering in this material, compatible with the previously proposed non-collinear 3-k magnetic structure. Further extensive magnetic studies on well-oriented (<100 > and <111>) UO2 crystals are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states at high fields.

  18. Design for a high field combined function superferric magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. C.; Morgan, G. H.

    A combined function superferric magnet option was investigated for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The option requires the maximum value of the field in the magnet to be much higher than that achieved in any existing combined function accelerator magnet. A model is presented in which a good field quality can be maintained up to 2T. It is done by carefully designing the yoke structure and positioning the coils in such a way that the iron poles tend to saturate evenly across the gap. A cold iron model might be necessary for this magnet.

  19. Superconductor Requirements and Characterization for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, E.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2015-05-01

    The 2014 Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel (P5) strategic plan for U.S. High Energy Physics (HEP) endorses a continued world leadership role in superconducting magnet technology for future Energy Frontier Programs. This includes 10 to 15 T Nb3Sn accelerator magnets for LHC upgrades and a future 100 TeV scale pp collider, and as ultimate goal that of developing magnet technologies above 20 T based on both High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) and Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) for accelerator magnets. To achieve these objectives, a sound conductor development and characterization program is needed and is herein described. This program is intended to be conducted in close collaboration with U.S. and International labs, Universities and Industry.

  20. Quasi permanent superconducting magnet of very high field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Y.; Liu, J.; Weinstein, R.; Chen, I. G.; Parks, D.; Xu, J.; Obot, V.; Foster, C.

    1993-01-01

    We report on persistent field in a quasi-permanent magnet made of high temperature superconductor. The material has an average of 40 percent molar excess of Y, relative to Y1Ba2Cu3O7 and has been irradiated with high energy light ions at 200 MeV. The magnet, which traps 1.52 T at 77.3 K, traps nearly 4 T at 64.5 K. No evidence of giant flux jump or sample cracking was observed.

  1. Magnetic Semiconductor Quantum Wells in High Fields to 60 Tesla: Photoluminescence Linewidth Annealing at Magnetization Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Awschalom, D.D.; Crooker, S.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Rickel, D.G.; Samarth, N.

    1999-05-24

    Magnetic semiconductors offer a unique possibility for strongly tuning the intrinsic alloy disorder potential with applied magnetic field. We report the direct observation of a series of step-like reductions in the magnetic alloy disorder potential in single ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se quantum wells between O and 60 Tesla. This disorder, measured through the linewidth of low temperature photoluminescence spectra drops abruptly at -19, 36, and 53 Tesla, in concert with observed magnetization steps. Conventional models of alloy disorder (developed for nonmagnetic semiconductors) reproduce the general shape of the data, but markedly underestimate the size of the linewidth reduction.

  2. 15 Years of R&D on high field accelerator magnets at FNAL

    DOE PAGES

    Barzi, Emanuela; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2016-07-01

    The High Field Magnet (HFM) Program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) has been developing Nb3Sn superconducting magnets, materials and technologies for present and future particle accelerators since the late 1990s. This paper summarizes the main results of the Nb3Sn accelerator magnet and superconductor R&D at FNAL and outlines the Program next steps.

  3. Gap Filling Ceramic Insulating Putty for High Field Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, J. A.; Rice, H. M.

    2008-03-01

    Gaps between the A15 superconducting cable and its supports can sometimes occur requiring expensive rework of the support or filling with a non-optimal material. Recently, a new ceramic putty has been developed that can fill these gaps to fully support the superconducting cable. This ceramic material can withstand the extreme temperature differences between the high temperature heat treatment and the cryogenic operation. Significant performance improvements have been made that will enable the insulating putty to be used in some accelerator magnet systems. Processing methods will be discussed as well as strength and thermal data.

  4. High-Field Magnetization of the Pyrochlore Compound Gd2Ti2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narumi, Yasuo; Kikkawa, Akiko; Katsumata, Koichi; Honda, Zentaro; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Kindo, Koichi

    2006-09-01

    High-field magnetization measurements have been preformed on a single crystal sample of the pyrochlore compound Gd2Ti2O7 using a pulse magnet in conjunction with a dilution refrigerator. The magnetization curve at 0.3 K reveals two magnetic phase transitions when the magnetic field is applied along b [111]. At temperatures slightly above TN, a magnetization plateau appears around 5 T and the magnetization increases again from about 15 T with a convex curvature. It is considered that this crossover is due to a competition among thermal fluctuations, short-range antiferromagnetic ordering and geometrical frustration.

  5. Very-high-field magnetic resonance imaging: instrumentation and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Kelley, D A; Schenck, J F

    1999-02-01

    Because of their advantage in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, high-field magnetic resonance imaging systems have become favored in the last few years for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) applications. In many ways the conceptual development of these high-field scanners has involved more-or-less straightforward extensions of practices at lower field strengths. However, in other ways specific engineering challenges have been encountered and largely overcome in the quest for scanners capable of realizing the advantages of high-field systems. An understanding of the technical trade-offs that can be made in terms of hardware performance is useful in deciding on the optimum system for a given fMRI application. In this article the technical issues surrounding high-field scanning are reviewed in the context of a typical brain mapping protocol. In addition there is a discussion of the safety issues related to the use of these systems.

  6. Nb$_3$Sn High Field Magnets for the High Luminosity LHC Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosio, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN requires a new generation of high field superconducting magnets. High field large aperture quadrupoles (MQXF) are needed for the low-beta triplets close to the ATLAS and CMS detectors, and high field two-in-one dipoles (11 T dipoles) are needed to make room for additional collimation. The MQXF quadrupoles, with a field gradient of 140 T/m in 150 mm aperture, have a peak coil field of 12.1 T at nominal current. The 11 T dipoles, with an aperture of 60 mm, have a peak coil field of 11.6 T at nominal current. Both magnets require Nb3Sn conductor and are the first applications of this superconductor to actual accelerator magnets.

  7. New high homogeneity 55T pulsed magnet for high field NMR.

    PubMed

    Orlova, A; Frings, P; Suleiman, M; Rikken, G L J A

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed magnets can produce magnetic fields largely exceeding those achieved with resistive or even hybrid magnets. This kind of magnet is indispensable in studies of field-induced phenomena which occur only in high magnetic field. A new high homogeneous pulsed magnet capable of producing field up to 55T and specially designed for NMR experiments was built and tested. Experimentally observed homogeneity of magnetic field in central part of the magnet is 10ppm over a sample volume of 2-3mm(3) at 12T and 30ppm at 47T, which are the best values ever reported for a pulsed magnet. Reasons which affect the field profile and reduce homogeneity at high field are discussed. PMID:27179456

  8. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Hoard, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  9. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  10. The spheromak as a prototype for ultra-high-field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.; Jardin, S.C.

    1987-08-01

    In view of current progress in the development of superconductor materials, the ultimate high-field limit of superconducting magnets is likely to be set by mechanical stress problems. Maximum field strength should be attainable by means of approximately force-free magnet windings having favorable ''MHD'' stability properties (so that small winding errors will not grow). Since a low-beta finite-flux-hole spheromak configuration qualifies as a suitable prototype, the theoretical and experimental spheromak research effort of the past decade has served to create a substantial technical basis for the design of ultra-high-field superconducting coils. 11 refs.

  11. Comparison of conventional and novel quadrupole drift tube magnets inspired by Klaus Halbach

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.

    1995-02-01

    Quadrupole drift tube magnets for a heavy-ion linac provide a demanding application of magnet technology. A comparison is made of three different solutions to the problem of providing an adjustable high-field-strength quadrupole magnet in a small volume. A conventional tape-wound electromagnet quadrupole magnet (conventional) is compared with an adjustable permanent-magnet/iron quadrupole magnet (hybrid) and a laced permanent-magnet/iron/electromagnet (laced). Data is presented from magnets constructed for the SuperHILAC heavy-ion linear accelerator, and conclusions are drawn for various applications.

  12. Development of High-Field Permanent Magnetic Circuits for NMRI/MRI and Imaging on Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangxin; Xie, Huantong; Hou, Shulian; Chen, Wei; Yang, Xiuhong

    2016-01-01

    The high-field permanent magnetic circuits of 1.2 T and 1.5 T with novel magnetic focusing and curved-surface correction are developed. The permanent magnetic circuit comprises a magnetic yoke, main magnetic steel, nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles, plugging magnetic steel, and side magnetic steel. In this work, a novel shimming method is proposed for the effective correction of base magnetic field (B 0) inhomogeneities, which is based on passive shimming on the telescope aspheric cutting, grinding, and fine processing technology of the nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles and active shimming adding higher-order gradient coils. Meanwhile, the magnetic resonance imaging dedicated alloy with high-saturation magnetic field induction intensity and high electrical resistivity is developed, and nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles which are made of the dedicated alloy have very good anti-eddy-current effect. In addition, the large temperature coefficient problem of permanent magnet can be effectively controlled by using a high quality temperature controller and deuterium external locking technique. Combining our patents such as gradient coil, RF coil, and integration computer software, two kinds of small animal Micro-MRI instruments are developed, by which the high quality MRI images of mice were obtained. PMID:27034951

  13. Development of High-Field Permanent Magnetic Circuits for NMRI/MRI and Imaging on Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangxin; Xie, Huantong; Hou, Shulian; Chen, Wei; Yang, Xiuhong

    2016-01-01

    The high-field permanent magnetic circuits of 1.2 T and 1.5 T with novel magnetic focusing and curved-surface correction are developed. The permanent magnetic circuit comprises a magnetic yoke, main magnetic steel, nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles, plugging magnetic steel, and side magnetic steel. In this work, a novel shimming method is proposed for the effective correction of base magnetic field (B0) inhomogeneities, which is based on passive shimming on the telescope aspheric cutting, grinding, and fine processing technology of the nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles and active shimming adding higher-order gradient coils. Meanwhile, the magnetic resonance imaging dedicated alloy with high-saturation magnetic field induction intensity and high electrical resistivity is developed, and nonspherical curved-surface magnetic poles which are made of the dedicated alloy have very good anti-eddy-current effect. In addition, the large temperature coefficient problem of permanent magnet can be effectively controlled by using a high quality temperature controller and deuterium external locking technique. Combining our patents such as gradient coil, RF coil, and integration computer software, two kinds of small animal Micro-MRI instruments are developed, by which the high quality MRI images of mice were obtained. PMID:27034951

  14. Numerical simulation of screening current distribution in HTS tape of high field magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Ryusei; Oga, Yuki; Noguchi, So; Igarashi, Hajime; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, properties of high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes, especially in-field performance and mechanical strength, have been continuously improved. The HTS tapes have been widely used for high field (>20 T) magnet researches and there are several technical challenges including field attenuation of an HTS magnet by screening currents induced within the HTS tapes. Several publications reported that the screening currents, induced by penetration of self magnetic fields into HTS tapes within an HTS magnet, weakened a field constant of the HTS magnet. The result may demonstrate that the screening current changes an overall current density distribution in HTS tapes and, as a consequence, the generated magnetic field. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the screening current distribution in an HTS tape. This paper reports numerical simulation of the screening current distribution in an HTS tape of high field magnets using 2D finite element method with the E-J characteristic of the HTS tape taken into account. Self magnetic field distribution and its orientation to the HTS tape are also considered to compute critical currents and locally generated electric fields, two key components to figure out the distribution of screening currents.

  15. Light weight, high field, stable, superconducting magnets for advanced transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lubell, M.S.; Dresner, L.; Kenney, W.J.; Lue, J.W.; Luton, J.N.; Schwenterly, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    Although the Guideway may be the most expensive component of a MAGLEV system, the importance of a suitable magnet system should not be underestimated. The reliability of operation of MAGLEV depends on the superconducting magnets performing to their specifications in a reliable manner (i.e., without training or quenching). Besides reliability the magnets should produce high field, be sufficiently stable to withstand reasonable perturbations, be light weight, be protected in the event of a quench, and be economical (although performance should outweigh cost). We propose to develop superconducting magnets that have these features. Our magnet designs are based on internally cooled, cable-in-conduit superconductor with Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC) as the structural reinforcement. Although the initial work is with metallic superconductors such as NbTi, the processes being developed will be applicable to the High Temperature Ceramic Superconductors when they become suitable for magnet applications.

  16. The design and construction of high field-uniformity permanent magnet system for MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.X.; Jiang, X.H.; Han, S. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the permanent magnet system used for MRI has some advantages: the lower cost/field ratio in the range of magnetic field 1.5-3.0 kG; no need power supply and cryogenic equipment. So, the MRI device with a permanent magnet system has marketable value. The MRI device requires a high field-uniformity magnet system. The necessary field-uniformity is better than several tens of ppm in a 30 cm diameter spherical volume. Generally, the shim coils can be used for correcting the magnetic field in working area, but the authors developed a passive method to correct the field-uniformity. First, the specially designed ferromagnetic pole pieces are disposed onto the surfaces of the main permanent magnet poles to improve the field-uniformity preliminarily. Then, the necessary field-uniformity will be obtained by using the magneto-dipoles which are suitably placed in the field domain.

  17. Development of superconducting magnet for high-field MR systems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zanming; van Oort, Johannes M.; Zou, Mark X.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we describe the development of superconducting magnets for high-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) by various businesses and institutions in China. As the Chinese MR market rapidly expands, many foreign and domestic companies and research institutions are joining the race to meet the burgeoning demand by developing key MRI components for various magnetic field configurations. After providing a brief introduction to research on MRI superconducting magnets that dates back to the 1980s, the first large-bore 1.5 T superconducting magnet with 50-cm DSV for whole-body MRI - successfully developed and manufactured by AllTech Medical Systems in Chengdu, China-is presented and its specifications are described.

  18. High field superconducting magnets (12 T and greater) for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.; Summers, L.T.; Kerns, J.A.

    1986-07-09

    The technology for producing high fields in large superconducting magnets has increased greatly in recent years, but must increase still more in the future. In this paper, we examine the present state of the art vis-a-vis the needs of a next-generation fusion machine and outline a program to provide for those needs. We also highlight recent developments that suggest the program goals are within reach.

  19. Magnetic properties of natural and synthetic olivines: high-field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferre, E. C.; Martin-Hernandez, F.

    2004-12-01

    Olivine [(Fex, Mg1-x)2 SiO4] is an orthosilicate solid solution between fayalite [Fe2 SiO4] and forsterite [Mg2 SiO4]. Olivine is a major constituent of the Earth mantle that is abundant in oceanic and continental peridotites and mantle xenoliths. The magnetic properties of olivines have been previously investigated using gem quality natural crystals known as peridots (Zabargad) or using laboratory grown synthetic crystals. Magnetic investigations are generally performed using low magnetic field or neutron diffraction techniques. Optical microscopy and TEM imagery reveal that most olivine crystals host iron oxides formed by exsolution during cooling. Theoretically, the magnetic susceptibility of olivine should decrease linearly from fayalite to fayalite as a function of the Fe content. The magnetic behavior should range from antiferromagnetic at high Fe content, paramagnetic at intermediate Fe contents and diamagnetic at very low Fe contents. New magnetic measurements, performed on various high field instruments (vibrating sample magnetometer, torque magnetometer, cantilever magnetometer), both on natural and synthetic samples, display ferromagnetic behavior, interpreted as due to the systematic presence of titanomagnetite inclusions in olivine crystals. These results emphasize the need to conduct measurements in high field in order to isolate the intrinsic paramagnetic properties of olivines. These measurements demonstrate the orthorhombic nature of the intrinsic paramagnetic properties, but also yield new data concerning the relationship between crystallographic axes, magnetic anisotropy and other physical anisotropies: [100] = K1, [010] = K2 and [001] = K3. Preliminary results also indicate substantial variations in degree of paramagnetic anisotropy (P) and paramagnetic shape factor (T). For Fo92, P = 1.359 and T = -0.845. These intrinsic paramagnetic properties are used to model the magnetic behavior of olivine across a range of temperatures relevant to

  20. Magnetism in CeRhIn5 at high fields measured by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mounce, A. M.; Ronning, F.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.

    2015-03-01

    De Haas-van Alphen measurements of CeRhIn5 at ambient pressure show an abrupt change in the Fermi surface volume at high fields, H* ~ 30 T, and low temperatures resulting in antiferromagnetic phases with a small Fermi surface at fields below H* and a large Fermi surface at fields H such that H* < H < 50 T. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the ideal probe for these magnetic states as the microscopic details are still lacking. Our preliminary NMR measurements find the magnetic order for H ∥ c is incommensurate up to 30 T as opposed to H ⊥ c which transitions from incommensurate to commensurate at H ~ 2 T. Furthermore, we find that the magnetic moment decreases near 17 T for H ∥ c . These measurements provide an insight into the magnetic anisotropy of CeRhIn5 and are a crucial step to studying its high field phases. Work at Los Alamos was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Materials and Engineering.

  1. Formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs from common envelopes.

    PubMed

    Nordhaus, Jason; Wellons, Sarah; Spiegel, David S; Metzger, Brian D; Blackman, Eric G

    2011-02-22

    The origin of highly magnetized white dwarfs has remained a mystery since their initial discovery. Recent observations indicate that the formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs is intimately related to strong binary interactions during post-main-sequence phases of stellar evolution. If a low-mass companion, such as a planet, brown dwarf, or low-mass star, is engulfed by a post-main-sequence giant, gravitational torques in the envelope of the giant lead to a reduction of the companion's orbit. Sufficiently low-mass companions in-spiral until they are shredded by the strong gravitational tides near the white dwarf core. Subsequent formation of a super-Eddington accretion disk from the disrupted companion inside a common envelope can dramatically amplify magnetic fields via a dynamo. Here, we show that these disk-generated fields are sufficiently strong to explain the observed range of magnetic field strengths for isolated, high-field magnetic white dwarfs. A higher-mass binary analogue may also contribute to the origin of magnetar fields. PMID:21300910

  2. Formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs from common envelopes.

    PubMed

    Nordhaus, Jason; Wellons, Sarah; Spiegel, David S; Metzger, Brian D; Blackman, Eric G

    2011-02-22

    The origin of highly magnetized white dwarfs has remained a mystery since their initial discovery. Recent observations indicate that the formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs is intimately related to strong binary interactions during post-main-sequence phases of stellar evolution. If a low-mass companion, such as a planet, brown dwarf, or low-mass star, is engulfed by a post-main-sequence giant, gravitational torques in the envelope of the giant lead to a reduction of the companion's orbit. Sufficiently low-mass companions in-spiral until they are shredded by the strong gravitational tides near the white dwarf core. Subsequent formation of a super-Eddington accretion disk from the disrupted companion inside a common envelope can dramatically amplify magnetic fields via a dynamo. Here, we show that these disk-generated fields are sufficiently strong to explain the observed range of magnetic field strengths for isolated, high-field magnetic white dwarfs. A higher-mass binary analogue may also contribute to the origin of magnetar fields.

  3. Formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs from common envelopes

    PubMed Central

    Nordhaus, Jason; Wellons, Sarah; Spiegel, David S.; Metzger, Brian D.; Blackman, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    The origin of highly magnetized white dwarfs has remained a mystery since their initial discovery. Recent observations indicate that the formation of high-field magnetic white dwarfs is intimately related to strong binary interactions during post-main-sequence phases of stellar evolution. If a low-mass companion, such as a planet, brown dwarf, or low-mass star, is engulfed by a post-main-sequence giant, gravitational torques in the envelope of the giant lead to a reduction of the companion’s orbit. Sufficiently low-mass companions in-spiral until they are shredded by the strong gravitational tides near the white dwarf core. Subsequent formation of a super-Eddington accretion disk from the disrupted companion inside a common envelope can dramatically amplify magnetic fields via a dynamo. Here, we show that these disk-generated fields are sufficiently strong to explain the observed range of magnetic field strengths for isolated, high-field magnetic white dwarfs. A higher-mass binary analogue may also contribute to the origin of magnetar fields. PMID:21300910

  4. A high-field (30 Tesla) pulsed magnet instrument for single-crystal scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Zahirul; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Narumi, Yasuo; Lang, Jonathan

    2010-03-01

    Pulsed magnets have emerged as a viable approach at synchrotron x-ray facilities for studying materials in high magnetic fields. We are developing a new high-field (30 Tesla) pulsed magnet system for single-crystal x-ray diffraction studies. It consists of a single 18mm-bore solenoid, designed and built at Tohoku University using high-tensile-strength and high conductivity CuAg wires. A dual-cryostat scheme has been developed at Advanced Photon Source in order to cool the coil using liquid nitrogen and the sample using a closed-cycle cryostat independently. Liquid nitrogen cooling allows repetition rate of a few minutes for peak fields near 30 Tesla. This scheme is unique in that it allows the applied magnetic field to be parallel to the scattering plane. Time-resolved scattering data are typically collected using a fast one-dimensional strip detector. Opportunities and challenges for experiments and instrumentation will be discussed.

  5. Low magnetic moment PIN diodes for high field MRI surface coils.

    PubMed

    Voskoboynik, Pavel; Joos, Ronald D; Doherty, W E; Goldfarb, Ron B

    2006-12-01

    Positive-intrinsic-negative (PIN) silicon diodes are commonly used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coils to perform active or passive blocking and detuning, or to disable circuit functions. However, diode packages with large magnetic moments are known to cause image artifacts in high field MRI systems. In this study, diode packages with low magnetic moment were designed by compensating components of ferromagnetic nickel and paramagnetic tungsten with diamagnetic silver. The new diodes have an initial positive susceptibility up to fields of 1 T and a negative susceptibility from 1 to 7 T. Their magnetic moments are one to two orders of magnitude smaller than those of standard diodes; moments as small as 20 nJ/T at 7 T were achieved. PMID:17278801

  6. High Field Pulsed Magnets for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granroth, G. E.; Lee, J.; Fogh, E.; Christensen, N. B.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Nojiri, H.

    2015-03-01

    A High Field Pulsed Magnet (HFPM) setup, is in use at the Spallation Nuetron Source(SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. With this device, we recently measured the high field magnetic spin structure of LiNiPO4. The results of this study will be highlighted as an example of possible measurements that can be performed with this device. To further extend the HFPM capabilities at SNS, we have learned to design and wind these coils in house. This contribution will summarize the magnet coil design optimization procedure. Specifically by varying the geometry of the multi-layer coil, we arrive at a design that balances the maximum field strength, neutron scattering angle, and the field homogeneity for a specific set of parameters. We will show that a 6.3kJ capacitor bank, can provide a magnetic field as high as 30T for a maximum scattering angle around 40° with homogeneity of +/- 4 % in a 2mm diameter spherical volume. We will also compare the calculations to measurements from a recently wound test coil. This work was supported in part by the Lab Directors' Research and Development Fund of ORNL.

  7. Characterization of Plasma Discharges in a High-Field Magnetic Tandem Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.

    1998-01-01

    High density magnetized plasma discharges in open-ended geometries, like Tandem Mirrors, have a variety of space applications. Chief among them is the production of variable Specific Impulse (I(sub sp)) and variable thrust in a magnetic nozzle. Our research group is pursuing the experimental characterization of such discharges in our high-field facility located at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL). These studies focus on identifying plasma stability criteria as functions of density, temperature and magnetic field strength. Plasma heating is accomplished by both Electron and Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ECR and ICR) at frequencies of 2-3 Ghz and 1-30 Mhz respectively, for both Hydrogen and Helium. Electron density and temperature has measured by movable Langmuir probes. Macroscopic plasma stability is being investigated in ongoing research.

  8. Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of the basal ganglia and related structures

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Birgit R.; Temel, Yasin; Roebroeck, Alard; Uludağ, Kâmil; Ivanov, Dimo; Kuijf, Mark L.; ter Haar Romenij, Bart M.

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a treatment for Parkinson's disease and other related disorders, involving the surgical placement of electrodes in the deeply situated basal ganglia or thalamic structures. Good clinical outcome requires accurate targeting. However, due to limited visibility of the target structures on routine clinical MR images, direct targeting of structures can be challenging. Non-clinical MR scanners with ultra-high magnetic field (7T or higher) have the potential to improve the quality of these images. This technology report provides an overview of the current possibilities of visualizing deep brain stimulation targets and their related structures with the aid of ultra-high field MRI. Reviewed studies showed improved resolution, contrast- and signal-to-noise ratios at ultra-high field. Sequences sensitive to magnetic susceptibility such as T2* and susceptibility weighted imaging and their maps in general showed the best visualization of target structures, including a separation between the subthalamic nucleus and the substantia nigra, the lamina pallidi medialis and lamina pallidi incompleta within the globus pallidus and substructures of the thalamus, including the ventral intermediate nucleus (Vim). This shows that the visibility, identification, and even subdivision of the small deep brain stimulation targets benefit from increased field strength. Although ultra-high field MR imaging is associated with increased risk of geometrical distortions, it has been shown that these distortions can be avoided or corrected to the extent where the effects are limited. The availability of ultra-high field MR scanners for humans seems to provide opportunities for a more accurate targeting for deep brain stimulation in patients with Parkinson's disease and related disorders. PMID:25414656

  9. The high field superferric magnet Design and test of a new dipole magnet for future hadron colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, John C.; Hinterberger, Henry; Russell Huson, F.; Mackay, William W.; Mann, Thomas L.; McIntyre, Peter M.; Phillips, Gerald C.; Pissanetzky, Sergio; Rocha, Richard; Schmidt, William M.; Shotzman, Garry; Wenzel, William A.; Fen Xie, Wan; Zeigler, John C.

    1988-07-01

    The Texas Accelerator Center has successfully tested a 6 T superferric dipole magnet of a design appropriate for future hadron colliders. The magnet surpassed the design field (90% of the short sample limit) on its first quench without training. The measured field quality is in excellent agreement with design calculations and meets collider requirements. The magnetic field design was developed at Rice University and is the subject of a Master's thesis. The features of the design include simple construction, efficient use of superconductor, and adequate containment of magnetic forces. A straightforward extension of the design to an 8 T dipole is under development. The high-field superferric magnet constitutes a significant improvement in magnet performance and cost for future accelerators.

  10. Stress management as an enabling technology for high-field superconducting dipole magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie Frank, III

    This dissertation examines stress management and other construction techniques as means to meet future accelerator requirement demands by planning, fabricating, and analyzing a high-field, Nb3Sn dipole. In order to enable future fundamental research and discovery in high energy accelerator physics, bending magnets must access the highest fields possible. Stress management is a novel, propitious path to attain higher fields and preserve the maximum current capacity of advanced superconductors by managing the Lorentz stress so that strain induced current degradation is mitigated. Stress management is accomplished through several innovative design features. A block-coil geometry enables an Inconel pier and beam matrix to be incorporated in the windings for Lorentz Stress support and reduced AC loss. A laminar spring between windings and mica paper surrounding each winding inhibit any stress transferral through the support structure and has been simulated with ALGORRTM. Wood's metal filled, stainless steel bladders apply isostatic, surface-conforming preload to the pier and beam support structure. Sufficient preload along with mica paper sheer release reduces magnet training by inhibiting stick-slip motion. The effectiveness of stress management is tested with high-precision capacitive stress transducers and strain gauges. In addition to stress management, there are several technologies developed to assist in the successful construction of a high-field dipole. Quench protection has been designed and simulated along with full 3D magnetic simulation with OPERARTM. Rutherford cable was constructed, and cable thermal expansion data was analysed after heat treatment. Pre-impregnation analysis techniques were developed due to elemental tin leakage in varying quantities during heat treatment from each coil. Robust splicing techniques were developed with measured resistivites consistent with nO joints. Stress management has not been incorporated by any other high field dipole

  11. High Field Magnetization Process of an S{=}1 One-Dimensional Antiferromagnet NENP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tsuneaki; Katori, Hiroko Aruga; Ajiro, Yoshitami

    1992-11-01

    High field magnetization measurements have been performed for NENP at low temperatures in steady fields up to 12 T and in pulsed fields up to 40 T. The magnetization for both directions parallel and perpendicular to the chain axis is extremely small in low fields and increases abruptly above the critical field Bc//{=}9.8± 0.2 T and Bc\\bot{=}13.1± 0.3 T. This result indicates that the ground state of NENP is nonmagnetic, that is, singlet and becomes magnetic above the critical field due to the crossover between the singlet and magnetic excited states, consistent with Haldane’s prediction. The magnetization data are analyzed on the basis of the Tsvelik theory. The two gaps and the single-ion anisotropy constant are estimated to be E1{=}14.2± 0.3 K, E2{=}26.8± 1.8 K and D≈7 K. Using the values of E1 and E2, the Haldane gap for D{=}0 is evaluated to be EG{=}(0.39± 0.2)|J|. This value is in good agreement with the estimation of the Haldane gap from the Monte Carlo simulation. The Tsvelik theory satisfactorily explains the field dependence of the magnetization for NENP.

  12. New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; Rijk, G. de; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P.; Hanzelka, P.

    2014-01-29

    In the framework of the R and D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m{sup 3} helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

  13. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  14. Tuning magnetic disorder in diluted magnetic semiconductors using high fields to 89 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, Scott A; Samarth, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent and ongoing studies at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos using the new '100 Tesla Multi-Shot Magnet', which is presently delivering fields up to {approx}89 T during its commissioning. We discuss the first experiments performed in this magnet system, wherein the linewidth of low-temperature photoluminescence spectra was used to directly reveal the degree of magnetic alloy disorder 'seen' by excitons in single Zn{sub 0.80}Cd{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.08}Se quantum wells. The magnetic potential landscape in II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is typically smoothed when the embedded Mn{sup 2+} spins align in an applied field. However, an important (but heretofore untested) prediction of current models of compositional disorder is that magnetic alloy fluctuations in many DMS compounds should increase again in very large magnetic fields approaching 100 T. We observed precisely this increase above {approx}70 T, in agreement with a simple model of magnetic alloy disorder.

  15. MAGNET ENGINEERING AND TEST RESULTS OF THE HIGH FIELD MAGNET R AND D PROGRAM AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    COZZOLINO,J.; ANERELLA,M.; ESCALLIER,J.; GANETIS,G.; GHOSH,A.; GUPTA,R.; HARRISON,M.; JAIN,A.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PARKER,B.; SAMPSON,W.; SOIKA,R.; WANDERER,P.

    2002-08-04

    The Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been carrying out design, engineering, and technology development of high performance magnets for future accelerators. High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) play a major role in the BNL vision of a few high performance interaction region (IR) magnets that would be placed in a machine about ten years from now. This paper presents the engineering design of a ''react and wind'' Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet that will provide a 12 Tesla background field on HTS coils. In addition, the coil production tooling as well as the most recent 10-turn R&D coil test results will be discussed.

  16. Oxypnictide SmFeAs(O,F) superconductor: a candidate for high-field magnet applications.

    PubMed

    Iida, Kazumasa; Hänisch, Jens; Tarantini, Chiara; Kurth, Fritz; Jaroszynski, Jan; Ueda, Shinya; Naito, Michio; Ichinose, Ataru; Tsukada, Ichiro; Reich, Elke; Grinenko, Vadim; Schultz, Ludwig; Holzapfel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The recently discovered oxypnictide superconductor SmFeAs(O,F) is the most attractive material among the Fe-based superconductors due to its highest transition temperature of 56 K and potential for high-field performance. In order to exploit this new material for superconducting applications, the knowledge and understanding of its electro-magnetic properties are needed. Recent success in fabricating epitaxial SmFeAs(O,F) thin films opens a great opportunity to explore their transport properties. Here we report on a high critical current density of over 10(5) A/cm(2) at 45 T and 4.2 K for both main field orientations, feature favourable for high-field magnet applications. Additionally, by investigating the pinning properties, we observed a dimensional crossover between the superconducting coherence length and the FeAs interlayer distance at 30-40 K, indicative of a possible intrinsic Josephson junction in SmFeAs(O,F) at low temperatures that can be employed in electronics applications such as a terahertz radiation source and a superconducting Qubit.

  17. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11

    the project start and that date a substantial shift in the MRI marketplace occurred, with rapid growth for systems at higher fields (1.5 T and above) and a consequent decline in the low field market (<1.0 T). While the project aim appeared technically attainable at that time, the conclusion was reached that the system and market economics do not warrant additional investment. The program was redirected to develop BSCCO 2212 multifilament wire development for high field superconducting magnets for NMR and other scientific research upon an agreement between DOE and Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology. The work t took place between September, 2004 and the project end in early 2006 was focused on 2212 multifilamentary wire. This report summarizes the technical achievements both in 2212 dip coated for an HTS MRI system and in BSCCO 2212 multifilamentary wire for high field magnets.

  18. An Analytical Technique to Elucidate Field Impurities From Manufacturing Uncertainties of an Double Pancake Type HTS Insert for High Field LTS/HTS NMR Magnets

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Seung-yong; Ahn, Min Cheol; Bobrov, Emanuel Saul; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses adverse effects of dimensional uncertainties of an HTS insert assembled with double-pancake coils on spatial field homogeneity. Each DP coil was wound with Bi2223 tapes having dimensional tolerances larger than one order of magnitude of those accepted for LTS wires used in conventional NMR magnets. The paper presents: 1) dimensional variations measured in two LTS/HTS NMR magnets, 350 MHz (LH350) and 700 MHz (LH700), both built and operated at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory; and 2) an analytical technique and its application to elucidate the field impurities measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets. Field impurities computed with the analytical model and those measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets agree quite well, demonstrating that this analytical technique is applicable to design a DP-assembled HTS insert with an improved field homogeneity for a high-field LTS/HTS NMR magnet. PMID:20407595

  19. An Analytical Technique to Elucidate Field Impurities From Manufacturing Uncertainties of an Double Pancake Type HTS Insert for High Field LTS/HTS NMR Magnets.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Seung-Yong; Ahn, Min Cheol; Bobrov, Emanuel Saul; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2009-06-01

    This paper addresses adverse effects of dimensional uncertainties of an HTS insert assembled with double-pancake coils on spatial field homogeneity. Each DP coil was wound with Bi2223 tapes having dimensional tolerances larger than one order of magnitude of those accepted for LTS wires used in conventional NMR magnets. The paper presents: 1) dimensional variations measured in two LTS/HTS NMR magnets, 350 MHz (LH350) and 700 MHz (LH700), both built and operated at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory; and 2) an analytical technique and its application to elucidate the field impurities measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets. Field impurities computed with the analytical model and those measured with the two LTS/HTS magnets agree quite well, demonstrating that this analytical technique is applicable to design a DP-assembled HTS insert with an improved field homogeneity for a high-field LTS/HTS NMR magnet.

  20. Tunable High-Field Magnetization in Strongly Exchange-Coupled Freestanding Co/CoO Core/Shell Coaxial Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Alvarez, German; Geshev, Julian; Agramunt-Puig, Sebastià; Navau, Carles; Sanchez, Alvaro; Sort, Jordi; Nogués, Josep

    2016-08-31

    The exchange bias properties of Co/CoO coaxial core/shell nanowires were investigated with cooling and applied fields perpendicular to the wire axis. This configuration leads to unexpected exchange-bias effects. First, the magnetization value at high fields is found to depend on the field-cooling conditions. This effect arises from the competition between the magnetic anisotropy and the Zeeman energies for cooling fields perpendicular to the wire axis. This allows imprinting predefined magnetization states to the antiferromagnetic (AFM) shell, as corroborated by micromagnetic simulations. Second, the system exhibits a high-field magnetic irreversibility, leading to open hysteresis loops attributed to the AFM easy axis reorientation during the reversal (effect similar to athermal training). A distinct way to manipulate the high-field magnetization in exchange-biased systems, beyond the archetypical effects, was thus experimentally and theoretically demonstrated. PMID:27502034

  1. High field nuclear magnetic resonance in transition metal substituted BaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garitezi, T. M.; Lesseux, G. G.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Adriano, C.; Reyes, A. P.; Kuhns, P. L.; Pagliuso, P. G.; Urbano, R. R.

    2014-05-01

    We report high field 75As nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on Co and Cu substituted BaFe2As2 single crystals displaying same structural/magnetic transition T0≃128 K. From our anisotropy studies in the paramagnetic state, we strikingly found virtually identical quadrupolar splitting and consequently the quadrupole frequency νQ≃2.57(1) MHz for both compounds, despite the claim that each Cu delivers 2 extra 3d electrons in BaFe2As2 compared to Co substitution. These results allow us to conclude that a subtle change in the crystallographic structure, particularly in the Fe-As tetrahedra, must be the most probable tuning parameter to determine T0 in this class of superconductors rather than electronic doping. Furthermore, our NMR data around T0 suggest coexistence of tetragonal/paramagnetic and orthorhombic/antiferromagnetic phases between the structural and the spin density wave magnetic phase transitions, similarly to what was reported for K-doped BaFe2As2 [Urbano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 107001 (2010)].

  2. Magnetic quantum tunneling: key insights from multi-dimensional high-field EPR.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J; Yang, E-C; Hendrickson, D N; Hill, S

    2009-08-21

    Multi-dimensional high-field/frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) spectroscopy is performed on single-crystals of the high-symmetry spin S = 4 tetranuclear single-molecule magnet (SMM) [Ni(hmp)(dmb)Cl](4), where hmp(-) is the anion of 2-hydroxymethylpyridine and dmb is 3,3-dimethyl-1-butanol. Measurements performed as a function of the applied magnetic field strength and its orientation within the hard-plane reveal the four-fold behavior associated with the fourth order transverse zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction, (1/2)B(S + S), within the framework of a rigid spin approximation (with S = 4). This ZFS interaction mixes the m(s) = +/-4 ground states in second order of perturbation, generating a sizeable (12 MHz) tunnel splitting, which explains the fast magnetic quantum tunneling in this SMM. Meanwhile, multi-frequency measurements performed with the field parallel to the easy-axis reveal HFEPR transitions associated with excited spin multiplets (S < 4). Analysis of the temperature dependence of the intensities of these transitions enables determination of the isotropic Heisenberg exchange constant, J = -6.0 cm(-1), which couples the four spin s = 1 Ni(II) ions within the cluster, as well as a characterization of the ZFS within excited states. The combined experimental studies support recent work indicating that the fourth order anisotropy associated with the S = 4 state originates from second order ZFS interactions associated with the individual Ni(II) centers, but only as a result of higher-order processes that occur via S-mixing between the ground state and higher-lying (S < 4) spin multiplets. We argue that this S-mixing plays an important role in the low-temperature quantum dynamics associated with many other well known SMMs.

  3. Flux pinning study of RE barium coper oxide coated conductors for high field magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Aixia

    REBa2Cu3O7-δ (REBCO, RE = rare earth) coated conductor (CC) holds great promise for high field magnet applications owing to its strong irreversibility field (Hirr), low electromagnetic anisotropy (γ2), and high critical current density (Jc). The work of this thesis is tightly related to the development of the funded 32 T, all-superconducting magnet project at the NHMFL. My concern is thus for understanding the optimizing of the working parameters of REBCO CC at low temperatures T, and very high magnetic fields H, focusing on how to enhance Ic and to reduce its angular dependence. Increasing the active cross-section is a direct and economical strategy to enhance the current-carrying capability for REBCO coated conductors. Unfortunately, the high Jc in thin REBCO layers is seldom sustained in thick layers because of difficulties of thick film growth control. In the presence of strong 3D (pin separation far less than film thickness) pins, a high and thickness-independent (Jc) should result. One of major tasks of this thesis is to explore what are the effective strong 3D pins that develop a high and thickness-independent Jc. High and weak thickness-dependent Jc at 77 K is obtained on most recent coated conductors, and BZO nanorods and RE2O 3 nanoparticles are identified as strong 3D pins contributing to this respectable Jc performance. At 77 K, we found that the strong pinning of BZO nanorods remains at least up to 9 T, whereas the strong pinning of RE2O3 nanoparticles gradually evolves to weak collective pinning as the irreversibility field is approached. The second principal part of this thesis concentrates on understanding and minimizing the angular dependence of Jc. Our study is based on the following procedure. First, we investigated the angular dependence of Jc (Jc(θ)) in the working condition of the future 32 T all-superconducting magnet, i.e. 4.2 K and high magnetic field up to 31 T. Our work shows that the low temperature Jc(θ) is Ginzburg-Landau-like at

  4. Feasibility study of Nb3Al Rutherford cable for high field accelerator magnet application

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Cooper, C.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Verweij, A.P.; Wake, M.; Willering, G; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Feasibility study of Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand and Rutherford cable for the application to high field accelerator magnets are being done at Fermilab in collaboration with NIMS. The Nb{sub 3}Al strand, which was developed and manufactured at NIMS in Japan, has a non-copper Jc of about 844 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2 K, a copper content of 50%, and filament size of about 50 microns. Rutherford cables with 27 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1.03 mm diameter were fabricated and tested. Quench tests on a short cable were done to study its stability with only its self field, utilizing a high current transformer. A pair of 2 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al cables was tested extensively at CERN at 4.3 and 1.9 K up to 11 Tesla including its self field with a high transport current of 20.2 kA. In the low field test we observed instability near splices and in the central region. This is related to the flux-jump like behavior, because of excessive amount of Nb in the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. There is possibility that the Nb in Nb{sub 3}Al can cause instability below 2 Tesla field regions. We need further investigation on this problem. Above 8 Tesla, we observed quenches near the critical surface at fast ramp rate from 1000 to 3000 A/sec, with quench velocity over 100 m/sec. A small racetrack magnet was made using a 14 m of Rutherford cable and successfully tested up to 21.8 kA, corresponding to 8.7 T.

  5. Development and Study of NB3SN Strands and Cables for High-Field Accelerator Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzi, E.; Andreev, N.; Bossert, M.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2010-04-01

    The high performance Nb3Sn strand produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology (OST) with the Restack Rod Process (RRP) and a 127 restack design is the baseline conductor presently used in the Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program. The original RRP-127 design was further improved in stability by increasing the Cu thickness between subelements after proving the effectiveness of this method in reducing subelement merging [1-3]. A number of RRP-127 billets of various cross sections (RRP-102/127, RRP-108/127 and RRP-114/127) were produced to optimize the design with respect to strand plastic deformation during cabling. The behavior of these new strands was studied using virgin and deformed strand samples, and compared with that of the RRP-54/61 stack design. A Rutherford cable made of 0.7 mm strands was also produced to be used in high field quadrupoles. This paper describes the RRP-127 strand development, and results of strand and cable analyses.

  6. Overcoming high-field RF problems with non-magnetic Cartesian feedback transceivers.

    PubMed

    Hoult, D I; Foreman, D; Kolansky, G; Kripiakevich, D

    2008-03-01

    In extending human MR to field strengths approaching 10 T, the wavelength of electromagnetic radiation at the proton Larmor frequency becomes less than human body size and conventional radio-frequency coil circumference. Consequently, radio-frequency magnetic fields are better generated by an array of small coils than by one large coil. In this article, the primary problem of array coil interactions during transmission is examined, and a standard proposed whereby secondary induced currents should be less than 1% of the primary coil current. The use of cancellation methods and of power amplifiers with high output impedance to reduce interactions is examined in the light of this standard and found wanting. Non-magnetic Cartesian feedback transceivers functioning at the magnet entrance are then proposed as a solution that both reduces instrumentation cost and increases the bandwidth over which the standard may be met. The compromises inherent in instrument design are detailed and examples given of the innovative circuitry used. It is shown experimentally that when connected to interacting coils, two Cartesian feedback instruments function stably in accord with theory and such that the proposed standard is typically attained over a bandwidth of 22 kHz during transmission (much greater during signal reception)-enough for all current MR protocols.

  7. Accretion in the High-Field Magnetic Cataclysmic Variable AR Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gary D.; Hoard, D. W.; Szkody, Paula; Melia, Fulvio; Honeycutt, R. Kent; Wagner, R. M.

    1999-11-01

    are at odds with low-state observations. At the same time, the high magnetic field in AR UMa has yielded a new, powerful observational tool: phase-resolved Zeeman spectroscopy of the emission lines produced in the accretion stream(s). Future high-quality observations and sophisticated modeling of these features hold promise for three-dimensional reconstructions of the gas flow in high-field magnetic variables. Observations reported in this paper were obtained in part at the Multiple Mirror Telescope Observatory, a facility operated jointly by the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution, and with the Apache Point Observatory (APO) 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC).

  8. Design of shared instruments to utilize simulated gravities generated by a large-gradient, high-field superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Yin, D. C.; Liu, Y. M.; Shi, J. Z.; Lu, H. M.; Shi, Z. H.; Qian, A. R.; Shang, P.

    2011-03-01

    A high-field superconducting magnet can provide both high-magnetic fields and large-field gradients, which can be used as a special environment for research or practical applications in materials processing, life science studies, physical and chemical reactions, etc. To make full use of a superconducting magnet, shared instruments (the operating platform, sample holders, temperature controller, and observation system) must be prepared as prerequisites. This paper introduces the design of a set of sample holders and a temperature controller in detail with an emphasis on validating the performance of the force and temperature sensors in the high-magnetic field.

  9. US-LHC MAGNET DATABASE AND CONVENTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MCCHESNEY,D.; JAIN,A.; PEGGS,S.; PILAT,F.; BOTTURA,L.; SABBI,G.

    1999-03-29

    The US-LHC Magnet Database is designed for production-magnet quality assurance, field and alignment error impact analysis, cryostat assembly assistance, and ring installation assistance. The database consists of tables designed to store magnet field and alignment measurements data and quench data. This information will also be essential for future machine operations including local IR corrections.

  10. High field strength (4.7T) magnetic resonance imaging of hydrocephalus in an African Grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus).

    PubMed

    Fleming, Gregory J; Lester, Nola V; Stevenson, Rhoda; Silver, Xeve S

    2003-01-01

    Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in a juvenile African Grey parrot by high-field strength (4.7-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Excellent anatomic detail was achieved, and there was severe dilation of all ventricles. Relative obstruction was localized to the level of or beyond the outflow of the fourth ventricle. There have been several reports of hydrocephalus diagnosed postmortem in psittacines (i.e., hook-billed parrots), however, this is the first report of an antemortem diagnosis in a psittacine using high-field strength MRI.

  11. Magnetic properties of superconducting GdBa2Cu3O(6 + delta) at low temperature and high field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Shapira, Y.; Hor, P. H.; Meng, R. L.; Chu, C. W.

    1988-01-01

    The magnetization of antiferromagnetic superconducting GdBa2Cu3O(6 + delta) has been measured for T in the range of 1.5 - 4.2 K for magnetic fields up to about 20 T. It is found that all Gd(3+) spins are nearly parallel at very high fields, and that this saturated spin subsystem coexists with superconductivity. Below the Neel temperature, 2.22 K, the transition from the 'canted' phase to the paramagnetic phase is observed by the application of a high magnetic field. The temperature dependence of this phase transition is also reported.

  12. Magnetic Gearing Versus Conventional Gearing in Actuators for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puchhammer, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic geared actuators (MGA) are designed to perform highly reliable, robust and precise motion on satellite platforms or aerospace vehicles. The design allows MGA to be used for various tasks in space applications. In contrast to conventional geared drives, the contact and lubrication free force transmitting elements lead to a considerable lifetime and range extension of drive systems. This paper describes the fundamentals of magnetic wobbling gears (MWG) and the deduced inherent characteristics, and compares conventional and magnetic gearing.

  13. High field magnetic behavior in Boron doped Fe2VAl Heusler alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, Ch.; Vasundhara, M.; Srinivas, V.; Rao, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    We have investigated the magnetic behavior of Fe2VAl1-xBx (x=0, 0.03, 0.06 and 0.1) alloys under high temperature and high magnetic field conditions separately. Although, the low temperature DC magnetization data for the alloys above x>0 show clear magnetic transitions, the zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) curves indicate the presence of spin cluster like features. Further, critical exponent (γ) deduced from the initial susceptibility above the Tc, does not agree with standard models derived for 3 dimensional long range magnetic systems. The deviation in γ values are consistent with the short range magnetic nature of these alloys. We further extend the analysis of magnetic behavior by carrying the magnetization measurements at high temperatures and high magnetic fields distinctly. We mainly emphasize the following observations; (i) The magnetic hysteresis loops show sharp upturns at lower fields even at 900 K for all the alloys. (ii) High temperature inverse susceptibility do not overlap until T=900 K, indicating the persistent short range magnetic correlations even at high temperatures. (iii) The Arrott's plot of magnetization data shows spontaneous moment (MS) for the x=0 alloy at higher magnetic fields which is absent at lower fields (<50 kOe), while the Boron doped samples show feeble MS at lower fields. The origin of this short range correlation is due to presence of dilute magnetic heterogeneous phases which are not detected from the X-ray diffraction method.

  14. Fabrication and test results of a high field, Nb3Sn superconducting racetrack dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Benjegerdes, R.; Bish, P.; Byford, D.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Higley, H.; Jackson, A.; Lietzke, A.; Liggins, N.; McInturff, A.D.; O'Neill, J.; Palmerston, E.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

    2001-06-15

    The LBNL Superconducting Magnet Program is extending accelerator magnet technology to the highest possible fields. A 1 meter long, racetrack dipole magnet, utilizing state-of-the-art Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor, has been built and tested. A record dipole filed of 14.7 Tesla has been achieved. Relevant features of the final assembly and tested results are discussed.

  15. Observation of High-Field-Side Crash and Heat Transfer during Sawtooth Oscillation in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.K.; Mazzucato, E.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr.; Domier, C.W.; Xia, Z.; Donne, A.J.H.; Classen, I.G.J.; Pol, M.J. van de; Munsat, T.

    2006-05-19

    High resolution (temporal and spatial), two-dimensional images of electron temperature fluctuations during sawtooth oscillations were employed to study the crash process and heat transfer in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas. The combination of kink and local pressure driven instabilities leads to a small poloidally localized puncture in the magnetic surface at both the low and the high field sides of the poloidal plane. This observation closely resembles the 'fingering event' of the ballooning mode model with the high-m mode only predicted at the low field side.

  16. Studies of $${\\rm Nb}_{3}{\\rm Sn}$$ Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Barzi, E.; Bossert, M.; Gallo, G.; Lombardo, V.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2011-12-21

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  17. Limits of NbTi and Nb3Sn, and development of W& R Bi-2212 High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Daniel; Dietderich, Daniel; Ferrracin, Paolo; Prestemon, Soren; Sabbi, GianLuca; Scanlan, Ron; Godeke, A.

    2007-06-01

    NbTi accelerator dipoles are limited to magnetic fields (H) of about 10 T, due to an intrinsic upper critical field (H{sub c2}) limitation of 14 T. To surpass this restriction, prototype Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets are being developed which have reached 16 T. We show that Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole technology is practically limited to 17 to 18 T due to insufficient high field pinning, and intrinsically to 20 to 22 T due to H{sub c2} limitations. Therefore, to obtain magnetic fields approaching 20 T and higher, a material is required with a higher H{sub c2} and sufficient high field pinning capacity. A realistic candidate for this purpose is Bi-2212, which is available in round wires and sufficient lengths for the fabrication of coils based on Rutherford-type cables. We initiated a program to develop the required technology to construct accelerator magnets from 'wind-and-react' (W&R) Bi-2212 coils. We outline the complications that arise through the use of Bi-2212, describe the development paths to address these issues, and conclude with the design of W&R Bi-2212 sub-scale magnets.

  18. Halbach arrays consisting of cubic elements optimised for high field gradients in magnetic drug targeting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Owen, Joshua; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-11-01

    A key challenge in the development of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) as a clinically relevant technique is designing systems that can apply sufficient magnetic force to actuate magnetic drug carriers at useful tissue depths. In this study an optimisation routine was developed to generate designs of Halbach arrays consisting of multiple layers of high grade, cubic, permanent magnet elements, configured to deliver the maximum pull or push force at a position of interest between 5 and 50 mm from the array, resulting in arrays capable of delivering useful magnetic forces to depths past 20 mm. The optimisation routine utilises a numerical model of the magnetic field and force generated by an arbitrary configuration of magnetic elements. Simulated field and force profiles of optimised arrays were evaluated, also taking into account the forces required for assembling the array in practice. The resultant selection for the array, consisting of two layers, was then constructed and characterised to verify the simulations. Finally the array was utilised in a set of in vitro experiments to demonstrate its capacity to separate and retain microbubbles loaded with magnetic nanoparticles against a constant flow. The optimised designs are presented as light-weight, inexpensive options for applying high-gradient, external magnetic fields in MDT applications.

  19. Halbach arrays consisting of cubic elements optimised for high field gradients in magnetic drug targeting applications.

    PubMed

    Barnsley, Lester C; Carugo, Dario; Owen, Joshua; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-11-01

    A key challenge in the development of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) as a clinically relevant technique is designing systems that can apply sufficient magnetic force to actuate magnetic drug carriers at useful tissue depths. In this study an optimisation routine was developed to generate designs of Halbach arrays consisting of multiple layers of high grade, cubic, permanent magnet elements, configured to deliver the maximum pull or push force at a position of interest between 5 and 50 mm from the array, resulting in arrays capable of delivering useful magnetic forces to depths past 20 mm. The optimisation routine utilises a numerical model of the magnetic field and force generated by an arbitrary configuration of magnetic elements. Simulated field and force profiles of optimised arrays were evaluated, also taking into account the forces required for assembling the array in practice. The resultant selection for the array, consisting of two layers, was then constructed and characterised to verify the simulations. Finally the array was utilised in a set of in vitro experiments to demonstrate its capacity to separate and retain microbubbles loaded with magnetic nanoparticles against a constant flow. The optimised designs are presented as light-weight, inexpensive options for applying high-gradient, external magnetic fields in MDT applications. PMID:26458056

  20. Halbach arrays consisting of cubic elements optimised for high field gradients in magnetic drug targeting applications.

    PubMed

    Barnsley, Lester C; Carugo, Dario; Owen, Joshua; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-11-01

    A key challenge in the development of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) as a clinically relevant technique is designing systems that can apply sufficient magnetic force to actuate magnetic drug carriers at useful tissue depths. In this study an optimisation routine was developed to generate designs of Halbach arrays consisting of multiple layers of high grade, cubic, permanent magnet elements, configured to deliver the maximum pull or push force at a position of interest between 5 and 50 mm from the array, resulting in arrays capable of delivering useful magnetic forces to depths past 20 mm. The optimisation routine utilises a numerical model of the magnetic field and force generated by an arbitrary configuration of magnetic elements. Simulated field and force profiles of optimised arrays were evaluated, also taking into account the forces required for assembling the array in practice. The resultant selection for the array, consisting of two layers, was then constructed and characterised to verify the simulations. Finally the array was utilised in a set of in vitro experiments to demonstrate its capacity to separate and retain microbubbles loaded with magnetic nanoparticles against a constant flow. The optimised designs are presented as light-weight, inexpensive options for applying high-gradient, external magnetic fields in MDT applications.

  1. The issues and tentative solutions for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field strength.

    PubMed

    Fries, Peter; Morelli, John N; Lux, Francois; Tillement, Olivier; Schneider, Günther; Buecker, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed at ultra-high field strengths beyond 3 Tesla (T) has become increasingly prevalent in research and preclinical applications. As such, the inevitable clinical implementation of such systems lies on the horizon. The major benefit of ultra-high field MRI is the markedly increased signal-to-noise ratios achievable, enabling acquisition of MR images with simultaneously greater spatial and temporal resolution. However, at field strengths higher than 3 T, the efficacy of Gd(III)-based contrast agents is diminished due to decreased r1 relaxivity, somewhat limiting imaging of the vasculature and contrast-enhanced imaging of tumors. There have been extensive efforts to design new contrast agents with high r1 relaxivities based on macromolecular compounds or nanoparticles; however, the efficacy of these agents at ultra-high field strengths has not yet been proven. The aim of this review article is to provide an overview of the basic principles of MR contrast enhancement processes and to highlight the main factors influencing relaxivity. In addition, challenges and opportunities for contrast-enhanced MRI at ultra-high field strengths will be explored. Various approaches for the development of effective contrast agent molecules that are suitable for a broad spectrum of applied field strengths will be discussed in the context of the current literature.

  2. High Field Magnetization Studies of Low Dimensional Heisenberg S = 1/2 Antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landee, C. P.; Albrecht, A. S.; Turnbull, M. M.

    1997-03-01

    The magnetization curves of a number of new 2D S=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnets have been determined in fields up to 30 tesla at low temperatures at the National High Magnetic Fields Laboratory. Magnets studied include (2-amino-5-methylpyridinium)_2CuBr4 (2-amino-5-chloropyridinium)_2CuBr_4, and [Cu(pz)_2(NO_3)](PF_6), where pz = pyrazine. All of the magnetization curves show upward curvature, a previously unknown effect for this model system. The magnetization curves are qualitatively similar to the theoretical prediction for the linear chain Heisenberg antiferromagnet. The saturation fields are consistent with those predicted from a molecular-field model, using exchange strengths obtained from susceptibility studies. Slight anisotropy has been observed in the single crystal studies of (2-amino-5-methylpyridinium)_2CuBr_4.

  3. A field-sweep/field-lock system for superconducting magnets--Application to high-field EPR.

    PubMed

    Maly, Thorsten; Bryant, Jeff; Ruben, David; Griffin, Robert G

    2006-12-01

    We describe a field-lock/field-sweep system for the use in superconducting magnets. The system is based on a commercially available field mapping unit and a custom designed broad-band 1H NMR probe. The NMR signal of a small water sample is used in a feedback loop to set and control the magnetic field to high accuracy. The current instrumental configuration allows field sweeps of +/-0.4 T and a resolution of up to 10(-5) T (0.1 G) and the performance of the system is demonstrated in a high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) application. The system should also be of utility in other experiments requiring precise and reproducible sweeps of the magnetic field such as DNP, ENDOR or PELDOR.

  4. A Field-Sweep/Field-Lock System for Superconducting Magnets-Application to High-Field EPR

    PubMed Central

    Maly, Thorsten; Bryant, Jeff; Ruben, David; Griffin, Robert G.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a field-lock/field-sweep system for the use in superconducting magnets. The system is based on a commercially available field mapping unit and a custom designed broad-band 1H-NMR probe. The NMR signal of a small water sample is used in a feedback loop to set and control the magnetic field to high accuracy. The current instrumental configuration allows field sweeps of ± 0.4 T and a resolution of up to 10-5 T (0.1 G) and the performance of the system is demonstrated in a high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) application. The system should also be of utility in other experiments requiring precise and reproducible sweeps of the magnetic field such as DNP, ENDOR or PELDOR. PMID:17027306

  5. Thermal and mechanical effects of quenches on Nb{sub 3}Sn high field hadron collider magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2001-11-05

    Thermal and its resulting mechanical stress due to quenches inside short and long epoxy impregnated Nb{sub 3}Sn high field magnets are studied with a quench simulation program, Kuench, and ANSYS program. For the protection of a long high field magnet, we have to use heaters to dump the stored energy uniformly inside the magnet, after detection of a spontaneous quench. The time delay of starting a forced quench with heaters, is estimated using ANSYS. Using this information, the thermal distribution in two-dimensional magnet cross section is studied. First a one meter model magnet with a dump resistor is used to estimate the effects and then a 10 meter long magnet is studied. The two-dimensional temperature distributions in the magnet cross sections are recorded every 5 ms, and visually displayed. With this visual animation displays we can understand intuitively the thermal and quench propagation in 2-dimensional field. The quenching cables get heated locally much more than the surrounding material and non-quenching conductor cables. With a one meter magnet with a dump resistor of 30 m{Omega}, typically only the quench starting cables and its neighbor cables get heated up to 100 K without significant effects from the heaters. With a10 meter magnet, heaters cause the quenches to most of the conductor blocks. The quench initiating cables get up to 250 to 300 K in 100 ms, but the surrounding and wedges are not heated up significantly. This causes the excessive stress in the quenching conductors and in their insulation material locally. The stress and strain in the conductor as well as in the insulation become excessive, and they are studied using the ANSYS stress analysis, using Von Mises criterion. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for the extended ten meter long magnet [1].

  6. Propagation of magnetic avalanches in Mn12Ac at high field sweep rates.

    PubMed

    Decelle, W; Vanacken, J; Moshchalkov, V V; Tejada, J; Hernández, J M; Macià, F

    2009-01-16

    Time-resolved measurements of the magnetization reversal in single crystals of Mn12Ac in pulsed magnetic fields, at magnetic field sweep rates from 1.5 kT/s up to 7 kT/s, suggest a new process that cannot be scaled onto a deflagrationlike propagation driven by heat diffusion. The sweep rate dependence of the propagation velocity, increasing from a few 100 m/s up to the speed of sound in Mn12Ac, indicates the existence of two new regimes at the highest sweep rates, with a transition around 4 kT/s that can be understood as a magnetic deflagration-to-detonation transition. PMID:19257315

  7. Propagation of magnetic avalanches in Mn12Ac at high field sweep rates.

    PubMed

    Decelle, W; Vanacken, J; Moshchalkov, V V; Tejada, J; Hernández, J M; Macià, F

    2009-01-16

    Time-resolved measurements of the magnetization reversal in single crystals of Mn12Ac in pulsed magnetic fields, at magnetic field sweep rates from 1.5 kT/s up to 7 kT/s, suggest a new process that cannot be scaled onto a deflagrationlike propagation driven by heat diffusion. The sweep rate dependence of the propagation velocity, increasing from a few 100 m/s up to the speed of sound in Mn12Ac, indicates the existence of two new regimes at the highest sweep rates, with a transition around 4 kT/s that can be understood as a magnetic deflagration-to-detonation transition.

  8. A portable high-field pulsed magnet system for x-ray scattering studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Z.; Ruff, J.P.C.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuda, Y. H.; Ross, K. A.; Gaulin, B. D.; Qu, Z.; Lang, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    We present a portable pulsed-magnet system for x-ray studies of materials in high magnetic fields (up to 30 T). The apparatus consists of a split-pair of minicoils cooled on a closed-cycle cryostat, which is used for x-ray diffraction studies with applied field normal to the scattering plane. A second independent closed-cycle cryostat is used for cooling the sample to near liquid helium temperatures. Pulsed magnetic fields (- 1 ms in total duration) are generated by discharging a configurable capacitor bank into the magnet coils. Time-resolved scattering data are collected using a combination of a fast single-photon counting detector, a multichannel scaler, and a high-resolution digital storage oscilloscope. The capabilities of this instrument are used to study a geometrically frustrated system revealing strong magnetostrictive effects in the spin-liquid state.

  9. Progress with high-field superconducting magnets for high-energy colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ~10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb$_3$Sn superconductors. Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ~15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. Furthermore, this review discusses the status and main results of Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.

  10. Progress with high-field superconducting magnets for high-energy colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ~10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb$_3$Sn superconductors.more » Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ~15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. Furthermore, this review discusses the status and main results of Nb$_3$Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.« less

  11. Progress with High-Field Superconducting Magnets for High-Energy Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Prestemon, Soren; Zlobin, Alexander V.

    2015-10-01

    One of the possible next steps for high-energy physics research relies on a high-energy hadron or muon collider. The energy of a circular collider is limited by the strength of bending dipoles, and its maximum luminosity is determined by the strength of final focus quadrupoles. For this reason, the high-energy physics and accelerator communities have shown much interest in higher-field and higher-gradient superconducting accelerator magnets. The maximum field of NbTi magnets used in all present high-energy machines, including the LHC, is limited to ˜10 T at 1.9 K. Fields above 10 T became possible with the use of Nb3Sn superconductors. Nb3Sn accelerator magnets can provide operating fields up to ˜15 T and can significantly increase the coil temperature margin. Accelerator magnets with operating fields above 15 T require high-temperature superconductors. This review discusses the status and main results of Nb3Sn accelerator magnet research and development and work toward 20-T magnets.

  12. Petal Resonator Surface Coil with a Circular Envelope for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, S. S.; Cuellar, G.; Solis, S. E.; Alejski, A.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2008-08-01

    A modified version of the petal resonator surface (PERES) coil is proposed in which the petal coils are located inside a circular-shaped coil as opposed to the previous PERES version which did not have a circular envelope. An 8-petal coil was simulated using a finite element method and the quasi-static approach to numerically investigate its electromagnetic characteristics. Numerical simulations showed that the field uniformity is not greatly affected by the use of circular-shaped coil inside in the circular envelope. A coil prototype was developed using the same coil configuration as above and tested on a commercial 3 T imager and a General Electric phantom. Phantom images also demonstrated that the mutual inductance between petals does not alter the coil performance. Standard pulse sequences were used to acquire phantom images with the petal resonator surface coil. It was shown that this prototype resonator coil is fully compatible with clinical high field MR imagers and clinical pulse sequences.

  13. Measuring remanence anisotropy of hematite in red beds: anisotropy of high-field isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, Dario; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2009-09-01

    The potential of using high-field anisotropy of isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR) measurements for determining the origin of natural remanent magnetization in red beds and for identifying and correcting possible red-bed inclination shallowing was investigated for specimens of the Carboniferous Shepody Formation of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada. The technique makes it possible for a typical paleomagnetic laboratory to measure the remanence anisotropy of high-coercivity hematite. High-field (hf) AIR was used in conjunction with 100 mT alternating field (af) and 120°C thermal demagnetization to separate the contribution of hematite to the remanence anisotropy from that of magnetite/maghemite and goethite, respectively. A 5-T impulse DC magnetic field was used for the hf-AIR to reset the magnetic moment of high-coercivity hematite so that demagnetization between AIR orientations was not necessary. The ability of a 5-T field to reset the magnetization was tested by generating an isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curve for hematite by using impulse DC magnetic fields up to 5 T in one orientation and followed by applying a field in the opposite direction at each step. Each field application was treated by 120°C heating and 100 mT af demagnetization before measurement. At 5 T, the difference between the magnetizations applied in opposite directions disappeared indicating that no magnetic memory persisted at this field strength. We performed a validity and reproducibility test of our hf-AIR measurement technique by measuring three specimens multiple times along two orthogonal coordinate systems. The method yielded highly reproducible results and, on rotating the specimen's coordinates, the fabric rotated by 90° as expected, showing that it is not an artifact of the technique. We also measured hf-AIR on samples that had previously been chemically demagnetized in 3N HCl to remove the secondary, chemically grown pigmentary hematite. The hf

  14. Recent Test Results of the High Field Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet HD2

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Bingham, B.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, A. R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G.; Wang, X.

    2009-10-19

    The 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, represents a step towards the development of block-type accelerator quality magnets operating in the range of 13-15 T. The magnet design features two coil modules composed of two layers wound around a titanium-alloy pole. The layer 1 pole includes a round cutout to provide room for a bore tube with a clear aperture of 36 mm. After a first series of tests where HD2 reached a maximum bore field of 13.8 T, corresponding to an estimated peak field on the conductor of 14.5 T, the magnet was disassembled and reloaded without the bore tube and with a clear aperture increased to 43 mm. We describe in this paper the magnet training observed in two consecutive tests after the removal of the bore tube, with a comparison of the quench performance with respect to the previous tests. An analysis of the voltage signals recorded before and after training quenches is then presented and discussed, and the results of coil visual inspections reported.

  15. Invited Article: Development of high-field superconducting Ioffe magnetic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Brome, C. R.; Butterworth, J. S.; Dzhosyuk, S. N.; Mattoni, C. E. H.; McKinsey, D. N.; Michniak, R. A.; Doyle, J. M.; Golub, R.; Korobkina, E.; O'Shaughnessy, C. M.; Palmquist, G. R.; Seo, P.-N.; Huffman, P. R.; Coakley, K. J.; Mumm, H. P.; Thompson, A. K.; Yang, G. L.; Lamoreaux, S. K.

    2008-03-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of three generations of superconducting Ioffe magnetic traps. The first two are low current traps, built from four racetrack shaped quadrupole coils and two solenoid assemblies. Coils are wet wound with multifilament NbTi superconducting wires embedded in epoxy matrices. The magnet bore diameters are 51 and 105mm with identical trap depths of 1.0T at their operating currents and at 4.2K. A third trap uses a high current accelerator-type quadrupole magnet and two low current solenoids. This trap has a bore diameter of 140mm and tested trap depth of 2.8T. Both low current traps show signs of excessive training. The high current hybrid trap, on the other hand, exhibits good training behavior and is amenable to quench protection.

  16. Windows on the human body--in vivo high-field magnetic resonance research and applications in medicine and psychology.

    PubMed

    Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin; Fischmeister, Florian Ph S; Grabner, Günther; Bauer, Herbert; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in "medical sensor-systems", i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla) are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given.

  17. Insert Coil Test for HEP High Field Magnets Using YBCO Coated Conductor Tapes

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, V.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-15

    The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 30-50 T. In this paper we present progress in insert coil development using commercially available YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} Coated Conductor. Technological aspects covered in the development, including coil geometry, insulation, manufacturing process and testing are summarized and discussed. Test results of double pancake coils operated in liquid nitrogen and liquid helium are presented and compared with the performance of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} tape short samples.

  18. Design of HQ -- a High Field Large Bore Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnet for LARP

    SciTech Connect

    Felice, H.; Ambrosio, G.; Anerella, M.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Ghosh, A. K.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Kashikhin, V.; Schmalze, J.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G. L.; Wanderer, P.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2008-08-17

    In support of the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade, a large bore (120 mm) Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole with 15 T peak coil field is being developed within the framework of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP). The 2-layer design with a 15 mm wide cable is aimed at pre-stress control, alignment and field quality while exploring the magnet performance limits in terms of gradient, forces and stresses. In addition, HQ will determine the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal margins of Nb{sub 3}Sn technology with respect to the requirements of the luminosity upgrade at the LHC.

  19. Survey of Processing Methods for High Strength High Conductivity Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-10-01

    This paper will deal with the basic concepts of attaining combination of high strength and high conductivity in pure materials, in-situ composites and macrocomposites. It will survey current attainments, and outline where some future developments may lie in developing wire products that are close to the theoretical strength of future magnet applications.

  20. High Field Magnetization Studies of Low Dimensional Heisenberg S = 1/2 Antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landee, C. P.; Turnbull, M. M.

    1998-03-01

    The magnetization curves of a number of low dimensional S=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnets have been determined in fields up to 30 tesla at low temperatures at the National High Magnetic Fields Laboratory. Materials studied include a family of 1D materials, based upon Cu(pyrazine)(NO_3)_2, 2D magnets consisting of pyrazine-bridged copper layers, and several spin ladders with singlet ground states. All of the magnetization data show upward curvature and are well described by T = 0 calculations based upon finite cluster models(Bonner and Fisher, Phys. Rev. A135, 640 (1964); Yang and Mutter, NANL cond-mat/9610092.). Chemical substitution on the pyrazine rings permits the variation of exchange constants by more than 25 percent for the family of well isolated chains. The spin ladder systems consist of ferromagnetic dimers weakly connected by antiferromagnetic intradimer interactions. Field induced transitions are seen at fields of less than one tesla for each of the three compounds.

  1. Cognitive, cardiac, and physiological safety studies in ultra high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kangarlu, A; Burgess, R E; Zhu, H; Nakayama, T; Hamlin, R L; Abduljalil, A M; Robitaille, P M

    1999-12-01

    A systematic analysis of the effect of an 8.0 tesla static magnetic field on physiological and/or cognitive function is presented in the normal volunteer and in the swine. A study of ten human subjects revealed no evidence of detectable changes in body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic pressure, and diastolic blood pressure after 1 hour of exposure. In addition, no cognitive changes were detected. Important ECG changes were noted which were related both to the position of the subject in the magnet and to the absolute strength of the magnetic field. As such, the ECG tracing at 8 tesla was not diagnostically useful. Nonetheless, all subjects exhibited normal ECG readings both before and following exposure to the 8 tesla field. Cardiac function was also examined in detail in the swine. No significant changes in body temperature, heart rate, left ventricular pressure, left ventricular end diastollic pressure, time rate of change of left ventricular pressure, myocardial stiffness index, cardiac output, systolic volume, troponin, and potassium levels could be detected following 3 h of exposure to a field strength of 8.0 tesla. It is concluded that no short term cardiac or cognitive effects are observed following significant exposure to a magnetic field of up to 8.0 tesla.

  2. Assembly and Test of HD2, a 36 mm bore high field Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, P.; Bingham, B.; Caspi, S.; Cheng, D. W,.; Dietderich, D. R.; Felice, H.; Godeke, A.; Hafalia, A. R.; Hannaford, C. R.; Joseph, J.; Lietzke, A. F.; Lizarazo, J.; Sabbi, G.; Trillaud, F.; Wang, X.

    2008-08-17

    We report on the fabrication, assembly, and test of the Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2. The magnet, aimed at demonstrating the application of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor in high field accelerator-type dipoles, features a 36 mm clear bore surrounded by block-type coils with tilted ends. The coil design is optimized to minimize geometric harmonics in the aperture and the magnetic peak field on the conductor in the coil ends. The target bore field of 15 T at 4.3 K is consistent with critical current measurements of extracted strands. The coils are horizontally pre-stressed during assembly using an external aluminum shell pre-tensioned with water-pressurized bladders. Axial pre-loading of the coil ends is accomplished through two end plates and four aluminum tension rods. The strain in coil, shell, and rods is monitored with strain gauges during assembly, cool-down and magnet excitation, and compared with 3D finite element computations. Magnet's training performance, quench locations, and ramp-rate dependence are then analyzed and discussed.

  3. Cognitive functional magnetic resonance imaging at very-high-field: eye movement control.

    PubMed

    Luna, B; Sweeney, J A

    1999-02-01

    The oculomotor system, which optimizes visual interaction with the environment, provides a valuable model system for probing the building blocks of higher-order cognition. Attention shifting, working memory, and inhibition of prepotent responses can be investigated in healthy individuals and patients with brain disorders. Although the neurophysiology of the oculomotor system has been well characterized at the single-cell level in nonhuman primates, its functional architecture in humans determined by evoked response procedures and studies of patients with focal lesions has been limited. Available evidence points to a widely distributed set of neocortical and subcortical brain regions involved in the control of eye movements, including brain stem, cerebellum, thalamus, striatum, and parietal and frontal cortices. The advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a noninvasive manner of localizing, at high spatial resolution, the brain systems that subserve different aspects of sensory and cognitive processes in humans. Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have already delineated the brain systems subserving sensorimotor and cognitive control of eye movements in adult and pediatric populations. Hence, the combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging and eye movement procedures can be used to probe the integrity of the brain in neurological and psychiatric disorders as well as provide a window into the changes in brain function subserving cognitive development. PMID:10389669

  4. High Field Magnetic Circular Dichroism in Ferromagnetic InMnSb and InMnAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeker, M. A.; Magill, B. A.; Khodaparast, G. A.; Saha, D.; Stanton, C. J.; McGill, S.; Wessels, B. W.

    An understanding of the fundamental interactions in narrow gap ferromagnetic semiconductors such as InMnAs and InMnSb has been developed primarily from static magnetization and electrical transport measurements. In this study, to provide a better understanding of the coupling of the Mn impurities to the conduction and valence bands through the sp-d exchange interactions, we have performed magnetic circular dichroism measurements (MCD) on MOVPE grown InMnAs and InMnSb. In our samples, the Mn content varies from 2% to 10.7% and all the samples have Curie temperatures above 300 K. The samples were photo-excited using a Quartz Tungsten Halogen lamp with energies ranging between 0.92-1.45 eV, and in magnetic fields up to 31 T. The temperatures ranged from 15-190 K. Comparison of the observed MCD with theoretical calculations provides a direct method to probe the band structure including the temperature dependence of the spin-orbit split-off bandgap and g-factors, as well as a means to estimate the sp-d coupling constants. Supported by the AFOSR through grant FA9550-14-1-0376, NSF-Career Award DMR-0846834 , NSF-DMR-60035274 , NSF-DMR-1305666, NSF MRI program (DMR-1229217).

  5. High-field magnetic resonance imaging of brain iron: birth of a biomarker?

    PubMed

    Schenck, John F; Zimmerman, Earl A

    2004-11-01

    The brain has an unusually high concentration of iron, which is distributed in an unusual pattern unlike that in any other organ. The physiological role of this iron and the reasons for this pattern of distribution are not yet understood. There is increasing evidence that several neurodegenerative diseases are associated with altered brain iron metabolism. Understanding these dysmetabolic conditions may provide important information for their diagnosis and treatment. For many years the iron distribution in the human brain could be studied effectively only under postmortem conditions. This situation was changed dramatically by the finding that T2-weighted MR imaging at high field strength (initially 1.5 T) appears to demonstrate the pattern of iron distribution in normal brains and that this imaging technique can detect changes in brain iron concentrations associated with disease states. Up to the present time this imaging capability has been utilized in many research applications but it has not yet been widely applied in the routine diagnosis and management of neurodegenerative disorders. However, recent advances in the basic science of brain iron metabolism, the clinical understanding of neurodegenerative diseases and in MRI technology, particularly in the availability of clinical scanners operating at the higher field strength of 3 T, suggest that iron-dependent MR imaging may soon provide biomarkers capable of characterizing the presence and progression of important neurological disorders. Such biomarkers may be of crucial assistance in the development and utilization of effective new therapies for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, multiple sclerosis and other iron-related CNS disorders which are difficult to diagnose and treat.

  6. A dual RF resonator system for high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, R; Bodgdanov, G; King, J; Allard, A; Ferris, C F

    2004-01-30

    A new apparatus has been developed that integrates an animal restrainer arrangement for small animals with an actively tunable/detunable dual radio-frequency (RF) coil system for in vivo anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging of small animals at 4.7 T. The radio-frequency coil features an eight-element microstrip line configuration that, in conjunction with a segmented outer copper shield, forms a transversal electromagnetic (TEM) resonator structure. Matching and active tuning/detuning is achieved through fixed/variable capacitors and a PIN diode for each resonator element. These components along with radio-frequency chokes (RFCs) and blocking capacitors are placed on two printed circuit boards (PCBs) whose copper coated ground planes form the front and back of the volume coil and are therefore an integral part of the resonator structure. The magnetic resonance signal response is received with a dome-shaped single-loop surface coil that can be height-adjustable with respect to the animal's head. The conscious animal is immobilized through a mechanical arrangement that consists of a Plexiglas body tube and a head restrainer. This restrainer has a cylindrical holder with a mouthpiece and position screws to receive and restrain the head of the animal. The apparatus is intended to perform anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging in conscious animals such as mice, rats, hamsters, and marmosets. Cranial images acquired from fully conscious rats in a 4.7 T Bruker 40 cm bore animal scanner underscore the feasibility of this approach and bode well to extend this system to the imaging of other animals. PMID:14706710

  7. Development of Rutherford-type cables for high field accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Borissov, E.; Elementi, L.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lombardo, V.; Rusy, A.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    Fermilab's cabling facility has been upgraded to a maximum capability of 42 strands. This facility is being used to study the effect of cabling on the performance of the various strands, and for the development and fabrication of cables in support of the ongoing magnet R&D programs. Rutherford cables of various geometries, packing factors, with and without a stainless steel core, were fabricated out of Cu alloys, NbTi, Nb{sub 3}Al, and various Nb{sub 3}Sn strands. The parameters of the upgraded cabling machine and results of cable R&D efforts at Fermilab are reported.

  8. Construction of a 56 mm aperture high-field twin-aperture superconducting dipole model magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlbaeck, J; Leroy, D.; Oberli, L.; Perini, D.; Salminen, J.; Savelainen, M.; Soini, J.; Spigo, G.

    1996-07-01

    A twin-aperture superconducting dipole model has been designed in collaboration with Finnish and Swedish Scientific Institutions within the framework of the LHC R and D program and has been built at CERN. Principal features of the magnet are 56 mm aperture, separate stainless steel collared coils, yoke closed after assembly at room temperature, and longitudinal prestressing of the coil ends. This paper recalls the main dipole design characteristics and presents some details of its fabrication including geometrical and mechanical measurements of the collared coil assembly.

  9. A conventional point of view on active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. Ming; Dill, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings used in rotating machinery should be designed as locally controlled, independent devices similar to other types of bearings. The functions of control electronics and power amplifiers can be simply and explicitly related to general bearing properties such as load capacity, stiffness, and damping. The dynamics of a rotor and its supporting active magnetic bearings are analyzed in a modified conventional method with an extended state vector containing the bearing state variables.

  10. Can Images Obtained With High Field Strength Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reduce Contouring Variability of the Prostate?

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, Nawaid; Sloboda, Ron; Kamal, Wafa; Ghosh, Sunita; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Danielson, Brita; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John; Monajemi, Tara

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether there is less contouring variability of the prostate using higher-strength magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared with standard MRI and computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were accrued to a prospective study that included the acquisition of 1.5-T MR and CT images at specified time points. A subset of 10 patients had additional 3.0-T MR images acquired at the same time as their 1.5-T MR scans. Images from each of these patients were contoured by 5 radiation oncologists, with a random subset of patients repeated to quantify intraobserver contouring variability. To minimize bias in contouring the prostate, the image sets were placed in folders in a random order with all identifiers removed from the images. Results: Although there was less interobserver contouring variability in the overall prostate volumes in 1.5-T MRI compared with 3.0-T MRI (p < 0.01), there was no significant differences in contouring variability in the different regions of the prostate between 1.5-T MRI and 3.0-T MRI. MRI demonstrated significantly less interobserver contouring variability in both 1.5-T and 3.0-T compared with CT in overall prostate volumes (p < 0.01, p = 0.01), with the greatest benefits being appreciated in the base of the prostate. Overall, there was less intraobserver contouring variability than interobserver contouring variability for all of the measurements analyzed. Conclusions: Use of 3.0-T MRI does not demonstrate a significant improvement in contouring variability compared with 1.5-T MRI, although both magnetic strengths demonstrated less contouring variability compared with CT.

  11. Characterization of a dielectric phantom for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Qi Duyn, Jeff H.; Gudino, Natalia; Zwart, Jacco A. de; Gelderen, Peter van; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Brown, Ryan

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: In this work, a generic recipe for an inexpensive and nontoxic phantom was developed within a range of biologically relevant dielectric properties from 150 MHz to 4.5 GHz. Methods: The recipe includes deionized water as the solvent, NaCl to primarily control conductivity, sucrose to primarily control permittivity, agar–agar to gel the solution and reduce heat diffusivity, and benzoic acid to preserve the gel. Two hundred and seventeen samples were prepared to cover the feasible range of NaCl and sucrose concentrations. Their dielectric properties were measured using a commercial dielectric probe and were fitted to a 3D polynomial to generate a recipe describing the properties as a function of NaCl concentration, sucrose concentration, and frequency. Results: Results indicated that the intuitive linear and independent relationships between NaCl and conductivity and between sucrose and permittivity are not valid. A generic polynomial recipe was developed to characterize the complex relationship between the solutes and the resulting dielectric values and has been made publicly available as a web application. In representative mixtures developed to mimic brain and muscle tissue, less than 2% difference was observed between the predicted and measured conductivity and permittivity values. Conclusions: It is expected that the recipe will be useful for generating dielectric phantoms for general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil development at high magnetic field strength, including coil safety evaluation as well as pulse sequence evaluation (including B{sub 1}{sup +} mapping, B{sub 1}{sup +} shimming, and selective excitation pulse design), and other non-MRI applications which require biologically equivalent dielectric properties.

  12. Characterization of a dielectric phantom for high-field magnetic resonance imaging applications

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Qi; Duyn, Jeff H.; Gudino, Natalia; de Zwart, Jacco A.; van Gelderen, Peter; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Brown, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this work, a generic recipe for an inexpensive and nontoxic phantom was developed within a range of biologically relevant dielectric properties from 150 MHz to 4.5 GHz. Methods: The recipe includes deionized water as the solvent, NaCl to primarily control conductivity, sucrose to primarily control permittivity, agar–agar to gel the solution and reduce heat diffusivity, and benzoic acid to preserve the gel. Two hundred and seventeen samples were prepared to cover the feasible range of NaCl and sucrose concentrations. Their dielectric properties were measured using a commercial dielectric probe and were fitted to a 3D polynomial to generate a recipe describing the properties as a function of NaCl concentration, sucrose concentration, and frequency. Results: Results indicated that the intuitive linear and independent relationships between NaCl and conductivity and between sucrose and permittivity are not valid. A generic polynomial recipe was developed to characterize the complex relationship between the solutes and the resulting dielectric values and has been made publicly available as a web application. In representative mixtures developed to mimic brain and muscle tissue, less than 2% difference was observed between the predicted and measured conductivity and permittivity values. Conclusions: It is expected that the recipe will be useful for generating dielectric phantoms for general magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil development at high magnetic field strength, including coil safety evaluation as well as pulse sequence evaluation (including B1+ mapping, B1+ shimming, and selective excitation pulse design), and other non-MRI applications which require biologically equivalent dielectric properties. PMID:25281973

  13. Detection of intramyocardial hemorrhage using high-field proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lotan, C.S.; Miller, S.K.; Bouchard, A.; Cranney, G.B.; Reeves, R.C.; Bishop, S.P.; Elgavish, G.A.; Pohost, G.M. )

    1990-07-01

    Proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has been used to define zones of myocardial infarction (MI), which appear as areas of relatively increased signal intensity (SI). However, zones of decreased SI have been observed within the areas of infarction and have been postulated to result from intramyocardial hemorrhage. To explore this phenomenon further, ex vivo spin-echo 1H NMR imaging at 1.5 Tesla was performed in 17 dogs after 24 hr (n = 9) and after 72 hr (n = 8) of coronary artery occlusion. In all dogs, a zone of increased SI (118 +/- 9% compared with normal myocardium) was observed in the distribution of the occluded coronary artery. In 12 of the 17 dogs, zones of decreased SI (92 +/- 8% compared with normal) were seen within or around the central zone of increased SI. Gross inspection and histological assessment of sliced myocardium usually disclosed hemorrhage in the regions of decreased SI. In three of the five dogs with no apparent zones of decreased SI on NMR, the infarct was small, and only minor hemorrhage was observed by gross inspection, whereas in the remaining two dogs no hemorrhage was seen. Myocardial flow in the hemorrhagic regions was significantly higher than in the necrotic core (59 +/- 29% vs. 31 +/- 24% compared with control, P less than 0.05). Image-derived calculation of T2 relaxation times in the different infarcted regions revealed a significant shortening of T2 in the infarcted hemorrhagic zones with decreased SI compared with the infarct zones with increased SI (49 +/- 8 msec vs. 66 +/- 8 msec, P less than 0.05).

  14. Brain-heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catie; Raven, Erika P; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-05-13

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain-heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain-heart interactions.

  15. Brain-heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catie; Raven, Erika P; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-05-13

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain-heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain-heart interactions. PMID:27044994

  16. Comparison Between Nb3Al and Nb3Sn Strands and Cables for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, A.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Rusy, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; Velev, V.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The Nb{sub 3}Al small racetrack magnet, SR07, has been successfully built and tested to its short sample limit beyond 10 Tesla without any training. Thus the practical application of Nb{sub 3}Al strands for high field accelerator magnets is established. The characteristics of the representative F4 strand and cable, are compared with the typical Nb{sub 3}Sn strand and cable. It is represented by the OST high current RRP Nb{sub 3}Sn strand with 108/127 configuration. The effects of Rutherford cabling to both type strands are explained and the inherent problem of the Nb{sub 3}Sn strand is discussed. Also the test results of two representative small racetrack magnets are compared from the stand point of Ic values, and training. The maximum current density of the Nb{sub 3}Al strands is still smaller than that of the Nb{sub 3}Sn strands, but if we take into account of the stress-strain characteristics, Nb{sub 3}Al strands become somewhat favorable in some applications.

  17. Manufacture and Testing of a High Field Gradient Magnetic Fractionation System for Quantitative Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Gametocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, Stephan; Woodward, Robert C.; Davis, Timothy M. E.; St. Pierre, Tim G.

    2010-12-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the most dangerous of the human malaria parasite species and accounts for millions of clinical episodes of malaria each year in tropical countries. The pathogenicity of Plasmodium falciparum is a result of its ability to infect erythrocytes where it multiplies asexually over 48 h or develops into sexual forms known as gametocytes. If sufficient male and female gametocytes are taken up by a mosquito vector, it becomes infectious. Therefore, the presence and density of gametocytes in human blood is an important indicator of human-to-mosquito transmission of malaria. Recently, we have shown that high field gradient magnetic fractionation improves gametocyte detection in human blood samples. Here we present two important new developments. Firstly we introduce a quantitative approach to replace the previous qualitative method and, secondly, we describe a novel method that enables cost-effective production of the magnetic fractionation equipment required to carry out gametocyte quantification. We show that our custom-made magnetic fractionation equipment can deliver results with similar sensitivity and convenience but for a small fraction of the cost.

  18. Windows on the Human Body – in Vivo High-Field Magnetic Resonance Research and Applications in Medicine and Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin; Fischmeister, Florian Ph. S.; Grabner, Günther; Bauer, Herbert; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in “medical sensor-systems”, i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla) are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given. PMID:22219684

  19. The high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments at ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32.

    PubMed

    Kummer, K; Fondacaro, A; Jimenez, E; Velez-Fort, E; Amorese, A; Aspbury, M; Yakhou-Harris, F; van der Linden, P; Brookes, N B

    2016-03-01

    A new high-field magnet endstation for X-ray magnetic dichroism experiments has been installed and commissioned at the ESRF soft X-ray beamline ID32. The magnet consists of two split-pairs of superconducting coils which can generate up to 9 T along the beam and up to 4 T orthogonal to the beam. It is connected to a cluster of ultra-high-vacuum chambers that offer a comprehensive set of surface preparation and characterization techniques. The endstation and the beam properties have been designed to provide optimum experimental conditions for X-ray magnetic linear and circular dichroism experiments in the soft X-ray range between 400 and 1600 eV photon energy. User operation started in November 2014. PMID:26917134

  20. Endometrium evaluation with high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging in patients submitted to uterine leiomyoma embolization

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Monica Amadio Piazza; Nasser, Felipe; Zlotnik, Eduardo; Messina, Marcos de Lorenzo; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the endometrial alterations related to embolization of uterine arteries for the treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis (pelvic pain and/or uterine bleeding) by means of high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance. Methods: This is a longitudinal and prospective study that included 94 patients with a clinical and imaging diagnosis of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis, all of them treated by embolization of the uterine arteries. The patients were submitted to evaluations by high-field magnetic resonance of the pelvis before and 6 months after the procedure. Specific evaluations were made of the endometrium on the T2-weighted sequences, and on the T1-weighted sequences before and after the intravenous dynamic infusion of the paramagnetic contrast. In face of these measures, statistical analyses were performed using Student's t test for comparison of the results obtained before and after the procedure. Results: An average increase of 20.9% was noted in the endometrial signal on T2-weighted images obtained after the uterine artery embolization procedure when compared to the pre-procedure evaluation (p=0.0004). In the images obtained with the intravenous infusion of paramagnetic contrast, an average increase of 18.7% was noted in the post-embolization intensity of the endometrial signal, compared to the pre-embolization measure (p<0.035). Conclusion: After embolization of the uterine arteries, there was a significant increase of the endometrial signal on the T2-weighted images and on the post-contrast images, inferring possible edema and increased endometrial flow. Future studies are needed to assess the clinical impact of these findings. PMID:23579745

  1. Multicomponent analysis of radiolytic products in human body fluids using high field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grootveld, Martin C.; Herz, Herman; Haywood, Rachel; Hawkes, Geoffrey E.; Naughton, Declan; Perera, Anusha; Knappitt, Jacky; Blake, David R.; Claxson, Andrew W. D.

    1994-05-01

    High field proton Hahn spin-echo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to investigate radiolytic damage to biomolecules present in intact human body fluids. γ-Radiolysis of healthy or rheumatoid human serum (5.00 kGy) in the presence of atmospheric O 2 gave rise to reproducible elevations in the concentration of NMR-detectable acetate which are predominantly ascribable to the prior oxidation of lactate to pyruvate by hydroxyl radical (·OH) followed by oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate by radiolytically-generated hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2) and/or further ·OH radical. Increases in the serum levels of non-protein-bound, low-molecular-mass components such as citrate and glutamine were also observed subsequent to γ-radiolysis, an observation which may reflect their mobilisation from protein binding-sites by ·OH radical, superoxide anion and/or H 2O 2. Moreover, substantial radiolytically-mediated elevations in the concentration of serum formate were also detectable. In addition to the above modifications, γ-radiolysis of inflammatory knee-joint synovial fluid (SF) generated a low-molecular-mass oligosaccharide species derived from the radiolytic fragmentation of hyaluronate. The radiolytically-mediated production of acetate in SF samples was markedly greater than that observed in serum samples, a consequence of the much higher levels of ·OH radical-scavenging lactate present. Indeed, increases in SF acetate concentration were detectable at doses as low as 48 Gy. We conclude that high field proton NMR analysis provides much useful information regarding the relative radioprotectant abilities of endogenous components and the nature, status and levels of radiolytic products generated in intact biofluids. We also suggest that NMR-detectable radiolytic products with associated toxicological properties (e.g. formate) may play a role in contributing to the deleterious effects observed following exposure of living organisms to sources of

  2. Advanced and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus.

    PubMed

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods. PMID:26236469

  3. Advanced and Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Sarbu, Nicolae; Bargalló, Núria; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric lupus is a major diagnostic challenge, and a main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is, by far, the main tool for assessing the brain in this disease. Conventional and advanced MRI techniques are used to help establishing the diagnosis, to rule out alternative diagnoses, and recently, to monitor the evolution of the disease. This review explores the neuroimaging findings in SLE, including the recent advances in new MRI methods. PMID:26236469

  4. Recent progress towards developing a high field, high-T(sub c) superconducting magnet for magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derochemont, L. Pierre; Oakes, Carlton E.; Squillante, Michael R.; Duan, Hong-Min; Hermann, Allen M.; Andrews, Robert J.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Maroni, Victor A.; Carlberg, Ingrid A.; Kelliher, Warren C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews superconducting magnets and high T(sub c) superconducting oxide ceramic materials technology to identify areas of fundamental impasse to the fabrication of components and devices that tap what are believed to be the true potential of these new materials. High T(sub c) ceramics pose problems in fundamentally different areas which need to be solved unlike low T(sub c) materials. The authors map out an experimental plan designed to research process technologies which, if suitably implemented, should allow these deficiencies to be solved. Finally, assessments are made of where and on what regimes magnetic system designers should focus their attention to advance the practical development of systems based on these new materials.

  5. High field (9.4 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging of cortical grey matter lesions in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schmierer, Klaus; Parkes, Harold G; So, Po-Wah; An, Shu F; Brandner, Sebastian; Ordidge, Roger J; Yousry, Tarek A; Miller, David H

    2010-03-01

    .9; SD = 5 versus 22.6 ms; SD = 4.7; P < 0.01). Associations were detected between phosphorylated neurofilament and myelin basic protein (r = 0.58, P < 0.01), myelin basic protein and T(2) (r = -0.59, P < 0.01), and neuronal density and T(1) (r = -0.57, P < 0.01). All indices correlated with duration of tissue fixation, however, including the latter in the analysis did not fundamentally affect the associations described. Our data show that T(2)-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 9.4 T enables detection of cortical grey matter lesion in post-mortem multiple sclerosis brain. The quantitative associations suggest that in cortical grey matter T(1) may be a predictor of neuronal density, and T(2) of myelin content (and-secondarily-axons). Successful translation of these results into in vivo studies using high field magnetic resonance imaging (e.g. 3 T and 7 T) will improve the assessment of cortical pathology and thereby have an impact on the diagnosis and natural history studies of patients with multiple sclerosis, as well as clinical trial designs for putative treatments to prevent cortical demyelination and neuronal loss.

  6. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study.

  7. Comparison between computed tomography multislice and high-field magnetic resonance in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Baldari, Diana; Capece, Sergio; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Tucci, Anna Giacoma; Klain, Michele; Cozzolino, Immacolata; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background Renal masses are a common finding in diagnostic imaging; these lesions usually are solid or cystic, benign or malignant, and the correct diagnosis may be difficult. The aim of our study was the comparison of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) and high-field magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnostic evaluation of renal masses. Methods We studied 29 patients, 16 men and 13 women aged 8-85 years (mean 61±17 years) with histo-cytological diagnosis of renal masses (n=31), of which the majority (74%; n=23) was represented by malignant lesions [renal cell carcinoma (Ca) =16, chromophobe renal cell Ca =2, squamous cell Ca =1, urothelial Ca =2, lymphoma =1, Wilms tumor =1]; the remaining 8 masses (26%) were benign (pyelonephritis =2, simple cyst =1, hematic cyst =1, lipoma =1 and oncocytoma =3). All patients underwent MSCT and MR (3.0 Tesla) before and after contrast injection; the images were evaluated in double-blind by two expert radiologists. The results of the images were then compared with the histo-cytological data to calculate the values of diagnostic accuracy for both methods in the identification and characterization of renal masses. The benign or malignant nature of the lesions was established according to the regularity of the margins, presence or absence of significant contrast enhancement, infiltration of perirenal fat and vascular invasion. The concordance of the results of the two imaging techniques was then calculated using the coefficient Kappa Cohen. Results For both identification and characterization of renal masses, MSCT and MR showed comparable values of diagnostic accuracy with a significant concordance (k=1); in particular, the diagnostic accuracy of MSCT/MR was 100%/100% for lesion identification, 90%/90% for lesion characterization in terms of benign or malignant nature, 97%/97% for the evaluation of lesion edges, 90%/90% for the assessment of lesion contrast enhancement, 93%/93% for the evaluation of peri-renal fat infiltration

  8. ECG-based gating in ultra high field cardiovascular magnetic resonance using an independent component analysis approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR), the synchronization of image acquisition with heart motion is performed in clinical practice by processing the electrocardiogram (ECG). The ECG-based synchronization is well established for MR scanners with magnetic fields up to 3 T. However, this technique is prone to errors in ultra high field environments, e.g. in 7 T MR scanners as used in research applications. The high magnetic fields cause severe magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects which disturb the ECG signal. Image synchronization is thus less reliable and yields artefacts in CMR images. Methods A strategy based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA) was pursued in this work to enhance the ECG contribution and attenuate the MHD effect. ICA was applied to 12-lead ECG signals recorded inside a 7 T MR scanner. An automatic source identification procedure was proposed to identify an independent component (IC) dominated by the ECG signal. The identified IC was then used for detecting the R-peaks. The presented ICA-based method was compared to other R-peak detection methods using 1) the raw ECG signal, 2) the raw vectorcardiogram (VCG), 3) the state-of-the-art gating technique based on the VCG, 4) an updated version of the VCG-based approach and 5) the ICA of the VCG. Results ECG signals from eight volunteers were recorded inside the MR scanner. Recordings with an overall length of 87 min accounting for 5457 QRS complexes were available for the analysis. The records were divided into a training and a test dataset. In terms of R-peak detection within the test dataset, the proposed ICA-based algorithm achieved a detection performance with an average sensitivity (Se) of 99.2%, a positive predictive value (+P) of 99.1%, with an average trigger delay and jitter of 5.8 ms and 5.0 ms, respectively. Long term stability of the demixing matrix was shown based on two measurements of the same subject, each being separated by one year, whereas an averaged detection

  9. Juvenile angiofibroma: imaging by magnetic resonance, CT and conventional techniques.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, G A; Phelps, P D

    1986-08-01

    Thirty patients with histologically verified angiofibromata have been investigated over a period of 14 years. They have been examined by conventional radiographic techniques and computerized tomography, and more recently 4 patients have been scanned by magnetic resonance. CT studies of patients with small tumours have shown that the point of origin is at the sphenopalatine foramen. The tumour enlarges the foramen and erodes bone locally giving rise to characteristic signs both on plain X-ray and on CT scan. The value of magnetic resonance imaging is assessed and it is concluded that in the presence of the characteristic 'antral sign' on plain X-ray, 3-plane magnetic resonance is now the method of choice to show the extent of the tumour pre-operatively. Magnetic resonance can also show the vascular nature of the angiofibroma by the demonstration of large vessels, shown as dark areas of negative signal within the tumour mass. With this new method of investigation available, angiography should now only be performed if embolization is deemed necessary prior to surgical removal of the angiofibroma.

  10. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Tim; Mallow, Johannes; Plaumann, Markus; Luchtmann, Michael; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Bernarding, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF) is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx) and a phased array coil for receive (Rx) tightly enclosing the monkey’s head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW) excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI. Methods The TW Primate System (TWPS) uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil. Results The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired. Conclusion The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system. PMID:26066653

  11. High-field magnetization of heusler alloys Fe2 XY ( X = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni; Y = Al, Si)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourov, N. I.; Marchenkov, V. V.; Korolev, A. V.; Belozerova, K. A.; Weber, H. W.

    2015-10-01

    The magnetization curves of ferromagnetic Heusler alloys Fe2 XY (where X = Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni are transition 3 d elements and Y = Al, Si are the s and p elements of the third period of the Periodic Table) have been measured at T = 4.2 K in the field range H ≤ 70 kOe. It has been shown that the high-field ( H ≥ 20 kOe) magnetization is described within the Stoner model.

  12. Magnetic properties of Zn doped Co{sub 2}Y hexaferrite by using high-field Mössbauer spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tae Lim, Jung; Sung Kim, Chul

    2014-05-07

    The polycrystalline samples of Ba{sub 2}Co{sub 2−x}Zn{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 22} (x = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5) were synthesized by using solid-state-reaction method. From the XRD patterns, analyzed by Rietveld refinement, the prepared samples are found to be single-phased with rhombohedral structure (R-3m). The magnetic properties of samples were investigated with vibrating sample magnetometer, and high-field Mössbauer spectrometer. From the zero-field-cooled curves under 100 Oe between 4.2 and 740 K, we observe that the samples show spin transition from helicalmagnetic to ferrimagnetic order. With increasing Zn ion concentration, the spin transition temperature (T{sub s}) and Curie temperature (T{sub C}) decrease linearly. We have obtained Zero-field Mössbauer spectra of all samples at various temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 650 K, and analyzed the spectra below T{sub C} as six-sextets for Fe sites. From the temperature dependence of hyperfine field (H{sub hf}), we have noticed an abrupt change in H{sub hf} at T{sub s}. In addition, Mössbauer spectra of all samples at 4.2 K were taken with applied field ranging from 0 to 50 kOe, indicating the canting angle between applied field and H{sub hf} decreased with increasing Zn concentration.

  13. High strength kiloampere Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox cables for high-field magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tengming; Li, Pei; Jiang, Jianyi; Cooley, Lance; Tompkins, John; McRae, Dustin; Walsh, Robert

    2015-06-01

    INCONEL X750 for various high-field magnet applications.

  14. Cotton-mouton effects, magnetic hyperpolarizabilities, and magnetic anisotropies of the methyl halides. Comparison with molecular Zeeman and high-field NMR spectroscopic results

    SciTech Connect

    Coonan, M.H.; Ritchie, G.L.D. )

    1991-02-07

    Measurements of the vapor-phase Cotton-Mouton effects of methyl fluoride, methyl bromide, and methyl iodide are reported. Analysis of the results, in conjunction with those of an earlier study of methane and methyl chloride, shows that in the series CH{sub 3}X (X = H, F, Cl, Br, I) the magnetic hyperpolarizabiity anisotropy, which is related to the quadratic response of the molecular polarizability to a magnetic field, is positive in sign and roughly proportional in magnitude to the mean polarizability. The magnetic anisotropies (10{sup 29}{Delta}{sub {chi}}/J T{sup {minus}2}) found for methyl chloride,methyl bromide, and methyl iodide (CH{sub 3}Cl, {minus}15.0 {plus minus} 1.3; CH{sub 3}Br, -15.1 {plus minus} 0.8; CH{sub 3}I, {minus}18.0 {plus minus} 1.5) are compared with values obtained by the molecular Zeeman and high-field {sup 2}H NMR spectroscopic methods.

  15. New 30 kA power system at Fermilab and its use for measuring the effects of ripple current on the performance of superconducting high field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Garvey, J.; Jaskierny, W.; Lamm, M.; Makulski, A.; Orris, D.F.; Pfeffer, H.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; Wolff, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    A new 30 kA, 30 V dc Power System was designed, built, and commissioned at Fermilab for testing Superconducting High Field Magnets. This system has been successfully supporting operations at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility since April 2002. It is based on six commercial 150 kW Power Energy Industries power supply modules and the following in-house modules: six 720 Hz filters, two 15 kA/1kV dc solid-state dump switch, and a 3 MJ/30 kA/1 kV dc dump resistor. Additional inhouse electronic components were designed and built to provide precise current regulation and distribution of current and current rate of change. An industrial-type Programmable Logic Controller system was used to provide equipment interlocks and monitoring. This paper summarizes studies on the influence of characteristics of this new power system--such as ripple current--on the performance of High Field Superconducting magnets.

  16. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Compatible Needles and Interactive Sequences for Musculoskeletal Interventions Using an Open High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Wonneberger, Uta; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Streitparth, Florian Walter, Thula Rump, Jens Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M.

    2010-04-15

    In this article, we study in vitro evaluation of needle artefacts and image quality for musculoskeletal laser-interventions in an open high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner at 1.0T with vertical field orientation. Five commercially available MRI-compatible puncture needles were assessed based on artefact characteristics in a CuSO4 phantom (0.1%) and in human cadaveric lumbar spines. First, six different interventional sequences were evaluated with varying needle orientation to the main magnetic field B0 (0{sup o} to 90{sup o}) in a sequence test. Artefact width, needle-tip error, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Second, a gradient-echo sequence used for thermometric monitoring was assessed and in varying echo times, artefact width, tip error, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were measured. Artefact width and needle-tip error correlated with needle material, instrument orientation to B0, and sequence type. Fast spin-echo sequences produced the smallest needle artefacts for all needles, except for the carbon fibre needle (width <3.5 mm, tip error <2 mm) at 45{sup o} to B0. Overall, the proton density-weighted spin-echo sequences had the best CNR (CNR{sub Muscle/Needle} >16.8). Concerning the thermometric gradient echo sequence, artefacts remained <5 mm, and the SNR reached its maximum at an echo time of 15 ms. If needle materials and sequences are accordingly combined, guidance and monitoring of musculoskeletal laser interventions may be feasible in a vertical magnetic field at 1.0T.

  17. Magnetic carbon nanostructures: microwave energy-assisted pyrolysis vs. conventional pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiahua; Pallavkar, Sameer; Chen, Minjiao; Yerra, Narendranath; Luo, Zhiping; Colorado, Henry A; Lin, Hongfei; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Khasanov, Airat; Ho, Thomas C; Young, David P; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2013-01-11

    Magnetic carbon nanostructures from microwave assisted- and conventional-pyrolysis processes are compared. Unlike graphitized carbon shells from conventional heating, different carbon shell morphologies including nanotubes, nanoflakes and amorphous carbon were observed. Crystalline iron and cementite were observed in the magnetic core, different from a single cementite phase from the conventional process.

  18. Processing and characterization of superconducting solenoids made of Bi-2212/Ag-alloy multifilament round wire for high field magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng

    As the only high temperature superconductor with round wire (RW) geometry, Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+x (Bi-2212) superconducting wire has the advantages of being multi-filamentary, macroscopically isotropic and twistable. With overpressure (OP) processing techniques recently developed by our group at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), the engineering current density (Je) of Bi-2212 RW can be dramatically increased. For example, Je of more than 600 A/mm 2 (4.2 K and 20 T) is achieved after 100 bar OP processing. With these intrinsically beneficial properties and recent processing progress, Bi-2212 RW has become very attractive for high field magnet applications, especially for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) magnets and accelerator magnets etc. This thesis summarizes my graduate study on Bi-2212 solenoids for high field and high homogeneity NMR magnet applications, which mainly includes performance study of Bi-2212 RW insulations, 1 bar and OP processing study of Bi-2212 solenoids, and development of superconducting joints between Bi-2212 RW conductors. Electrical insulation is one of the key components of Bi-2212 coils to provide sufficient electrical standoff within coil winding pack. A TiO 2/polymer insulation offered by nGimat LLC was systematically investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dielectric property measurements, and transport critical current (Ic) property measurements. About 29% of the insulation by weight is polymer. When the Bi-2212 wire is fully heat treated, this decomposes with slow heating to 400 °C in flowing O2. After the full reaction, we found that the TiO2 did not degrade the critical current properties, adhered well to the conductor, and provided a breakdown voltage of more than 100 V. A Bi-2212 RW wound solenoid coil was built using this insulation being offered by nGimat LLC. The coil resistance was constant through coil winding, polymer burn

  19. A portable high-field pulsed-magnet system for single-crystal x-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahirul; Lang, Jonathan C.; Ruff, Jacob P. C.; Ross, Kathryn A.; Gaulin, Bruce D.; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H.; Qu Zhe

    2009-11-15

    We present a portable pulsed-magnet system for x-ray studies of materials in high magnetic fields (up to 30 T). The apparatus consists of a split-pair of minicoils cooled on a closed-cycle cryostat, which is used for x-ray diffraction studies with applied field normal to the scattering plane. A second independent closed-cycle cryostat is used for cooling the sample to near liquid helium temperatures. Pulsed magnetic fields ({approx}1 ms in total duration) are generated by discharging a configurable capacitor bank into the magnet coils. Time-resolved scattering data are collected using a combination of a fast single-photon counting detector, a multichannel scaler, and a high-resolution digital storage oscilloscope. The capabilities of this instrument are used to study a geometrically frustrated system revealing strong magnetostrictive effects in the spin-liquid state.

  20. A portable high-field pulsed-magnet system for single-crystal x-ray scattering studies.

    PubMed

    Islam, Zahirul; Ruff, Jacob P C; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H; Ross, Kathryn A; Gaulin, Bruce D; Qu, Zhe; Lang, Jonathan C

    2009-11-01

    We present a portable pulsed-magnet system for x-ray studies of materials in high magnetic fields (up to 30 T). The apparatus consists of a split-pair of minicoils cooled on a closed-cycle cryostat, which is used for x-ray diffraction studies with applied field normal to the scattering plane. A second independent closed-cycle cryostat is used for cooling the sample to near liquid helium temperatures. Pulsed magnetic fields (approximately 1 ms in total duration) are generated by discharging a configurable capacitor bank into the magnet coils. Time-resolved scattering data are collected using a combination of a fast single-photon counting detector, a multichannel scaler, and a high-resolution digital storage oscilloscope. The capabilities of this instrument are used to study a geometrically frustrated system revealing strong magnetostrictive effects in the spin-liquid state. PMID:19947737

  1. First Observation of the High Field Side Sawtooth Crash and Heat Transfer during Driven Reconnection Processes in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, HK; Luhmann, NC; Donne, AJH; Classen, IGJ; Domier, CW; Mazzucato, E; Munsat, T; van de Pol, MJ; Xia, Z

    2005-12-01

    High resolution (temporal and spatial), two-dimensional images of electron temperature fluctuations during sawtooth oscillations were employed to study driven reconnection processes in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas. The combination of kink and local pressure driven instabilities leads to an "X-point" reconnection process that is localized in the toroidal and poloidal planes. The reconnection is not always confined to the magnetic surfaces with minimum energy. The heat transport process from the core is demonstrated to be highly collective rather than stochastic.

  2. [Comparative assessment of MR-semiotics of acutest intracerebral hematomas in low- and extra high-field frequency magnetic resonance tomography].

    PubMed

    Skvortsova, V I; Burenchev, D V; Tvorogova, T V; Guseva, O I; Prokhorov, A V; Smirnov, A M; Kupriianov, D A; Pirogov, Iu A

    2009-01-01

    An objective of the study was to compare sensitivity of low- and extra high-field frequency magnetic resonance (MR) tomography of acutest intracerebral hematomas (ICH) and to assess differences between symptoms in obtained images. A study was conducted using experimental ICH in rats (n=6). Hematomas were formed by two injections of autologic blood into the brain. MR-devices "Bio Spec 70/30" with magnetic field strength of 7 T and "Ellipse-150" with magnetic field strength of 0,15 T were used in the study. MR-tomography was carried out 3-5 h after the injections. Both MR-devices revealed the presence of pathological lesion in all animals. Extra highfield frequency MR-tomography showed the specific signs of ICH caused by the paramagnetic effect of deoxyhemoglobin in T2 and T2*-weighted images (WI) and low frequency MR-tomography - in T2*-WI only. The comparable sensitivity of low- and extra high-field frequency MR-devices in acutest ICH was established.

  3. High-field (9.4 T) MRI of brain dysmyelination by quantitative mapping of magnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlei; Li, Wei; Johnson, G Allan; Wu, Bing

    2011-06-01

    The multilayered myelin sheath wrapping around nerve axons is essential for proper functioning of the central nervous system. Abnormal myelination leads to a wide range of neurological diseases and developmental disorders. Non-invasive imaging of myelin content is of great clinical importance. The present work demonstrated that loss of myelin in the central nervous system of the shiverer mouse results in a dramatic reduction of magnetic susceptibility in white matter axons. The reduction resulted in a near extinction of susceptibility contrast between gray and white matter. Quantitative magnetic susceptibility imaging and diffusion tensor imaging were conducted on a group of control and shiverer mice at 9.4 T. We measured the resonance frequency distribution of the whole brain for each mouse. Magnetic susceptibility maps were computed and compared between the two groups. It was shown that the susceptibility contrast between gray and white matter was reduced by 96% in the shiverer compared to the controls. Diffusion measurements further confirmed intact fiber pathways in the shiverer mice, ruling out the possibility of axonal injury and its potential contribution to the altered susceptibility. As an autosomal recessive mutation, shiverer is characterized by an almost total lack of central nervous system myelin. Our data provide new evidences indicating that myelin is the predominant source of susceptibility differences between deep gray and white matter observed in magnetic resonance imaging. More importantly, the present study suggests that quantitative magnetic susceptibility is a potential endogenous biomarker for myelination.

  4. Alignment of bicelles studied with high-field magnetic birefringence and small-angle neutron scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Liebi, Marianne; van Rhee, Peter G; Christianen, Peter C M; Kohlbrecher, Joachim; Fischer, Peter; Walde, Peter; Windhab, Erich J

    2013-03-12

    Birefringence measurements at high magnetic field strength of up to 33 T were used to detect magnetically induced alignment of bicelles composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), cholesterol, and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DMPE-DTPA) with complexed lanthanide ions. These birefringence measurements together with a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis in a magnetic field showed parallel alignment of the bicelles if the lanthanide was thulium (Tm(3+)), and perpendicular alignment with dysprosium (Dy(3+)). With the birefringence measurements, the order parameter S can be determined as a function of the magnetic field strength, if the magnetic alignment reaches saturation. Additional structural information can be obtained if the maximum induced birefringence is considered. The degree of alignment of the studied bicelles increased with decreasing temperature from 40 to 5 °C and showed a new bicellar structure comprising a transient hole formation at intermediate temperatures (20 °C) during heating from 5 to 40 °C.

  5. First observation of amino acid side chain dynamics in membrane proteins using high field deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsey, R.A.; Kintanar, A.; Tsai, M.D.; Smith, R.L.; Janes, N.; Oldfield, E.

    1981-05-10

    The first deuterium NMR spectra of an individual membrane protein, bacteriohodopsin in the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium R1 has been obtained. Biosynthetic isotopic enrichment with (gamma-2H6) valine and high field Fourier transform operation permitted rapid data acquisition on intact membranes, including measurement of relaxation times. At some temperatures high quality spectra could be obtained in less than 1 s. (U-14C)Valine tracer studies indicate that less than or equal to 2% of valine added to the growth medium is broken down and incorporated into other membrane constituents. The NMR results indicate that the valine side chain is a rather rigid structure. Motion about C alpha-C beta is slow (less than 10(5) s-1) at growth temperature, while motion about C beta-C gamma is as expected fast (much greater than 10(5) s-1) at all accessible temperatures. The activation energy for methyl group rotation from spin-lattice relaxation data between -75 and 53 degrees C is approximately 2.4 kcal/mol, in good agreement with previous 1H NMR studies on solid alkanes. Preliminary data on (gamma-2H6)valine-labeled Acholeplasma laidlawii B (PG9) cell membranes are also presented. Results strongly suggest that it should now be possible to observe in great detail the motions of any type of amino acid side chain in membrane proteins, including the effects of lipid composition on protein dynamics.

  6. Limits of NbTi and Nb3Sn, and Development of W&R Bi-2212 HighField Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Prestemon,S.O.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2006-12-01

    NbTi accelerator dipoles are limited to magnetic fields (H)of about 10 T, due to an intrinsic upper critical field(Hc2) limitationof 14 T. To surpass this restriction, prototype Nb3Sn magnets are beingdeveloped which have reached 16 T. We show that Nb3Sn dipole technologyis practically limited to 17 to 18 T due to insufficient high fieldpinning, and intrinsically to 20 to 22 T due to Hc2 limitations.Therefore, to obtain magnetic fields approaching 20 T and higher, amaterial is required with a higher Hc2 and sufficient high field pinningcapacity. A realistic candidate for this purpose is Bi-2212, which isavailable in roundwires and sufficient lengths for the fabrication ofcoils based on Rutherford-type cables. We initiated a program to developthe required technology to construct accelerator magnets from'windand-react' (W&R) Bi-2212 coils. We outline the complicationsthat arise through the use of Bi-2212, describe the development paths toaddress these issues, and conclude with the design of W&R Bi-2212sub-scale magnets.

  7. Cost of high-field Nb/sub 3/Sn and NbTi accelerator dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1982-11-01

    Future high-energy proton accelerators will likely require very high magnetic fields if the size of the accelerator and associated experimental areas are to be limited to dimensions that can be accomodated by the terrain at convenient sites. Two commercially available superconductors can be used to produce magnetic fields of 10T or more. The first is Nb/sub 3/Sn, which can operate in pool boiling helium at 4.4 K. The second is NbTi, which must be cooled to about 1.9 K in superfluid helium. In this paper the costs of 5-cm-bore, 6-m-long magnets made of these materials and operating at fields from 5 to 11 T are compared. At 10 T the capital cost of a NbTi coil operating in superfluid helium is 35% less than the cost of a Nb/sub 3/Sn coil. The cost of the NbTi coil is still 10% less after the differential operating costs that will be incurred over the life of the accelerator are included. The results presented here are a summary of a detailed analysis of these costs given in a separate report.

  8. Magnetofluorescent micelles incorporating Dy(III)-DOTA as potential bimodal agents for optical and high field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael; Vander Elst, Luce; Laurent, Sophie; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2016-03-21

    Dysprosium(iii) was coordinated to four 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) bisamide derivatives functionalized with amphiphilic p-dodecylaniline and p-tetradecylaniline in a differing cis- and trans-orientation. The complexes were assembled into mono-disperse micelles having size distribution maxima ranging from 10 to 15 nm and the magnetic and optical properties of the micelles were examined in detail. The micelles show characteristic Dy(iii) emission with quantum yields reaching 0.8%. The transverse relaxivity r2 per Dy(iii) ion at 500 MHz and 310 K reaches maximum values of ca. 20 s(-1) mM(-1) which is a large increase when compared to a value of 0.8 s(-1) mM(-1) observed for Dy(III)-DTPA. The micelles were stable in water when incubated at 37 °C for 1 week and showed no relaxivity decrease when measured in the presence of 4% (w/v) human serum albumin. The efficient T2 relaxation, especially at strong magnetic fields, is sustained by the high magnetic moment of the dysprosium(iii) ion, the coordination of water molecules and long rotational correlation times. PMID:26865457

  9. Experimental Fusion of Contrast Enhanced High-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging and High-Resolution Micro-Computed Tomography in Imaging the Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Counter, S. Allen; Damberg, Peter; Aski, Sahar Nikkhou; Nagy, Kálmán; Berglin, Cecilia Engmér; Laurell, Göran

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Imaging cochlear, vestibular, and 8th cranial nerve abnormalities remains a challenge. In this study, the membranous and osseous labyrinths of the wild type mouse inner ear were examined using volumetric data from ultra high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium contrast at 9.4 Tesla and high-resolution micro-computed tomography (µCT) to visualize the scalae and vestibular apparatus, and to establish imaging protocols and parameters for comparative analysis of the normal and mutant mouse inner ear. Methods: For in vivo MRI acquisition, animals were placed in a Milleped coil situated in the isocenter of a horizontal 9.4 T Varian magnet. For µCT examination, cone beam scans were performed ex vivo following MRI using the µCT component of a nanoScan PET/CT in vivo scanner. Results: The fusion of Gd enhanced high field MRI and high-resolution µCT scans revealed the dynamic membranous labyrinth of the perilymphatic fluid filled scala tympani and scala vestibule of the cochlea, and semicircular canals of the vestibular apparatus, within the µCT visualized contours of the contiguous osseous labyrinth. The ex vivo µCT segmentation revealed the surface contours and structural morphology of each cochlea turn and the semicircular canals in 3 planes. Conclusions: The fusion of ultra high-field MRI and high-resolution µCT imaging techniques were complementary, and provided high-resolution dynamic and static visualization of the complex morphological features of the normal mouse inner ear structures, which may offer a valuable approach for the investigation of cochlear and vestibular abnormalities that are associated with birth defects related to genetic inner ear disorders in humans. PMID:26401173

  10. Observation of high field DHVA-effect and induced magnetism in single crystal TiBe/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    van Deursen, A.P.J.; van Ruitenbeek, J.M.; Verhoef, W.A.; de Vroomen, A.R.; Smith, J.L.; de Groot, R.A.; Koelling, D.D.; Mueller, F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Recently much interest has been given to itinerant magnetism in cubic Laves phase or C15 materials. Primarily this stems from the discussion of the relationship of p-state pairing and ferromagnetism in ZrZn/sub 2/ by Enz and Matthias, and the possibility of triplet superconductivity. The most recent work in this field has focused on the isoelectronic, isostructural material TiBe/sub 2/, and the possibility that this material is metamagnetic. That TiBe/sub 2/ is close to some form of magnetic instability can be infered indirectly from the peaked nature of its density of states near the fermi level, but also from the observation of ferromagnetism in TiBe/sub 2-x/Cu/sub x/, when x is greater than about 0.15. In this paper a single crystal of pure TiBe/sub 2/ is considered in fields larger than 15 Tesla (T) and at a temperature of 1.3/sup 0/K.

  11. Characterization of Alloys with Potential for Application in Cable-in-Conduit Conductors for High-Field Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; Miller, J. R.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2004-06-01

    Since the introduction of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) concept, a variety of alloys have been proposed for fabricating the jacket. The jacket provides primary containment of the supercritical helium coolant and is typically also the primary structural component for the magnet. These functions create requirements for strength, toughness, weldability, and fabricability in tubular form. When the CICC uses Nb3Sn, there are additional requirements to accommodate the manufacturing and heat-treatment processes for the superconductor as well as its strain-sensitive performance during operation. Both of the present favorite jacket alloys, Incoloy 908 and modified (ultra-low carbon) 316LN, have both demonstrated acceptable functionality as well as a few undesirable features. In this paper, we present data from cryogenic mechanical tests on a group of heat-resistant, high-strength superalloys that appear to offer equal or better mechanical performance (e.g. strength, toughness, and modulus) while mitigating the undesirable aspects (e.g. SAGBO in the case of I908 and thermal-expansion mismatch with Nb3Sn in the case of 316LN). Data are presented for each alloy in the as-received and aged conditions. These alloys are presently being considered as candidates for use in the next-generation hybrid magnet for the NHMFL but may also be of interest to the fusion and energy storage communities.

  12. Development of high field SQUID magnetometer for magnetization studies up to 7 T and temperatures in the range from 4.2 to 300 K

    SciTech Connect

    Nagendran, R.; Thirumurugan, N.; Chinnasamy, N.; Janawadkar, M. P.; Sundar, C. S.

    2011-01-15

    We present the design, fabrication, integration, testing, and calibration of a high field superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The system is based on dc SQUID sensor with flux locked loop readout electronics. The design is modular and all the subsystems have been fabricated in the form of separate modules in order to simplify the assembly and for ease of maintenance. A novel feature of the system is that the current induced in the pickup loop is distributed as inputs to two different SQUID sensors with different strengths of coupling in order to improve the dynamic range of the system. The SQUID magnetometer has been calibrated with yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere as a standard reference material. The calibration factor was determined by fitting the measured flux profile of the YIG sphere to that expected for a point dipole. Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was also used as another reference material for the calibration and the effective magnetic moment of the Gd{sup 3+} could be evaluated from the temperature dependent magnetization measurements. The sensitivity of the system has been estimated to be about 10{sup -7} emu at low magnetic fields and about 10{sup -5} emu at high magnetic fields {approx}7 T.

  13. Limits of NbTi and Nb3Sn, and Development of W&R Bi-2212 HighField Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Prestemon,S.O.; Sa bbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2006-09-01

    NbTi accelerator dipoles are limited to magneticfields (H)of about 10 T, due to an intrinsic upper critical field (Hc2) limitationof 14 T. To surpass this restriction, prototype Nb3Sn magnets are beingdeveloped which have reached 16 T. We show that Nb3Sn dipole technologyis practically limited to 17 to 18 T due to insufficient high fieldpinning, and intrinsically to 20 to 22 T due to Hc2 limitations.Therefore, to obtain magnetic fields approaching 20 T and higher, amaterial is required with a higher Hc2 and sufficient high field pinningcapacity. A realistic candidate for this purpose is Bi-2212, which isavailable in roundwires and sufficient lengths for the fabrication ofcoils based on Rutherford-type cables. We initiated a program to developthe required technology to construct accelerator magnets from'windand-react' (W&R) Bi-2212 coils. We outline the complicationsthat arise through the use of Bi-2212, describe the development paths toaddress these issues, and conclude with the design of W&R Bi-2212sub-scale magnets.

  14. Development of high field SQUID magnetometer for magnetization studies up to 7 T and temperatures in the range from 4.2 to 300 K.

    PubMed

    Nagendran, R; Thirumurugan, N; Chinnasamy, N; Janawadkar, M P; Sundar, C S

    2011-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication, integration, testing, and calibration of a high field superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The system is based on dc SQUID sensor with flux locked loop readout electronics. The design is modular and all the subsystems have been fabricated in the form of separate modules in order to simplify the assembly and for ease of maintenance. A novel feature of the system is that the current induced in the pickup loop is distributed as inputs to two different SQUID sensors with different strengths of coupling in order to improve the dynamic range of the system. The SQUID magnetometer has been calibrated with yttrium iron garnet (YIG) sphere as a standard reference material. The calibration factor was determined by fitting the measured flux profile of the YIG sphere to that expected for a point dipole. Gd(2)O(3) was also used as another reference material for the calibration and the effective magnetic moment of the Gd(3+) could be evaluated from the temperature dependent magnetization measurements. The sensitivity of the system has been estimated to be about 10(-7) emu at low magnetic fields and about 10(-5) emu at high magnetic fields ∼7 T.

  15. New magnetic structures in novel and conventional manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoud-Aladine, Aziz; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Juan; Perca, Cristian; Pinsard-Gaudart, Loreynne

    2011-03-01

    The determination of the magnetic structures of manganites has always been at the root of their fundamental understanding. We studied the magnetic structures of half-doped charge ordered manganites that are either show the prototype CE-type magnetic structure (Pr 1/2 Ca 1/2 Mn O3), or variants of this order (YBaMn 2 O6 and Pr 0.6 Ca 0.4 Mn O3) with neutron diffraction. The study of Pr 1/2 Ca 1/2 Mn O3 (ILL, France) is the first ever done on a single crystal and it essentially confirms the pioneering picture, whereas the NPD studies of YBaMn 2 O6 (PSI, Switzerland) and Pr 0.6 Ca 0.4 Mn O3 (ISIS, UK), give two unprecedented results. The YBaMn 2 O6 magnetic structure corroborates the hotly debated ordering of Zener Polarons, and high resolution NPD data evidence a new spin reorientation transition around T ~ 20 K far below its TN ~ 170 K in Pr 0.6 Ca 0.4 Mn O3 that has so far only been vaguely observed. We will discuss the consequences that these results have on the still hotly debated understanding of the connection between charge/orbital and spin orderings in the manganites.

  16. An Ultra-High Field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of Post Exercise Lactate, Glutamate and Glutamine Change in the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Andrea; Thomas, Adam G; Rawlings, Nancy B; Near, Jamie; Nichols, Thomas E; Clare, Stuart; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Stagg, Charlotte J

    2015-01-01

    During strenuous exercise there is a progressive increase in lactate uptake and metabolism into the brain as workload and plasma lactate levels increase. Although it is now widely accepted that the brain can metabolize lactate, few studies have directly measured brain lactate following vigorous exercise. Here, we used ultra-high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain to obtain static measures of brain lactate, as well as brain glutamate and glutamine after vigorous exercise. The aims of our experiment were to (a) track the changes in brain lactate following recovery from exercise, and (b) to simultaneously measure the signals from brain glutamate and glutamine. The results of our experiment showed that vigorous exercise resulted in a significant increase in brain lactate. Furthermore, both glutamate and glutamine were successfully resolved, and as expected, although contrary to some previous reports, we did not observe any significant change in either amino acid after exercise. We did however observe a negative correlation between glutamate and a measure of fitness. These results support the hypothesis that peripherally derived lactate is taken up by the brain when available. Our data additionally highlight the potential of ultra-high field MRS as a non-invasive way of measuring multiple brain metabolite changes with exercise. PMID:26732236

  17. An Ultra-High Field Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of Post Exercise Lactate, Glutamate and Glutamine Change in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Andrea; Thomas, Adam G.; Rawlings, Nancy B.; Near, Jamie; Nichols, Thomas E.; Clare, Stuart; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Stagg, Charlotte J.

    2015-01-01

    During strenuous exercise there is a progressive increase in lactate uptake and metabolism into the brain as workload and plasma lactate levels increase. Although it is now widely accepted that the brain can metabolize lactate, few studies have directly measured brain lactate following vigorous exercise. Here, we used ultra-high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain to obtain static measures of brain lactate, as well as brain glutamate and glutamine after vigorous exercise. The aims of our experiment were to (a) track the changes in brain lactate following recovery from exercise, and (b) to simultaneously measure the signals from brain glutamate and glutamine. The results of our experiment showed that vigorous exercise resulted in a significant increase in brain lactate. Furthermore, both glutamate and glutamine were successfully resolved, and as expected, although contrary to some previous reports, we did not observe any significant change in either amino acid after exercise. We did however observe a negative correlation between glutamate and a measure of fitness. These results support the hypothesis that peripherally derived lactate is taken up by the brain when available. Our data additionally highlight the potential of ultra-high field MRS as a non-invasive way of measuring multiple brain metabolite changes with exercise. PMID:26732236

  18. Direct Observation of Ion Exchange in Mechanically Activated LiH+MgB2 System Using Ultra-High Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Wan, Xiufeng; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2009-04-06

    The LiBH4 + MgH2 system has great potential for hydrogen vehicle applications. In this study, the reported solid-state hydrogenation system made of LiH + 1/2MgB2 has been investigated using ultra-high field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It is found that Mg-Li ion exchange occurs within MgB2 during ball milling to form a compound of (Mg1-xLi2x)B2 which facilitates the formation of LiBH4 in the subsequent hydriding reaction. This discovery offers a scientific foundation for investigating the detailed mechanisms of solid-state hydrogenation and dehdrogenation of the LiBH4 +MgH2 system in the future.

  19. Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage:. Conventional and Trapped Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, Mario

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is a most efficient system for energy storage because it stores energy directly in electrical form. The SMES concept is described and analyzed with an examination of its economic viability. The impact of high-temperature supeconductivity on SMES is explored, and a trapped energy storage (TES) innovation that may have beneficial technical and economic ramifications is introduced. In addition to presenting a broad overview, this paper may be of help to those making an evaluation of the potential impact of SMES/TES on the development of new energy sources, and to determine for which energy sources it is most appropriate.

  20. Ultra-High-Field MR Neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Balchandani, P.; Naidich, T.P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY At ultra-high magnetic fields, such as 7T, MR imaging can noninvasively visualize the brain in unprecedented detail and through enhanced contrast mechanisms. The increased SNR and enhanced contrast available at 7T enable higher resolution anatomic and vascular imaging. Greater spectral separation improves detection and characterization of metabolites in spectroscopic imaging. Enhanced blood oxygen level–dependent contrast affords higher resolution functional MR imaging. Ultra-high-field MR imaging also facilitates imaging of nonproton nuclei such as sodium and phosphorus. These improved imaging methods may be applied to detect subtle anatomic, functional, and metabolic abnormalities associated with a wide range of neurologic disorders, including epilepsy, brain tumors, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and psychiatric conditions. At 7T, however, physical and hardware limitations cause conventional MR imaging pulse sequences to generate artifacts, requiring specialized pulse sequences and new hardware solutions to maximize the high-field gain in signal and contrast. Practical considerations for ultra-high-field MR imaging include cost, siting, and patient experience. PMID:25523591

  1. A high-field 3He metastability exchange optical pumping polarizer operating in a 1.5 T medical scanner for lung magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, G.; Pałasz, T.; Wojna, A.; Głowacz, B.; Suchanek, M.; Olejniczak, Z.; Dohnalik, T.

    2013-05-01

    After being hyperpolarized using the technique of Metastability Exchange Optical Pumping (MEOP), 3He can be used as a contrast agent for lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MEOP is usually performed at low magnetic field (˜1 mT) and low pressure (˜1 mbar), which results in a low magnetization production rate. Polarization preserving compression with a compression ratio of order 1000 is also required. It was demonstrated in sealed cells that high nuclear polarization values can be obtained at higher pressures with MEOP, if performed at high magnetic field (non-standard conditions). In this work, the feasibility of building a high-field polarizer that operates within a commercial 1.5 T scanner was evaluated. Preliminary measurements of nuclear polarization with sealed cells filled at different 3He gas pressures (1.33 to 267 mbar) were performed. The use of an annular shape for the laser beam increased by 25% the achievable nuclear polarization equilibrium value (Meq) at 32 and 67 mbar as compared to a Gaussian beam shape. Meq values of 66.4% and 31% were obtained at 32 and 267 mbar, respectively, and the magnetization production rate was increased by a factor of 10 compared to the best results obtained under standard conditions. To study the reproducibility of the method in a polarizing system, the same experiments were performed with small cells connected to a gas handling system. Despite careful cleaning procedure, the purity of the 3He gas could not be matched to that of the sealed cells. Consequently, the polarization build-up times were approximately 3 times longer in the 20-30 mbar range of pressure than those obtained for the 32 mbar sealed cell. However, reasonable Meq values of 40%-60% were achieved in a 90 ml open cell. Based on these findings, a novel compact polarizing system was designed and built. Its typical output is a 3He gas flow rate of 15 sccm with a polarization of 33%. In-vivo lung MRI ventilation images (Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of

  2. Assessment of Age-Related Morphometric Changes of Subcortical Structures in Healthy People Using Ultra-High Field 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Yuan; Zhao, Lei; Yu, Tao; Qiao, Liang; Ni, Duan-Yu; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the age-related morphometric changes of subcortical structures in healthy people. Materials and Methods: Ultra-high field 7 tesla magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in humans was used to visualize the subcortical structures of healthy young, middle-aged and elderly participants. Using the magnetization-prepared two rapid acquisition gradient echo (MP2RAGE) sequence, we assessed the visibility of the margins of the thalamus and white matter in the thalamus, as well as the anterior commissure (AC) and posterior commissure (PC) length, the maximal height of the thalamus, the half width of the third ventricle and the distance between the AC and the center of the mammillothalamic tract (MTT) at the level of the AC-PC plane. All quantitative data were statistically evaluated. Results: The AC-PC length did not differ significantly among the three groups. The maximal height of the thalamus decreased with age (rs(53) = −0.719, p < 0.001). The half width of the third ventricle (rs(53) = 0.705, p < 0.001) and the distance between the AC and the center of the MTT (rs(53) = 0.485, p < 0.001) increased with age. The distance between the AC and the center of the MTT of the young and the elderly participants differed significantly (p = 0.007). Conclusion: The AC-PC length is not a good candidate for proportional correction during atlas-to-patient registration. The maximal height of the thalamus and the half width of the third ventricle correlated strongly with age, and the MTT position in relation to the AC shifted posteriorly as age increased. These age-related morphometric changes of subcortical structures should be considered in targeting for functional neurosurgery. PMID:27725800

  3. Chemical spray pyrolysis of Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O high-T(sub c) superconductors for high-field bitter magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derochemont, L. Pierre; Zhang, John G.; Squillante, Michael R.; Hermann, A. M.; Duan, H. M.; Andrews, Robert J.; Kelliher, Warren C.

    1991-01-01

    The deposition of Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O thick films by spray pyrolyzing a Ba-Ca-Cu-O precursor film and diffusing thallium into the film to form the superconducting phase is examined. This approach was taken to reduce exposure to thallium and its health and safety hazards. The Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O system was selected because it has very attractive features which make it appealing to device and manufacturing engineering. Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O will accommodate a number of superconducting phases. This attribute makes it very forgiving to stoichiometric fluctuations in the bulk and film. It has excellent thermal and chemical stability, and appears to be relatively insensitive to chemical impurities. Oxygen is tightly bound into the systems, consequently there is no orthorhombic (conductor) to tetragonal (insulator) transition which would affect a component's lifetime. More significantly, the thallium based superconductors appear to have harder magnetic properties than the other high-Tc oxide ceramics. Estimates using magnetoresistance measurements indicate that at 77 K Tl2Ba2CaCu2O10 will have an upper critical field, H(sub c2) fo 26 Tesla for applied fields parallel to the c-axis and approximately 1000 Tesla for fields oriented in the a-b plane. Results to date have shown that superconducting films can be reproducibly deposited on 100 oriented MgO substrates. One film had a zero resistance temperature of 111.5 K. Furthermore, x ray diffraction analysis of the films showed preferential c-axis orientation parallel to the plane of the substrate. These results have now made it possible to consider the manufacture of a superconducting tape wire which can be configured into a topology useful for high-field magnet designs. The research which leads to the preparation of these films and plans for further development are reviewed.

  4. A high-field magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using an oven-controlled crystal oscillator as the local oscillator of its radio frequency transceiver.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Tang, Weinan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-09-01

    A home-made high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrometer with multiple receiving channels is described. The radio frequency (RF) transceiver of the spectrometer consists of digital intermediate frequency (IF) circuits and corresponding mixing circuits. A direct digital synthesis device is employed to generate the IF pulse; the IF signal from a down-conversion circuit is sampled and followed by digital quadrature detection. Both the IF generation and the IF sampling use a 50 MHz clock. An oven-controlled crystal oscillator, which has outstanding spectral purity and a compact circuit, is used as the local oscillator of the RF transceiver. A digital signal processor works as the pulse programmer of the spectrometer, as a result, 32 control lines can be generated simultaneously while an event is triggered. Field programmable gate array devices are utilized as the auxiliary controllers of the IF generation, IF receiving, and gradient control. High performance, including 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, 1 MHz receiving bandwidth, and 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, is achieved. High-quality images on a 1.5 T MRI system using the spectrometer are obtained.

  5. Comparison of noncontrast computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of Great Danes with cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Martin-Vaquero, Paula; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Drost, Wm Tod

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) provides excellent bony detail, whereas magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is superior in evaluating the neural structures. The purpose of this prospective study was to assess interobserver and intermethod agreement in the evaluation of cervical vertebral column morphology and lesion severity in Great Danes with cervical spondylomyelopathy by use of noncontrast CT and high-field MR imaging. Fifteen client-owned affected Great Danes were enrolled. All dogs underwent noncontrast CT under sedation and MR imaging under general anesthesia of the cervical vertebral column. Three observers independently evaluated the images to determine the main site of spinal cord compression, direction and cause of the compression, articular process joint characteristics, and presence of foraminal stenosis. Overall intermethod agreement, intermethod agreement for each observer, overall interobserver agreement, and interobserver agreement between pairs of observers were calculated by use of kappa (κ) statistics. The highest overall intermethod agreements were obtained for the main site of compression and direction of compression with substantial agreements (κ = 0.65 and 0.62, respectively), whereas the lowest was obtained for right-sided foraminal stenosis (κ = 0.39, fair agreement). For both imaging techniques, the highest and lowest interobserver agreements were recorded for the main site of compression and degree of articular joint proliferation, respectively. While different observers frequently agree on the main site of compression using both imaging techniques, there is considerable variation between modalities and among observers when assessing articular process characteristics and foraminal stenosis. Caution should be exerted when comparing image interpretations from multiple observers.

  6. HIGH FIELD SOLENOID FOR MUON COOLING.

    SciTech Connect

    KAHN, S.A.; ALSHARO'A, M.; HANLET, P.; JOHNSON, R.P.; KUCHNIR, M.; NEWSHAM, F.; GUPTA, R.C.; PALMER, R.B.; WILLEN, E.

    2006-06-26

    Magnets made with high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils operating at low temperatures have the potential to produce extremely high fields for use in accelerators and beam lines. The specific application of interest that we are proposing is to use a very high field (of the order of 50 Tesla) solenoid to provide a very small beta region for the final stages of cooling for a muon collider. With the commercial availability of HTS conductor based on BSCCO technology with high current carrying capacity at 4.2 K, very high field solenoid magnets should be possible. In this paper we will evaluate the technical issues associated with building this magnet. In particular we address how to mitigate the high Lorentz stresses associated with this high field magnet.

  7. Combined high-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopy increase extent of resection and progression-free survival for pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Peter T.; Evans, John A.; Zipfel, Gregory J.; Chole, Richard A.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Haughey, Bruce H.; Getz, Anne E.; Silverstein, Julie; Rich, Keith M.; Kim, Albert H.; Dacey, Ralph G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The clinical benefit of combined intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) and endoscopy for transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma resection has not been completely characterized. This study assessed the impact of microscopy, endoscopy, and/or iMRI on progression-free survival, extent of resection status (gross-, near-, and subtotal resection), and operative complications. Methods Retrospective analyses were performed on 446 transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma surgeries at a single institution between 1998 and 2012. Multivariate analyses were used to control for baseline characteristics, differences during extent of resection status, and progression-free survival analysis. Results Additional surgery was performed after iMRI in 56/156 cases (35.9 %), which led to increased extent of resection status in 15/156 cases (9.6 %). Multivariate ordinal logistic regression revealed no increase in extent of resection status following iMRI or endoscopy alone; however, combining these modalities increased extent of resection status (odds ratio 2.05, 95 % CI 1.21–3.46) compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery. Multivariate Cox regression revealed that reduced extent of resection status shortened progression-free survival for near- versus gross-total resection [hazard ratio (HR) 2.87, 95 % CI 1.24–6.65] and sub- versus near-total resection (HR 2.10; 95 % CI 1.00–4.40). Complication comparisons between microscopy, endoscopy, and iMRI revealed increased perioperative deaths for endoscopy versus microscopy (4/209 and 0/237, respectively), but this difference was non-significant considering multiple post hoc comparisons (Fisher exact, p = 0.24). Conclusions Combined use of endoscopy and iMRI increased pituitary adenoma extent of resection status compared to conventional transsphenoidal microsurgery, and increased extent of resection status was associated with longer progression-free survival. Treatment modality combination did not significantly impact

  8. Conventional and anisotropic magnetic entropy change in HoAl2 ferromagnetic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, L. A.; Campoy, J. C. P.; Plaza, E. J. R.; de Souza, M. V.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present theoretical investigations on the conventional and anisotropic magnetocaloric effects in the cubic HoAl2 ferromagnetic compound. They are investigated in terms of a Hamiltonian that takes into account the Zeeman and exchange magnetic interactions, and crystalline electric field. In this study we have explored recent experimental results in HoAl2 single crystals and polycrystalline samples. HoAl2 presents a spin reorientation transition at 20 K and different signatures of this phenomenon are reproduced in our calculations. In addition, we have calculated the anisotropic variation of magnetic entropy that corresponds to a rotation of a HoAl2 single crystal from its [110] towards its [100] direction in the presence of a constant applied magnetic field. The intensity of the anisotropic effect is twice that one of the conventional effect at spin reorientation region. A subtle signature of the spin reorientation is also observed in the [111] direction. We conclude that the crystal electric field term plays the principal role to describe the main magnetic characteristics of the system, not being necessary to include in the Hamiltonian others effects such as elastic or high order magnetic interactions.

  9. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  10. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  11. Studies of ${\\rm Nb}_{3}{\\rm Sn}$ Strands Based on the Restacked-Rod Process for High Field Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, E.; Bossert, M.; Gallo, G.; Lombardo, V.; Turrioni, D.; Yamada, R.; Zlobin, A. V.

    2011-12-21

    A major thrust in Fermilab's accelerator magnet R&D program is the development of Nb3Sn wires which meet target requirements for high field magnets, such as high critical current density, low effective filament size, and the capability to withstand the cabling process. The performance of a number of strands with 150/169 restack design produced by Oxford Superconducting Technology was studied for round and deformed wires. To optimize the maximum plastic strain, finite element modeling was also used as an aid in the design. Results of mechanical, transport and metallographic analyses are presented for round and deformed wires.

  12. Investigation of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems Using 6Li Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Ultra-High Field

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2008-07-15

    Abstract The significantly enhanced spectral resolution in the 6Li MAS NMR spectra of Li-N-H systems at ultra-high field of 21.1 tesla is exploited, for the first time, to study the detailed electronic and chemical environmental changes associated with mechanical activation of Li-N-H system using high energy balling milling. Complementary to ultra-high field studies, the hydrogen discharge dynamics are investigated using variable temperature in situ 1H MAS NMR at 7.05 tesla field. The significantly enhanced spectral resolution using ultra-high filed of 21.1 tesla was demonstrated along with several major findings related to mechanical activation, including the upfield shift of the resonances in 6Li MAS spectra induced by ball milling, more efficient mechanical activation with ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature than with ball milling at room temperature, and greatly enhanced hydrogen discharge exhibited by the liquid nitrogen ball milled samples.

  13. Electric and magnetic properties measurement and analysis of a conventional and a superconducting power transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Pronto, A. G.; Vilhena, N.; Pina, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    Power transformers based on High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) technology have revealed potential for several practical applications, offering economic, environmental and operational benefits. In this work, two 650 VA single-phase transformers prototypes were developed, tested and characterized: a conventional one, using copper windings, and another with the same primary copper winding, but with a secondary winding made of HTS BSCCO tape. The two prototypes were compared regarding magnetic properties, losses, electric parameters and efficiency, and the results are presented and interpreted. Also, several measures to determine AC critical current of the HTS tape were made. The results are compared with DC critical current for the same tape.

  14. Crossover from conventional to inverse indirect magnetic exchange in the depleted Anderson lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulbach, Maximilian W.; Titvinidze, Irakli; Potthoff, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the finite-temperature properties of an Anderson lattice with regularly depleted impurities. The physics of this model is ruled by two different magnetic exchange mechanisms: conventional Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction at weak hybridization strength V and an inverse indirect magnetic exchange (IIME) at strong V , both favoring a ferromagnetic ground state. The stability of ferromagnetic order against thermal fluctuations is systematically studied by static mean-field theory for an effective low-energy spin-only model emerging perturbatively in the strong-coupling limit as well as by dynamical mean-field theory for the full model. The Curie temperature is found at a maximum for a half-filled conduction band and at intermediate hybridization strengths in the crossover regime between RKKY and IIME.

  15. Operation of a 400MHz NMR magnet using a (RE:Rare Earth)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting coil: Towards an ultra-compact super-high field NMR spectrometer operated beyond 1GHz.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y; Piao, R; Iguchi, S; Nakagome, H; Takao, T; Kominato, K; Hamada, M; Matsumoto, S; Suematsu, H; Jin, X; Takahashi, M; Yamazaki, T; Maeda, H

    2014-10-18

    High-temperature superconductors (HTS) are the key technology to achieve super-high magnetic field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers with an operating frequency far beyond 1GHz (23.5T). (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO, RE: rare earth) conductors have an advantage over Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x (Bi-2223) and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-x (Bi-2212) conductors in that they have very high tensile strengths and tolerate strong electromagnetic hoop stress, thereby having the potential to act as an ultra-compact super-high field NMR magnet. As a first step, we developed the world's first NMR magnet comprising an inner REBCO coil and outer low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coils. The magnet was successfully charged without degradation and mainly operated at 400MHz (9.39T). Technical problems for the NMR magnet due to screening current in the REBCO coil were clarified and solved as follows: (i) A remarkable temporal drift of the central magnetic field was suppressed by a current sweep reversal method utilizing ∼10% of the peak current. (ii) A Z2 field error harmonic of the main coil cannot be compensated by an outer correction coil and therefore an additional ferromagnetic shim was used. (iii) Large tesseral harmonics emerged that could not be corrected by cryoshim coils. Due to those harmonics, the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectra are ten-fold lower than those for a conventional LTS NMR magnet. As a result, a HSQC spectrum could be achieved for a protein sample, while a NOESY spectrum could not be obtained. An ultra-compact 1.2GHz NMR magnet could be realized if we effectively take advantage of REBCO conductors, although this will require further research to suppress the effect of the screening current. PMID:25462945

  16. Operation of a 400 MHz NMR magnet using a (RE:Rare Earth)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting coil: Towards an ultra-compact super-high field NMR spectrometer operated beyond 1 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Y.; Piao, R.; Iguchi, S.; Nakagome, H.; Takao, T.; Kominato, K.; Hamada, M.; Matsumoto, S.; Suematsu, H.; Jin, X.; Takahashi, M.; Yamazaki, T.; Maeda, H.

    2014-12-01

    High-temperature superconductors (HTS) are the key technology to achieve super-high magnetic field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers with an operating frequency far beyond 1 GHz (23.5 T). (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO, RE: rare earth) conductors have an advantage over Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10-x (Bi-2223) and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-x (Bi-2212) conductors in that they have very high tensile strengths and tolerate strong electromagnetic hoop stress, thereby having the potential to act as an ultra-compact super-high field NMR magnet. As a first step, we developed the world's first NMR magnet comprising an inner REBCO coil and outer low-temperature superconducting (LTS) coils. The magnet was successfully charged without degradation and mainly operated at 400 MHz (9.39 T). Technical problems for the NMR magnet due to screening current in the REBCO coil were clarified and solved as follows: (i) A remarkable temporal drift of the central magnetic field was suppressed by a current sweep reversal method utilizing ∼10% of the peak current. (ii) A Z2 field error harmonic of the main coil cannot be compensated by an outer correction coil and therefore an additional ferromagnetic shim was used. (iii) Large tesseral harmonics emerged that could not be corrected by cryoshim coils. Due to those harmonics, the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectra are ten-fold lower than those for a conventional LTS NMR magnet. As a result, a HSQC spectrum could be achieved for a protein sample, while a NOESY spectrum could not be obtained. An ultra-compact 1.2 GHz NMR magnet could be realized if we effectively take advantage of REBCO conductors, although this will require further research to suppress the effect of the screening current.

  17. Successful serial imaging of the mouse cerebral arteries using conventional 3-T magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Hiroshi; Hokamura, Kazuya; Natsume, Takahiro; Kimura, Tetsuro; Kamio, Yoshinobu; Magata, Yasuhiro; Namba, Hiroki; Katoh, Takasumi; Sato, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Umemura, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Serial imaging studies can be useful in characterizing the pathologic and physiologic remodeling of cerebral arteries in various mouse models. We tested the feasibility of using a readily available, conventional 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to serially image cerebrovascular remodeling in mice. We utilized a mouse model of intracranial aneurysm as a mouse model of the dynamic, pathologic remodeling of cerebral arteries. Aneurysms were induced by hypertension and a single elastase injection into the cerebrospinal fluid. For the mouse cerebrovascular imaging, we used a conventional 3-T MRI system and a 40-mm saddle coil. We used non-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to detect intracranial aneurysm formation and T2-weighted imaging to detect aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A serial MRI was conducted every 2 to 3 days. MRI detection of aneurysm formation and subarachnoid hemorrhage was compared against the postmortem inspection of the brain that was perfused with dye. The imaging times for the MRA and T2-weighted imaging were 3.7±0.5 minutes and 4.8±0.0 minutes, respectively. All aneurysms and subarachnoid hemorrhages were correctly identified by two masked observers on MRI. This MRI-based serial imaging technique was useful in detecting intracranial aneurysm formation and subarachnoid hemorrhage in mice. PMID:25920958

  18. Development and experimental verification of a theory for high-field, ultralow-temperature magnetic linear dichroism of glasses containing molecular chromophores with spin doublet ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bominaar, Emile L.; Peterson, Jim

    1999-10-01

    The first observation of magnetic linear dichroism in a metalloprotein Kramers system is reported, namely, that exhibited by the porphyrin moiety in ferricytochrome c (spin S=1/2). The measurements were conducted at low temperatures and in strong magnetic fields to maximize the signal intensity, which is intrinsicly weak in this case. The theory used in the interpretation of the wavelength dependence of this magneto-optical effect is based on the rigid-shift approximation in which the dichroic spectra are expressed as a sum of zeroth, first, and second derivatives of the underlying electronic absorption band. Similar to the case for magnetic circular dichroism, magnetic linear dichroism is caused by the Zeeman interactions of the molecular-chromophore electrons with an applied magnetic field. Two kinds of Zeeman interaction are considered, termed "inner state" and "outer state" depending on, respectively, whether or not they act between the components of a single Kramers doublet of the chromophore. It is formally demonstrated that the zeroth-derivative term for an electric-dipole transition between Kramers doublets arising from inner-state Zeeman interactions (nominally the strongest effect) completely cancels in the powder average over a randomly oriented ensemble of chromophores for all values of temperature and field. This cancellation has a profound effect on the magnetic linear dichroism of molecular chromophores suspended in glasses, as the effect now entirely relies on a set of weaker residual terms, each one having its own spectroscopic characteristics. The residual contributions have been estimated on the basis of electronic-term-energy differences and bandwidths in ferricytochrome c, resulting in the identification of the inner- and outer-state terms C1 and F0 as the dominant signatures. This prediction is in agreement with the experimental data for the shape and dependence on applied field and temperature of the magneto-dichroic spectrum for this

  19. Can we evaluate cranial aneurysms on conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Caliskan, Emine; Pekcevik, Yeliz; Kaya, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the contribution of conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the determination of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods: Brain MRI and computed tomography angiography (CTA) of 45 patients (29 women and 16 men; age range, 32–80 years) with aneurysm were analyzed. A comparison was made between brain MRI and CTA based on size and presence of aneurysm. The comparisons between MRI and CTA were investigated through Bland-Altman graphics, receiver operating characteristic curve, and Kappa statistics. Results: Fifty-seven aneurysms were evaluated. Forty-five percent of 57 aneurysms on CTA were detected on conventional brain MRI. A significant correlation was found between CTA and brain MRI in the diagnosis of aneurysm (P < 0.05). In an analysis of the size measurement, a significant correlation was observed between CTA and brain MRI. Seventy-seven percent of aneurysms <4 mm was not detected and the efficiency of MRI in the detection of aneurysms <4 mm was found to be low. Conclusion: Aneurysms can also be appreciated on conventional brain MRI, and vascular structures should be reviewed carefully while analyzing brain MRI. PMID:26933351

  20. Structural, morphological, optical and magnetic properties of Co3O4 nanoparticles prepared by conventional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, S.; Sivakumar, K.; Karthikeyen, B.; Ragupathi, C.; Sundaram, R.

    2016-07-01

    Cobalt oxide (Co3O4) is one of the favorable nanoparticles (NPs) that possesses many remarkable properties so that it can be used in medicine, chemistry, environment, energy, information, industry, and so on. In this study, the crystalline Co3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were successfully prepared by an efficient conventional method technique from an using different fuels. In the present paper, pure phase and well-dispersed Co3O4 were synthesized via the starch and aqueous ammonia solution in the stoichiometric fuel compositions. The structure and morphology of by way of organized Co3O4 nanoparticles were characterized by the structural analysis, electron microscopy studies, and optical properties studies. Magnetic properties exposed that the Co3O4 nanoparticles had ferromagnetic performance at room temperature with saturation magnetization of 71.09 emu/g. The results revealed that the changing the precursor led to great effects on the crystal size, emission peaks, and the reaction time of preparing the Co3O4 NPs. The significant feature of this manuscript is that the effects of different precursors on the structural magnetic and optical properties of Co3O4 NPs were investigated for the first time. The average particle size of samples (A and B) 23.6 and 22.2 nm, respectively.

  1. High-Field Combined-Function Magnets for a 1.5 x 1.5 TeV Muon Collider Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Alexahin, Y.; Mokhov, N.V.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Designs and parameters of dipoles and combined-function quadrupoles for bending arc lattice of a 1.5x1.5 TeV muon collider with an average luminosity of 4x1034 cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} are presented. The magnets use the Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor and provide the required gradients and fields with the appropriate operating margins and field quality. The magnet apertures accommodate tungsten liners to minimize the dynamic heat load in the superconducting coils.

  2. Intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging combined with neuronavigation-guided resection of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma in Broca's area: a rare case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Cheng, Jingliang; Li, Hongwei; Liu, Xianzhi; Zheng, Yuan; Wang, Chaoyan; Luo, Wenzheng; Nie, Yunfei; Li, Zhengwei; Pang, Beibei; Yang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Cranial Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (MC) and those that occurred in brain parenchymal were fairly rare aggressive neoplasm commonly affecting the bone of young adults. Here, we reported a case with intracranial MC, invading Broca's area, a rare site not previously reported, which was presumed to be a glioma. We performed a gross total resection guided by intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) combined with neuronavigation. Follow-up shows no language and other brain function loss. Furthermore, we present a review of literature. We emphasized the importance of gross total resection guiding by the combination of iMRI and neuronavigation, which was proved to be both reliable and effective in language preservation. PMID:26064406

  3. Vortex states and quantum magnetic oscillations in conventional type-II superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniv, Tsofar; Zhuravlev, Vladimir; Vagner, Israel; Wyder, Peter

    2001-10-01

    The theory of pure type-II superconductors at high magnetic fields and low temperatures has recently attracted much attention due to the discovery of de Haas-van Alphen oscillations deep in the vortex state. In this article the authors review the state of the art in this rapidly growing new field of research. The very existence of quantum magnetic oscillations deep in the vortex state poses challenging questions to the theorists working in this field. For a conventional extreme type-II superconductor in magnetic fields just below the upper critical field Hc2, the quasiparticle spectrum is gapless and the de Haas-van Alphen effect is suppressed with respect to the corresponding normal-state signal due to superconducting induced currents near the vortex cores, which are of paramagnetic nature. Numerical simulations of the quasiparticle band structure in the Abrikosov vortex lattice show the existence of well-separated Landau bands below Hc2. An analytical perturbative approach, which emphasizes the importance of phase coherence in quasiparticle scattering by the pair potential in the Abrikosov lattice, predicts a relatively weak magnetic breakdown of the corresponding cyclotron orbits. In contrast to the situation in the Abrikosov lattice state, a theory based on a random vortex lattice model yields large exponential decay of the de Haas-van Alphen oscillations with the superconducting order parameter below Hc2. The disordered nature of the vortex state near Hc2 in real superconductors, where long-range phase coherence in the superconducting order parameter is destroyed, could explain the success of this model in interpreting experimental data below Hc2. In the Abrikosov vortex lattice state, which usually stabilizes well below Hc2, the residual damping of the de Haas-van Alphen amplitude is significantly reduced. In quasi-two-dimensional superconductors, phase fluctuations associated with sliding Bragg chains along principal axes in the vortex lattice lead to a weak

  4. T1 and susceptibility contrast at high fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelavalli, Jaladhar

    Clinical imaging at high magnetic field strengths (≥ 3Tesla) is sought after primarily due to the increased signal strength available at these fields. This increased SNR can be used to perform: (a) high resolution imaging in the same time as at lower field strengths; (b) the same resolution imaging with much faster acquisition; and (c) functional MR imaging (fMRI), dynamic perfusion and diffusion imaging with increased sensitivity. However they are also associated with increased power deposition (SAR) due to increase in imaging frequency and longer T1 relaxation times. Longer T1s mean longer imaging times for generating good T1 contrast images. On the other hand for faster imaging, at high fields fast spin echo or magnetization prepared sequences are conventionally proposed which are, however, associated with high SAR values. Imaging with low SAR is more and more important as we move towards high fields and particularly for patients with metallic implants like pacemakers or deep brain stimulator. The SAR limit acceptable for these patients is much less than the limit acceptable for normal subjects. A new method is proposed for imaging at high fields with good contrast with simultaneous reduction in power deposition. Further, T1 based contrast optimization problem in FLASH imaging is considered for tissues with different T1s but same spin densities. The solution providing optimal imaging parameters is simplified for quick and easy computation in a clinical setting. The efficacy of the simplification is evaluated and practical limits under which the simplification can be applied are worked out. The phase difference due to variation in magnetic susceptibility property among biological tissues is another unique source of contrast which is different from the conventional T1, T2 and T2* contrast. This susceptibility based phase contrast has become more and more important at high fields, partly due to contrast generation issues due to longer T 1s and shorter T2s and

  5. Recent developments of high field ESR systems in Kobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, H.; Tomoo, M.; Okubo, S.; Sakurai, T.; Fujisawa, M.; Tomita, T.; Kimata, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Kawauchi, M.; Kindo, K.

    2006-11-01

    The magnetic field of the high field ESR system in Kobe University has been extended to 55 T by using a new non-destructive pulse magnet and the 300 kJ (10kV) capacitor bank. The properties of new 55 T pulse magnet are reported. As an example of its application, the high field ESR measurement of a quantum spin system CsCuCl3 for Hparallela will be shown.

  6. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging in confirmed progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Massey, Luke A; Micallef, Caroline; Paviour, Dominic C; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Ling, Helen; Williams, David R; Kallis, Constantinos; Holton, Janice L; Revesz, Tamas; Burn, David J; Yousry, Tarek; Lees, Andrew J; Fox, Nick C; Jäger, Hans R

    2012-12-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) is often used to aid the diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy (MSA), but its ability to predict the histopathological diagnosis has not been systematically studied. cMRI from 48 neuropathologically confirmed cases, including PSP (n = 22), MSA (n = 13), Parkinson's disease (PD) (n = 7), and corticobasal degeneration (n = 6), and controls (n = 9) were assessed blinded to clinical details and systematically rated for reported abnormalities. Clinical diagnosis and macroscopic postmortem findings were retrospectively assessed. Radiological assessment of MRI was correct in 16 of 22 (72.7%) PSP cases and 10 of 13 (76.9%) MSA cases with substantial interrater agreement (Cohen's kappa 0.708; P < .001); no PSP case was misclassified as MSA or vice versa. MRI was less sensitive but more specific than clinical diagnosis in PSP and both more sensitive and specific than clinical diagnosis in MSA. The "hummingbird" and "morning glory" signs were highly specific for PSP, and "the middle cerebellar peduncle sign" and "hot cross bun" for MSA, but sensitivity was lower (up to 68.4%) and characteristic findings may not be present even at autopsy. cMRI, clinical diagnosis, and macroscopic examination at postmortem have similar sensitivity and specificity in predicting a neuropathological diagnosis. We have validated specific radiological signs in pathologically confirmed PSP and MSA. However, the low sensitivity of these and macroscopic findings at autopsy suggest a need for imaging techniques sensitive to microstructural abnormalities without regional atrophy.

  7. High field magnetotransport and point contact Andreev reflection measurements on CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br—Degenerate magnetic semiconductor single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, K. Coey, J. M. D.; Stamenov, P.; Alaria, J.

    2014-05-07

    Single crystals of the metallically degenerate fully magnetic semiconductors CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br have been prepared by the Chemical Vapour Transport method, using either Se or Br as transport agents. The high-quality, millimetre-sized, octahedrally faceted, needle- and platelet-shaped crystals are characterised by means of high field magnetotransport (μ{sub 0}H≤ 14 T) and Point Contact Andreev Reflection. The relatively high spin polarisation observed |P|>0.56, together with the relatively low minority carrier effective mass of 0.25 m{sub e}, and long scattering time  10{sup −13} s, could poise these materials for integration in low- and close-to-room temperature minority injection bipolar heterojunction transistor demonstrations.

  8. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART II, UNIT 6, ASSIGNMENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS STUDY GUIDE IS FOR INDIVIDUAL STUDENT USE IN STUDYING ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 ASSIGNMENT SHEETS PROVIDES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, STUDY REFERENCES,…

  9. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART II, UNIT 6, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR TEACHER USE IN DIRECTING INDIVIDUAL STUDY OF ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 INSTRUCTOR'S SHEETS GIVES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, REFERENCES, SUPPLEMENTARY…

  10. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART I, UNIT 5, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR TEACHER USE IN DIRECTING INDIVIDUAL STUDY OF ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 INSTRUCTOR'S SHEETS GIVES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, REFERENCES, AND…

  11. ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIAL CONTROL. A-C CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL, PART I, UNIT 5, ASSIGNMENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUTTON, MACK C.

    THIS GUIDE IS FOR INDIVIDUAL STUDENT USE IN STUDYING ALTERNATING CURRENT CONVENTIONAL MAGNETIC MOTOR CONTROL IN ELECTRICAL-ELECTRONIC PROGRAMS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS SPECIALIST AND ADVISERS. EACH OF THE 10 ASSIGNMENT SHEETS PROVIDES THE LESSON SUBJECT, PURPOSE, INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION, STUDY REFERENCES, SUPPLEMENTARY…

  12. Automatic segmentation of cartilage in high-field magnetic resonance images of the knee joint with an improved voxel-classification-driven region-growing algorithm using vicinity-correlated subsampling.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ceyda Nur; Albayrak, Songül

    2016-05-01

    Anatomical structures that can deteriorate over time, such as cartilage, can be successfully delineated with voxel-classification approaches in magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, segmentation via voxel-classification is a computationally demanding process for high-field MR images with high spatial resolutions. In this study, the whole femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage compartments in the knee joint were automatically segmented in high-field MR images obtained from Osteoarthritis Initiative using a voxel-classification-driven region-growing algorithm with sample-expand method. Computational complexity of the classification was alleviated via subsampling of the background voxels in the training MR images and selecting a small subset of significant features by taking into consideration systems with limited memory and processing power. Although subsampling of the voxels may lead to a loss of generality of the training models and a decrease in segmentation accuracies, effective subsampling strategies can overcome these problems. Therefore, different subsampling techniques, which involve uniform, Gaussian, vicinity-correlated (VC) sparse, and VC dense subsampling, were used to generate four training models. The segmentation system was experimented using 10 training and 23 testing MR images, and the effects of different training models on segmentation accuracies were investigated. Experimental results showed that the highest mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) values for all compartments were obtained when the training models of VC sparse subsampling technique were used. Mean DSC values optimized with this technique were 82.6%, 83.1%, and 72.6% for femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage compartments, respectively, when mean sensitivities were 79.9%, 84.0%, and 71.5%, and mean specificities were 99.8%, 99.9%, and 99.9%.

  13. Automatic segmentation of cartilage in high-field magnetic resonance images of the knee joint with an improved voxel-classification-driven region-growing algorithm using vicinity-correlated subsampling.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ceyda Nur; Albayrak, Songül

    2016-05-01

    Anatomical structures that can deteriorate over time, such as cartilage, can be successfully delineated with voxel-classification approaches in magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, segmentation via voxel-classification is a computationally demanding process for high-field MR images with high spatial resolutions. In this study, the whole femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage compartments in the knee joint were automatically segmented in high-field MR images obtained from Osteoarthritis Initiative using a voxel-classification-driven region-growing algorithm with sample-expand method. Computational complexity of the classification was alleviated via subsampling of the background voxels in the training MR images and selecting a small subset of significant features by taking into consideration systems with limited memory and processing power. Although subsampling of the voxels may lead to a loss of generality of the training models and a decrease in segmentation accuracies, effective subsampling strategies can overcome these problems. Therefore, different subsampling techniques, which involve uniform, Gaussian, vicinity-correlated (VC) sparse, and VC dense subsampling, were used to generate four training models. The segmentation system was experimented using 10 training and 23 testing MR images, and the effects of different training models on segmentation accuracies were investigated. Experimental results showed that the highest mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) values for all compartments were obtained when the training models of VC sparse subsampling technique were used. Mean DSC values optimized with this technique were 82.6%, 83.1%, and 72.6% for femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage compartments, respectively, when mean sensitivities were 79.9%, 84.0%, and 71.5%, and mean specificities were 99.8%, 99.9%, and 99.9%. PMID:27017069

  14. Comparative Study of Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles by High-Frequency Heat Dissipation and Conventional Magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, V.; Goodwill, J.; Mallapragada, S.; Prozorov, T.; Prozorov, R.

    2014-11-13

    The rate of heating of a water-based colloid of uniformly sized 15 nm magnetic nanoparticles by high-amplitude and high-frequency ac magnetic field induced by the resonating LC circuit (nanoTherics Magnetherm) was measured. The results are analyzed in terms of specific energy absorption rate (SAR). Fitting field amplitude and frequency dependences of SAR to the linear response theory, magnetic moment per particles was extracted. The value of magnetic moment was independently evaluated from dc magnetization measurements (Quantum Design MPMS) of a frozen colloid by fitting field-dependent magnetization to Langevin function. The two methods produced similar results, which are compared to the theoretical expectation for this particle size. Additionally, analysis of SAR curves yielded effective relaxation time.

  15. Comparative Study of Magnetic Properties of Nanoparticles by High-Frequency Heat Dissipation and Conventional Magnetometry

    DOE PAGES

    Malik, V.; Goodwill, J.; Mallapragada, S.; Prozorov, T.; Prozorov, R.

    2014-11-13

    The rate of heating of a water-based colloid of uniformly sized 15 nm magnetic nanoparticles by high-amplitude and high-frequency ac magnetic field induced by the resonating LC circuit (nanoTherics Magnetherm) was measured. The results are analyzed in terms of specific energy absorption rate (SAR). Fitting field amplitude and frequency dependences of SAR to the linear response theory, magnetic moment per particles was extracted. The value of magnetic moment was independently evaluated from dc magnetization measurements (Quantum Design MPMS) of a frozen colloid by fitting field-dependent magnetization to Langevin function. The two methods produced similar results, which are compared to themore » theoretical expectation for this particle size. Additionally, analysis of SAR curves yielded effective relaxation time.« less

  16. The High Field Magnetic Dependence of Critical Current Density at 4.2 K for Ag-Sheathed Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy Superconducting Tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Noritsugu; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Uno, Naoki; Kumakura, Hiroaki; Togano, Kazumasa; Watanabe, Kazuo

    1990-03-01

    Critical current density (Jc) at 4.2 K and its dependence on applied magnetic field was measured for Ag-sheathed Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy superconducting tape. The specimen showed a strong grain alignment which could be attained by adjusting the conditions of heat treatment. The degree of crystal orientation (F) was evaluated to be up to 95% by XRD for this specimen. In the case of magnetic field applied in a direction parallel to the tape, the Jc initially decreased with the magnetic field from 1.2× 105 A/cm2 at 1 T to 5× 104 A/cm2 at 10T and then remained almost constant up to 23 T. As the F value decreased from 95%, Jc also decreased. The pinning force (Fp) of the 95%-F-value tape was estimated to be about 1× 1010 N/m3 at 23 T. This value is larger than those of conventional low-Tc superconductors.

  17. Neurodegenerative disease high-field imaging

    PubMed Central

    van der Grond, J.; van Buchem, M.A.; van Zijl, P.; Webb, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    High field magnetic resonance imaging is showing potential for imaging of neurodegenerative diseases. 7 T MRI is beginning to be used in a clinical research setting and the theoretical benefits, i.e. higher signal-to-noise, sensitivity to iron, improved MRA and increased spectral resolution in spectroscopy are being confirmed. Despite the limited number of studies to date, initial results in patients with multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease show promising additional features in contrast that may assist in better diagnosis of these disorders. PMID:22548926

  18. Optimization of the magnetic horn for the nuSTORM non-conventional neutrino beam using the genetic algorithm

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, A.; Bross, A.; Neuffer, D.

    2015-05-28

    This paper describes the strategy for optimizing the magnetic horn for the neutrinos from STORed Muons (nuSTORM) facility. The nuSTORM magnetic horn is the primary collection device for the secondary particles generated by bombarding a solid target with 120 GeV protons. As a consequence of the non-conventional beamline designed for nuSTORM, the requirements on the horn are different from those for a conventional neutrino beamline. At nuSTORM, muons decay while circulating in the storage ring, and the detectors are placed downstream of the production straight so as to be exposed to the neutrinos from muon decay. nuSTORM aims at preciselymore » measuring the neutrino cross sections, and providing a definitive statement about the existence of sterile neutrinos. The nuSTORM horn aims at focusing the pions into a certain phase space so that more muons from pion decay can be accepted by the decay ring. The paper demonstrates a numerical method that was developed to optimize the horn design to gain higher neutrino flux from the circulating muons. A Genetic Algorithm (GA) was applied to the simultaneous optimization of the two objectives in this study. In conclusion, the application of the technique discussed in this paper is not limited to either the nuSTORM facility or muon based facilities, but can be used for other neutrino facilities that use magnetic horns as collection devices.« less

  19. Optimization of the magnetic horn for the nuSTORM non-conventional neutrino beam using the genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.; Bross, A.; Neuffer, D.

    2015-05-28

    This paper describes the strategy for optimizing the magnetic horn for the neutrinos from STORed Muons (nuSTORM) facility. The nuSTORM magnetic horn is the primary collection device for the secondary particles generated by bombarding a solid target with 120 GeV protons. As a consequence of the non-conventional beamline designed for nuSTORM, the requirements on the horn are different from those for a conventional neutrino beamline. At nuSTORM, muons decay while circulating in the storage ring, and the detectors are placed downstream of the production straight so as to be exposed to the neutrinos from muon decay. nuSTORM aims at precisely measuring the neutrino cross sections, and providing a definitive statement about the existence of sterile neutrinos. The nuSTORM horn aims at focusing the pions into a certain phase space so that more muons from pion decay can be accepted by the decay ring. The paper demonstrates a numerical method that was developed to optimize the horn design to gain higher neutrino flux from the circulating muons. A Genetic Algorithm (GA) was applied to the simultaneous optimization of the two objectives in this study. In conclusion, the application of the technique discussed in this paper is not limited to either the nuSTORM facility or muon based facilities, but can be used for other neutrino facilities that use magnetic horns as collection devices.

  20. Does Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Combined With Conventional Imaging Modalities Decrease the Rates of Surgical Margin Involvement and Reoperation?

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hung-Wen; Chen, Chih-Jung; Lin, Ying-Jen; Chen, Shu-Ling; Wu, Hwa-Koon; Wu, Yu-Ting; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Chen, Shou-Tung; Chen, Dar-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to assess whether preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with conventional breast imaging techniques decreases the rates of margin involvement and reexcision. Data on patients who underwent surgery for primary operable breast cancer were obtained from the Changhua Christian Hospital (CCH) breast cancer database. The rate of surgical margin involvement and the rate of reoperation were compared between patients who underwent conventional breast imaging modalities (Group A: mammography and sonography) and those who received breast MRI in addition to conventional imaging (Group B: mammography, sonography, and MRI). A total of 1468 patients were enrolled in this study. Among the 733 patients in Group A, 377 (51.4%) received breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and 356 (48.6%) received mastectomy. Among the 735 patients in Group B, 348 (47.3%) received BCS and 387 (52.7%) received mastectomy. There were no significant differences in operative method between patients who received conventional imaging alone and those that received MRI and conventional imaging (P = 0.13). The rate of detection of pathological multifocal/multicentric breast cancer was markedly higher in patients who received preoperative MRI than in those who underwent conventional imaging alone (14.3% vs 8.6%, P < 0.01). The overall rate of surgical margin involvement was significantly lower in patients who received MRI (5.0%) than in those who received conventional imaging alone (9.0%) (P < 0.01). However, a significant reduction in rate of surgical margin positivity was only observed in patients who received BCS (Group A, 14.6%; Group B, 6.6%, P < 0.01). The overall BCS reoperation rates were 11.7% in the conventional imaging group and 3.2% in the combined MRI group (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in rate of residual cancer in specimens obtained during reoperation between the 2 preoperative imaging groups

  1. Globally conditioned Granger causality in brain-brain and brain-heart interactions: a combined heart rate variability/ultra-high-field (7 T) functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Duggento, Andrea; Bianciardi, Marta; Passamonti, Luca; Wald, Lawrence L; Guerrisi, Maria; Barbieri, Riccardo; Toschi, Nicola

    2016-05-13

    The causal, directed interactions between brain regions at rest (brain-brain networks) and between resting-state brain activity and autonomic nervous system (ANS) outflow (brain-heart links) have not been completely elucidated. We collected 7 T resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data with simultaneous respiration and heartbeat recordings in nine healthy volunteers to investigate (i) the causal interactions between cortical and subcortical brain regions at rest and (ii) the causal interactions between resting-state brain activity and the ANS as quantified through a probabilistic, point-process-based heartbeat model which generates dynamical estimates for sympathetic and parasympathetic activity as well as sympathovagal balance. Given the high amount of information shared between brain-derived signals, we compared the results of traditional bivariate Granger causality (GC) with a globally conditioned approach which evaluated the additional influence of each brain region on the causal target while factoring out effects concomitantly mediated by other brain regions. The bivariate approach resulted in a large number of possibly spurious causal brain-brain links, while, using the globally conditioned approach, we demonstrated the existence of significant selective causal links between cortical/subcortical brain regions and sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation as well as sympathovagal balance. In particular, we demonstrated a causal role of the amygdala, hypothalamus, brainstem and, among others, medial, middle and superior frontal gyri, superior temporal pole, paracentral lobule and cerebellar regions in modulating the so-called central autonomic network (CAN). In summary, we show that, provided proper conditioning is employed to eliminate spurious causalities, ultra-high-field functional imaging coupled with physiological signal acquisition and GC analysis is able to quantify directed brain-brain and brain-heart interactions reflecting

  2. Structural and magnetic properties of conventional and microwave treated Ni-Zr doped barium strontium hexaferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kanagesan, S.; Jesurani, S.; Velmurugan, R.; Prabu, S.; Kalaivani, T.

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Saturation magnetization increases whereas the coercivity decreases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The transition from hard phase to soft phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Therefore, it is used for high-density magnetic recording applications. -- Abstract: M-type hexaferrites of component B{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 12-2x}Ni{sub x}Zr{sub x}O{sub 19} were investigated. The XRD patterns show single phase of the magnetoplumbite barium strontium ferrite and no other phases were present. Significant increase in line broadening of the XRD patterns was observed indicating a decrease of grain size. The samples exhibit well defined crystallization; all of them are hexagonal platelet grains. As the substitution level increased x = 0.2-0.8 mol%, the grains are agglomerated and the average diameter increased. The H{sub c} decreases remarkably with increasing Ni and Zr ions content. It was found that the particle size could be effectively decreased and coercivity H{sub c} could easily be controlled by varying the concentration (x) without significantly decreasing saturation magnetization. In particular, Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 12-2x}Ni{sub x}Zr{sub x}O{sub 19} with x = 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 mol% has suitable magnetic characteristics with particle size small enough for high-density magnetic recording applications.

  3. Magnetic ionic liquids as non-conventional extraction solvents for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Rodríguez, María J; Nacham, Omprakash; Clark, Kevin D; Pino, Verónica; Anderson, Jared L; Ayala, Juan H; Afonso, Ana M

    2016-08-31

    This work describes the applicability of magnetic ionic liquids (MILs) in the analytical determination of a group of heavy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Three different MILs, namely, benzyltrioctylammonium bromotrichloroferrate (III) (MIL A), methoxybenzyltrioctylammonium bromotrichloroferrate (III) (MIL B), and 1,12-di(3-benzylbenzimidazolium) dodecane bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)]imide bromotrichloroferrate (III) (MIL C), were designed to exhibit hydrophobic properties, and their performance examined in a microextraction method for hydrophobic analytes. The magnet-assisted approach with these MILs was performed in combination with high performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. The study of the extraction performance showed that MIL A was the most suitable solvent for the extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and under optimum conditions the fast extraction step required ∼20 μL of MIL A for 10 mL of aqueous sample, 24 mmol L(-1) NaOH, high ionic strength content of NaCl (25% (w/v)), 500 μL of acetone as dispersive solvent, and 5 min of vortex. The desorption step required the aid of an external magnetic field with a strong NdFeB magnet (the separation requires few seconds), two back-extraction steps for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons retained in the MIL droplet with n-hexane, evaporation and reconstitution with acetonitrile. The overall method presented limits of detection down to 5 ng L(-1), relative recoveries ranging from 91.5 to 119%, and inter-day reproducibility values (expressed as relative standard derivation) lower than 16.4% for a spiked level of 0.4 μg L(-1) (n = 9). The method was also applied for the analysis of real samples, including tap water, wastewater, and tea infusion. PMID:27506350

  4. The Pioneer XI high field fluxgate magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. A.; Ness, N. F.

    1975-01-01

    The high field fluxgate magnetometer experiment flown aboard the Pioneer XI spacecraft is described. This extremely simple instrument was used to extend the spacecraft's upper-limit measurement capability by approximately an order of magnitude (from 0.14 mT to 1.00 mT) with minimum power and volume requirements. This magnetometer was designed to complement the low-field measurements provided by a helium vector magnetometer and utilizes magnetic ring core sensors with biaxial orthogonal sense coils. The instrument is a single-range, triaxial-fluxgate magnetometer capable of measuring fields of up to 1 mT along each orthogonal axis, with a maximum resolution of 1 microT.

  5. Superferric microundulator with high field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadichev, V. A.; Vysotsky, V. S.; Tsikhon, V. N.; Eremichev, V. T.

    1993-07-01

    A model of a plane superferric undulator with a period of 8 mm was made and tested. Its length is 100 mm, its width is 50 mm, and 4 and 2.5 mm air gaps between upper and lower poles were used for magnetic measurements. The gap can be changed by inserting spacers of the necessary thickness. The magnetic structure is made of magnetically soft low carbon iron (Armco). The slots for winding were machine cut. The windings are made of 40 turns of Nb 3Sn superconductor or 10 turns of NbTi for the 4 and 2.5 mm gaps, respectively. The maximum current in the first series of experiments was 70 A and in the second series it was 450 A. Poles of three types were tried. The maximum magnetic field amplitude of 7.7 kG was measured with the poles in the form of a trapezoid. This field corresponds to an undulator deflection parameter K = 0.57. Results of magnetic measurements are presented.

  6. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  7. Feasibility of using high temperature superconducting magnets and conventional magnetic loop antennas to attract or repel objects at the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randhawa, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    A study was undertaken to see if magnetic forces can be used at the Space Station to attract or repel spacecrafts such as the Orbital Manuevering Vehicle (OMV) or the Orbiter. A large magnet, in the form of a current loop, is assumed to be placed at the Space Station and another one on the spacecraft. The expression for the force between the two dipoles (loops) is obtained. Using a force of 15 Newtons (3.4 pounds) in order to move the spacecraft, the number of ampere-turn needed in the current loops was calculated at various distances between them. The expression for the force of attraction between a current loop and a soft magnetic material was also examined and the number of amp-turn needed to provide a force of one-tenth of a pound at various distances is also calculated. This one tenth of a pound force would be used in a life line system for the retrieval of an adrift crewman or tool at the Space Station. The feasibility of using conventional antenna on the Station and the incoming vehicle for attraction or repulsion was also examined.

  8. Overcoming the low relaxivity of gadofosveset at high field with spin locking.

    PubMed

    Richardson, O C; Scott, M L J; Tanner, S F; Waterton, J C; Buckley, D L

    2012-10-01

    The contrast agent gadofosveset, which binds reversibly to serum albumin, has a high longitudinal relaxivity at lower magnetic fields (≤3.0 T) but a much lower relaxivity at high fields. Spin locking is sensitive to macromolecular content; it is hypothesized that combining this technique with the albumin-binding properties of gadofosveset may enable increased relaxivity at high fields. In vitro measurements at 4.7 T found significantly higher spin-lock relaxation rates, R1ρ (1/T1ρ), when gadofosveset was serum albumin-bound than when unbound. R1ρ values for a nonbinding contrast agent (gadopentetate dimeglumine) in serum albumin were similar to those for unbound gadofosveset. R2 (1/T2) values were also significantly higher at 4.7 T for serum albumin-bound gadofosveset than for unbound. Spin locking at high field generates significantly higher relaxation rates for gadofosveset than conventional contrast agents and may provide a method for differentiating free and bound molecules at these field strengths.

  9. High field superconductor development and understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Larbalestier, David C.; Lee, Peter J.; Tarantini, Chiara

    2014-09-28

    All present circular accelerators use superconducting magnets to bend and to focus the particle beams. The most powerful of these machines is the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN. The main ring dipole magnets of the LHC are made from Nb-Ti but, as the machine is upgraded to higher luminosity, more powerful magnets made of Nb3Sn will be required. Our work addresses how to make the Nb3Sn conductors more effective and more suitable for use in the LHC. The most important property of the superconducting conductor used for an accelerator magnet is that it must have very high critical current density, the property that allows the generation of high magnetic fields in small spaces. Nb3Sn is the original high field superconductor, the material which was discovered in 1960 to allow a high current density in the field of about 9 T. For the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC, much higher current densities in fields of about 12 Tesla will be required. The critical value of the current density is of order 2600 A/mm2 in a field of 12 Tesla. But there are very important secondary factors that complicate the attainment of this critical current density. The first is that the effective filament diameter must be no larger than about 40 µm. The second factor is that 50% of the cross-section of the Nb3Sn conductor that is pure copper must be protected from any poisoning by any Sn leakage through the diffusion barrier that protects the package of niobium and tin from which the Nb3Sn is formed by a high temperature reaction. These three, somewhat conflicting requirements, mean that optimization of the conductor is complex. The work described in this contract report addresses these conflicting requirements. They show that very sophisticated characterizations can uncover the way to satisfy all 3 requirements and they also suggest that the ultimate optimization of Nb3Sn is still not yet in sight

  10. Pyrethroid residue determination in organic and conventional vegetables using liquid-solid extraction coupled with magnetic solid phase extraction based on polystyrene-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xi; Yang, Hongshun

    2017-02-15

    A detection method using polystyrene-coated magnetic nanoparticles based extraction technique coupled to HPLC was developed for trace amount of pyrethroids residue detection in vegetable matrixes. The recoveries for five kinds of commonly used pyrethroids were in the range of 91.6%-116.2%. The sensitivity and precision of the method were satisfactory with the limits of detection and limits of quantification in the range of 0.0200-0.0392ngg(-1) and 0.072-0.128ngg(-1), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations for the recoveries of the analytes were lower than 6.8% and 10.7%, respectively. The nanoparticles can be washed and recycled after use. The results indicate that the developed method was efficient, fast, economical and environmentally friendly. The method was successfully applied to detect the pyrethroids residue in ten pairs of commonly consumed organic and conventional fresh vegetables in Singapore. Pyrethroids residue was detected in four kinds of conventional vegetables and one kind of organic vegetable.

  11. Pyrethroid residue determination in organic and conventional vegetables using liquid-solid extraction coupled with magnetic solid phase extraction based on polystyrene-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xi; Yang, Hongshun

    2017-02-15

    A detection method using polystyrene-coated magnetic nanoparticles based extraction technique coupled to HPLC was developed for trace amount of pyrethroids residue detection in vegetable matrixes. The recoveries for five kinds of commonly used pyrethroids were in the range of 91.6%-116.2%. The sensitivity and precision of the method were satisfactory with the limits of detection and limits of quantification in the range of 0.0200-0.0392ngg(-1) and 0.072-0.128ngg(-1), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations for the recoveries of the analytes were lower than 6.8% and 10.7%, respectively. The nanoparticles can be washed and recycled after use. The results indicate that the developed method was efficient, fast, economical and environmentally friendly. The method was successfully applied to detect the pyrethroids residue in ten pairs of commonly consumed organic and conventional fresh vegetables in Singapore. Pyrethroids residue was detected in four kinds of conventional vegetables and one kind of organic vegetable. PMID:27664638

  12. Pinning influence on high-field reversible magnetization in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Puzniak, R.; Ricketts, J.; Schuetzmann, J.; Gu, G.D.; Koshizuka, N.

    1995-09-01

    The temperature and field dependence of the magnetization in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} single crystals was measured above the irreversibility line in magnetic fields parallel to the {ital c} axis. We found a significant change in the slope of the magnetization {ital dM}/{ital dT} approximately 5 K above the irreversibility temperature. Related changes in the field dependence of the reversible magnetization slope {ital dM}/{ital d}(ln{ital H}) were also observed. The effect is attributed to the influence of pinning on the distribution of vortices in the material. A modification of the relation describing the field dependence of the reversible magnetization in a superconductor with pinning is proposed.

  13. HIGH FIELD Q-SLOPE AND THE BAKING EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2009-11-01

    The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing RF losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by a low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated at high temperature in the presence of a small partial pressure of nitrogen. Improvement of the cavity performances have been obtained, while surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  14. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  15. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton L.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2013-12-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization' schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than those at 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters.

  16. Low-field MRI can be more sensitive than high-field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Aaron M.; Truong, Milton

    2014-01-01

    MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is the key factor for image quality. Conventionally, SNR is proportional to nuclear spin polarization, which scales linearly with magnetic field strength. Yet ever-stronger magnets present numerous technical and financial limitations. Low-field MRI can mitigate these constraints with equivalent SNR from non-equilibrium ‘hyperpolarization’ schemes, which increase polarization by orders of magnitude independently of the magnetic field. Here, theory and experimental validation demonstrate that combination of field independent polarization (e.g. hyperpolarization) with frequency optimized MRI detection coils (i.e. multi-turn coils using the maximum allowed conductor length) results in low-field MRI sensitivity approaching and even rivaling that of high-field MRI. Four read-out frequencies were tested using samples with identical numbers of 1H and 13C spins. Experimental SNRs at 0.0475 T were ∼40% of those obtained at 4.7 T. Conservatively, theoretical SNRs at 0.0475 T 1.13-fold higher than 4.7 T were possible despite an ∼100-fold lower detection frequency, indicating feasibility of high-sensitivity MRI without technically challenging, expensive high-field magnets. The data at 4.7 T and 0.0475 T was obtained from different spectrometers with different RF probes. The SNR comparison between the two field strengths accounted for many differences in parameters such as system noise figures and variations in the probe detection coils including Q factors and coil diameters. PMID:24239701

  17. SU-E-J-03: Characterization of the Precision and Accuracy of a New, Preclinical, MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound System for Image-Guided Interventions in Small-Bore, High-Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ellens, N; Farahani, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) has many potential and realized applications including controlled heating and localized drug delivery. The development of many of these applications requires extensive preclinical work, much of it in small animal models. The goal of this study is to characterize the spatial targeting accuracy and reproducibility of a preclinical high field MRgFUS system for thermal ablation and drug delivery applications. Methods: The RK300 (FUS Instruments, Toronto, Canada) is a motorized, 2-axis FUS positioning system suitable for small bore (72 mm), high-field MRI systems. The accuracy of the system was assessed in three ways. First, the precision of the system was assessed by sonicating regular grids of 5 mm squares on polystyrene plates and comparing the resulting focal dimples to the intended pattern, thereby assessing the reproducibility and precision of the motion control alone. Second, the targeting accuracy was assessed by imaging a polystyrene plate with randomly drilled holes and replicating the hole pattern by sonicating the observed hole locations on intact polystyrene plates and comparing the results. Third, the practicallyrealizable accuracy and precision were assessed by comparing the locations of transcranial, FUS-induced blood-brain-barrier disruption (BBBD) (observed through Gadolinium enhancement) to the intended targets in a retrospective analysis of animals sonicated for other experiments. Results: The evenly-spaced grids indicated that the precision was 0.11 +/− 0.05 mm. When image-guidance was included by targeting random locations, the accuracy was 0.5 +/− 0.2 mm. The effective accuracy in the four rodent brains assessed was 0.8 +/− 0.6 mm. In all cases, the error appeared normally distributed (p<0.05) in both orthogonal axes, though the left/right error was systematically greater than the superior/inferior error. Conclusions: The targeting accuracy of this device is sub-millimeter, suitable for many

  18. Theory of charge transport in diffusive normal metal/conventional superconductor point contacts in the presence of magnetic impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Golubov, A. A.; Inoue, J.; Asano, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Charge transport in the diffusive normal metal/insulator/s-wave superconductor junctions is studied in the presence of the magnetic impurity for various situations, where we have used the Usadel equation with Nazarov's generalized boundary condition. It is revealed that the magnetic impurity scattering suppresses the proximity effect. Wide variety of the line shapes of the tunneling conductance is obtained. Only for high transparent junction the normalized conductance around zero voltage can be enhanced by the magnetic impurity scattering.

  19. High field superconductor development and understanding project, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Larbalestier, David C.; Lee, Peter J.

    2009-07-15

    Over 25 years the Applied Superconductivity Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provided a vital technical resource to the High Energy Physics community covering development in superconducting strand for HEP accelerator magnet development. In particular the work of the group has been to develop the next generation of high field superconductors for high field application. Grad students Mike Naus, Chad Fischer, Arno Godeke and Matt Jewell improved our understanding of the microstructure and microchemistry of Nb3Sn and their impact on the physical and mechanical properties. The success of this work has led to the continued funding of this work at the ASC after it moved to the NHMFL and also to direct funding from BNL for some aspects of Nb3Sn cable evaluation.

  20. Comparison of magnetic wire navigation with the conventional wire technique for percutaneous coronary intervention of chronic total occlusions: a randomised, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christian; Berger, Rudolf; Scherzer, Sabine; Krenn, Lisa; Gangl, Clemens; Dalos, Daniel; Delle-Karth, Georg; Neunteufl, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Wire crossing of a chronic total coronary occlusion (CTO) is time consuming and limited by the amount of contrast agent and time of radiation exposure. Magnetic wire navigation (MWN) might accelerate wire crossing by maintaining a coaxial vessel orientation. This study compares MWN with the conventional approach for recanalization of CTOs. Forty symptomatic patients with CTO were randomised to MWN (n = 20) or conventional approach (n = 20) for antegrade crossing of the occlusion. In the intention-to-treat analysis, MWN showed a shorter crossing time (412 versus 1131 s; p = 0.001), and, consequently, lower usage of contrast agent (primary endpoint 42 versus 116 ml; p = 0.01), and lower radiation exposure (dose-area product: 29 versus 80 Gy*cm(2); p = 0.002) during wire crossing compared to the conventional approach. Accordingly, in the per-protocol analysis, the wire-crossing rate was, in trend, higher using the conventional approach (17 of 31) compared to MWN (9 of 28; p = 0.08). The use of MWN for revascularisation of CTOs is feasible and reduces crossing time, use of contrast agent, and radiation exposure. However, due to a broader selection of wires, the conventional approach enables wire crossing in cases failed by MWN and seems to be the more successful choice.

  1. Experimental Comparison of Microwave, Oxygen Plasmas in a Conventional Electron-Cyclotron Resonance, Diverging Magnetic Field and in a Multi-pole Magnetic Field Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akitsu, Tetsuya

    1998-10-01

    A plasma-enhanced reactive sputtering was developed for the deposition of oriented thin crustals of metallic-oxide compound. An oxygen plasma was excited with microwave, electron cyclotron resonance discharge at 2.45 GHz and a compact DC magnetron sputtering was combined. The discharge characteristics was compared in two types of magnetic field configurations.using the optical emission spectroscopy and the appearance potential mass-spectrometry. In a divergent magnetic field, the microwave was absorbed in a single electron-cyclotron resonance Layer, 30-45 mm apart from a crystallized ceramic vesse, and the deposition region was exposed to a freely expanding plasma. Next, the end of the magnetic field line was closed with a magnetic circuit and the source plasma was magnetically confined in the local mirror, thus only neutral oxygen was allowed to expand into the deposition region.

  2. Developments of Multi-extreme High Field ESR in Kobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, H.; Okubo, S.; Ohmichi, E.; Sakurai, T.; Zhang, W.-M.; Shimokawa, T.

    2013-03-01

    Recent developments of "multi-extreme" high magnetic field electron spin resonance (ESR) in Kobe will be reviewed. Our high magnetic field ESR covers the frequency region between 0.03 and 7 THz and the temperature region between 1.8 and 300 K. With this high magnetic field ESR system we can apply the magnetic field up to 55 T using a Cu-Ag pulsed magnet and a 300 kJ (10 kV) capacitor bank. Under this high magnetic field we can also apply the high pressure up to 1.4 GPa. As we can make the measurement under low temperature, high magnetic field and high pressure simultaneously, we name it as "multi-extreme" ESR. Moreover, in order to gain the sensitivity of our high magnetic field ESR, we have developed a micro-cantilever ESR system using a torque method, which enables the ESR measurement of micrometer size single crystal at low temperature. At the moment we are in the process of extending the magnetic field region of micro-cantilever ESR. Recently we have succeeded in making the measurement up to 369 GHz and the achieved sensitivity is about 1010 spins/G, which is much higher than that using the conventional transmission method. Finally our development of magnetization detected ESR using SQUID magnetometer (SQUID ESR) will be also presented.

  3. Metal-Metal Interactions in Trinuclear Copper(II) Complexes [Cu3(RCOO)4(H2TEA)2] and Binuclear [Cu2(RCOO)2(H2TEA)2]. Syntheses and Combined Structural, Magnetic, High-Field Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, and Theoretical Studies.

    PubMed

    Ozarowski, Andrew; Calzado, Carmen J; Sharma, Raj Pal; Kumar, Santosh; Jezierska, Julia; Angeli, Celestino; Spizzo, Federico; Ferretti, Valeria

    2015-12-21

    The trinuclear [Cu3(RCOO)4(H2TEA)2] copper(II) complexes, where RCOO(-) = 2-furoate (1), 2-methoxybenzoate (2), and 3-methoxybenzoate (3, 4), as well as dimeric species [Cu2(H2TEA)2(RCOO)2]·2H2O, have been prepared by adding triethanolamine (H3TEA) at ambient conditions to hydrated Cu(RCOO)2 salts. The newly synthesized complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, spectroscopic techniques (IR and UV-visible), magnetic susceptibility, single crystal X-ray structure determination and theoretical calculations, using a Difference Dedicated Configuration Interaction approach for the evaluation of magnetic coupling constants. In 1 and 2, the central copper atom lies on an inversion center, while in the polymorphs 3 and 4, the three metal centers are crystallographically independent. The zero-field splitting parameters of the trimeric compounds, D and E, were derived from high-field, high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectra at temperatures ranging from 3 to 290 K and were used for the interpretation of the magnetic data. It was found that the dominant interaction between the terminal and central Cu sites J12 is ferromagnetic in nature in all complexes, even though differences have been found between the symmetrical or quasi-symmetrical complexes 1-3 and non-symmetrical complex 4, while the interaction between the terminal centers, J23, is negligible.

  4. Apparatus having reduced mechanical forces for supporting high magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of supporting extremely high magnetic fields suitable for plasma confinement, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements are significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by conventional techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  5. Tokamak coordinate conventions: COCOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, O.; Medvedev, S. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    Dealing with electromagnetic fields, in particular current and related magnetic fields, yields "natural" physical vector relations in 3-D. However, when it comes to choosing local coordinate systems, the "usual" right-handed systems are not necessarily the best choices, which means that there are several options being chosen. In the magnetic fusion community such a difficulty exists for the choices of the cylindrical and of the toroidal coordinate systems. In addition many codes depend on knowledge of an equilibrium. In particular, the Grad-Shafranov axisymmetric equilibrium solution for tokamak plasmas, ψ, does not depend on the sign of the plasma current Ip nor that of the magnetic field B0. This often results in ill-defined conventions. Moreover the sign, amplitude and offset of ψ are of less importance, since the free sources in the equation depend on the normalized radial coordinate. The signs of the free sources, dp/dψ and dF2/dψ (p being the pressure, ψ the poloidal magnetic flux and F=RBφ), must be consistent to generate the current density profile. For example, RF and CD calculations (Radio Frequency heating and Current Drive) require an exact sign convention in order to calculate a co- or counter-CD component. It is shown that there are over 16 different coordinate conventions. This paper proposes a unique identifier, the COCOS convention, to distinguish between the 16 most-commonly used options. Given the present worldwide efforts towards code integration, the proposed new index COCOS defining uniquely the COordinate COnventionS required as input by a given code or module is particularly useful. As codes use different conventions, it is useful to allow different sign conventions for equilibrium code input and output, equilibrium being at the core of any calculations in magnetic fusion. Additionally, given two different COCOS conventions, it becomes simple to transform between them. The relevant transformations are described in detail.

  6. Investigation of magnetic properties of MnZn-substituted strontium ferrite nanopowders prepared via conventional ceramic technique followed by a high energy ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arab, A.; Mardaneh, M. R.; Yousefi, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Strontium ferrite powders with substitution of Mn2+ and Zn2+ ions for Fe3+ ions according to the formula SrMnxZnxFe12-2xO19, wherein x ranging from 0 to 1 with a step of 0.2, has been pre-milled via conventional ceramic method and calcined at 1200 °C for 4 h in the air. In order to get nanopowders, the obtained powders were milled again in a high energy SPEX mill for 1 h and 15 min. XRD study was performed to investigation the phases and structural properties of samples. Lattice parameters and mean crystallite sizes of the milled powders were determined from the XRD data and Scherrer's formula. Size of particles was studied by TEM. The DC electrical resistivities of the milled samples have been measured by the two-point probe method. In addition, room temperature magnetizations and coercivities of the samples in a magnetic field of 14.7 kOe have been determined from the hysteresis loops. The behavior of magnetizations of samples has been discussed based on core-shell model and according to the site occupation of substituted cations on the sublattices. The discussion of site occupation also supports the increase of lattice parameters as x increases.

  7. Sultan - forced flow, high field test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.; Vecsey, G.; Weymuth, P.; Zellweger, J.

    1981-09-01

    Three European laboratories: CNEN (Frascati, I) ECN (Petten, NL) and SIN (Villigen, CH) decided to coordinate their development efforts and to install a common high field forced flow test facility at Villigen Switzerland. The test facility SULTAN (Supraleiter Testanlage) is presently under construction. As a first step, an 8T/1m bore solenoid with cryogenic periphery will be ready in 1981. The cryogenic system, data acquisition system and power supplies which are contributed by SIN are described. Experimental feasibilities, including cooling, and instrumentation are reviewed. Progress of components and facility construction is described. Planned extension of the background field up to 12T by insert coils is outlined. 5 refs.

  8. Physical processes at high field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the radiation produced by the high field interaction with the rare gases have revealed the presence of both copious harmonic production and fluorescence. The highest harmonic observed was the seventeenth (14.6 rm) in Ne, the shortest wavelength ever produced by that means. Strong fluorescence was seen in Ar, Kr, and Xe with the shortest wavelengths observed being below 10 nm. Furthermore, radiation from inner-shell excited configurations in Xe, specifically the 4d/sup 9/5s5p ..-->.. 4d/sup 10/5s manifold at approx. 17.7 nm, was detected. The behaviors of the rare gases with respect to multiquantum ionization, harmonic production, and fluorescence were found to be correlated so that the materials fell into two groups, He and Ne in one and Ar, Kr, and Xe in the other. These experimental findings, in alliance with other studies on inner-shell decay processes, give evidence for a role of atomic correlations in a direct nonlinear process of inner-shell excitation. It is expected that an understanding of these high-field processes will enable the generation of stimulated emission in the x-ray range. 59 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. High field - low energy muon ionization cooling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham; Palmer, Robert B.; Neuffer, David

    2015-09-01

    Muon beams are generated with large transverse and longitudinal emittances. In order to achieve the low emittances required by a muon collider, within the short lifetime of the muons, ionization cooling is required. Cooling schemes have been developed to reduce the muon beam 6D emittances to ≈300 μ m -rad in transverse and ≈1 - 1.5 mm in longitudinal dimensions. The transverse emittance has to be further reduced to ≈50 - 25 μ m -rad with an upper limit on the longitudinal emittance of ≈76 mm in order to meet the high-energy muon collider luminosity requirements. Earlier studies of the transverse cooling of low energy muon beams in high field magnets showed a promising performance, but did not include transverse or longitudinal matching between the stages. In this study we present the first complete design of the high field-low energy ionization cooling channel with transverse and longitudinal matching. The channel design was based on strong focusing solenoids with fields of 25-30 T and low momentum muon beam starting at 135 MeV /c and gradually decreasing. The cooling channel design presented here is the first to reach ≈50 micron scale emittance beam. We present the channel's optimized design parameters including the focusing solenoid fields, absorber parameters and the transverse and longitudinal matching.

  10. High-field electron-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V

    1999-02-26

    Recent advances in novel technologies (including chirped-pulse amplification, femtosecond laser systems operating in the TW-PW range, high-gradient rf photoinjectors, and synchronized relativistic electron bunches with subpicosecond durations and THz bandwidths) allow experimentalists to study the interaction of relativistic electrons with ultrahigh-intensity photon fields. Ponderomotive scattering can accelerate these electrons with extremely high gradients in a three-dimensional vacuum laser focus. The nonlinear Doppler shift induced by relativistic radiation pressure in Compton backscattering is shown to yield complex nonlinear spectra which can be modified by using temporal laser pulse shaping techniques. Colliding laser pulses, where ponderomotive acceleration and Compton backscattering are combined, could also yield extremely short wavelength photons. Finally, one expects strong radiative corrections when the Doppler-upshifted laser wavelength approaches the Compton scale. These are discussed within the context of high-field classical electrodynamics, a new discipline borne out of the aforementioned innovations.

  11. Bi-2212 round wire development for high field applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, H.; Huang, Y.; Hong, S.; Gerace, M.; Parrell, J.

    2014-05-01

    Oxford Superconducting Technology (OST) has been continuously improving Bi-2212 round wire performance because of its potential for application in high-field magnets (> 25 T). We focused on Bi-2212 wire configuration design, filament densification and reducing carbon and hydrogen contamination to improve the engineering critical current density (JE). Several wire configurations have been developed to meet different wire diameter and operating current requirements. The swaging, cold isostatic pressing (CIP) and over-pressure heat treatment processes have been demonstrated to effectively increase Bi-2212 filament mass density in the final wire and result in high performance over long length. The JE values exceeding 550 A/mm2 at 4.2 K, 15 T have been achieved on the CIPed 1 m long sample using a 10 bar over-pressure (OP) heat treatment. The twisted Bi-2212 wire significantly reduced ac loss without the critical current degradation.

  12. REVIEW OF HIGH FIELD Q SLOPE, CAVITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2008-01-23

    One of the most interesting phenomenon occurring in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk niobium is represented by a sharp decrease of the quality factor above peak surface magnetic field of about 90 mT and is referred to as "high field Q-slope" or "Q-drop". This phenomenon was observed first in 1997 and since then some effort was devoted to the understanding of the causes behind it. Still, no clear physical interpretation of the Q-drop has emerged, despite several attempts. In this contribution, I will review the experimental results for various cavities measured in many laboratories and I will try to identify common features and differences related to the Q-drop.

  13. Topical report on subsurface fracture mapping from geothermal wellbores. Phase I. Pulsed radar techniques. Phase II. Conventional logging methods. Phase III. Magnetic borehole ranging

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenbaum, B.A.; Rawson, G.

    1980-09-01

    To advance the state-of-the-art in Hot Dry Rock technology, an evaluation is made of (i) the use of radar to map far-field fractures, (ii) the use of more than twenty different conventional well logging tools to map borehole-fracture intercepts, and (iii) the use of magnetic dipole ranging to determine the relative positions of the injection well and the production well within the fractured zone. It is found that according to calculations, VHF backscatter radar has the potential for mapping fractures within a distance of 50 +- 20 meters from the wellbore. A new technique for improving fracture identification is presented. Analyses of extant data indicate that when used synergistically the (1) caliper, (2) resistivity dipmeter, (3) televiewer, (4) television, (5) impression packer, and (6) acoustic transmission are useful for mapping borehole-fracture intercepts. Improvements in both data interpretation techniques and high temperature operation are required. The surveying of one borehole from another appears feasible at ranges of up to 200 to 500 meters by using a low frequency magnetic field generated by a moderately strong dipole source (a solenoid) located in one borehole, a sensitive B field detector that traverses part of the second borehole, narrow band filtering, and special data inversion techniques.

  14. Quantum oscillations of the critical current and high-field superconducting proximity in ballistic graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Shalom, M.; Zhu, M. J.; Fal'Ko, V. I.; Mishchenko, A.; Kretinin, A. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Woods, C. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Geim, A. K.; Prance, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    Graphene-based Josephson junctions provide a novel platform for studying the proximity effect due to graphene’s unique electronic spectrum and the possibility to tune junction properties by gate voltage. Here we describe graphene junctions with a mean free path of several micrometres, low contact resistance and large supercurrents. Such devices exhibit pronounced Fabry-Pérot oscillations not only in the normal-state resistance but also in the critical current. The proximity effect is mostly suppressed in magnetic fields below 10 mT, showing the conventional Fraunhofer pattern. Unexpectedly, some proximity survives even in fields higher than 1 T. Superconducting states randomly appear and disappear as a function of field and carrier concentration, and each of them exhibits a supercurrent carrying capacity close to the universal quantum limit. We attribute the high-field Josephson effect to mesoscopic Andreev states that persist near graphene edges. Our work reveals new proximity regimes that can be controlled by quantum confinement and cyclotron motion.

  15. A simple aloe vera plant-extracted microwave and conventional combustion synthesis: Morphological, optical, magnetic and catalytic properties of CoFe2O4 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, A.; Sridhar, R.; Arul Antony, S.; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-11-01

    Nanocrystalline magnetic spinel CoFe2O4 was synthesized by a simple microwave combustion method (MCM) using ferric nitrate, cobalt nitrate and Aloe vera plant extracted solution. For the comparative study, it was also prepared by a conventional combustion method (CCM). Powder X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray and selected-area electron diffraction results indicate that the as-synthesized samples have only single-phase spinel structure with high crystallinity and without the presence of other phase impurities. The crystal structure and morphology of the powders were revealed by high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, show that the MCM products of CoFe2O4 samples contain sphere-like nanoparticles (SNPs), whereas the CCM method of samples consist of flake-like nanoplatelets (FNPs). The band gap of the samples was determined by UV-Visible diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The magnetization (Ms) results showed a ferromagnetic behavior of the CoFe2O4 nanostructures. The Ms value of CoFe2O4-SNPs is higher i.e. 77.62 emu/g than CoFe2O4-FNPs (25.46 emu/g). The higher Ms value of the sample suggest that the MCM technique is suitable for preparing high quality nanostructures for magnetic applications. Both the samples were successfully tested as catalysts for the conversion of benzyl alcohol. The resulting spinel ferrites were highly selective for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and exhibit important difference among their activities. It was found that CoFe2O4-SNPs catalyst show the best performance, whereby 99.5% selectivity of benzaldehyde was achieved at close to 93.2% conversion.

  16. NSTX High Field Side Gas Fueling System

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel; M. Anderson; G. Barnes; M. Bell; W. Blanchard; L. Dudek; D. Gates; R. Gernhardt; R. Maingi; D. Mueller; T. Provost; R. Raman; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Winston

    2003-10-09

    Fueling National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas with gas injected from the high field side (HFS) has produced earlier, more reliable transitions to the H-mode, longer H-mode durations, higher toroidal rotation, and higher edge electron temperature compared with similar discharges using the low field side (LFS) gas fueling injectors. The HFS gas fueling system consists of a Center Stack midplane injector, and an injector at the inner, upper corner of the Center Stack. The challenging design and installation constraints for the HFS gas system involved placing the control components as close as possible to the machine-vacuum interface, devising a special feed-through flange, traversing through vessel regions whose temperatures during bake-out range from 150 to 350 degrees Centigrade, adapting the gas transport tubing size and route to the small instrumentation wire channels behind the existing graphite plasma facing component tiles on the Center Stack, and providing output orifices shielded from excessive plasma power depositions while concentrating the output flow to facilitate fast camera viewing and analysis. Design, recent performance, and future upgrades will be presented.

  17. High field electrophoresis—computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, M. J.; Kułakowski, K.

    2004-11-01

    We describe for the first time the results, obtained by means of a new two-dimensional version of a cellular automaton (2DA), designed for the simulation of the gel electrophoresis at high fields. The calculations are performed up to N=442 reptons. The results are compared with those from a modified version of the one-dimensional automaton (1DA), which has been constructed previously. The modification is that the movements of different parts of a molecule of DNA are treated as statistically independent events. This approach is applied also for 2DA. Main results are: (i) for long molecules (N≫1) the velocity v tends to a constant both for 1DA and 2DA; (ii) the diffusion coefficient D for 2DA increases with N; (iii) 2DA enables the formation of so-called hernias, i.e. fragments of DNA locally perpendicular to the molecule, and (iv) a direct observation of the geometration effect. The results (i) and (ii) mimic the experimental behavior at high electric fields. We also calculate a dimensionless quantity y=D/(Lv), where L=Na is the molecule length and a is the stiffness length. The discussion of y reveals the role of the length fluctuations.

  18. High-field MRI and mercury release from dental amalgam fillings.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M J; Neghab, M; Anoosheh, S M H; Bahaeddini, N; Mortazavi, G; Neghab, P; Rajaeifard, A

    2014-04-01

    Mercury is among the most toxic nonradioactive elements which may cause toxicity even at low doses. Some studies showed release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings in individuals who used mobile phone. This study was conducted to assess the effect of high-field MRI on mercury release from dental amalgam filling. We studied two groups of students with identical tooth decays requiring a similar pattern of restorative dentistry. They were exposed to a magnetic flux density of 1.5 T produced by a MRI machine. 16 otherwise healthy students with identical dental decay participated in this study. They underwent similar restorative dentistry procedures and randomly divided into two groups of MRI-exposed and control arms. Urinary concentrations of mercury in the control subjects were measured before (hour 0) and 48 and 72 hrs after amalgam restoration, using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Urinary concentrations of mercury in exposed individuals were determined before (hour 0), and 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after amalgam restoration. Unlike control subjects, they underwent conventional brain MRI (15 min, 99 slices), 24 hrs after amalgam restoration. The mean±SD urinary mercury levels in MRI-exposed individuals increased linearly from a baseline value of 20.70±17.96 to 24.83±22.91 μg/L 72 hrs after MRI. In the control group, the concentration decreased linearly from 20.70±19.77 to 16.14±20.05 μg/L. The difference between urinary mercury in the exposed and control group, 72 hrs after MRI (96 h after restoration),was significant (p=0.046). These findings provide further support for the noxious effect of MRI (exposure to strong magnetic field)and release of mercury from dental amalgam fillings.

  19. U.S. EPA High-Field NMR Facility with Remote Accessibility

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s High-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Research Facility housed in Athens, GA has two Varian 600 MHz NMR spectrometers used for conducting sophisticated experiments in environmental science. Off-site users can ship their samples and perform their NMR experiments remotely fr...

  20. Rapid brain MRI acquisition techniques at ultra-high fields.

    PubMed

    Setsompop, Kawin; Feinberg, David A; Polimeni, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    Ultra-high-field MRI provides large increases in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as well as enhancement of several contrast mechanisms in both structural and functional imaging. Combined, these gains result in a substantial boost in contrast-to-noise ratio that can be exploited for higher-spatial-resolution imaging to extract finer-scale information about the brain. With increased spatial resolution, however, there is a concurrent increased image-encoding burden that can cause unacceptably long scan times for structural imaging and slow temporal sampling of the hemodynamic response in functional MRI - particularly when whole-brain imaging is desired. To address this issue, new directions of imaging technology development - such as the move from conventional 2D slice-by-slice imaging to more efficient simultaneous multislice (SMS) or multiband imaging (which can be viewed as "pseudo-3D" encoding) as well as full 3D imaging - have provided dramatic improvements in acquisition speed. Such imaging paradigms provide higher SNR efficiency as well as improved encoding efficiency. Moreover, SMS and 3D imaging can make better use of coil sensitivity information in multichannel receiver arrays used for parallel imaging acquisitions through controlled aliasing in multiple spatial directions. This has enabled unprecedented acceleration factors of an order of magnitude or higher in these imaging acquisition schemes, with low image artifact levels and high SNR. Here we review the latest developments of SMS and 3D imaging methods and related technologies at ultra-high field for rapid high-resolution functional and structural imaging of the brain. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Threats to ultra-high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2009-08-01

    In 2004 the European Commission (EC) adopted a directive restricting occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. This directive (2004/40/CE), which examines the possible health risks of the electromagnetic fields from mobile phones, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and other devices, concluded that upper limits on radiation and applied electromagnetic fields are necessary to prevent workers from suffering any undue acute health effects. But although not initially intended, the biggest impact of the directive could be on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is used in hospitals worldwide to produce images of unrivalled quality of the brain and other soft tissues.

  2. Alternative Contrast Mechanisms in High Field MR Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Robert Thomas

    1995-01-01

    In high-field MR Microscopy, the T_1 relaxation times may become long and converge while the T_2 relaxation times may become short and converge. As a result, much of the contrast is due solely to differences in spin density. The use of T_{1rho} as an alternative contrast parameter in high-field MR Microscopy has been explored here. To this end, MR Microscopy experiments have been performed using 2.0 and 9.4 Tesla Bruker MRI systems. Spectroscopy experiments at 9.4 Tesla were performed on several phantoms (5.75% agar gel, 1.0 mM MnCl_2, 7.3% and 20% gelatin). Imaging experiments were performed on two, 17.5 day old, perfusion fixed, mouse embryos, embedded in 7.3% gelatin to minimize drying and susceptibility differences. The relaxation times, T_1, T _2, and T_{1rho }, the signal to noise ratios (SNR) and contrast to noise ratios (CNR), have been measured for several types of tissue. The T_{1rho} relaxation times were measured at four locking field strengths, 0.7, 0.9, 1.3 and 1.7 G. T_1 and T_2 imaging experiments were performed using a conventional spin warp imaging sequence. T_{1rho } imaging experiments were performed using a presaturating spin locking pulse, followed by a conventional spin warp imaging sequence. Muscle, diencephalon, lung and liver were chosen for the relaxation time measurements as they offered both good tissue specificity and size. Both static and locking field dispersion of T _{1rho} were observed in the selected mouse embryo tissues. The observed T _{1rho} relaxation times were generally longer than the T_2 relaxation times, increased with locking field strength, and were consistently shorter at 9.4 Tesla than at 2.0 Tesla. The static field dispersion of T_ {1rho} and T_2 are both believed to be due, in part, to diffusion losses through susceptibility induced gradients. The losses are much smaller in the T_{1rho} images, and decrease as the locking pulse is increased. Finally, under certain circumstances, T_{1rho }-weighting could produce

  3. Safety of high speed guided ground transportation systems: Comparison of magnetic and electric fields of conventional and advanced electrified transportation systems. Final report, September 1992-March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F.M.; Feero, W.E.; Jacobs, W.L.

    1993-08-01

    Concerns exist regarding the potential safety, environmental and health effects on the public and on transportation workers due to electrification along new or existing rail corridors, and to proposed maglev and high speed rail operations. Therefore, the characterization of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by both steady (dc) and alternating currents (ac) at power frequency (50 Hz in Europe and 60 Hz in the U.S.) and above, in the Extreme Low Frequency (ELF) range (3-3000 Hz) is of interest. The report summarizes and compares the results of a survey of EMF characteristics (spatial, temporal and frequency bands) for representative conventional railroad and transit and advanced high-speed systems including: the German TR-07 maglev system; the Amtrak Northeast Corridor (NEC) and North Jersey Transit (NJT) trains; the Washington, DC Metrorail (WMATA) and the Boston, MA (MBTA) transit systems; and the French TGV-A high speed rail system. This comprehensive comparative EMF survey produced both detailed data and statistical summaries of EMF profiles, and their variability in time and space. EMF ELF levels for WMATA are also compared to those produced by common environmental sources at home, work, and under power lines, but have specific frequency signatures.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Angiography of the Peripheral Vessels in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: When Is an Additional Conventional Angiography Required?

    SciTech Connect

    Janka, R. Wenkel, E.; Fellner, C.; Lang, W.; Bautz, W.; Uder, M.

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of this work was to find out how often the clinician asks for a conventional angiography (CA) in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) after a magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has been performed and how often the CA reveals additional information for therapy planning. Quality criteria for the MRA were defined and tested to see whether they can predict the need for an additional CA. In this prospective study, 81 patients suffering from PAOD (Fontaine classification IIa, n = 13; IIb, n = 33; III, n = 10; IV, n = 25) were examined with a 1.5-T MR-scanner with dedicated coils using a step-by-step technique. The vascular surgeon decided whether he could plan the therapy on the basis of the MRA or if he needed an additional CA. The MRA was assessed in terms of the image quality of the MRA and regarding therapeutic management of the patient in a two-grade scale: sufficient and insufficient. In 27/81 (33%) patients, the clinician asked for a CA, which revealed new information in only 11 patients. The relative number of MRAs with insufficient image quality was significantly higher (p < 0.01) in the group with additional information on CA (8/11) compared to the group without additional information (0/16). The assessment of an MRA based on image quality and regarding therapeutic management of the patient might reduce the number of CAs for therapy planning in patients with PAOD.

  5. On-line high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-nuclear magnetic resonance method of the markers of nerve agents for verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Avik; Gupta, Hemendra K; Garg, Prabhat; Jain, Rajeev; Dubey, Devendra K

    2009-07-01

    This paper details an on-flow liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-nuclear magnetic resonance (LC-UV-NMR) method for the retrospective detection and identification of alkyl alkylphosphonic acids (AAPAs) and alkylphosphonic acids (APAs), the markers of the toxic nerve agents for verification of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Initially, the LC-UV-NMR parameters were optimized for benzyl derivatives of the APAs and AAPAs. The optimized parameters include stationary phase C(18), mobile phase methanol:water 78:22 (v/v), UV detection at 268nm and (1)H NMR acquisition conditions. The protocol described herein allowed the detection of analytes through acquisition of high quality NMR spectra from the aqueous solution of the APAs and AAPAs with high concentrations of interfering background chemicals which have been removed by preceding sample preparation. The reported standard deviation for the quantification is related to the UV detector which showed relative standard deviations (RSDs) for quantification within +/-1.1%, while lower limit of detection upto 16mug (in mug absolute) for the NMR detector. Finally the developed LC-UV-NMR method was applied to identify the APAs and AAPAs in real water samples, consequent to solid phase extraction and derivatization. The method is fast (total experiment time approximately 2h), sensitive, rugged and efficient.

  6. Fabrication and Test Results of a Prototype, Nb3Sn Superconducting Racetrack Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Gourlay, S. A.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gupta, R.; Hannaford, R.; Harnden, W.; Lietzke, A.; McInturff, A.D.; Millos, G.A.; Morrison, L.; Morrison, M.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1998-09-01

    A prototype, Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting magnet, utilizing a racetrack coil design has been built and tested. This magnet represents the first step in a recently implemented program to develop a high field, accelerator quality magnet. This magnet was constructed with coils wound from conductor developed for the ITER project, limiting the magnet to a field of 6-7 Tesla. Subsequent magnets in the program will utilize improved conductor, culminating in a magnet design capable of producing fields approaching 15 Tesla. The simple geometry is more suitable for the use of brittle superconductors necessary to eventually reach high field levels. In addition, fewer and simpler parts are used in fabricating these coils compared with the more conventional cosine theta cross section coils. The general fabrication steps, mechanical design and quench performance are discussed.

  7. Clinical Tumor Dimensions May Be Useful to Prevent Geographic Miss in Conventional Radiotherapy of Uterine Cervix Cancer-A Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Justino, Pitagoras Baskara; Baroni, Ronaldo; Blasbalg, Roberto; Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa de

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of geographic miss associated with the classic four-field 'box' irradiation technique and to define the variables that predict this risk. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 80 patients with uterine cervix cancer seen between 2001 and 2006. Median age was 55 years (23-82 years), and 72 (90%) presented with squamous cell carcinoma. Most patients (68.7%) presented with locally advanced disease (IIb or more). Magnetic resonance imaging findings from before treatment were compared with findings from simulation of the conventional four-field 'box' technique done with rectal contrast. Study variables included tumor volume; involvement of vagina, parametrium, bladder, or rectum; posterior displacement of the anterior rectal wall; and tumor anteroposterior diameter (APD). Margins were considered adequate when the target volume (primary tumor extension, whole uterine body, and parametrium) was included within the field limits and were at least 1 cm in width. Results: Field limits were inadequate in 45 (56%) patients: 29 (36%) patients at the anterior and 28 (35%) at the posterior border of the lateral fields. Of these, 12 patients had both anterior and posterior miss, and this risk was observed in all stages of the disease (p = 0.076). Posterior displacement of the anterior rectal wall beyond S2-S3 was significantly correlated with the risk of geographic miss (p = 0.043). Larger tumors (APD 6 cm or above and volume above 50 cm{sup 3}) were also significantly correlated with this risk (p = 0.004 and p = 0.046, respectively). Conclusions: Posterior displacement of the anterior rectal wall, tumor APD, and volume can be used as guidance in evaluating the risk of geographic miss.

  8. Generation and evaluation of an ultra-high-field atlas with applications in DBS planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Brian T.; Poirier, Stefan; Guo, Ting; Parrent, Andrew G.; Peters, Terry M.; Khan, Ali R.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a common treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) and involves the use of brain atlases or intrinsic landmarks to estimate the location of target deep brain structures, such as the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi). However, these structures can be difficult to localize with conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and thus targeting can be prone to error. Ultra-high-field imaging at 7T has the ability to clearly resolve these structures and thus atlases built with these data have the potential to improve targeting accuracy. Methods T1 and T2-weighted images of 12 healthy control subjects were acquired using a 7T MR scanner. These images were then used with groupwise registration to generate an unbiased average template with T1w and T2w contrast. Deep brain structures were manually labelled in each subject by two raters and rater reliability was assessed. We compared the use of this unbiased atlas with two other methods of atlas-based segmentation (single-template and multi-template) for subthalamic nucleus (STN) segmentation on 7T MRI data. We also applied this atlas to clinical DBS data acquired at 1.5T to evaluate its efficacy for DBS target localization as compared to using a standard atlas. Results The unbiased templates provide superb detail of subcortical structures. Through one-way ANOVA tests, the unbiased template is significantly (p <0.05) more accurate than a single-template in atlas-based segmentation and DBS target localization tasks. Conclusion The generated unbiased averaged templates provide better visualization of deep brain nuclei and an increase in accuracy over single-template and lower field strength atlases.

  9. High resolution NMR measurements using a 400MHz NMR with an (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting inner coil: Towards a compact super-high-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Piao, R; Iguchi, S; Hamada, M; Matsumoto, S; Suematsu, H; Saito, A T; Li, J; Nakagome, H; Takao, T; Takahashi, M; Maeda, H; Yanagisawa, Y

    2016-02-01

    Use of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) inner coils in combination with conventional low-temperature superconducting (LTS) outer coils for an NMR magnet, i.e. a LTS/HTS NMR magnet, is a suitable option to realize a high-resolution NMR spectrometer with operating frequency >1GHz. From the standpoint of creating a compact magnet, (RE: Rare earth) Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO) HTS inner coils which can tolerate a strong hoop stress caused by a Lorentz force are preferred. However, in our previous work on a first-generation 400MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet, the NMR resolution and sensitivity were about ten times worse than that of a conventional LTS NMR magnet. The result was caused by a large field inhomogeneity in the REBCO coil itself and the shielding effect of a screening current induced in that coil. In the present paper, we describe the operation of a modified 400MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet with an advanced field compensation technology using a combination of novel ferromagnetic shimming and an appropriate procedure for NMR spectrum line shape optimization. We succeeded in obtaining a good NMR line shape and 2D NOESY spectrum for a lysozyme aqueous sample. We believe that this technology is indispensable for the realization of a compact super-high-field high-resolution NMR. PMID:26778351

  10. Superconducting Materials, Magnets and Electric Power Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, George

    2011-03-01

    The surprising discovery of superconductivity a century ago launched a chain of convention-shattering innovations and discoveries in superconducting materials and applications that continues to this day. The range of large-scale applications grows with new materials discoveries - low temperature NbTi and Nb3 Sn for liquid helium cooled superconducting magnets, intermediate temperature MgB2 for inexpensive cryocooled applications including MRI magnets, and high temperature YBCO and BSSCO for high current applications cooled with inexpensive liquid nitrogen. Applications based on YBCO address critical emerging challenges for the electricity grid, including high capacity superconducting cables to distribute power in urban areas; transmission of renewable electricity over long distances from source to load; high capacity DC interconnections among the three US grids; fast, self-healing fault current limiters to increase reliability; low-weight, high capacity generators enabling off-shore wind turbines; and superconducting magnetic energy storage for smoothing the variability of renewable sources. In addition to these grid applications, coated conductors based on YBCO deposited on strong Hastelloy substrates enable a new generation of all superconducting high field magnets capable of producing fields above 30 T, approximately 50% higher than the existing all superconducting limit based on Nb3 Sn . The high fields, low power cost and the quiet electromagnetic and mechanical operation of such magnets could change the character of high field basic research on materials, enable a new generation of high-energy colliding beam experiments and extend the reach of high density superconducting magnetic energy storage.

  11. Dosimetric Comparison between Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided and Conventional Two-Dimensional Point A-Based Intracavitary Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Juan; Yuan, Wei; Wang, Ruihua; Wang, Qiuping; Li, Yi; Xue, Chaofan; Yan, Yanli; Ma, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Liu, Zi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to comprehensively compare the 3-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided and conventional 2-dimensional (2D) point A-based intracavitary brachytherapy (BT) planning for cervical cancer with regard to target dose coverage and dosages to adjacent organs-at risk (OARs). Methods A total of 79 patients with cervical cancer were enrolled to receive 2D point A-based BT planning and then immediately to receive 3D planning between October 2011 and April 2013 at the First Hospital Affiliated to Xi’an Jiao Tong University (Xi’an, China). The dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IR-CTV) and OARs were compared between the 2D and 3D planning. Results In small tumors, there was no significant difference in most of the DVHs between 2D and 3D planning (all p>0.05). While in big tumors, 3D BT planning significantly increased the DVHs for most of the GTV, HR-CTV and IR-CTV, and some OARs compared with 2D planning (all P<0.05). In 3D planning, DVHs for GTV, HR-CTV, IR-CTV and some OARs were significantly higher in big tumors than in small tumors (all p<0.05). In contrast, in 2D planning, DVHs for almost all of the HR-CTV and IR-CTV were significantly lower in big tumors (all p<0.05). In eccentric tumors, 3D planning significantly increased dose coverage but decreased dosages to OARs compared with 2D planning (p<0.05). In tumors invading adjacent tissues, the target dose coverage in 3D planning was generally significantly higher than in 2D planning (P<0.05); the dosages to the adjacent rectum and bladder were significantly higher but those to sigmoid colon were lower in 3D planning (all P<0.05). Conclusions 3D MRI image-guided BT planning exhibits advantages over 2D planning in a complex way, generally showing advantages for the treatment of cervical cancer except small tumors. PMID:27611853

  12. Construction of block-coil high-field model dipoles for future hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, Raymond; Elliott, Tim; Henchel, William; McInturff, Al; McIntyre, Peter; Sattarov, Akhdior

    2002-08-04

    A family of high-field dipoles is being developed at Texas A&M University, as part of the program to improve the cost-effectiveness of superconducting magnet technology for future hadron colliders. The TAMU technology employs stress management, flux-plate control of persistent-current multipoles, conductor optimization using mixed-strand cable, and metal-filled bladders to provide pre-load and surface compliance. Construction details and status of the latest model dipole will be presented.

  13. Lattices for a high-field 30 TeV hadron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Peggs, S.; Dell, F.; Harrison, M.; Syphers, M.; Tepikian, S.

    1996-12-01

    Long arc cells would lead to major cost savings in a high field high T{sub c} hadron collider, operating in the regime of significant synchrotron radiation. Two such lattices, with half cell lengths of 110 and 260 m, are compared. Both allow flexible tuning, and have large dynamic apertures when dominated by chromatic sextupoles. Lattices with longer cells are much more sensitive to systematic magnet errors, which are expected to dominate.

  14. Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

    2013-09-03

    An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

  15. Perspectives for the high field approach in fusion research and advances within the Ignitor Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppi, B.; Airoldi, A.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, G.; Belforte, G.; Boggio-Sella, E.; Cardinali, A.; Cenacchi, G.; Conti, F.; Costa, E.; D'Amico, A.; Detragiache, P.; De Tommasi, G.; DeVellis, A.; Faelli, G.; Ferraris, P.; Frattolillo, A.; Giammanco, F.; Grasso, G.; Lazzaretti, M.; Mantovani, S.; Merriman, L.; Migliori, S.; Napoli, R.; Perona, A.; Pierattini, S.; Pironti, A.; Ramogida, G.; Rubinacci, G.; Sassi, M.; Sestero, A.; Spillantini, S.; Tavani, M.; Tumino, A.; Villone, F.; Zucchi, L.

    2015-05-01

    The Ignitor Program maintains the objective of approaching D-T ignition conditions by incorporating systematical advances made with relevant high field magnet technology and with experiments on high density well confined plasmas in the present machine design. An additional objective is that of charting the development of the high field line of experiments that goes from the Alcator machine to the ignitor device. The rationale for this class of experiments, aimed at producing poloidal fields with the highest possible values (compatible with proven safety factors of known plasma instabilities) is given. On the basis of the favourable properties of high density plasmas produced systematically by this line of machines, the envisioned future for the line, based on novel high field superconducting magnets, includes the possibility of investigating more advanced fusion burn conditions than those of the D-T plasmas for which Ignitor is designed. Considering that a detailed machine design has been carried out (Coppi et al 2013 Nucl. Fusion 53 104013), the advances made in different areas of the physics and technology that are relevant to the Ignitor project are reported. These are included within the following sections of the present paper: main components issues, assembly and welding procedures; robotics criteria; non-linear feedback control; simulations with three-dimensional structures and disruption studies; ICRH and dedicated diagnostics systems; anomalous transport processes including self-organization for fusion burning regimes and the zero-dimensional model; tridimensional structures of the thermonuclear instability and control provisions; superconducting components of the present machine; envisioned experiments with high field superconducting magnets.

  16. Perspectives and limitations of parallel MR imaging at high field strengths.

    PubMed

    Heidemann, Robin M; Seiberlich, Nicole; Griswold, Mark A; Wohlfarth, Katrin; Krueger, Gunnar; Jakob, Peter M

    2006-05-01

    In medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging, it is standard practice to use MR scanners with a field strength of 1.5 Tesla. Recently, an ongoing trend towards higher field strengths can be observed, with a new potential clinical standard of 3.0 Tesla. High-field MR imaging, with its intrinsic higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), can enable new applications for MRI in medical diagnosis, or can serve to improve existing methods. The use of high field MRI is not without its limitations, however. Besides SNR, other unwanted effects increase with a higher field strength. Without correction, these high field problems can cause a serious loss in image quality. An elegant way to address these problems is the use of parallel imaging. In many clinical applications, parallel MRI (pMRI) is part of the standard protocol, as pMRI can enhance virtually every MRI application without necessarily affecting the contrast behavior of the underlying imaging sequence. In addition to the speed advantages offered by pMRI, the capability of parallel imaging to reduce significant high field-specific problems, thereby improving image quality, will be of major importance.

  17. NMR in High Fields and Field Gradients up to 42 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmund, Eric E.

    2002-03-01

    We describe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed in fields as high as 42 T. This work was done at Northwestern University and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) with superconducting magnets, resistive Bitter-style electromagnets, and a superconducting-resistive hybrid magnet. After reviewing crucial probe and spectrometer design features, we describe the scientific and technical advantages that high field provides for two experiments. First, we studied the mixed state of the high-temperature superconductor YBa_2Cu_3O_7-x through ^17O NMR.[1] The NMR spectrum gives the field distribution associated with vortices which we use to selectively inspect regions inside and outside the vortex core. We use the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T_1-1) to probe the electronic density-of-states in this spatially resolved fashion. Second, we have studied ultraslow diffusion in glass-forming liquids such as glycerol. These studies use the high magnetic field gradient at the edge of the solenoid, which can exceed 200 T/m for the resistive magnets at the NHMFL. We employed a 4 K inductive shield to stabilize the fluctuations in the resistive magnets' applied field over the necessarily long timescales of a slow diffusion NMR experiment. We have also made use of fast frequency jumping to enhance signal-to-noise by circumventing the finite spatial excitation bandwidth imposed by the large gradient. We show NMR experiments of slow diffusion in glass-formers up to high field (H0 = 21 T, G = 220 T/m) that have resolved diffusivities as low as 10-10 cm^2/s. [1] V. F. Mitrovic et.al., Nature 413, 501-504 (2001).

  18. Potential traceable markers of organic matter in organic and conventional dairy manure using ultraviolet–visible and solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic dairy (OD) production is drawing increasing attention because of public concerns about food safety, animal welfare and the potential environmental impacts of conventional dairy (CD) systems. However, very limited information is available on how organic farming practices affect the chemical ...

  19. Superconducting Magnets for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenan, Peter

    2000-03-01

    MRI is now a well established diagnostic technique in medicine. The richness of information provided by magnetic resonance gives rise to a variety of techniques which in turn leads to a variety of magnet designs. Magnet designers must consider suitable superconduting materials for the magnet, but need also to consider the overall fomat of the magnet to maximise patient comfort, access for clinicians and convenience of use - in some examples magnets are destined for use within the operating theatre and special considerations are required for this. Magnet types include; (1) low-field general purpose imagers, (2) extremity imaging, (3) open magnets with exellent all-round access often employing iron or permanent magnetic materials, (4) high-field magnets, and (5) very high-field (7 Tesla and more) magnets for spectroscopy and functional imaging research. Examples of these magnet varieties will be shown and some of the design challenges discussed.

  20. Comparison of in-office magnetic resonance imaging versus conventional radiography in detecting changes in erosions after one year of infliximab therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gaylis, Norman B; Needell, Steven D; Rudensky, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare standard hand radiographs with in-office 0.2 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in monitoring response to therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who were receiving infliximab, to evaluate the frequency and location of erosions, and to determine if there were differences in outcome based on disease duration at baseline. Patients who satisfied the American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA and were receiving infliximab therapy were evaluated with a baseline and 1-year follow-up MRI. Magnetic resonance images were interpreted by two blinded, board-certified radiologists. Bone erosions were identified as well-defined defects extending through the cortical margin. The mean age of the 48 patients was 58.5 years. The median infliximab dosage was 4 mg/kg. Baseline data showed that 41 patients had abnormal MRIs. The mean time between the baseline and follow-up MRI examinations was 10.5 months. Follow-up MRI revealed regression in 11 patients. Thirty-one patients had both MRIs and radiographs. Magnetic resonance imaging was approximately twice as sensitive as radiography in detecting erosions at baseline. In-office MRI was useful in monitoring disease response after the initiation of infliximab treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging is potentially a very valuable diagnostic tool and prognostic indicator for use in patients with RA. PMID:17694258

  1. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Robertson, J. B.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An infrared radiation detector including a cadmium sulfide platelet having a cathode formed on one of its ends and an anode formed on its other end is presented. The platelet is suitably doped such that stationary high-field domains are formed adjacent the cathode when based in the negative differential conductivity region. A negative potential is applied to the cathode such that a high-field domain is formed adjacent to the cathode. A potential measuring probe is located between the cathode and the anode at the edge of the high-field domain and means are provided for measuring the potential at the probe whereby this measurement is indicative of the infrared radiation striking the platelet.

  2. ADX: a high field, high power density, Advanced Divertor test eXperiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; ADX Team

    2014-10-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment (ADX) - a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research program on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. This high field (6.5 tesla, 1.5 MA), high power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) facility would utilize Alcator magnet technology to test innovative divertor concepts for next-step DT fusion devices (FNSF, DEMO) at reactor-level boundary plasma pressures and parallel heat flux densities while producing high performance core plasma conditions. The experimental platform would also test advanced lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion-cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) actuators and wave physics at the plasma densities and magnetic field strengths of a DEMO, with the unique ability to deploy launcher structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-field side - a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and wave physics is most favorable for efficient current drive, heating and flow drive. This innovative experiment would perform plasma science and technology R&D necessary to inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of FNSF/DEMO - in a timely manner, on a cost-effective research platform. Supported by DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  3. Parahydrogen-enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theis, T.; Ganssle, P.; Kervern, G.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance, conventionally detected in magnetic fields of several tesla, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices, interest in NMR in fields comparable to the Earth's magnetic field and below (down to zero field) has been revived. Despite the use of superconducting quantum interference devices or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared with conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated through parahydrogen-induced polarization, enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H scalar nuclear spin-spin couplings (known as J couplings) in compounds with 13C in natural abundance, without the need for signal averaging. The resulting spectra show distinct features that aid chemical fingerprinting.

  4. Observation of Thermoelectric Currents in High-Field Superconductor-Ferromagnet Tunnel Junctions.

    PubMed

    Kolenda, S; Wolf, M J; Beckmann, D

    2016-03-01

    We report on the experimental observation of spin-dependent thermoelectric currents in superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions in high magnetic fields. The thermoelectric signals are due to a spin-dependent lifting of the particle-hole symmetry, and are found to be in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The maximum Seebeck coefficient inferred from the data is about -100  μV/K, much larger than commonly found in metallic structures. Our results directly prove the coupling of spin and heat transport in high-field superconductors.

  5. High field CdS detector for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyagi, R. C.; Boer, K. W.; Hadley, H. C.; Robertson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    New and highly sensitive method of detecting infrared irradiation makes possible solid state infrared detector which is more sensitive near room temperature than usual photoconductive low band gap semiconductor devices. Reconfiguration of high field domains in cadmium sulphide crystals provides basis for discovery.

  6. Least Squares Magnetic-Field Optimization for Portable Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Magnet Design

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Jeffrey L; Franck, John; Demas, Vasiliki; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2008-03-27

    Single-sided and mobile nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensors have the advantages of portability, low cost, and low power consumption compared to conventional high-field NMR and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems. We present fast, flexible, and easy-to-implement target field algorithms for mobile NMR and MRI magnet design. The optimization finds a global optimum ina cost function that minimizes the error in the target magnetic field in the sense of least squares. When the technique is tested on a ring array of permanent-magnet elements, the solution matches the classical dipole Halbach solution. For a single-sided handheld NMR sensor, the algorithm yields a 640 G field homogeneous to 16 100 ppm across a 1.9 cc volume located 1.5 cm above the top of the magnets and homogeneous to 32 200 ppm over a 7.6 cc volume. This regime is adequate for MRI applications. We demonstrate that the homogeneous region can be continuously moved away from the sensor by rotating magnet rod elements, opening the way for NMR sensors with adjustable"sensitive volumes."

  7. Permanent magnet with MgB2 bulk superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Akiyasu; Ishihara, Atsushi; Tomita, Masaru; Kishio, Kohji

    2014-07-01

    Superconductors with persistent zero-resistance currents serve as permanent magnets for high-field applications requiring a strong and stable magnetic field, such as magnetic resonance imaging. The recent global helium shortage has quickened research into high-temperature superconductors (HTSs)—materials that can be used without conventional liquid-helium cooling to 4.2 K. Herein, we demonstrate that 40-K-class metallic HTS magnesium diboride (MgB2) makes an excellent permanent bulk magnet, maintaining 3 T at 20 K for 1 week with an extremely high stability (<0.1 ppm/h). The magnetic field trapped in this magnet is uniformly distributed, as for single-crystalline neodymium-iron-boron. Magnetic hysteresis loop of the MgB2 permanent bulk magnet was detrmined. Because MgB2 is a simple-binary-line compound that does not contain rare-earth metals, polycrystalline bulk material can be industrially fabricated at low cost and with high yield to serve as strong magnets that are compatible with conventional compact cryocoolers, making MgB2 bulks promising for the next generation of Tesla-class permanent-magnet applications.

  8. Permanent magnet with MgB{sub 2} bulk superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Akiyasu; Ishihara, Atsushi; Tomita, Masaru; Kishio, Kohji

    2014-07-21

    Superconductors with persistent zero-resistance currents serve as permanent magnets for high-field applications requiring a strong and stable magnetic field, such as magnetic resonance imaging. The recent global helium shortage has quickened research into high-temperature superconductors (HTSs)—materials that can be used without conventional liquid-helium cooling to 4.2 K. Herein, we demonstrate that 40-K-class metallic HTS magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) makes an excellent permanent bulk magnet, maintaining 3 T at 20 K for 1 week with an extremely high stability (<0.1 ppm/h). The magnetic field trapped in this magnet is uniformly distributed, as for single-crystalline neodymium-iron-boron. Magnetic hysteresis loop of the MgB{sub 2} permanent bulk magnet was determined. Because MgB{sub 2} is a simple-binary-line compound that does not contain rare-earth metals, polycrystalline bulk material can be industrially fabricated at low cost and with high yield to serve as strong magnets that are compatible with conventional compact cryocoolers, making MgB{sub 2} bulks promising for the next generation of Tesla-class permanent-magnet applications.

  9. High field optical nonlinearity and the Kramers-Kronig relations.

    PubMed

    Wahlstrand, J K; Cheng, Y-H; Milchberg, H M

    2012-09-14

    The nonlinear optical response to high fields is absolutely measured for the noble gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. We find that the response is quadratic in the laser field magnitude up to the ionization threshold of each gas. Its size and quadratic dependence are well predicted by a Kramers-Kronig analysis employing known ionization probabilities, and the results are consistent with calculations using the time-dependent Schrödinger equation.

  10. Development of high-pressure, high-field and multifrequency electron spin resonance system.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, T; Taketani, A; Tomita, T; Okubo, S; Ohta, H; Uwatoko, Y

    2007-06-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) system which covers the magnetic field region up to 16 T, the quasicontinuous frequency region from 60 to 700 GHz, the temperature region from 1.8 to 4.2 K, and the hydrostatic pressure region up to 1.1 GPa has been developed. This is the first pulsed high-field and multifrequency ESR system with the pressure region over 1 GPa as far as we know. Transmission ESR spectra under hydrostatic pressure can be obtained by combining a piston-cylinder-type pressure cell and the pulsed magnetic field ESR apparatus. The pressure cell consists of a NiCrAl cylinder and sapphire or zirconia inner parts. The use of sapphire or zirconia as inner parts enables us to observe ESR under pressure because these inner parts have high transmittance for the electromagnetic wave with millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. We have successfully applied this system for the pressure dependence measurements of an isolated spin system NiSnCl(6)6H(2)O up to 1.1 GPa. It was found that the single ion anisotropy parameter D of this compound strongly depends on pressure. The parameter D is approximately proportional to the pressure up to 0.75 GPa, and the relation between D and the pressure can be used for the pressure calibration of this high-field and high-pressure ESR system.

  11. Analysis of chemical warfare agents in organic liquid samples with magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction and gas chromatography mass spectrometry for verification of the chemical weapons convention.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varoon; Purohit, Ajay Kumar; Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Goud, Raghavender D; Tak, Vijay; Pardasani, Deepak; Shrivastava, Anchal Roy; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2016-05-27

    A simple, sensitive and low temperature sample preparation method is developed for detection and identification of Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) and scheduled esters in organic liquid using magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction (MDSPE) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The method utilizes Iron oxide@Poly(methacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) resin (Fe2O3@Poly(MAA-co-EGDMA)) as sorbent. Variants of these sorbents were prepared by precipitation polymerization of methacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (MAA-co-EGDMA) onto Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Fe2O3@poly(MAA-co-EGDMA) with 20% MAA showed highest recovery of analytes. Extractions were performed with magnetic microspheres by MDSPE. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, method showed linearity in the range of 0.1-3.0μgmL(-1) (r(2)=0.9966-0.9987). The repeatability and reproducibility (relative standard deviations (RSDs) %) were in the range of 4.5-7.6% and 3.4-6.2% respectively for organophosphorous esters in dodecane. Limits of detection (S/N=3/1) and limit of quantification (S/N=10/1) were found to be in the range of 0.05-0.1μgmL(-1) and 0.1-0.12μgmL(-1) respectively in SIM mode for selected analytes. The method was successfully validated and applied to the extraction and identification of targeted analytes from three different organic liquids i.e. n-hexane, dodecane and silicon oil. Recoveries ranged from 58.7 to 97.3% and 53.8 to 95.5% at 3μgmL(-1) and 1μgmL(-1) spiking concentrations. Detection of diethyl methylphosphonate (DEMP) and O-Ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX) in samples provided by the Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons Proficiency Test (OPCW-PT) proved the utility of the developed method for the off-site analysis of CWC relevant chemicals.

  12. Analysis of chemical warfare agents in organic liquid samples with magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction and gas chromatography mass spectrometry for verification of the chemical weapons convention.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varoon; Purohit, Ajay Kumar; Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Goud, Raghavender D; Tak, Vijay; Pardasani, Deepak; Shrivastava, Anchal Roy; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2016-05-27

    A simple, sensitive and low temperature sample preparation method is developed for detection and identification of Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) and scheduled esters in organic liquid using magnetic dispersive solid phase extraction (MDSPE) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The method utilizes Iron oxide@Poly(methacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) resin (Fe2O3@Poly(MAA-co-EGDMA)) as sorbent. Variants of these sorbents were prepared by precipitation polymerization of methacrylic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (MAA-co-EGDMA) onto Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Fe2O3@poly(MAA-co-EGDMA) with 20% MAA showed highest recovery of analytes. Extractions were performed with magnetic microspheres by MDSPE. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, method showed linearity in the range of 0.1-3.0μgmL(-1) (r(2)=0.9966-0.9987). The repeatability and reproducibility (relative standard deviations (RSDs) %) were in the range of 4.5-7.6% and 3.4-6.2% respectively for organophosphorous esters in dodecane. Limits of detection (S/N=3/1) and limit of quantification (S/N=10/1) were found to be in the range of 0.05-0.1μgmL(-1) and 0.1-0.12μgmL(-1) respectively in SIM mode for selected analytes. The method was successfully validated and applied to the extraction and identification of targeted analytes from three different organic liquids i.e. n-hexane, dodecane and silicon oil. Recoveries ranged from 58.7 to 97.3% and 53.8 to 95.5% at 3μgmL(-1) and 1μgmL(-1) spiking concentrations. Detection of diethyl methylphosphonate (DEMP) and O-Ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX) in samples provided by the Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons Proficiency Test (OPCW-PT) proved the utility of the developed method for the off-site analysis of CWC relevant chemicals. PMID:27113675

  13. Study of high field superconducting solenoids for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, Michael J.; Sadovskiy, Y.; Zlobin, Alexander V; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    The final beam cooling stages of a possible Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 40-50 T in an aperture of 40-50 mm. In this paper we study possible solutions towards creating DC fields of that order using available superconductors. Several magnetic and mechanical designs, optimized for the maximum performance are presented and compared in terms of cost and size.

  14. High-field paramagnetic Meissner effect and flux creep in low-T c Ti-V alloy superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matin, M.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Sharath Chandra, L. S.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-02-01

    We report an experimental study on the high-field paramagnetic Meissner effect (HFPME) performed by measuring both the temperature and time dependence of magnetization in the two compositions of superconducting Ti-V alloys where certain secondary phases are non-superconducting, and thereby act as efficient pinning centres for the flux lines. While spatially non-uniform flux density driven by flux line pinning at these secondary phases is the necessary condition for the observation of the HFPME, our study indicates that the flux creep effect plays a supplementary role to reinforce the HFPME. It is found that in the temperature and magnetic field regime of the HFPME, the field-cooled magnetization of these samples relaxes monotonically towards a more positive value with elapsed time. We comment on how this paramagnetic relaxation behaviour of the field-cooled magnetization is correlated with the unusual thermo-magnetic responses related to the HFPME.

  15. Magnetizing of permanent magnets using HTS bulk magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Muraya, Tomoki; Kawasaki, Nobutaka; Fukui, Satoshi; Ogawa, Jun; Sato, Takao; Terasawa, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    A demagnetized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet was scanned just above the magnetic pole which contains the HTS bulk magnet generating a magnetic field of 3.27 T. The magnet sample was subsequently found to be fully magnetized in the open space of the static magnetic fields. We examined the magnetic field distributions when the magnetic poles were scanned twice to activate the magnet plate inversely with various overlap distances between the tracks of the bulk magnet. The magnetic field of the "rewritten" magnet reached the values of the magnetically saturated region of the material, showing steep gradients at the border of each magnetic pole. As a replacement for conventional pulse field magnetizing methods, this technique is proposed to expand the degree of freedom in the design of electromagnetic devices, and is proposed as a novel practical method for magnetizing rare-earth magnets, which have excellent magnetic performance and require intense fields of more than 3 T to be activated.

  16. High-Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for Solid and Solution Biological NMR

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, A.B.; Paëpe, G. De; van der Wel, P.C.A.; Hu, K.-N.; Joo, C.-G.; Bajaj, V.S.; Mak-Jurkauskas, M.L.; Sirigiri, J.R.; Herzfeld, J.; Temkin, R.J.; Griffin, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) results in a substantial nuclear polarization enhancement through a transfer of the magnetization from electrons to nuclei. Recent years have seen considerable progress in the development of DNP experiments directed towards enhancing sensitivity in biological nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This review covers the applications, hardware, polarizing agents, and theoretical descriptions that were developed at the Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology for high-field DNP experiments. In frozen dielectrics, the enhanced nuclear polarization developed in the vicinity of the polarizing agent can be efficiently dispersed to the bulk of the sample via 1H spin diffusion. This strategy has been proven effective in polarizing biologically interesting systems, such as nanocrystalline peptides and membrane proteins, without leading to paramagnetic broadening of the NMR signals. Gyrotrons have been used as a source of high-power (5–10 W) microwaves up to 460 GHz as required for the DNP experiments. Other hardware has also been developed allowing in situ microwave irradiation integrated with cryogenic magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR. Advances in the quantum mechanical treatment are successful in describing the mechanism by which new biradical polarizing agents yield larger enhancements at higher magnetic fields. Finally, pulsed methods and solution experiments should play a prominent role in the future of DNP. PMID:19194532

  17. Development of high-pressure and high-field ESR system using SQUID magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, T; Fujimoto, K; Goto, R; Okubo, S; Ohta, H; Uwatoko, Y

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a high-pressure and high-field electron spin resonance (ESR) system using the combination of a commercially available superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer and a clamp-type piston cylinder pressure cell. The magnetic field range is up to 5 T, and the maximum pressure reaches 1.5 GPa. The most characteristic feature of this system is its easy handling as compared with other high-pressure ESR systems. Moreover, the macroscopic magnetization measurement can be performed simultaneously with the microscopic ESR measurement. In addition to these features, the well-established pressure calibration method utilizing the change of superconducting transition temperature of tin can be applied to this system. By using this system, we obtained pressure dependence of the single ion magnetic anisotropy parameter D of NiSnCl(6)·6H(2)O up to 1.5 GPa precisely, and the magnetization behavior of this material under pressure was explained well by its pressure dependence of the D value.

  18. RACETRACK MAGNET DESIGNS AND TECHNOLOGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA, R.

    2006-04-03

    This paper presents a review of racetrack coil magnet designs and technologies for high field magnets that can be used in LHC upgrade. The designs presented here allow both ''Wind & React'' and ''React & Wind'' technologies as they are based on flat racetrack coils with large bend radii. Test results of the BNL 10.3 T ''React & Wind'' common coil magnet are also presented. A possible use of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) in future high field accelerator magnets is examined.

  19. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  20. Understanding and manipulating the RF fields at high field MRI.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tamer S; Hue, Yik-Kiong; Tang, Lin

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a complete overview of the electromagnetics (radiofrequency aspect) of MRI at low and high fields. Using analytical formulations, numerical modeling (computational electromagnetics), and ultrahigh field imaging experiments, the physics that impacts the electromagnetic quantities associated with MRI, namely (1) the transmit field, (2) receive field, and (3) total electromagnetic power absorption, is analyzed. The physical interpretation of the above-mentioned quantities is investigated by electromagnetic theory, to understand 'What happens, in terms of electromagnetics, when operating at different static field strengths?' Using experimental studies and numerical simulations, this paper also examines the physical and technological feasibilities by which all or any of these specified electromagnetic quantities can be manipulated through techniques such as B(1) shimming (phased array excitation) and signal combination using a receive array in order to advance MRI at high field strengths. Pertinent to this subject and with highly coupled coils operating at 7 T, this paper also presents the first phantom work on B(1) shimming without B(1) measurements.

  1. Detecting breast microcalcifications with high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Hendrik; Stehouwer, Bertine L; Bakker, Chris J G; Klomp, Dennis W J; van Diest, Paul J; Luijten, Peter R; Seevinck, Peter R; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Viergever, Max A; Veldhuis, Wouter B

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to detect microcalcifications in human whole breast specimens using high-field MRI. Four mastectomy specimens, obtained with approval of the institutional review board, were subjected to gradient-echo MRI acquisitions on a high-field MR scanner. The phase derivative was used to detect microcalcifications. The echo time and imaging resolution were varied to study the sensitivity of the proposed method. Computed tomography images of the mastectomy specimens and prior acquired mammography images were used to validate the results. A template matching algorithm was designed to detect microcalcifications automatically. The three spatial derivatives of the signal phase surrounding a field-perturbing object allowed three-dimensional localization, as well as the discrimination of diamagnetic field-perturbing objects, such as calcifications, and paramagnetic field-perturbing structures, e.g. blood. A longer echo time enabled smaller disturbances to be detected, but also resulted in shading as a result of other field-disturbing materials. A higher imaging resolution increased the detection sensitivity. Microcalcifications in a linear branching configuration that spanned over 8 mm in length were detected. After manual correction, the automatic detection tool identified up to 18 microcalcifications within the samples, which was in close agreement with the number of microcalcifications found on previously acquired in vivo mammography images. Microcalcifications can be detected by MRI in human whole breast specimens by the application of phase derivative imaging. PMID:24535752

  2. High-Field Hall Resistivity and Magnetoresistance of Electron-Doped Pr2-xCexCuO4-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengcheng; Balakirev, F. F.; Greene, R. L.

    2007-07-01

    We report resistivity and Hall effect measurements in electron-doped Pr2-xCexCuO4-δ films in magnetic field up to 58 T. In contrast to hole-doped cuprates, we find a surprising nonlinear magnetic field dependence of Hall resistivity at high field in the optimally doped and overdoped films. We also observe a crossover from quadratic to linear field dependence of the positive magnetoresistance in the overdoped films. A spin density wave induced Fermi surface reconstruction model can be used to qualitatively explain both the Hall effect and magnetoresistance.

  3. High field volume coil with unbalance current distribution for MRI applications of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrufo, O. R.; Hernández, J.; Rodríguez, A. O.

    2010-12-01

    The development of transceiver volume coils for high field MRI is still a very dynamic field of investigation and development Temnikov has been recently proposed a new volume coil design, similar to the to the gradiometer coil. It is also claimed that it is possible to individually tune it with a single chip capacitor. This motivated the development of a coil prototype based on this idea for whole-body MRI of rodents at 7 Tesla. Electromagnetic simulations of the RF field generated by this coil design were previously performed to study its properties. Electromagnetic simulations were also conducted for a standard birdcage coil with similar dimensions for fare comparison. In all numerical simulations, an unbalanced currents distribution was assumed by applying half the current intensity to designated legs. This coil design operated in the transceiver mode and was linear-driven. The coil size was manufactured to accommodate small rodents. Numerical simulations showed a field uniformity improvement of our coil over the standard birdcage coil. A popular birdcage coil was also constructed to compare their performances. Phantom and rat images were acquired for both volume coils to prove the viability of this coil design for high field MRI applications and standard spin echo pulse sequences Thus, these preliminary results make this coil design a good candidate for MRI and MRS applications of high magnetic fields.

  4. High field X-ray diffraction measurements of Mn2Sb0.95Ge0.05

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamori, Taoto; Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Takahashi, Kohki; Umetsu, Rie Y.; Hiroi, Masahiko; Koyama, Keiichi

    2016-08-01

    Magnetization and high-field X-ray powder diffraction measurements were performed for Mn2Sb0.95Ge0.05 with a tetragonal structure in magnetic fields up to 5 T in the 10-300 K temperature range. For B = 0 T and 5 T, a first-order magnetic transition from a ferrimagnetic (FRI) to an antiferromagnetic (AFM) state occurred at Tt ˜ 180 K and 150 K, respectively, and were accompanied by an iso-structural transformation. For this transition from the AFM to FRI state, the lattice parameters a and c changed by |Δa/a| = 0.15% and by |Δc/c| = 0.47% at 180 K. The compound showed both metamagnetic transition from the AFM to FRI state with a hysteresis at the temperature just below Tt and magnetic field-induced iso-structural transformation.

  5. Test Results of HD2, A High Field Nb3Sn Dipole with A 36 MM Bore

    SciTech Connect

    Ferracin, Paolo

    2008-05-19

    The Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed the 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2. With tilted (flared) ends to avoid obstructing a 36 mm clear bore, HD2 represents a step towards the use of block-type coils in high-field accelerator magnets. The coil design has been optimized to minimize geometric harmonics and reduce the conductor peak field in the end region, resulting in an expected short sample dipole field of 15 T. The support structure is composed by an external aluminum shell pre-tensioned with pressurized bladders and interference keys, and by two stainless steel end plates compressing the coil ends through four aluminum axial rods. We report on magnet design, assembly, and test results, including training performance, quench locations, and strain gauge measurements.

  6. High-field Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects at high pressure in oriented ruby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, Marius; Broto, Jean-Marc; Gonzalez, Jesus

    2008-10-01

    High-field Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects have been observed in single crystals of ruby submitted to hydrostatic pressure up to 10 GPa. A specific setup with a miniature diamond-anvil cell has been developed to combine high pressure and pulsed magnetic fields and to perform magnetophotoluminescence measurements. Careful analysis of low-temperature (4.2 and 77 K) photoluminescence spectra with a 56 T magnetic field applied along the c axis allows for the rectification of the assignment of observed emission lines to corresponding Zeeman-split levels. Besides, the intrinsic Zeeman-splitting factors of excited states reveal a linear pressure-induced increase. This enhancement is a signature of an increase in trigonal distortion induced by hydrostatic pressure. Moreover, spectra with magnetic field perpendicular to crystallographic c axis exhibit a Paschen-Back effect reflecting the progressive alignment of Cr3+ ions spin along the applied field. However, no pressure modification is observed in this compound, contrarily to the Heisenberg-to-Ising spin character pressure-induced transition observed in alexandrite.

  7. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma.

    PubMed

    Li, Ge

    2015-01-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)-an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents-could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST. PMID:26507314

  8. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ge

    2015-10-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)—an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents—could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST.

  9. Topical Developments in High-Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Matthew K.; Frantz, Derik K.; Walish, Joseph J.; Ravera, Enrico; Luchinat, Claudio; Swager, Timothy M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    We report our recent efforts directed at improving high-field DNP experiments. We investigated a series of thiourea nitroxide radicals and the associated DNP enhancements ranging from ε = 25 to 82 that demonstrate the impact of molecular structure on performance. We directly polarized low-gamma nuclei including 13C, 2H, and 17O using trityl via the cross effect. We discuss a variety of sample preparation techniques for DNP with emphasis on the benefit of methods that do not use a glass-forming cryoprotecting matrix. Lastly, we describe a corrugated waveguide for use in a 700 MHz / 460 GHz DNP system that improves microwave delivery and increases enhancements up to 50%. PMID:25977588

  10. High-field transport in two-dimensional graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tian; Konar, Aniruddha; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2011-09-01

    Transport of carriers in two-dimensional graphene at high electric fields is investigated by combining semianalytical and Monte Carlo methods. A semianalytical high-field transport model based on the high rate of optical phonon emission provides useful estimates of the saturation currents in graphene. For developing a more accurate picture, the nonequilibrium (hot) phonon effect and the role of electron-electron scattering were studied using Monte Carlo simulations. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the hot phonon effect plays a dominant role in current saturation, and electron-electron scattering strongly thermalizes the hot carrier population in graphene. We also find that electron-electron scattering removes negative differential resistance in graphene. Transient phenomenon such as velocity overshoot can be used to speed up graphene-based high-speed electronic devices by shrinking the channel length below 80 nm if electrostatic control can be exercised in the absence of a band gap.

  11. ANALYSIS OF HIGH FIELD NON-LINEAR LOSSES ON SRF SURFACES DUE TO SPECIFIC TOPOGRAPHIC ROUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xu,Charles Reece,Michael Kelley

    2012-07-01

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities will eventually be limited by the realization of fundamental material limits, whether it is Hc1 or Hsh, or some derivative thereof, at which the superconductivity is lost. Before reaching this fundamental field limit at the macro level, it must be encountered at localized, perhaps microscopic, sites of field enhancement due to local topography. If such sites are small enough, they may produce thermally stabilized normal-conducting regions which contribute non-linear losses when viewed from the macro resonant field perspective, and thus produce degradation in Q0. We have undertaken a calculation of local surface magnetic field enhancement from specific fine topographic structure by conformal mapping method and numerically. A solution of the resulting normal conducting volume has been derived and the corresponding RF Ohmic loss simulated.

  12. Microstructural understanding and critical current optimization of advanced high field superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bonney, L.A.; Willis, T.C.; Larbalestier, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    It is of great importance to improve critical current density, J[sub c] in A15 superconductors for high field magnet applications. Most current work to improve J[sub c] in A15 wires concentrates on increasing the overall J[sub c] by increasing the fraction of superconducting phase in the wire, by improving the uniformity of the superconductor cross section along the length of the wire and by adjusting the strainstate of the A15 layer. The goal of the A15 work in this group was to investigate the intrinsic J[sub c] of the A15 layer itself. To do this, a better understanding of factors controlling the intrinsic J[sub c]of the Nb[sub 3]Sn was pursued.

  13. Atomic Hydrogen as High-Precision Field Standard for High-Field EPR

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Stefan; Ozarowski, Andrew; Britt, R. David; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    We introduce atomic hydrogen trapped in an octaisobutylsilsesquioxane nanocage (H@iBuT8) as a new molecular high-precision magnetic field standard for high-field EPR spectroscopy of organic radicals and other systems with signals around g = 2. Its solid-state EPR spectrum consists of two narrow lines separated by about 51 mT and centered at g ≈ 2. The isotropic g factor is 2.00294(3) and essentially temperature independent. The isotopic 1H hyperfine coupling constant is 1416.8(2) MHz below 70 K and decreases slightly with increasing temperature to 1413.7(1) MHz at room temperature. The spectrum of the standard does not overlap with those of most organic radicals, and it can be easily prepared and is stable at room temperature. PMID:20813570

  14. High-field launch electron cyclotron heating experiments in the ELMO Bumpy Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; Swain, D.W.; White, T.L.; Kimrey, H.D.; Bigelow, T.S.; Cobble, J.A.; Hillis, D.L.; Richards, R.K.; Uckan, T.

    1985-05-01

    The midplane microwave heating system in the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) was supplemented with power launched from the high-field side of the fundamental resonance by an antenna in the magnet coil throat. Up to 43 kW of polarized (extraordinary mode), 28-GHz power was successfully launched with one antenna. Measurements were made of changes in the core and hot electron ring plasma parameters when throat-launch power was added. In sharp contrast to initial expectations, the bulk core plasma parameters were degraded while the ring parameters, in the launch cavity, were improved. These results are explained in light of a modified picture of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) in EBT. A picture of localized microwave absorption and particle losses is supported by additional measurements.

  15. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    DOE PAGES

    G. Ciovati; Myneni, G.; Stevie, F.; Maheshwari, P.; Griffis, D.

    2010-02-22

    Here, the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimedmore » at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q-slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high temperature heat-treatments, while SIMS surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.« less

  16. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, G. Myneni, F. Stevie, P. Maheshwari, D. Griffis

    2010-02-01

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low-temperature (100–140°C, 12–48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimed at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high-temperature heat treatments, while secondary ion mass spectroscopy surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  17. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati; Myneni, G.; Stevie, F.; Maheshwari, P.; Griffis, D.

    2010-02-22

    Here, the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimed at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q-slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high temperature heat-treatments, while SIMS surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  18. Short-lived charge-transfer excitons in organic photovoltaic cells studied by high-field magneto-photocurrent.

    PubMed

    Devir-Wolfman, Ayeleth H; Khachatryan, Bagrat; Gautam, Bhoj R; Tzabary, Lior; Keren, Amit; Tessler, Nir; Vardeny, Z Valy; Ehrenfreund, Eitan

    2014-07-29

    The main route of charge photogeneration in efficient organic photovoltaic cells based on bulk hetero-junction donor-acceptor blends involves short-lived charge-transfer excitons at the donor-acceptor interfaces. The cell efficiency is critically affected by the charge-transfer exciton recombination and dissociation processes. By measuring the magneto-photocurrent under ambient conditions at room temperature, we show here that magnetic field-induced spin-mixing among the charge-transfer exciton spin sublevels occurs in fields up to at least 8.5 Tesla. The resulting magneto-photocurrent increases at high fields showing non-saturating behaviour up to the highest applied field. We attribute the observed high-field spin-mixing mechanism to the difference in the donor-acceptor g-factors. The non-saturating magneto-photocurrent response at high field indicates that there exist charge-transfer excitons with lifetime in the sub-nanosecond time domain. The non-Lorentzian high-field magneto-photocurrent response indicates a dispersive decay mechanism that originates due to a broad distribution of charge-transfer exciton lifetimes.

  19. High-Field Transport in Semiconducting Material and Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nisar

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Considering the developments and most recent technological innovations of semiconductor devices, it is important to investigate the ramifications of charge carrier transport in high electric field in modern semiconductor microstructures, where the electric fields are found to be necessarily high. The fundamental ideas of transport theory including the mobility -limiting scattering mechanisms are reviewed. The ideas of linear transport are extended and the derivation of the high-field distribution is described in a single-valley model appropriate for the band structures of silicon and germanium. The velocity-field profile obtained from this distribution function is compared with the experimental results on bulk (3-dimensional) samples of silicon and germanium. The two-band model of intrinsic transport in a high electric field is also included. The single valley distribution is applied to the multi-valley structures of CaAs and (InGa)As to explain the experimentally observed negative differential resistivity in bulk samples. The calculations are further extended to two dimensional quantum -well microstructures of GaAs and (InGa)As. The conditions necessary for negative differential resistivity in these microstructures to be observable is also discussed. The applications of the above ideas in modelling submicron -length channel field effect transistors (MOSFET's and MODFET's) is discussed. Suggestions for further future applications of the analysis are offered.

  20. High-Gain High-Field Fusion Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ge

    2015-01-01

    A Faraday wheel (FW)—an electric generator of constant electrical polarity that produces huge currents—could be implemented in an existing tokamak to study high-gain high-field (HGHF) fusion plasma, such as the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). HGHF plasma can be realized in EAST by updating its pulsed-power system to compress plasma in two steps by induction fields; high gains of the Lawson trinity parameter and fusion power are both predicted by formulating the HGHF plasma. Both gain rates are faster than the decrease rate of the plasma volume. The formulation is checked by earlier ATC tests. Good agreement between theory and tests indicates that scaling to over 10 T at EAST may be possible by two-step compressions with a compression ratio of the minor radius of up to 3. These results point to a quick new path of fusion plasma study, i.e., simulating the Sun by EAST. PMID:26507314

  1. Control and data acquisition systems for high field superconducting wigglers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batrakov, A.; Ilyin, I.; Karpov, G.; Kozak, V.; Kuzin, M.; Kuper, E.; Mamkin, V.; Mezentsev, N.; Repkov, V.; Selivanov, A.; Shkaruba, V.

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the control and DAQ system of superconducting wigglers with magnetic field range up to 10.3 T. The first version of the system controls a 7 T superconducting wiggler prepared for installation at Bessy-II (Germany). The second one controls a 10 T wiggler which is under testing now at the SPring-8 site (Japan). Both systems are based on VME apparatus. The set of specialized VME modules is elaborated to arrange wiggler power supply control, full time wiggler monitoring, and magnetic field high accuracy measurement and field stabilization. The software for the control of the wigglers is written in C language for VxWorks operation system for a Motorola-162 VME controller. The task initialization, stops and acquisition of the data can be done from the nearest personal computer (FTP host for VME), or from the remote system as well.

  2. Animal models and high field imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Öz, Gülin; Tkáč, Ivan; Uğurbil, Kamil

    2013-09-01

    A plethora of magnetic resonance (MR) techniques developed in the last two decades provide unique and noninvasive measurement capabilities for studies of basic brain function and brain diseases in humans. Animal model experiments have been an indispensible part of this development. MR imaging and spectroscopy measurements have been employed in animal models, either by themselves or in combination with complementary and often invasive techniques, to enlighten us about the information content of such MR methods and/or verify observations made in the human brain. They have also been employed, with or independently of human efforts, to examine mechanisms underlying pathological developments in the brain, exploiting the wealth of animal models available for such studies. In this endeavor, the desire to push for ever-higher spatial and/or spectral resolution, better signal-to-noise ratio, and unique image contrast has inevitably led to the introduction of increasingly higher magnetic fields. As a result, today, animal model studies are starting to be conducted at magnetic fields ranging from ~ 11 to 17 Tesla, significantly enhancing the armamentarium of tools available for the probing brain function and brain pathologies.

  3. High Field Magnetoresistance of Graphene at the Dirac Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checkelsky, Joseph; Li, Lu; Ong, N. P.

    2008-03-01

    The longitudinal and Hall resistance of graphene near the charge neutral point have been studied down to low temperature (20 mK) in high magnetic field (20 T). At issue is the nature of the ground state in the vicinity of the Dirac point in high magnetic fields. In samples in which the offset voltage is small, we observe a highly unusual approach to an insulating state as the field increases. In samples with μ> 0.5 T-1 and V0< 3 V, the resistance at the Dirac point R0 increases divergently to Mφ in fields of 14-20 T at temperatures T < 2 K. This divergent behavior is suppressed in samples with large V0. Surprisingly, this rise shows little temperature dependence below 2 K. The acute dependence on magnetic field and accompanying lack of activated behavior with temperature provides evidence for an unusual cross-over or transition to the insulating state. Implications for theoretical models including gapless edge modes and Quantum Hall Ferromagnetism will be discussed in the context of these results.

  4. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter.

    PubMed

    Green, B; Kovalev, S; Asgekar, V; Geloni, G; Lehnert, U; Golz, T; Kuntzsch, M; Bauer, C; Hauser, J; Voigtlaender, J; Wustmann, B; Koesterke, I; Schwarz, M; Freitag, M; Arnold, A; Teichert, J; Justus, M; Seidel, W; Ilgner, C; Awari, N; Nicoletti, D; Kaiser, S; Laplace, Y; Rajasekaran, S; Zhang, L; Winnerl, S; Schneider, H; Schay, G; Lorincz, I; Rauscher, A A; Radu, I; Mährlein, S; Kim, T H; Lee, J S; Kampfrath, T; Wall, S; Heberle, J; Malnasi-Csizmadia, A; Steiger, A; Müller, A S; Helm, M; Schramm, U; Cowan, T; Michel, P; Cavalleri, A; Fisher, A S; Stojanovic, N; Gensch, M

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields and the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. We benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution. PMID:26924651

  5. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    DOE PAGES

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; Geloni, G.; Lehnert, U.; Golz, T.; Kuntzsch, M.; Bauer, C.; Hauser, J.; Voigtlaender, J.; et al

    2016-02-29

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields andmore » the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. In conclusion, we benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution.« less

  6. High-Field High-Repetition-Rate Sources for the Coherent THz Control of Matter

    PubMed Central

    Green, B.; Kovalev, S.; Asgekar, V.; Geloni, G.; Lehnert, U.; Golz, T.; Kuntzsch, M.; Bauer, C.; Hauser, J.; Voigtlaender, J.; Wustmann, B.; Koesterke, I.; Schwarz, M.; Freitag, M.; Arnold, A.; Teichert, J.; Justus, M.; Seidel, W.; Ilgner, C.; Awari, N.; Nicoletti, D.; Kaiser, S.; Laplace, Y.; Rajasekaran, S.; Zhang, L.; Winnerl, S.; Schneider, H.; Schay, G.; Lorincz, I.; Rauscher, A. A.; Radu, I.; Mährlein, S.; Kim, T. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kampfrath, T.; Wall, S.; Heberle, J.; Malnasi-Csizmadia, A.; Steiger, A.; Müller, A. S.; Helm, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T.; Michel, P.; Cavalleri, A.; Fisher, A. S.; Stojanovic, N.; Gensch, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort flashes of THz light with low photon energies of a few meV, but strong electric or magnetic field transients have recently been employed to prepare various fascinating nonequilibrium states in matter. Here we present a new class of sources based on superradiant enhancement of radiation from relativistic electron bunches in a compact electron accelerator that we believe will revolutionize experiments in this field. Our prototype source generates high-field THz pulses at unprecedented quasi-continuous-wave repetition rates up to the MHz regime. We demonstrate parameters that exceed state-of-the-art laser-based sources by more than 2 orders of magnitude. The peak fields and the repetition rates are highly scalable and once fully operational this type of sources will routinely provide 1 MV/cm electric fields and 0.3 T magnetic fields at repetition rates of few 100 kHz. We benchmark the unique properties by performing a resonant coherent THz control experiment with few 10 fs resolution. PMID:26924651

  7. Pioneering Structural Solutions for Compact High Field Experiments Developed for the Alcator and the Ignitor Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvetti, M.; Coppi, B.

    2015-11-01

    Recently there has been an increased awareness of the fact that the line of research based on compact high field machines is the most promising to approach ignition conditions in DT burning plasmas and has acquired new perspectives for its applications. Then the technological solutions that have made these machines possible have become subject to new attention and, in some cases, to rediscovery. The Alcator Program and, followed by Ignitor Program, has led to invent the coupled air-core former poloidal field system that has made compact machine possible and has been adopted on all advanced toroidal machines that came after Alcator. A recently rediscovered solution aimed at reducing the mechanical stresses in the inner legs of the toroidal magnet coils is the ``Upper and Lower Bracing Rings'' system that has had a key role in the design of the Ignitor machine and its evolution. Another solution to minimize the machine dimensions while maintaining high toroidal fields, in order to achieve high plasma current densities, is that of ``bucking and wedging'' of the toroidal magnet by coupling it mechanically to the central solenoid. Sponsored in part by the U.S. DoE.

  8. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  9. Short period, high field cryogenic undulator for extreme performance x-ray free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, F. H.; Marcus, G.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Scheer, M.; Bahrdt, J.; Weingartner, R.; Gaupp, A.; Grüner, F.

    2010-07-01

    Short period, high field undulators can enable short wavelength free electron lasers (FELs) at low beam energy, with decreased gain length, thus allowing much more compact and less costly FEL systems. We describe an ongoing initiative to develop such an undulator based on an approach that utilizes novel cryogenic materials. While this effort was begun in the context of extending the photon energy regime of a laser-plasma accelerator based electron source, we consider here implications of its application to sub-fs scenarios in which more conventional injectors are employed. The use of such low-charge, ultrashort beams, which has recently been proposed as a method of obtaining single-spike performance in x-ray FELs, is seen in simulation to give unprecedented beam brightness. This brightness, when considered in tandem with short wavelength, high field undulators, enables extremely high performance FELs. Two examples discussed in this paper illustrate this point well. The first is the use of the SPARX injector at 2.1 GeV with 1 pC of charge to give 8 GW peak power in a single spike at 6.5 Å with a photon beam peak brightness greater than 1035photons/(smm2mrad20.1%BW), which will also reach LCLS wavelengths on the 5th harmonic. The second is the exploitation of the LCLS injector with 0.25 pC, 150 as pulses to lase at 1.5 Å using only 4.5 GeV energy; beyond this possibility, we present start-to-end simulations of lasing at unprecedented short wavelength, 0.15 Å, using 13.65 GeV LCLS design energy.

  10. Diffuse Axonal Injury at Ultra-High Field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Moenninghoff, Christoph; Kraff, Oliver; Maderwald, Stefan; Umutlu, Lale; Theysohn, Jens M.; Ringelstein, Adrian; Wrede, Karsten H.; Deuschl, Cornelius; Altmeppen, Jan; Ladd, Mark E.; Forsting, Michael; Quick, Harald H.; Schlamann, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is a specific type of traumatic brain injury caused by shearing forces leading to widespread tearing of axons and small vessels. Traumatic microbleeds (TMBs) are regarded as a radiological marker for DAI. This study aims to compare DAI-associated TMBs at 3 Tesla (T) and 7 T susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) to evaluate possible diagnostic benefits of ultra-high field (UHF) MRI. Material and Methods 10 study participants (4 male, 6 female, age range 20-74 years) with known DAI were included. All MR exams were performed with a 3 T MR system (Magnetom Skyra) and a 7 T MR research system (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen, Germany) each in combination with a 32-channel-receive coil. The average time interval between trauma and imaging was 22 months. Location and count of TMBs were independently evaluated by two neuroradiologists on 3 T and 7 T SWI images with similar and additionally increased spatial resolution at 7 T. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Count and diameter of TMB were evaluated with Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results Susceptibility weighted imaging revealed a total of 485 TMBs (range 1-190, median 25) at 3 T, 584 TMBs (plus 20%, range 1-262, median 30.5) at 7 T with similar spatial resolution, and 684 TMBs (plus 41%, range 1-288, median 39.5) at 7 T with 10-times higher spatial resolution. Hemorrhagic DAI appeared significantly larger at 7 T compared to 3 T (p = 0.005). Inter- and intraobserver correlation regarding the counted TMB was high and almost equal 3 T and 7 T. Conclusion 7 T SWI improves the depiction of small hemorrhagic DAI compared to 3 T and may be supplementary to lower field strengths for diagnostic in inconclusive or medicolegal cases. PMID:25793614

  11. Magnet Healing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finegold, Leonard

    2000-03-01

    Many people are convinced that static magnets—applied to their skin—will heal ills, and many businesses sell such magnets. The biophysics of such healing was reviewed [1] together with the general biophysics of static fields. Birds and insects do use the earth’s magnetic field for navigation. While insect and frog egg development can clearly be influenced by high fields (7 T and 17 T respectively), there is no experimental evidence that small magnetic fields (of less than 0.5 T) might heal, and much evidence that they cannot heal. A puzzle to the physics community is: How to show laypersons that simple magnets (very probably) do not heal, however attractive that idea might be. [1] L. Finegold, The Physics of "Alternative Medicine": Magnet Therapy, The Scientific Review of Alternative Medicine 3:26-33 (1999).

  12. Image homogenization using pre-emphasis method for high field MRI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Wang, Chunsheng; Yu, Baiying; Vigneron, Daniel; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) field (B1) inhomogeneity due to shortened wavelength at high field is a major cause of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nonuniformity in high dielectric biological samples (e.g., human body). In this work, we propose a method to improve the B1 and MRI homogeneity by using pre-emphasized non-uniform B1 distribution. The intrinsic B1 distribution that could be generated by a RF volume coil, specifically a microstrip transmission line (MTL) coil used in this work, was pre-emphasized in the sample’s periphery region of interest to compensate for the central brightness induced by high frequency interference effect due to shortened wave length. This pre-emphasized non-uniform B1 can be realized by varying the parameters of microstrip elements, such as the substrate thickness of MTL volume coil. Both numerical simulation and phantom MR imaging studies were carried out to investigate the feasibility and merit of the proposed method in achieving homogeneous MR images. The simulation results demonstrate that by using a pre-emphasized B1 distribution generated by the MTL volume coil, relatively uniform B1 distribution and homogeneous MR image (98% homogeneity) within the spherical phantom (15 cm diameter) were achieved with 4.5 mm thickness. The B1 and MRI intensity distributions of a 16-element MTL volume coil with fixed substrate thickness and five varied saline loads were modeled and experimentally tested. Similar results from both simulation and experiments were obtained, suggesting substantial improvements of B1 and MRI homogeneities within the phantom containing 125 mM saline. The overall results demonstrate an efficient B1 shimming approach for improving high field MRI. PMID:24040618

  13. Superconductivity and Critical Current of Iron-Based Superconductors in High Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Although high-temperature superconducting cuprates have been discovered for more than 26 years, high-field applications are still based on low-temperature superconductors (LTS), such as Nb3Sn. The high anisotropies, brittle textures and high manufacturing costs limit the applicability of the cuprates. Recently, we demonstrated that the iron superconductors, without most of the drawbacks of the cuprates, have a superior high-field performance over LTS at 4.2 K [Nat. Commun. 4:1347 (2013); Rep. Prog. Phys. 74 124510 (2011)]. In this presentation, I will discuss recent progress aimed at understanding the relationships between superconductivity, critical current, and nano-scaled structure defects in iron-based superconductors, with emphasis on the properties of superconducting iron chalcogenide films. Critical current densities Jc ~ 107 A/cm2 were observed in FeSe0.5Te0.5 films grown on CeO2 buffered single-crystalline and flexible metal substrates. These films are capable of carrying Jc exceeding 105 A/cm2 under 30 T magnetic fields. Furthermore, we found that these films have significantly higher Tc (>20K) as compared to bulk samples (bulk Tc ~ 15 K) for the entire doping regime of FeSe1-xTex. Structural analysis revealed that these films generally have significantly smaller c-axis and a-axis lattice constant than the bulk value, suggesting that the crystal structure changes have a dominating impact on the superconducting transition in iron-based superconductors. Large Jc enhancement can also be realized in iron based superconductors by irradiation with proton and heavy ions that opens a new avenue for a tailored landscape of effective vortex pinning defects.

  14. Multistage Background Field Removal (MUBAFIRE)-Compensating for B0 Distortions at Ultra-High Field.

    PubMed

    Lindemeyer, Johannes; Oros-Peusquens, Ana-Maria; Shah, N Jon

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of tissue magnetic susceptibility and the resultant magnetic field offers a new avenue for quantitative tissue characterisation by MRI. One crucial step in mining the phase and field data for relevant tissue information is the correction of externally induced field shifts. This article outlines a multistep approach comprising several methodologies for background field removal. The virtues of B0 long-range variation detection and compensation of more localised external disturbances are unified in a sequential filter chain. The algorithm is tested by means of a numerical Monte Carlo simulation model and applied to in vivo measurements at 3T and 9.4T as well as to a fixed brain tissue measurement at 9.4T. Further, a comparison to conventional filter types has been undertaken. PMID:26393515

  15. High field pulsed microwiggler comprising a conductive tube with periodically space slots

    DOEpatents

    Warren, R.W.

    1992-09-01

    A microwiggler assembly produces large magnetic fields for oscillating charged particle beams, particularly electron beams for free electron laser (FEL) application. A tube of electrically conductive material is formed with radial slots axially spaced at the period of the electron beam. The slots have alternate 180[degree] relationships and are formed to a maximum depth of 0.6 to 0.7 times the tube circumference. An optimum slot depth is selected to eliminate magnetic quadrupole fields within the microwiggler as determined from a conventional pulsed wire technique. Suitable slot configurations include single slits, double slits, triple slits, and elliptical slots. An axial electron beam direction is maintained by experimentally placing end slits adjacent entrance and exit portions of the assembly, where the end slit depth is determined by use of the pulsed wire technique outside the tube. 10 figs.

  16. High field pulsed microwiggler comprising a conductive tube with periodically space slots

    DOEpatents

    Warren, Roger W.

    1992-01-01

    A microwiggler assembly produces large magnetic fields for oscillating ched particle beams, particularly electron beams for free electron laser (FEL) application. A tube of electrically conductive material is formed with radial slots axially spaced at the period of the electron beam. The slots have alternate 180.degree. relationships and are formed to a maximum depth of 0.6 to 0.7 times the tube circumference. An optimum slot depth is selected to eliminate magnetic quadrupole fields within the microwiggler as determined from a conventional pulsed wire technique. Suitable slot configurations include single slits, double slits, triple slits, and elliptical slots. An axial electron beam direction is maintained by experimentally placing end slits adjacent entrance and exit portions of the assembly, where the end slit depth is determined by use of the pulsed wire technique outside the tube.

  17. Studies of high-field sections of a muon helical cooling channel with coil separation

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M.L.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) was proposed for 6D cooling of muon beams required for muon collider and some other applications. HCC uses a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets which produce solenoidal field superimposed with transverse helical dipole and helical gradient fields. HCC is usually divided into several sections each with progressively stronger fields, smaller aperture and shorter helix period to achieve the optimal muon cooling rate. This paper presents the design issues of the high field section of HCC with coil separation. The effect of coil spacing on the longitudinal and transverse field components is presented and its impact on the muon cooling discussed. The paper also describes methods for field corrections and their practical limits. The magnetic performance of the helical solenoid with coil separation was discussed in this work. The separation could be done in three different ways and the performances could be very different which is important and should be carefully described during the beam cooling simulations. The design that is currently being considered is the one that has the poorest magnetic performance because it presents ripples in all three components, in particular in the helical gradient which could be quite large. Moreover, the average gradient could be off, which could affect the cooling performance. This work summarized methods to tune the gradient regarding the average value and the ripple. The coil longitudinal thickness and the helix period can be used to tune G. Thinner coils tend to reduce the ripples and also bring G to its target value. However, this technique reduces dramatically the operational margin. Wider coils can also reduce the ripple (not as much as thinner coils) and also tune the gradient to its target value. Longer helix periods reduce ripple and correct the gradient to the target value.

  18. High Field RMF FRC Experiments on STX-HF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreason, Samuel; Slough, John

    2001-10-01

    As part of the effort of the TCS program to explore the physics of RMF generated FRCs, a start-up experiment has been constructed to operate at much higher RMF and axial magnetic fields. It is hoped that with the RMF alone at higher power density , it will be possible to form plasmas with both high density, and high electron and ion temperatures. To this end the STX experiment with its 2 MW RMF supply was reconfigured to drive a smaller plasma volume (rp reduced from 18 to 6 cm). In addition an axially remote plasma source was used to supply plasma in a manner that limits neutral contamination and RMF field penetration issues. With axial fields in the kG range, plasma temperatures and densities in a more fusion relevant regime can be studied. Initial results at low RMF power (60 kW) have produced Te = Ti for the first time (T_tot 25 eV). As a result, both ions and electrons are magnetized (ωτ >> 1). Unlike previous experiments, the plasma is formed with a fully penetrated RMF field, producing a rigid rotor current profile. The plasma resistivity at low RMF power is consistent with classical ( 60 μohm-m). The particle confinement is found to be considerably enhanced by the RMF, with a confinement time several times classical. Results at higher power will be presented as well.

  19. Niobium-germanium superconducting tapes for high-field magnet applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginski, A. I.; Roland, G. W.; Daniel, M. R.; Woolam, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A process of fabricating superconducting Nb3Ge tapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been developed and tapes up to 10 meters long fabricated. The typical properties achieved were: critical temperature T sub c = 20 K, upper critical field H sub c2 = 29 tesla at 4.2 K, and J sub c = 3 to 4 x 10 to the 8th power A m(-2) at 4.2 K, 18 tesla. The relative depression of T sub c and H sub c2 compared with the best thin film samples sputtered on sapphire was due to the presence of Nb5Ge3 second-phase particles used as flux pinning centers and to strains induced by thermal mixmatch with Hastelloy B tape substrates. A peculiar field dependence of flux pinning force that was observed in both CVD and sputtered Nb3Ge indicated a premature pin-breaking mechanism or a phase inhomogeneity. Directions of further optimization work were defined.

  20. Development of Cu-Nb alloy microcomposite conductors for high field pulsed magnets. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pantsyrnyi, V.I.; Shikov, A.K.; Nikulin, A.D.; Belyiakov, N.M.; Potapenko, I.I.; Vorob`ova, A.E.; Silaev, A.G.; Kozlenkova, N.I.; Zinov`ev, V.G.; Drobyshev, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Primary goal is to develop high strength-high conductivity composite wires with enhanced cross section. The following research areas were started: melting, deformation, TEM, SEM, and mechanical/electrical characterization of in-situ Cu-Nb microcomposites. Consumable arc melting using initial composite electrodes produced by cold deformation was chosen for preparing initial ingots of Cu-(16- 18)wt%Nb alloy. The deformation process including extrusion, drawing with intermediate heat treatments, and rolling was analyzed. Structure of Cu-Nb composite was investigated at all stages of its fabrication. Rebundling was successfully used to manufacture conductors with enhanced cross sections. Wire with 3x7mm{sup 2} cross section and 50m length was produced with UTS (20 C) = 1000 MPa and electroconductivity 70% IACS.

  1. Biomechanical factors and physical examination findings in osteoarthritis of the knee: associations with tissue abnormalities assessed by conventional radiography and high-resolution 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to explore the associations between knee osteoarthritis (OA)-related tissue abnormalities assessed by conventional radiography (CR) and by high-resolution 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as biomechanical factors and findings from physical examination in patients with knee OA. Methods This was an explorative cross-sectional study of 105 patients with knee OA. Index knees were imaged using CR and MRI. Multiple features from CR and MRI (cartilage, osteophytes, bone marrow lesions, effusion and synovitis) were related to biomechanical factors (quadriceps and hamstrings muscle strength, proprioceptive accuracy and varus-valgus laxity) and physical examination findings (bony tenderness, crepitus, bony enlargement and palpable warmth), using multivariable regression analyses. Results Quadriceps weakness was associated with cartilage integrity, effusion, synovitis (all detected by MRI) and CR-detected joint space narrowing. Knee joint laxity was associated with MRI-detected cartilage integrity, CR-detected joint space narrowing and osteophyte formation. Multiple tissue abnormalities including cartilage integrity, osteophytes and effusion, but only those detected by MRI, were found to be associated with physical examination findings such as crepitus. Conclusion We observed clinically relevant findings, including a significant association between quadriceps weakness and both effusion and synovitis, detected by MRI. Inflammation was detected in over one-third of the participants, emphasizing the inflammatory component of OA and a possible important role for anti-inflammatory therapies in knee OA. In general, OA-related tissue abnormalities of the knee, even those detected by MRI, were found to be discordant with biomechanical and physical examination features. PMID:23039323

  2. High Field Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR with Surfactant Sheltered Biradicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We illustrate the ability to place a water-insoluble biradical, bTbk, into a glycerol/water matrix with the assistance of a surfactant, sodium octyl sulfate (SOS). This surfactant approach enables a previously water insoluble biradical, bTbk, with favorable electron–electron dipolar coupling to be used for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in frozen, glassy, aqueous media. Nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) experiments are conducted to determine the distribution of urea and several biradicals within the SOS macromolecular assembly. We also demonstrate that SOS assemblies are an effective approach by which mixed biradicals are created through an assembly process. PMID:24506193

  3. Simultaneous EEG-fMRI at ultra-high field: artifact prevention and safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Jorge, João; Grouiller, Frédéric; Ipek, Özlem; Stoermer, Robert; Michel, Christoph M; Figueiredo, Patrícia; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Gruetter, Rolf

    2015-01-15

    The simultaneous recording of scalp electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can provide unique insights into the dynamics of human brain function, and the increased functional sensitivity offered by ultra-high field fMRI opens exciting perspectives for the future of this multimodal approach. However, simultaneous recordings are susceptible to various types of artifacts, many of which scale with magnetic field strength and can seriously compromise both EEG and fMRI data quality in recordings above 3T. The aim of the present study was to implement and characterize an optimized setup for simultaneous EEG-fMRI in humans at 7 T. The effects of EEG cable length and geometry for signal transmission between the cap and amplifiers were assessed in a phantom model, with specific attention to noise contributions from the MR scanner coldheads. Cable shortening (down to 12 cm from cap to amplifiers) and bundling effectively reduced environment noise by up to 84% in average power and 91% in inter-channel power variability. Subject safety was assessed and confirmed via numerical simulations of RF power distribution and temperature measurements on a phantom model, building on the limited existing literature at ultra-high field. MRI data degradation effects due to the EEG system were characterized via B0 and B1(+) field mapping on a human volunteer, demonstrating important, although not prohibitive, B1 disruption effects. With the optimized setup, simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions were performed on 5 healthy volunteers undergoing two visual paradigms: an eyes-open/eyes-closed task, and a visual evoked potential (VEP) paradigm using reversing-checkerboard stimulation. EEG data exhibited clear occipital alpha modulation and average VEPs, respectively, with concomitant BOLD signal changes. On a single-trial level, alpha power variations could be observed with relative confidence on all trials; VEP detection was more limited, although

  4. Interpretation of Conventional Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungjun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    The conventional mass is not a precise physical quantity but useful virtual one in mass metrology. Because the precise level of conventional mass is related to the OIML class, it is necessary to check if the assignment of weight class is under control. The documents of OIML (International Organization of Legal Metrology) D 28 and R 111 describe the limitation of the quantity in real application. In this presentation, we are trying to interpret and review the concept of conventional mass, for example, by estimating buoyancy deviation and maximum permissible error, in weight calibrations in Korea. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  5. Cincinnati; Our Convention City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borchin, Anna

    1970-01-01

    During Easter week, 1971, Cincinnati will be the hostess of the 50th anniversary convention of the Catholic Library Association. Items of historical interest concerning the city are briefly described. (NH)

  6. Structural analysis of sulfated fucans by high-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Mulloy, B; Ribeiro, A C; Vieira, R P; Mourão, P A

    1994-02-01

    The structures of several sulfated polysaccharides isolated from marine organisms have been determined by a combination of degradative and spectroscopic techniques. For two sulphated fucans, one isolated from the sea cucumber L. grisea, and one from the sea urchin L. variegatus, a novel type of polysaccharide structure is proposed based on the analysis of one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Both polysaccharides are linear, 1-->3 linked alpha-L-fucans in which a four-residue repeating unit is defined by specific patterns of sulfation at the 2- and 4-positions. The four residues give rise to spin systems which may be identified by 2-dimensional 1H-1H correlated spectroscopy (COSY), and the sequence of the residues is deduced from inter-residue nuclear Overhauser enhancements which produce cross-peaks in the NOESY spectrum. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first polysaccharides for which a regular repeating unit is defined by the pattern of sulfate substitution alone.

  7. Onset of Superconductivity in YBCO in Very High Fields from ^17O and ^63Cu NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, William

    2000-03-01

    We have used NMR to study the onset of superconductivity in near optimally doped YBCO in fields from 1 to 27 T. We have compared Knight shift(^17O), spin-spin relaxation measurements(^17O), and spin lattice relaxation measurements (^63Cu and ^17O). The measurements have been performed as a function of temperature above and below the transition region. The Knight shift can be measured with considerable precision directly giving the Pauli spin susceptibility. We show that the onset of superconductivity in a magnetic field is really a crossover region from normal state behavior to a vortex liquid for which we determine a H-T phase diagram up to high field. The relaxation measurements show clear evidence for the opening of a pseudo gap near 100 K in the transition region. The different NMR experiments are sensitive to the susceptibility dependence on wave vector from different regions of the Brillouin zone indicating possible origins of such a gap including superconducting fluctuations or a gap in the spin excitation spectrum. Magnetic field dependence of the data allows discrimination. Intercomparison between samples near optimal doping as well as the work from other laboratories will be made. This work was performed in collaboration with V. F. Mitović, H. N. Bachman, E. E. Sigmund, M. Eschrig, J. A. Sauls, A. P. Reyes, P. Kuhns, and W. G. Moulton. Work at Northwestern University is supported by the NSF (DMR 91-20000) through the Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity. The NHMFL is supported through the NSF and the state of Florida.

  8. Wall scanning probe for high-field side plasma measurements on Alcator C-Mod.

    PubMed

    Smick, Noah; LaBombard, Brian

    2009-02-01

    A new, high-field side scanning probe has been added to Alcator C-Mod's complement of edge diagnostics. The wall scanning probe is designed to provide all the benefits of a linear plunge, multielectrode scanning probe while working from the confined space of the inner tokamak wall. The drive mechanism is an embedded coil which produces a torque with the ambient toroidal magnetic field when energized, thus allowing the probe to plunge to different preprogramed depths at different times during a plasma discharge. The probe tip is designed for easy replacement and is presently configured to operate as a modified, high heat-flux "Gundestrup-type" probe with four tungsten electrodes. The probe has demonstrated the ability to obtain cross-field profiles for electron temperature, density, floating potential, and plasma flow information (parallel and perpendicular to B) up to a depth of a few millimiters inside the last-closed flux surface in standard C-Mod discharges. The tungsten-tipped probe has proved very robust and shows little or no damage though it routinely handles surface heat fluxes on the order of 100 MW/m(2) at peak insertion.

  9. Intermediate length scale organisation in tin borophosphate glasses: new insights from high field correlation NMR.

    PubMed

    Tricot, G; Saitoh, A; Takebe, H

    2015-11-28

    The structure of tin borophosphate glasses, considered for the development of low temperature sealing glasses or anode materials for Li-batteries, has been analysed at the intermediate length scale by a combination of high field standard and advanced 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. The nature and extent of B/P mixing were analysed using the (11)B((31)P) dipolar heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence NMR sequence and the data interpretation allowed (i) detecting the presence and analysing the nature of the B-O-P linkages, (ii) re-interpreting the 1D (31)P spectra and (iii) extracting the proportion of P connected to borate species. Interaction between the different borate species was analysed using the (11)B double quantum-simple quantum experiment to (i) investigate the presence and nature of the B-O-B linkage, (ii) assign the different borate species observed all along the composition line and (iii) monitor the borate network formation. In addition, (119)Sn static NMR was used to investigate the evolution of the chemical environment of the tin polyhedra. Altogether, the set of data allowed determining the structural units constituting the glass network and quantifying the extent of B/P mixing. The structural data were then used to explain the non-linear and unusual evolution of the glass transition temperature.

  10. Corneal temperature changes induced by high-field-strength MR imaging with a head coil.

    PubMed

    Shellock, F G; Crues, J V

    1988-06-01

    High-field-strength/high-frequency magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems can cause tissue heating. Since the eye is particularly susceptible to temperature elevations because of its relatively poor blood supply, the authors measured corneal temperatures in 33 patients immediately before and after MR imaging performed with a 1.5-T (64-MHz) imager and a transmit/receive head coil at estimated peak specific absorption rates (SAR) ranging from 2.54 to 3.05 W/kg. There was a statistically (P less than .001) significant increase in the average corneal temperature (32.7 degrees C +/- 0.7 before imaging, 33.2 degrees C +/- 0.5 after). The changes in corneal temperature ranged from 0.0 degrees C to 1.8 degrees C (mean, 0.5 degrees C), and the highest corneal temperature measured after imaging was 34.4 degrees C. In animal models, the eye temperature threshold for radio frequency-induced cataractogenesis is between 41 degrees C and 55 degrees C. The authors conclude that clinical MR imaging with use of a head coil at the SARs studied causes relatively minor increases in corneal temperature that do not appear to pose any thermal hazard to ocular tissue. PMID:3363146

  11. Transport Comparisons between ITER-FEAT and Compact High-Field Tokamak Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Horton, Wendell; Bateman, Glenn; Kritz, Arnold H.; Porcelli, Franco

    2000-10-01

    The next generation magnetic fusion reactors under active consideration are ITER-FEAT and compact high-field (CHF) tokamaks. These represent two rather different concepts for achieving a burning plasma. We use the BALDUR predictive transport code with the MMM99 transport model and the alternative OHE transport model(Aaron J. Redd, et al.,) Phys. Plasmas 5, (1998) 1369. with ITG and new ETG physics. We simulate the proposed reactor designs and compare their fusion performance parameters. ITER-FEAT is a next step large NBI driven reactor with the goal of achieving Q=10 and thus represents a straightforward scaling of our recent study of the transport in JET and DIIID.(P. Zhu, et al.,) Phys. Plasmas 7 (2000) 2898. Comparisons will be made with CHF reactor designs as well as the original ITER design in order to clarify issues identified in the comparison of these machines types. The off-diagonal turbulent particle pinch will be studied as a key issue in the CHF reactor design simulations.

  12. Ultra-high field parallel imaging of the superior parietal lobule during mental maze solving.

    PubMed

    Jerde, Trenton A; Lewis, Scott M; Goerke, Ute; Gourtzelidis, Pavlos; Tzagarakis, Charidimos; Lynch, Joshua; Moeller, Steen; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François; Adriany, Gregor; Trangle, Jeran; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2008-06-01

    We used ultra-high field (7 T) fMRI and parallel imaging to scan the superior parietal lobule (SPL) of human subjects as they mentally traversed a maze path in one of four directions (up, down, left, right). A counterbalanced design for maze presentation and a quasi-isotropic voxel (1.46 x 1.46 x 2 mm thick) collection were implemented. Fifty-one percent of single voxels in the SPL were tuned to the direction of the maze path. Tuned voxels were distributed throughout the SPL, bilaterally. A nearest neighbor analysis revealed a "honeycomb" arrangement such that voxels tuned to a particular direction tended to occur in clusters. Three-dimensional (3D) directional clusters were identified in SPL as oriented centroids traversing the cortical depth. There were 13 same-direction clusters per hemisphere containing 22 voxels per cluster, on the average; the mean nearest-neighbor, same-direction intercluster distance was 9.4 mm. These results provide a much finer detail of the directional tuning in SPL, as compared to those obtained previously at 4 T (Gourtzelidis et al. Exp Brain Res 165:273-282, 2005). The more accurate estimates of quantitative clustering parameters in 3D brain space in this study were made possible by the higher signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios afforded by the higher magnetic field of 7 T as well as the quasi-isotropic design of voxel data collection.

  13. Convents as homes.

    PubMed

    Arias, Enrique Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The present article discusses convents as homes. Resulting from the study of a Gregorian source presently housed at DePaul University's Richardson library, this article probes the complexities and restrictions of convent life in 17th century Spain. The Sanctoral de Visperas (1653) functions as a backdrop for a consideration of how singing chant and attendant rituals enriched the lives of nuns. Also included are references to nuns from this period who were outstanding musicians and poets and whose works have recently received enthusiastic attention. PMID:16556588

  14. Convents as homes.

    PubMed

    Arias, Enrique Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The present article discusses convents as homes. Resulting from the study of a Gregorian source presently housed at DePaul University's Richardson library, this article probes the complexities and restrictions of convent life in 17th century Spain. The Sanctoral de Visperas (1653) functions as a backdrop for a consideration of how singing chant and attendant rituals enriched the lives of nuns. Also included are references to nuns from this period who were outstanding musicians and poets and whose works have recently received enthusiastic attention.

  15. Polarizing agents and mechanisms for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization of frozen dielectric solids.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kan-Nian

    2011-09-01

    This article provides an overview of polarizing mechanisms involved in high-frequency dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of frozen biological samples at temperatures maintained using liquid nitrogen, compatible with contemporary magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Typical DNP experiments require unpaired electrons that are usually exogenous in samples via paramagnetic doping with polarizing agents. Thus, the resulting nuclear polarization mechanism depends on the electron and nuclear spin interactions induced by the paramagnetic species. The Overhauser Effect (OE) DNP, which relies on time-dependent spin-spin interactions, is excluded from our discussion due the lack of conducting electrons in frozen aqueous solutions containing biological entities. DNP of particular interest to us relies primarily on time-independent, spin-spin interactions for significant electron-nucleus polarization transfer through mechanisms such as the Solid Effect (SE), the Cross Effect (CE) or Thermal Mixing (TM), involving one, two or multiple electron spins, respectively. Derived from monomeric radicals initially used in high-field DNP experiments, bi- or multiple-radical polarizing agents facilitate CE/TM to generate significant NMR signal enhancements in dielectric solids at low temperatures (<100 K). For example, large DNP enhancements (∼300 times at 5 T) from a biologically compatible biradical, 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL), have enabled high-resolution MAS NMR in sample systems existing in submicron domains or embedded in larger biomolecular complexes. The scope of this review is focused on recently developed DNP polarizing agents for high-field applications and leads up to future developments per the CE DNP mechanism. Because DNP experiments are feasible with a solid-state microwave source when performed at <20K, nuclear polarization using lower microwave power (<100 mW) is possible by forcing a high proportion of biradicals to

  16. Triple-echo steady-state T2 relaxometry of the human brain at high to ultra-high fields.

    PubMed

    Heule, Rahel; Bär, Peter; Mirkes, Christian; Scheffler, Klaus; Trattnig, Siegfried; Bieri, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative MRI techniques, such as T2 relaxometry, have demonstrated the potential to detect changes in the tissue microstructure of the human brain with higher specificity to the underlying pathology than in conventional morphological imaging. At high to ultra-high field strengths, quantitative MR-based tissue characterization benefits from the higher signal-to-noise ratio traded for either improved resolution or reduced scan time, but is impaired by severe static (B0 ) and transmit (B1 ) field heterogeneities. The objective of this study was to derive a robust relaxometry technique for fast T2 mapping of the human brain at high to ultra-high fields, which is highly insensitive to B0 and B1 field variations. The proposed method relies on a recently presented three-dimensional (3D) triple-echo steady-state (TESS) imaging approach that has proven to be suitable for fast intrinsically B1 -insensitive T2 relaxometry of rigid targets. In this work, 3D TESS imaging is adapted for rapid high- to ultra-high-field two-dimensional (2D) acquisitions. The achieved short scan times of 2D TESS measurements reduce motion sensitivity and make TESS-based T2 quantification feasible in the brain. After validation in vitro and in vivo at 3 T, T2 maps of the human brain were obtained at 7 and 9.4 T. Excellent agreement between TESS-based T2 measurements and reference single-echo spin-echo data was found in vitro and in vivo at 3 T, and T2 relaxometry based on TESS imaging was proven to be feasible and reliable in the human brain at 7 and 9.4 T. Although prominent B0 and B1 field variations occur at ultra-high fields, the T2 maps obtained show no B0 - or B1 -related degradations. In conclusion, as a result of the observed robustness, TESS T2 may emerge as a valuable measure for the early diagnosis and progression monitoring of brain diseases in high-resolution 2D acquisitions at high to ultra-high fields.

  17. Convention Problems - 1787.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Deroy L.

    Designed to motivate eighth-grade civics students in the study of the United States Constitution, this game is intended to simulate the basic problems faced by the delegates to the Philadelphia Convention of 1787. The four parts of the game introduce the governmental concepts of the bicameral legislature, the executive branch, the judicial branch,…

  18. A variable torque motor compatible with magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeck, W. W.; Ha, S.-H.; Farmaka, S.; Nalcioglu, O.

    2009-04-01

    High magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) do not allow the employment of conventional motors due to various incompatibility issues. This paper reports on a new motor that can operate in or near high field magnets used for MRI. The motor was designed to be operational with the MRI equipment and could be used in a rotating imaging gantry inside the magnet designed for dual modality imaging. Furthermore, it could also be used for image guided robotic interventional procedures inside a MRI system if so desired. The prototype motor was developed using magnetic resonance (MR) compatible materials, and its functionality with MR imaging was evaluated experimentally by measuring the performance of the motor and its effect on the MR image quality. Since in our application, namely, single photon emission tomography, the motor has to perform precise stepping of the gantry in small angular steps the most important parameter is the start-up torque. The experimental results showed that the motor has a start-up torque up to 1.37 Nm and rotates at 196 rpm when a constant voltage difference of 12 V is applied at a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The MR image quality was quantified by measuring the signal-to-noise of images acquired under different conditions. The results presented here indicate that the motor is MR compatible and could be used for rotating an imaging gantry or a surgical device inside the magnet.

  19. Ultrasensitive magnetometry and magnetic resonance imaging using cantilever detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugar, Daniel

    2009-03-01

    Micromachined cantilevers make remarkable magnetometers for nanoscale measurements of magnetic materials and for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We present various applications of cantilever magnetometry at low temperature using cantilevers capable of attonewton force sensitivity. Small, unexpected magnetic effects can be seen, such as anomalous damping in magnetic field. A key application is magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) of both electron and nuclear spins. In recent experiments with MRFM-based NMR imaging, 3D spatial resolution better than 10 nm was achieved for protons in individual virus particles. The achieved volumetric resolution represents an improvement of 100 million compared to the best conventional MRI. The microscope is sensitive enough to detect NMR signals from adsorbed layers of hydrocarbon contamination, hydrogen in multiwall carbon nanotubes and the phosphorus in DNA. Operating with a force noise on the order of 6 aN per root hertz with a magnetic tip that produces a field gradient in excess of 30 gauss per nanometer, the magnetic moment sensitivity is ˜0.2 Bohr magnetons. The corresponding field sensitivity is ˜3 nT per root hertz. To our knowledge, this combination of high field sensitivity and nanometer spatial resolution is unsurpassed by any other form of nanometer-scale magnetometry.

  20. A variable torque motor compatible with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Roeck, W W; Ha, S-H; Farmaka, S; Nalcioglu, O

    2009-04-01

    High magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) do not allow the employment of conventional motors due to various incompatibility issues. This paper reports on a new motor that can operate in or near high field magnets used for MRI. The motor was designed to be operational with the MRI equipment and could be used in a rotating imaging gantry inside the magnet designed for dual modality imaging. Furthermore, it could also be used for image guided robotic interventional procedures inside a MRI system if so desired. The prototype motor was developed using magnetic resonance (MR) compatible materials, and its functionality with MR imaging was evaluated experimentally by measuring the performance of the motor and its effect on the MR image quality. Since in our application, namely, single photon emission tomography, the motor has to perform precise stepping of the gantry in small angular steps the most important parameter is the start-up torque. The experimental results showed that the motor has a start-up torque up to 1.37 Nm and rotates at 196 rpm when a constant voltage difference of 12 V is applied at a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The MR image quality was quantified by measuring the signal-to-noise of images acquired under different conditions. The results presented here indicate that the motor is MR compatible and could be used for rotating an imaging gantry or a surgical device inside the magnet.

  1. [Neonatal conventional ventilation guidelines].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory pathology is a frequent problem in Neonatal Intensive Care Units; the last few years, our knowledge about its management has improved enormously. Conventional Ventilatory support is a high-specialized technique that maintains a correct alveolar gas exchange while the primary aetiology is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory failure improves. The aim of this document is to present some clinical guidelines for every professional working with newborns who have respiratory pathology

  2. Laparoscopic versus conventional appendectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Vallina, V L; Velasco, J M; McCulloch, C S

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to prospectively define the impact of laparoscopy on the management of patients with a presumed diagnosis of appendicitis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: While the role of laparoscopy in the management of cholelithiasis is well established, its impact on the management of acute appendicitis needs to be objectively defined and compared to that of conventional management. Several authors have predicted that laparoscopic appendectomy will become the preferred treatment for appendicitis. METHODS: Two groups of consecutive patients with similar clinical characteristics of acute appendicitis were compared. Data on the laparoscopic group were compiled prospectively on standardized forms; data on the conventional group were collected retrospectively. Operative time, hospital stay, analgesia, cost, and return to normal activities were noted. RESULTS: Seventeen consecutive patients who underwent appendectomy were compared to 18 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopy (16 of these 18 had laparoscopic appendectomy). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of clinical characteristics and appendiceal histopathology. The mean operative times were 61 +/- 4.1 minutes and 46 +/- 2.9 minutes for the laparoscopy and conventional groups, respectively (p < 0.01). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in the laparoscopic appendectomy group, with 81% of patients being discharged on their first postoperative day (p < 0.001). The laparoscopic appendectomy patients required significantly less narcotic analgesia (p < 0.02). Return to normal activity was not significantly different between the two groups. The average total cost of laparoscopic appendectomy was 30% greater than that of conventional appendectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopy is a useful adjunct to the management of patients with a presumed clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis. PMID:8239785

  3. Integration of ultra-high field MRI and histology for connectome based research of brain disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shan; Yang, Zhengyi; Fischer, Karin; Zhong, Kai; Stadler, Jörg; Godenschweger, Frank; Steiner, Johann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bogerts, Bernhard; Mawrin, Christian; Reutens, David C.; Speck, Oliver; Walter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became increasingly relevant for in vivo neuroscientific research because of improved spatial resolutions. However, this is still the unchallenged domain of histological studies, which long played an important role in the investigation of neuropsychiatric disorders. While the field of biological psychiatry strongly advanced on macroscopic levels, current developments are rediscovering the richness of immunohistological information when attempting a multi-level systematic approach to brain function and dysfunction. For most studies, histology sections lost information on three-dimensional reconstructions. Translating histological sections to 3D-volumes would thus not only allow for multi-stain and multi-subject alignment in post mortem data, but also provide a crucial step in big data initiatives involving the network analyses currently performed with in vivo MRI. We therefore investigated potential pitfalls during integration of MR and histological information where no additional blockface information is available. We demonstrated that strengths and requirements from both methods can be effectively combined at a spatial resolution of 200 μm. However, the success of this approach is heavily dependent on choices of hardware, sequence and reconstruction. We provide a fully automated pipeline that optimizes histological 3D reconstructions, providing a potentially powerful solution not only for primary human post mortem research institutions in neuropsychiatric research, but also to help alleviate the massive workloads in neuroanatomical atlas initiatives. We further demonstrate (for the first time) the feasibility and quality of ultra-high spatial resolution (150 μm isotopic) imaging of the entire human brain MRI at 7T, offering new opportunities for analyses on MR-derived information. PMID:24098272

  4. Early knee changes in dancers identified by ultra-high-field 7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Chang, G; Diamond, M; Nevsky, G; Regatte, R R; Weiss, D S

    2014-08-01

    We aimed to determine whether a unique, ultra-high-field 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner could detect occult cartilage and meniscal injuries in asymptomatic female dancers. This study had Institutional Review Board approval. We recruited eight pre-professional female dancers and nine non-athletic, female controls. We scanned the dominant knee on a 7 T MRI scanner using a three-dimensional fast low-angle shot sequence and a proton density, fast spin-echo sequence to evaluate cartilage and menisci, respectively. Two radiologists scored cartilage (International Cartilage Repair Society classification) and meniscal (Stoller classification) lesions. We applied two-tailed z- and t-tests to determine statistical significance. There were no cartilage lesions in dancers or controls. For the medial meniscus, the dancers demonstrated higher mean MRI score (2.38 ± 0.61 vs 1.0 ± 0.97, P < 0.0001) and higher frequency of mean grade 2 lesions (88% vs 11%, P < 0.01) compared with the controls. For the lateral meniscus, there was no difference in score (0.5 ± 0.81 vs 0.5 ± 0.78, P = 0.78) in dancers compared with the control groups. Asymptomatic dancers demonstrate occult medial meniscal lesions. Because this has been described in early osteoarthritis, close surveillance of dancers' knee symptoms and function with appropriate activity modification may help maintain their long-term knee health.

  5. High-Field Functional Imaging of Pitch Processing in Auditory Cortex of the Cat.

    PubMed

    Butler, Blake E; Hall, Amee J; Lomber, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    The perception of pitch is a widely studied and hotly debated topic in human hearing. Many of these studies combine functional imaging techniques with stimuli designed to disambiguate the percept of pitch from frequency information present in the stimulus. While useful in identifying potential "pitch centres" in cortex, the existence of truly pitch-responsive neurons requires single neuron-level measures that can only be undertaken in animal models. While a number of animals have been shown to be sensitive to pitch, few studies have addressed the location of cortical generators of pitch percepts in non-human models. The current study uses high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the feline brain in an attempt to identify regions of cortex that show increased activity in response to pitch-evoking stimuli. Cats were presented with iterated rippled noise (IRN) stimuli, narrowband noise stimuli with the same spectral profile but no perceivable pitch, and a processed IRN stimulus in which phase components were randomized to preserve slowly changing modulations in the absence of pitch (IRNo). Pitch-related activity was not observed to occur in either primary auditory cortex (A1) or the anterior auditory field (AAF) which comprise the core auditory cortex in cats. Rather, cortical areas surrounding the posterior ectosylvian sulcus responded preferentially to the IRN stimulus when compared to narrowband noise, with group analyses revealing bilateral activity centred in the posterior auditory field (PAF). This study demonstrates that fMRI is useful for identifying pitch-related processing in cat cortex, and identifies cortical areas that warrant further investigation. Moreover, we have taken the first steps in identifying a useful animal model for the study of pitch perception. PMID:26225563

  6. Parametric Investigations of Non-Conventional Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2001-01-12

    Hall thrusters might better scale to low power with non-conventional geometry. A 9 cm cylindrical, ceramic-channel, Hall thruster with a cusp-type magnetic field distribution has been investigated. It exhibits discharge characteristics similar to conventional coaxial Hall thrusters, but does not expose as much channel surface. Significantly, its operation is not accompanied by large amplitude discharge low frequency oscillations.

  7. Disappearance of Ising nature in Ca3ZnMnO6 studied by high-field ESR.

    PubMed

    Ruan, M Y; Ouyang, Z W; Guo, Y M; Cheng, J J; Sun, Y C; Xia, Z C; Rao, G H; Okubo, S; Ohta, H

    2014-06-11

    High-field electron spin resonance measurements of an antiferromagnet Ca3ZnMnO6 isostructure, with the Ising-chain multiferroic Ca3CoMnO6, have been carried out. Two distinct resonance modes were observed below TN = 25 K, which is well explained by conventional antiferromagnetic resonance theory with easy-plane anisotropy. The zero-field spin gap is derived to be about 166 GHz, originating from the easy-plane anisotropy and exchange interaction. Our result suggests that the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction, which may induce spin canting, is absent. Disappearance of Ising anisotropy in Ca3ZnMnO6 suggests that the Co(4+) ion, as well as the Co-Mn superexchange, plays an important role for the Ising nature in Ca3CoMnO6. PMID:24828049

  8. Electromagnetic modeling of REBCO high field coils by the H-formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jing; Bai, Hongyu; Lu, Jun; Gavrilin, Andrew V.; Zhou, Youhe; Weijers, Hubertus W.

    2015-12-01

    electromagnetic behavior and ac losses in REBCO high field coils. It also provides a basis to analyze the mechanical characteristics in the coils in the future.

  9. Toward increased concentration sensitivity for continuous wave EPR investigations of spin-labeled biological macromolecules at high fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Likai; Liu, Zhanglong; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Esquiaqui, Jackie M.; Hunter, Robert I.; Hill, Stephen; Smith, Graham M.; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2016-04-01

    High-field, high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at W-(∼94 GHz) and D-band (∼140 GHz) is important for investigating the conformational dynamics of flexible biological macromolecules because this frequency range has increased spectral sensitivity to nitroxide motion over the 100 ps to 2 ns regime. However, low concentration sensitivity remains a roadblock for studying aqueous samples at high magnetic fields. Here, we examine the sensitivity of a non-resonant thin-layer cylindrical sample holder, coupled to a quasi-optical induction-mode W-band EPR spectrometer (HiPER), for continuous wave (CW) EPR analyses of: (i) the aqueous nitroxide standard, TEMPO; (ii) the unstructured to α-helical transition of a model IDP protein; and (iii) the base-stacking transition in a kink-turn motif of a large 232 nt RNA. For sample volumes of ∼50 μL, concentration sensitivities of 2-20 μM were achieved, representing a ∼10-fold enhancement compared to a cylindrical TE011 resonator on a commercial Bruker W-band spectrometer. These results therefore highlight the sensitivity of the thin-layer sample holders employed in HiPER for spin-labeling studies of biological macromolecules at high fields, where applications can extend to other systems that are facilitated by the modest sample volumes and ease of sample loading and geometry.

  10. Toward increased concentration sensitivity for continuous wave EPR investigations of spin-labeled biological macromolecules at high fields.

    PubMed

    Song, Likai; Liu, Zhanglong; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Esquiaqui, Jackie M; Hunter, Robert I; Hill, Stephen; Smith, Graham M; Fanucci, Gail E

    2016-04-01

    High-field, high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at W-(∼94 GHz) and D-band (∼140 GHz) is important for investigating the conformational dynamics of flexible biological macromolecules because this frequency range has increased spectral sensitivity to nitroxide motion over the 100 ps to 2 ns regime. However, low concentration sensitivity remains a roadblock for studying aqueous samples at high magnetic fields. Here, we examine the sensitivity of a non-resonant thin-layer cylindrical sample holder, coupled to a quasi-optical induction-mode W-band EPR spectrometer (HiPER), for continuous wave (CW) EPR analyses of: (i) the aqueous nitroxide standard, TEMPO; (ii) the unstructured to α-helical transition of a model IDP protein; and (iii) the base-stacking transition in a kink-turn motif of a large 232 nt RNA. For sample volumes of ∼50 μL, concentration sensitivities of 2-20 μM were achieved, representing a ∼10-fold enhancement compared to a cylindrical TE011 resonator on a commercial Bruker W-band spectrometer. These results therefore highlight the sensitivity of the thin-layer sample holders employed in HiPER for spin-labeling studies of biological macromolecules at high fields, where applications can extend to other systems that are facilitated by the modest sample volumes and ease of sample loading and geometry.

  11. Noninvasive quantitative mapping of conductivity and dielectric distributions using RF wave propagation effects in high-field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Han

    2003-06-01

    In this paper I show with phantom and animal experiments a non-invasive and quantitative method for measuring the conductivity and dielectric distributions based on high field magnetic resonance imaging. High field MRI is accompanied by significant RF wave propagation effects. They are observed as phase and magnitude variations of the image that cannot be removed by optimizing the static field homogeneity, or by improving the RF coils. These variations reflect the RF field distribution in the sample, and in fact obey a modified Helmholtz equation. By mapping both the phase and magnitude of the field with MRI techniques, both the conductivity and the dielectric constant are determined non-invasively. In phantom experiments at 1.5 tesla, conductivity values were measured at 4 mm resolution to 0.5 S/m accuracy. At 4.7 tesla, the accuracy was improved to 0.2 S/m, and the dielectric constant was measured to an accuracy of 5 (relative to vacuum) for 2cm regions.

  12. Size-dependent nonlinear weak-field magnetic behavior of maghemite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    de Montferrand, Caroline; Lalatonne, Yoann; Bonnin, Dominique; Lièvre, Nicole; Lecouvey, Marc; Monod, Philippe; Russier, Vincent; Motte, Laurence

    2012-06-25

    The magnetic behavior at room temperature of maghemite nanoparticles of variable sizes (from 7 to 20 nm) is compared using a conventional super quantum interference device (SQUID) and a recently patented technology, called MIAplex. The SQUID usually measures the magnetic response versus an applied magnetic field in a quasi-static mode until high field values (from -4000 to 4000 kA m(-1)) to determine the field-dependence and saturation magnetization of the sample. The MIAplex is a handheld portable device that measures a signal corresponding to the second derivative of the magnetization around zero field (between -15 and 15 kA m(-1)). In this paper, the magnetic response of the size series is correlated, both in diluted and powder form, between the SQUID and MIAplex. The SQUID curves are measured at room temperature in two magnetic field ranges from -4000 to 4000 kA m(-1) (-5T to 5T) and from -15 to 15 kA m(-1). Nonlinear behavior at weak fields is highlighted and the magnetic curves for diluted solutions evolve from quasi-paramagnetic to superparamagnetic behavior when the size of the nanoparticles increases. For the 7-nm sample, the fit of the magnetization with the Langevin model weighted with log-normal distribution corresponds closely to the magnetic size. This confirms the accuracy of the model of non-interacting superparamagnetic particles with a magnetically frustrated surface layer of about 0.5 nm thickness. For the other samples (10-nm to 21-nm), the experimental weak-field magnetization curves are modeled by more than one population of magnetically responding species. This behavior is consistent with a chemically uniform but magnetically distinct structure composed of a core and a magnetically active nanoparticle canted shell. Accordingly the weak-field signature corresponds to the total assembly of the nanoparticles. The impact of size polydispersity is also discussed.

  13. Electron localization effects on the low-temperature high-field magnetoresistivity of three-dimensional amorphous superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, A. V.; Yeh, N.-C.; Tsuei, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    The electrical resistivity ρ of three-dimensional amorphous superconducting films a-Mo3Si and a-Nb3Ge is measured in magnetic fields μ0H up to 30 T. At low temperatures and at magnetic fields above the upper critical field Hc2, ρ is temperature independent and decreases as a function of magnetic field. This field dependence is consistent with localization theory in the high-field limit [μ0H>>ħ/(4eL2φ), where Lφ is the phase-coherence length]. Above the superconducting transition temperature Tc, the temperature dependence of the conductivity is consistent with inelastic scattering processes which are destructive to the phase coherence for electron localization, thereby allowing estimates for Lφ(T). The Hall effect data on a-Mo3Si, in conjunction with the resistivity data, allow the determination of the carrier concentration and mean free path. The upper critical field is comparable to (in a-Mo3Si) and significantly larger than (in a-Nb3Ge) the Clogston-Chandrasekhar paramagnetic limit. This phenomenon is discussed in the context of electron localization.

  14. Proximity superconductivity in ballistic graphene at high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prance, J. R.; Ben Shalom, M.; Zhu, M. J.; Fal'Ko, V. I.; Mishchenko, A.; Kretinin, A. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Woods, C. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Geim, A. K.

    We present measurements of the superconducting proximity effect in graphene-based Josephson junctions with a mean free path of several microns, which exceeds the junctions' length. The junctions exhibit low contact resistance and large supercurrents. We observe Fabry-Pérot oscillations in the normal-state resistance and the critical current of the junctions. The proximity effect is mostly suppressed in magnetic fields of <10 mT showing the conventional Fraunhofer interference pattern; however, unexpectedly, a weak proximity effect survives in magnetic fields as high as 1 T. Superconducting states randomly appear and disappear as a function of field and carrier concentration, and each exhibits a supercurrent carrying capacity close to the universal limit of e Δ/h where Δ is the superconducting gap of the contacts. We attribute the high-field supercurrent to mesoscopic Andreev states that persist near graphene edges. Our work reveals new proximity regimes that can be controlled by quantum confinement and cyclotron motion.

  15. Microstructural understanding and critical current optimization of advanced high field superconductors. Progress report, February 1, 1991--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bonney, L.A.; Willis, T.C.; Larbalestier, D.C.

    1993-04-01

    It is of great importance to improve critical current density, J{sub c} in A15 superconductors for high field magnet applications. Most current work to improve J{sub c} in A15 wires concentrates on increasing the overall J{sub c} by increasing the fraction of superconducting phase in the wire, by improving the uniformity of the superconductor cross section along the length of the wire and by adjusting the strainstate of the A15 layer. The goal of the A15 work in this group was to investigate the intrinsic J{sub c} of the A15 layer itself. To do this, a better understanding of factors controlling the intrinsic J{sub c}of the Nb{sub 3}Sn was pursued.

  16. Measurement of untruncated nuclear spin interactions via zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, J. W.; Sjolander, T. F.; King, J. P.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Levine, E. H.; Bajaj, V. S.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zero- to ultralow-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from the effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the coupling averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial alignment, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero- to ultralow-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-13C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This permits the investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin J coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole coupling Hamiltonian that are invisible in conventional high-field NMR. This technique expands the capabilities of zero- to ultralow-field NMR and has potential applications in precision measurement of subtle physical interactions, chemical analysis, and characterization of local mesoscale structure in materials.

  17. Modeling the high-field section of a muon helical cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A.V.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, M.J.; Lombardo, V.; Lopes, M.L.; Yu, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S.A.; Turenne, M.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design and parameters of a short model of a high-field helical solenoid for muon beam cooling. Structural materials choices, fabrication techniques and first test results are discussed.

  18. Magnetic-resonance imaging of the human brain with an atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Savukov, I; Karaulanov, T

    2013-07-22

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is conventionally performed in very high fields, and this leads to some restrictions in applications. To remove such restrictions, the ultra-low field MRI approach has been proposed. Because of the loss of sensitivity, the detection methods based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a shielded room were used. Atomic magnetometers have similar sensitivity as SQUIDs and can also be used for MRI, but there are some technical difficulties to overcome. We demonstrate that MRI of the human brain can be obtained with an atomic magnetometer with in-plane resolution of 3 mm in 13 min.

  19. Magnetic-resonance imaging of the human brain with an atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savukov, I.; Karaulanov, T.

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is conventionally performed in very high fields, and this leads to some restrictions in applications. To remove such restrictions, the ultra-low field MRI approach has been proposed. Because of the loss of sensitivity, the detection methods based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) in a shielded room were used. Atomic magnetometers have similar sensitivity as SQUIDs and can also be used for MRI, but there are some technical difficulties to overcome. We demonstrate that MRI of the human brain can be obtained with an atomic magnetometer with in-plane resolution of 3 mm in 13 min.

  20. Magnetic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Ferrofluidics Corporation's recent innovation is a spindle for rotating computer discs that supports the disc's rotating shaft on a film of magnetic fluid instead of conventional ball bearings. According to its developers, the spindle offers greatly increased rotational stability, meaning substantially reduced vibration and mechanical noise, and non- repeatable runout. This allows disc drives to store two to 10 times more information.

  1. Permanent magnet design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leupold, Herbert A.

    1991-01-01

    Design techniques developed for the exploitation of high energy magnetically rigid materials such as Sm-Co and Nd-Fe-B have resulted in a revolution in kind rather than in degree in the design of a variety of electron guidance structures for ballistic and aerospace applications. Salient examples are listed. Several prototype models were developed. These structures are discussed in some detail: permanent magnet solenoids, transverse field sources, periodic structures, and very high field structures.

  2. GPU-accelerated FDTD modeling of radio-frequency field-tissue interactions in high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Chi, Jieru; Liu, Feng; Weber, Ewald; Li, Yu; Crozier, Stuart

    2011-06-01

    The analysis of high-field RF field-tissue interactions requires high-performance finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computing. Conventional CPU-based FDTD calculations offer limited computing performance in a PC environment. This study presents a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel-computing framework, producing substantially boosted computing efficiency (with a two-order speedup factor) at a PC-level cost. Specific details of implementing the FDTD method on a GPU architecture have been presented and the new computational strategy has been successfully applied to the design of a novel 8-element transceive RF coil system at 9.4 T. Facilitated by the powerful GPU-FDTD computing, the new RF coil array offers optimized fields (averaging 25% improvement in sensitivity, and 20% reduction in loop coupling compared with conventional array structures of the same size) for small animal imaging with a robust RF configuration. The GPU-enabled acceleration paves the way for FDTD to be applied for both detailed forward modeling and inverse design of MRI coils, which were previously impractical.

  3. Conventional mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joseph D.

    2010-01-01

    The provision of mechanical ventilation for the support of infants and children with respiratory failure or insufficiency is one of the most common techniques that are performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). Despite its widespread application in the PICUs of the 21st century, before the 1930s, respiratory failure was uniformly fatal due to the lack of equipment and techniques for airway management and ventilatory support. The operating rooms of the 1950s and 1960s provided the arena for the development of the manual skills and the refinement of the equipment needed for airway management, which subsequently led to the more widespread use of endotracheal intubation thereby ushering in the era of positive pressure ventilation. Although there seems to be an ever increasing complexity in the techniques of mechanical ventilation, its successful use in the PICU should be guided by the basic principles of gas exchange and the physiology of respiratory function. With an understanding of these key concepts and the use of basic concepts of mechanical ventilation, this technique can be successfully applied in both the PICU and the operating room. This article reviews the basic physiology of gas exchange, principles of pulmonary physiology, and the concepts of mechanical ventilation to provide an overview of the knowledge required for the provision of conventional mechanical ventilation in various clinical arenas. PMID:20927268

  4. High field side launch of RF waves: A new approach to reactor actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Faust, I. C.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lin, Y.; Mumgaard, R. T.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Vieira, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Wukitch, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Launching radio frequency (RF) waves from the high field side (HFS) of a tokamak offers significant advantages over low field side (LFS) launch with respect to both wave physics and plasma material interactions (PMI). For lower hybrid (LH) waves, the higher magnetic field opens the window between wave accessibility (n∥≡c k∥/ω >√{1 -ωpi 2/ω2+ωpe 2/ωce 2 }+ωp e/|ωc e| ) and the condition for strong electron Landau damping (n∥˜√{30 /Te } with Te in keV), allowing LH waves from the HFS to penetrate into the core of a burning plasma, while waves launched from the LFS are restricted to the periphery of the plasma. The lower n∥ of waves absorbed at higher Te yields a higher current drive efficiency as well. In the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), HFS launch allows for direct access to the mode conversion layer where mode converted waves absorb strongly on thermal electrons and ions, thus avoiding the generation of energetic minority ion tails. The absence of turbulent heat and particle fluxes on the HFS, particularly in double null configuration, makes it the ideal location to minimize PMI damage to the antenna structure. The quiescent SOL also eliminates the need to couple LH waves across a long distance to the separatrix, as the antenna can be located close to plasma without risking damage to the structure. Improved impurity screening on the HFS will help eliminate the long-standing issues of high Z impurity accumulation with ICRF. Looking toward a fusion reactor, the HFS is the only possible location for a plasma-facing RF antenna that will survive long-term. By integrating the antenna into the blanket module it is possible to improve the tritium breeding ratio compared with an antenna occupying an equatorial port plug. Blanket modules will require remote handling of numerous cooling pipes and electrical connections, and the addition of transmission lines will not substantially increase the level of complexity. The obvious engineering

  5. Frustrated magnets in high magnetic fields—selected examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnitza, J.; Zvyagin, S. A.; Zherlitsyn, S.

    2016-07-01

    An indispensable parameter to study strongly correlated electron systems is the magnetic field. Application of high magnetic fields allows the investigation, modification and control of different states of matter. Specifically for magnetic materials experimental tools applied in such fields are essential for understanding their fundamental properties. Here, we focus on selected high-field studies of frustrated magnetic materials that have been shown to host a broad range of fascinating new and exotic phases. We will give brief insights into the influence of geometrical frustration on the critical behavior of triangular-lattice antiferromagnets, the accurate determination of exchange constants in the high-field saturated state by use of electron spin resonance measurements, and the coupling of magnetic degrees of freedom to the lattice evidenced by ultrasound experiments. The latter technique as well allowed new, partially metastable phases in strong magnetic fields to be revealed.

  6. Frustrated magnets in high magnetic fields-selected examples.

    PubMed

    Wosnitza, J; Zvyagin, S A; Zherlitsyn, S

    2016-07-01

    An indispensable parameter to study strongly correlated electron systems is the magnetic field. Application of high magnetic fields allows the investigation, modification and control of different states of matter. Specifically for magnetic materials experimental tools applied in such fields are essential for understanding their fundamental properties. Here, we focus on selected high-field studies of frustrated magnetic materials that have been shown to host a broad range of fascinating new and exotic phases. We will give brief insights into the influence of geometrical frustration on the critical behavior of triangular-lattice antiferromagnets, the accurate determination of exchange constants in the high-field saturated state by use of electron spin resonance measurements, and the coupling of magnetic degrees of freedom to the lattice evidenced by ultrasound experiments. The latter technique as well allowed new, partially metastable phases in strong magnetic fields to be revealed. PMID:27310818

  7. ESD and the Rio Conventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarabhai, Kartikeya V.; Ravindranath, Shailaja; Schwarz, Rixa; Vyas, Purvi

    2012-01-01

    Chapter 36 of Agenda 21, a key document of the 1992 Earth Summit, emphasised reorienting education towards sustainable development. While two of the Rio conventions, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), developed communication, education and public awareness (CEPA)…

  8. COMMON COIL MAGNET PROGRAM AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA, R.; ANERELLA, M.; COZZOLINO, J.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; GHOSH, A.; HARRISON, M.; MORGAN, G.; MURATORE, J.; PARKER, B.; SAMPSON, W.; WANDERER, P.

    2000-09-17

    The goal of the common coil magnet R&D program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is to develop a 12.5 T, 40 mm aperture dipole magnet using ''React and Wind Technology'' with High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) playing a major role. Due to its ''conductor friendly'' nature, the common coil design is attractive for building high field 2-in-1 dipoles with brittle materials such as HTS and Nb{sub 3}Sn. At the current rate of development, it is expected that a sufficient amount of HTS with the required performance would be available in a few years for building a short magnet. In the interim, the first generation dipoles will be built with Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor. They will use a ''React and Wind'' technology similar to that used in HTS and will produce a 12.5 T central field in a 40 mm aperture. The Nb{sub 3}Sn coils and support structure of this magnet will become a part of the next generation hybrid magnet with inner coils made of HTS. To develop various aspects of the technology in a scientific and experimental manner, a 10-turn coil program has been started in parallel. The program allows a number of concepts to be evaluated with a rapid throughput in a cost-effective way. Three 10-turn Nb{sub 3}Sn coils have been built and one HTS coil is under construction. The initial test results of this ''React & Wind'' 10-turn coil program are presented. It is also shown that a common coil magnet design can produce a field quality that is as good as a conventional cosine theta design.

  9. Zero and Ultra-Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Via Optical Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, John Woodland

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is among the most powerful analytical tools available to the chemical and biological sciences for chemical detection, characterization, and structure elucidation. NMR experiments are usually performed in large magnetic fields in order to maximize sensitivity and increase chemical shift resolution. However, the high magnetic fields required for conventional NMR necessitate large, immobile, and expensive superconducting magnets, limiting the use of the technique. New hyperpolarization and non-inductive detection methods have recently allowed for NMR measurements in the inverse regime of extremely low magnetic fields. Whereas a substantial body of research has been conducted in the high-field regime, taking advantage of the efficient coherent control afforded by a spectroscopy dominated by coupling to the spectrometer, the zero- and ultra-low-field (ZULF) regime has remained mostly unexplored. In this dissertation, we investigate the applicability of ZULF-NMR as a novel spectroscopic technique complimentary to high-field NMR. In particular, we consider various aspects of the ZULF-NMR experiment and the dynamics of nuclear spins under various local spin coupling Hamiltonians. We first survey zero-field NMR experiments on systems dominated by the electron-mediated indirect spin-spin coupling (J-coupling). The resulting J-spectra permit precision measurement of chemically relevant information due to the exquisite sensitivity of J-couplings to subtle changes in molecular geometry and electronic structure. We also consider the effects of weak magnetic fields and residual dipolar couplings in anisotropic media, which encode information about nuclear magnetic moments and geometry, and further resolve topological ambiguities by lifting degeneracies. By extending the understanding of the interactions that contribute to ZULF-NMR spectra, this work represents a significant advancement towards a complete description of zero- and ultra

  10. Alpha channeling with high-field launch of lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, I. E.; Bertelli, N.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-15

    Although lower hybrid waves are effective at driving currents in present-day tokamaks, they are expected to interact strongly with high-energy particles in extrapolating to reactors. In the presence of a radial alpha particle birth gradient, this interaction can take the form of wave amplification rather than damping. While it is known that this amplification more easily occurs when launching from the tokamak high-field side, the extent of this amplification has not been made quantitative. Here, by tracing rays launched from the high-field-side of a tokamak, the required radial gradients to achieve amplification are calculated for a temperature and density regime consistent with a hot-ion-mode fusion reactor. These simulations, while valid only in the linear regime of wave amplification, nonetheless illustrate the possibilities for wave amplification using high-field launch of the lower hybrid wave.

  11. Alpha channeling with high-field launch of lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, I. E.; Bertelli, N.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-04

    Although lower hybrid waves are effective at driving currents in present-day tokamaks, they are expected to interact strongly with high-energy particles in extrapolating to reactors. In the presence of a radial alpha particle birth gradient, this interaction can take the form of wave amplification rather than damping. While it is known that this amplification more easily occurs when launching from the tokamak high-field side, the extent of this amplification has not been made quantitative. Here, by tracing rays launched from the high- field-side of a tokamak, the required radial gradients to achieve amplification are calculated for a temperature and density regime consistent with a hot-ion-mode fusion reactor. As a result, these simulations, while valid only in the linear regime of wave amplification, nonetheless illustrate the possibilities for wave amplification using high-field launch of the lower hybrid wave.

  12. Alpha channeling with high-field launch of lower hybrid waves

    DOE PAGES

    Ochs, I. E.; Bertelli, N.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-11-04

    Although lower hybrid waves are effective at driving currents in present-day tokamaks, they are expected to interact strongly with high-energy particles in extrapolating to reactors. In the presence of a radial alpha particle birth gradient, this interaction can take the form of wave amplification rather than damping. While it is known that this amplification more easily occurs when launching from the tokamak high-field side, the extent of this amplification has not been made quantitative. Here, by tracing rays launched from the high- field-side of a tokamak, the required radial gradients to achieve amplification are calculated for a temperature and densitymore » regime consistent with a hot-ion-mode fusion reactor. As a result, these simulations, while valid only in the linear regime of wave amplification, nonetheless illustrate the possibilities for wave amplification using high-field launch of the lower hybrid wave.« less

  13. Fabrication of Plasma Transient Density Structures and its Application to High-Field Plasma Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Szuyuan; Wang Jyhpyng; Lin Jiunnyuan

    2006-11-27

    Fabrications of plasma transient density structures such as plasma waveguide, variable gas jet length, longitudinal density structure, and transverse wiggler by using laser machining in a gas jet are presented. The implementations of the technique of variable gas jet length with laser machining to achieve tomographic diagnosis of laser wakefield electron acceleration, x-ray lasing, and high harmonic generation are reported. Applications of these elements of high-field plasma devices and their combinations to enhance the products in high-field physics are presented or proposed.

  14. Dual-source parallel radiofrequency excitation ACR phantom magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T: Assessment of the effect of image quality on high-contrast spatial resolution, percent signal ghosting, and low-contrast object detectability in comparison with conventional single-source transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung-Bae; Park, Yong-Sung; Choe, Bo-Young

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess dual-source parallel radiofrequency (RF) excitation American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3T compared with conventional single-source RF transmission and compared with the standard ACR MRI phantom test. We used a 3T MR scanner equipped with dual-source parallel RF excitation and an 8-channel head phased array coil. We employed T1- and T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) pulse sequences for an assessment of the impact of image quality on high-contrast spatial resolution, percent signal ghosting and low-contrast object detectability following the ACR MRI quality control (QC) manual. With geometric accuracy and identical slice locations, dual RFs using dual-source parallel RF excitation MR showed an advantage over single RF using dual-source parallel RF excitation MR and conventional MR in terms of high-contrast spatial resolution (p < 0.010), percent signal ghosting (p < 0.010), and low-contrast object detectability (p < 0.010). The quality of the image from the dual-source parallel RF excitation MR equipment was superior to that of the image from conventional MR equipment for the ACR phantom. We need to pursue dual-source parallel RF excitation MR studies involving various clinical cases.

  15. Flow and kinematics of partially molten continental crust measured by both low- and high-field AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, C.; Ferre, E.; Martin-Hernandez, F.

    2002-12-01

    There is considerable debate about the flow of the partially molten mid- to lower continental crust during orogenic deformation. Geologic observations of migmatite terrains suggest that deformation of orogenic crust is controlled by both horizontal flow, leading to layered migmatite, and vertical flow, reflecting the emplacement of gneiss domes cored by migmatite. Lateral flow of the mid- to lower crust has been described by the popular channel-flow model, and vertical flow is driven by gravitational instabilities. Unfortunately, fabrics in migmatites are difficult to unravel due to pervasive, high-temperature recrystallization. Planar fabrics such as migmatitic banding, layering, or foliation, are usually preserved macroscopically, but lineations are commonly unclear. Therefore, the petrofabric analysis of migmatites, including the definition of sense of shear, is problematic. We have developed a new structural methodology for the study of migmatite based on the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) combined with image analysis. Our results on Archean migmatites of the Minnesota River Valley establish this method as a powerful petrofabric tool. Dimension stone quarries provide ideal sampling sites. The migmatites are coarse grained, granitic to tonalitic in composition and display a centimeter scale compositional layering. The layering and the regional foliation are subhorizontal to shallowly dipping to the NE. Mineral lineations are largely not observable. Low-field magnetism is carried mainly by primary multidomain magnetite grains ranging 20-200 microns in size. The magnetic susceptibilities are generally high, around 5000 to 10000 10-6 SI. The degree of magnetic anisotropy is large, between 1.2 and 1.3. The principal axes of the low-field AMS ellipsoid coincide with those defined by the foliation, and the magnetic lineation is consistently oriented E-W; the degree of anisotropy is broadly correlated with mineral fabric intensity. In high-field (HF = 1

  16. On the Origins of Signal Variance in FMRI of the Human Midbrain at High Field

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Robert L.; Coaster, Mariam; Rogers, Baxter P.; Newton, Allen T.; Moore, Jay; Anderson, Adam W.; Zald, David H.; Gore, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) in the midbrain at 7 Tesla suffers from unexpectedly low temporal signal to noise ratio (TSNR) compared to other brain regions. Various methodologies were used in this study to quantitatively identify causes of the noise and signal differences in midbrain fMRI data. The influence of physiological noise sources was examined using RETROICOR, phase regression analysis, and power spectral analyses of contributions in the respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges. The impact of between-shot phase shifts in 3-D multi-shot sequences was tested using a one-dimensional (1-D) phase navigator approach. Additionally, the effects of shared noise influences between regions that were temporally, but not functionally, correlated with the midbrain (adjacent white matter and anterior cerebellum) were investigated via analyses with regressors of ‘no interest’. These attempts to reduce noise did not improve the overall TSNR in the midbrain. In addition, the steady state signal and noise were measured in the midbrain and the visual cortex for resting state data. We observed comparable steady state signals from both the midbrain and the cortex. However, the noise was 2–3 times higher in the midbrain relative to the cortex, confirming that the low TSNR in the midbrain was not due to low signal but rather a result of large signal variance. These temporal variations did not behave as known physiological or other noise sources, and were not mitigated by conventional strategies. Upon further investigation, resting state functional connectivity analysis in the midbrain showed strong intrinsic fluctuations between homologous midbrain regions. These data suggest that the low TSNR in the midbrain may originate from larger signal fluctuations arising from functional connectivity compared to cortex, rather than simply reflecting physiological noise. PMID:23658643

  17. The European convention on bioethics.

    PubMed

    de Wachter, M A

    1997-01-01

    Nearly fifteen years after the Council of Europe first called for a pan-European convention on issues in bioethics to harmonize disparate national regulations, in November 1996 the council's Committee of Ministers approved the Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine for formal adoption. The draft convention, released in July 1994, provoked strong public, professional, and governmental debate among European nations, particularly regarding provisions for biomedical research with subjects unable to give informed consent. If ratified, the "bioethics convention" will become the first such document to have binding force internationally.

  18. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed.

  19. Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility of kunzite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowska, J. A.; Cisowski, J.; Voiron, J.; Heimann, J.; Czaja, M.; Mazurak, Z.

    2000-11-01

    We have studied the high-field magnetization up to 14.5 T and magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range 1.6-400 K of three different samples of natural kunzite crystals, being a variety of spodumene (LiAlSi 2O 6) and containing transition metal ions. It appears that the total magnetization and susceptibility consist of the paramagnetic contribution following from the temperature-dependent Brillouin-type behavior of magnetic ions and temperature-independent diamagnetic contribution of the spodumene matrix which we have found as being equal to -3.5×10 -7 emu/g. We have identified the Mn 2+ ions as the dominant ones in the kunzites studied and we have determined the molar concentration of these ions as lying in the range 0.2-0.4%.

  20. Comparing the Detectability of Hepatocellular Carcinoma by C-Arm Dual-Phase Cone-Beam Computed Tomography During Hepatic Arteriography With Conventional Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric; Lin, MingDe; Rao, Pramod; Bhagat, Nikhil; Noordhoek, Niels; Radaelli, Alessandro; Blijd, Jaerl; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the sensitivity of dual-phase cone-beam computed tomography during hepatic arteriography (CBCTHA) for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by comparing it with the diagnostic imaging 'gold standard': contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) of the liver. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight HCC lesions (mean diameter 3.9 {+-} 3.3 cm) in 20 patients (13 men, mean age 61.4 years [range 50 to 80]), who sequentially underwent baseline diagnostic liver CE-MRI and then underwent early arterial- and delayed portal venous-phase CBCTHA during drug eluting-bead transarterial chemoembolization, were evaluated. Dual-phase CBCTHA findings of each tumor in terms of conspicuity were compared with standard CE-MR images and classified into three grades: optimal, suboptimal, and nondiagnostic. Results: Seventy-seven (mean diameter 4.2 {+-} 3.4 cm [range 0.9 to 15.9]) (93.9%) of 82 tumors were detected. Sensitivity of arterial-phase (71.9%) was lower than that of venous-phase CBCTHA (86.6%) for the detection of HCC lesions. Of the 82 tumors, 33 (40.2%) and 52 (63.4%), 26 (31.7%) and 19 (23.2%), and 23 (28%) and 11 (13.4%) nodules were classed as optimal, suboptimal, and nondiagnostic on arterial- and venous-phase CBCTHA images, respectively. Seventeen (73.9%) of the 23 tumors that were not visible on arterial phase were detected on venous phase. Six (54.5%) of the 11 tumors that were not visible on venous phase were detected on arterial phase. Conclusions: Dual-phase CBCTHA has sufficient image quality to detect the majority of HCC lesions compared with the imaging 'gold standard': CE-MRI of the liver. Moreover, dual-phase CBCTHA is more useful and reliable than single-phasic imaging to depict HCC nodules.

  1. In vivo nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging by selective irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, P A; Foster, T H; Leue, W M

    1984-01-01

    NMR images of preselected chemically shifted species can be obtained by selective irradiation of the remainder of the NMR chemical shift spectrum prior to application of a conventional NMR imaging sequence. The chemical-selective irradiation consists of narrow-bandwidth pi/2 or saturation radio-frequency pulses applied in the absence of imaging gradients. The technique permits substantial reductions in scan and reconstruction times over standard three- and four-dimensional Fourier transform chemical-shift-imaging methods, when images of few spectral peaks are desired. It is also suitable for the elimination of chemical shift artifacts in conventional high-field NMR imaging. In vivo applications of the technique to the head and limbs in a 1.5-T magnetic field yield 1H H2O and -CH2-images, with little detectable -CH2- in muscle and brain. Images PMID:6593729

  2. Histological Confirmation and Biological Significance of Cartilage Canals Demonstrated Using High Field MRI in Swine at Predilection Sites of Osteochondrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Ferenc; Nissi, Mikko J.; Zhang, Jinjin; Benson, Michael; Schmitter, Sebastian; Ellermann, Jutta M.; Carlson, Cathy S.

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage canal vessels in epiphyseal cartilage have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of osteochondrosis/osteochondritis dissecans. The present study aimed to validate high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods to visualize these vessels in young pigs. Osteochondral samples from the distal femur and distal humerus (predilection sites of osteochondrosis) of piglets were imaged post-mortem: (1) using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) in an MRI scanner, followed by histological evaluation; and (2) after barium perfusion using μCT, followed by clearing techniques. In addition, both stifle joints of a 25-day-old piglet were imaged in vivo using SWI and gadolinium enhanced T1-weighted MRI, after which distal femoral samples were harvested and evaluated using μCT and histology. Histological sections were compared to corresponding MRI slices, and three-dimensional visualizations of vessels identified using MRI were compared to those obtained using μCT and to the cleared specimens. Vessels contained in cartilage canals were identified using MRI, both ex vivo and in vivo; their locations matched those observed in the histological sections, μCT images, and cleared specimens of barium-perfused tissues. The ability to visualize cartilage canal blood vessels by MRI, without using a contrast agent, will allow future longitudinal studies to evaluate their role in developmental orthopedic disease. PMID:23939946

  3. Improvements in RF Shimming in High Field MRI Using High Permittivity Materials With Low Order Pre-Fractal Geometries.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Rita; Webb, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-high field MRI is an area of great interest for clinical research and basic science due to the increased signal-to-noise, spatial resolution and magnetic-susceptibility-based contrast. However, the fact that the electromagnetic wavelength in tissue is comparable to the relevant body dimensions means that the uniformity of the excitation field is much poorer than at lower field strengths. In addition to techniques such as transmit arrays, one simple but effective method to counteract this effect is to use high permittivity "pads". Very high permittivities enable thinner, flexible pads to be used, but the limiting factor is wavelength effects within the pads themselves, which can lead to image artifacts. So far, all studies have used simple continuous rectangular/circular pad geometries. In this work we investigate how the wavelength effects can be partially mitigated utilizing shaped pad with holes. Several arrangements have been simulated, including low order pre-fractal geometries, which maintain the overall coverage of the pad, but can provide better image homogeneity in the region of interest or higher sensitivity depending on the setup. Experimental data in the form of in vivo human images at 7T were acquired to validate the simulation results. PMID:26890643

  4. Decoding the direction of imagined visual motion using 7 T ultra-high field fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Emmerling, Thomas C.; Zimmermann, Jan; Sorger, Bettina; Frost, Martin A.; Goebel, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    There is a long-standing debate about the neurocognitive implementation of mental imagery. One form of mental imagery is the imagery of visual motion, which is of interest due to its naturalistic and dynamic character. However, so far only the mere occurrence rather than the specific content of motion imagery was shown to be detectable. In the current study, the application of multi-voxel pattern analysis to high-resolution functional data of 12 subjects acquired with ultra-high field 7 T functional magnetic resonance imaging allowed us to show that imagery of visual motion can indeed activate the earliest levels of the visual hierarchy, but the extent thereof varies highly between subjects. Our approach enabled classification not only of complex imagery, but also of its actual contents, in that the direction of imagined motion out of four options was successfully identified in two thirds of the subjects and with accuracies of up to 91.3% in individual subjects. A searchlight analysis confirmed the local origin of decodable information in striate and extra-striate cortex. These high-accuracy findings not only shed new light on a central question in vision science on the constituents of mental imagery, but also show for the first time that the specific sub-categorical content of visual motion imagery is reliably decodable from brain imaging data on a single-subject level. PMID:26481673

  5. Narrowband Emission in Compton/Thomson Sources Operating in the High-Field Regime

    DOE PAGES

    Terzic, Balsa; Deitrick, Kirsten E.; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kraff, Geoffrey A.

    2014-02-21

    We present a novel and quite general analysis of the interaction of a high-field chirped laser pulse and a relativistic electron, in which exquisite control of the spectral brilliance of the upshifted Thomson-scattered photon is shown to be possible. Normally, when Thomson scattering occurs at high field strengths, there is ponderomotive line broadening in the scattered radiation. This effect makes the bandwidth too large for some applications, and reduces the spectral brilliance. In this paper we show that such broadening can be corrected and eliminated by suitable frequency modulation of the incident laser pulse. Further, we suggest a practical realizationmore » of this compensation idea in terms of a chirped-beam driven FEL oscillator configuration, and show that significant compensation can occur, even with the imperfect matching to be expected in these conditions.« less

  6. Polarization-tunable terahertz radiation in the high-field regime.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Polarization control of terahertz (THz) pulses in the high-field regime is a challenging subject. Here we propose and numerically demonstrate an all-optical scheme to generate a polarization-tunable high-field THz source based on relativistic laser plasma interactions. By adjusting the polarization state of the driving laser, collective oscillation of the plasmas can be steered. Phase difference between the laser field components is inherited in the plasma dynamics, as well as in the resulting THz generation process. Single-cycle extremely intense THz pulses with field strength ∼  GV/cm can be generated. The THz polarization state can be tuned from linear through elliptical to circular by changing the polarization state of the driving laser. PMID:27244439

  7. Narrowband Emission in Compton/Thomson Sources Operating in the High-Field Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Terzic, Balsa; Deitrick, Kirsten E.; Hofler, Alicia S.; Kraff, Geoffrey A.

    2014-02-21

    We present a novel and quite general analysis of the interaction of a high-field chirped laser pulse and a relativistic electron, in which exquisite control of the spectral brilliance of the upshifted Thomson-scattered photon is shown to be possible. Normally, when Thomson scattering occurs at high field strengths, there is ponderomotive line broadening in the scattered radiation. This effect makes the bandwidth too large for some applications, and reduces the spectral brilliance. In this paper we show that such broadening can be corrected and eliminated by suitable frequency modulation of the incident laser pulse. Further, we suggest a practical realization of this compensation idea in terms of a chirped-beam driven FEL oscillator configuration, and show that significant compensation can occur, even with the imperfect matching to be expected in these conditions.

  8. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  9. Anomaly of the rotational nonergodicity parameter of glass formers probed by high field electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercu, V.; Martinelli, M.; Massa, C. A.; Pardi, L. A.; Rössler, E. A.; Leporini, D.

    2008-08-01

    Exploiting the high angular resolution of high field electron paramagnetic resonance measured at 95, 190, and 285 GHz we determine the rotational nonergodicity parameter of different probe molecules in the glass former o-terphenyl and polybutadiene in a model-independent way. Our results clearly show a characteristic change in the temperature of the nonergodicity parameter proving a rather sharp dynamic crossover in both systems, in contrast to previous results from other techniques.

  10. Mode Conversion of High-Field-Side-Launched Fast Waves at the Second Harmonic of Minority Hydrogen in Advanced Tokamak Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sund, R.; Scharer, J.

    2003-12-01

    Under advanced tokamak reactor conditions, the Ion-Bernstein wave (IBW) can be generated by mode conversion of a fast magnetosonic wave incident from the high-field side on the second harmonic resonance of a minority hydrogen component, with near 100% efficiency. IBWs have the recognized capacity to create internal transport barriers through sheared plasma flows resulting from ion absorption. The relatively high frequency (around 200 MHz) minimizes parasitic electron absorption and permits the converted IBW to approach the 5th tritium harmonic. It also facilitates compact antennas and feeds, and efficient fast wave launch. The scheme is applicable to reactors with aspect ratios < 3 such that the conversion and absorption layers are both on the high field side of the magnetic axis. Large machine size and adequate separation of the mode conversion layer from the magnetic axis minimize poloidal field effects in the conversion zone and permit a 1-D full-wave analysis. 2-D ray tracing of the IBW indicates a slightly bean-shaped equilibrium allows access to the tritium resonance.

  11. Distortion-free magnetic resonance imaging in the zero-field limit

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, Nathan; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Bouchard, Louis-S.; Demas, Vasiliki; Muck, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2009-07-09

    MRI is a powerful technique for clinical diagnosis and materials characterization. Images are acquired in a homogeneous static magnetic field much higher than the fields generated across the field of view by the spatially encoding field gradients. Without such a high field, the concomitant components of the field gradient dictated by Maxwell's equations lead to severe distortions that make imaging impossible with conventional MRI encoding. In this paper, we present a distortion-free image of a phantom acquired with a fundamentally different methodology in which the applied static field approaches zero. Our technique involves encoding with pulses of uniform and gradient field, and acquiring the magnetic field signals with a SQUID. The method can be extended to weak ambient fields, potentially enabling imaging in the Earth's field without cancellation coils or shielding. Other potential applications include quantum information processing and fundamental studies of long-range ferromagnetic interactions.

  12. High field superconductor development and understanding: A. Establishing the limits of performance of niobium titanium; B. Establishing whether Chevrel Phase materials can become useful high field superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.J.; Jablonski, P.D.; Cooley, L.D.; Stejic, G.; Bonney, L.A.; Willis, T.C.; Larbalestier, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    The acquisition of a hydrostatic extrusion press now allows us to extrude composites under controlled conditions and enables us to fabricate new composite designs. We have successfully extruded a variety of composites including powder metallurgy APCs. Our conventional APC composite has been successfully brought to the completion of its fabrication. The results of the characterization of that composite have proven to be quite exciting. There is proof that the ideal'' microstructures that are hoped for in APC composites can be made. The flux pinning force of our APC composite is stronger than that for a conventional composite, despite having about half of the volume fraction of pins and a lower B[sub c2] than occurs in a conventional composite. Additionally, the uniform nature of the microstructure makes our APC composite well-suited for more fundamental studies of flux pinning. We have fabricated thin film model'' conductors in order to understand basic flux-pinning mechanisms and these films have yielded interesting data on the importance of film geometry. Further advances have been made in increasing the J[sub c] of Chevrel Phase conductors and a clear path is now outlined for further improvement.

  13. Probes for High Field Solid-state NMR of Lossy Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Christopher V.; Wu, Chin H.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2010-01-01

    In solid-state NMR exphydrated samples biopolymers are susceptible to radio-frequency heating and have a significant impact on probe tuning frequency and performance parameters such as sensitivity. These considerations are increasingly important as magnetic field strengths increase with improved magnet technology. Recent developments in the design, construction, and performance of probes for solid-state NMR experiments on stationary lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are reviewed. PMID:20435493

  14. Development of high-strength and high-conductivity conductor materials for pulsed high-field magnets at Dresden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünberger, W.; Heilmaier, M.; Schultz, L.

    2001-01-01

    The work at the IFW Dresden is focused on the development of microcomposite Cu-Ag alloys and steel-copper macrocomposites with high-nitrogen steel and pearlitic steel jackets, respectively. In Cu-Ag alloys the investigation of continuously cast rods with different starting diameters suggests that the cooling rate during solidification determining the dendrite arm spacing has a minor influence on the development of the strength compared to the cooling velocity after solidification which determines the extent of the Ag-supersaturation in the Cu solid solution. Maximum strength at minimum drawing strain demands (i) a sufficient volume fraction of eutectic in order to suppress discontinuous precipitation (absence of grain boundaries) and (ii) a sufficiently rapid cooling after solidification in order to prevent pre-precipitation. With a continuously cast starting rod of 12 mm diameter a maximum tensile strength of 1.3 GPa was obtained after a drawing strain of only η=4.3. Steel-copper macrocomposites were fabricated by the ‘rod-in-tube’ technology. The experiments with austenitic high-nitrogen steels were performed with two alloys. With the commercial alloy Nicrofer 3033 a strength level of 1.2 GPa has been achieved with a 52 vol% Cu composite at a drawing strain of η=2.3. A composite with pearlitic C60-steel (0.6 wt% C) and 56 vol% Cu showed a tensile strength of 1.53 GPa after a final patenting at a diameter of 14.7 mm and a drawing strain of η=4.

  15. Anisotropic diffusion of metabolites in peripheral nerve using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance spectroscopy at ultra-high field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellegood, Jacob; McKay, Ryan T.; Hanstock, Chris C.; Beaulieu, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Although the diffusivity and anisotropy of water has been investigated thoroughly in ordered axonal systems (i.e., nervous tissue), there have been very few studies on the directional dependence of diffusion of metabolites. In this study, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient (Trace/3 ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values of the intracellular metabolites N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine and phosphocreatine (tCr), choline (Cho), taurine (Tau), and glutamate and glutamine (Glx) were measured parallel and perpendicular to the length of excised frog sciatic nerve using a water suppressed, diffusion-weighted, spin-echo pulse sequence at 18.8 T. The degree of anisotropy (FA) of NAA (0.41 ± 0.09) was determined to be less than tCr (0.59 ± 0.07) and Cho (0.61 ± 0.11), which is consistent with previously reported human studies of white matter. In contrast, Glx diffusion was found to be almost isotropic with an FA value of 0.20 ± 0.06. The differences of FA between the metabolites is most likely due to their differing micro-environments and could be beneficial as an indicator of compartment specific changes with disease, information not readily available with water diffusion.

  16. Design of a conduction-cooled 9.4 T REBCO magnet for whole-body MRI systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Iwai, Sadanori; Otani, Yasumi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tosaka, Taizo; Tasaki, Kenji; Nomura, Shunji; Kurusu, Tsutomu; Ueda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, So; Ishiyama, Atsushi; Urayama, Shinichi; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2016-10-01

    A project on the development of REBa2Cu3O7-δ (REBCO) magnets for ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was started in 2013. Since REBCO-coated conductors feature high mechanical strength under tensile stress and high critical current density, use of REBCO coils would allow superconducting magnets to be made smaller and lighter than conventional ones. In addition, a conduction-cooled superconducting magnet is simpler to use than one cooled by a liquid helium bath because the operation and maintenance of the cryogenic system become simpler, without the need to handle cryogenic fluid. Superconducting magnets for MRI require homogeneous, stable magnetic fields. The homogeneity of the magnetic field is highly dependent on the coil shape and position. Moreover, in REBCO magnets, the screening-current-induced magnetic field, which changes the magnetic field distribution of the magnet, is one of the critical issues. In order to evaluate the magnetic field homogeneity and the screening-current-induced magnetic field, a 1 T model magnet and some test coils were fabricated. From an evaluation of the 1 T model magnet, it was found that the main reason for magnetic field inhomogeneity was the tolerances in the z-axis positions of the coils, and therefore, it is important to control the gap between the single pancakes. In addition, we have already demonstrated the generation of an 8.27 T central magnetic field at 10 K with a small test coil. The screening-current-induced magnetic field was 0.43 T and was predictable by using an electromagnetic field simulation program. These results were reflected in the design of a conduction-cooled 9.4 T REBCO magnet for whole-body MRI systems. The magnet was composed of six main coils and two active shield coils. The total conductor length was 581 km, and the stored energy was 293 kJ. The field inhomogeneity was 24 ppm peak to peak and 3 ppm volume-root-mean-square (VRMS) for a 500 mm diameter spherical volume (DSV). The axial

  17. High field dc conduction current and spectroscopy of aged transformer oil

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sulaiman, A.A.; Ahmed, O.; Hassan, M.M.; Quresh, M.

    1982-11-01

    This paper studies the experimental results of the quasi-state high field dc conduction current, and changes occuring in the molecular structure of aged transformer oil, sampled from EHV transformer operating for the last five years. Aged oil was compared with fresh transformer oil and liquid paraffin. It was found that aged oil exhibits higher conduction than both of the other oils through 600 seconds of field application. However, no molecular changes were detected using different techniques of spectroscopy such as GC; UV; IR and NMR. Metallic impurities were found to be of the same order but the acidity increased manifolds to that of fresh oil.

  18. Fabrication of spatial transient-density structures as high-field plasma photonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, C.-H.; Huang, S.-Y.; Kuo, C.-C.; Lin, M.-W.; Wang, J.; Chen, S.-Y.; Lee, C.-H.; Lin, J.-Y.

    2005-07-15

    Fabrication of periodic transient-density structures in a gas jet with a boundary scale length approaching 10 {mu}m was demonstrated. This was achieved by passing an ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse through a patterned mask and imaging the mask onto the target plane. Gas/plasma density at the laser-irradiated regions drops as a result of hydrodynamic expansion following ionization and heating by the laser pulse. The fabrication of gas/plasma density structures with such a scheme is an essential step in the development of plasma photonic devices for applications in high-field physics.

  19. Single-shot spatiotemporal measurements of high-field terahertz pulses

    SciTech Connect

    van Tilborg, Jeroen; Schroeder, Carl; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-17

    The electric field profiles of broad-bandwidth coherent terahertz (THz) pulses, emitted by laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches, are studied. The near-single-cycle THz pulses are measured with two single-shot techniques in the temporal and spatial domains. Spectra of 0-6 THz and peak fields up to {approx_equal} 0.4 MV cm{sup -1} are observed. The measured field substructure demonstrates the manifestation of spatiotemporal coupling at focus, which affects the interpretation of THz radiation as a bunch diagnostic and in high-field pump-probe experiments.

  20. Waveform control pulse magnetization for HTS bulk magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Shigeuchi, Koji; Okuda, Sayo; Watasaki, Masahiro; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-01

    For the past 10 years, we have studied high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk magnets for use in electromagnetic rotating machines. If the magnetic field effectively magnetizes the HTS bulk, then the size of the motor and generator can be reduced without a reduction in output. We showed that the melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O HTS bulk effectively traps a high magnetic field using waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM). WCPM makes it possible to generate any pulsed magnetic field waveform by appropriately changing the duty ratio of the pulse width modulation. By chopping so that the pulsed magnetic field has a period of about 1ms, the WCPM technology enables active control of the rise time and suppresses magnetic flux motion that decreases magnetization efficiency. This method is also useful for any HTS bulk magnet, and the high magnetic flux density is trapped in the HTS bulk by a single pulse magnetic field. We developed a magnetizer that has a feedback system from the penetrated magnetic flux density to realize WCPM. In this research, using only a single pulse magnetic field of WCPM method at 77K, an HTS bulk with a 45mm diameter and 19mm thickness trapped a maximum magnetic field of 1.63T, which is more than 90% of the trapped magnetic flux density by FC magnetization. This result suggests that the pulse magnetizing method can replace the conventional field-cooled method and promote the practical use of HTS magnets for electromagnetic power applications.

  1. NULL Convention Floating Point Multiplier

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Seshasayanan

    2015-01-01

    Floating point multiplication is a critical part in high dynamic range and computational intensive digital signal processing applications which require high precision and low power. This paper presents the design of an IEEE 754 single precision floating point multiplier using asynchronous NULL convention logic paradigm. Rounding has not been implemented to suit high precision applications. The novelty of the research is that it is the first ever NULL convention logic multiplier, designed to perform floating point multiplication. The proposed multiplier offers substantial decrease in power consumption when compared with its synchronous version. Performance attributes of the NULL convention logic floating point multiplier, obtained from Xilinx simulation and Cadence, are compared with its equivalent synchronous implementation. PMID:25879069

  2. Relativistically Self-Channeled Femtosecond Terawatt Lasers for High-Field Physics and X-Ray Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A.B.; Boyer, K.; Cameron, S.M.; Luk, T.S.; McPherson, A.; Nelson, T.; Rhodes, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    Optical channeling or refractive guiding processes involving the nonlinear interaction of intense femtosecond optical pulses with matter in the self-focussing regime has created exciting opportunities for next-generation laser plasma-based x-ray sources and directed energy applications. This fundamentally new form of extended paraxial electromagnetic propagation in nonlinear dispersive media such as underdense plasma is attributed to the interplay between normal optical diffraction and intensity-dependent nonlinear focussing and refraction contributions in the dielectric response. Superposition of these mechanisms on the intrinsic index profile acts to confine the propagating energy in a dynamic self-guiding longitudinal waveguide structure which is stable for power transmission and robust compression. The laser-driven channels are hypothesized to support a degree of solitonic transport behavior, simultaneously stable in the space and time domains (group velocity dispersion balances self-phase modulation), and are believed to be self-compensating for diffraction and dispersion over many Rayleigh lengths in contrast with the defining characteristics of conventional diffractive imaging and beamforming. By combining concentrated power deposition with well-ordered spatial localization, this phenomena will also create new possibilities for production and regulation of physical interactions, including electron beams, enhanced material coupling, and self-modulated plasma wakefields, over extended gain distances with unprecedented energy densities. Harmonious combination of short-pulse x-ray production with plasma channeling resulting from a relativistic charge displacement nonlinearity mechanism in the terawatt regime (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) has been shown to generate high-field conditions conducive to efficient multi-kilovolt x-ray amplification and peak spectral brightness. Channeled optical propagation with intense short-pulse lasers is expected to impact several

  3. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  4. Theory of electron emission in high fields from atomically sharp emitters: Validity of the Fowler-Nordheim equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, P. H.; He, Jun; Miller, J.; Miskovsky, N. M.; Weiss, B.; Sullivan, T. E.

    1993-04-01

    Field emission from metallic emitters is generally described by the Fowler-Nordheim [F-N] theory, which is based on a planar model of the tip with a classical image correction. Within the free electron model and the WKB approximation, the planar tip model leads to the well-known Fowler-Nordheim equation, which predicts that a plot of log J/F 2 versus 1/F, where J is the current density and F, the field, should be a straight line within the narrow range of field strengths of typical field emission experiments, 3 - 5V/nm. This has been experimentally confirmed for conventional emitters, (i.e., electrolytically etched tips with radii ⪆50 nm). Field emitters fabricated with today's new techniques are much sharper with radii of curvature of the order of nm's or even the size of a single atom. Hence, the local geometry of the tip may become an important factor in the electron emission process. To investigate the effects of the shape and/or size on emission, the authors, in a recent series of papers, studied the dependence of the current-voltage characteristics on the local geometry of pointed emitters. It was found that the calculated results, plotted as log J/V 2 vs. 1/V, do not exhibit the straight line behavior predicted by the Fowler-Nordheim theory. In addition, there is a dramatic increase in the tunneling current for a fixed external bias, V, relative to the Fowler-Nordheim result for a planar model of the tip with the same bias voltage. Using the exact current integral additional results have been obtained exhibiting the effects of emitter curvature on field electron energy distributions and on electron emission in high fields and temperatures. These results continue to differ with the predictions of the Fowler-Nordheim equation for the same emitter models. Therefore, the adequacy of a β-factor in the conventional planar model Fowler-Nordheim equation to account for emitter curvature is examined. It is demonstrated that even a β-modified Fowler

  5. High-field magneto-thermo-mechanical testing system for characterizing multiferroic bulk alloys.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Nickolaus M; Karaman, Ibrahim; Ross, Joseph H; Chumlyakov, Yuriy I

    2015-11-01

    Multiferroic meta-magnetic shape memory alloys are well known for exhibiting large magnetic field induced actuation strains, giant magnetocaloric effects, magneto-resistance, and structural and magnetic glassy behaviors. Thus, they are candidates for improving modern day sensing, actuation, magneto-resistance, and solid-state refrigeration processes. Until now, however, experimental apparatuses have typically been able to probe a limited ferroic parameter space in these materials, i.e., only concurrent thermal and mechanical responses, or magnetic and thermal responses. To overcome this barrier and better understand the coupling of multiple fields on materials behavior, a magneto-thermo-mechanical characterization device has been designed and implemented. This device is capable of compressing a specimen at load levels up to 5300 N collinearly with applied fields up to 9 T between temperatures of -100 °C and 120 °C. Uniaxial stress, strain, temperature, magnetic field, and the volumetric average magnetization have been simultaneously measured under mixed loading conditions on a NiCoMnIn meta-magnetic shape memory alloy and a few selected results are presented here. PMID:26628146

  6. High-field magneto-thermo-mechanical testing system for characterizing multiferroic bulk alloys.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Nickolaus M; Karaman, Ibrahim; Ross, Joseph H; Chumlyakov, Yuriy I

    2015-11-01

    Multiferroic meta-magnetic shape memory alloys are well known for exhibiting large magnetic field induced actuation strains, giant magnetocaloric effects, magneto-resistance, and structural and magnetic glassy behaviors. Thus, they are candidates for improving modern day sensing, actuation, magneto-resistance, and solid-state refrigeration processes. Until now, however, experimental apparatuses have typically been able to probe a limited ferroic parameter space in these materials, i.e., only concurrent thermal and mechanical responses, or magnetic and thermal responses. To overcome this barrier and better understand the coupling of multiple fields on materials behavior, a magneto-thermo-mechanical characterization device has been designed and implemented. This device is capable of compressing a specimen at load levels up to 5300 N collinearly with applied fields up to 9 T between temperatures of -100 °C and 120 °C. Uniaxial stress, strain, temperature, magnetic field, and the volumetric average magnetization have been simultaneously measured under mixed loading conditions on a NiCoMnIn meta-magnetic shape memory alloy and a few selected results are presented here.

  7. High-field magneto-thermo-mechanical testing system for characterizing multiferroic bulk alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Nickolaus M.; Karaman, Ibrahim; Ross, Joseph H.; Chumlyakov, Yuriy I.

    2015-11-01

    Multiferroic meta-magnetic shape memory alloys are well known for exhibiting large magnetic field induced actuation strains, giant magnetocaloric effects, magneto-resistance, and structural and magnetic glassy behaviors. Thus, they are candidates for improving modern day sensing, actuation, magneto-resistance, and solid-state refrigeration processes. Until now, however, experimental apparatuses have typically been able to probe a limited ferroic parameter space in these materials, i.e., only concurrent thermal and mechanical responses, or magnetic and thermal responses. To overcome this barrier and better understand the coupling of multiple fields on materials behavior, a magneto-thermo-mechanical characterization device has been designed and implemented. This device is capable of compressing a specimen at load levels up to 5300 N collinearly with applied fields up to 9 T between temperatures of -100 °C and 120 °C. Uniaxial stress, strain, temperature, magnetic field, and the volumetric average magnetization have been simultaneously measured under mixed loading conditions on a NiCoMnIn meta-magnetic shape memory alloy and a few selected results are presented here.

  8. Thermo-magnetic instabilities in Nb3Sn superconducting accelerator magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Bordini, Bernardo

    2006-09-01

    The advance of High Energy Physics research using circulating accelerators strongly depends on increasing the magnetic bending field which accelerator magnets provide. To achieve high fields, the most powerful present-day accelerator magnets employ NbTi superconducting technology; however, with the start up of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2007, NbTi magnets will have reached the maximum field allowed by the intrinsic properties of this superconductor. A further increase of the field strength necessarily requires a change in superconductor material; the best candidate is Nb3Sn. Several laboratories in the US and Europe are currently working on developing Nb3Sn accelerator magnets, and although these magnets have great potential, it is suspected that their performance may be fundamentally limited by conductor thermo-magnetic instabilities: an idea first proposed by the Fermilab High Field Magnet group early in 2003. This thesis presents a study of thermo-magnetic instability in high field Nb3Sn accelerator magnets. In this chapter the following topics are described: the role of superconducting magnets in High Energy Physics; the main characteristics of superconductors for accelerator magnets; typical measurements of current capability in superconducting strands; the properties of Nb3Sn; a description of the manufacturing process of Nb3Sn strands; superconducting cables; a typical layout of superconducting accelerator magnets; the current state of the art of Nb3Sn accelerator magnets; the High Field Magnet program at Fermilab; and the scope of the thesis.

  9. High-field instability of a field-induced triplon Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhimov, Abdulla; Sherman, E. Ya.; Kim, Chul Koo

    2010-01-01

    We study properties of magnetic field-induced Bose-Einstein condensate of triplons as a function of temperature and the field within the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach including the anomalous density. We show that the magnetization is continuous across the transition, in agreement with the experiment. In sufficiently strong fields the condensate becomes unstable due to triplon-triplon repulsion. As a result, the system is characterized by two critical magnetic fields: one producing the condensate and the other destroying it. We show that nonparabolic triplon dispersion arising due to the gapped bare spectrum and the crystal structure has a strong influence on the phase diagram.

  10. Comparative High Field Magneto-transport Of Rare Earth Oxypnictides With Maximum Transition Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Balakirev, Fedor F; Migliori, A; Riggs, S; Hunte, F; Gurevich, A; Larbalestier, D; Boebinger, G; Jaroszynski, J; Ren, Z; Lu, W; Yang, J; Shen, X; Dong, X; Zhao, Z; Jin, R; Sefat, A; Mcguire, M; Sales, B; Christen, D; Mandrus, D

    2008-01-01

    We compare magnetotransport of the three iron-arsenide-based compounds ReFeAsO (Re=La, Sm, Nd) in very high DC and pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 and 54 T, respectively. Each sample studied exhibits a superconducting transition temperature near the maximum reported to date for that particular compound. While high magnetic fields do not suppress the superconducting state appreciably, the resistivity, Hall coefficient, and critical magnetic fields, taken together, suggest that the phenomenology and superconducting parameters of the oxypnictide superconductors bridges the gap between MgB{sub 2} and YBCO.

  11. Prostate MR imaging at high-field strength: evolution or revolution?

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Hartman, Robert P; Lyonnet, Denis

    2006-02-01

    As 3 T MR scanners become more available, body imaging at high field strength is becoming the subject of intensive research. However, little has been published on prostate imaging at 3 T. Will high-field imaging dramatically increase our ability to depict and stage prostate cancer? This paper will address this question by reviewing the advantages and drawbacks of body imaging at 3 T and the current limitations of prostate imaging at 1.5 T, and by detailing the preliminary results of prostate 3 T MRI. Even if slight adjustments of imaging protocols are necessary for taking into account the changes in T1 and T2 relaxation times at 3 T, tissue contrast in T2-weighted (T2w) imaging seems similar at 1.5 T and 3 T. Therefore, significant improvement in cancer depiction in T2w imaging is not expected. However, increased spatial resolution due to increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) may improve the detection of minimal capsular invasion. Higher field strength should provide increased spectral and spatial resolution for spectroscopic imaging, but new pulse sequences will have to be designed for overcoming field inhomogeneities and citrate J-modulation issues. Finally, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is the method of imaging that is the most likely to benefit from the increased SNR, with a significantly better trade-off between temporal and spatial resolution.

  12. The conceptual design of a robust, compact, modular tokamak reactor based on high-field superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, D. G.; Bonoli, P.; Barnard, H.; Haakonsen, C.; Hartwig, Z.; Kasten, C.; Palmer, T.; Sung, C.; Sutherland, D.; Bromberg, L.; Mangiarotti, F.; Goh, J.; Sorbom, B.; Sierchio, J.; Ball, J.; Greenwald, M.; Olynyk, G.; Minervini, J.

    2012-10-01

    Two of the greatest challenges to tokamak reactors are 1) large single-unit cost of each reactor's construction and 2) their susceptibility to disruptions from operation at or above operational limits. We present an attractive tokamak reactor design that substantially lessens these issues by exploiting recent advancements in superconductor (SC) tapes allowing peak field on SC coil > 20 Tesla. A R˜3.3 m, B˜9.2 T, ˜ 500 MW fusion power tokamak provides high fusion gain while avoiding all disruptive operating boundaries (no-wall beta, kink, and density limits). Robust steady-state core scenarios are obtained by exploiting the synergy of high field, compact size and ideal efficiency current drive using high-field side launch of Lower Hybrid waves. The design features a completely modular replacement of internal solid components enabled by the demountability of the coils/tapes and the use of an immersion liquid blanket. This modularity opens up the possibility of using the device as a nuclear component test facility.

  13. Widespread inflammation in CLIPPERS syndrome indicated by autopsy and ultra-high-field 7T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Blaabjerg, Morten; Ruprecht, Klemens; Sinnecker, Tim; Kondziella, Daniel; Niendorf, Thoralf; Kerrn-Jespersen, Bjørg Morell; Lindelof, Mette; Lassmann, Hans; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Paul, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine if there is widespread inflammation in the brain of patients with chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS) syndrome by using histology and ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T. Methods: We performed a detailed neuropathologic examination in 4 cases, including 1 autopsy case, and studied 2 additional patients by MRI at 7.0T to examine (1) extension of inflammation to areas appearing normal on 3.0T MRI, (2) potential advantages of 7.0T MRI compared to 3.0T MRI in reflecting widespread inflammation, perivascular pathology, and axonal damage, and (3) the possibility of lymphoma. Results: In the autopsy case, perivascular inflammation dominated by CD4+ T cells was not only detected in the brainstem and cerebellum but also in brain areas with normal appearance on 3.0T MRI, including supratentorial regions and cranial nerve roots. There was no evidence of lymphoma in any of the 4 patients. The 7.0T MRI in clinical remission also revealed supratentorial lesions and perivascular pathology in vivo with contrast-enhancing lesions centered around a small venous vessel. Ultra-high-field MRI at 7.0T disclosed prominent T1 hypointensities in the brainstem, which were not seen on 3.0T MRI. This corresponded to neuropathologic detection of axonal injury in the autopsy case. Conclusion: Our findings suggest more widespread perivascular inflammation and postinflammatory axonal injury in patients with CLIPPERS. PMID:27144217

  14. Magnetism in Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenck, John

    2000-03-01

    For centuries physicians, scientists and others have postulated an important role, either as a cause of disease or as a mode of therapy, for magnetism in medicine. Although there is a straightforward role in the removal of magnetic foreign bodies, the majority of the proposed magnetic applications have been controversial and have often been attributed by mainstream practitioners to fraud, quackery or self-deception. Calculations indicate that many of the proposed methods of action, e.g., the field-induced alignment of water molecules or alterations in blood flow, are of negligible magnitude. Nonetheless, even at the present time, the use of small surface magnets (magnetotherapy) to treat arthritis and similar diseases is a widespread form of folk medicine and is said to involve sales of approximately one billion dollars per year. Another medical application of magnetism associated with Mesmer and others (eventually known as animal magnetism) has been discredited, but has had a culturally significant role in the development of hypnotism and as one of the sources of modern psychotherapy. Over the last two decades, in marked contrast to previous applications of magnetism to medicine, magnetic resonance imaging or MRI, has become firmly established as a clinical diagnostic tool. MRI permits the non-invasive study of subtle biological processes in intact, living organisms and approximately 150,000,000 diagnostic studies have been performed since its clinical introduction in the early 1980s. The dramatically swift and widespread acceptance of MRI was made possible by scientific and engineering advances - including nuclear magnetic resonance, computer technology and whole-body-sized, high field superconducting magnets - in the decades following World War Two. Although presently used much less than MRI, additional applications, including nerve and muscle stimulation by pulsed magnetic fields, the use of magnetic forces to guide surgical instruments, and imaging utilizing

  15. A Proposed Convention for Writing FITS Data Tapes: DRAFT 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ROSAT/ASCA/Xte Development Team

    Even with today's advances in networking, file system capacities and CD technology it is often necessary to transport and store scientific data sets on magnetic tape. The FITS data format standard contains guidelines on how to write FITS files to magnetic tape but does not address the problem of indexing or organizing tape files. Currently available magnetic tape media can store multiple gigabytes of information on a single tape, which translates into thousands of FITS files per tape. Thus, the lack of a standard tape indexing and organizing scheme can, in many instances, become a serious problem. Faced with the above dilemma, the Astrophysics Data Facility at Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a simple in-house convention for indexing the contents of FITS data tapes that allows software to quickly and easily inventory tape contents. This paper describes the convention used by our organization. We propose that this convention be adopted into the FITS standard as the way to index and organize the contents of magnetic tape media.

  16. High Field Remagnetization of Hematite Concretions from Utah, USA and Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, T.; Kletetschka, G.; Chan, M.; Mikula, V.; Adamovic, J.; Pruner, P.; Schnabl, P.; Wasilewski, P.

    2007-03-01

    Terrestrial hematite concretions of the Navajo Sandstone have been discussed as analogues to the blueberries on Mars. Magnetic investigation of terrestrial concretions showed unusual behavior of antiferromagnetic hematite-goethite composition that may mem

  17. Novel mono-static arrangement of the ASDEX Upgrade high field side reflectometers compatible with electron cyclotron resonance heating stray radiation.

    PubMed

    Silva, A; Varela, P; Meneses, L; Manso, M

    2012-10-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade frequency modulated continuous wave broadband reflectometer system uses a mono-static antenna configuration with in-vessel hog-horns and 3 dB directional couplers. The operation of the new electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) launcher and the start of collective Thomson scattering experiments caused several events where the fragile dummy loads inside the high field side directional couplers were damaged, due to excessive power resulting from the ECRH stray fields. In this paper, we present a non-conventional application of the existing three-port directional coupler that hardens the system to the ECRH stray fields and at the same time generates the necessary reference signal. Electromagnetic simulations and laboratory tests were performed to validate the proposed solution and are compared with the in-vessel calibration tests.

  18. MAGNETIC IMAGING OF NANOCOMPOSITE MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect

    VOLKOV,V.V.ZHU,Y.

    2003-08-03

    Understanding the structure and magnetic behavior is crucial for optimization of nanocomposite magnets with high magnetic energy products. Many contributing factors such as phase composition, grain size distribution and specific domain configurations reflect a fine balance of magnetic energies at nanometer scale. For instance, magnetocrystalline anisotropy of grains and their orientations, degree of exchange coupling of magnetically soft and hard phases and specific energy of domain walls in a material. Modern microscopy, including Lorentz microscopy, is powerful tool for visualization and microstructure studies of nanocomposite magnets. However, direct interpretation of magnetically sensitive Fresnel/Foucault images for nanomagnets is usually problematic, if not impossible, because of the complex image contrast due to small grain size and sophisticated domain structure. Recently we developed an imaging technique based on Lorentz phase microscopy [l-4], which allows bypassing many of these problems and get quantitative information through magnetic flux mapping at nanometer scale resolution with a magnetically calibrated TEM [5]. This is our first report on application of this technique to nanocomposite magnets. In the present study we examine a nanocomposite magnet of nominal composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14+{delta}}B{sub 1.45} (14+{delta}=23.3, i.e. ''hard'' Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-phase and 47.8 wt% of ''soft'' {alpha}-Fe phase ({delta}=9.3)), produced by Magnequench International, Inc. Conventional TEM/HREM study (Fig. 1-2) suggests that material has a bimodal grain-size distribution with maximum at d{sub max}=25 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase and d{sub max} = 15 nm for {alpha}-Fe phase (Fig.1c, Fig.2) in agreement with synchrotron X-ray studies (d{sub max}=23.5 nm for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B [6]). Lattice parameters for Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phase are a=8.80 and c=12.2 {angstrom}, as derived from SAED ring patterns (Fig.1a), again in good agreement with X-ray data

  19. Equilibrium drives of the low and high field side n = 2 plasma response and impact on global confinement

    DOE PAGES

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N. C.; Haskey, S. R.; Nazikian, R.; Strait, E. J.; Chen, X.; Ferraro, N. M.; King, J. D.; Lyons, B. C.; Park, J. -K.

    2016-03-31

    The nature of the multi-modal n=2 plasma response and its impact on global confinement is studied as a function of the axisymmetric equilibrium pressure, edge safety factor, collisionality, and L-versus H-mode conditions. Varying the relative phase (ΔΦUL) between upper and lower in-vessel coils demonstrates that different n=2 poloidal spectra preferentially excite different plasma responses. These different plasma response modes are preferentially detected on the tokamak high-field side (HFS) or low-field side (LFS) midplanes, have different radial extents, couple differently to the resonant surfaces, and have variable impacts on edge stability and global confinement. In all equilibrium conditions studied, the observedmore » confinement degradation shares the same ΔΦUL dependence as the coupling to the resonant surfaces given by both ideal (IPEC) and resistive (MARS-F) MHD computation. Varying the edge safety factor shifts the equilibrium field-line pitch and thus the ΔΦUL dependence of both the global confinement and the n=2 magnetic response. As edge safety factor is varied, modeling finds that the HFS response (but not the LFS response), the resonant surface coupling, and the edge displacements near the X-point all share the same ΔΦUL dependence. The LFS response magnitude is strongly sensitive to the core pressure and is insensitive to the collisionality and edge safety factor. This indicates that the LFS measurements are primarily sensitive to a pressure-driven kink-ballooning mode that couples to the core plasma. MHD modeling accurately reproduces these (and indeed all) LFS experimental trends and supports this interpretation. In contrast to the LFS, the HFS magnetic response and correlated global confinement impact is unchanged with plasma pressure, but is strongly reduced in high collisionality conditions in both H- and L-mode. This experimentally suggests the bootstrap current drives the HFS response through the kink-peeling mode drive, though

  20. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    SciTech Connect

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C.; Yiacoumi, Sotira

    1997-10-01

    Magnetic-seeding filtration is a technology under development for the enhanced removal of magnetic and non-magnetic particulates from liquids. This process involves the addition of a small amount of magnetic seed particles (such as naturally occurring iron oxide) to a waste suspension, followed by treatment with a magnetic filter. Non-magnetic and weakly magnetic particles are made to undergo nonhomogeneous flocculation with the seed particles, forming flocs of high magnetic susceptibility that are readily removed by a conventional high-gradient magnetic filter. This technology is applicable to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatants. Magnetic-seeding filtration may be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes. Waste stream characteristics for which the technology may be applicable include (1) particle sizes ranging from relatively coarse (several microns) to colloidal particles, (2) high or low radiation levels, (3) broad-ranging flow rates, (4) low to moderate solids concentration, (5) cases requiring high decontamination factors, and (6) aqueous or non-aqueous liquids. At this point, the technology is at the bench-scale stage of development; laboratory studies and fundamental modeling are currently being employed to determine the capabilities of the process.

  1. High-field properties of carbon-doped MgB2 thin films by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition using different carbon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wenqing; Ferrando, V.; Pogrebnyakov, A. V.; Wilke, R. H. T.; Chen, Ke; Weng, Xiaojun; Redwing, Joan; Wung Bark, Chung; Eom, Chang-Beom; Zhu, Y.; Voyles, P. M.; Rickel, Dwight; Betts, J. B.; Mielke, C. H.; Gurevich, A.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Li, Qi; Xi, X. X.

    2011-12-01

    We have studied the high-field properties of carbon-doped MgB2 thin films prepared by hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD). Carbon doping was accomplished by adding carbon-containing gas, such as bis(methylcyclopentadienyl)magnesium and trimethylboron, into the hydrogen carrier gas during the deposition. In both cases, Tc drops slowly and residual resistivity increases considerably with carbon doping. Both the a and c lattice constants increase with carbon content in the films, a behavior different from that of bulk carbon-doped MgB2 samples. The films heavily doped with trimethylboron show very high parallel Hc2 over 70 T at low temperatures and a large temperature derivative -\\rmd H_{ {c2}}^{\\parallel } /\\rmd T near Tc. These behaviors are found to depend on the unique microstructure of the films, which consists of MgB2 layers a few-nanometers thick separated by non-superconducting MgB2C2 layers. This leads to an increase in the parallel Hc2 by the geometrical effect, which is in addition to the significant enhancement of Hc2 due to changes in the scattering rates within and between the two bands present in films doped using both carbon sources. The high Hc2 and high-field Jc(H) values observed in this work are very promising for the application of MgB2 in high magnetic fields.

  2. INTERACTION REGION MAGNETS FOR VLHC.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.; HARRISON,M.

    2001-09-24

    The interaction region (IR) magnets for the proposed very large hadron collider (VLHC) require high gradient quadrupoles and high field dipoles for high luminosity performance. Moreover, the IR magnets for high energy colliders and storage rings must operate in an environment where the amount of energy deposited on superconducting coils is rather large. In the case of doublet IR optics with flat beams, the design of the first 2-in-1 quadrupole defines the geometry and pole tip field in this and other IR magnets. This paper will present a novel design of this magnet that allows a very small separation between the two apertures. A brief discussion of the conceptual magnetic design of this and other magnets for interaction regions is given. The influence of critical current density in superconductor (a higher value of which is most beneficial to high performance IR magnet design) is also discussed. Since High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) retain most of their critical current density at high fields and at elevated temperatures, they offer an attractive possibility for the IR magnet designs of future colliders or upgrades of present colliders.

  3. Two high-field thermodynamically stable conductivity states in photoconductive CdS, one n-type and one p-type

    SciTech Connect

    Böer, Karl W.

    2015-08-28

    Photoconductive CdS is known to be n-type and develops high-field domains in the range of negative differential conductivities. These domains have been extensively discussed, and when remaining attached to the electrodes have been renamed Böer domains (a broader definition suggested earlier is misleading) [K. Thiessen, Phys. Status Solidi B 248, 2775 (2011)]. They are occurring at high applied voltage in a range at which the current becomes highly non-ohmic that is conventionally described as N-shaped when the conductance decreases with increasing bias or as S-shaped when the current starts to increase again. In this paper only such cases will be discussed in which the current stays below significant Joule heating (no current channel formation), and only for stationary electrode-attached high-field domains. These are the cathode-attached domains that are maintained by field-quenching and are thermodynamically stable. Their finding is summarized in the first segment of this paper. When the applied voltage is increased, an anode-attached hyper-high-field domain develops that is stabilized by a hole blocking anode and will be analyzed in more detail below. It will be shown that they are a thermodynamically stable p-type photoconductive state of CdS. These two new states can be used to determine the carrier densities and mobilities as function of the field and the effective work function in dependence of the spectral distribution of the optical excitation. In a thin slab adjacent to a blocking cathode, the quasi-Fermi levels are spread to a precise amount and are kept there in the entire high-field region. This opens the opportunity to analyze with small modulation of the excitation the trap transition coefficients near these quasi-Fermi levels separately, without broadening interference from other signals. This has already resulted in the discovery of an unusually sharp electron quenching level when the CdS was in a p-type state with an anode adjacent domain. It is

  4. Two high-field thermodynamically stable conductivity states in photoconductive CdS, one n-type and one p-type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böer, Karl W.

    2015-08-01

    Photoconductive CdS is known to be n-type and develops high-field domains in the range of negative differential conductivities. These domains have been extensively discussed, and when remaining attached to the electrodes have been renamed Böer domains (a broader definition suggested earlier is misleading) [K. Thiessen, Phys. Status Solidi B 248, 2775 (2011)]. They are occurring at high applied voltage in a range at which the current becomes highly non-ohmic that is conventionally described as N-shaped when the conductance decreases with increasing bias or as S-shaped when the current starts to increase again. In this paper only such cases will be discussed in which the current stays below significant Joule heating (no current channel formation), and only for stationary electrode-attached high-field domains. These are the cathode-attached domains that are maintained by field-quenching and are thermodynamically stable. Their finding is summarized in the first segment of this paper. When the applied voltage is increased, an anode-attached hyper-high-field domain develops that is stabilized by a hole blocking anode and will be analyzed in more detail below. It will be shown that they are a thermodynamically stable p-type photoconductive state of CdS. These two new states can be used to determine the carrier densities and mobilities as function of the field and the effective work function in dependence of the spectral distribution of the optical excitation. In a thin slab adjacent to a blocking cathode, the quasi-Fermi levels are spread to a precise amount and are kept there in the entire high-field region. This opens the opportunity to analyze with small modulation of the excitation the trap transition coefficients near these quasi-Fermi levels separately, without broadening interference from other signals. This has already resulted in the discovery of an unusually sharp electron quenching level when the CdS was in a p-type state with an anode adjacent domain. It is

  5. Scaling of high-field transport and localized heating in graphene transistors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Myung-Ho; Islam, Sharnali; Dorgan, Vincent E; Pop, Eric

    2011-10-25

    We use infrared thermal imaging and electrothermal simulations to find that localized Joule heating in graphene field-effect transistors on SiO(2) is primarily governed by device electrostatics. Hot spots become more localized (i.e., sharper) as the underlying oxide thickness is reduced, such that the average and peak device temperatures scale differently, with significant long-term reliability implications. The average temperature is proportional to oxide thickness, but the peak temperature is minimized at an oxide thickness of ∼90 nm due to competing electrostatic and thermal effects. We also find that careful comparison of high-field transport models with thermal imaging can be used to shed light on velocity saturation effects. The results shed light on optimizing heat dissipation and reliability of graphene devices and interconnects. PMID:21913673

  6. Harmonic generation at high field strengths - Frequency shifts and saturation phenomena. [optical mixing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stappaerts, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Optical harmonic generation and mixing in the gas phase has been proposed as a technique for the generation of coherent radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectral region. At the high field strengths required by these processes the interaction between atoms and the electromagnetic field shows intensity-dependent resonances. In this paper we modify harmonic generation theory to include the effect of these frequency shifts. Closed-form expressions for generated dipole moment, absorption probability, and coherence length are presented. The most important consequences of frequency shifts on resonantly enhanced processes are that the pump laser must be tuned away from the small-field resonance frequency, that the conversion efficiency may saturate, and that the dispersion of the medium may change sign. As an example, the generation of 198-A radiation by a five-photon mixing process in Li(+) is considered.

  7. Comparison of oxide leakage currents induced by ion implantation and high field electric stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguenheim, D.; Bravaix, A.; Monserie, C.; Moragues, J. M.; Lambert, P.; Boivin, P.

    2001-08-01

    We compare in this work the electrical properties of gate leakage currents induced through the thin SiO2 oxide layer of metal-oxide-semiconductor structures by high-energy ion implantation (Boron B2+) and high field electrical stresses where electrons are injected from the gate in the Fowler-Nordheim regime. Even if the high-frequency capacitance-voltage characteristics are very different after both treatments, comparable increases and similar shapes are found at low field in static gate current-voltage curves, typical of equivalent oxide damage. Moreover, these stress or implantation induced leakage currents are both removed in a similar way by a thermal anneal under forming gas at 430°C. We conclude that similar defects could be induced through the oxide by both processes and generate those excess currents by a defect assisted tunneling mechanism.

  8. High field terahertz emission from relativistic laser-driven plasma wakefields

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zi-Yu; Pukhov, Alexander

    2015-10-15

    We propose a method to generate high field terahertz (THz) radiation with peak strength of GV/cm level in the THz frequency gap range of 1–10 THz using a relativistic laser interaction with a gaseous plasma target. Due to the effect of local pump depletion, an initially Gaussian laser pulse undergoes leading edge erosion and eventually evolves to a state with leading edge being step function. Interacting with such a pulse, electrons gain transverse residual momentum and excite net transverse currents modulated by the relativistic plasma frequency. These currents give rise to the low frequency THz emission. We demonstrate this process with one and two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  9. Process for the chemical preparation of high-field ZnO varistors

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, Robert A.; Dosch, Robert G.; Tuttle, Bruce A.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical preparation techniques involving co-precipitation of metals are used to provide micro-structural characteristics necessary in order to produce ZnO varistors and their precursors for high field applications. The varistors produced have homogeneous and/or uniform dopant distributions and a submicron average grain size with a narrow size distribution. Precursor powders are prepared via chemical precipitation techniques and varistors made by sintering uniaxially and/or isostatically pressed pellets. Using these methods, varistors were made which were suitable for high-power applications, having values of breakdown field, E.sub.B, in the 10-100 kV/cm range, .alpha.>30 and densities in the range of 65-99% of theoretical, depending on both composition and sintering temperature.

  10. High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry for mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Swearingen, Kristian E; Moritz, Robert L

    2012-10-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas-phase ions by their behavior in strong and weak electric fields. FAIMS is easily interfaced with electrospray ionization and has been implemented as an additional separation mode between liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) in proteomic studies. FAIMS separation is orthogonal to both LC and MS and is used as a means of on-line fractionation to improve the detection of peptides in complex samples. FAIMS improves dynamic range and concomitantly the detection limits of ions by filtering out chemical noise. FAIMS can also be used to remove interfering ion species and to select peptide charge states optimal for identification by tandem MS. Here, the authors review recent developments in LC-FAIMS-MS and its application to MS-based proteomics. PMID:23194268

  11. Fabrication of highly ordered nanoporous alumina films by stable high-field anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanbo; Zheng, Maojun; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2006-10-01

    Stable high-field anodization (1500-4000 A m-2) for the fabrication of highly ordered porous anodic alumina films has been realized in a H3PO4-H2O-C2H5OH system. By maintaining the self-ordering voltage and adjusting the anodizing current density, high-quality self-ordered alumina films with a controllable inter-pore distance over a large range are achieved. The high anodizing current densities lead to high-speed film growth (4-10 µm min-1). The inter-pore distance is not solely dependent on the anodizing voltage, but is also influenced by the anodizing current density. This approach is simple and cost-effective, and is of great value for applications in diverse areas of nanotechnology.

  12. An atomistic description of the high-field degradation of dielectric polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Bealing, Clive R.; Ramprasad, R.

    2013-11-07

    A microscopic mechanism governing the initiating step in the high-field aging of crystalline polyethylene is proposed, based on density functional calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. It is assumed that electrons, holes, and excitons are present in the system. While the additional individual electrons or holes are not expected to lead to significant degradation, the presence of triplet excitons are concluded to be rather damaging. The electron and hole states of the exciton localize on a distorted region of polyethylene, significantly weakening nearby C–H bonds and facilitating C–H bond scission. The barrier to cleavage of the weakened C–H bonds is estimated and is comparable to the thermal energy, suggesting that this mechanism may be responsible for the degradation of polyethylene when placed under electrical stress, e.g., in high-voltage cables.

  13. On the nature of high field charge transport in reinforced silicone dielectrics: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanhui; Schadler, Linda S.

    2016-08-01

    The high field charge injection and transport properties in reinforced silicone dielectrics were investigated by measuring the time-dependent space charge distribution and the current under dc conditions up to the breakdown field and were compared with the properties of other dielectric polymers. It is argued that the energy and spatial distribution of localized electronic states are crucial in determining these properties for polymer dielectrics. Tunneling to localized states likely dominates the charge injection process. A transient transport regime arises due to the relaxation of charge carriers into deep traps at the energy band tails and is successfully verified by a Monte Carlo simulation using the multiple-hopping model. The charge carrier mobility is found to be highly heterogeneous due to the non-uniform trapping. The slow moving electron packet exhibits a negative field dependent drift velocity possibly due to the spatial disorder of traps.

  14. A process for the chemical preparation of high-field ZnO varistors

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, R.A.; Dosch, R.G.; Tuttle, B.A.

    1986-02-19

    Chemical preparation techniques involving co-precipitation of metals are used to provide microstructural characteristics necessary in order to produce ZnO varistors and their precursors for high field applications. The varistors produced have homogeneous and/or uniform dopant distributions and a submicron average grain size with a narrow size distribution. Precursor powders are prepared via chemical precipitation techniques and varistors made by sintering uniaxially and/or isostatically pressed pellets. Using these methods, varistors were made which were suitable for high-power applications, having values of breakdown field, E/sub B/, in the 10 to 100 kV/cm range, ..cap alpha.. > 30 and densities in the range of 65 to 99% of theoretical, depending on both composition and sintering temperature.

  15. INTERCOMPARISON OF PERFORMANCE OF RF COIL GEOMETRIES FOR HIGH FIELD MOUSE CARDIAC MRI

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Christakis; Angeli, S.; Gkagkarellis, S.; Cofer, G.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-turn spiral surface coils are constructed in flat and cylindrical arrangements and used for high field (7.1 T) mouse cardiac MRI. Their electrical and imaging performances, based on experimental measurements, simulations, and MRI experiments in free space, and under phantom, and animal loading conditions, are compared with a commercially available birdcage coil. Results show that the four-turn cylindrical spiral coil exhibits improved relative SNR (rSNR) performance to the flat coil counterpart, and compares fairly well with a commercially available birdcage coil. Phantom experiments indicate a 50% improvement in the SNR for penetration depths ≤ 6.1 mm from the coil surface compared to the birdcage coil, and an increased penetration depth at the half-maximum field response of 8 mm in the 4-spiral cylindrical coil case, in contrast to 2.9 mm in the flat 4-turn spiral case. Quantitative comparison of the performance of the two spiral coil geometries in anterior, lateral, inferior, and septal regions of the murine heart yield maximum mean percentage rSNR increases of the order of 27–167% in vivo post-mortem (cylindrical compared to flat coil). The commercially available birdcage outperforms the cylindrical spiral coil in rSNR by a factor of 3–5 times. The comprehensive approach and methodology adopted to accurately design, simulate, implement, and test radiofrequency coils of any geometry and type, under any loading conditions, can be generalized for any application of high field mouse cardiac MRI. PMID:23204945

  16. High-field EPR study of carotenoid and chlorophyll cation radicals in photosystem II.

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshmi, K. V.; Reifler, M. J.; Brudvig, G. W.; Poluektov, O. G.; Wagner, A. M.; Thurnuaer, M. C.; Chemistry; Yale Univ.

    2000-11-16

    In photosystem II (PS II), chlorophyll, {beta}-carotene, and cytochrome b{sub 559} are alternate electron donors that may be involved in a photoprotection mechanism. The present study describes the use of high-field EPR spectroscopy to characterize the low-temperature photooxidation of Chl{sub z} and Car cofactors in PS II. The EPR signals of the individual species, previously not resolved at X-band frequency (9 GHz), are resolved at higher D-band frequency (130 GHz) in deuterated Synechococcus lividus PS II. Deuteration of PS II results in significant narrowing of the EPR lines, yielding well-resolved EPR spectra of the Car{sup +} and Chl{sub z}{sup +} radicals at 130 GHz. The g tensors of the individual species were determined by EPR spectral simulations. The g tensor determined for the Car{sup +} radical (g{sub xx} = 2.00335, g{sub yy} = 2.00251, g{sub zz} = 2.00227) is similar to that previously observed for a canthaxanthin cation radical but with a slightly rhombic tensor. The Chl{sub z}{sup +} g tensor (g{sub xx} = 2.00312, g{sub yy} = 2.00263, g{sub zz} = 2.00202) is similar to that of a chlorophyll a cation radical. This study shows that both the carotenoid and chlorophyll radicals are generated in PS II by illumination at temperatures from 6 to 190 K and that there is no interconversion of Car{sup +} and Chl{sub z}{sup +} radicals upon dark annealing at temperatures up to 160 K. This study also establishes the feasibility of using deuteration and high-field EPR to resolve previously unresolvable cofactor signals in PS II.

  17. Volcanic sanidinites: an example for the mobilization of high field strength elements (HFSE) in magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aßbichler, Donjá; Heuss-Aßbichler, Soraya; Müller, Dirk; Kunzmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In earth science the mobility of high field strength elements (HFSE) is generally discussed in context of hydrothermal processes. Recent investigations mainly address processes in (late) magmatic-, metamorphic- and submarine hydrothermal systems. They have all in common that H2O is main solvent. The transport of HFSE is suggested to be favored by volatiles, like boron, fluorine, phosphate and sulfate (Jiang et al., 2005). In this study processes in magmatic system are investigated. Sanidinites are rare rocks of igneous origin and are found as volcanic ejecta of explosive volcanoes. They consist mainly of sanidine and minerals of the sodalite group. The very porous fabric of these rocks is an indication of their aggregation from a gaseous magmatic phase. The large sanidine crystals (up to several centimeters) are mostly interlocking, creating large cavities between some crystals. In these pores Zr crystallizes as oxide (baddeleyite, ZrO2) or silicate (zircon, ZrSiO4). The euhedral shape of these minerals is a further indication of their formation out of the gas phase. Furthermore, bubbles in glass observed in some samples are evidence for gas-rich reaction conditions during the formation of the sanidinites. The formation of sanidinites is suggested to be an example for solvothermal processes in natural systems. Solvothermal processes imply the solvation, transport and recrystallization of elements in a gas phase. Results obtained from whole rock analysis from sanidinites from Laacher See (Germany) show a positive correlation between LOI, sulfate, Cl, and Na with the HFSE like Zr. Na-rich conditions seem to ameliorate the solvothermal transport of Zr. All these features point to the formation of sanidinites in the upper part of a magma chamber, where fluid consisting of SO3 and Cl compounds in addition to H2O, CO2 and HFSE (high field strength elements) like Zr accumulate.

  18. Diluted Magnetic Iv-Vi Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.; Pascher, H.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * MAGNETIC PROPERTIES * Susceptibility * High Field Magnetization * Spin Glass Phase * Free Carrier Induced Ferromagnetism * Magnetic Properties of Layered IV-VI Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors * CALCULATION OF LANDAU STATES: MEAN FIELD THEORY FOR IV-VI COMPOUNDS * MAGNETOTRANSPORT * OPTICAL INTERBAND TRANSITIONS * Photoluminescence Without Magnetic Field * Magnetooptical Interband Transitions * COHERENT RAMAN SCATTERING * Theory * Classical approach * Nonlinear susceptibility in semiconductors * Experimental Results and Discussion * Results: Pb1-xMnxTe * Results: Pb1-xEuxSe * Effective Electron and Hole g factors * FAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY * COMPARISON EXPERIMENT - MOLECULAR FIELD THEORY * Band and Exchange Parameters * Selection Rules * CONCLUSION * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  19. Development and manufacture of a Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor for the high-field test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, R.M.; Cornish, D.N.; Spencer, C.R.; Gregory, E.; Adam, E.

    1981-10-20

    The High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) project has two primary goals. The first is to establish manufacturing capability for a Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor suitable for use in a mirror fusion coil. The second is to provide a test facility for evaluating other fusion conductor designs at high fields. This paper describes some of the problems encountered and the solutions devised in working toward the first goal. Construction of the test facility coils will be described in a subsequent paper.

  20. Cryogen-free superconducting magnet system for multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonance up to 12.1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Alex I.; Smirnova, Tatyana I.; MacArthur, Ryan L.; Good, Jeremy A.; Hall, Renny

    2006-03-01

    Multifrequency and high field/high frequency (HF) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a powerful spectroscopy for studying paramagnetic spin systems ranging from organic-free radicals to catalytic paramagnetic metal ion centers in metalloproteins. Typically, HF EPR experiments are carried out at resonant frequencies ν =95-300GHz and this requires magnetic fields of 3.4-10.7T for electronic spins with g ≈2.0. Such fields could be easily achieved with superconducting magnets, but, unlike NMR, these magnets cannot operate in a persistent mode in order to satisfy a wide range of resonant fields required by the experiment. Operating and maintaining conventional passively cooled superconducting magnets in EPR laboratories require frequent transfer of cryogens by trained personnel. Here we describe and characterize a versatile cryogen-free magnet system for HF EPR at magnetic fields up to 12.1T that is suitable for ramping the magnetic field over the entire range, precision scans around the target field, and/or holding the field at the target value. We also demonstrate that in a nonpersistent mode of operation the magnetic field can be stabilized to better than 0.3ppm/h over 15h period by employing a transducer-controlled power supply. Such stability is sufficient for many HF EPR experiments. An important feature of the system is that it is virtually maintenance-free because it is based on a cryogen-free technology and therefore does not require any liquid cryogens (liquid helium or nitrogen) for operation. We believe that actively cooled superconducting magnets are ideally suited for a wide range of HF EPR experiments including studies of spin-labeled nucleic acids and proteins, single-molecule magnets, and metalloproteins.

  1. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  2. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for... and microwave ovens; and (2) For each basic model of conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens...

  3. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for... and microwave ovens; and (2) For each basic model of conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens...

  4. 10 CFR 429.23 - Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave... Conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens, microwave ovens. (a) Sampling plan for selection of units for... and microwave ovens; and (2) For each basic model of conventional cooking tops, conventional ovens...

  5. Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guclu, Caner; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, Hemantha Kumar; Capolino, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Photoinduced magnetic force between nanostructures, at optical frequencies, is investigated theoretically. Till now optical magnetic effects were not used in scanning probe microscopy because of the vanishing natural magnetism with increasing frequency. On the other hand, artificial magnetism in engineered nanostructures led to the development of measurable optical magnetism. Here two examples of nanoprobes that are able to generate strong magnetic dipolar fields at optical frequency are investigated: first, an ideal magnetically polarizable nanosphere and then a circular cluster of silver nanospheres that has a looplike collective plasmonic resonance equivalent to a magnetic dipole. Magnetic forces are evaluated based on nanostructure polarizabilities, i.e., induced magnetic dipoles, and magnetic-near field evaluations. As an initial assessment on the possibility of a magnetic nanoprobe to detect magnetic forces, we consider two identical magnetically polarizable nanoprobes and observe magnetic forces on the order of piconewtons, thereby bringing it within detection limits of conventional atomic force microscopes at ambient pressure and temperature. The detection of magnetic force is a promising method in studying optical magnetic transitions that can be the basis of innovative spectroscopy applications.

  6. Dilution Confusion: Conventions for Defining a Dilution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishel, Laurence A.

    2010-01-01

    Two conventions for preparing dilutions are used in clinical laboratories. The first convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A plus "b" volumes of solution B. The second convention defines an "a:b" dilution as "a" volumes of solution A diluted into a final volume of "b". Use of the incorrect dilution convention could affect…

  7. Implementing the chemical weapons convention

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, B.; Tanzman, E. A.

    1999-12-07

    In 1993, as the CWC ratification process was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the CWC with national law could cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States as to how the CWC would be carried out. As a result, the author's colleagues and the author prepared the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Committee of CWC Legal Experts, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Central Europe, reviewed the Manual. In February 1998, they finished the second edition of the Manual in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The Manual tries to increase understanding of the Convention by identifying its obligations and suggesting methods of meeting them. Education about CWC obligations and available alternatives to comply with these requirements can facilitate national response that are consistent among States Parties. Thus, the Manual offers options that can strengthen international realization of the Convention's goals if States Parties act compatibly in implementing them. Equally important, it is intended to build confidence that the legal issues raised by the Convention are finite and addressable. They are now nearing competition of an internet version of this document so that interested persons can access it electronically and can view the full text of all of the national implementing legislation it cites. The internet address, or URL, for the internet version of the Manual is http: //www.cwc.ard.gov. This paper draws from the Manual. It comparatively addresses approximately thirty

  8. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  9. The Scaling Rule and Fluxon Core Pinning in a High-Field Superconductor with Artificially Introduced Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Lance David

    Flux pinning affects virtually every aspect of high-field superconductivity. Its fundamental mechanism(s) are in principle derived from a complicated theory, but are in practice generally accessed through measuring the field dependence of the bulk flux pinning force (F _{p}(B)). The central piece of information is the shape of the F_{p }(B) curve: It is generally accepted that if, and only if, the curve's shape is constant while the temperature or pin dimension changes, one pinning mechanism is dominant (the 'scaling rule'). During the course of this thesis, we established that the shape of F_{p}(B) is affected by the statistical distribution of the elementary pinning forces (f_{p}). Contrary to prior beliefs, it was concluded that the shape of the bulk pinning force curve for fluxon core pinning is constant, when the distribution is broad, only if the microstructure is fractal. The peak of the F_ {p}(B) curve occurs at a lower field prior models predict, regardless of whether the shape of the curve is constant. When the distribution is narrow, a constant shape occurs, and has the shape predicted for core pinning and direct summation. Thus, the bulk pinning force curve and the elementary pinning mechanism are directly related by the scaling rule only when the f_ {p} distribution is narrow. Within this context, core pinning has been investigated with a specially fabricated Nb-Ti composite having artificially introduced pins, for which the f_{p } distribution is as narrow as can be made. By design, core pinning should be dominant; the shape of the F_{p}(B) curve does not, however, have the predicted form. The results can be explained by a new pinning mechanism, which incorporates the proximity effect and an anisotropic fluxon core, as proposed by Gurevich. It is concluded that the shape of the bulk pinning force curve is very sensitive to the proximity effect, and it can have a peak at a higher field than was previously thought possible for core pinning. The scaling

  10. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: High-Field-Strength MR Microscopy in the Human Substantia Nigra and Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Foroutan, Parastou; Murray, Melissa E.; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Schweitzer, Katherine J.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in the magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation properties of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and tissue from neurologically normal brains by using high-resolution (21.1-T, 900-MHz) MR microscopy of postmortem human midbrain and basal ganglia. Materials and Methods: This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board at the Mayo Clinic and informed consent was obtained. Postmortem tissue from age-matched PSP (n = 6) and control (n = 3) brains was imaged by using three-dimensional fast low-angle shot MR imaging with isotropic resolution of 50 μm. Relaxation times and parametric relaxation maps were generated from spin-echo and gradient-recalled-echo sequences. MR findings were correlated with histologic features by evaluating the presence of iron by using Prussian blue and ferritin and microglia burden as determined by a custom-designed color deconvolution algorithm. T2 and T2*, signal intensities, percent pixels (that could not be fitted in a pixel-by-pixel regression analysis due to severe hypointensity), and histologic data (total iron, ferritin, and microglia burden) were statistically analyzed by using independent sample t tests (P < .05). Results: PSP specimens showed higher iron burden in the cerebral peduncles and substantia nigra than did controls. However, only the putamen was significantly different, and it correlated with a decrease of T2* compared with controls (−48%; P = .043). Similarly, substantia nigra showed a significant decrease of T2* signal in PSP compared with controls (−57%; P = .028). Compared with controls, cerebral peduncles showed increased T2 (38%; P = .026) and T2* (34%; P = .014), as well as higher T2 signal intensity (57%; P = .049). Ferritin immunoreactivity was the opposite from iron burden and was significantly lower compared with controls in the putamen (−74%; P = .025), red nucleus (−61%; P = .018), and entire basal ganglia section (−63%; P = .016). Conclusion: High-field

  11. Mass spectrometric characterization of a high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purves, Randy W.; Guevremont, Roger; Day, Stephen; Pipich, Charles W.; Matyjaszczyk, Matthew S.

    1998-12-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has become an important method for the detection of many compounds because of its high sensitivity and amenability to miniaturization for field-portable monitoring; applications include detection of narcotics, explosives, and chemical warfare agents. High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) differs from IMS in that the electric fields are applied using a high-frequency periodic asymmetric waveform, rather than a dc voltage. Furthermore, in FAIMS the compounds are separated by the difference in the mobility of ions at high electric field relative to low field, rather than by compound to compound differences in mobility at low electric field (IMS). We report here the first cylindrical-geometry-FAIMS interface with mass spectrometry (FAIMS-MS) and the MS identification of the peaks observed in a FAIMS compensation voltage (CV) spectrum. Using both an electrometer-based-FAIMS (FAIMS-E) and FAIMS-MS, several variables that affect the sensitivity of ion detection were examined for two (polarity reversed) asymmetric waveforms (modes 1 and 2) each of which yields a unique spectrum. An increase in the dispersion voltage (DV) was found to improve the sensitivity and separation observed in the FAIMS CV spectrum. This increase in sensitivity and the unexpected dissimilarity in modes 1 and 2 suggest that atmospheric pressure ion focusing is occurring in the FAIMS analyzer. The sensitivity and peak locations in the CV spectra were affected by temperature, gas flow rates, operating pressure, and analyte concentration.

  12. Sintering behavior of doped ZnO powders for high field varistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghirlanda, M.

    1990-08-01

    The sintering of ZnO varistor precursor powders, doped with Co, Mn and different concentrations of Bi and Al, is investigated and discussed in relation with sintering models. One purpose of the present study is to provide information valuable for the fabrication of high field varistors. As the fundamental parameter of these electronic components is the breakdown voltage per unit of thickness, which is determined by the number of grain boundaries per linear dimension, the grain size and the sintered density are crucial variables, and the sintering is a central step in the manufacturing of such varistors. Sintering experiments performed at constant heating rate in a loading dilatometer provide data on the densification and creep of the compacted powders. Another goal of the present study is to provide an experimental basis for the interpretation of the evolution of the ratio between densification rate and creep rate in terms of competition between densification and microstructure coarsening. This is accomplished by taking advantage of the variety of sintering behaviors that takes place in the system ZnO-Bi-Al: the comparison of these behaviors allows us to correlate the macroscopic sintering parameters to the evolution of the microstructure. It results that, while in non-doped powders densification and coarsening develop in a balanced way, resulting in the constancy of the ratio between densification rate and creep rate, the effect of the dopants on the sintering kinetics alters such a balance, leading this ratio to vary. 17 figs.

  13. Low-Field and High-Field Characterization of THUNDER Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Z.; Mossi, K.; Smith, R.; Bernd, J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    THUNDER (THin UNimorph DrivER) actuators are pre-stressed piezoelectric devices developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) that exhibit enhanced strain capabilities. As a result, they are of interest in a variety of aerospace applications. Characterization of their performance as a function of electric field, temperature and frequency is needed in order to optimize their operation. Towards that end, a number of THUNDER devices were obtained from FACE International Co. with a stainless steel substrate varying in thickness from 1 mil to 20 mils. The various devices were evaluated to determine low-field and high-field displacement its well as the polarization hysteresis loops. The thermal stability of these drivers was evaluated by two different methods. First, the samples were thermally cycled under electric field by systematically increasing the maximum temperature from 25 C to 200 C while the displacement was being measured. Second, the samples were isothermally aged at 0 C, 50 C, 100 C. and 150 C in air, and the isothermal decay of the displacement was measured at room temperature as a function of time.

  14. SAR simulations for high-field MRI: how much detail, effort, and accuracy is needed?

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Diehl, D; Gebhardt, M; Mallow, J; Speck, O

    2013-04-01

    Accurate prediction of specific absorption rate (SAR) for high field MRI is necessary to best exploit its potential and guarantee safe operation. To reduce the effort (time, complexity) of SAR simulations while maintaining robust results, the minimum requirements for the creation (segmentation, labeling) of human models and methods to reduce the time for SAR calculations for 7 Tesla MR-imaging are evaluated. The geometric extent of the model required for realistic head-simulations and the number of tissue types sufficient to form a reliable but simplified model of the human body are studied. Two models (male and female) of the virtual family are analyzed. Additionally, their position within the head-coil is taken into account. Furthermore, the effects of retuning the coils to different load conditions and the influence of a large bore radiofrequency-shield have been examined. The calculation time for SAR simulations in the head can be reduced by 50% without significant error for smaller model extent and simplified tissue structure outside the coil. Likewise, the model generation can be accelerated by reducing the number of tissue types. Local SAR can vary up to 14% due to position alone. This must be considered and sets a limit for SAR prediction accuracy. All these results are comparable between the two body models tested. PMID:22611018

  15. SAR simulations for high-field MRI: how much detail, effort, and accuracy is needed?

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Diehl, D; Gebhardt, M; Mallow, J; Speck, O

    2013-04-01

    Accurate prediction of specific absorption rate (SAR) for high field MRI is necessary to best exploit its potential and guarantee safe operation. To reduce the effort (time, complexity) of SAR simulations while maintaining robust results, the minimum requirements for the creation (segmentation, labeling) of human models and methods to reduce the time for SAR calculations for 7 Tesla MR-imaging are evaluated. The geometric extent of the model required for realistic head-simulations and the number of tissue types sufficient to form a reliable but simplified model of the human body are studied. Two models (male and female) of the virtual family are analyzed. Additionally, their position within the head-coil is taken into account. Furthermore, the effects of retuning the coils to different load conditions and the influence of a large bore radiofrequency-shield have been examined. The calculation time for SAR simulations in the head can be reduced by 50% without significant error for smaller model extent and simplified tissue structure outside the coil. Likewise, the model generation can be accelerated by reducing the number of tissue types. Local SAR can vary up to 14% due to position alone. This must be considered and sets a limit for SAR prediction accuracy. All these results are comparable between the two body models tested.

  16. Separation and identification of isomeric glycopeptides by high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Creese, Andrew J; Cooper, Helen J

    2012-03-01

    The analysis of intact glycopeptides by mass spectrometry is challenging due to the numerous possibilities for isomerization, both within the attached glycan and the location of the modification on the peptide backbone. Here, we demonstrate that high field asymmetric wave ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), also known as differential ion mobility, is able to separate isomeric O-linked glycopeptides that have identical sequences but differing sites of glycosylation. Two glycopeptides from the glycoprotein mucin 5AC, GT(GalNAc)TPSPVPTTSTTSAP and GTTPSPVPTTST(GalNAc)TSAP (where GalNAc is O-linked N-acetylgalactosamine), were shown to coelute following reversed-phase liquid chromatography. However, FAIMS analysis of the glycopeptides revealed that the compensation voltage ranges in which the peptides were transmitted differed. Thus, it is possible at certain compensation voltages to completely separate the glycopeptides. Separation of the glycopeptides was confirmed by unique reporter ions produced by supplemental activation electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. These fragments also enable localization of the site of glycosylation. The results suggest that glycan position plays a key role in determining gas-phase glycopeptide structure and have implications for the application of FAIMS in glycoproteomics.

  17. SEMI-AUTOMATIC SEGMENTATION OF BRAIN SUBCORTICAL STRUCTURES FROM HIGH-FIELD MRI

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinyoung; Lenglet, Christophe; Sapiro, Guillermo; Harel, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Volumetric segmentation of subcortical structures such as the basal ganglia and thalamus is necessary for non-invasive diagnosis and neurosurgery planning. This is a challenging problem due in part to limited boundary information between structures, similar intensity profiles across the different structures, and low contrast data. This paper presents a semi-automatic segmentation system exploiting the superior image quality of ultra-high field (7 Tesla) MRI. The proposed approach handles and exploits multiple structural MRI modalities. It uniquely combines T1-weighted (T1W), T2-weighted (T2W), diffusion, and susceptibility-weighted (SWI) MRI and introduces a dedicated new edge indicator function. In addition to this, we employ prior shape and configuration knowledge of the subcortical structures in order to guide the evolution of geometric active surfaces. Neighboring structures are segmented iteratively, constraining over-segmentation at their borders with a non-overlapping penalty. Extensive experiments with data acquired on a 7T MRI scanner demonstrate the feasibility and power of the approach for the segmentation of basal ganglia components critical for neurosurgery applications such as deep brain stimulation. PMID:25192576

  18. Influence of electrode geometry on the high-field characteristics of photoconductive silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Madangarli, V.P.; Gradinaru, G.; Korony, G.; Sudarshan, T.S.; Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Patterson, P.E.

    1994-07-01

    A series of experiment were conducted to study the influence of electrode geometry on the prebreakdown (and breakdown) characteristics of high resistivity ({rho} > 30 k{Omega}-cm), p-type Si wafers under quasi-uniform and non-uniform electric field configurations. In the quasi-uniform field configuration, the 1mm thick Si wafer was mounted between the slots of two plane parallel stainless steel disc electrodes (parallel), while the non-uniform field was obtained by mounting the wafer between two pillar-type electrodes with a hemispherical tip (pillar). The main objective of the above investigation was to verify if the uniform field configuration under a parallel system has a positive influence by reducing the field enhancement at the contact region, as opposed to the definite field enhancement present in the case of the non-uniform pillar system. Also, it was proposed to study the effect of the contact profile on the field distribution over the wafer surface and hence its influence on the high-field performance of the Si wafers.

  19. High field superconductivity in alkali metal intercalates of MoS2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woollam, J. A.; Flood, D. J.; Wagoner, D. E.; Somoano, R. B.; Rembaum, A.

    1973-01-01

    In the search for better high temperature, high critical field superconductors, a class of materials was found which have layered structures and can be intercalated with various elements and compounds. Since a large number of compounds can be formed, intercalation provides a method of control of superconducting properties. They also provide the possible medium for excitonic superconductivity. Results of magnetic field studies are presented on alkali metal (Na, K, Rb, and Cs) intercalated MoS2 (2H polymorph).

  20. Induced Anisotropy in FeCo-Based Nanocrystalline Ferromagnetic Alloys (HITPERM) by Very High Field Annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, F.; Garmestani, H.; Chu, S.-Y.; McHenry, M. E.; Laughlin, D. E.

    2004-01-01

    Very high magnetic field annealing is shown to affect the magnetic anisotropy in FeCo-base nanocrystalline soft ferromagnetic alloys. Alloys of composition Fe(44.5)Co(44.5)Zr(7)B(4) were prepared by melt spinning into amorphous ribbons, then wound to form toroidal bobbin cores. One set of cores was crystallized in a zero field at 600 deg. C for 1 h, then, field annealed at 17 tesla (T) at 480 deg. C for 1 h. Another set was crystallized in a 17-T field at 480 deg. C for 1 h. Field orientation was transverse to the magnetic path of the toroidal cores. An induced anisotropy is indicated by a sheared hysteresis loop. Sensitive torque magnetometry measurements with a Si cantilever sensor indicated a strong, uniaxial, longitudinal easy axis in the zero-field-crystallized sample. The source is most likely magnetoelastic anisotropy, caused by the residual stress from nanocrystallization and the nonzero magnetostriction coefficient for this material. The magnetostrictive coefficient lambda(5) is measured to be 36 ppm by a strain gage technique. Field annealing reduces the magnitude of the induced anisotropy. Core loss measurements were made in the zero-field-crystallized, zero-field-crystallized- than-field-annealed, and field-crystallized states. Core loss is reduced 30%-50% (depending on frequency) by field annealing. X-ray diffraction reveals no evidence of crystalline texture or orientation that would cause the induced anisotropy. Diffusional pair ordering is thought to be the cause of the induced anisotropy. However, reannealing the samples in the absence of a magnetic field at 480 deg. C does not completely remove the induced anisotropy.

  1. Josephson current between topological and conventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioselevich, P. A.; Ostrovsky, P. M.; Feigel'man, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the stationary Josephson current in a junction between a topological and an ordinary (topologically trivial) superconductor. Such an S-TS junction hosts a Majorana zero mode that significantly influences the current-phase relation. The presence of the Majorana state is intimately related with the breaking of the time-reversal symmetry in the system. We derive a general expression for the supercurrent for a class of short topological junctions in terms of the normal-state scattering matrix. The result is strongly asymmetric with respect to the superconducting gaps in the ordinary (Δ0) and topological (Δtop) leads. We apply the general result to a simple model of a nanowire setup with strong spin-orbit coupling in an external magnetic field and proximity-induced superconductivity. The system shows parametrically strong suppression of the critical current Ic∝Δtop/RN2 in the tunneling limit (RN is the normal-state resistance). This is in strong contrast with the Ambegaokar-Baratoff relation applicable to junctions with preserved time-reversal symmetry. We also consider the case of a generic junction with a random scattering matrix and obtain a more conventional scaling law Ic∝Δtop/RN .

  2. Cooling System Design for a Split High Field Bitter-type Electromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birmingham, William; Bates, Evan; Romero-Talamas, Carlos; Rivera, William

    2014-10-01

    For the purpose of analyzing magnetized dusty plasma at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), we are designing a split resistive electromagnet. When completed, the magnet will be capable of generating fields of 10 T for 10 seconds. The type of design proposed here was originally developed by Francis Bitter, and achieves high magnetic fields by helically stacked disk-shaped solenoids with axially oriented cooling channels. In order to ensure the safety and functionality of the apparatus, the geometry and placement of the cooling passages must be designed to establish a manageable temperature profile throughout the coil. The estimated power consumption from resistive losses is nearly 7 MW, thus it is imperative to optimize the cooling capacity of the system. The cooling capacity is limited by the mass of chilled water available at one time and the maximum achievable mass flow through the coils. The system is also designed to withstand the resultant mechanical stresses from the Lorentz force. Slot-shaped cooling channels are used. The number and placement of these channels is optimized through an iterative and integrated design process which combines analytic calculations with finite element analyses. The methodology and results of the design process is presented.

  3. Conventionalism and integrable Weyl geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucheu, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Since the appearance of Einstein's general relativity, gravitation has been associated to the space-time curvature. This theory introduced a geometrodynamic language which became a convenient tool to predict matter behaviour. However, the properties of space-time itself cannot be measurable by experiments. Taking Poincaré idea that the geometry of space-time is merely a convention, we show that the general theory of relativity can be completely reformulated in a more general setting, a generalization of Riemannian geometry, namely, the Weyl integrable geometry. The choice of this new mathematical language implies, among other things, that the path of particles and light rays should now correspond to Weylian geodesies. Such modification in the dynamic of bodies brings a new perception of physical phenomena that we will explore.

  4. Influence of paramagnetic melanin on the MRI contrast in melanoma: a combined high-field (11.7 T) MRI and EPR study.

    PubMed

    Godechal, Q; Mignion, L; Karroum, O; Magat, J; Danhier, P; Morandini, R; Ghanem, G E; Leveque, P; Gallez, B

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer and its incidence is rising each year. Because the current methods of diagnosis based on the visual aspect of the tumor show limitations, several new techniques are emerging to help in this diagnosis, amongst which are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The origin of the typical contrast pattern observable in melanoma in T1 - and T2 -weighted images remains to be elucidated and is a source of controversy. In addition, melanin could create sufficient magnetic inhomogeneities to allow its visualization on T2 *-weighted images using high-field MRI. In order to elucidate the possible role of melanin in the MRI contrast of melanoma, the present study was designed to correlate the paramagnetic content in melanin pigment to the contrast on T1 -, T2 - and T2 *-weighted images. MR images were obtained in vivo at 11.7 T using four types of experimental tumors with different pigmentations (B16, HBL, LND1 melanomas and KHT sarcomas). The paramagnetic content in melanin pigment was measured by EPR. No significant correlation was observed between the content in melanin and the relaxation times T1 , T2 and T2 *, emphasizing that the presence of pigment alone has negligible effect on the MRI contrast.

  5. High critical current density and low anisotropy in textured Sr1−xKxFe2As2 tapes for high field applications

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhaoshun; Ma, Yanwei; Yao, Chao; Zhang, Xianping; Wang, Chunlei; Wang, Dongliang; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    From the application point of view, large critical current densities Jc (H) for superconducting wires are required, preferably for magnetic fields higher than 5 T. Here we show that strong c-axis textured Sr1−xKxFe2As2 tapes with nearly isotropic transport Jc were fabricated by an ex-situ powder-in-tube (PIT) process. At 4.2 K, the Jc values show extremely weak magnetic field dependence and reach high values of 1.7×104 A/cm2 at 10 T and 1.4×104 A/cm2 at 14 T, respectively, these values are by far the highest ever reported for iron based wires and approach the Jc level desired for practical applications. Transmission electron microscopy investigations revealed that amorphous oxide layers at grain boundaries were significantly reduced by Sn addition which resulted in greatly improved intergranular connectivity. Our results demonstrated the strong potential of using iron based superconductors for high field applications. PMID:23256034

  6. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  7. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Aquino, D.; Rinaldi, C.

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given.

  8. High field FT-ICR mass spectrometry for molecular characterization of snow board from Moscow regions.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Dmitry M; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Polyakova, Olga V; Lebedev, Albert T

    2016-07-01

    High field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry analysis of eight snow samples from Moscow city allowed us to identify more than 2000 various elemental compositions corresponding to regional air pollutants. The hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of the data showed good concordance of three main groups of samples with the main wind directions. The North-West group (A1) is represented by several homologous CHOS series of aliphatic organic aerosols. They may form as a result of enhanced photochemical reactions including oxidation of hydrocarbons with sulfonations due to higher amount of SO2 emissions in the atmosphere in this region. Group A2, corresponding to the South-East part of Moscow, contains large amount of oxidized hydrocarbons of different sources that may form during oxidation in atmosphere. These hydrocarbons appear correlated to emissions from traffic, neighboring oil refinery, and power plants. Another family of compounds specific for this region involves CHNO substances formed during oxidation processes including NOx and NO3 radical since emissions of NOx are higher in this part of the city. Group A3 is rich in CHO type of compounds with high H/C and low O/C ratios, which is characteristic of oxidized hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol. CHNO types of compounds in A3 group are probably nitro derivatives of condensed hydrocarbons such as PAH. This non-targeted profiling revealed site specific distribution of pollutants and gives a chance to develop new strategies in air quality control and further studies of Moscow environment. PMID:26994789

  9. High field FT-ICR mass spectrometry for molecular characterization of snow board from Moscow regions.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Dmitry M; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Polyakova, Olga V; Lebedev, Albert T

    2016-07-01

    High field Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry analysis of eight snow samples from Moscow city allowed us to identify more than 2000 various elemental compositions corresponding to regional air pollutants. The hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of the data showed good concordance of three main groups of samples with the main wind directions. The North-West group (A1) is represented by several homologous CHOS series of aliphatic organic aerosols. They may form as a result of enhanced photochemical reactions including oxidation of hydrocarbons with sulfonations due to higher amount of SO2 emissions in the atmosphere in this region. Group A2, corresponding to the South-East part of Moscow, contains large amount of oxidized hydrocarbons of different sources that may form during oxidation in atmosphere. These hydrocarbons appear correlated to emissions from traffic, neighboring oil refinery, and power plants. Another family of compounds specific for this region involves CHNO substances formed during oxidation processes including NOx and NO3 radical since emissions of NOx are higher in this part of the city. Group A3 is rich in CHO type of compounds with high H/C and low O/C ratios, which is characteristic of oxidized hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol. CHNO types of compounds in A3 group are probably nitro derivatives of condensed hydrocarbons such as PAH. This non-targeted profiling revealed site specific distribution of pollutants and gives a chance to develop new strategies in air quality control and further studies of Moscow environment.

  10. CCD Washington photometry of three highly field star contaminated open clusters in the third Galactic quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Clariá, J. J.; Parisi, M. C.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2009-01-01

    We present CCD photometry in the Washington system C and T1 passbands down to T1 ˜ 19.5 magnitudes in the fields of Czernik 26, Czernik 30, and Haffner 11, three poorly studied open clusters located in the third Galactic quadrant. We measured T1 magnitudes and C - T1 colors for a total of 6472 stars distributed throughout cluster areas of 13.6' × 13.6' each. Cluster radii were estimated from star counts in appropriate-sized boxes distributed throughout the entire observed fields. Based on the best fits of isochrones computed by the Padova group to the ( C - T1, T1) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), we derived color excesses, heliocentric distances and ages for the three clusters. These are characterized by a relatively small angular size and by a high field star contamination. We performed a firm analysis of the field star contamination of the CMDs and examined different relationships between the position in the Galaxy of known open clusters located within 1 kpc around the three studied ones, their age and their interstellar visual absorption. We confirm previous results in the sense that the closer the cluster birthplace to the Galactic plane, the higher the interstellar visual absorption. We also found that the space velocity dispersion perpendicular to the Galactic plane diminishes as the clusters are younger. The positions, interstellar visual absorptions, ages, and metallicities of the three studied clusters favor the hypothesis that they were not born in the recently discovered Canis major (CMa) dwarf galaxy before it was accreted by the Milky Way.

  11. Magnetic-seeding filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Depaoli, D.

    1996-10-01

    This task will investigate the capabilities of magnetic-seeding filtration for the enhanced removal of magnetic and nonmagnetic particulates from liquids. This technology appies to a wide range of liquid wastes, including groundwater, process waters, and tank supernatant. Magnetic-seeding filtration can be used in several aspects of treatment, such as (1) removal of solids, particularly those in the colloidal-size range that are difficult to remove by conventional means; (2) removal of contaminants by precipitation processes; and (3) removal of contaminants by sorption processes.

  12. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  13. Ultra-high field NMR studies of antibody binding and site-specific phosphorylation of {alpha}-synuclein

    SciTech Connect

    Sasakawa, Hiroaki |; Sakata, Eri; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Masuda, Masami |; Mori, Tetsuya; Kurimoto, Eiji; Iguchi, Takeshi; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masato; Kato, Koichi |

    2007-11-23

    Although biological importance of intrinsically disordered proteins is becoming recognized, NMR analyses of this class of proteins remain as tasks with more challenge because of poor chemical shift dispersion. It is expected that ultra-high field NMR spectroscopy offers improved resolution to cope with this difficulty. Here, we report an ultra-high field NMR study of {alpha}-synuclein, an intrinsically disordered protein identified as the major component of the Lewy bodies. Based on NMR spectral data collected at a 920 MHz proton frequency, we performed epitope mapping of an anti-{alpha}-synuclein monoclonal antibody, and furthermore, characterized conformational effects of phosphorylation at Ser129 of {alpha}-synuclein.

  14. Environmental applications of magnetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R; Stober, J C; Turner, G M; Oldfield, F; Bloemendal, J; Dearing, J A; Rummery, T A

    1980-02-01

    A wide range of examples of the application of magnetic measurements to environmental studies illustrate the advantages of magnetic techniques over conventional methods. Magnetic measurements, in both the field and the laboratory, are particularly useful for reconnaissance work because of their spee and flexibility, Quantification as well as simple diagnosis of the transformation and movement of magnetic minerals within and between the atmosphere, lithosphere, and hydrosphere is practical. Techniques of investigating intrinsic and mineral magnetic properties, in addition to paleomagnetic remanence, are described in subjects as diverse as meteorology, hydrology, sedimentology, geophysics, and ecology. PMID:17795619

  15. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.; Mueller, Fred M.; Smith, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  16. Apparatus for storing high magnetic fields having reduced mechanical forces and reduced magnetic pollution

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.; Mueller, F.M.; Smith, J.L.

    1991-04-09

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of storing extremely high magnetic fields for the purpose of energy storage or for other uses, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements and the magnetic field pollution produced at locations away from the configuration are both significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by currently proposed techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency. 15 figures.

  17. Conventional terrorism and critical care.

    PubMed

    Singer, Pierre; Cohen, Jonathan D; Stein, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Incidents of conventional weapons terror are increasingly part of the reality of the modern world, and in Israel, 19,948 incidents have been reported from September 2000 to December 2003. Most victims are injured in explosions resulting from suicide bombings. Exposure to the blast (primary mechanism of injury) may produce unique injuries affecting gas-containing organs, including perforation of the eardrums (most common injury); pulmonary blast injury, characterized by alveolar capillary disruption and bronchopleural fistulas; and bowel perforation, which is uncommon and may be delayed from 1 to 14 days after the injury. However, most injuries are the result of penetrating trauma (secondary mechanism) resulting from bomb fragments and nails, bolts, and steel pellets embedded in the bomb striking the victim, and blunt trauma (tertiary mechanism) sustained when the victim is propelled against an object by the blast wind. The severity of the injuries is increased when the blast occurs in a confined space. Victims of terror-inflicted injuries have a high Injury Severity Score (30% >16), a high requirement for intensive care unit admission (22.8% in Israel), and have a more prolonged hospital course and higher mortality than victims of any other form of trauma. PMID:15640681

  18. Cosmic ray decreases and magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.

    1992-01-01

    Energetic particle data, obtained from IMP 8, in conjunction with solar wind field and plasma data at the times of reported magnetic clouds was studied. It is shown that magnetic clouds can cause a depression of the cosmic ray flux but high fields are required. A depression of 3 percent in a neutron monitor requires a field of about 25 nT. Such high fields are found only in a subset of coronal ejecta. The principal cause for Forbush decreases associated with energetic shocks is probably turbulence in the post-shock region although some shocks will be followed by an ejecta with a high field. Each event is different. The lower energy particles can help in identifying the dominant processes in individual events.

  19. Superconducting magnets and devices for space vehicles and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1971-01-01

    Superconductivity research has been oriented toward those problems that tend to restrict the greater application of superconducting devices in space research and technology. These include magnetic problems of high field magnets, increasing operating temperatures, and development of useful competitive superconducting instruments.

  20. Simplified THz Instrumentation for High-Field DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2012-01-01

    We present an alternate simplified concept to irradiate a nuclear magnetic resonance sample with terahertz (THz) radiation for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments using the TE01 circular waveguide mode for transmission of the THz power and the illumination of the DNP sample by either the TE01 or TE11 mode. Using finite element method and 3D electromagnetic simulations we demonstrate that the average value of the transverse magnetic field induced by the THz radiation and responsible for the DNP effect using the TE11 or the TE01 mode are comparable to that generated by the HE11 mode and a corrugated waveguide. The choice of the TE11/TE01 mode allows the use of a smooth-walled, oversized waveguide that is easier to fabricate and less expensive than a corrugated waveguide required for transmission of the HE11 mode. Also, the choice of the TE01 mode can lead to a simplification of gyrotron oscillators that operate in the TE0n mode, by employing an on-axis rippled-wall mode converter to convert the TE0n mode into the TE01 mode either inside or outside of the gyrotron tube. These novel concepts will lead to a significant simplification of the gyrotron, the transmission line and the THz coupler, which are the three main components of a DNP system. PMID:22977293